Questions and Replies

Filter by year

27 May 2022 - NW1698

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What are the (a) reasons that mining communities such as (i) Sasolburg, (ii) Secunda, (iii) Witbank and (iv) Rustenburg are still largely underdeveloped after so many years of mining activities on their shores and (b) consequences for the mining houses that have failed to fulfil their responsibilities toward the specified communities?

Reply:

a) Although Social economic development is the constitutional mandate of the Local Government, mining companies have to also contribute to the socio-economic development of the area they are operating through Social and Labour Plans. Mining companies around those areas have committed to contribute to the socio-economic development of the area in line with the IDPs of the municipalities.

b) The Department has a responsibility to monitor compliance. If non-compliance is detected, the Department issues a directive to remedy the non-compliance. If the non-compliance is not addressed, it may lead to a right being suspended or cancelled.

27 May 2022 - NW1687

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

In light of the recent results of the Fraser Institute's Annual Survey of Mining Companies 2021, wherein the Republic was ranked as the world’s 10th least attractive mining destination, what (a) has he found to have been the reasons to influence this and (b) steps will be taken by his department to guarantee that the mining industry in the Republic remains lucrative and appealing to investors?

Reply:

The Department gazetted the Exploration Strategy recently and key areas of influence were identified. Government and social partners will address these to improve the country’s investment attractiveness within the next five years.

There are logistical (rail and freight), regulatory (water and environmental licensing) and security challenges which fall outside the mandate of the DMRE.

26 May 2022 - NW1673

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether, in light of the President’s announcement of the Red Tape Unit during the State of the Nation Address, she has found that the President still has confidence in her department since it was established in 2014; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether she has found that small, medium and micro enterprise owners in the Republic still have confidence in her department to reduce red tape; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Presidential Red Tape Reduction Team, under the leadership of Mr Sipho Nkosi, is an important red tape reduction initiative and a centralised coordination office, whose task is to rally both the efforts and resources to deal with issues of red tape in government. It is by no means a vote of no confidence on the DSBD by the President and the SMMEs.

The DSBD views this development as a meaningful contribution particularly by the private sector in providing expertise to contribute to coordinating, aligning and unblocking channels to address long standing red tape and administrative challenges, that have plagued businesses and more especially small businesses and Co-operatives, but also large ones with start-ups, micro and informal sector even more vulnerable as participants in the economy.

The Department have engaged on numerous steps to ensuring a productive, goal orientated and positive working relationship with the Red Tape Office in the Presidency. The engagement with the Presidency through the Red Tape Office have decided to identify clear areas of collaboration. The details of all these proposals are being finalised and shall form part of the strategic engagement and focussed coordination channels between the DSBD and Mr Nkosi’s Office.

2. The Department understands that communication is a dynamic process of engagement on the needs of our SMMEs and through the Provincial Roadshows and Provincial Partnerships, the Department has proactively engaged SMMEs and Co-operatives in seven (8) provinces already. These engagements would often take place in rural and far-flung locations with the purpose of meeting, listening to and attending to SMMEs’ and Co-operatives’ needs. The range of inputs received from SMMEs have been constructive, which is evident that SMMEs still have the confidence in the DSBD to reduce red tape. There has been overwhelming attendance and participation in these roadshows.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

26 May 2022 - NW1453

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In light of the fact that once a child turns 18, they no longer qualify for a child support grant and foster care grant, unless still enrolled in schooling, what is the total number of youth who previously received a child support grant and foster care grant in the period 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2022, who have been awarded a National Student Financial Aid Scheme bursary in each tertiary institution?

Reply:

The tables below provide an overview of the number of new applications, where the applicant was a SASSA beneficiary in the period 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2022, that were funded by NSFAS, per academic year and institution. The information has been provided per education sector (University or TVET College).

Universities:

TVET Colleges:

26 May 2022 - NW1482

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether Higher Health has released the regulations on COVID-19 protocol in the Post School Education and Training sector, considering the forced mandatory vaccination policy of some institutions; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

HIGHER HEALTH, with support from its Technical Scientific Team, the Department of Health and the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD), has developed a comprehensive and clear set of PSET guidelines and protocols on managing COVID-19 in the sector which were formally released by the Minister of Higher Education, Training, Science and Innovation since 30 April 2020.  One of these guidelines is the GUIDELINE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES ON COVID-19 VACCINE IN THE POST-SCHOOL EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR that can be followed in producing institution-specific vaccine policies.  This guideline has been produced after extensive consultation with relevant stakeholders in the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) sector, including Universities South Africa, the South African Public Colleges Organisation, Community Education and Training (CET) College management, student bodies and student leadership, labour unions, public health experts and the HIGHER HEALTH Scientific Technical Task Team.

The guideline has been presented to the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation.  The Minister referred the guideline to the COVID-19 Ministerial Task Team led by the Deputy Minister and comprise all stakeholders including unions and student formations.  The guideline is currently still under consultation with various stakeholders and has not been released in the PSET sector.  

At this stage the Department does not promote mandatory vaccine policies in institutions.

26 May 2022 - NW1481

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which courses offered by the Walter Sisulu University (WSU) are not accredited, (b) what are the outcomes of deliberations between the WSU and the Council on Higher Education on the issue of accreditation and (c) which other institutions of higher learning have challenges with accreditation of courses they offer?

Reply:

(a)    There are five programmes being offered at the institution, which are continuations of legacy qualifications which were formally accredited as aligned to the Higher Education Qualifications Framework (HEQF). These are:

  • Advanced Diploma in Internal Auditing; 
  • Advanced Diploma in Journalism; 
  • BSc Honours in Zoology; 
  • Master of Medicine in Obstetrics and Gynaecology; and
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Chemical Pathology. 

It should be noted that in 2013, a revised Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework (HEQSF) was gazetted as policy, replacing the HEQF, and all higher education institutions had to align their legacy qualifications to the HEQSF. New student registrations could only be taken into the legacy qualifications until 31 December 2019, after which the programmes had to be taught out or a new programme put in place that enabled continued offering in the area. 

The five qualifications listed above fall within this category and should be in teach-out until new replacement programmes are accredited and registered. In the case of the Walter Sisulu University (WSU), there were new student registrations after 31 December 2019.

There is a sixth qualification, i.e. the Postgraduate Diploma in Library and Information Services, which also has legacy roots and has not been offered since 2019.

(b)    The Higher Education Quality Committee (HEQC) of the Council on Higher Education (CHE) approved that the following processes should be undertaken:

  • Appoint an evaluator to review the HEQSF alignment processes for the five programmes. Once the report of the evaluator has been compiled, the HEQC will consider the report and recommendations. This process is underway.
  • A full audit of all the programmes WSU is offering will be undertaken to confirm that all programmes being offered meet the compliance requirements of the three regulatory bodies, i.e. Department, CHE and South African Qualifications Authority. This process has also already commenced.

(c)     There are no further cases that have come to the attention of the CHE or Department. A Data Validation Project is underway by the CHE which is intended to validate the HEQSF alignment data to ensure the accreditation record at the CHE is an accurate reflection of what the institutions can offer. If/when discrepancies are identified, the CHE will deal with them in a similar manner to the processes described above.

25 May 2022 - NW1792

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Finance

With regard to the address by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, to the nation on 18 April 2022 after the devastating floods in KwaZuluNatal, wherein the President commented that the Minister of Finance, Mr E Godongwana, had said that R1 billion is immediately available and Parliament will be approached for the appropriation of additional resources, (a) how has the R1 billion been spent and (b) what are the details of the additional resources that will be made available for relief and recovery?

Reply:

a) The R1 billion mentioned by the President refers to funds that are provided for in the 2022 Division of Revenue Bill (and are not new monies), namely disaster relief funds (for immediate response) through the Provincial Disaster Response Grant and the Municipal Disaster Response Grant. These grants are allocated R144 million and R371 million respectively in 2022/23. A further R501 million is available for this financial year in the form of provincial and municipal Emergency Housing Grants. These funds, amounting to just over R1 billion, are available shortly after Treasury receives an application from the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) and / or the national Department of Human Settlements (DHS), which are responsible for administering these grants. NDMC and DHS submit their applications to National Treasury once they have verified the submissions received from the province(s) and municipality(ies) concerned. To date, National Treasury has not received any applications from the NDMC or DHS.

b) In addition to immediate relief grants, state organs can reprioritise their budgets and existing conditional grants for emergency relief, reconstruction and recovery. For example, the Human Settlements Development Grant to provinces already allows for the construction of houses. Additional resources are also available through the contingency reserve, which will become available after the Appropriations Bill is passed. Another option is to use the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) fund, which mainly consists of donor disbursements through various financing agreements, plus interest accrued on capital of related development projects. Therefore, since the full cost of emergency relief, reconstruction, and recovery is yet to be determined, it is difficult to determine whether the sources discussed above are adequate.

25 May 2022 - NW1535

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends signing a proclamation to direct the Special Investigating Unit to launch an investigation into the alleged R480 million that was spent purchasing municipal cars, which were unused for four years, in the Rustenburg Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No motivation for a proclamation has been submitted to the Presidency by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU). The SIU has indicated that it has not received any allegations on this matter, and will follow-up with the Municipality for details and to assess if the allegations fall within its mandate.

25 May 2022 - NW1501

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the apartheid era migrant labour hostels, what (a) total number of privately-owned hostels (i) have been abandoned and/or (ii) are no longer managed and/or maintained by their private owners and (b) does her department intend to do with the privately-owned hostels?

Reply:

(a) Government has no legal authority/jurisdiction over privately owned hostels and as such information/statistics required is not held by any sphere of government, instead, the government’s authority is limited only in respect of public hostels which are owned by provincial human settlements departments or municipalities.

(b) The Department is currently consulting stakeholders to solicit inputs for the regulations that must inform norms and standards that will apply to privately and publicly-owned rental accommodation.

25 May 2022 - NW1580

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

a) South Africa has a bilateral science and innovation partnership agreement with the Russian Federation in science and technology signed in October 2014. The partnership is of mutual benefit to both countries which advances internationalisation of science and innovation.

b) Regarding the question on commercial projects with the Russian Federation –the Department of Science and Innovation has no known commercial contracts with the Russian Federation and to the best of the Department’s knowledge, its entities also do not have commercial contracts with the Russian Federation.

(i) None.

(ii) None.

(aa) n/a

(bb) n/a

(cc) n/a

(dd) n/a

(ee) n/a

c) Should there be commercial contracts of mutual interest the general government procurement and contract management processes will be followed also informed by our national interest and foreign policy imperatives.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

The Department of Higher Education and Training does not have any commercial contracts with the Government of the Russian Federation or any entity based in the Russian Federation. The Department mainly cooperates with the Russian Federation in human capital development in the form of scholarships. Tuition and accommodation is paid by the Government of the Russian Federation. The Department covers return flight tickets and top-up stipends provided by the Russian Federation. The monies are disbursed to students by the South African Embassy in Moscow.

A consolidated response for both the Department and the Public Entities accordingly reporting to it is also attached for convenience.

25 May 2022 - NW1778

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) was the purpose of the trip that he and the Director-General of his department took to the United States of America on 22 April 2021, (b) total amount did the trip cost his department and (c) are the outcomes of engagements emanating from the trip?

Reply:

(a)-(c) Neither myself, nor the Directors-General, Drs Phil Mjwara or Nkosinathi Sishi were on an official trip to the United States of America on the said date.

25 May 2022 - NW1356

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the Vrede area and the eMawageni informal settlement in the Phumelela Local Municipality which are prone to flooding, lacks basic utilities and have been disregarded by the authorities for decades, what steps has her department taken to ensure that the families are placed in well-equipped human settlements with schools, clinics and reliable transportation?

Reply:

A feasibility study completed by Phumelela Local Municipality in Mavageng informal settlement in Vrede indicated that the area is prone to a hundred year flood-line and therefore inhabitable. The municipality advised the residents of Mavageng informal settlement that they would be relocated to Thembalihle Ext 14. There was resistance from the residents and therefore could not be relocated. Thembalihle Ext 14 has since been fully allocated to other beneficiaries.

The municipality has since resolved to make provision for these residents to be allocated sites in an approved township named Thembalihle Ext 8 which consists of 1400 erven allocated as follows:

Zoning

Number of Erven

Residential

1310

Business

5

Church

7

Light Industrial

14

Crèche

5

School

3

Public Open Space

18

Street

13

Total

1400

The municipality is yet to consult the occupants with this alternative relocation site. It is important to also note that the alternative Ext. 8 currently does not have municipal engineering services however, in this financial year (i.e., 2022/23) the Free State Department of Human Settlements has been made provision for the reticulation of this area. A project has been registered in this regard with the registration number F21080058/1 and is included in the 2022/23 FS Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant’s Business Plan.

25 May 2022 - NW1507

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1789 on 21 October 2021, any progress has been made with the disciplinary hearing against the KwaZulu-Natal Regional Court President, Mr Eric Nzimande, in 2018; if not, why not; if so, what was the finding; 2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. I have been informed by the Magistrates Commission that its Executive Committee (EXCO) resolved to appoint two (2) private practitioners to lead the evidence on behalf of the Commission. This resolution was taken with consideration of the duration of the hearing/inquiry, and the fact that if magistrates were to lead the evidence, those magistrates would have to be replaced in their courts. The two private practitioners were duly appointed as Persons to Lead the Evidence (PLEs) on 23 September 2021.

I have further been informed that dates have been proposed for early in the 2nd half of 2022 to commence with the Inquiry.

2. No. The Magistrates Commission is an independent statutory body and any requests for statements should be referred to the Chairperson of the Magistrates Commission.

25 May 2022 - NW1784

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the fact that he authorised Morné Harmse’s release on parole in March 2022, after the specified person served the minimum period of incarceration for his 20-year sentence for a murder committed in 2008, despite the expert consensus being that the person still had serious psychological deviations and serious aggression issues, on what basis did he ignore and/or overrule the expert opinion?

Reply:

The placement on parole of offender Morné Harmse’s was not approved by the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services as the Minister is responsible for parole consideration of offenders that are sentenced to life imprisonment (lifers). Offenders serving determinate sentences are considered by the Case Management Committees and the Correctional Supervision and Parole Boards (CSPB) without the intervention of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services.

Offender Morné Harmse was first considered on 16 November 2019, by the CSPB for possible placement on parole after completion of his minimum detention period on 09 June 2019, and was found not suitable for placement. Subsequently five (05) further profiles were approved by the CSPB and he was referred for further interventions.

Offender Morné Harmse was reconsidered by the CSPB on 24 February 2022, and this time parole placement was approved effective from 03 March 2022, subject to compliance with parole conditions. The decision to place offender Morné Harmse on parole was taken after considering multi-disciplinary reports including the Social Work report. Offender Harmse still continues with rehabilitation efforts under the system of Community Corrections. The offender is complying with his placement conditions since he was placed out.

END

25 May 2022 - NW1450

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In light of the fact that every single week brings more written complaints about the Home Affairs Branch located in Main Road of Somerset West, wherein persons have to queue for hours multiple times to get access to services and have to return several times to no avail, and in view of the fact that one of the problems is that the computer system takes an inordinately long time to process every single transaction and is regularly offline, what (a) steps has he taken to improve the computer and software package system in order to deliver services and (b) are the time periods with this?

Reply:

(a&b) According to the SITA e-Health report the network reachability and availability was 100% for this office. See the attached bandwidth utilisation report. All the functional workstations within the Somerset West Office are equipped with computers with the required software to run the Modernisation system. This office is part of dataline upgrades for the Live Capture project for 2022/23 which is already in process with SITA SCM.

END

25 May 2022 - NW1986

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Coronavirus Command Council has been disbanded now that the State of Disaster has ended; if not, what is the (a) purpose of the continued existence of the specified Council and (b) legal basis is relied upon for its continued existence in the period after the State of Disaster; if so, on what date was the council officially disbanded?

Reply:

The National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) was established as a committee of Cabinet by the Cabinet in its meeting of 15 March 2020 to coordinate government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. The NCCC makes recommendations to Cabinet on measures necessary to manage the pandemic.

The NCCC continues to perform this function since, although the national state of disaster has been lifted, the COVID-19 pandemic is unfortunately not yet over.

As a Cabinet committee – which, like all other Cabinet Committees, was established to support the work of Cabinet in whichever form the Executive deems most practical or useful – the existence of the NCCC is not dependent on a national state of disaster being in operation.

25 May 2022 - NW1744

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

What measures did his department put in place to ensure that there is transparency in the entire recruitment and appointment process for heads of departments?

Reply:

The prescripts and accompanying norms and standards issued by the MPSA remain the mechanisms established to ensure that recruitment and selection is fair, transparent and are in line with Section 195 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996.

Section 12 of the Public Service Act, 1994 provides for the appointment of Head of Department which gives the President such power at National Government and the Premier such power within the relevant province.

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) issued the Executive Protocol: Principles and Procedures for the Employment of Heads of Department (HoDs) and Deputy Directors-General (DDGs) Nationally. This was to support the President and Ministers with regard to HoD posts (recruitment, selection, appointment and other career incidents) at National Government.

The Department of Public Service and Administration provides support to the MPSA regarding the processing of Cabinet Memoranda on appointments of Heads of Department to Cabinet. The process of quality checking aims to ensure that the relevant prescripts (Public Service Act, 1994, Public Service Regulations, 2016 and relevant Directives, Determinations, Guides as issued) were followed. In the event that prescripts were not followed, such Cabinet Memoranda are referred back to the relevant delegated Minister with regard to the filling of a Head of Department post and do not serve before Cabinet until issues of concern are resolved.

If the issue of noncompliance impacting the fairness and transparency of the process, are not addressed, the relevant Executive Authority would be advised to re-advise the post and ensure compliance with relevant prescripts and prescribed policies.

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration has also issued a capacitation guide to all Premiers regarding the recruitment of Heads of Department and the required processes to follow. The Premier of the relevant province is the relevant Executive Authority for purposes of such appointments.

End

25 May 2022 - NW1793

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his address to the nation on Monday, 18 April 2022, following the devastating floods of April 2022, wherein he announced a national state of disaster and the fact that the primary responsibility to co-ordinate and manage the disaster is assigned to the national sphere of government and committed to a three-phase response, namely, immediate humanitarian relief, stabilisation and recovery, and reconstruction and rebuilding, (a) what are the details of the implementation plan for the first two phases, (b) who has he assigned to lead each of the first two phases and (c) how will the public be updated on progress of the first two phases?

Reply:

Phase 1 on provision of immediate humanitarian relief focuses on addressing the immediate needs within affected communities. This includes search, rescue and recovery operations, burial assistance, death certificates, post-mortems, health services, psychosocial support, temporary shelter, food, personal essentials and emergency water supply.

Phase 2 on stabilisation and recovery interventions focuses on short term measures to repair and rebuild public infrastructure and facilities. This includes water, sanitation, stormwater and drainage infrastructure, electricity infrastructure, roads and bridges, rail networks, telecommunications infrastructure, health facilities, solid waste infrastructure, school infrastructure and human settlements. It also includes the provision of housing support and provision of social relief of distress grants.

For the details of the implementation plans, I refer the Honourable Member to the presentation by the Department of Cooperative Governance to the Ad Hoc Joint Committee on Flood Disaster Relief and Recovery on 23 May 2022.

The coordination of efforts by relevant stakeholders is the responsibility of the Minister of

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). Each organ of state is responsible for interventions across the phases as per their respective mandates.

The Communication and Community Mobilisation Task Team led by the Government Communications and Information System (GCIS) is responsible for communicating progress to the public. Updates are also being provided through existing platforms across the spheres of government.

25 May 2022 - NW1485

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What are the reasons that the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has refused to fund the studies of certain students (names furnished), who are first-year students at the University of Cape Town, despite the fact that their father, who is the sole breadwinner at home, is a retired public servant whose annual income is far less than the required threshold for NSFAS funding?

Reply:

During the financial eligibility evaluation of the students the entity found that the father earned more than the R350 000 threshold as per the SARS 2021 Tax Assessment. The students were not funded for this reason.

24 May 2022 - NW1504

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) Given the recent fires in Joe Slovo informal settlements in Langa, which is an annual occurrence over the past 10 years in the City of Cape Town, what total number of informal settlements are recorded in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality; (2) what steps has her department taken to upgrade informal settlements in the past 10 years; (3) whether her department allocated any monies for the upgrade of informal settlements in the City of Cape Town in the past 10 years; if not, why not; if so, what is the (a) reason that the settlements have not been upgraded and (b) plan of her department to deal with the crisis of informal settlements and backyard dwellers in Cape Town?

Reply:

1. The total number of Informal Settlements:

TYPES - AREAS OF INFORMALITY

SETTLEMENTS

STRUCTURES

Backyarder Settlement

31

1 419

Informal Settlement

497

201 151

IDA/TRA/ Re-blocked

33

12 361

Rental Stock Settlements

71

9 478

Small Farmers/ Rural Settlement

17

2 863

New settlements (i.e. Land invasions March 2020 to October 2021)

186

59 192

TOTAL

835

286 464

The data is collected form aerial photography or drone footage with individual structure counts, physical surveys in some instances and solid waste door to door survey information. Data is updated on an annual basis.

2. The analysis of each settlement resulted in the most likely development pathway for that specific settlement. The steps taken can be one of the following options:

Basic Access Improvement: Rolling out of basic access frameworks (i.e. improved roads & pedestrian movement) as part of the basic service package to informal settlements.

De-densification: Settlements which will be required to be de-densified prior to any in-situ (UISP or Superblock) development can be implemented. Basic services provided in interim.

Superblock: Provide formal access roads with formal services infrastructure but no individual serviced sites and only shared services – no or minimal relocation initially required. Settlement is suitable for a superblock approach which can comprise of residential blocks of approximately 90m x 30m with the provision of shared water (1:25 ratio) and sanitation (1:5 ratio), door-to-door waste collection and individual electrification. All roads, storm water and pedestrian access ways to be developed to an “A-Grade” standard.

UISP: Provide every household in informal settlement with own individual serviced site when upgrading to formality – no top structures provided and no or limited relocation required. Settlements which will be developed as a UISP type of project with individual erven with each erf having its own water and sanitation points (1:1 ratio), waste collection, formal roads, storm water management and electrification.

Re-blocked & Enhanced Re-blocking: Settlements which can potentially be Re-blocked where it meets the density and settlement size criteria. Those settlements where the city has established and confirmed the interest and willingness from the community to participate and support a re-blocking type of project.

Managed Settlement Programme: Greenfield site prepared for rapid occupation with shared services initially but with potential to upgrade to individual serviced sites over time & owner construction of top structure.

Total Relocation: Certain settlements will be required to be relocated in totality due to various factors such as location in areas prone to flooding, under power lines in road reserves and located on landfill sites. The locational risk factors of the settlement require relocation to a safer environment. Basic services is provided in interim.

3. Yes, the following budget allocations were received for the upgrading of informal settlements:

FINANCIAL YEAR

BUDGET

2021/22

R316 521 045

2020/21

R242 535 817

2019/20

R204 423 506

2018/19

R159 409 166

2017/18

R194 899 707

2016/17

R117 546 392

2015/16

R58 600 165

2014/15

R85 917 567

2013/14

R97 658 338

2012/13

R27 654 000

a) The funding received for the upgrading of informal settlements were utilised for settlements where planning approvals were obtained, de-densification could be achieved for in-situ upgrading as per the UISP approach. Not all settlements are suitable for upgrading and a vast number is inappropriately located e.g. in rail reserve, over bulk infrastructure line, under ESKOM power lines or in flood prone locations. These types of settlements will need to be relocated in totality. The other factor is to find well located land suitable for residential development which is not necessarily located on the outskirts of the city far away from any job opportunity of social facility.

b) The growth in informality is part of the urbanisation process taking place across all urban centres in the country. The growth in the demand for housing in the City of Cape Town outstrip the production of housing opportunities by the city, province and the private sector. Lastly the negative economic conditions, such as the increase in job losses under Covid 19 the country has been experiencing has led to more people not being in a position to pay rent for formal or informal locations and thus resulting in growth of informal settlements.

23 May 2022 - NW1408

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the reasons for the delays by his department in fixing the ageing infrastructure of wastewater treatment plants in the Emfuleni Local Municipality where residents are currently living with human excrement at their doorsteps?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation has appointed Rand Water as the implementing agent for the sanitation intervention in Emfuleni. Funding has been allocated to Rand Water to rehabilitate four wastewater treatments works and to increase the capacity of the Sebokeng wastewater treatment works.

In addition, contractors are currently on site replacing collapsed sewer pipelines and removing blockages in sewer pipelines to stop sewage spilling into people’s yards and into the environment.

Rand Water is also assisting Emfuleni Municipality to improve the operation and maintenance of its wastewater treatment systems. It is anticipated that the rehabilitation of the wastewater treatment works will be completed by the end of this year.

---00O00---

23 May 2022 - NW1814

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of (a) land claims were lodged in the Chief Albert Luthuli tribal area in Mpumalanga and (b)(i) the specified land claims have been settled to date and (ii) by what date does she envisage that the rest will be settled?

Reply:

(a) 351

(b)(i) 295

(b)(ii) Most of the claims that remain within this municipality have disputes that are referred to court for adjudication; the finalization dates are therefore dependent on conclusion of court processes.

END

 

23 May 2022 - NW1696

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Noting how more than 600 learners did not report to school after the devastating floods in KwaZulu-Natal, what (a) engagements has her department made with the management of affected schools and (b) are the agreed-upon contingency plans?

Reply:

The question asked by the Honourable Member falls within the purview of the Member of Executive Council (MEC) of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), not the Minister of Basic Education. Attached please see response from KZN. 

23 May 2022 - NW1367

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date does she envisage that her Department will provide housing to the community of ward 8 in Kagisano-Molopo Local municipality, following empty promises that were made to the residents by the specified municipality in 2016?

Reply:

The Department including the North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements, is not aware of such a commitment made by the municipality. However, the Department will engage communities, and municipalities in order to undertake the necessary pre-planning and detailed planning processes, construct houses and thereafter allocate to qualifying beneficiaries.

23 May 2022 - NW1808

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will review the closing of Seekoegat Primary School in the Western Cape, since there was no sufficient consultation between her department and the community before the decision to close the school was taken; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The closing of a school is a provincial matter and should be referred to the Member of the Executive Council of the relevant province.

23 May 2022 - NW163

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he and/or his department ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

  1. No
  2. (b) and (c), Falls away

END

23 May 2022 - NW1500

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the apartheid era migrant labour hostels, what is the (a) name and (b) location of each (i) state and/or state-owned hostel, (ii) city owned hostel, (iii) privately owned hostel and (iv) so called grey hostel that was privately built on public land; (2) Whether her department regards grey hostels as public housing; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of how her department intends to utilise such hostels?

Reply:

1. The table below which are categorized per province provide the details in respect of question 1 (a) (b) (i) &(ii)

1. NORTHERN CAPE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Dingaan Hostel

Northern Cape

Sol Plaatje Municipality

 

  2. EASTERN CAPE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

 

NIL

 

 

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

 

 

 

​   3. MPUMALANGA

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

KwaGuqa Phase 1

Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality

2.

KwaGuqa Phase 2

Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality

3.

KwaGuqa Phase 3)

Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality

4.

Emthonjeni Phase 1

Emakhazeni

Emakhazeni Local Municipality

5.

Emthonjeni Phase 2

Emakhazeni

Emakhazeni Local Municipality

6.

Emgwenya

Emakhazeni

Emakhazeni Local Municipality

4. GAUTENG

No.

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Diepkloof Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

2.

Jabulani Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

3.

Orlando West Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

4.

Dube Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

5.

Meadowlands Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

6.

Nancefield Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

7.

Lifateng Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

8.

Mapetla Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

9.

Dobsonville / Simphiwe Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

10.

Rethabile LTA Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

11.

Van Beek Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

12.

Anthea Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

13.

City Deep Hostel

Gauteng

 

14.

M2 Nobuhle Women Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

15.

M1 Madala Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

16.

Helen Joseph Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

17.

Jeppe Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

18.

Denver Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

19.

George Goch Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

20.

MBA Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

21.

Murry and Roberts Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

22.

City Deep Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

23.

Mai Mai Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

24.

Stan Hop Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

25.

Rosherville Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

26.

Kagiso Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

27.

Green Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

28.

Munsieville Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

29.

Boiketlo Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

30.

Lanmen Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

31.

Mohlakeng Hostel

Johannesburg

Rand West City

32.

Mohlakeng Madala Old Hostel

Johannesburg

Rand West City

33.

Bekkersdal Hostel

Johannesburg

Rand West City

34.

Khutsong Hostel

West Rand

Merafong City

35.

Foschville Hostel

West Rand

Merafong City

36.

Ratanda Hostel – Protea Street

Gauteng

Lesedi Municipality

37.

Ratanda Hostel – Shalimah Ridge

Gauteng

Lesedi Municipality

38.

Boipatong Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

39.

Sebokeng Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

40.

Kwa-Masiza Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

41.

Sharpville Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

42.

Saulsville Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

43.

Mamelodi Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

44.

Soshanguve Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

45.

Refilwe

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

46.

Kudube Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane metro

47.

Zithobeni Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

48.

Sethokga Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

49.

Mazibuko Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

50.

Nguni Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

51.

Sotho Hostel

Ekurhululeni

Ekurhuleni Metro

52.

Kwa-Thema Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

53.

Wattville Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

54.

Daveyton Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

55.

Thokoza Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

56.

Vusumuzi Hostel / Essellen Park Site

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

57.

Kwesine Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

58.

Buyafuthi Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

59.

Enhlanzeni Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

60.

LTA / Granaker Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

61.

NCP

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

62.

Park President

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

63.

Peter Faber

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

64.

Police Barracks

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

65.

Selcast

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

66.

Masisulu

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

67.

Clover

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

68.

Dukathole

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

5. FREE STATE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Masimong 4 Estate

Free State

Matjhabeng LM

2.

Merriespruit 3

Free State

Matjhabeng LM

3.

Zamdela Hostel 4

Free State

Metsimaholo LM

6. KWAZULU NATAL

 

NAME OF THE HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

S J Smith

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

2.

Dalton road

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

3.

Kwamashu

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

4.

Jacobs

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

5.

Glebelands

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

6.

Umlazi “t”/17

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

7.

Kwamakhutha

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

8.

Klaarwater

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

9.

East Street

KZN

Provincial Department of Human Settlements

10.

Ikwezi

KZN

Provincial Department of Human Settlements

11.

Enseleni

uMhlathuze

City of uMhlathuze

12.

Esikhaleni (bhambatha)

uMhlathuze

City of uMhlathuze

13.

Enhlalakahle

Umvoti

Umvoti Local Municipality

14.

nkongolwane

KZN

Abaqulusi Local Municipality

15.

Steadville

eMnambithi

eMnambithi Local Municipality

16.

Kwadabeka

KZN

EThekwini Municipality

17.

Thokoza women

KZN

EThekwini Municipality

18.

Shakaville men’s

KwaDukuza

KwaDukuza Local Municipality

19.

Shakaville women’s

KwaDukuza

KwaDukuza Local Municipality

20.

Sibongile

KZN

Endumeni Local Municipality

21.

Sithembile

KZN

Endumeni Local Municipality

22.

nkanyezi

eManambithi

eManambithi Local Municipality

23.

Bhekuzulu

KZN

Abaqulusi Local Municpality

7. WESTERN CAPE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Worcester, Russel Skema 22

Breede Valley

Breede Valley Municipality

2.

Paarl, Paarl Mbekweni B & C Hostels

Drakenstein

Drakenstein Municipality

3.

Paarl (East), Dube Village Houses (Hostel

Drakenstein

Drakenstein Municipality,

4.

Paarl, White City Hostels

Drakenstein

Drakenstein Municipality,

5.

Nduli, Ceres, V3

Witzenberg

Witzenberg Municipality,

6.

Zwelihle, Zwelihle, Shandu street

Overstrand

Overstrand Municipality,

7.

Caledon, Santa, Caledon

Theewaterskloof

Theewaterskloof Municipality

8.

Caledon, Kromco, Caledon - Botrivier

Western Cape

Provincial Government

9.

Grabouw, Hillside,

Theewaterskloof

National Public Works

10.

Grabouw, Waterwese,

Theewaterskloof

Water Affairs & Forestry

11.

Velddrif, Hostel Project

Western Cape

Berg River Municipality,

12.

Clanwilliam, Scheme House,

Cape Town

Cederberg Municipality,

13.

George, Rosemore Units for the aged,

George

George Municipality,

14.

Nelspoort, Nursing House,

Beaufort West

Beaufort West Municipality,

15.

Langa Old Flats

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro,

16.

Langa New Flats,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro,

17.

Blue Line Hostel, Zone 1-16, Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

18.

Dura Hostels, Zones 2 & 16,Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

19.

Cape Foundary, Zone 2,Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

20.

North Barracks Hostels,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

21.

Zones:1,2,17,18,19,20,23,24 &26

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

22.

LTA Hostels,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

23.

Police Quarters, Zone 2 & 5, Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

24.

Cape Metro, Zone 2

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

25.

Wespico, Zone 2

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

26.

Nyanga: J - Section,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

27.

R.J Southey Hostel, NY 61, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

28.

Simcor Hostel , NY 61, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

29.

Martin and East, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

30.

Lupini and Tate, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

31.

R.H Morris, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

32.

Stocks & Stocks, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

33.

Wonder Coat, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

34.

Renown, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

35.

Gorrie and Findlay, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

36.

Gordon Verhoef and Krause, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

37.

Lingelihle Hostel, NY 110, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

38.

Cape Oil, NY 121, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

39.

Guguletu Hostel NY 76 (Block 7), Block G29 1-28, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

40.

Guguletu Hostel NY 76, NY 61, NY 64 and NY 67 (Block5), (Block G1-18 and 488), Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

41.

Guguletu Hostel NY 76, NY 61, NY 64 and NY 67 (Block5), (Block G1-18 and 488), Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

42.

Guguletu 64(Block3)Block G23-25,27 A & B, 28 A & B, 32, 49 and 50, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

8.NORTH WEST

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Dube Hostel

Tlokwe

Information is not available.

2.

Mafikeng Rental TBA

Mafikeng

Information not available.

3.

Jouberton Hostel

Matlosana

Information is not available.

9. LIMPOPO

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Tshikota Hostel

Makhado

Information is not available.

2.

Talana Hostel

Greater Tzaneen

Information is not available.

3.

Seshego Hostel

Polokwane

Information is not available.

4.

Marapong Hostel

Polokwane

Information is not available.

1. (a) (b) (iii) it must be noted that currently, the government does not have any legal authority/jurisdiction over privately owned hostels, and as such details required for this question are not held by any domain of government.

1. (a) (b) (iv), it must also be noted that government has no legal authority/jurisdiction over private hostels which have been built on public land (grey hostels), and as such details required for this question are not held by any domain of government.

2. The department does not regard grey hostels as public housing. The reason is, that such hostels are not subsidized by government funds and are owned by the private sector although some may be on government land. The private owners can sell to the government and or enter into partnership with the government such that these hostels can be used as part of other housing programmes that are meant for public housing.

23 May 2022 - NW1583

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

There are no commercial contracts entered into by my Department or any of the Entities reporting to me with the govenment of the Russian Federation.

---00O00---

23 May 2022 - NW1705

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has approached the Department of Social Services to provide social workers to schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education partnered with the Department of Social Development (DSD) as efforts to ensure the provision of psychosocial support to learners and educators with the intention of building resilience, minimizing mental health problems and ensuring continuity of teaching and learning in schools. All Provincial Departments of Education refer learners to DSD, particularly for statutory services in relation to child abuse cases.

Working with the Gauteng Department of Education, the DSD has employed one hundred and thirteen (113) social workers, eighteen (18) Social Work Supervisors and ten (10) Social Auxilliary Workers, and attached them to the Education Districts. The contact details for the DSD supervisors have been provided to schools and School Based Support Team members should they need to escalate cases.

To strengthen psychosocial support during COVID-19, the Free State Department of Education partnered with the Department of Social Development (DSD) around placement of Social Work Interns at District level. Fifty four (54) social work interns were placed in the respective Districts and hotspot areas within circuits. Orientation of these Social workers on the psychosocial needs in the context of COVID-19 was conducted by the DBE and the Province. The placement has since been terminated.

The North West Department of Education has partnered with the DSD by referring learners with psychosocial support needs to social workers within the DSD and networking with DSD to provide trauma debriefing and counselling of learners. They have established an Inter sectoral collaboration with Health and DSD in terms of identification and support of learners.

In KwaZulu-Natal Education Department, each school in the Province has been linked to the Health facilities and DSD service office for the provision of health and psychosocial support services respectively.

Mpumalanga Department of Education has been in discussion with DSD on how they can assist with the Social Workers employed by DSD. Currently, they have a working partnership where districts have contact details of DSD district coordinators, for case referral purposes.

The Northern Cape Department of Education refer cases that need further support to Provincial and District Structures of the DSD and Health. The Province conducts monthly meetings with DoH and DSD.

23 May 2022 - NW1559

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What intervention measures have been put in place to provide housing to the community of Ward 6 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality that has been waiting to be allocated housing since the contractor left without completing building their houses in 2018?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements technical team has completed the quantification of all the houses so that it can extend the scope of the developer to complete all the incomplete houses before the end of of the current financial year.

23 May 2022 - NW145

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the process regarding the appointment of the next Chief Justice of the Republic, he received any correspondence and/or input, in any format whatsoever, from the deployment committee of any interested party regarding the specified deployment committee or party’s preferred candidate(s) for appointment to the specified position; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

No. I did not receive any correspondence in any format whatsoever.

END.

23 May 2022 - NW1785

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, in anticipation of the disaster and/or loss that the farmers who plant along the Pongola River between the Jozini and Umhlabuyalingana Local Municipalities will surely suffer as a result of the unplanned opening of the Jozini Dam as it is filled to its capacity, any provision will be made to compensate the farmers as they solely depend on the farms for a living; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. Farmers are encouraged to practice best farming practices and avoid farming in high risk areas such as along the rivers, to prevent and mitigate impacts of disaster risks such as floods.

The dams are monitored by the Department of Water and Sanitation and in cases where they must be opened a communication is made to the communities located downstream. The farming communities are advised to remove the equipment used to collect water when opening of dams is anticipated to avoid losses.

 

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development addresses disasters in line with the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) and the National Disaster Management Framework of 2005 as amended. Farmers who are affected by the impacts of disasters are considered in line with the Disaster Management Act, 2022 (Act No. 57 of 2002) following the assessment of damages, which unfortunately makes no provision for compensation of losses. Additionally, in encouraging good farming practices, farming along the riverbanks is a risk on its own and cannot be supported through disaster relief assistance as it is against the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 1983 (Act No. 43 of 1983). The Farmers are always encouraged to implement risk reduction measures as communicated through monthly advisories.

23 May 2022 - NW1572

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education does not have any commercial contracts with the Russian Federation.

23 May 2022 - NW1675

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the nature of the allegations and/or wrongdoing that led to the suspension of the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer of Mhlathuze Water by the Mhlathuze Water Board in December 2021; (2) whether the specified officials are still suspended; if not, (a) why not and (b) what is the outcome of the investigation; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

1.  The Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer of Mhlathuze Water were put on precautionary suspension on 8 December 2021 following whistle-blower allegations. If proven, these allegations would require the Board to institute a detailed investigation.

2. In January 2022, based on the outcome of the preliminary investigation, the Board deemed it appropriate to extend the period of the precautionary suspension for three months with an option of extension for a period not exceeding six months in line with entity’s policy. The two remain on precautionary suspension until the investigation is concluded.

NW2003E

 

---00O00---

23 May 2022 - NW1649

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has found that most of the waste water treatment plants and sewage pumping stations in municipalities in the Free State and the North West are either completely non-functional and/or operating at diminished capacity; if not, will he, in collaboration with the relevant departments, undertake an assessment of what total number of the plants and/or stations are functional and operating at full or near full capacity and report its findings to Parliament; if so, what is he, in collaboration with the relevant departments, doing to ensure that (a) existing sewage infrastructure is refurbished and (b) any capital expenditure allocated towards the purpose is not misappropriated?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) revived the Green Drop programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. The Green Drop regulation programme sought to identify and develop the core competencies that, if strengthened, would gradually and sustainably improve the standard of wastewater management in South Africa. The Green Drop programme seeks to induce changes in behaviour of individuals and institutions to facilitate continuous improvement and adoption of best practice management of wastewater networks and treatment systems. The programme evaluates the entire wastewater management services over a one-year audit period. The Green Drop report was released on 1 April 2022, and it can be accessed on the departmental website www.dws.gov.za.

In the Green Drop report, it has been indicated that 64 (FS) and 33 (NW) Wastewater Treatment Systems have been identified to be at critical state in the Free State and Northwest Provinces respectively. The table below provides details systems at critical state in the two provinces. Letters of non-compliance in terms of green drop report audit findings have been sent to respective water services authorities responsible for the systems at critical state, requiring them to submit a detailed corrective action plan to the DWS.

Table of Systems at critical state in Free State and Northwest provinces

FREE STATE PROVINCE

64

Kopanong LM

 

 

 

 

4

 

Fauresmith

 

Gariep Dam

 

Jagersfontein

 

Reddersburg

Letsemeng LM

 

 

2

 

Koffiefontein

 

Oppermansgronde

Mafube LM

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

Namahadi

 

Villiers/Qalabotjha

 

Frankfort

 

Tweeling

 

Cornelia

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

Elandsriver

 

Kestell

 

Makwane/Matsegeng

 

Moeding

 

Phuthaditjhaba

 

Tshiame

 

Wilge/Harrismith

Mangaung LM

 

 

 

6

 

BFN - Northern Works

 

BFN-Bloemdustria

 

Soutpan

 

Dewetsdorp

 

Van Stadensrus

 

Wepener

Mantsopa LM

 

 

 

3

 

Excelsior

 

Ladybrand

 

Tweespruit

Masilonyana LM

 

 

 

3

 

Brandfort

 

Theunissen-Masilo

 

Winburg

Matjhabeng LM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

Allanridge

 

Hennenman

 

Mmamahabane

 

Odendaalsrus

 

Phomolong

 

Thabong

 

Theronia

 

Ventersburg

 

Virginia

 

Witpan

Mohokare LM

 

 

 

3

 

Rouxville

 

Smithfield

 

Zastron

Nala LM

 

 

 

3

 

Bothaville

 

Wesselsbron

 

Monyakeng

Ngwathe LM

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

Parys

 

Vredefort

 

Koppies

 

Heilbron

 

Edenville

Nketoana LM

 

1

 

Lindley/Ntha

Phumulela LM

 

 

 

3

 

Vrede

 

Warden

 

Memel

Setsoto LM

 

 

 

3

 

Ficksburg

 

Clocolan

 

Marquard New

Tswelopele LM

 

1

 

Hoopstad

Moqhaka LM

 

 

 

3

 

Kroonstad

 

Steynsrus

 

Viljoenskroon

Metsimaholo LM

 

 

2

 

Deneysville-Refengkgotso

 

Oranjeville

NORTHWEST PROVINCE

33

Dr Ruth Mompati DM

8

Naledi LM

Vryburg

Mamusa LM

Schweizer Reneke

Naledi LM

Stella

Greater Taung LM

 

 

 

 

Taung Hospital

 

Taung Station

 

Diplankeni/Mogogong

 

Maganeng/Pudimoe

 

Reivilo

Kgetleng River LM

 

 

 

 

4

 

Koster AS

 

Swartruggens

 

Koster Ponds

 

Mazista

Madibeng LM

 

 

 

3

 

Mothotlung

 

Eagles Landing

 

Sunway

Maquassi Hills LM

 

 

2

 

Leeudoringstad

 

Wolmaranstad

Moretele LM

 

1

 

Swartdam

Moses Kotane LM

 

 

2

 

Mogwase

 

Madikwe

Ngaka Modiri Molema DM

13

Ditsobotla LM

 

 

Coligny

 

Lichtenburg

 

Itsoseng

Mafikeng LM

 

Mahikeng

 

Mmabatho

Ramoshere Moilwa LM

 

Lehurutshe-Welbedacht

 

Zeerust

Tswaing LM

 

 

 

 

 

Delareyville

 

Sannieshof

 

Ottosdal

 

Atamelang

 

Groot Marico

 

Itekeng Ponds

a) The department will from the financial year 2022/2023 onwards, through the Water Service Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) prioritise the approval of business plans from municipalities designed to refurbish and upgrade the diminishing wastewater treatment works. It should be noted that the department provides funding to municipalities for upgrading and refurbishing wastewater treatment works through the Water Service Infrastructure Grant and Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) on an ongoing basis. The department will continue supporting municipalities in collaboration with CoGTA, to ensure that the wastewater treatment works are complaint with the required standard in line with the green drop requirements.

b) The department allocates grants in line with the approved business plans of WSAs. The business plans are followed by supporting documentations such as cashflows and project plans documents. The department further allocates funds in terms of direct transfers and indirect transfers to municipalities. The department will monitor the expenditure of the grants to ensure that funds are not misappropriated. The department will further enforce Division of Revenue Act to ensure that the grant funding is spent in line with the requirements of the Act. Where there is misappropriation, required actions will be taken in line with the Act itself.

---00O00---

23 May 2022 - NW1398

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to the weak structures which were highlighted by the recent floods on Kwazulu-Natal, what measures have been put in place to ensure that people are not made to live in weak, dangerous structures called homes?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements ensures quality control by insisting that all housing projects be enrolled with the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) which is a regulatory body of home building industry that was established in 1998 in accordance with the provisions of the Housing Consumers Protection Measures Act, 1998 (Act No. 95 of 1998). Its mandate is to protect the interests of housing consumers and to ensure that builders comply with the prescribed building industry standards. This enrolment protects housing consumers from any unscrupulous home builders who deliver substandard houses, shoddy workmanship and poor quality products.

It should also be noted that floods in the Province not only affected Breaking New Ground homes but also other forms of homes and houses including high-income residential units and general infrastructure as a consequence of prolonged high rainfall.

23 May 2022 - NW1394

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has any plans to support local fertiliser production companies especially those that produce mono-ammonium phosphate; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) amongst others; regulates the manufacturing, distribution, importation, sale and use of fertilizers in terms of Fertilizers, Farm Feeds, Agricultural Remedies and Stock Remedies Act, 1947 (Act No. 36 of 1947).

To be able to manufacture, import, sell and export; the mono-ammonium phosphate fertilizer must be registered in terms of the said Act. Thus, DALRRD provides support to local fertiliser production companies by ensuring that the mono-ammonium phosphate fertilizers they produce are registered in terms of the said Act to enable them to sell and export the products.

23 May 2022 - NW784

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will provide Mr N P Masipa with the details of the communal areas in (a) Northwest and (b) Northern Cape in terms of the (i) number of dipping tanks for sheep and cattle, (ii) districts and/or areas where they are located, (iii) distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities, (iv) details of the dipping committees and (v) frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) North West Province (pages 2-4)

(i) 23 dipping tanks for cattle. There are no dipping tanks for sheep.

(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Please refer to Table 1 below.

(ii) Northern Cape Province (pages 4-11)

(i) 96 dipping tanks for sheep and 1 dipping tank for cattle.

(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Please refer to Table 2 below.

TABLE 1: NORTH WEST PROVINCE

Categories

No. of Dipping Tanks

  1. Districts

Local

Village

(iii) Distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities

(iv) Details of the dipping committees

(v) Frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years.

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Ditloung

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Mayaiyane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Seatlhane1

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Seatlhane2

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Manthe

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Tlapeng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Matsheng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Longaneng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Morokweng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Dikhwiting

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Molelema

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Graspan

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Khudutlou

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Mothanthanyaneng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Kokomeng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Ga-modisenyane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Tlakgameng Tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing

Mofufutso2

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Mofufutso tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing

Middleton B

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Middleton B tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Mogosane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Mogosane tibal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Makhubung

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Makhubung tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Tsetse

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Bakwena tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Setlhwatlhwe

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong bo Ratlou tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Madibogo

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong bo Ratlou tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

TABLE 2: NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

Categories

(i)No. of Dipping Tanks

(ii)Districts

Local

Village

(iii)Distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities

(iv)Details of the dipping committees

(v)Frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Ditshoswaneng

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Mapoteng

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Seoding

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

2

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Batlharos x 2

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Maruping

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Witputs

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Legobate

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Galotlhare

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Gadiboe

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Ezperanza

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Gantatelang

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Lophalaphala

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Tshukudung

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Vergenoeg

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Permonkie

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Kamden

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bushbuck

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bailybriths

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Itireleng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Kikahela

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Motlhoeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bothetheletsa

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Matlhabanelong

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Zaneen

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Tamros 1

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Dikhing

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Colston

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Pietersham

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Zero

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Tokolaan

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 1

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 4

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 3

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 5

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 7

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 8

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 9

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk2

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Deerward

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Heuningvlei

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Greenwich

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Halifax

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Hove

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Conway

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Tauton

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Deal

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Harrow

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Makhubung

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Shalaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Tsiloane

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Leeds (

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Perth

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Glyde (Sesipi)

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Berwick

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Madibeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Abbey

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Eiffel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Klein Eiffel (Avon)

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Argyle

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Tay

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Sark

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Cahar

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Deurward

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Magwagwe

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Slough

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Padstow

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Laxey

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Rooipomp

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Garapoana

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Gamokatedi

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Gapitia

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Cattle

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Occidental Range

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Deurham

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Bendel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Battlemount

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Gamorona

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Magobing

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Shipton

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Ellendale

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Fairfield

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Mathanthanyan

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Maketlele

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Kokfontein

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Radiatsongwa

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Cardington

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Logaganeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Metswetsaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Molapotlase

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Kgabetlwane

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Dithakong

     

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Segwaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Cassel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Danoon

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Gahuwe

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Glenred

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Bothithong

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

23 May 2022 - NW1813

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will her department provide adequate water to the Chief Ampie Mayisa Secondary School in the Govan Mbeki Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, where approximately 2 000 learners are enrolled?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Mpumalanga Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

23 May 2022 - NW1832

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) invader species and/or trees that take up grazing spaces have been identified in each province and (b) plans have been put in place to deal with the identified invader species in each province?

Reply:

a)  Invader species in terms of the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act No 43 of 1983 (CARA), refers to both indigenous and alien invader species which have beneficial properties that warrant continued presence under certain circumstances. The objective of the Act with respect to invaders species that may lead to bush encroachment (indigenous species) on grazing areas, is not always aimed at eradication but the focus is on thinning and reducing them to normal and acceptable levels. Invader species that occur outside the demarcated areas are however eradicated to minimise undesirable species which may degrade the veld. The type of problematic invader plants that are found across the country covers the whole spectrum of declared species in terms of the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 1983 (Act No. 43 of 1983). The occurrence of these species varies from province to province due to various factors including climatic conditions.

The invader species identified as dominant include the following:

Table 1: List of invader species per province:

PROVINCE

DOMINANT INVADER SPECIES

EASTERN CAPE

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush-indigenous), Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle), Lantana camara (Lantana), and Opuntia species (prickle pear) and blue bush (recently identified and more work is being done to acquire information on this plant)

KWAZULU-NATAL

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush-indigenous), Lantana Camara (Lantana), Silver dealbata (Silver wattle) and Acacia mearnsii (Black Wattle)

MPUMALANGA

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush - indigenous), Lantana Camara (Lantana), Silver dealbata (Silver wattle) and Acacia mearnsii (Black Wattle) and Dichrostachys cineria (Sickle bush-Indigenous).

GAUTENG

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush-indigenous), Dichrostachys cineria (Sickle bush-Indigenous), Silver dealbata (Silver wattle) and Acacia mearnsii (Black Wattle) and Cereus Jamacaru (Queen of the night)–Bio control agent has been released on it and it is found to be under control.

LIMPOPO

Dichrostachys cineria (Sickle bush-Indigenous), Prosopis spp. (Mesquite) in communal grazing areas and Lopholaena coriifolia (small-leaved fluff-bush).

NORTH WEST

Seriphium plumosum-Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush - indigenous), Acacia Mellifera (Swarthaak) indigenous and Prosopis spp. (Mesquite).

FREE STATE

Seriphium plumosum - Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush), Cestrum laevigatum (Inkberry), Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle) and Opuntia species (Prickle pears)

NORTHERN CAPE

Acacia Mellifera (Swarthaak) and Prosopis spp. (Mesquite), Rhigozum trichotomum (Driedoring)

WESTERN CAPE

Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle), Acacia saligna (Port Jackson), Eucalyptus spp (Blue gum)

Hakea spp and Pinus spp

b) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has put in place the following measures to manage and control invader species and/or trees in all Provinces:

  • A dedicated resource monitoring unit that audits veld infested by invader species in terms of the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 1983 (Act No. 43 of 1983), CARA is in place. The mandate of the team is to assess the status of veld in collaboration with provinces to identify invader species that threaten the productivity of grazing areas. The team also provides advice on control measures to land users. Directives are only served to land users as a last resort to facilitate compliance with CARA legislation;
  • Through its Landcare programme, the Department collaborates with relevant research institutions to support control of invader species across the country. Provincial Departments of Agriculture are also involved. Collaboration includes provision of technical and governance advice in areas affecting veld management for improved grazing and livestock production;
  • Where applicable, partnership with relevant stakeholders are put in place to facilitate the control of Bankrupt Bush and Prosopis in various communities through the Landcare programme;
  • Awareness campaigns have been conducted and DALRRD has coordinated the development of a database to record bush encroacher species in the veld. To date, surveys have been conducted where bankrupt bush encroachment was dominant in grazing areas. The strategy on management of invader indigenous species is currently being developed; and
  • DALRRD will continue conducting capacity building sessions for land users and farmers on management of invader species per biome during the 2022/23 financial year. Guidelines on possible management of invader species and veld improvement will be developed and shared with relevant stakeholders.

23 May 2022 - NW1550

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she intends to relook the curriculum offered by agricultural colleges which offer part time and/or short courses that are currently offered by the Agricultural Research Council (ARC), as that will assist farmers to reduce the costs associated with travelling to the ARC in Pretoria?

Reply:

No. The programmes offered by the 11 Colleges of Agriculture are divided into two sub - programmes, namely Higher Education (HET) providing agricultural training from NQF level 5 to 7, and formal and non-formal training on NQF level 1 to 4 (except for Taung College of Agriculture and Potchefstroom College of Agriculture where farmer training is done at Kgora Training Centre). The NQF Level 1 to 4 programmes have emphasis on farmer training i.e. smallholder, subsistence and commercial farmers, and in most cases, they collaborate with Agricultural Research Council (ARC).

The Colleges of Agriculture (CoAs) through the Provincial Departments of Agriculture (PDAs) have existing working relationship with the ARC, mostly though signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) and some of the Colleges also host the ARC within their premises. The relationship allows the two parties to collaborate in offering short courses either through sharing of premises or expertise. Farmers only travel to ARC premises in instances where a specific or specialised infrastructure is needed for practical training.

23 May 2022 - NW1627

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What further monies from his department’s budget have been paid to certain companies (names furnished) concerning the Bus Rapid Transport operations (a) in the 2021-22 financial year and (b) since 1 April 2022; (2) whether the City of Ekurhuleni has received any audited financial statements from the specified companies; if not, on what basis is money continuing to be paid over to them?

Reply:

1. (a)&(b) KTVR is the operating company owned and managed by affected minibus owners in the Phase 1 area in Ekurhuleni. The National Department of Transport transfers funds to the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality under the Division of Revenue Act authorising conditional grants. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality procures services utilising its own supply chain policies under the relevant legislation. One of these services is operating the interim Harambee Phase 1 contract which is performed by KTVR.

The operating contract related transfers to KTVR from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality for the relevant years are as follows:

Financial Years

Total Spend

April 2021 to March 2022

R174 276 431,22

April 2022 to date

0

Total Spend

R174 276 431,22

2. Yes, Audited Financial Statements have been received from KTVR. The latest audited

Financial Statement on file with Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is for the year ending June 2021.

23 May 2022 - NW1823

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of no-fee schools are without a school feeding scheme and (b) are the reasons behind this?

Reply:

a) Zero. 

b) The National School Nutrition Programme's mandate is to provide school meals to Q1-3 primary and secondary schools, and identified special schools. The Department has no knowledge of any schools falling into these categories that are not included in the programme.

23 May 2022 - NW1400

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What plans have been put in place to relocate persons living in hostels to a decent residential area in order to restore their dignity and discontinue the legacy of apartheid which placed black persons in crowded inhumane environments?

Reply:

The Department has a programme called the Community Residential Units (CRU) which provides grant funding to provinces and municipalities for the upgrading, conversion, or complete redevelopment of existing government owned rental stock, including hostels. It is a 100% subsidy funded programme that targets low income persons and households earning below R3 500 per month who are unable to access existing formal private rental options. The CRU programme provides family oriented accommodation typologies which usually comprises of separate bedrooms and living areas as opposed to previous hostels which were designed with the intention of housing single sex migrant labourers. The programme is available to all provinces and municipalities with hostels that are publicly owned.

23 May 2022 - NW1656

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with regard to the ongoing unlawful land invasions at the Knoflokskraal site that continue to pose significant challenges to the Grabouw plantation and the surrounding communities, and considering the financial and security impacts, she has launched an investigation into the alleged involvement of political parties in the invasions in the past year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the findings; (2) whether she will consider laying charges against organisations and/or political parties found to have encouraged or facilitated unlawful occupations of the specified plantation; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total number of unlawful occupants are currently residing on the site and (b) are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) established that the specified property at the Knoflokskraal site does not fall under its custodianship but is under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI). DALRRD therefore, has not launched any investigation on this property.

(2)(a),(b) Falls away.

23 May 2022 - NW1508

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, given that the water infrastructure in KwaZulu-Natal in areas such as (a) Umdoni, (b) Umzinto, (c) Malangeni and (d) Port Shepstone have been in a dilapidated state well before the recent floods, he will indicate by which date the infrastructure in the specified areas will be improved; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (2) whether any provisions are being made to assist the poor communities that are affected by the lack of and/or no access to drinking water; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will establish an effective oversight committee to monitor repairs and/or the replacement of bulk water infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Ugu District Muniicpality is the Water Services Authority (WSA) for the aforementioned areas. All the water supply systems listed above have experienced water supply interruptions due to:

  • Water demands exceeding the available supply. The schemes need to be upgraded to meet the growing demands.
  • The aging pipe infrustructure, and mechincal and electrical componets of water treatment works and pumpstations. The corrective measures include the implementaion of a pipeline replacement programme under the Municipal Infrustructure Grant (MIG) and allocation of up to 10% of the MIG funding towards operations and maintainance.

The recent floods have severely impacted on water and sanitation services in the Ugu DM area and teams are currently assessing the damage to the infrustructure and working hard to restore water supply and recover the systems.

Prior to the floods, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) had been assisting with the water services challenges that are being experienced in the Ugu DM. The DWS is a member of the Inter-Ministerial Task Team that has been established by the Premier of KwaZulu-Natal to determine the root causes of water supply interruptions in the various supply systems, develop implementable interventions, and monitor the progress made with implementation of the interventions.

The DWS is also a member of the Technical Task Team and the Water Supply Challenges WAR Room that is assisting the Ugu DM to implement immediate interventions to stabilise the supply systems and develop a turnaround strategy.

However, since the floods, support efforts have focused on restoring water and sanitation services to flood damaged areas and assessing the cost to restore the infrastructure. The DWS has also assisted the Ugu DM and the Provincial Disaster Mangement Centre with disaster relief funding applications.

(2) As part of the flood relief interventions, the DWS has also hired 20 additional water tankers to assist the Ugu DM to provide emergency relief across the District for 90 days. This will allow repairs to damaged infrastruture to be effected and the systems to be restored.

(3) As mentioned in 1 above, the DWS is part of the technical task team established by the Premier. This team is overseeing the interventions along with the Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and engineers from the Municipal Inftustructure Supprt Agency.

The DWS has also deployed a team of multidisciplinary engineers and technical experts to quantify and cost the flood damages.

---00O00---

23 May 2022 - NW264

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether invigilators have been paid their salaries for the December 2021 examinations period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All Provincial Education Departments have paid their invigilators, except for two PEDs, where there are outstanding payments. In the case of the Western Cape, 22 of the 2007 invigilators that were appointed have not been paid. The 22 outstanding payments emanate from administrative issues relating to incorrect banking details, awaiting deceased estate details, and individuals blocked on Persal due to different reasons. In the Eastern Cape, 594 of the 1192 invigilators have not been paid, due to incomplete or late submission of documents by the invigilators. However, this has now been finalised and the outstanding payments were made.   

20 May 2022 - NW1765

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What number of doctors have not been paid by his department of health in each province, (b) for what period have they not been paid and (c) in what province has this occurred; (2) whether doctors have been paid overtime; if not, (a) in what provinces are overtime payments outstanding and (b) for how long have overtime payments been outstanding; if so, in what provinces doctors have been paid overtime?

Reply:

Honourable Member, this information is not readily available at the National Department of Health but is with the provinces. The National Department of Health is therefore consulting with all the Provincial Departments of Health to source the full details on this matter. The Minister will provide the Honourable Member and Parliament with the response as soon as the details have been received from the Provinces.

END.

20 May 2022 - NW1797

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has put measures in place to protect vulnerable farm workers in Ward 02 Blinkwater in the Emakhazeni Local Municipality and Ward 05 SIS Farming Group areas in the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

  • Inspections were conducted on employers mentioned above Blinkwater and SIS Farming group on the 18 August 2021 and 26 April 2022 respectively.
  • Inspections were conducted on Basic Condition of Employment Act guided by Standard Operating Procedure of the Department of Employment and Labour
  • Employers will again be inspected after 12 months to monitor compliance, as guided by Standard Operating Procedure of the Department of Employment and Labour
  • However re-active inspection can be conducted on request

20 May 2022 - NW1830

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In light of the recent floods that destroyed infrastructure in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, what (a) number of workers have been affected due to (i) them not being able to go to work and/or (ii) their work place infrastructure being destroyed and (b) intervention measures will he put in place to avoid permanent job losses?

Reply:

The number of workers that have been affected by the floods is still being established. Once lodging of claims gets to its logical conclusion, certain things will become clearer, including the stats that Hon. Member is looking for.

Currently, the Unemployment Insurance Fund is engaged in discussions with a number of stakeholders (including NEDLAC) in terms of how best to respond to the disaster in KwaZulu Natal and the ripple effect (of the floods) downstream.

The Provincial Offices of the Department of Employment and Labour in Gauteng, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu Natal have been tasked with handling the claims related to recent floods in those provinces.

These claims have been given priority by the provinces. Affected employees are able to claim for Reduced Work Time and the unemployment benefit claim in line with the Unemployment Insurance Act and the Unemployment Insurance Contributions Act. Employers are also able to apply for the Reduced Work Time and the unemployment benefit claims directly with the provincial offices on behalf of their employees.

Unemployment Insurance Fund through its Labour Activation Programme has (the normal) Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme which provides support to distressed companies that seek to retain their employees. Under the scheme, the UIF funds 75% of an employee’s basic salary up to a maximum amount of R17 119,44 per month, for a maximum period of twelve months. Eligible companies affected by the flood can apply for this relief scheme through the CCMA.

Furthermore, the UIF also has another Labour Activation Programme called the Business Turnaround and Recovery Programme which provides support to enterprises facing economic distress and initiatives aimed at preventing job losses. Eligible companies affected by the flood can apply for this support scheme through Productivity South Africa.