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10 April 2017 - NW908

Profile picture: James, Ms LV

James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the SA Maritime Safety Authority has any debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more; if so, (a) what (i) are the details of the debts, (ii) are the reasons for non-payment in each case, (b) on what date will each debt be settled and (c) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

Reply:

a) (i) and (a) (ii)

SAMSA SUPPLIER INVOICES OLDER THAN 30 DAYS

     

Supplier Name

Amount Over 30 Days

Comments

 

 

 

1. WorldSport South Africa

R 2 053 332

The amount was the subject of a dispute with the supplier. The supplier has since agreed to

payments in 6 monthly instalments following the resolution of a dispute.

 

 

 

2. PNN Ship Suppliers and Logistics

R 1 752 276

Supplier payment is effected upon receiving funding from the Department of Fisheries and Forestry. This occurs at quarterly intervals upon which all outstanding supplier invoices are cleared. The next payment run will occur in April/May 2017.

 

 

 

3. Lloyd's Register EMEA

R 965 000

Supplier payment is done bi-annually. The next payment will be made in June 2017.

 

 

 

4. Microsoft Ireland Operations

R 239 812

Supplier payment is effected upon receiving funding from the Department of Fisheries and Forestry. This occurs at quarterly intervals upon which all outstanding supplier invoices are cleared. The next payment run will occur in April/May 2017.

Supplier Name

Amount Over 30 Days

Comments

5. Only Orange Electrical CC

R 307 865

Supplier payment is effected upon receiving funding from the Department of Fisheries and Forestry. This occurs at quarterly intervals upon which all outstanding supplier invoices are cleared. The next payment run will occur in April/May 2017.

 

 

 

6. Viking Life Saving Equipment

R 160 616

Supplier payment is effected upon receiving funding from the Department of Fisheries and Forestry. This occurs at quarterly intervals upon which all outstanding supplier invoices are cleared. The next payment run will occur in April/May 2017.

TOTAL

R 5 478 901

 

b) All the invoices will be settled in the current financial year (2017/18). A mentioned above, the main reason for the bulk of the long outstanding invoices is SAMSAs cash flow situation which resulted in delays in supplier payments with some of the suppliers, particularly the major suppliers, agreeing on structured payment plans. The financial situation is improving which will lead to most, if not all, suppliers over 30 days old being brought up to date.

c) A supplier reconciliation is performed for each supplier. Any invoice that is identified as long outstanding, the reasons thereof are obtained from the employee who placed an order with the supplier. In addition, suppliers would often contact finance staff when their invoices miss the payment date. The finance staff would follow up on the reasons and resolve the matter.

10 April 2017 - NW900

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Air Traffic and Navigation Services has any debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more; if so, (a) what (i) are the details of these debts, (ii) are the reasons for non-payment in each case, (b) on what date will each debt be settled and (c) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

Reply:

ATNS has no debt that remained unpaid for more than 30 days. Therefore (a) to (c) with subsections are not applicable.

07 April 2017 - NW808

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many tenders has the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa awarded to a certain company (name furnished) in the period 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2016 and (b) what was the value of the tenders in each case?

Reply:

a) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa has not awarded any tender to the certain company between 01 January 2013 to 31 December 2016

b) See response (a)

07 April 2017 - NW897

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa has any debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more; if so, (a) what (i) are the details of these debts, (ii) are the reasons for non-payment in each case, (b) on what date will each debt be settled and (c) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

Reply:

Yes, the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa has debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more.

a) (i) Debt outstanding for more than 60 days see link below:

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW897Table-170407.docx

a) (ii) 95% of debt is owed to Transnet. Discussions are ongoing between PRASA and Transnet to resolve the debt. 4% of debt is owed to other suppliers; some invoices have disputes that are in the process of clearing, whilst others have not have been paid due to cash constraints.

b) Debt is settled twice a month.

c) (i) Invoices are signed off by end user as confirmation that services were rendered

   (ii) Invoices are loaded on system

  (iii) Payments are made twice a month on invoices 30 days and older dependant on cash flow constraints, small suppliers is prioritised. Age analyses are scrutinised by CFO’s for reasons of non-payment.

07 April 2017 - NW757

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What plans are in place to upgrade train stations in each province, (b)(i) why have some stations been abandoned and left to dilapidate and (ii) what plans are there to upgrade these stations and (c)(i) how have passengers who previously caught trains at train stations that are no longer in use been accommodated and (ii) since when have these arrangements been in place in respect of each station?

Reply:

a) The upgrading and improvement of Railway stations which are used for the delivery of both Commuter and Long Distance Rail services is ongoing and occurs annually through a National Station Improvement Programme (NSIP) and National Station Upgrade Programme (NSUP). Table 1 below reflects the number of completed projects since April 2012 to March 2016.

Table 1

 

It is anticipated that for the 2016/2017 financial year a total of forty three (43) station improvements (NSIP) and fifteen (15) station upgrades projects (NSUP) will be completed. For the 2017/2018 financial year a total of forty five (45) station improvement projects (NSIP) and fifteen (15) station upgrade projects (NSUP) are earmarked for completion. The table below outlines a project name list for stations prioritised for the 2017/2018 financial year per region.

National Station Improvement Programme (NSIP)

Gauteng South Region

Gauteng North Region

Western Cape Region

Kwazulu Natal Region

Eastern Cape Region

1.Dunnottar station

8) Akasiaboom Station

20) Du Toit

27) Winkelspruit Station

34) Arnoldton Station

2. Servaas Station

9) Silverton Station Drainage & Fencing

21) Fisantekraal

28) Charlottedale Station

35) De Mist Station

3. Selpark Station

10) Gezina Station

22) Gouda

29) Ottawa Station

36) Mdantsane Station

4. Noupoort Station

11) Soshanguve Station

23) Vlottenburg

30) Compensation Station

37) Mount Ruth Station

5. Union Station

12) Kopanong Station

24) Esplanade

31) Frazer Station

38) East London Station - Fire Infrastructure Refurbishment drainage and paving in Depot Yard

6. Betlhehem Station

13) De Wildt Station

25) Stellenbosch

32) Phoenix Station

39) Port Elizabeth Station – Fire Infrastructure Refurbishment

7. Grasmere Station

14) Komatipoort Station

26) Paarl

33) Shallcross Station

40) Sydenham Station

 

15) Kaapmuiden Station

   

41) Port Elizabeth Station

 

16) Nelspruit Station

   

42) East London Station

 

17) Akasiaboom Station

   

43) Perseverance Station

 

18) Pienaarspoort

   

44) Sterkstroom Station

 

19) Mamelodi Gardens

   

45) Cradock Station

National Station Upgrade Programme (NSUP)

Gauteng South Region

Gauteng North Region

Western Cape Region

Kwazulu Natal Region

1. Florida Station

9) Akasiaboom Overhead Station

10) Cape Town Station Upgrade Phase 6

15) DBN Station Fire Compliance - (Phase 2)

2. Jeppe Station

 

11)Cape Town Station Phase 1 Forecourt & Amenities

 

3. Bloemfontein Station

 

12)Mbekweni Station Upgrade

 

4. Germiston Station -Shosholoza Meyl Office

 

13) Mutual Station

 

5. Park Station – (4) projects

 

14)Woltemade Station

 

(b) (i) Some stations have been closed due to operational requirements of rationalisation of stations in close proximity to each other, low passenger numbers and safety considerations.

(ii) Not applicable, see (i) above

(c) (i) Passenger are referred to an existing of upgraded stations, closer to them.

07 April 2017 - NW892

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the boards of companies that fall under the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, (a) how do the various boards co-ordinate with each other, (b) what (i) processes and/or (ii) procedures are followed, (c) who constitutes the coordinating body and (d) what criteria is used to select each member onto the coordinating body?

Reply:

a) The Board had resolved to request the Chairpersons of the respective Subsidiary Boards to attend and submit their reports to the Governance and Performance Committee of the Main Board, which is comprised of the PRASA Board Chairperson and the Chairpersons of the Board Committees. PRASA has two Subsidiaries, namely: Autopax (Bus service) and Intersite (Property Development).

b) (i) They engaged through the Governance and Performance Committee of the Board.

(ii) Subsidiary Board Chairpersons submit reports to and attend the Governance and Performance Committee of the Board.

c) Governance and Performance Committee of the Board – which is made up of the Board Chairperson and the Chairperson of the Board Committees.

d) The Board had resolved to request the Chairpersons of the respective Subsidiary Boards to attend and submit their reports to the Governance and Performance Committee of the Main Board.

07 April 2017 - NW902

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Road Traffic Management Corporation has any debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more; if so, (a) what (i) are the details of these debts, (ii) are the reasons for non-payment in each case, (b) on what date will each debt be settled and (c) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

Reply:

a) (i) are the details of these debts,

Service provider / Invoice holder

Invoice number

Invoice dates

Reason for non-payment

Settlement date

Putco Mafani Consulting

INV2016-09-06

06-09-2016

This matter has been referred to the Legal unit as there is a contractual disagreement.

Once agreement is reached

Nexus Travel

INV082193 to INV0920319

29-01-2016 to 15-09-2016

There was dispute on charges for accommodation and conference fees

RTMC has agreed on a settlement of R151 005.74 which was PAID in March. The balance of R557 990.74 will be reversed.

The RTMC has two debts over 30 days:

  • Putco Mafani Consulting – R20 000
  • Nexus Travel - R728 996.46

(ii) what are the reasons for non-payment in each case,

  • Nexus Travel – Nexus overcharged RTMC on the accommodation and conference fees and we have agreed on a settlement of R151 005.74 which was PAID in March. The balance of R557 990.74 will be reversed.
  • Putco Mafani Consulting – This matter has been referred to the Legal unit as there is a contractual disagreement.

b) Nexus Travel has been paid already during the last week of March and Putco Mafani Consulting will depend on the outcome of the advice from Legal unit.

c) (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

The Corporation pays creditors on a weekly basis and has no history of long overdue debts. The preliminary creditors’ age analysis for March 2017, indicates that only 0.03% of creditors were over 30 days; and it was only two suppliers.

When invoices are received, they are recorded in a register for follow up, sent to programme managers for sign off and paid promptly. Where there is a delay, Logistics Management follows up with programme managers.

07 April 2017 - NW759

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) When was the asset register of (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities that reports to her last updated, (b) how often are the asset registers updated, (c) which assets are unaccounted for in the past three financial years and (d) what was the values of each of the assets; (2) what (a) are the reasons for these unaccounted assets, (b) is being done to identify the asset, (c) were the opening balances of the asset registers for each of the past three financial years, (d) procedures, processes and mechanisms exist to ensure the integrity and accuracy of the asset registers of (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her?

Reply:

Department

REPLY

(1)(a)(i) The asset register of the Department of Transport is updated as and when asset transactions occur.

(1)(b) The asset registers of the Department of Transport are updated daily.

(1)(c) & Assets that were unaccounted for in the last three financial years and the values of these

(1)(d) assets are as follows for the Department of Transport, relating to the Electronic National Traffic Information System (eNaTIS):

Asset

Value

Year unaccounted for

eNaTIS Software

229,954,000.00

2014/15

2013/14

eNaTIS Hardware

264,201,000.00

2014/15

2013/14

eNaTIS Hardware

24,987,000.00

2014/15

 

(2)(a) The reasons why these assets were unaccounted for were because of uncertainty that existed regarding the ownership of the assets in terms of the Modified Cash Standard and the ongoing litigation between the Department and the eNaTIS service provider.

(2)(b) The eNaTIS assets were disclosed in the financial statements for the year ended on 31 March 2016. Currently the Road Traffic Management Corporation and the Department are verifying the assets as per the Constitutional Court judgment of 9 November 2016 that the

(2)(c) Opening balances of asset registers of the Department of Transport for the past three financial years:

Year

Tangible assets

Intangible assets

Immovable assets

Minor assets

2015/16

48,425,669.75

305,146.47

353,434,058.10

19,224,456.51

2014/15

42,979,152.90

305,146.47

353,434,058.10

17,446,342.55

2013/14

34,703,408.58

305,146.47

345,237,479.35

15,825,827.56

(2)(d) The Department has a reliable asset management function.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (a) Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)’s asset register is updated as and when asset transactions occur, (b) asset transactions occur on a continued basis and thus the asset register is continuously updated, (c) no assets are unaccounted for, (d) ACSA has no unaccounted assets.
  2. ACSA has no unaccounted assets and has the appropriate procedures and processes in place to maintain the integrity and accuracy of asset registers.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(1) (a) ATNS’s fixed asset register is updated on a monthly basis with acquisitions and disposals. Useful life extensions are reviewed on an annual basis and updated prior to financial year end being 31 March annually.

(b) ATNS’s fixed asset register is updated on a monthly basis

(c) There are no assets that are not accounted for

(d) There are no assets that are not accounted for and thus this is not applicable

(2) (a) There are no assets that are not accounted for

(b) The annual fixed assets verification process identifies assets that are obsolete; idle; not barcoded; transferred without approval. Maintenance expenses, computer consumable expenses and small office equipment expenses are scrutinized on a monthly basis to ensure that all assets are correctly accounted for.

(c) The opening balances for the past three financial years are as follows:

  • 2016/17 R 651 720 948 – Carrying amount
  • 2015/16 R 616 658 761 – Carrying amount
  • 2014/15 R 706 011 872 – Carrying amount

(d) The integrity and accuracy of the fixed assets is ensured through the following processes:

  • Annual useful life review of assets
  • Annual impairment test of assets
  • Annual verification to ensure that assets are adequately barcoded and accounted for

Ensuring that the acquisitions and accounting of assets comply with the latest
International Financial Reporting Standards; Public Finance Management Act
and Generally Accepted Accounting Practices.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The undermentioned is the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s response to the following questions: (1) (a) (i) N/A, (ii), (b), (c), (d); and (2) (a), (b), (c), (d) (i) and (ii).

The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) Asset Register is updated on a monthly basis as and when assets are bought and sold. The Asset Register is also reconciled to the general ledger on a monthly basis. The SACAA Asset Register is updated on a monthly basis. All SACAA assets have been reconciled. The values of each of the asset categories is as per the table below as at the end of February 2017. The asset categories are Property, Plant, Equipment, and Intangible Assets.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

(1) (a) (ii) CBRTA updates assets register

(b) monthly as more assets are acquired and/or depreciated in line with the Agency’s Fixed Assets policy. There is a bi-annual (twice a year) asset verification exercise that is conducted in line with the current policy on Non-Current Assets (Fixed Assets).

(c) There are no assets that are unaccounted for, and the assets are accounted for in line with applicable GRAP statements, be it on acquisition and / or impairment.

(d) Not applicable.

(2) (a) Not applicable

(b) The bi-annual asset verification exercise is conducted in line with the current policy on Non-Current Assets (Fixed Assets) with the primary aim of ensuring amongst others, that the assets are accounted for and properly recorded.

(c) The audited opening balances per the C-BRTA statement of financial position (Property, Plant and Equipment) were as shown below:

April 2014 R7, 971, 345

April 2015 R9, 535, 112

April 2016 R8, 491, 941

(d) The asset register and the Agency’s balance sheets have been subjected to the audit processes by the Auditor General (SA), and no material findings have been reported. Internal audits have also been performed by the internal auditor on the assets as part of financial discipline review and there were no material findings noted in the last three financial years

Road Accident Fund

(1) (a)(ii) The Fixed Asset Register of the RAF was last updated on 6 October 2016 following the RAF’s bi-annual asset verification process. The next major update will happen on 5 April 2017 after the final asset verification process.

(b) the Fixed Asset Register is updated on a continuous basis for asset movements or additions in terms of the RAF’s approved Fixed Asset Management Policy. The updates are performed by specific individuals in accordance with the principle of segregation of duties. Major updates take place bi-annually as a result of the RAF’s bi-annual asset verification process.

(c) the assets which are unaccounted for in the past three financial years are reflected in the attached spreadsheet and

(d) the values of each of the assets are reflected in the attached spreadsheets;

(2) (a) the reasons for these unaccounted assets are largely due to the fading or removal of identifying barcodes due to normal wear and tear; the theft of assets in which instance the RAF considers claims against its insurers where this is possible and, or financially viable having regard to the excess payable in respect of the particular claim; and where the RAF was prevented from documenting assets which were removed during attachment processes executed by the Sheriff of the court,

(b) the RAF is doing the following to identify the assets:

  • Asset verifications are performed bi-annually to ensure assets on the Fixed Asset Register are verified.
  • Assets reported as unverified during the verification are flagged and the following procedures are performed:
  • The Facilities Management Department and the Information Communication Technology Departments attempt to verify the asset on the floor. If the asset cannot be verified all information on the accounting system and the Fixed Asset Register, including manual records are utilised in an effort to identify the original purchaser in an attempt to pinpoint the cost centre owner in order to enquire from the cost centre owner as to the location of the asset. If the location of the asset cannot be identified using manual records, transfer documentation for the movement of assets to other regions as a result of asset transfer or employee secondment are also reviewed.

Only after these processes have been completed are the assets approved for write off by the RAF’s Asset Disposal Committee. All submissions motivating for asset disposal are presented to the committee to be reviewed before they are approved for de-recognition on the Fixed Asset Register. The Asset Disposal Committee commenced its duties in July 2016.

(c) the opening balance of the Fixed Asset Register (opening book values) for the

2014-15 financial year was R 268 169 000,

2015-16 financial year was R 281 807 000, and

2016-17 financial year was R 227 245 000,

(d)(ii) the following procedures, processes and mechanisms exist to ensure the integrity of the RAF Fixed Asset Register:

  • The RAF’s Fixed Asset Management Policy
  • The RAF’s Fixed Asset Management Standard Operating Procedure
  • Management Directives have been issued where necessary
  • Audits are performed by the Internal Audit Department
  • Audits are performed by the Auditor General (no material findings have been raised)
  • A bi-annual verification exercise is performed in September and March of each year
  • The RAF has implemented the segregation of asset management functions for recording and maintaining the Fixed Asset Register
  • Clearly defined roles are in place for the Facilities Management and Information Communication Technology Departments.
  • Dedicated resources are employed to ensure Fixed Assets are recorded accurately and completely.
  • A Reconciliation of the Fixed Asset Register to Financial Records is performed on a monthly basis.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

(1) (a) (ii) RTMC updates assets register on a

(b) Monthly basis with all assets procured and the relevant depreciation is also run.

(c) There are no unaccounted assets

(d) Not applicable

(2) (a) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) opening balance: 2013/14 – R20,372,747

2014/15 – R26,338,596

2015/16 – R26,416,188

(d) procedures, processes and mechanisms exist to ensure the integrity and accuracy of the asset registers

  • Regular physical asset verification spot checks.
  • Monthly reconciliation of GL to FAR
  • Receiving of all assets that are procured is done by Asset unit and the assets are barcoded immediately
  • Asset movement forms are used to allocate assets to an end user
  • Room inventory lists are posted for each area listing all the assets in the area.
  • Assets under the control of a centralised unit with an asset controller appointed within each business unit for day to day controlling.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(1) (a)(ii) RTIA – during the month of March 2017

(b) On a monthly basis and as and when there are new transactions that are required to be added to the asset register.

(c) There are no unaccounted assets

(d) Not applicable

(2) (b)(a) N/A

(b) Asset count twice a year

(c) 2016 = R 9 923 359

2015 = R 4 209 735

2014 = R 643 257

(d) Approved asset policy

Bi-annual physical verification of assets

Assets are subjected to annual audit both internally and externally

A regular review and monitoring of asset movement and changes

All assets are insured.

Asset management function in place.

Monthly recording of the accounting records

Quarterly reporting to MANCO

EXCO and Audit Committee

Internal control around purchase maintenance recording and disposal of assets in place.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

1. (a)(ii) SANRAL

(b) SANRAL’s asset register is updated whenever a new asset is acquired or old/redundant assets are written off for various reasons, including technological obsolescence.

(c) There are no assets which are not unaccounted

(d) Not applicable

2. (a) and (b) No unaccounted assets exists.

(c) The opening balances for the past three financial years are:

2014/15 R303 747 772 000

2015/16 R308 819 013 000

2016/17 R315 293 979 000

(d) (ii) The integrity and accuracy of the asset register is ensured through monthly reconciliation of the asset register to SANRAL’s general ledger. Furthermore, asset verification is performed twice a year to ensure that assets physical exists.

South Africa Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a) SAMSA fixed asset register gets updated every time there is movement, eg acquisition, disposal, loss through destruction etc, of assets. The fixed asset register was last updated on 24 March 2017;

1 (b) The Fixed Asset Register gets updated immediately when there is a movement in fixed assets as well as monthly and annually as part of month end and annual reporting process;

1(c) Assets totaling R124, 660.86 were unaccounted for in the past three years by the entity;

1(d) The following is a list of assets that were unaccounted for:

ASSET DESCRIPTION

ASSET ID / SERIAL NUMBER

ACQUISITION COST

1.ACER TMP 255 Laptop

CH2388

R15,112.52

2.ACER TMP 255 Laptop

CH2389

R15,112.52

3. Trueline Bird Wattmeter

OQ2080

R12,871.74

4. Trueline Bird Wattmeter

OQ2081

R12,871.74

5.ARG Electric Design Tool/Tester

0203 000 333

R37,231.26

6. HP Probook 6360b Laptop

0201 000 671

R10,696.94

7. CANON Scan Front 300/300P

CH3090

R19,229.17

8. CANON Digital Camera

0303 000 120

R1,534.97

TOTAL

 

R124,660.86

     

2(a) Most of the assets were stolen and the Fixed Asset Register was not updated on time. Some could not be located during fixed asset verification but were never removed from the Fixed Asset Register.

2(b) Since the beginning of the 2016/17 financial year, a process has been implemented where fixed assets are verified quarterly. The reasons for missing assets are investigated and, if valid, eg stolen asset without a possibility of recovery, the Fixed Asset Register is updated.

2(c) Fixed Asset Register opening balances:

DESCRIPTION

31 March 2016 (R’000)

31 March 2015(R’000)

31 March 2014 (R’000)

Opening Balance

R37,487

R46,269

R46,035

2(d) Procedures and processes for fixed asset management have been improved to ensure completeness and accuracy of fixed assets. This includes ensuring assets are adequately safeguarded and regular verification of fixed assets is conducted - variances are investigated to understand the root cause and ensuring a repetition in the future.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (a) (ii) the asset register of the Ports Regulator was last updated in August 2016 when computer equipment was purchased. (b) The asset register is updated every time there’s a purchase and/or disposal including changes in location for all assets. (c) All assets of the Ports Regulator are accounted for in the assets register. This is also confirmed by Auditor General from their last audit. (d) Not applicable.
  2. There were no assets that belong to the Ports Regulator which were not accounted for in the asset register. (a) Not applicable, (b) Not applicable, (c) Not applicable, (d) Not applicable.

Passenger Rail of Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. (a) PRASA’ s asset register is updated and audited on an annual basis.
  2. Asset register is updated when an asset becomes ready for use, when an asset is damaged (Part of Asset Departments’ function on a daily basis).
  3. There are no known assets unaccounted for in the past three financial years.
  4. See response (c) there are no known unaccounted assets.

2. (a) There are no unaccounted assets.

(b) Regular asset verification, at least twice a year.

(c) Audited balances over past 3 years

2015/16 Financial Year……………R32, 8 billion

2014/15 Financial Year……………R29, 7 billion

2013/14 Financial Year……………R26, 4 billion

(d) Frequent physical verification of assets, monthly reconciliations

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(1)

(a)(ii) Asset Register of RSR was last updated in March 2017.

  1. Asset Register of RSR is updated every time there are changes in assets. This includes acquisition, movements, disposals and asset verification results.
  2. There were no unaccounted assets in the past three years.
  3. Please see response in (c).

(2)Please see response in (1)(c).

  1. Asset verification is conducted twice a year in line with the Asset Management Policy
  2. The opening balances of the asset register for each of the past three years were:

Asset category

2015/16

2014/15

2013/14

Property, Plant and Equipment

R6 014 828

R6 744 003

R2 585 413

Intangible assets

R11 539 932

R2 901 167

R190 399

TOTAL

R17 554 760

R9 645 170

R2 775 812

These are the carrying amounts at the beginning of each financial year.

(d)(ii) The Asset Management Policy of the RSR governs how assets should be managed. This includes the recording, assets verifications and the disposals processes.

07 April 2017 - NW761

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the total number of investigations that the Civil Aviation Authority has undertaken in each province in the past three financial years, (b) what is the nature of each investigation, (c) what did each investigation cost, (d) what are the outcomes of each investigation, (e) what lessons have been learnt from each investigation and (f) what is being done to prevent a repeat of irregular incidents in future?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

Below is the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s response to questions (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f).

a) The table below provides details on the total number of investigation conducted over the past three financial years by the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s Accident and Incident Investigation Division. In line with international standards, and as prescribed in Annex 13 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), aircraft accidents are classified into two categories, i.e. as either an Accident or Serious Incident.

TOTAL NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS IN THE PAST THREE FINANCIAL YEARS

Year of Occurrence (Financial Year)

Accidents

Serious Incidents

Total

2014/2015

120

77

197

2015/2016

110

26

136

2016 - Feb 2017

69

14

83

NOTE: The 2016/2017 financial year statistics excludes March 2017 occurrences, which will be tallied only at the end of March 2017.

TOTAL NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS PER PROVINCE IN THE PAST THREE FINANCIAL YEARS

Financial Year

GP

NW

LP

FS

EC

WC

MP

NC

KZN

O/B

2014/2015

37

8

10

6

17

12

12

4

10

4

2015/2016

33

11

12

3

14

12

9

1

6

9

2016/2017

19

7

12

2

4

10

5

0

5

5

NOTES:

  • GP Gauteng Province
  • NW North West Province
  • LP Limpopo Province
  • FS Free State Province
  • EC Eastern Cape Province
  • WC Western Cape Province
  • MP Mpumalanga Province
  • NC Northern Cape Province
  • KZN KwaZulu-Natal Province
  • O/B Borders of South Africa.

b) The nature of aircraft accident and incident investigations differ depending on the occurrence. Investigation are conducted in line with requirements outlined in Annex 13 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). This means:

  1. in instances where an aircraft sustains minor damages and there are no reported injuries, the investigation will commence immediately but will be conducted off site, meaning that the Investigator in Charge and his or her team of Investigators do not need to go to the crash site in order to conduct the investigation; and
  2. In instances where the aircraft sustains major damages and there are reported injuries or a fatality or fatalities, the investigating would commence immediately and on site.

c) The table below outlines the total annual costs, over a three financial year period, of activities associated with aircraft accident and incident investigations.

ANNUAL COSTS OF ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FOR THE PAST THREE FINACIAL YEARS

Financial Year

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

Total Cost

R 16 919 937.45

R 18 378 990.80

R 17 736 577.23

d) The outcome of investigations revealed the following as main probable cause(s) and contributing factors for the accident or serious incident:

OUTCOMES OF THE AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS

Occurrence Causals

Contributing factor(s)

Human Error

  • Poor technique/airmanship
  • Failure to maintain flying speed/stall
  • Loss of directional control
  • Disregard of standard operating procedures
  • Disorientation

Aircraft Technical

(mechanical failure of a component)

  • Fuel starvation/Exhaustion
  • Metal fatigue/fracture
  • Engine failure
  • Mechanical failure
  • Loss of power
  • Combustion malfunction

Aircraft Operations

  • Unsuccessful forced landing
  • Sling load operation
  • Missed approach
  • Wake turbulence

e) The primary lessons learned from each investigations is that we are then able to determined what caused the accident or serious incident and what are the other factors that contributed to the accident.

f) The SACAA has formed partnerships with the industry aimed at developing and implementing measures that prevent a repeat of similar incidents. The following has thus far been implemented:

  1. Safety recommendations emanating from the investigation reports are issued to affected aircraft operators and organisations that maintain the aircraft to implement measures to prevent future accident.
  2. Safety awareness notices are issued where there’s a trend of similar incidents even if there’s different types of aircraft involved, e.g. collusion with wires due to low flying.
  3. The Safety Management Systems (SMS) was introduced and has been and continue to be implemented by operators. This allows operators to manage their safety risk based on incidents they experience in their organisation.
  4. The SACAA continuously hosts round-table discussions with the industry on aviation safety.
  5. The SACAA introduced the Annual Safety Seminar and uses it to share safety information with the industry. Local and global trends relating to the causes and contributing factors of accidents and incidents are shared with the industry.
  6. Once finalized, accident and serious incidents investigation reports are made public and available through the SACAA website (www.caa.co.za).

NW820E

07 April 2017 - NW737

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to economic activities that are taking place at various toll plaza gates, such as selling food stuff, (a) on whose authority are the specified activities taking place, (b) under what legislation, (c) since what date did the commercial activities commence and (d) how is this monitored and controlled; (2) (a) what is the total number of persons who have been charged and arrested for illegal commercial activities that are conducted at toll plazas in each province and (b) what is being done to stop the illegal commercial activities at toll plazas?

Reply:

(1)

a) No one. Neither the Department of Transport nor the South African National Roads Agency Limited gave authority for such activities on the Road reserves.

b) Not applicable, as above (a).

c) Neither the Department of Transport nor the South African National Roads Agency Limited has the details on the dates as there was never any authority given.

(d Not applicable, see (a) (b) (c) above.

(2)

(a) Neither the Department of Transport nor the South African National Roads Agency Limited has the details about anyone charged.

(b) Any illegal activity with National network is enforced in terms of the National Road Traffic Act, SANRAL Act, and Criminal Procedure Act, to mention but three.

07 April 2017 - NW907

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency has any debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more; if so, (a) what (i) are the details of these debts, (ii) are the reasons for non-payment in each case, (b) on what date will each debt be settled and (c) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

Reply:

The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) pays its debt timeously, at an average of 14 days per creditor. There are however, isolated instances where service providers are not paid within 30 days of receipt of invoices for a variety of reasons, for instance, where the service has not been satisfactory and warrants engagement with the service providers, or where errors have been picked up from the supplier invoices or where the price charged is not in line with what was contracted or quoted. As at end of February 2017, the following creditors’ balances were not paid and been over 30 days:

(a) i

   

(a) ii

(b)

Service provider

Invoice number

Invoice dates

Reason for non-payment

Settlement date

Eris Property

DBBMARCRO/2016/10

(Parking rental)

21-10-2016

Disputed as the invoiced service was never ordered or rendered to the Agency. Service provider to provide credit note.

Subsequently settled in March 2017 by means of credit note received from the Supplier

Madijo Trading Enterprises

INV 2549

(Supply of Uniform)

2015-04-16

Disputed as the ordered goods were not delivered as per the specifications. Goods returned to service provider.

Once engagements with the service provider for a credit note are concluded

Orange Fox Security Services

Inv0000866

(Security)

2014-06-13

Disputed as there is no proof that the ordered items were delivered.

Once engagements with the service provider for a credit note are concluded

Mdluli Office Automation (Seartec)

Various invoice numbers backdated by supplier between periods June 2016-January 2017.

(Photocopiers)

Various invoice dates. Backdated between June 2016- January 2017. Invoices sent by supplier on 27 January 2017 and 30 January 2017

The service provider did not invoice the Agency and had internal backlog and were undergoing internal restructuring. Invoices were subsequently received in January 2017 and backdated.

Partially settled in March 2017.

Disputed amounts will be settled once engagements with the service provider have been concluded.

Sipho Mano

Inv. 20278

Inv. 20277

Inv. 20258

(Catering and events)

05-02-2013

04-02-2013

19-10-2013

Disputed as the service provider invoiced above the quotation and approved purchase order amounts.

Supplier to credit the overcharged amount or amount to be written off in June 2017.

(b) i

   

(b) ii

(b)

Service provider

Invoice number

Invoice dates

Reason for non-payment

Settlement date

Atlantis Corporate Travel

Hof0124254

(Travel)

31/05/2015

Invoice was disputed due to overcharging by service provider. Invoice in excess of the purchase order and the initial quotation. The purchase order amount was paid.

The service provider could also not produce any supporting documents to prove or explain the variance.

Ongoing engagements with the service provider for a credit note and efforts are being put in place to resolve this matter by the end of May 2017.

Atlantis Corporate Travel

Hof0142429

(Travel)

30/11/2015

Invoice was disputed due to overcharging by service provider. Invoice in excess of the purchase order and the initial quotation.

The purchase order amount was paid.

The service provider could also not produce any supporting documents to proof or explain the variance.

 

Duma Travel

Hof0710448

(Travel)

13/05/2015

Invoice was disputed as the service was not rendered and the service provider could also not produce any supporting documents to prove that the service was rendered.

 

Duma Travel

Hof0699427

Travel)

22/04/2015

Invoice was disputed as the service was not rendered and the service provider could also not produce any supporting documents to prove that the service was rendered.

 

Duma Travel

Hof0560673

(Travel)

31/08/2014

Invoice was disputed as the service was not rendered and the service provider could also not produce any supporting documents to prove that the service was rendered.

 

Duma Travel

Hof0710428

(Travel)

13/05/2015

Invoice was disputed as the service was not rendered and the service provider could also not produce any supporting documents to prove that the service was rendered.

 

(c) (i) (ii) (iii) Mechanisms and processes are already firmly in place to ensure suppliers are paid on time. There is a dedicated unit within the Finance division that handles payments to suppliers. All invoices received are recorded and stamped reflecting the date of receipt. Invoices are upon receipt, matched with the relevant supporting documentation and submitted to relevant officials to validate delivery of goods or services. Disputes are clearly communicated to the service providers to ensure that such disputes are resolved on time.

The Agency has a duty to ensure payments are not irregular, are not fraudulent and are for the services ordered and rendered. No interest or fruitless expenditure has therefore been charged to the Agency as a result of supplier payment delays in the last two financial years.

07 April 2017 - NW899

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Road Accident Fund has any debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more; if so, (a) what (i) are the details of these debts, (ii) are the reasons for non-payment in each case, (b) on what date will each debt be settled and (c) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made on time?

Reply:

On 28 February 2017 the Road Accident Fund (RAF) presented its financial position and cash constraints to the Portfolio Committee on Transport (PCoT). This presentation was linked to the debts as posed in this Parliamentary Question and included reference to the RAF’s 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16 Annual Financial Statements previously presented to PCoT inclusive of the same financial reality.

The RAF has debt that has remained unpaid for 30 days or more, defined for purposes of this reply as money the RAF is required to pay immediately and excludes borrowings. To avoid doubt, the RAF has no borrowings;

(a)(i) debts older than 30 days (Claims Creditors as at 4 April 2017 and Trade Creditors as at 28 February 2017) comprise of a total of 14 555 individual debts with a combined value of R 5.5 billion, which are debts processed for payment but have not yet been paid. In respect of Claims Creditors (payments due in relation to claims made under the Road Accident Fund Act, No. 56 of 1996) (Act), the details of the debts are set out in the table below:

Claim Creditor Category

Number of Claims Creditors

Value in Rand

Payment Date

Claimant creditors - capital

5 198

R 3 960 543 951

Less than 180 days from date of payment request as per the RAF’s Cash Management Plan

Claimant creditors - cost

3 792

R 748 282 177

 

Writ creditors (capital and / or costs)

1 858

R 783 182 863

 

Supplier creditors

180

R 2 465 110

 

Undertaking creditors

199

R 3 100 830

 

RAF attorneys, actuaries and other claim operations service providers

3 147

R 60 009 169

 

Details of debts due to Trade Creditors are captured in the table below:

Category

Number of Trade Creditors

Number of Transactions

Value in Rand

Payment Date

Trade Creditors

17

181

R  6 147 178

Dependent on reconciling of items

(ii) the reason for non-payment in respect of each Claims Creditor is the lack of cash to make payment when due as a result of the mismatch between the funding the RAF receives via the Road Accident Fund Fuel Levy (approximately R2.8 billion per month) and the payments the RAF is required to make to Claims Creditors in terms of the Act (approximately R3 billion per month), and the reasons for non-payment in respect of each Trade Creditor is due to engagements in the ordinary course of business with the suppliers of goods and services on items being queried for any number of reasons – also known as reconciling items.

(b) the RAF implemented a Cash Management Plan based on the RAF’s actuarially determined Funding Model, to determine the number of days necessary to effect payment on the basis of the monthly Road Accident Fund Fuel Levy income forecast and the monthly claim settlement patterns and related service level agreements (these calculations are refreshed when circumstances change materially, or at a minimum once a year). The key objective of the Cash Management Plan is to ensure the maximum number of payments to all categories of Claim Creditors and Trade Creditors, within the available cash constraints, noting that there is insufficient cash to settle all debts which are due for payment at any point in time. Currently the maximum payment days the RAF endeavors to honor are 180 days from when the debt was processed for payment. However, the exact date of settlement of the outstanding debts in respect of each of the Claims Creditors is unknown as the payment date is dependent on the category of debt as defined in the Cash Management Plan and the available cash to make payment (which is in turn dependent on the fluctuating monthly Road Accident Fund Fuel Levy income and the ad hoc recovery of diesel rebates, which reduce the Road Accident Fund Fuel Levy income), number of claims settled, number of judgments, number of writs, and operational interruptions as a result of bank account attachments. The exact date of settlement of the outstanding debts in respect of each Trade Creditor is unknown because of the dependency on the reconciling of items.

(c) noting the challenges relating to cash constraints and the reconciling of items, the following mechanisms are in place to ensure that payments are made: (i) manual and automated payment processes, and daily, weekly and monthly reporting mechanisms, (ii) the RAF Accounts Payable Policy and Standard Operating Procedure, and (iii) the Cash Management Plan.

07 April 2017 - NW758

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the statistics in respect of each airport for luggage and baggage that has (a) gone missing, (b) been damaged and (c) experienced missing items, after flights have landed from their destination in the past three financial years; (2) what (a) investigations have been undertaken in this regard, (b) was the outcome in each instance, (c) new (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms have been put in place to prevent these incidences from reoccurring and (d) have been the cost to Airports Company South Africa in each specified financial year in this regard; (3) what (a) suspensions, (b) changes, (c) disciplinary action or (d) any other similar actions have taken place in this regard at each airport in each financial year?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. In terms of the IATA baggage policy, the airline is accountable and responsible for the passenger’s baggage. According to the IATA codes, delayed, damaged and/ stolen bags are recorded by either the airline or its handling company on behalf of the passenger which is handled as a claim.

2. See above answer to question (1).

3. When an airport official and/or staff is involved or positively implicated in pilferage, their access permit cards are blacklisted by ACSA and the matter is reported to SAPS.

07 April 2017 - NW760

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the total number of investigations that the Rail Safety Regulator has undertaken in each province in the past three financial years, (b) what is the nature of each investigation, (c) what did each investigation cost, (d) what are the outcomes of each investigation, (e) what lessons have been learnt from each investigation and (f) what is being done to prevent a repeat of irregular incidents in future?

Reply:

(a) & (b)

Number of Investigations Conducted

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

8

8

10

26

Derailments

14

32

24

70

Level crossing Collisions

7

13

18

38

People Struck By Trains

1

3

22

26

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

12

19

31

Averted Collisions

0

2

3

5

Runaways Trains

1

1

1

3

Train High Tension Fires

1

0

1

2

Electrocution

0

0

1

1

Signal Passed At Danger

2

1

0

3

Total

34

72

99

205

Gauteng

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

1

3

2

6

Derailments

4

9

13

26

Level crossing Collisions

1

3

1

5

People Struck By Trains

0

2

12

14

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

9

13

22

Other

2

2

5

9

North West

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

0

2

0

2

Derailments

0

2

1

4

Level crossing Collisions

4

4

1

9

People Struck By Trains

0

0

0

0

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

1

0

1

Other

1

0

0

1

Western Cape

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

1

3

0

4

Derailments

3

6

1

10

Level crossing Collisions

1

2

4

7

People Struck By Trains

0

0

4

4

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

3

3

6

Other

1

0

1

2

Free State

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

0

0

0

0

Derailments

0

1

1

2

Level crossing Collisions

0

0

0

0

People Struck By Trains

0

0

0

0

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

0

0

0

Other

0

0

0

0

Eastern Cape

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

0

0

1

1

Derailments

1

4

0

5

Level crossing Collisions

0

2

2

4

People Struck By Trains

0

0

0

0

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

0

0

0

Other

0

0

0

0

Limpopo Province

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

3

1

0

4

Derailments

0

2

2

4

Level crossing Collisions

0

0

4

4

People Struck By Trains

0

0

0

0

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

0

0

0

Other

0

0

0

0

Northern Cape

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

0

0

0

0

Derailments

0

3

12

15

Level crossing Collisions

0

1

 

1

People Struck By Trains

0

0

0

0

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

0

0

0

Other

0

0

0

0

Mpumalanga

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

1

2

1

4

Derailments

4

2

0

6

Level crossing Collisions

0

0

11

11

People Struck By Trains

0

0

0

0

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

0

0

0

Other

1

0

0

1

KwaZulu Natal

Category

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total

Collision between trains

2

0

1

3

Derailments

2

1

4

7

Level crossing Collisions

1

0

4

5

People Struck By Trains

0

1

3

4

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

0

0

4

4

Other

0

0

0

0

(c) The cost of each investigation:

Cost per Independent BOI

Occurrence

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

PE Station Derailment

R 831 184,27

 

Lebaleng rear-end Collision

 

R 514 026,00

 

Denver rear-end Collision

 

R 1 814110,73

 

Kaalfontein derailment

 

R 520 880,00

 

Lower Adamson and Gaika derailments

 

R 724 600,00

 

Blaney head-on Collision

 

R 358 188,00

 

Booysens rear-end collision

 

R 580 764,00

 

Booysens rear-end collision

   

R 140 402,00

Kimberley derailment (AFRO 4000)

   

R 361 500,00

Total

R 831 184,27

R 4 512 568,73

R 501 902,00

The costs for RSR internal investigations includes operational costs only. These are conducted by the RSR inspectorate. The table below show the total costs for internal investigation for the last three (3) financial years.

Operational Costs for RSR Internal Investigations

Financial Year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Cost

R 169 681,73

R 344 180,00

R 388 420,00

(d) The outcome of each investigation

See attached Excel Spreadsheet

(e) 

Category

Lessons Learnt

Collision between trains

  • We need collision avoidance systems installed in trains
  • Invest in maintenance of infrastructure and rolling stock

Derailments

  • We need more wayside monitoring equipment
  • Invest in maintenance of infrastructure and rolling stock

Level crossing Collisions

  • We need enforcement at level crossings
  • We need to upgrade protection at level crossings
  • We need to redesign some level crossings

People Struck By Trains

  • Protection of the railway reserves
  • Awareness to the public
  • Enforcement

Platform Train Interface Occurrences

  • Upgrade of stations
  • Introduction of new trains
  • Security at stations
  • Public Announcements at stations (Improved and audible communication)

Averted Collisions

  • Re-Training of employees
  • Fitness for Duty Declaration when reporting for Duty
  • Manage overtime

Runaways Trains

Adherence to procedures

Train High Tension Fires

Maintenance of rolling stock

Electrocution

Supervision

Signal Passed At Danger

Adherence to procedures

(f) The Railway Safety Regulator has adopted a strategic approach to enhance its oversight role, by conducting research on driver behaviour at level crossings (human factors), new technologies and have developed regulations that will support safe railway operations.

04 April 2017 - NW187

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total number of passengers travelling through airports in South Africa that ware managed by the Airports Company South Africa in relation to (a) international flights and (b) domestic flights in the (i) 2014, (ii) 2015 and (iii) 2016 calendar years? NW 198E

Reply:

CY

FLIGHT TYPE CODE

ARRIVAL Passengers

DEPARTURE Passengers

TOTAL Passengers

TOTAL Passengers

2014

Domestic

11 912 205

11 945 260

23 857 465

35 296 866

 

International

5 157 363

5 210 205

10 367 568

 
 

Regional

537 540

534 293

1 071 833

 

2015

Domestic

13 066 368

13 094 665

26 161 033

37 750 447

 

International

5 225 445

5 288 053

10 513 498

 
 

Regional

539 729

536 187

1 075 916

 

2016

Domestic

13 762 375

13 781 577

27 543 952

39 787 939

 

International

5 506 282

5 597 132

11 103 414

 
 

Regional

570 633

569 940

1 140 573

 

04 April 2017 - NW806

Profile picture: Tlhaole, Mr L S

Tlhaole, Mr L S to ask the Minister of Transport

What measures does her department have in place to reduce the road carnage on the R31 road between Hotazel and Kuruman in the Northern Cape, which is as a result of a very narrow road that is used by many heavy vehicles?

Reply:

The Department has programmes in place to deal with the reduction of road carnages on R31 road. These programs are anchored around the pillars of United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety.

There is also improvement visibility of traffic police to ensure safety of all road users in this road.

We have attended to the road shoulders of the R31 to increase its capacity to cater for the heavy vehicle traffic, in particular.

The long term plans are that the additional lanes will be introduced and design life of road be improved.

04 April 2017 - NW762

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the reasons that some entities reporting to her do not have their latest annual report available online via their respective websites (b) by what date will the annual reports be available online?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

The latest Integrated Report 2016 is available on the website.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. The latest Annual Report 2015 is available on the website, the reports are also achieved from 2010- 2014.
  2. The 2016 Annual Report will be available as soon as it is tabled in Parliament.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) The latest annual report of the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA), i.e. for the 2015/2016 financial year, is available online via the organisation’s website. Each year, and without fail, the SACAA ensures that its annual report is available online via its website immediately on receipt of confirmation that the annual report has been tabled in Parliament.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

  1. The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency has the latest annual report available online via the Agency’s website.
  2. Not applicable as the latest annual report is available online.

Road Accident Fund

(a) The Road Accident Fund has the latest annual report available online via the Agency’s website.

(b) Not applicable as the latest annual report is available online.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

  1. The Road Traffic Management Corporation has the latest annual report available online via the Agency’s website.

(b) Not applicable as the latest annual report is available online.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

  1. The Road Traffic Infringement Agency has the latest annual report available online via the Agency’s website.
  2. Not applicable as the latest annual report is available online.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

(a) The South African National Roads Agency Limited has the latest annual report available online via the Agency’s website.

(b) Not applicable as the latest annual report is available online.

Ports Regulator South Africa (PRSA)

  1. The previous year’s annual report has not been uploaded on the Ports Regulator’s website as a result or error, however this will be uploaded as soon as possible.
  2. The annual report will be loaded before the end of the 2016/17 financial year.

South African Maritime Safety Authority ( SAMSA)

SAMSA publishes its Annual Performance Plan, Strategic Plans and all our Annual Reports on the SAMSA website as required.

Passenger Rail of Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. PRASA places its annual reports on its main websites.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

a) The Railway Safety Regulator’s 15/16 Annual Report is available on the entity’s website

b) N/A

03 April 2017 - NW652

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With regard to the secondment of Mr Collins Letsoalo from her department to the Passenger Rail Agengy of South Africa as its acting Group Chief Executive Officer (GCEO) in 2016, (a) what were the conditions on perks, remuneration and benefits for the specified person, (b) what perks and/or remuneration by month were awarded to the specified person over and above the conditions of the secondment, (c) what were the reasons for the perks, (d) what is she and/or her department doing to recoup these perks, remuneration and benefits from the specified person; (2) (a) what plans are in place to charge any official(s) in this regard, (b) who will be charged and (c) for what reasons will the specified official(s) be charged in each instance? (3) (a) what plans are in place to replace Mr Collins Letsoalo and (b) what is the total amount budgeted for this purpose?

Reply:

1 (a) The Acting Chief Executive Officer (AGCEO), Mr Collins Letsoalo was appointed, by the Board, to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa following his secondment by the Minister of Transport.

The Board and Mr Letsoalo entered into an agreement dated the 07 July 2016 under the following conditions:

The effective date being 01 July 2017 until further notice or until a permanent GCEO is appointed.

PRASA would pay an annualized salary rate applicable to this position – the annualized salary rate applicable to this position is currently R5, 986,140.07 (498 845 p/m) which is a cost to company package.

The AGCEO is eligible to receive all the benefits applicable to this position – the current benefits applicable to this position include:

Medical Aid (compulsory, but can opt out if covered in spouse Medical Aid scheme). – Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

Provident Fund (to be structured from package) - Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

Funeral Cover (to be structured from package) - Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

13th cheque (optional and to be structured from package) - Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

Car and VIP protection (subject to fringe benefit tax).

Car allowance (to be structured from package) Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

Performance Bonus (if declared) - No bonuses have been declared at PRASA

A company cellular phone on an unlimited package (open line) - Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

Executive cover (for all executives) Mr Letsoalo did not exercise this option at PRASA.

(b) There were no perks that were awarded to the AGCEO that were above the conditions of secondment.

(c) There were no perks that were awarded to the AGCEO that were above the conditions of secondment.

(d) There is at present no need or reason to recoup any perks, remuneration and benefit from the specified person

(2) (a) The board upon the request from the minister has initiated an investigation and once this has been concluded the outcome will be addressed accordingly.

(b) This aspect will be known once the investigation has been concluded.

(c) This aspect will be known once the investigation has been concluded.

(3) (a) The board had already advertised the Group Chief Executive Officer position and the advert closed on the 15/03/2017. The next steps are the interview process (the approach and the appointment).

(b) R5, 986,140.07 (498 845 p/m) which is a cost to company package.

 

29 March 2017 - NW651

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) did the investigation of the Gautrain by the Railway Safety Regulator in February 2017 reveal, (ii) are the terms of reference of the board of inquiry into this incident and (iii) (aa) are the start and (bb) termination dates of this inquiry, (b) who will serve on the board of inquiry and (c) how was each member of the board selected?

Reply:

a) (i) The preliminary investigations found that the points which guide the train movement were not completely closed for safe passage of trains. The Board of Inquiry (BOI) into this accident will further probe the matter and identify the underlying causes.

(ii) The BOI is mandated to investigate amongst other things, the following:

  • The immediate and root/underlying causes leading up to and surrounding the incident,
  • The adequacy, effectiveness and personnel knowledge of the relevant procedures and training background regarding activities pertaining to adherence to, specifically applicable train operating procedures by the train drivers and the Train Control Officer (TCO) concerned as set out in local instructions, General Appendix and other applicable directives,
  • The activation, execution and management of the emergency and clearing up process as set out in local contingency plans and relevant directives,
  • The adequacy and effectiveness of maintenance systems and procedures for perway and signaling, and
  • Review the history of previous near misses; in order to ascertain what corrective actions were taken to address these.

(iii) (aa) The Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) immediately conducted a preliminary investigation and subsequently issued a report on 16 February 2017. Shortly after issuing a preliminary report, the Term of Reference (ToR) for sourcing expertise of various disciplines were developed. The supply chain management processes are in progress

(bb) It is envisaged to complete the BOI by end of September 2017. However, it should be noted that BOI’s could take six (6) to twelve (12) months to complete.

b) The following expertise with be represented on the BOI

- Legal Expert (Chairperson)

- Signal Expert

- Perway Expert

- Human Factors Experts

c) Members has not been appointed yet. The process is being facilitated by the RSR Supply Chain Management (SCM) department in line with the legislative framework.

29 March 2017 - NW624

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What was the total flood damage to the R33 road and bridge between Lephalale and Vaalwater in 2014, (b) were any funds by (i) national or (ii) provincial departments allocated for the flood damage, (c) why has the bridge near Vaalwater on this main road to Lephalale not yet been rebuilt, (d) when will the road and bridge be fixed and (e) what is the total cost to rebuild the bridge and road?

Reply:

a) The total damages from 2014 floods on both the R33 Road (formerly P198/1) and Merriespruit Bridge were estimated at R23m as per the initial assessment and final verification.

b) (i) No funds were made available for National Department

(ii) Funds were made available to Limpopo Provincial Roads for temporary (Emergency Funds) and permanent (Reconstruction and Rehabilitation) restoration of access. Emergency funds were made available immediately and the road was repaired by patching the potholes and resealing. Pipe Culvert Bridge was erected to restore access on the washed-away Merriespruit Bridge, with assistance of private sector. Reconstruction and Rehabilitation funds were only made available to the province as part of Provincial Road Maintenance Grant over an MTEF period, from 2015/16 financial year.

c) The bridge has not been built due to the following;

(i) During 2014, the road P198/1 was part of the list of roads to be transferred from the then Limpopo Provincial Department of Road and Transport to SANRAL and the transfer was finalized after flood damages. The road now belongs to SANRAL in terms of Notice 538 of National Gazette No 37815, and SANRAL is finalizing their assessment which is already revealing additional two bridges might be reconstructed on the R33.

(ii) SANRAL upon taking over the road preferred to standardize the bridge and the road accordingly, and the process entailed commissioning a new design of the infrastructure and a budgeting process to cover the standard of design.

Other processes including application of environmental authorization has to be done.

d) The road has been repaired to a relatively required standard while the plan to fix the bridge is been finalized. The road is also monitored and maintained on a constant basis by SANRAL. The construction of the bridge is planned to start in October 2017 and the construction process is scheduled to take about 14 months from the date of construction. The bridge will be completed by January 2019, in case all processes run as planned. The project steering committee has also been established specifically for the road and the bridge to monitor and establish possible measure to fix the bridge and the road, while also fostering road safety.

e) The total cost to fix the bridge has not been established but will be determined through the final design report which is expected by the 15th May 2017, also refer to point a) above.

29 March 2017 - NW590

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any entity reporting to her procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments, and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

The Airports Company South Africa (“ACSA”) has not procured any services from a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council.

The mentioned service providers have not been awarded any work or provided goods or services to ACSA, and as such no payments were made.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a), (b), (c), (d); ATNS, the Air Traffic and Navigation Services State Owned Company of South Africa, has not procured any service or process payment to any of the listed companies

(i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (Not Applicable) ATNS satisfy its requirements through competition unless there are justifiable reasons to the contrary and none of the listed companies were contracted through any procurement process embarked on by ATNS.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The SACAA had no need for and therefore did not procure any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council. As such, question (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v), and (vi) are no longer applicable.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

a) the Agency did not make any payments to Mr Mzwanele Manyi because no services were procured from him.

b) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

c) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

d) No services were procured or payments made to the Black Business Council.

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) Falls Away as no transaction was made.

Road Accident Fund

a) the Agency did not make any payments to Mr Mzwanele Manyi because no services were procured from him.

b) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

c) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

d) No services were procured or payments made to the Black Business Council.

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) Falls Away as no transaction was made.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

a) the Agency did not make any payments to Mr Mzwanele Manyi because no services were procured from him.

b) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

c) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

d) No services were procured or payments made to the Black Business Council.

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) Falls Away as no transaction was made.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

a) the Agency did not make any payments to Mr Mzwanele Manyi because no services were procured from him.

b) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

c) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

d) No services were procured or payments made to the Black Business Council.

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) Falls Away as no transaction was made.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

a) the Agency did not make any payments to Mr Mzwanele Manyi because no services were procured from him.

b) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

c) No services were procured or payments made to the Progressive Professional Forum;

d) No services were procured or payments made to the Black Business Council.

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) Falls Away as no transaction was made.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

No PRASA has not procured services or made payments to any of the entities listed.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

No Railway Safety Regulator has not procured services or made payment to any of the entities listed

South Africa Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA has not made any payment to;

  1. Mr Mzwanele Manyi;
  2. The Progressive Professionals Forum;
  3. The Decolonisation Fund, and/or;
  4. The Black Business Council.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator did not procure any services nor make payment to:

  1. Mr Manyi
  2. The Progressive Professionals Forum
  3. The Decolonisation Fund
  4. The Black Business Council

The reason for no payments/procurement with the above mentioned bodies is because the business of the Regulator did not involve the need for services from the abovementioned individual and organisations.

29 March 2017 - NW594

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of SA’s management has put any plans in place to approach National Treasury for financial assistance in the foreseeable future; if so, (a) what is the estimated amount involved and (b) for what specific purpose will the financial assistance be required?

Reply:

PRASA together with Department of Transport are working on a comprehensive Turn Around Strategy for PRASA. Once the financial requirement for the Turn Around is finalised the Department will assist PRASA and engage with National Treasury.

29 March 2017 - NW653

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the order by the Grahamstown High Court which ordered the Eastern Cape Department of Roads and Public Works to reimburse farmers who have repaired damaged roads themselves, what plans have been put in place should similar orders be instituted for roads under the ambit of her department or any of its entities?

Reply:

The Department of Roads and Public Works (EC) has received the judgement and is in a process of evaluating its options. The department is still considering the judgement and is seeking legal opinion.

29 March 2017 - NW625

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the high accident rate on the N1 between Bela-Bela and Polokwane (a) what was the exact number of accidents in the (i) 2013-14 (ii) 2014-15 (iii) 2015-16 and (iv) 2016-17 financial years, (b) how many people were killed in each financial year, (c) what were the causes of each fatal accident and (d) what actions did her department take to ensure that (i) road users abide by all road rules and (ii) number of fatal accidents is drastically reduced?

Reply:

a) What was the exact number of accidents in

(i) 2013 stats are not available due to technical problems

(ii) 2014 there were 46 fatal crashes

(iii) 2015 there were 81 fatal crashes

(iv) 2016 there were 97 fatal crashes

b) How many people were killed:

2014 there were 83 fatalities, 2015 there were 137 fatalites, 2016 there were 181 fatalities

c) What were the causes:

The accidents mainly caused by single vehicles overturning, sideswipe between vehicle travelling in opposite directions, head-on collisions and collision with pedestrians

d) What did the department do:

(i)(ii) The Department of Transport through its agency (Road Traffic Management Corporation) has ensured the deployment of traffic officers on this road to ensure visible law enforcement. Road safety education is also undertaken to educate road users about safe usage of the road.

29 March 2017 - NW648

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why did she give notice to suspend members of the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) and then reverse this decision, (b) what informed her decision in each instance, (c) what process will she follow going forward with regard to the Auditor General’s report that ACSA is not implementing appropriate steps to prevent continued irregular, wasteful and fruitless expenditure, (d) what are the timeframes and timelines in this regard and (e) (i) who has been suspended and/or charged in this regard and (ii) why?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

In order to reply to the question asked by The Honourable Mr M S de Freitas, Department of Transport need clarity on a notice or information relating to suspend members and the reverse decision.

The sooner we receive clarity then we will be able to reply accordingly.

29 March 2017 - NW710

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Did (a) her department or (b) any entity reporting to her participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event h_osted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017; if so, what amount was spent in each case; (2) did (a) her department or (b) any entity reporting to her participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma; if so, (aa) which items were purchased and (bb) at what cost, in each case?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. (b) No, ACSA did not participate in the dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017.

(2) (b) No, ACSA did not participate in the auction of the souvenirs or personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob Zuma.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. (a) Not applicable (b) No, ATNS did not participate in the dialogue

(2) (a) Not applicable (b) No, ATNS did not participate in the auction of (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings, (aa) not applicable and (bb) not applicable.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (a) Not applicable. (b) The SACAA did not participate in the event. (2) (a) Not applicable. (b) As the SACAA did not participate in the event; therefore questions (i), (ii), (aa), (bb), are no longer applicable.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

(1) (b) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA) did not participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017;

(2) (b) the CBRTA did not participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma.

Road Accident Fund

(1) (b) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) did not participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017;

(2) (b) the RAF did not participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma.

 

Road Traffic Management Corporation

(1) (b) The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) did not participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017;

(2) (b) the RTMC did not participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma.

 

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(1) (b) The Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) did not participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017;

 

(2) (b) the RTIA did not participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

(1) (b) The South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) did not participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017;

(2) (b) the SANRAL did not participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma.

South Africa Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. SAMSA did not participate in the event.
  2. SAMSA did not participate in the auction.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

1. The Ports Regulator did not participate in the Dialogues that took place at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga on 25 February 2017 and no payments associated with the event were made.

2. (b) the Ports Regulator did not participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs, (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma, and did not purchase any items.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. No. PRASA did not participate in the Dialogue with the President
  2. No. PRASA did not participate in the auction.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

  1. No. PRASA did not participate in the Dialogue with the President
  2. No. PRASA did not participate in the auction.

29 March 2017 - NW650

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why have the computers in the licence renewal unit in the town of Balfour in the Dipaleseng Municipality in Mpumalanga not been moved with the original move to a temporary building, (b) when will the computers be moved and (c) how are licence renewals and other functions being conducted in the meantime?

Reply:

(a) The temporary building was found to be non-compliant in terms of the NaTIS Security Policy Framework. Therefore, the computers were not moved into this building. The municipality has been urged to ensure that the services are resumed as soon as possible and the process of completing the new office building is expedited.

(b) A new site has since been identified and a call to relocate the NaTIS and the technicians and the NaTIS Security Officers are currently evaluating the new site for NaTIS Security Policy Framework assessment and once the approval is obtained the relocation will be effected.

(c) There is a current temporary arrangement for renewals and other related functions to be handled by the neighbouring centres at Lekwa, Govan Mbeki and Emalahleni Local Authorities, which are within the proximity of Dipaliseng Local Authority.

28 March 2017 - NW323

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the land claim of the Ba Mare a Phogole and the land owned by SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) that falls within this land claim area, (a) what submission will Sanral make in this regard to the Land Claims Commission, (b) what will be the main points contained in Sanral’s submission, (c) what alternative plans will Sanral make should this claim be granted and (d) what would be the estimated costs involved?

Reply:

a) SANRAL will demonstrate that the land claimed is incapable of being restored to the claimants.

b) The main points to be contained in our submission will be that (i) a road which carries a high volume of economically important traffic has been built on the properties at great cost and, (ii) further property has been acquired for future road widening and improvements at significant cost, which cannot be alienated without affecting our ability to carry increased traffic volumes in future.

c) SANRAL does not currently have an alternative plan and would have to start afresh with planning an entirely new route on another alignment.

d) It is impossible to estimate the costs of building an alternative route without first investigating the possible alternative alignments.

28 March 2017 - NW649

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What is her department doing to stop the transportation of persons, and children in particular, at the back of (a) light duty vehicles, (b) panel vans, (c) trailers, (d) heavy duty trucks and/or (e) any other vehicle that does not have safety belts at the back of it; (2) (a) how many persons have been fined for engaging in this practice in each province in the past three financial years, (b) what was the total value in rand of the fines in each financial year and (c) what are the statistics in this regard in each province in the past three financial years?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) (c) covered by the term “goods vehicles” . In relation to the transport of persons at the rear of goods vehicles the Department has promulgated legislation that completely prohibits such transportation if it is conducted for reward. It must be noted that a complete ban on such transportation will result in some of the sectors operationally shutting down due to financial viability.

The Department is trying to deal with transportation of person at the rear of goods vehicles published for comments regulations on the 11th May 2015 intending to restrict the number of persons transported at the rear of such vehicles to five (5).This proposal was however not supported by most of the transport sectors using goods vehicles to transport their workers to the relevant sites. Sectors such as the agricultural, building, construction, gardening services, etc

However, on the 11th November 2016 the Department incorporated in to the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 ( Act No.93 of 1996) regulations prohibiting the transportation of school children at the rear of goods vehicles.

(2) (a) Currently, they are not fined as it is not yet prohibited to transport persons at the rear of goods vehicles.

(b) (c) Falls away since there are no fines.

28 March 2017 - NW321

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to vehicle roadworthiness checks conducted when vehicles are stopped on roads, (a)(i) who conducts such vehicle roadworthiness checks and (ii) what qualifies them to undertake such checks, (b) what is entailed when conducting such checks, (c) what is actually checked and (d) how are such checks undertaken?

Reply:

a) (i) The law enforcement officer such as Traffic Officer, Police Officer, Peace Officer, etc.

  (ii) What qualifies them to undertake such checks?

  • They undergo the Training
  • After the completion of training, they register as such
  • For anyone to qualify they have to be appointed as:

- National Traffic Officer in terms of Section 3A (1) (a) of Act, 1996 (Act 93 of 1996)

- Provincial or Local Traffic Officers in terms of Road Traffic Act, 1989(Act No. 29 0f 1989)

- Police Officer in terms of Section 334(3)(a) of the Criminal Procedure Act,1977(Act No. 51 of 1977)

- Peace Officer in terms of Section 334(1) (a) of Criminal Procedure Act, 1977(Act No. 51 of 1977)

  • They are issued with an appointment card

b) A Safe Roadside vehicle check point

c) Officers checked the:

  • A Driver and a Vehicle fitness
  • The relevant documentation for the driver and the vehicle

d) An Officer on duty, will pull over the vehicle in a safe manner from to the side of the road.

When the vehicle is safely stopped, an Officer approaches the driver of the vehicle.

He/she will greet the driver and explain the reason for stopping the vehicle.

Whilst observing driver fitness, will request a driver’s licence and check the validity thereof.

An Officer will then check the vehicle roadworthiness systematically starting at the driver from inside and outside the vehicle by checking:

  • Parking and Service brakes
  • Pedals (Clutch, Brake and Accelerator)
  • Odometer
  • Interior and Exterior mirror on the driver’s side
  • A warning Device
  • Driver Seatbelt
  • Driver’s door
  • Front right tyre, wheelnuts
  • Windscreen
  • Right Windscreen wiper
  • Right front lamp
  • Direction Indicator on the front right side
  • Front Number Plate compare it with the number plate on the licence disc
  • Left front lamp
  • Direction Indicator on left front
  • Ask the driver to open the Bonnet and an Officer check oil leaks and exposed wires
  • Left front tyre, wheelnuts
  • Left Exterior mirror
  • Licence Disc(validity)
  • Left front door
  • Left front Seatbelt
  • Left rear door
  • Left rear Seatbelt
  • Left rear tyre, wheelnuts
  • Left rear lamp
  • Left rear Direction Indicator
  • Left Stop lamp
  • Rear Number Plate( compare it with the front Number Plate)
  • Number Plate lamps
  • Rear right Lamp
  • Rear right Stop lamp
  • Rear right tyre, wheelnuts
  • Exhaust
  • Rear right door

If all is in good working order, an Officer will return a driver’s licence to the driver with an original copy of check form (marked) release him/her and direct him/her safely back to the road.

If there is any defect found during the inspection, an Officer will issue an infringement to the driver, thereafter release him/her and direct him/her safely back to the road.

If the documentation or the driver’s licence is not valid or relevant to the vehicle, an Officer will arrest the driver.

If an Officer suspects that the driver is driving under the influence, he/she will test the driver using relevant equipment and if the results are positive, then the driver will be arrested and handed to the Police for further handling.

20 March 2017 - NW474

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister Transport

Whether her department procured an y services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Coouncil; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured,(ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case? NW530F REPLY The Department of Transport did not procure any services from / or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council. The reason is because no bids or quotations were awarded to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/ or (d) the Black Business Council.

Reply:

The Department of Transport did not procure any services from / or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council.

The reason is because no bids or quotations were awarded to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/ or (d) the Black Business Council.

20 March 2017 - NW531

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the current status of the traffic control lights at the (a) north and (b) south weighbridge stations on the N12 at Potchefstroom in the Tlokwe Local Municipality; (2) Whether the cameras were installed at each of the specified weighbridge stations; if not, in each case, (a) why not and (b) what happened to the specified cameras; is so (i) on what date were the cameras installed and (ii) what ae the further relevant details; (3) What are the minimum amount of hours that each of the weighbridge stations are operational on each day of the week?

Reply:

1. The traffic lights at the weighbridge on N12:

 (A) Northern side traffic lights are performing satisfactory and improvements are underway to increase visibility and prevent possible fraudulent activity that might occur during weighing process.

(b) Southern side 2trafiic lights are operational and never had problems since they were installed.

2. The cameras were installed at each specified weighbridge station and are functioning well, and they are efficient especially in dealing with fraud and corruption in this environment.

 (a) And (b) fall away.

(b) (i) Cameras were installed about two years ago.

3. The minimum operational hours on average per day are 8 hours and 40 hours per week, for both North and South Bound stations.

20 March 2017 - NW479

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the rationale for seconding Mr Collins Letsoalo to the position of Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) and the Road Traffic Management Corporation and (b) what steps does she intend to take with regard to his alleged unacceptable conduct at PRASA?

Reply:

a) Mr Letsoalo was seconded to both PRASA and TMC to act as GCEO and CEO respectively to temporarily close the gaps, that we created by the departure of the incumbents.

b) The Department is not aware of Mr Letsoalo’s unacceptable conduct to PRASA

   ff: The honorable members are requested to supply the department with details to enable proper investigation and relevant action

14 March 2017 - NW345

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) (a) Since 1 January 2010, what are the national (i) payment figures (ii) percentages regarding AARTO traffic infringements in relation to the fines issued (b) who are the external service providers at each municipal authority in the country responsible for issuing fines and collecting payments in respect of the violations; (2) what are the nature and extent of the contracts that municipal authorities sign with external service providers; (3) whether (a) the contracts and the appointment of external service providers are in accordance with the appropriate municipal legislation and (b) municipal service providers are entitled to make use of external service providers; if not, why not; if so, what legislation serves as a basis for this; (4) whether there are any provisions included in the service level agreement of the tender agreement that (a) hold the service provider responsible for inadequate service delivery by means of a a penalty clause, (b) authorise additional fees that the external mechanisms are allowed to levy from members of the public and (c) place a prohibition on the use of the data by an external service provider to create an additional product and in so doing exploit the data economically; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Since 1 January 2010, the Department through the Road Traffic Management Agency, responsible for piloting the AARTO Act, issued in total 26 089 730 fines in the City of Tshwane and City of Johannesburg. The break down of this figures are as on the table below:

(i) AARTO payment figures:

Financial Year

AARTO Revenue Collected

2010/11

R 53 506 570.02

2011/12

R 86 553 514.98

2012/13

R 143 185,321.00

2013/14

R 274 398 904.99

2014/15

R 306 993 704.98

2015/16

R 555 459 029.99

(ii) Percentages regarding AARTO traffic infringements in relation to the fines issued:

Financial Year

Number of AARTO Infringements/Offences

% of AARTO Infringements/Offences

2010/11

1 478 265

5.67%

2011/12

1 707 052

6.54%

2012/13

3 474 353

13.32%

2013/14

6 797 128

26.05%

2014/15

6 120 436

23.46%

2015/16

6 512 496

24.96%

Total

26 089 730

100%

2. The honourable member should remember that road and traffic are exclusive Schedule 5A provincial function while municipal roads, traffic and parking are exclusive schedule 5B Municipal function and in contrast, road and traffic is a concurrent function with the National Department of Transport playing largely a facilitating and regulatory role.

It is on this basis that the Department is unable to provide information on (2), however this information can be sources directly from the Municipalities.

3. Please see above (2)

4. Please see above (2)

14 March 2017 - NW407

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Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What amount was (a) budgeted for and (b) actually spent on the maintenance of the E514 tar road in Kiepersol, Mpumalanga, (i) in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14, (cc) 2014-15 and (dd) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016; (2) whether any unspent funds were returned to the (a) National Treasury or (b) Mpumalanga Provincial Treasury; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) on what date was the specified road last worked on?

Reply:

In terms of section 25. (1) of THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL ROADS AGENCY LIMITED AND NATIONAL ROADS ACT, the Agency of the Department of Transport, is given the power to perform, all strategic planning with regard to the South African national roads system, as well as the planning, design, construction, operation, management, control, maintenance and rehabilitation of national roads for the Republic. The road referred to by the honourable Mr KP Robertson is not part of the national road network and no budgets was allocated for road because it is part of the Mpumalanga Provincial Road Network.

(1) Falls away

(2) Falls away

(3) Falls away

Additional information for the Minister

However, the question was referred to the province and the following below is their reply:

Can you please provide me with the budget allocations for the E514 over the past five financial years?

The road in question is Provincial road D514 with a total length of 12.6 km, from the R536 between Hazyview and Sabie at the Western end, and road D1035 at Kiepersol at the Eastern end.

It is known that the road is in poor condition, as indicated by the diagram below. Annual assessments are done on all Provincial paved roads as part of the DPWRT’s Road Asset Management System (RAMS).

One of the important metrics that are derived from these assessments is the Visual Condition Index (VCI), which is an overall indicator of the road condition on a percentage scale of 0 – 100%.

The VCI on road D514 varies roughly between 30 and 40, which classifies the road as in “Poor” condition according to the applicable TMH 9 technical manual. (See Annexure 1 for clear graph)

The DPWRT budget for routine road maintenance is allocated to each of the 21 Cost Centres in the Province, broken down into 15 routine maintenance activities like patching, drainage, grass cutting, etc. Thus, the budget is prepared per activity and there is no specific budget allocation for each road separately.

The budget for preventive maintenance (reseal) and capital works like rehabilitation are allocated per road (or project). However, no project has been budgeted for or implemented on D514 during the past five financial years.

In addition, please provide me with the budget spent on E514 over the past five financial years.

The expenditure for each Cost Centre is kept for each of the 15 routine maintenance activities across all roads in the specific area of responsibility. As a result, the expenditure is not kept by individual road and thus cannot be provided for road D514.

No capital projects have been implemented on D514 over the last 5 financial years.

Have there been any unspent budgets and were these sent back to Treasury? If not, how was the budget spent?

No, there has not been any unspent budgets in relation to D514. The DPWRT has utilized 100% of its budget for the past 5 financial years.

Please indicate the last time any department has worked on the E514 project. Could we be provided with an annexure?

Various routine maintenance activities were performed on D514 during the past financial year. Due to the number of potholes, patching is obviously very important. The previous last time patching has been done on road D514 was on 23 January 2017.

A maintenance team is scheduled to do further patching during the week of 27 February, depending on weather conditions.

ANNEXURE

14 March 2017 - NW340

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to her secondment of Mr Letsoalo as the acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) (details furnished), she intends (a) taking any disciplinary action against Mr Letsoalo and (b) recovering all monies incorrectly paid to Mr Letsoalo; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 2) will there be an investigation into (a) who was responsible for the payment and (b) how the specified person was responsible; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Mr Letsoalo secondment was done in terms of section 15(3) of the Public Service Act. The matter of the remuneration of the secondment allowance is a matter that is being dealt with within PRASA.

a. See background information above

b. See background information above

2. PRASA is investigating the matter

a.  See the background information above

10 March 2017 - NW378

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(i) MINISTER

Inherited from Minister Ben Martins

 

YZB713GP

BZ93DBGP

(a) Make

BMW

LEXUS

(b) Model

X5

LX570

(c ) Price

R 789 924.00

R1 084 312.37

(d) Date of purchase

Apr-10

Aug-12

(ii) DEPUTY MINISTER

 

CA954053

BZ84KGGP

(a) Make

BMW

BMW

(b) Model

X6

535i Gran Turismo

(c ) Price

R 790 000.00

R789 634.50

(d) Date of purchase

Sep-12

Aug-12

(aa) (aaa) 2014-15

The vehicles mentioned in (i) and (ii) above, were used by the Principals during this period.

(aa) (bbb) 2015-16

The vehicles mentioned in (i) and (ii) above, were used by the Principals during this period.

(bb) since 1 April 2016

The vehicles mentioned in (i) and (ii) above, were used by the Principals during this period.

07 March 2017 - NW334

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Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How are roving traffic hotspots coordinated, (b) what are the objectives of these roving hotspots, (c) (i) how many and (ii) where have these hotspots taken place in the past three financial years, (d) how are the successes or failures of these hotspots ascertained, (e) what were the successes and failures of each hotspot in each province and (f)(i) what are the lessons learnt from these hotspots and (ii) what has been implemented in each province as a result?

Reply:

Reference must be made rather to Roving road blocks and not roving traffic Hotspots. The roving road blocks are also known as Mini Road side check points as opposed to fully fleshed road blocks with all the Road Traffic Signs displayed as prescribed in the Road Block Manual.

(a) The coordination of these roving road blocks is done within the provincial coordinating structures and Law Enforcement Technical Committee (LETCOM) to optimize the use and sharing of limited resources.

(b) The objectives of operations are to reduce road crashes and make road safe; target un-roadworthy vehicles and unfit drivers such as drunk drivers; and increase visibility of officers on the road.

(c) Number of Road blocks is (i) 74 382

(ii) The Road Blocks were conducted in all provinces.

(d) These operations are informed by the Road Traffic Intelligence report and situational analysis per area.

(e)Successes and failures are determined by number of crashes in the province, and number of arrests of drunk drivers.

(f) (i) Lesson learned is that there is a need for stronger coordination of joint operationsto be guided from national level and provincewith identified critical locations to be assisted through the deployment of the National Traffic Police resources from time to time.

(ii) Each province is currently establishing coordinating structures to plan and optimize coordination.

07 March 2017 - NW330

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Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

What plans does she intend to put in place in order to back up the statement that she made in December 2016 that no one should get a free pass on the road in reference to individuals such as mayors, Deputy Ministers and Ministers who transgress road regulations and overtake other vehicles illegally, (b)(i) how will this be measured and (ii) what punitive measures will be imposed on the offenders?

Reply:

A. The statement was made on the understanding that no one is above the law and traffic law enforcement officers should apply existing laws equally to all the people in the country. No additional plans are required to apply already existing law without fear, favour or prejudice.

B. (i) This will be measured by the number of people caught breaking road traffic regulations.

    (ii) The law prescribes sufficient detailson punitive measures to be imposed on the road traffic offenders. These measures must be imposed to all offenders without any exception.

06 March 2017 - NW328

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Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What were the main objectives of the Third National Road Safety Summit held in November 2016, (b)(i) which objectives were met, (ii) how were the objectives measured, (iii) what objectives have not yet been met from the previous summits and (iv) what is being done to meet each objective that has not been met and (c) what was the total cost of the summit;

Reply:

  1. (a) The Objectives of the 3rd Annual Road Safety Summit held in November 2016:

The overall objective is to follow-up on the implementation progress of the previous Summit Resolutions. The Road Safety Summit is an annual Summit which the Department uses as a monitoring tool to assess progress and what interventions are required in the implementation of the previous Resolutions.

The following are the objectives that speak to the different components of the Summit:

  • Review results of the 365 day road safety programme detailing successes and failures including devising strategies how best these programmes can be achieved collectively
  • Refocus on how best set targets in the road safety strategy can be met through a collaborative effort among all stakeholders
  • Strengthening of law enforcement authorities among these being the increase of law enforcement officers
  • Focus on the review of existing legislation particularly the National Road Traffic Act and AARTO Amendment Bill
  • road structural challenges and educational campaigns aimed at raising awareness about road safety hazards among motorists, passengers and pedestrians
  • AARTO national rollout and points demerit system
  • Tackling corruption and bribery mainly in the licensing testing stations and driving schools
  • Improve road user behavior and attitude by involving communities
  • Improve driving skills and abilities of drivers
  • map out and devise funding strategies for road safety programmes between government, business, Ngos and communities
  • work out implementation mechanism of Summit resolutions at national, provincial, district, metro and municipal levels of government to ensure effective implementation of the National Road Safety Strategy 2014/19 to derive tangible and measurable results
  • Improve coordination of road safety managment

(b) (i) which objectives were met

The following objectives were met while others remain work-in-progress

  • Tackling corruption and bribery mainly in the licensing testing stations and driving schools
  • Review results of the 365 day road safety programme detailing successes and failures including devising strategies how best these programmes can be achieved collectively
  • Strengthening of law enforcement authorities among these being the increase of law enforcement officers
  • Improve road user behavior and attitude by involving communities
  • Improve driving skills and abilities of drivers
  • Improve coordination of road safety management

(ii) The objectives are measured based on the following Key Performance Indicators:

  • Development of national anti-fraud policy for implementation by all entities in all regions by 2018
  • Number of anti-corruption training interventions rolled out to government officials and members of the public
  • Number of officials trained on anti-corruption
  • Number of members of the public trained on anti-corruption
  • Number of incidents of fraud and corruption reported, charges investigated, prosecuted successfully

Number of new systems and processes introduced to address fraud and corruption.

  • Number of educational/road safety awareness campaigns initiated
  • Incorporation of specific road safety content in basic education curriculum by 2017

Improved road safety knowledge of South Africans year-on-year (measured through surveys)

  • Number of traffic violations occurred
  • Development of intelligence-led enforcement campaigns for national implementation
  • Increased visibility of traffic police, 24/7 (measured by surveys)
  • Successful implementation of AARTO - Implement systems to identify repeat offenders by 2018
  • Number of Vulnerable Road User (VRU) crash statistics: cyclists; motor passengers, , pedestrians etc.
  • Number of educational programmes, activities to promote community discussion and involvement in road safety at school and community levels
  • Number of learners and community members engaged in road safety programmes
  • Number of incentives developed for good driving/road user behaviour
  • Development of bi-annual conference for youth on road safety

Number of youth role models included in Road Safety Ambassador programme

  • Regulate driving schools by 2019
  • Introduction of driver re-testing by 2022

Number of drivers re-tested periodically

  • Establishment of inter-departmental National Roads Safety Council (NRSC) with fixed scheduled meetings by 2017
  • Adherence to defined meeting schedule

(iii) what objectives have not yet been met from the previous summits

  • AARTO national rollout and points demerit system
  • map out and devise funding strategies for road safety programmes between government, business, Ngos and communities
  • Refocus on how best set targets in the road safety strategy can be met through a collaborative effort among all stakeholders
  • map out and devise funding strategies for road safety programmes between government, business, Ngos and communities
  • work out implementation mechanism of Summit resolutions at national, provincial, district, metro and municipal levels of government to ensure effective implementation of the National Road Safety Strategy 2014/19 to derive tangible and measurable results

(iv) what is being done to meet each objective that has not been met

The respective Roads entities of the Department have incorporated the above in their annual performance plans to ensure that measures are in place to implement these objectives as well as concrete synchronisation of plans with Metro and Municipal to ensure effective implementation of the Road Safety strategy to derive tangible and measurable results.

A special Funding and Implementation committee has been established whose sole role is to establish a funding model strategy which will speak to the implementation of the overall National Road Safety Strategy.

(v) what was the total cost of the summit

R431 297.00

2.  (a) (i) Invitations were sent to more than 350 people and also used the Word of Mouth at the targeted audience

(ii) About 550 people attended the Summit

(b)(i) The Minister of Transport, senior officials from the Department of Transport, MEC of Transport in KZN province, MEC of Social Development in the KZN Province, CEOs of state owned entities of Transport, officials from the entities of state owned entities

(ii) The Provincial Governments of Transport, Basic Education, Social Development, Health and Community Safety, the National Government Department of Transport, private sector companies, NGO representatives, Youth sector representatives, Faith based representatives, Driving Schools representatives, Taxi and Bus industry representatives, Provincial Legislature members, South African Roads federation representatives, Zoleka Mandela Foundation, Global Road Safety Projects representative, Women in Transport representative, Community based organisations and Media houses

06 March 2017 - NW320

320Mr M S F de Freitas to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2245 on 22 November 2016, what were the costs for personal security provided for the (a) Acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and (b) CEO of the Road Traffic Management Corporation in each specified financial year;

Reply:

1.    (a) Security to the then Acting Chief Executive Officer was provided by a private company at a cost R158 118 per month

       (b) Security to the current CEO of the RTMC is provided by members of the National Traffic Police, who are already employees of the Corporation. The Corporation incurs only their salary and related costs.

 

2.     (a) The details of risk assessment are available and can be accessed from the relevant law enforcement agency that conducted the assessment.

        (b) The assessment was conducted by the South African Police Crime Intelligence.

06 March 2017 - NW319

319Mr M S F de Freitas to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) When (i) will or (ii) were e-toll contracts (be) renewed, (b) what are the conditions in this regard, (c) how do the current conditions differ from the previous conditions, (d) what monitoring mechanisms exist in this regard and (e) what is the cost of new e-toll contracts?

Reply:

A.  (i)(ii) The current contract for e-toll operations is still valid. As a result, no renewal has taken place. The applicable time periods for the operational contract, as was awarded historically are as follow:

  • ORT Operations : 96 Calendar Months
  • TCH Operations : 60 Calendar Months
  • VPC Operations : 60 Calendar Months

These time periods apply from 3 December 2013, when toll collection for the Gauteng freeways commenced.

B.  Not applicable

C.  Not applicable

D.  SANRAL uses the FIDIC Gold Contract as a basis for monitoring the performance of the contractor.

E.  Not Applicable

06 March 2017 - NW324

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) Whether there are any plans in place to process the non-paid e-toll bills using the same processes and procedures used to deal with the infringement of traffic regulations and fines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

1.      Yes.

Non-payment of toll is a violation in terms of the SANRAL Act No 7 of 1998 and not in terms of the AARTO Act or NRTA. The actual unpaid toll amount is also recoverable in terms of the SANRAL Act.

Disobeying the regulatory toll sign is however an infringement in terms of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 and prosecution will be in terms of the provisions of the NRTA.

There are two processes in place for the prosecution of traffic offences, the Criminal Procedure system in SA, excluding Tshwane and Johannesburg where the AARTO system is in place.

If a prosecution is instituted in terms of the SANRAL Act, the Criminal Procedure System will also be used as AARTO does not currently accommodate offences other than traffic related offences.

If the prosecution is instituted in terms of the offence of disobeying a toll sign, the AARTO system must be used, as it is the system regulating traffic offences in Johannesburg and Tshwane. Due to all toll payments being processed in the district of Tshwane, the AARTO system will apply.

2.     Please provide more details about the “specified plans”. I am not aware of any specification. A legal opinion is not required as the provisions of the AARTO Act are clear. If a person fails to comply with the infringement notice and courtesy letters issued to him or her and an enforcement order is issued for the infringement, the NaTIS system will block the issuing of NaTIS documents until such enforcement order is paid or otherwise resolved.

3.     See (2) above.

06 March 2017 - NW331

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the reasons for the Road Traffic Infringement Agency not having their latest Annual Report available via their website, (b) by what date will the specified report be posted on their website and (c) what processes and procedures exist to ensure that such public documents are posted on their website upon publication

Reply:

1.  The RTIA Annual Report is very high resolution document that cannot be reduced to be a small size by even splitting it. A small portion of it is actual conversion to PDF while majority is in high resolution graphics. Website couldn’t accept it. We are making means to upload the aforementioned document to our website.

2.  Latest date is Friday, 03 March 2017 to be posted onto our website.

3.  The RTIA Policy on Performance Information management provides that the audited annual report should be approved by the Board (Audit and Risk Committee) be submitted to the Department of Transport, National Treasury and the Auditor-General. After such approvals it is presented to the Minister of Transport at the Annual General Meeting where after it is tabled at Parliament. Once, the Annual Report has been tabled at Parliament, the Agency then can publish it onto the website.

06 March 2017 - NW333

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What goods have been reported as (i) damaged (ii) stolen and (iii) missing items from luggage, in the past three financial years at each airport, (b) what was the total value of the specified goods and (c) whether (i) investigations, (ii) arrests and (iii) prosecutions have taken place in each case and (d) how many officials have been (i) charged, (ii) arrested and (iii) discharged at each airport?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

 (a) (i)(ii)(iii) The issues of missing luggage are handled by individual airlines and the Department of Transport will therefore not have the information requested.

 (b) (c) (i)(ii)(iii) Falls away

(d) (i)(ii)(iii) Falls away

06 March 2017 - NW322

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What pedestrian road safety education and information campaigns are in place, (b) where have these campaigns taken place in each month in the past three financial years, (c) how are the successes and failures of these campaigns assessed, (d) what amount has been spent on these campaigns in the past three financial years and (e) who conducts these campaigns?

Reply:

a)  The Pedestrian road safety programmes focus mainly on those factors that lead to pedestrians being involved in road crashes and those are in the main:

  • Impaired walking, this focuses on drinking and walking. People who drink and walk are at a greater risk of being involved in a crash as their ability to act swiftly to avoid a crash is impaired. As such a need is there to educate people about the dangers inherent in drinking and walking.
  • Dangerous walking – specifically jay walking. There is a disturbing trend of people who walk freely on national and provincial roads that have high volumes of traffic and multi lanes. This is notwithstanding those who jay walk in built up areas. Our statistics show that quite a substantial number of pedestrians are victims of jaywalking.
  • Distracted walking, this relates walking while using a cell phone or listening to music on one’s headphones. It mostly applies to the youth. This results in the person not having a full appreciation of the happening around him or her. Thus rendering them vulnerable to a potential crash. The pedestrians are then educated and made aware of this danger.

b)  where have these campaigns taken place in each month in the past three financial years,

Year

2014

2015

2016

 

Month

 

Location

 

Province

 

Hoffman Square, Bloemfontein

Tumahole, Parys

 

Free State

January

Vosloorus; Pretoria

 

 

Gauteng

Year

2014

2015

2016

Month

Location

Province

 

Colesburg; Noupoort

Colesburg&Noupoort

 

Northern Cape

 

Tlhabane

 

 

North West

February

Paledi Spar, Polokwane

 

 

Limpopo

 

 

Klerksdorp

 

North West

 

 

De Aar; Haartswater

 

Northern Cape

 

 

Bree Street, Johannesburg

 

Gauteng

March

 

Paarl

 

Western Cape

 

 

Parys; Kroonstad

 

Free State

 

 

Midrand

 

Gauteng

 

 

Pietermaritzburg

 

KwaZulu-Natal

 

Cradock

 

 

Eastern Cape

 

 

Bloemfontein; March

 

Free State

 

 

Ratanda

 

Gauteng

 

 

 

Galeshewe

Northern Cape

 

 

 

Phagameng, Modimolle

Limpopo

 

 

Rustenburg

 

North West

April

Athlone

 

 

Western Cape

 

 

 

Pietrmaritzburg

KwaZulu-Natal

 

 

 

Alzu

Mpumalanga

 

Cradock

 

 

Eastern Cape

 

Modimolle

 

Phalaborwa; Giyani

Limpopo

 

Valhalla, Pretoria

 

 

Gauteng

 

Ficksburg

Sasolburg

 

Free State

 

 

 

Galeshewe

Northern Cape

May

Chatsworth; Edendale

 

 

KwaZulu-Natal

 

Randfontein

 

Chiawelo, Soweto

Gauteng

 

Du Noon

 

 

Western Cape

 

 

 

Galeshewe

Northern Cape

Year

2014

2015

2016

Month

Location

Province

     

Thohoyandou

Limpopo

June

Gugulethu

 

Khayelitsha; Goodwood

Western Cape

 

Mthatha; Cofimvaba

 

East London

Eastern Cape

 

Dobsonville, Soweto

Thokoza Park, Soweto

Hammanskraal; Dlamini and Chiawelo

Gauteng

 

 

 

Mperebere; Mogwase

North West

 

 

 

Modimolle

Limpopo

 

 

 

Bloemfontein

Free State

 

 

 

John Daka, Kimberley

Northern Cape

 

 

 

Market Square, Pietermaritzburg

KwaZulu-Natal

 

 

 

eMalahleni

Mpumalanga

July

Delft

 

Rondebosch

Western Cape

 

 

 

Alice

Eastern Cape

 

Montrose

Bloemfontein

Bloemfontein

Free State

 

 

 

Belabela

Limpopo

 

 

 

Caledon

Western Cape

 

 

Middleburg

Alzu

Mpumalanga

 

Kenilworth

 

 

KwaZulu-Natal

August

Middleburg

 

eMalahleni

Mpumalanga

 

 

Klerksdorp; Rustenburg

Ikageng, Potchefstroom

North West

 

Richardsbay

 

Portshepstone

KwaZulu-Natal

 

Kranskop

 

Mashaba

Limpopo

 

Midrand

 

 

Gauteng

 

 

Kiwane

 

Eastern Cape

 

 

Kimberley

De Aar

Northern Cape

September

 

University of Free State

Kroonstad

Free State

 

Modimolle; Polokwane

Sibasa

Polokwane

Limpopo

 

Volksrust

 

Nghodwana

Mpumalanga

 

 

Gugulethu

Overberg

Western Cape

October

Benoni

 

 

Gauteng

 

Sasolburg

Kroonstad

 

Free State

 

 

 

Polokwane

Limpopo

         

Year

2014

2015

2016

Month

Location

Province

November

 

Hazyview; Bushbuckridge

Kuruman

Nortern Cape

 

 

 

Caledon

Western Cape

 

 

 

Lichtenburg; Potchefstroom

North West

 

Hazyview; Bushbuckridge

Middleburg

 

Mpumalanga

 

Heidelburg

Heidleburg

 

Gauteng

 

Ethekwini

Ethekwini

 

KwaZulu-Natal

December

 

 

GraafReinet

Eastern Cape

 

 

 

Alzu

Mpumalanga

 

 

Modimolle

Belabela; Kranskop

Limpopo

 

 

 

Equestria; Pretoria

Gauteng

 

 

 

Portshepstone

KwaZulu-Natal

 

 

Bloemfontein; Kroonstad

 

 

c)  The department through the RTMC monitors the implementation and evaluates the impact of the programmes. The findings are then used to enhance the implementation so as to ensure effective and efficient utilisation of resource. The RTMC also reports on the crash data and this also depicts the situation as it pertains to the performance of road safety programmes. Thus assessing the effectiveness of the campaigns.

d)  The spending on these campaigns in the past three financial years

2014: R9 million

2015: R5 million

2016: R21 million

(e)  The department, provinces, municipalities and the road entities in line with their legislative mandate. There are instances where the department and its entities have entered into partnerships with the private sector for this purpose. This is premised on the notion that road safety is everybody’s responsibility.

06 March 2017 - NW327

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) What are the details of the festive season road-safety campaign, including dates and activities and (ii) on what basis was the campaign designed, (b)(i) how was the success of this campaign measured and (ii) what factors emerged that showed statistics to be worse this festive season than the previous one and (c) what plans are in place to rectify this?

Reply:

(a) (i) What are the details of the festive season road-safety campaign, including dates and activities

The focus was mainly on drivers, passengers and pedestrians, although cyclists contribute a minimal percentage to the road fatalities, they were also targeted.

Road User Group

Venue

Province

Drivers, Passengers, Pedestrians

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Drivers, Passengers

Stray animals

Stray animals

Stray animals

Stray animals

Stray animals

Interfaith

Launch - Eldoradopark

Alzu

 

Petroport

NI Shell Ultra City

Graaf Reinet

Launch EC Festive

Ngodwana, N4

Newcastle Taxi Rank

N12 and Potchefstroom Taxi Rank

Kuruman Taxi Rank

Motswako Galeshewe

Engen Kranskop and tollgate

Bela Bela Taxi rank

Engen Bloemfontein and Tollgate

Kwaggafontein Complex

Port Edward

Margate Taxi Rank

Ikageng Gate, Potchefstroom

Potchefstroom Taxi Rank

Lichtenburg Taxi Rank

Nkomazi

Elokwatini

Seoding Village, Kuruman

Nkangala

Kagung, Kuruman

Maruping Village, Mothibistad,

Kuruman

Gauteng

Mpumalanga

 

 Gauteng

Eastern Cape

Mpumalanga

KZN

North West

Northern Cape

Limpopo

Free State

Mpumalanga

KZN

North West

Mpumalanga

Mpumalanga

Northern Cape

Mpumalanga

Northern Cape

Northern Cape

(ii) on what basis was the campaign designed

This is informed by our crash data that the majority of people who die on our roads are vulnerable road users. Thus the campaign sort to reach out passengers and pedestrians. It is common cause that during the festive season people travel long distances on the road, hence the campaign was also developed and targeted drivers as well.

(b) (i) how was the success of this campaign measured

This was through determining the number of people that were reached through our campaigns using various mediums. As well as through the feedback we received while engaging road users.

(ii) what factors emerged that showed statistics to be worse this festive season than the previous one

Factors that emerged to make this year’s statistics worse than the previous one include the rainy conditions that conditions that prevailed over this period. The festive season was also characterised by three successive long weekends. This encourage the consumption of alcohol and lond distance traveling.

(c) what plans are in place to rectify this?

Road Safety Education planned a more intense 365 Day Road Safety Plan. The Department, provinces and all the Roads Entities are gearing up to implementing the National Road Safety Strategy once approved by Cabinet. In the meantime efforts are being put in place to enhance the work that is being done through law enforcement, education and awareness campaigns as well as media campaigns. These programmes focus on the following:

  • Driver programme which includes dangerous driving, impaired driving, distracted driving and roadworthiness of vehicles
  • Passenger programme which includes seatbelt usage, child restraints, distracted behaviour
  • Pedestrian programme which includes impaired walking, distracted walking, dangerous walking and visibility
  • Cyclist programme which include impaired cycling, distracted cycling and dangerous cycling and visibility
  • Youth driver programme which was directed specifically to the youth driver Youth at Institutions of Higher Learning which was directed to youth at Universities and colleges
  • Stray animal programme which was directed to cattle owners and how to look after the cattle, visibility
  • Interfaith programme which was directed to churches

06 March 2017 - NW329

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What were the main objectives of the First National Traffic Indaba held in December 2016, (b)(i) which objectives were met and (ii) how were the objectives measured, (c) what was the total cost of the indaba and (d) how many people (i) were invited and (ii) attended the indaba;

Reply:

  1. (a) The main objectives of the First National Traffic Indaba were to bring together traffic law enforcement officers from all entities in the country to discuss:
  • Improved and integrated law enforcement
  • Best practices in the law enforcement fraternity
  • Economic impact of road carnages
  • Norms and standards of law enforcement
  • New technologies to improve efficiency in law enforcement
  • Improved working conditions for traffic law enforcement officers
  • Quality of licensed drivers

(b)  (i) All the objectives were met

(ii) The objectives were measured through the quality of papers presented, the quality of engagements in at the breakaway sessions and the commitment to declaration adopted at the end of the Indaba.

(c) R7,4 m

(d) (i) 1200 people were invited

(ii) 1300 attended

2.   (a) The difference between the indaba and road safety summit is that the indaba aimed at getting traffic law enforcers to discuss and share experiences among themselves on matters that impede them in the execution of their duties and how these can be improved.

On the other hand the Road Safety Summit brings together government agencies and civil society representatives to discuss on the cross-cutting issues of road safety and community-based initiatives that can be implemented to reduce road crashes.

(b) The two could not be combined because the indaba was focussed exclusively on professional issues facing traffic law enforcers in the country whereas the summit focusses on the issues confronted by the general public.

06 March 2017 - NW325

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Which train stations have been closed in each province since January 1994, (b) what are the reasons for the closure of the specified train stations, (c) what alternative arrangements have been put in place for passengers who were using the train stations, (d) what costs were involved in (i) running the stations and (ii) maintaining the closed stations and (e) (i) what are the future plans for the specified train stations and (ii) what costs are involved?

Reply:

Please see table below: which answers questions a,b,c,d (i) (ii) e (i)

(e) (ii) The future cost of running the specified stations have not been calculated as yet.

ANNEXURE A

  1. Gauteng Metrorail

A total of eleven (11) stations / halts are closed. The following is the detailed information:

 

(a)STATION

TYPE

(b)REASON

(c)ALTERNATIVE STATION

(d)(i)(ii)COST OF RUNNING

(e)(i)FUTURE PLAN

1

Union (1989)

Station

Never opened

-

R0

None

2

Avenue (1990)

Station

Very low revenue, isolated station, robberies, commuter safety

Dunswart (1 km) and Northmead (2km)

R0

None. Current alternative stations within acceptable radius.

3

Golf (2008)

Halt

Closed due to safety

Schutte (1 km) and Technikon (1 km)

R7 000 p.m

None. Current alternative stations within acceptable radius.

4

Fountain (2008)

Halt

Only two trains stopping for workers

Kloofsig (1 km)

R7 000 p.m

None. Current alternative stations within acceptable radius.

5

Newclaire (2014)

Station

Burned by residents due to community unrest

Bosmont (1km) and Westbury (1 km)

R 80 000 p.m

To be rebuilt in 2017/18 financial year

6

Village Main (2016)

Station

No revenue generated

Booysens (1km) and Farraday (1 km)

R 15 000 p.m

None. Current alternative stations within acceptable radius.

7

Grosvenor (2016)

Halt

Closed due to safety

Langlaagte (1 km) and Mayfair (1 km)

R 7000 p.m

None. Current alternative stations within acceptable radius.

8

Mears (2016)

Halt

Closed due to stray current project

Train re-routed via Capital Park

R 7 000 p.m

Station will be reopened after stray current project in June 2017

9

Devinish (2016)

Halt

Closed due to stray current project

Train re-routed via Capital Park

R 7 000 p.m

Station will be reopened after stray current project in June 2017

10

Walker (2016)

Halt

Closed due to stray current project

Train re-routed via Capital Park

R 7 000 p. m

Station will be reopened after stray current project in June 2017

11

Loftus (2016)

Station

Closed due to stray current project

Train re-routed via Capital Park

R70 000 p m

Station will be reopened after stray current project in June 2017

2.   Western Cape Metrorail

One (1) station in the Western Cape is closed.

 

STATION

TYPE

REASON

ALTERNATIVE STATION

COST OF RUNNING

FUTURE PLAN

1

Gouda (2016)

Transnet station

Station

Station closed as a result of the Prohibition Notice issued by the Railway Safety Regulator. The Prohibition Notice relates to the platform height, shelter, lighting and ablution facilities.

Wellington Station

Gouda commuters transported by busses to Wellington Station.

R0

Cost of hiring busses R417 414.84 p.m

PRASA will upgrade the current infrastructure according to specific capital projects and implement corrective actions submitted to Railway Safety Regulator.

3.   Kwa-Zulu Natal Metrorail

All stations are operational.

4.    Eastern Cape Metrorail

All stations are operational.

06 March 2017 - NW326

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the reasons that the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) reduced the passenger services charges for the 2017 calendar year, (b) what criteria were used to determine the reduction of charges, (c) what impact will the reduction of charges have on ACSA and (d) what measures are put in place to mitigate the impact of the reduction of charges?

Reply:

1.    The largest contributors to the reduction in the ACSA tariff in 2016/17 are the following:

(i)   Durban International Airport (DIA) proceeds; and

(ii)  The Claw back

This causes a temporary reduction in the tariff while the amounts are being returned to the users. Once these amounts have been returned to the users, there will be an increase in the tariff in 2020/21. The Regulating Committee has noted that this should be considered during the next Permission application.

2.     The Regulating Committee to ACSA and ATNS applies a regulatory approach for the determination of revenues for ACSA which results in airport charges. The regulatory approach allows for a return on capital invested. This can be effected by claw backs i.e. historical capital expenditure claw back.The Regulating Committee has concluded that only 50% of the proceeds relating to the DIA should be returned to the users. The tariff reduction was calculated using ACSA’s model, where ACSA had inserted a tariff reduction in 2015/16 and 2016/17 as a result of the capex under spend.

3.    It will result in a reduction in tariffs in years 2017/18 and a subsequent increase in the tariff in 2020/21 will in excess of CPI once the claw-back and DIA proceeds have been returned to the users. The reduction is a temporary measure over 2017/18, 2018/19 and 2019/20. Thereafter there will be an increase returning the tariffs more in line with ACSA’s long-term historical capital expenditure claw back.

4.     The reduction in charges is temporary in nature. ACSA’s model shows certain key financial ratios that were considered by the Regulating Committee to determine affordability. Furthermore, the Department of Transport has developed a roadmap for the review of the economic regulatory framework for ACSA and ATNS to address issues of predictability, transparency and long term sustainability of ACSA and the aviation industry at large. This involves amendments to the Airports Company Act and agreement amongst industry stakeholders of an appropriate funding model.