Questions and Replies

23 March 2017 - NW288

Profile picture: Bara, MO

Bara, MO to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the claiming of concessions from her department, (a) what amount was requested and (b) what amount was actually paid for the 2015 academic year for each school in the (i) Edenvale, (ii) Tembisa and (iii) Kempton Park school districts?

Reply:

The response below was sourced from Gauteng Department of Education

SCHOOL NAME

(a)

Total exemption granted *

(b)

Amount actually paid

  1. (ii) & (iii)

Districts

DUNVEGAN PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 425 000

R 59 882

EDENVALE

EASTLEIGH PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 3 564 204

R 84 457

EDENVALE

EDENGLEN HIGH SCHOOL

R 2 025 300

R 68 560

EDENVALE

EDENGLEN PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 488 553

R 40 951

EDENVALE

EDENVALE HIGH SCHOOL

R 1 134 600

R 10 348

EDENVALE

HOËRSKOOL EDENVALE

R 730 000

R 23 080

EDENVALE

HURLYVALE PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 335 840

R 33 209

EDENVALE

LAERSKOOL M W DE WET PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 839 200

R 53 495

EDENVALE

ARBOR PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 633 280

R 47 757

KEMPTON PARK

BIRCH ACRES PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 442 200

R 17 267

KEMPTON PARK

BONAERO PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 942 480

R 46 931

KEMPTON PARK

CRESSLAWN PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 819 000

R 47 771

KEMPTON PARK

EDLEEN PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 273 000

R 39 518

KEMPTON PARK

HOËRSKOOL BIRCHLEIGH

R 4 158 000

R 162 072

KEMPTON PARK

SCHOOL NAME

(a)

Amount requested

(b)

Amount actually paid

  1. (ii) & (iii)

Districts

HOËRSKOOL JEUGLAND

R 3 324 420

R 89 324

KEMPTON PARK

HOËRSKOOL KEMPTON PARK

R 1 822 800

R 46 258

KEMPTON PARK

KEMPTON PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 392 370

R 19 538

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL BIRCHLEIGH

R 1 377 000

R 52 681

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL BREDELL

R 989 175

R 35 896

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL EDLEEN

R 833 085

R 36 401

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL IMPALA

R 1 097 250

R 42 142

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL JEUGPARK PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 387 100

R 81 849

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL KEMPTON PARK

R 1 615 900

R 96 147

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL KREFT

R 1 062 600

R 68 840

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL KRUINSIG

R 772 200

R 31 139

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL MOOIFONTEIN PRIMARY SCHOOL

R 1 426 590

R 92 700

KEMPTON PARK

LAERSKOOL VAN RIEBEECKPARK

R 1 155 220

R 105 390

KEMPTON PARK

NORKEM PARK HIGH SCHOOL

R 3 108 400

R 190 533

KEMPTON PARK

RHODESFIELD TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL

R 1 203 300

R 50 963

KEMPTON PARK

SIR PIERRE VAN RYNEVELD HIGH SCHOOL

R 1 971 420

R 91 580

KEMPTON PARK

MASIQHAKAZE SECONDARY SCHOOL

R 61 000

R 169 885

TEMBISA

MASISEBENZE COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL

R 347 500

R 77 423

TEMBISA

Source: Gauteng Provincial Education Department

* Assuming that all learners were granted 100% fee exemption

 

23 March 2017 - NW368

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Stander, Ms T to ask the Ms T Stander (DA) asked the Minister of Public Works

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(i) The Minister of Public Works

(a) and (b) Make & Model

(c) Price

(d) Date purchased

BMW X5 F15 XDrive 4.0D

R918 459.61

12 November 2015

(ii) The Deputy Minister of Public Works

(a) and (b) Make & Model

(c) Price

(d) Date purchased

Volkswagen Touareg 3.0 V6 TDI

R709 484.00

21 November 2014

BMW F10 535i

R681 432.34

01 January 2015

(bb) No motor vehicle has been purchased since 01 April 2016.

23 March 2017 - NW466

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

Whether her Department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progrssive Professional Forum, (C) the Decolonisation Fund and / or (d) Black Business Council, if not, in each case, why not, if so, what (i) services were procured , (ii) was is the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid (v) was the purpose of the payments (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payment in each case?

Reply:

a) No, Mr Mzwanele Manyi did not respond to any bids advertised by the department.

b) No, the Progressive professionals Forum did not respond to any bids advertised by the department

c) No, the Decolonisation Fund did not respond to any bids advertised by the department

d) No Black Business Council did not respond to any bids advertised by the department.

  1. Not applicable
  2. Not applicable
  3. Not applicable
  4. Not applicable
  5. Not applicable
  6. Not applicable

23 March 2017 - NW127

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the total number of learners in (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools who fell pregnant in each province during the (aa) 2014, (bb) 2015 and (cc) 2016 school years and (b) how many of the specified learners returned to school in each year respectively and (c) how many were reported by schools to the South African Police Service for reasons related to sexual offences in each year?

Reply:

The responses below are provided as per:

The total number of learners in (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools who fell pregnant in each province during the (aa) 2014, (bb) 2015 and (cc) 2016 school years.

(a)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc)

Table 1: Number of learners who fell pregnant, by province, between 2014 and 2016

Year

Province

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Other

Total

2014

EC

0

0

0

5

16

42

67

99

164

134

0

527

 

FS

0

1

0

12

7

27

95

182

167

262

12

765

 

GT

0

0

4

16

71

201

639

1 541

1 486

1 204

55

5 217

 

KZ

7

7

12

27

49

146

338

731

852

862

8

3 039

 

LP

0

1

 

6

6

37

105

197

161

148

2

663

 

MP

3

9

83

105

169

357

490

723

670

593

8

3 438

 

NC

1

1

3

11

39

69

152

379

278

187

0

1 119

 

NW

0

0

0

1

10

203

282

196

106

59

95

953

 

WC

0

0

5

25

49

166

498

671

709

740

1

2 864

 

National

11

19

107

208

416

1 248

2 666

4 719

4 593

4 189

181

18 357

2015

EC

0

0

2

2

6

19

26

49

82

57

0

243

 

FS

1

1

4

6

19

29

56

178

179

221

0

694

 

GT

0

1

4

13

56

239

610

1 410

1 689

1 219

5

5 246

 

KZ

2

2

4

6

18

87

235

553

729

673

99

2 408

 

LP

0

0

0

4

9

34

148

308

216

189

1

909

 

MP

4

0

6

22

172

409

489

607

561

378

122

2 770

 

NW

0

0

0

4

3

23

54

71

73

46

0

274

 

NC

0

0

0

3

4

4

4

18

16

20

0

69

 

WC

0

0

7

18

45

165

443

668

799

746

0

2 891

 

National

7

4

27

78

332

1 009

2 065

3 862

4 344

3 549

227

15 504

2016

EC

 

 

 

1

1

5

10

20

32

37

 0

106

 

FS

1

 

1

3

21

30

50

123

120

138

 0

487

 

GT

1

2

6

28

83

280

615

1 069

1 118

1 164

 0

4 366

 

LP

 

 

 

9

5

35

103

241

223

212

 0

828

 

NW

 

1

 

 

5

17

56

109

91

80

 0

359

 

WC

 

1

5

15

48

187

369

526

612

666

 0

2 429

 

NC

 

 

 

 

3

6

27

50

40

31

 0

157

 

National

2

4

12

56

166

560

1 230

2 138

2 236

2 328

 0

8 732

Source 1: 2014-16 Annual School Survey

Source 2: PEDs submissions

Note 1: 2016 data for KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga are still not available.

Note 2: The ASS question on learner pregnancy asks the school principal for: “the number of learners (That they are aware of) who got pregnant the previous academic year”.

Note 3: The data, as received from the provinces, are preliminary and must be treated with caution, since it has not been published in this format.

(b) The Department is in no position to report on learners who returned to school after pregnancy.

(c) The following cases were reported to South African Police Services (SAPS) for reasons related to sexual offences in each year:

2013 /14 = 56 680

2014 /15 = 53 617

2015 /16 = 51 895

The South African Police Services collects data on a yearly basis on sexual offences. However, they not only concentrate on reported schools cases but to the entire public services. The referred data is from ‘Crime situation in South Africa’.

22 March 2017 - NW383

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to value added tax (VAT) refunds claimed by VAT vendors but not yet refunded as at (a) 28 February 2016 and (b) 28 February 2017, (i) what is the total value of VAT refunds claimed, (ii) what is the number of VAT refunds claimed, (iii) what is the total value of VAT refunds under audit and (iv) what is the monthly age analysis by (aa) value and (bb) number of claims in each case; (2) will he make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The following information is submitted by the South African Revenue Service and cannot be verified by the National Treasury:

1. (a)(i) The total value of VAT refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2015 to 29 February 2016 was R128, 199, 029, 418 of which R18, 132, 500, 365 was not refunded by 29 February 2016. It should be noted that the rand value represent the amount as supplied by the vendor on the return.

(ii) The total number of VAT refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2015 to 29 February 2016 was 341, 167 of which 34, 132 claims were not refunded by 29 February 2016. It should be noted that only returns required during the period in question were included. The information

therefore excludes all late returns and / or carry over from previous years.

(iii) The total value of VAT refunds still being audited as at 29 February 2016 was R12, 211, 133, 733.

(iv)(aa)(bb) The age analysis on value and numbers are as follows:

AGE - Refund claimed, not refunded by 29 February2016

Volume

Value (R)

% Num

%Value

0 to 1 Month

18 199

-R 13 246 824 575.38

53%

73%

2 to 3 Months

6 797

-R 3 049 763 560.52

20%

17%

4 to 6 Months

4 617

-R 1 234 288 282.26

14%

7%

7 to 9 Months

2 980

-R 387 210 521.74

9%

2%

10 to 12 Months

1 539

-R 214 413 425.68

5%

1%

 

34 132

-R 18 132 500 365.58

 

 

 

(b)(i) The total value of VAT refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2016 to 28 February 2017 was R129, 276, 961, 011 of which R19, 614, 184, 427 was not refunded by 28 February 2017. It should be noted that the rand value represent the amount as supplied by the vendor on the return.

(ii) The total number of VAT refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2016 to 28 February 2017 was 343, 674 of which 43, 650 claims were not refunded by 28 February 2017. It should be noted that only returns required during the period in question were included. The information therefore excludes all late returns and / or carry over from previous years.

(iii) The total value of VAT refunds still being audited as at 28 February 2017 was R17, 345, 095, 383.

(iv)(aa)(bb) The age analysis on value and numbers are as follows:

AGE - Refund claimed, not refunded by 28 February 2017

Volume

Value (R)

% Num

%Value

0 to 1 Month

25 484

-R 15 618 903 496.32

58%

80%

2 to 3 Months

8 159

-R 2 306 849 282.77

19%

12%

4 to 6 Months

5 407

-R 1 167 860 197.89

12%

6%

7 to 9 Months

3 113

-R 372 262 868.44

7%

2%

10 to 12 Months

1 487

-R 148 308 582.46

3%

1%

 

43 650

-R 19 614 184 427.88

 

 

 

2. While I am unable to verify the above data, I have, as you are aware, approved the request by the Tax Ombud, Judge Ngoepe, to undertake a systemic investigation into VAT refunds and related matters given the unusual number of complaints received by the Ombud’s office.

22 March 2017 - NW384

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to diesel refunds claimed but not yet refunded as at (a) 28 February 2016 and (b) 28 February 2017, (i) what is the total value of diesel refunds claimed, (ii) what is the total number of diesel refunds claimed, (iii) total value of diesel refunds under audit and (iv) what is the monthly age analysis by (aa) value and (bb) number of claims in each case; (2) will he make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The following information is submitted by the South African Revenue Service and cannot be verified by the National Treasury:

1. (a)(i) The total value of Diesel refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2015 to 29 February 2016 was R6, 704, 966, 735 of which R806, 047, 046 were not refunded by 29 February 2016. It should be noted that the rand value represent the amount as supplied by the vendor on the return.

(ii) The total number of Diesel refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2015 to 29 February 2016 was 50, 931 of which 7, 191 claims were not refunded by 29 February 2016. It should be noted that only the returns required during the period in question were included. The information therefore excludes all late returns and / or carry over from previous years.

(iii) Diesel audits are conducted manually and information is only available for ongoing or completed audits. Information for audit cases, ongoing at a specific historic point in time is not available.

(iv)(aa)(bb) The age analysis on value and numbers are as follows:

AGE - Refund claimed, not refunded by 29 February 2016

Volume

Value

(R)

%

Volume

%

Value

0 to 1 Month

2 546

-R 412 278 143.78

35%

51%

2 to 3 Months

1 631

-R 161 455 695.28

23%

20%

4 to 6 Months

1 478

-R 139 218 514.26

21%

17%

7 to 9 Months

1 347

-R 83 750 122.50

19%

10%

10 to 12 Months

189

-R 9 344 571.16

3%

1%

 

7 191

-R 806 047 046.98

100%

100%

(b)(i) The total value of Diesel refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2016 to 28 February 2017 was R2, 557, 865, 443 of which R657, 079, 282 were not refunded by 28 February 2017. It should be noted that the rand value represent the amount as supplied by the vendor on the return.

(ii) The total number of Diesel refunds claimed for the period 1 March 2016 to 28 February 2017 was 55, 547 of which 6, 064 claims were not

refunded by 28 February 2017. It should be noted that only returns required during the period in question were included. The information therefore excludes all late returns and / or carry over from previous years.

(iii) The total value of Diesel refunds still being audited as at 28 February 2017 was R237, 115, 712.

(iv)(aa)(bb) The age analysis on value and numbers are as follows:

 

AGE - Refund claimed, not refunded by 28 February2017

Volume

Value (R)

%

Volume

%

Value

0 to 1 Month

2 607

-R 313 996 337.02

43%

48%

2 to 3 Months

1 262

-R 122 845 855.28

21%

19%

4 to 6 Months

1 015

-R 133 252 934.28

17%

20%

7 to 9 Months

1 088

-R 79 436 521.18

18%

12%

10 to 12 Months

92

-R 7 547 635.00

2%

1%

 

6 064

-R 657 079 282.76

100%

100%

2. While I am unable to verify the above data, I have, as you are aware, approved the request by the Tax Ombud, Judge Ngoepe, to undertake a systemic investigation into VAT refunds and related matters given the unusual number of complaints received by the Ombud’s office.

20 March 2017 - NW296

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) How many burglaries occurred at the Silvermine Military Complex in Simon’s Town, Western Cape, since 1 January 2014, (b) what was stolen or vandalised in each instance and (c) what were the related costs of each incident; (2) whether any person was apprehended and/or arrested for any of the specified crimes; if so, what were the consequences in each case; (3) what remedial measures were put in place to prevent a future occurrence of theft and vandalism at the specified military complex?

Reply:

1. (a) There have been two burglary incidents at the Silvermine Military Complex.

(b) In the first incident copper cables and parts of antennas were stolen and the second incident cables were stolen.

(c) Cost of stolen equipment estimated at R50 000-00 in the first incident, whilst estimated value in the second incident, still being determined.

2. Security levels were escalated in the area by increasing security patrols by the Military Police and deploying additional SA Navy security personnel to the complex.

20 March 2017 - NW298

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What is the condition of the perimeter security fences around the Silvermine Military Complex in Simon’s Town, Western Cape, (b) is there any alert detection system connected to the fences, (c) is there any siren attached to the fences in the event of a breach of security, (d) are there soldiers and security guards protecting this strategic facility and (e) are there surveillance cameras monitoring this facility; (2) is she aware of any breach of security at the specified facility; if so, what directives were issued from her office in this regard; (3) did the Officer Commanding of the specified facility take all the necessary measures to address the breach of security and report it to higher authorities when he was unable to resolve it?

Reply:

1. (a) It is in a serious state of disrepair.

(b) No.

(c) No.

(d) Yes.

(e) No.

2. N/A.

3. Yes.

20 March 2017 - NW352

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

No new vehicles were purchased for the Minister or Deputy Minister in the period referred to in the question.

The vehicles currently used for official purposes were purchased as follows:

  • Minister: Toyota Fortuner, bought in March 2010 at a price of R411 373.
    • Purpose: for use in Pretoria and in performance of duties in the central and northern parts of the country.
  • Minister: Toyota Fortuner, bought in February 2011 at a price of R477 693.
    • Purpose: for use in Cape Town and surrounding areas.
  • Deputy Minister: Mercedes Benz E-class, bought in February 2011 at a price of R647 865.
    • Purpose: for use in Pretoria and in performance of duties in the central and northern parts of the country
  • Deputy Minister: Audi Q7, bought in April 2013 at a price of R684 988.
    • Purpose: for use in Cape Town and surrounding areas.

-END-

20 March 2017 - NW57

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the incident that took place on 4 November 2016 on the square outside the Nelson Mandela Bay City Hall (details furnished), why (a) were the SANDF members armed, (b) was the specified site targeted and (c) did the SANDF members allegedly attempt to drive over a municipal vehicle occupied by a member of the Mayoral Committee at the time; (2) whether the SANDF members were acting on orders from the SANDF headquarters; if not, on whose orders were they acting; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any of the SANDF members involved in the incident will be court-martialled for their actions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

(a) Officer Commanding SA Army Support Base Eastern Cape instructed the members to be armed as per Army Doctrine.

(b) No, there was no specific site targeted. More than one family who stayed illegally was evicted. The Officer Commanding reported that the choice of delivering near the municipality was as requested by the lady being removed out of the military house.

(c) When the SANDF trucks were leaving, someone tried to block their way by putting a vehicle in front of them. The vehicle was left unoccupied, trying to block the way.

Orders were given by the Officer Commanding SA Army Support Base Eastern Cape.

The Board of Enquiry is currently at LEGSATO for legal advice once returned actions will be taken as been advised by LEGSATO.

20 March 2017 - NW58

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether the board of inquiry established into possible irregularities at the SA Air Force’s 21 Squadron has (a) completed the specified inquiry and (b) compiled a report with its findings; if not, by what date will the inquiry be completed; if so, (i) by what date will the specified report be made available to the (aa) Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and (bb) public, (ii) what were the main (aa) findings and (bb) recommendations of the report and (iii) what action has been taken to date to implement the recommendations?

Reply:

The Board of Inquiry is not completed yet

20 March 2017 - NW59

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her reply to oral question 268 on 16 November 2016, how many (a) C130s in the 28 Squadron and (b) Dakotas in the 35 Squadron are currently fully operational in the SA Air Force?

Reply:

a) Six of the nine C130s are operational with three of those six being serviceable.

b) None of the seven Dakotas are currently operational or serviceable due to the implementation of Air Worthiness Directive on the primary flight controls.

20 March 2017 - NW295

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the Silvermine Military Complex in Simon’s Town, Western Cape, is a national key point; if not, why not; if so, what security measures are required for such a facility; (2) whether the required security measures are in place at the specified military complex; if not, what are the (a) shortcomings and (b) challenges; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No, it is not a national key point.

2. The security measures in place are considerable

20 March 2017 - NW297

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) is the strategic significance of the Silvermine Military Complex in Simon’s Town, Western Cape, to the SA Navy, (b) negative impact did the theft of cables and damage to antennae have on the effective communication with vessels at sea and otherwise, (c) maintenance and repairs took place after each incident and (d) are these reports available for inspection?

Reply:

1. (a) The primary function of Navcomcen Cape (NCC) at Silvermine Complex is to support strategic and tactical radio communication for the SA Navy. In addition, NCC also provides strategic HF Communications to the SA Air Force (SAAF).

In order to provide these functions, NCC comprises of an Upper and Lower Antennae Farms. The lower antenna farm was destroyed by fire and the repair solution to get this antenna farm back to operational status is currently in process. The antenna cables from the upper antenna farm runs underground through this field and was not damaged in the fire. It is these cables that were cut and stolen leaving the communication centre with a limited reception capability.

(b) NCC had limited reception capability due to the antenna cable theft and Navcomcen Durban (NCD) (standby communications centre) provided support as a back-up for reception services. However, NCC is still able to maintain daily strategic communications with SAS AMATOLA currently on OP KETANE and NCD provided communications for the SAN.

(c) The antenna and the perimeter fencing that were damaged in the fires have not been repaired. After the recent theft in Jan 17, repairs have been effected on one antenna which was fully restored. After the theft in Feb 17, the restored antenna was damaged again and awaiting further repairs.

(d) Yes.

20 March 2017 - NW432

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) With reference to her department’s draft regulations for the domestic trade in rhinoceros horn, or a part, product or derivative of rhinoceros horn, published in Notice 74 in Government Gazette 40601 on 8 February 2017, (a) how many times a year can a person export the two rhinoceros horns limitation contained in regulation 3(3) and (b) what steps will be taken to ensure that fraud, forgery and corruption will not be included in this process; (2) will full criminal investigations and analyses be conducted in (a) South Africa and (b) internationally on any person applying for a permit to trade in rhinoceros horns; if not, why not; if so, (i) will the specified persons be excluded from trading in rhinoceros horns if they are found guilty and (ii) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (3) whether the legal ramifications for non-compliance with Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species resolutions contained in the specified regulations will be amended to include harsher penalties for perpetrators; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) will specialised courts with magistrates who specialise in environmental and conservation laws be established and (c) will enforcement bodies dealing with corruption, fraud and forgery be made available?

Reply:

(1)

(a) The draft regulations propose that a person may export only two rhino horns for personal purposes. The intention was that two horns would be the total allowed as a once-off export provided an import permit is obtained and the importing country has legislation in place to ensure compliance with the Convention. This aspect will however be finalised after the closing date for the submission of comments, and will depend on the nature of comments received.

(b) The possession and trade in rhino horn requires that permits and various checks are build into the permit system to address concerns relating to fraud and forgery, including the DNA profiling and marking of each horn. To ensure uniformity and strict control the Minister of Environmental Affairs proposed to the Members of Executive Council (MECs) responsible for the environment that the issuance of these permits take place at a national level, with the Minister as the issuing authority. This option is possible in terms of section 87A(3) of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (NEMBA), 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004), and with the written agreement of the MECs responsible for the conservation of biodiversity in the respective provinces. This is proposed as a mechanism is intended to reduce a number of authorisation and therefore be able to curb any potential gap in the system.

(2)

(a) and (b)(i) No.

An application for a permit will not trigger a criminal investigation unless there is information linked to the application that raises the reasonable suspicion that an offence has been committed. A query, however, will be made in relation to such applications to determine whether the parties involved in the application fall foul of section 92A of the NEMBA which enables the issuing authority to refuse a permit in the following circumstances:

  • If the carrying out of the restricted activity is likely to have a negative impact on the survival of the listed threatened or protected species;
  • if the applicant has been convicted of an offence in terms of this Act; or
  • in accordance with a ground for refusal contemplated in any regulation.

However, criminal investigations may be conducted by both the Environmental Management Inspectors and members of the South African Police Service (SAPS) in the event that there is a reasonable suspicion that a crime has been committed within South Africa related to failure to comply with biodiversity-related legislation which would include these regulations once they are finalised and promulgated.

In relation to international investigations, the South African authorities do not have mandate to conduct criminal investigations outside of South Africa; however, where a criminal investigation may have been initiated either in South Africa or in another country based on reasonable suspicion that an offence has been committed, the authorities have mechanisms to share information and co-operate, for example, through International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) or Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES).

(b)(ii)

Where necessary, the CITES Management Authorities of importing countries can be requested to verify whether rhino horns that have been exported for personal purposes, are still in the possession of the persons who have imported the horns. If it is found not to be the case, South Africa may consider refusing export permits for persons from those countries (as has previously been done in respect of the refusal of rhino hunting permits in similar circumstances). If a person is found guilty within the Republic of South Africa of an offence in terms of NEMBA, for instance in respect of the domestic trade in rhino horn, a permit in this regard may be refused in terms of section 92A.

(3)

(a) No. Section 98(2) of NEMBA makes provision for the maximum penalties that may be imposed in terms of regulations, which is:

  • imprisonment for a period not exceeding five years;
  • a fine not exceeding R5 million, and in the case of a second or subsequent conviction, to a fine not exceeding R10 million or imprisonment for a period not exceeding 10 years or in both instances to both a fine and such imprisonment; or
  • both a fine and such imprisonment.

However, a process involving the substantial amendment of NEMBA has been initiated which will include a proposed adjustment of the maximum penalties that may be imposed in terms of NEMBA for the carrying out of, among others, a restricted activity involving a specimen of a listed threatened or protected species without a permit.

The Department of Environmental Affairs has held previous engagements with representatives from the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the legislative development section of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DOJ&CD) to discuss proposals for legislative amendments related to minimum sentences and bail proceedings for contraveners of biodiversity legislation. All of the role-players agreed that the current maximum penalty provided for in NEMBA of a fine not exceeding R10 million and/or imprisonment for a period exceeding 10 years is sufficiently high to obtain sentences that are in accordance with the gravity of these types of offences. In this respect, the NPA, SAPS, DOJ&CD and the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) agreed that the ongoing sensitising of magistrates and prosecutors to the nature, extent and impacts of environmental crimes should continue as a key awareness-raising mechanism in supporting the handing down of appropriate sentences.

A critical initiative that did emanate from the above-mentioned discussion, was the bringing into effect of the Criminal Matters Amendment Act, 2015 (Act No. 18 of 2015) that included several new offences for which there is now a ‘reverse onus’ on the accused to show that they are entitled to bail. Of specific relevance for the illegal trade or export of rhino horn is the inclusion of specific offences in terms of the Prevention of Organised Crime Act (Chapter 2, 3, 4) into schedule 5 of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No. 51 of 1977), as these crimes are executed by criminal syndicates for which charges such as racketeering and money laundering would be appropriate. Where these charges are being investigated, the onus will be on the accused to demonstrate why s/he is entitled to bail, rather than the onus being on the State to show why the accused should not be released on bail.

(b) During the course of 2009 and 2010, the Department of Environmental Affairs collaborated with the Department of Water Affairs (DWA), as it was then known, and the DOJ&CD to undertake a feasibility study into the establishment of dedicated environmental courts. While the results of the study highlighted the highly complex legal and scientific considerations required in the proper investigation, prosecution and adjudication of these types of offences, the statistics showed that the volume of cases being handed down to the NPA for prosecution, at that particular time, did not warrant the establishment of a dedicated environmental court. Subsequent to this and based on the number of rhino related cases linked to the Kruger National Park, the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has recently decided to open the Skukuza Regional Court with effect from 7 March 2017. In addition to the ongoing awareness-raising initiatives of the department in relation to magistrates and prosecutors, it has also recently presented a round of advanced training for Environmental Management Inspectors focusing on criminal investigation techniques and procedures.

(c) The department already works with those authorities handling enforcement in relation to corruption, fraud and forgery. Once these aspects are identified to be present in a particular matter, the department engages with the relevant SAPS units and refers the matter for further investigation by these authorities. NW486E

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20 March 2017 - NW479

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the rationale for seconding Mr Collins Letsoalo to the position of Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) and the Road Traffic Management Corporation and (b) what steps does she intend to take with regard to his alleged unacceptable conduct at PRASA?

Reply:

a) Mr Letsoalo was seconded to both PRASA and TMC to act as GCEO and CEO respectively to temporarily close the gaps, that we created by the departure of the incumbents.

b) The Department is not aware of Mr Letsoalo’s unacceptable conduct to PRASA

ff: The honorable members are requested to supply the department with details to enable proper investigation and relevant action

20 March 2017 - NW474

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister Transport

Whether her department procured an y services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Coouncil; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured,(ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case? NW530F REPLY The Department of Transport did not procure any services from / or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council. The reason is because no bids or quotations were awarded to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/ or (d) the Black Business Council.

Reply:

The Department of Transport did not procure any services from / or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council.

The reason is because no bids or quotations were awarded to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/ or (d) the Black Business Council.

20 March 2017 - NW531

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the current status of the traffic control lights at the (a) north and (b) south weighbridge stations on the N12 at Potchefstroom in the Tlokwe Local Municipality; (2) Whether the cameras were installed at each of the specified weighbridge stations; if not, in each case, (a) why not and (b) what happened to the specified cameras; is so (i) on what date were the cameras installed and (ii) what ae the further relevant details; (3) What are the minimum amount of hours that each of the weighbridge stations are operational on each day of the week?

Reply:

1. The traffic lights at the weighbridge on N12:

 (A) Northern side traffic lights are performing satisfactory and improvements are underway to increase visibility and prevent possible fraudulent activity that might occur during weighing process.

(b) Southern side 2trafiic lights are operational and never had problems since they were installed.

2. The cameras were installed at each specified weighbridge station and are functioning well, and they are efficient especially in dealing with fraud and corruption in this environment.

 (a) And (b) fall away.

(b) (i) Cameras were installed about two years ago.

3. The minimum operational hours on average per day are 8 hours and 40 hours per week, for both North and South Bound stations.

17 March 2017 - NW354

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 01 April 2016?

Reply:

Kindly note that the vehicles of the Minister and Deputy Minister were purchased in 2014 and therefore the response to this question is still the same as that we gave to question no 259 in July 2014 which reads as follows:

The New Executive was announced in May 2014 and is setting up departments according the proclamation by the President dated the 3 July 2014.

Government is committed to apply austerity measures as spelt out by Cabinet and each Ministry is expected to inherit existing infrastructure. However, should there be none the normal government procurement process will be followed.While Government seeks value for money, it will source purchases from the local market in line with a commitment to support local industry and producers of goods and services.

Official vehicles are the property of the state and are used on official duty for direct interaction with communities and stakeholders as part of the Public Participation programmes and Parliamentary programmes of Ministers. These enable Ministers to fulfil their duties which may call for their presence in different parts of the country.

When official vehicles are purchased for Ministerial use, procurement is done according to an existing framework and guidelines that stipulate that new purchases of vehicles may take place when the currently provided official vehicle for that office has reached 120 000 km or 5 years, whichever comes first. 

Official vehicles may (sometimes) experience serious mechanical problems or could be in a poor condition.  In such cases, the respective Department may approve the replacements of such a vehicle, subject to obtaining a detailed mechanical report by the vehicle manufacturer or approved dealer.

The total purchase price of the vehicle chosen by the Member may not exceed in respect of a prescribed percentage of the inclusive annual remuneration package of an Executive Member.

 

17 March 2017 - NW361

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputies (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

 

Question (aaa)

2014/15

Make

Model

Price

Date purchased

(i)

Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Mercedes Benz

ML 350 BlueTec (Black)

R716 500.00

16/8/2013

 

Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Mercedes Benz

ML 350 BlueTec(Silver)

R784 190.00

06/9/2013

 

Question (bbb)

2015/16

Make

Model

Price

Date purchased

(i)

Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Mercedes Benz

ML 350 (Black)

R716 500.00

As per table (aaa) – vehicle not replaced

 

Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Mercedes Benz

ML 350 (Silver)

R784 190.00

As per table (aaa) –vehicle not replaced

*No vehicles purchased since 1 April 2016 to date.

Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development

  1. Did not purchase any vehicle in the 2014/15, 2015/16 financial years and since 1 April 2016. The vehicles Deputy Minister is currently using have been bought in the 2013/14 financial year.
  2. The table below provides details of vehicles purchased for use by the Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development:

Question type

FINANCIAL YEARS

 

2014-15

2015-16

Since 1 April 2016

1. Make

Two (2) Toyota Lexus

No vehicle purchased in the 2015-16 financial year, and since 1 April 2016 to date. The Deputy Minister is currently using the same vehicles purchased in July 2014.

2. Model

ES250 EX

 

3. Price

R438 152.00 per vehicle

 

4. Date purchased

July 2014

 

N.B: The two vehicles are split as follows: One vehicle for usage in Cape Town and surrounding areas, and the other vehicle for usage in Pretoria and surrounding areas.

Deputy Minister of Correctional Services

  1. (b) (c)(d) (i) The Deputy Minister of Correctional Services has two official vehicles. A Mercedes Benz S400 which is utilised in Pretoria and Mercedes Benz ML400 for Cape Town. The details of official vehicles for the Deputy Minister as follows:

(ii)(aa)(aaa)(bbb)(bb)

  1. Make
  1. Model

(c)Price

(d) date on which each vehicle was purchased

Date used by his deputies

2014-15

MERCEDES BENZ

S400

R1 198 834.19

2014/09/03

2014/2015 to date

2014-15

MERCEDES BENZ

ML400

R1 200 000.00

2014/09/03

2014/2015 to date

2015-16

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2015-16

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2016-17

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2016-17

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

17 March 2017 - NW472

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether his department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr MzwaneleManyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

a. Mr MzwaneleManyi

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

b. Progressive Professionals Forum

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

c. Decolonisation Fund

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

d. Black Business Council

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

17 March 2017 - NW431

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) With reference to her department’s draft regulations for the domestic trade in rhinoceros horn, or a part, product or derivative of rhinoceros horn, published in Notice 74 in Government Gazette 40601 on 8 February 2017, how (a) do the references to non-commercial purposes tie in with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species resolution regarding rhinoceros, (b) will she ascertain that any person importing rhinoceros horn will not sell the horn commercially, (c) will she ensure that the freight agents are authorised to import and export rhinoceros horn and (d) will the freight agents attain authorisation; (2) whether persons residing in South Africa but who are not South African citizens will be able to own (a) live or (b) dead rhinoceros; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) (a) who may export rhinoceros horn, (b) how will the Environmental Management Inspectorate and any other authorised officials verify the authenticity of permits and (c) what training will they receive in this regard?

Reply:

 

  1. (a)In terms of Article III 3. (c) of the text of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) a Management Authority of the State of import can grant an import permit if it is satisfied that the specimen is not to be used for primarily commercial purposes. The permit issued then reflects that it’s for personal purposes. Further guidance on the interpretation of the term “primarily commercial purposes” is provided in a Resolution, i.e. Resolution Conf. 5.10 (Rev. CoP15) – Definition of ‘primarily commercial purposes’. The following strict provisions in the text of the Convention are important to note in this regard:

A CITES import permit must be issued first by the CITES Management Authority of the importing country (import permit is required before an export permit can be issued). Before an import permit can be issued:

    1. a Scientific Authority of the country of import must have advised that the import of the rhino horn will be for purposes which are not detrimental to the survival of the species involved; and
    2. the Management Authority of the country of import must be satisfied that the rhino horn is not to be used for primarily commercial purposes.

When satisfied that such a CITES import permit has been issued, the exporting country (South Africa) can then issue an export permit in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004) (NEMBA), provided that:

    1. a Scientific Authority of South Africa has advised that such export will not be detrimental to the survival of that species; and
    2. the Management Authority of South Africa is satisfied that the rhino horn was not obtained in contravention of South Africa’s biodiversity legislation.

It should be noted that the above provisions are legally binding on all Parties to the Convention and non-compliance with provisions result in a Party being subjected to compliance procedures, which could lead to trade suspensions. These provisions are included in the provisions of the CITES Regulations promulgated in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No 10 of 2004) and the proposed regulations introduce further restrictions provided for in terms of Article XIV 1. (a) of the Convention that gives Parties the right to adopt stricter domestic measures.

(b) The draft regulations propose that, before a CITES export permit will be issued, the CITES Management Authority of the importing country must first confirm in writing that it has adequate domestic legislation in place to ensure that the rhino horn, once imported, will not be used in a manner that would be in conravention with the provisions of CITES as far as it relates to the importation of Appendix I specimens.

(c) Yes. A person is required to obtain a permit in terms of NEMBA to import or export a specimen of a listed threatened or protected species. These draft regulations pertaining to the domestic trade in rhino horns require that all export permits must be endorsed at the port of exit (this is already a requirement in terms of the CITES Regulations, 2010). The draft regulations further propose that rhino horns may only be exported via OR Tambo International Airport, and only by a freight agent who is authorised to do so in terms of an export permit. The endorsement of the permit at OR Tambo International Airport upon exportation of the rhino horn is the means to ensure that the freight agent is duly authorised to export the rhino horns. This restriction will ensure that all exports are directed through a specific process and will facilitate monitoring and enforcement without disrupting detection activities at OR Tambo and all other ports of entry and exit.

(d) Yes. Black rhino is listed as an endangered species in terms of section 56 of NEMBA, and white rhino is listed as a protected species and therefore permits area required in terms of section 57 of NEMBA to carry out restricted activities (including export) involving rhino specimens. The procedure to obtain permits in terms of NEMBA, is prescribed in the Threatened or Protected Species Regulations, 2007; this procedure also applies for the application of a permit to export rhino horn. Freight agents must follow this procedure to submit their applications for the exportation of rhino horn to the relevant issuing authority. The latter is determined in terms of section 87A of NEMBA.

  1. (a)Yes. The NEMBA does not prevent a person who is not a citizen of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) or a permanent resident within the RSA, to own a live rhino, provided that such a person has a permit issued in terms of NEMBA, for the possession of live rhino. However, to obtain a possession permit, such person must prove legal acquisition of the live rhino; e.g. provide a copy of a permit to purchase/ receive live rhino.

(b) Yes. A person referred to in Paragraph (2)(a) will be legally in possession of a dead rhino, if the live rhino he/ she has purchased/ received legally, dies, whether the mortality is due to natural causes or as a result of poaching.

  1. (a)The provisions of CITES do not impose a restriction as to who may export rhino horn, provided that the appropriate permit procedure referred to in Paragraph (1)(a) is followed. The draft regulations do not intend to impose a restriction in this regard, and clarifies that persons who are not citizens of the Republic of South Africa or permanent residents within the RSA, and who legally own rhino or who have obtained rhino horn legally within the RSA, may also export rhino horn, provided that the CITES provisions referred to above and the requirements contained in the draft regulations are met.

(b)& (c) The need for a CITES import or export permit is not a new requirement in terms of these draft regulations; this permit requirement has previously been in place in terms of provincial conservation legislation, and since 2010 in terms of the national CITES Regulations. As a result, Environmental Management Inspectors have already been trained in the ability to verify the authenticity of CITES permits. Additional training will be provided prior to the implementation of the final set of regulations to ensure EMI’s are aware of the restrictions relating to export. It should also be borne in mind that these trained EMI’s are already deployed and are working at OR Tambo, endorsing permits, monitoring exports and imports and undertaking detection.

 

17 March 2017 - NW430

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) Why was the press conference scheduled to announce her department’s highly anticipated rhinoceros management programme postponed and (b) by what date will the specified press conference take place?

Reply:

 

(a) The media conference was postponed because the date that it was scheduled for clashed with the press briefings of other Government programmes such as the Budget and others, all of which was happening on the same day hence only two journalists had confirmed attendance and this was not going to help. The other reason was that the other Ministers within the Security Cluster were also unavailable.

(b) In light of the fact that the press conference had to be postponed, the department took a decision to release the comprehensive media statement outlining the success of the Integrated Strategic Management of Rhinoceros, and including the rhino poaching and arrest statistics on 27 February 2017. The statement is attached, for ease of reference.

Minister Molewa highlights progress on Integrated Strategic Management of Rhinoceros

node

27 February 2017

 

This statement covers the period January through December 2016, which is inclusive of the period September to December 2016.  

As you will all know, rhino poaching is a National Priority Crime, and we as government continue to work as a team in the implementation of the Integrated Strategic Management of Rhinoceros.

This is our multi-sectoral, interdisciplinary approach involving Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and the South African National Parks (SANParks), the Department of Defence (as a leader of the SANDF) the South African Police Service (SAPS) and its Directorate of Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) also known as the Hawks, the State Security Agency (SSA), the South African Revenue Service (SARS), the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, as well as the provincial conservation authorities.

Our respective government departments continue to work in unison with the private sector, communities and civil society in ensuring that our integrated approach yields success.

We have stated on numerous occasions that the media has an important role to play in raising awareness about the issue of rhino poaching.

A number of media houses have therefore been instrumental in mobilizing the South African public at large around our approach to conserving our country’s rhino and I want to encourage you to keep up the good work.

The Integrated Strategic Management Approach comprises four pillars, namely:

  • Compulsory Interventions
  • Managing Rhino Populations
  • Long-term sustainability Interventions, and
  • New interventions

All of the four pillars are implemented in the context of:

  • Regional and International cooperation.

These have delivered a number of satisfying results that we will address during this briefing.

1.        Compulsory Interventions 

1.1    Arrests, investigations and prosecutions

As you are aware, enforcement operations related to rhino are led by the South African Police Service (SAPS) supported by the afore-mentioned departments and State Agencies.

These enforcement operations form a firm base from which SANParks, KZN Ezemvelo Wildlife, and our provincial parks authorities and agencies execute their well-planned anti-poaching operations.  Amongst these are enforcement operations that are implemented in KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga and Limpopo and are also coordinated by the Mission Area Joint Operations Command (MAJOC) which is based in Skukuza. The Kruger National Park experiences relatively higher levels of rhino poaching, where due focus is given.

The Intensive Protection Zone (IPZ) approach in the KNP is working well and ensures more tailored solutions to the different protection zones, including for the protection of elephant. Key to this success has been the development of a world class anti–poaching unit like an Air wing, a Canine Unit, a Special Ranger capability, Protection Services and an Environmental Crime Investigation unit.

In addition to the existing interventions, we continue to identify and use game-changing technological interventions as critical to winning our battle against poaching. These include customized technology systems primarily aimed at situational awareness, such as early warning, detection and tracking systems. We appreciate the support of the donor community and the Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) for their innovation and partnership in this regard.

We are pleased to announce that in the period under review, there has been an increase in the number of arrests for poaching-related offences inside the Kruger National Park, the area hardest hit by poaching.

During 2016, the SAPS reported that a total of 680 poachers and traffickers were arrested for rhino-related poaching offences nationally. This is a marked increase in arrests from  317 in 2015. Of this number, 417 were arrested both within and outside the Kruger National Park.

A total of 148 firearms were seized inside the Park in 2016, and 6 just outside the Park.

The Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation continues with its efforts towards disrupting and combating wildlife traffickers during 2016 and participated in several national and international initiatives in combating wildlife trafficking with national and international partners.

The Hawks currently have other projects under investigation.

We herewith provide an update on a number of high-profile cases.

  • In the matter of State v Groenewald and 11 others the next court date: trial ready is scheduled for the 15th of June 2017. The accused face 1 840 charges of racketeering.
  • In the matter of State v Ras and 10 Others, the accused face 318 charges of racketeering. The case has been provisionally postponed to the 15th of September 2017.
  • In the matter of State v Big Joe Nyalunga and 9 others the accused face 73 charges of racketeering. The next court date is on the 14th of March 2017.
  • In the matter of State v Sithole and 21 others the accused face charges of racketeering. The case went to trial on the 25th of January 2017.
  • In the matter of State vs Gwala and two others the next court date is 17 March 2017.  It is envisaged that the trial in this case will proceed in the second part of 2017.

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development recognizes that to ensure   success on rhino anti-poaching, initiatives need to be adequately measured, cases have to be investigated and successfully prosecuted,  and those found guilty of rhino poaching convicted.

In the period under review a number of rhino poaching related offences went to trial.

The following are the highlights of some of the successful convictions.

  • In the matter of State v Rodger and 2 others, the accused faced charges of illegal hunting of rhino, possession of rhino horn and the illegal possession of firearms and ammunition. They were convicted on the 08th of March 2016. Accused number one was found guilty and sentenced to five (5) years imprisonment. Accused number two was found guilty and sentenced to twenty (20) years imprisonment. Accused number three was found guilty and sentenced to nine (9) years imprisonment.
  • In the matter of State v Tlou and 5 others, the accused were charged with illegal dealing in rhino horn and the illegal hunting of rhino. On the 11th of March 2016 five of the accused were found guilty and sentenced to 15 years imprisonment. The sixth accused was found guilty and sentenced to 10 years imprisonment.
  • In the matter of State v Pahmbudzirai, the accused was charged with the illegal hunting of rhino and the possession of rhino horn. On the 11th of August 2016 the accused was found guilty and sentenced to 12 years imprisonment.
  • In the matter of State v Kubai and 1 other the accused were charged with the illegal hunting of rhino and the possession of rhino horn. On the 15th of August 2016 both accused were found guilty and sentenced to eleven (11) years imprisonment.

In order to successfully tackle the illicit trade in rhino horn, it is key that we detect and prevent incidents of smuggling, working with our colleagues in neighbouring countries.

We are pleased to inform you that the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has decided to open the Skukuza Regional Court with effect from 7th March 2017.

Currently, high profile cases are being transferred to the Skukuza Regional Court. The decision to open this as a Regional Court will ensure that case turnaround times are expedited. 

1.2 Ports of Entry and Exit

In 2016, the Green Scorpions trained 905 border officials on initiatives focused on the Illicit International Cross Border Movement of Endangered Species.

In December 2016, 90 judicial officers from four different countries participated in a Judicial Colloquium related to the adjudication of crimes relating to biodiversity, the result of a partnership between DEA, the GEF-UNEP Rhino Programme and the South African Judicial Education Institute.

The GEF-UNEP Programme has also enabled the renovation of a new laboratory at the  Veterinary Genetics Laboratory of the University of Pretoria where the rhino DNA samples are analysed. This additional capacity has also enabled us to analyse some of the backlog of routine rhino horn samples.  During 2016, we also received rhino DNA samples from seizures in Mozambique and Vietnam. This  has enabled us to link these seizures to illegal activities in South Africa relating to rhino and providing investigators with critical information to guide further investigations.

1.3 Poaching Statistics

We are pleased to report that our Integrated Strategic Management Approach is yielding the desired results. The 2016 statistics indicate that we registered a decline in the number of rhino poached, both for the country as a whole and for KNP. A total of 1 054 rhino were poached in 2016, compared to 1 175 in the same period for 2015, representing a decline of 10.3%.

Specifically for the KNP, a total of 662 rhino carcasses were found in 2016 compared to 826 in 2015. This represents a reduction of 19.85% in 2016. This is despite a continued increase in the number of illegal incursions into the Kruger National Park. 

For 2016 there were a staggering 2883 instances of poaching-related activities (such as poaching camps, contacts, crossings, sightings, tracks and shots fired) in the Park, compared to 2 466 recorded in the same period in 2015. This is an increase of 16.9%.These criminal gangs are armed to the teeth, well-funded and part of transnational syndicates who will stop at nothing to get their hands on rhino horn. This decrease can be attributed to the efforts of our men and women on the ground, especially our rangers.

While there has been a decrease in the number of rhino killed for their horns in the Kruger National Park and Mpumalanga, the number of rhino poached unfortunately increased in some other provinces. This indicates that syndicates are feeling the pressure from the interventions being employed in the KNP. We are therefore prioritising these pressure points through enforcement operations.

It is with concern that we report that in 2016, 46 elephants were poached in the Kruger National Park. The interventions being implemented to counter rhino poaching are also used to respond to this emerging threat.

It is clear that more financial resources are required to address this challenge that we are experiencing in terms of both rhino and elephant poaching.

2. Managing Rhino Populations

2.1 Translocations

SANParks continues with the translocation of rhino from high risk poaching areas to safer and better suited, secure localities.

This has enabled us to evaluate the progress of our conservation management approach and sets out key actions and strategies needed to ensure the long-term survival and growth of the rhino species in the wild. 

During 2016 eleven rhino were internally translocated away from boundaries in the KNP for security reasons, thereby complimenting the internal movements that started during 2014.

We stated in our last briefing that we were in the process of conducting an evaluation of internal translocations. The evaluation will be formally completed by March this year. 

It is important to state that the moving of these animals always carries with it inherent risks, especially in respect of old cows and territorial bulls. But what is encouraging is that young cows and sub-adult males integrate easily into existing rhino populations.

2.2 Biological Management

Our Rhino Stronghold Initiative continues, though the drought has affected our operations as it did for most of last year. Translocation has proven a viable biological management tool to ensure the long-term sustainability and safety of South Africa’s rhino population.  During 2016, a total of 106 rhino were translocated to private rhino strongholds, following suitability assessments conducted by SANParks late last year.Overall, our translocations have been successful and no trans-located rhino were poached.

We are all aware of the damaging effect this drought continues to have on our country, and the KNP has not been immune.  We have found that the deaths of rhino in the KNP, as a result of the drought of drought condition, has risen.

During September 2016, a rhino survey using the scientifically accepted block count method recorded that a total of 6 649 - 7 830 white rhino lived in Kruger National Park.

This is lower than the 8 365 - 9 337 that lived in the Kruger National Park during 2015. It must be noted that the natural deaths of white rhino increased due to the unprecedented drought conditions.

A total of 349 – 465 black rhino lived in Kruger National Park in 2016 compared to 313 – 453 in 2015.  The drought effect was not as noticeable on the black rhinos.

2.4 Rhino Orphans 

Adding to the impact of rhino management strategies, are ongoing efforts to recover and rear young rhino calves left orphaned through poaching incidents. The Peace Parks Foundation, through the Rhino Protection Programme, continues to provide crucial operational support to the rescue, care and rehabilitation of rhino orphans and currently there are approximately 28 orphans under the care of Kruger National Park and partners, with a 10 being cared for by Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife.

3. Long-term Sustainability Interventions

3.1 Amendment of Norms and Standards

We have finalised the amendments to the Norms and Standards for the marking of rhinoceros and rhinoceros horn, and the hunting of rhinoceros for trophy hunting purposes. These amendments are now subject to the approval processes for implementation.

3.2 The Moratorium on the sale of rhino horn; the proposed regulations for the Domestic Trade in Rhino Horn; and the Proposed Prohibition on Powdering and Shaving of Rhino Horn

On 8 February 2017, we published three notices for public participation.

The first notice contains provisions relating to proposed regulations for the domestic trade in rhino horn, the second one proposes prohibitions on the powdering and shaving of rhino horn, and the third notice contains a proposal to remove the Eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) from the list of invasive species and to include it in the list of threatened or protected species (as a protected species). The latter ensures that all rhino sub-species are covered by the proposed legislative provisions.

By way of a brief background, a moratorium or prohibition on the domestic trade in rhino horn was implemented in 2009 as one of the measures to address the illegal killing of rhino and the illegal trade in rhino horn.

This prohibition  was implemented to enable government to develop and implement compliance, regulatory, monitoring and enforcement mechanisms to ensure domestic trade is well managed and regulated; while illegal activities are prosecuted.

We are convinced that the implementation of the 2009 moratorium  was a rational and reasonable measure that contributed positively to the conservation and protection of the rhino in South Africa.

In November 2015 the High Court of South Africa Gauteng Division ordered that the moratorium be set aside with retrospective effect. This followed an application brought by Johan Kruger and Another against the Department.

We have subsequently filed an application for leave to appeal this judgement to the Constitutional Court and we await the outcome of the court process. Until then the moratorium remains in place.

In considering actions to be taken relating to the moratorium and in response to the ongoing litigation, we developed a  set of regulations that are in compliance with the Integrated Strategic Management  of Rhino Approach adopted by Cabinet in 2014, Sections 56 and 57(2) of theNational Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (NEMBA), the Threatened or Protected Species (TOPS) Regulations, existing CITES Regulations relating to the import, export or re-export of rhino specimens, as well as applicable provincial and national legislation.

This set of proposed regulations will ensure that there is no gap in regulatory provisions, thus ensuring the strict regulation of a prospective domestic trade in rhino horn. The commercial international trade in rhino horn is prohibited in terms of the CITES.

3.3 Communities

Community involvement in conservation is critical to the success of the Integrated Strategic Management approach. The Department, working closely with the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform with strategic partners from government, conservation agencies, NGOs and private sector is implementing detailed initiatives to actively facilitate transformation of the sector through land access and support programmes for new entrants.

The Biodiversity Economy provides a unique opportunity to enhance the livelihoods of communities based on the natural resources that they have at their disposal. Through the Biodiversity Economy Strategy, a number of initiatives aimed at unlocking the economic potential of biological resources have emerged.

These support programmes include basic infrastructure development, capacity building, game donation, business plan compilation, feasibility studies and facilitate market access. The wildlife economy component has to date provided support to community owned conservation enterprises in Mayibuye in KwaZulu-Natal, Double drift in the Eastern Cape, Balyepe, Leshiba and Mabaleng in Limpopo Province, Sepelong in the Free State, Nkambeni and Gidjana Bevhula around the KNP. The expected impact will be job creation, skills development and entrepreneurship. The average financial spending from the Department on these community intervention is R8m per project, excluding game donations and private sector investment.

In addition, as part of the implementation of the Biodiversity Economy Strategy, I am pleased to announce that we are in the process of consulting with provincial conservation authorities on a ground-breaking new initiative around game donation to previously disadvantaged communities. This is part of our efforts to transform the sector and ensure that we create opportunities for previously disadvantaged communities.

Making communities owners of wildlife remains key to our strategy. In this regard, as part of the implementation,  SANParks has called for public expressions of interest that will create opportunities for emerging game farmers around national parks to provide mechanisms for the transparent and equitable supply of founder herds of game to applicants and raise awareness for conservation, protected area management and sustainable utilisation principles in the wildlife industry.

The People and Parks flagship programme continues to be a key component of our community support strategy. We continue to engage with communities surrounding our parks and jointly planning with them on issues of mutual interest. The Department is currently implementing 30 support projects around the country in the various protected areas with a total budget of R1 334 098 200.  An additional 14 projects across all provinces are in the pipeline with an anticipated budget of R352 685 216. Through the People and Parks Window of the Environment Programme, we have created 1 585 408 job opportunities.

Through the implementation of the programme, facilitation of various pertinent aspects of communities related to protected areas management is diligently facilitated. In the eighth conference, which was hosted in September last year, significant strides were made,  where eight tittle deeds  were awarded and accompanying R1.2 million compensation each for North West claimed protected areas were transferred to the local communities.

At the recent conference, we endorsed the establishment of the Youth in Conservation Programme which seeks to mobilize for youth participation in matters of conservation. The inaugural youth workshop that conceptualized the action plan was held last month.

Furthermore, as part of the long-term sustainability measures, the DEA embarked on a capacity building programmes targeting rhino poaching hotspot provinces, and to date we have trained 120 young people in Mpumalanga, Limpopo and North West. Plans are in place to roll out this youth programme in the remaining provinces (40 per province = 240).

The Kids in Parks programme  continues to target a minimum of 5000 youth across the country. This programme involves young people at an early age, thus creating a sense of ownership towards conservation.

SANParks is in the process of conducting land suitability assessments on several properties owned by communities and entrepreneurs so that we can transfer animals to them, in line with the objectives of our Biodiversity Economy Strategy.

4.  International and regional cooperation 

4.1 Southern African Development Community (SADC)

The implementation of the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching Strategy (LEAP) remains a priority. During a recent extraordinary joint meeting of the South African Development Community (SADC) Ministers of Environment and Natural Resources and of the Organ on Defence, Peace and Security Co-operation which took place in Swaziland (from 1 to 3 February 2017), it was agreed that the implementation of the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching Strategy must be fast-tracked.

This means that at the highest level within both the SADC security and environmental structures there is commitment to establish National Wildlife Crime Prevention Task Forces in order to facilitate the implementation of this Strategy:

  • To fast-track the implementation of the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching Strategy (LEAP), including the establishment and operationalization of the Wildlife Crime Prevention Coordination Unit (WCPCU);
  • To put in place harmonized regional mechanisms for dealing with wildlife crime effectively, improve inter-agency cooperation and coordination between law enforcement officers to further align and harmonize law enforcement efforts; and
  • Consider creating a window for wildlife under the SADC Regional Development Fund to support conservation and law enforcement as part of resource mobilization.

The Joint Ministers of Environment and Natural Resources and of the Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation further:  

  • Considered and adopted the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching (LEAP) Strategy;
  • Urged SADC Member States which have not established multi-agency National Wildlife Crime Prevention Task Forces yet, to do so in order to facilitate the implementation of the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching (LEAP) Strategy;
  • Urged Member States to prioritize and integrate activities in the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching (LEAP) Strategy into their national plans;
  • Recommended to Council to approve the establishment of a coordination, assessment and monitoring mechanism in the form of a Joint Committee of Ministers of Environment and Natural Resources, the Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation and other relevant authorities to oversee implementation of the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching (LEAP) Strategy. The Committee will also serve as a platform for sharing of information and best practices, and meet annually;
  • Recommended to Council to approve the establishment of a Wildlife Crime Prevention and Coordination Unit to coordinate implementation of the crime and law enforcement component of the SADC LEAP Strategy as part of the Secretariat structure review process and that it be placed in the Directorate of the Organ; and
  • Directed the Secretariat to enhance synergies and linkages with all relevant stakeholders in the implementation of the SADC Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching (LEAP) Strategy.

4.2 Mozambique 

Collaboration with the Government of Mozambique continues to improve and the partnership has been greatly successful in the past year.

Significant progress has been made in terms of constructing new houses and relocating families. Over 30% of the families from eight villages have been relocated. With the remaining 70% of families still to be relocated, this project is now expected to be completed in 2018. It has been impressed upon us that the government of Mozambique puts priority on quality and humanity within this resettlement process.

An agreement between the government of Mozambique and its Private Concessionaires located on the Eastern boundary of the Kruger National Park was signed on 22 February in Maputo. The essence of this agreement is to formalize the involvement of Private Sector on enhanced protection of Wildlife as well as improvement of livelihoods of adjacent communities. This is a replication of what we in South Africa have done with our concessionaires on the Western side of the Kruger national Park and thus a direct result of our collaboration.

Specific interventions focused on the youth of the two countries were agreed upon. As a result, a youth awareness programme was developed as part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Areas (GLTFCA) initiative.  The aim of this programme would be to develop interventions which are specifically designed to createawareness amongst the youth on the value of the natural heritage of the two countries.

Following this, community members from the villages of Mavodze, Chibotane, Macavene and Mahlaule living in, and adjacent to, the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique were taken across the border into Kruger National Park (KNP) from 22 to 27 August 2016 on a Youth Programme Pilot Project.  The main aim of the pilot was to empower local communities, create awareness and promote wise use of natural resources and was developed under the guidance of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park Joint Management Board and its implementing agencies in Mozambique and South Africa (SANParks). This pilot was implemented by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation (Laureus) in collaboration with the Peace Parks Foundation (PPF).

The Joint Management Board is in the process of evaluating the pilot youth project, after which a framework to guide the development and implementation of a longitudinal programme will be designed. The longer term programme will also be extended to include the Zimbabwean component of the TFCA.

4.3 Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Vietnam

Our work with Lao is part of the strategic collaboration with rhino range and consumer states, aimed at neutralising the threat of organised transnational criminal syndicates involved in the illegal wildlife trade.

A Memorandum of Understanding in the field of Biodiversity Conservation and Management was signed with the Lao People’s Democratic Republic during the 17th Conference of the Parties to CITES in September 2016.

The second phase of a Vietnamese Youth Education Project, implemented in partnership with Peace Parks Foundation and Wilderness Foundation, was launched in schools throughout Ho Chi Minh City in May 2016.

The campaign utilizes print, social and entertainment media integrated into the school, to educate and empower youth as ambassadors for rhino protection and conservation. 

4.4. International Cooperation

During 2016 South Africa participated in the Hanoi Conference on Illegal Wildlife Trade in Vietnam, a follow-up from conferences in London in 2014 and Kasane in Botswana in 2015.

Recognizing the significant scale and detrimental economic, environmental, security, and social impacts of the illegal trade in wildlife, much of the focus was on implementation of actions following the commitments made at the previous events.

In 2016 South Africa also successfully hosted the 17th Conference of the Parties to CITES and adopted a number of decisions relating to the illegal international trade in wildlife; combating wildlife cybercrime and strengthening wildlife forensic capacity.

All Parties were urged to review the implementation of the Resolution on the conservation and trade in rhino. The resolution urges all parties to adopt and implement comprehensive legislation and enforcement controls aimed at reducing illegal trade in rhino parts and derivatives, and that make provision for strong penalties, (including custodial sentences) to deter illegal killing of rhinoceros and illegal possession of and trade in rhino horn.

Other resolutions of importance include the Resolution aimed at prohibiting, preventing, detecting and countering corruption which facilitates activities conducted in violation of the Convention.

The Resolution on enforcement further strengthens international cooperation, the sharing of best practice and the mobilization of funds for sustainable interventions to combat wildlife trafficking in general.

The COP also adopted decisions directed at the CITES Secretariat to conduct missions to Vietnam and Mozambique and to report to the CITES Standing Committee.

4.5 International Law Enforcement Engagements

In a bid to improve coordination and communication between law enforcement agencies from different countries we continue to support and engage with the International Consortium to Combat Wildlife Crime (ICCWC) and in particular the CITES Secretariat, INTERPOL and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), that brings together law enforcement officials in African and South East Asian countries.

The Hawks have further strengthened their priority actions through engagement with international agencies, partnering with the Asset Recovery Inter Agency Network Southern Africa (ARINSA), the Wildlife Inter-Regional Enforcement (WIRE) group harnessing the support of international partners for those priorities that involve transnational syndicates. This addresses wildlife trafficking, combining resources and efforts and facilitating training opportunities and technology development.

The management of rhino populations aimed at optimising birth rates is one of the focus areas of the Rhino Lab that was held in August 2016 as part of the broader Operation Phakisa programme. Guided by the outcomes of the Cabinet endorsed Committee of Inquiry report, the lab resulted in the establishment of a number of initiatives with detailed action plans. They will further strengthen the integrated approach to Rhino protection and conservation in South Africa.

The groundwork has been laid and excellent progress has been made in the past two years.

The successes we have achieved are because of, inter alia, our dedicated law-enforcement authorities, dedicated prosecutors, customs and excise officials and the Department of Environmental Affairs’ Green Scorpions. They are to be commended for the great work they have been doing in this space.

All South Africans are urged to report any wildlife crime so that we, as an integrated law enforcement effort team, can continue to successfully act against organised criminal enterprises fostering rhino poaching.

For media inquiries contact:

Albi Modise

Cell: +27 83 490 2871

 

17 March 2017 - NW400

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Edwards, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to the site inspection at Portion 100, Bokfontein 448JQ, by her department, (a) what corrective measures will the owner of Microlife Organic Products implement and (b) by what date will the owner of the specified site comply with the implementation of the specified measures?

Reply:

 

The Environmental Management Inspectors from the Department of Environmental Affairs did not undertake an inspection at this site. We have been informed however, that Inspectors from the North West Department of Rural, Environment and Agricultural Development (NW READ), which is the department responsible for issuing the Environmental Authorisation in respect of the facility, did carry out such an inspection.

A. The matter was investigated and it appeared that the facility is undertaking certain processes and using equipment which are not included in the Environmental Authorisation. Accordingly, an administrative enforcement process was initiated by the North West READ and a pre-compliance notice was served on Microlife on 2 March 2017. This notice provides the facility with an opportunity to provide representations (as required by administrative law) in response to the allegations against them and to provide reasons why a final compliance notice should not be issued. We are advised that the representation from Microlife was received on 6 March 2017 and is currently being evaluated by the provincial officials. Thereafter, a decision will then be made as to whether or not a compliance notice with corrective instructions will be issued.

B. As mentioned above, although an administrative enforcement action has been initiated, further investigation and review of information is required prior to making a decision on any final instructions.

 

16 March 2017 - NW385

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) Whether the Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSETA) incurred a cost of R41 775,42 for the rental of a vehicle on behalf of its board chairperson for the period 18 to 22 October 2016; if so, (a) what was the purpose, (b) what are the (i) names and (ii) positions of individuals who were transported, (c) what are the names of the places that were visited during each specified trip and (d) what was the reason for using a luxury 4x4 vehicle; (2) (a) what is the detailed breakdown of all costs incurred on the specified trip, (b) how were the costs paid for and (c) which board members and staff qualify for assistance of this nature; (3) Whether the costs incurred were in line with the official travel policy of AgriSETA; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) by whom was the policy adopted; (4) Whether any person has been held accountable for the costs incurred; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes.

According to the Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSETA):

(a) “The purpose of the trip was to meet the former Chairperson, Professor Mayende, to finalise the hand-over process following his resignation as the Chairperson of the AgriSETA Board to take up the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor for the University of Fort Hare. During this trip, the acting Chairperson scheduled a meeting with the former Member of Executive Council of Agriculture in the Free State, Ms M Qabathe, and the Head of Communications at Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality, Mr Q Khedama, regarding partnerships with AgriSETA.

(b) Names and positions of people transported

(i) Name

(ii) Position

Mr Thami ka Plaatjie

Acting Chairperson of the Board

(c) The following places were visited:

  • Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality; and
  • University of Fort Hare campus in East London.

(d) The acting Chairperson had to attend a meeting in Bloemfontein (Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality) which was followed by a meeting in East London (University of Fort Hare) the next day. As flights could not be found on the specified meeting dates, a decision was taken to use road transport.

2. Based on the information submitted by the SETA, the detailed breakdown of the cost incurred per trip is as follows:

(a) R38 290.30 was incurred for car hire and R3 300.12 for hotel accommodation at the Blue Lagoon Hotel in East London and Protea Hotel in Bloemfontein.

(b) Travel with Flair was appointed by AgriSETA to manage its travel bookings.

(c) Only board members are entitled to use this category of vehicles.”

3. The AgriSETA Policy is silent on this matter.

4. No official has been held accountable, however, the Department is still investigating the matter in terms of the relevant prescripts of the Skills Development Act, No. 97 of 1998 (as amended).

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 385 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

16 March 2017 - NW202

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)How many (a) applications were received (b) places are available, (c) learners are currently enrolled, (d) government-funded educator positions are available and (e) school governing body-funded educators are employed in each school in the (i) Edenvale, (ii) Tembisa and (iii) Kempton Park school districts for the 2017 academic year; (2) what is the average learner to government-funded educator ratio per grade for each of the specified schools?

Reply:

 

The response below was provided by the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Gauteng Department of Education.

(1)

  • A total of 331 625 Grade 1 and 8 applications were received for the 2017 academic year.
  • In terms of the 10th day statistics, the Department had a total number of 355 420 Grade 1 and 8 learners enrolled in the schools in 2016. The Grade 7 learners in the combined schools are not accounted for in the 2017 applications as they were progressed in grade. These learners did not have to apply to Grade 8 as they were already registered in the combined schools. There is, however, sufficient space to accommodate all the 2016 applicants.
  • A total of 331 625 learners were placed as of 20 February 2017.
  • Please see Annexure A for the number of government-funded educator positions and the average learner to government-funded educator ratio for each of the specified schools in the Ekurhuleni district.
  • Please see Annexure B for the number of school governing body-funded educators employed in each of the specified schools in the Ekurhuleni district based on the 2016 data. Please note that the Department is still finalising the collection of 2017 data.

2. Please see Annexure A for the average learner to government-funded educator ratio for each of the specified schools in the Ekurhuleni district.

 

16 March 2017 - NW476

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James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Women in the Presidency

Whether her office procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr MzwaneleManyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

 

(a), (b), (c), and (d), No services were procured and/or payments made.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date………………………..

16 March 2017 - NW387

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) Whether a representative of his department accepted a memorandum highlighting various issues of concern regarding the Maluti Technical and Vocational Education and Training College in April 2016; if so, (2) whether his department attended to (a) any of the issues raised and (b) the request for investigation or a forensic investigation; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what were the findings in each case; (3) whether his department intends to convey its decision to the members of staff who handed over the memorandum; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

(1) The Department received a memorandum from the Maluti Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College dated 6 April 2016. The Director-General and senior managers visited the college on 19 May 2016 and met with the College Council, management and concerned parties on the matters raised.

(2) (a) The Department attended to and resolved all the matters raised, allocating R6.088 million to infrastructure, maintenance and security for all campuses as per the proposal received from the college:

Maluti TVET College Campus

Amount (R)

Bethlehem Campus

2 011 000

Bonamelo Campus

934 000

Itemoheleng Campus

436 000

Kwetlisong Campus

1 197 000

Main Campus

368 000

Harrismith New Building

1 142 000

Total

088 000

The Table below summarise the issues and actions taken.

ISSUE

UPDATE

Maluti Students and Staff Memorandum

The Director-General and Deputy Director-General for TVET convened a meeting on 19 May 2016) with the Maluti TVET College students and staff.

Delivery of outstanding textbooks, protective clothing, tables and chairs

A total of 3 727 textbooks were purchased. Three campuses received protective clothing. 750 Tables and 850 chairs were ordered for three campuses.

Windows and doors should be fixed

Bonamelo’s doors and windows were fixed and the service provider was sent to other campuses to ascertain the need and fix where required. At the main campus, Kwetlisong, Lere la Tshepe and Itemoheleng doors and locks were fixed.

Water crisis

Water supply to each site was a serious challenge due to the drought. The Department of Water Affairs and Sanitation was approached on the matter. The college has managed was then able to source more water to truck to each site. The college also purchased its own water tanker to augment the current supply. In addition more water tanks were installed at each site

Lecturer vacancies due to natural attrition and maternity leave

College has filled lecturer vacancies and continues to do so as and when a need arises.

Students access cards

A service provider was sourced to print student cards for all campuses. All students have student cards.

Audit of all workshop at the college

An audit was conducted in line with the 2013 DHET Resources List. Computers and equipment have been bought for the workshops.

Library access (implementation plan)

Study rooms have been identified and availed while Student Support Service centres are planned to be built at campuses where there are none.

Temporary toilets to be procured

The toilets at Bonamelo and Sefikeng were fixed on the 20 May 2016.

Student Representative Council (SRC) induction

The SRC was inducted on 20 May 2016.

Feedback report on practical exposure of students to courses and workload of lecturers

The Principal will ensure that students are exposed to practicals. A meeting was held with the lecturers of Itemoheleng on 1 June 2016 and Bonamelo on 3 June 2016. The outcome of both meetings were that there was no lecturer who worked more than the maximum contact time of 25 hours per week.

Audit the college registration process and employ staff to focus on registration

An intensive audit of the registration process was undertaken and the outcome was that there is nothing wrong with the process itself. In fact, the campuses that implemented it correctly showed a reduction on time spent during registration.

Circular on criteria used in awarding bursaries to students

The guidelines were explained to students during the induction process.

 

(b) A forensic investigation was conducted at the college and finalised in 2016. The forensic report will be handed over to the College Council for further action.

(3) The college Principal has been providing feedback on a regular basis to staff.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 387 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 March 2017 - NW398

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether the SA Police Service submitted a full report on the forensic audit into alleged financial mismanagement at the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) by the former Executive Director, Chief Financial Officer and others to (a) her and (b) NEDLAC by 23 February 2017; if not, in each case, (i) why not and (ii) by what date is the specified police report expected; if so, (2) Will she provide a copy of the police report to Mr. I M Ollis; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

 

  1. In terms of the NEDLAC forensic investigation case no CAS132/1/015, NPA has informed NEDLAC that the matter is receiving attention and that the provisional report that was to be finalised on the 24th February 2017, has not been completed. The NPA has promised that NEDLAC will be advised in due course when the report is ready.

15 March 2017 - NW399

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Labour

Did her (a) department or (b) Ministry pay for any (i) travel or (ii) subsistence costs for any international trips undertaken by any Member of Parliament in the 2016 calendar year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what are the (aa) names, (bb) amount spent, (cc) purpose of the trip and (dd) any further relevant details?

Reply:

The Department / Minister of Labour did not pay for any Member of Parliament.

15 March 2017 - NW274

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) are the full details of the Tourism Oceans Phakisa initiative and (b) progress have been made on the recommendations of the Marine Tourism Lab to date?

Reply:

A. In 2014, South Africa launched Operation Phakisa which focuses on unlocking the economic potential of the country’s oceans. Initially there were four focus areas selected as new growth areas in the ocean economy, with the objective of growing them and deriving value for the country. These were:

  1. marine transport and manufacturing activities, such as coastal shipping, trans-shipment, boat building, repair and refurbishment;
  2. offshore oil and gas exploration;
  3. aquaculture; and
  4. marine protection services and ocean governance.

 

 During an oceans economy review workshop in 2015, two focus areas were added namely; Coastal and Marine Tourism(CMT) and Small Harbours.

B. The Coastal and Marine Tourism Lab[1] convened on a full-time basis from 11 April to 23 May 2016 with the purpose of identifying specific initiatives to accelerate growth, development and transformation in the sector. The Lab supported the implementation of the Oceans Economy Phakisa, thereby contributing to the President’s 9 Point Plan to accelerate job-creation and inclusive growth. The Lab’s work was guided by six principles namely; economic sustainability, transformation, environmental integrity, community empowerment, responsible tourism, and a community-centred approach. Detailed plans outlining the specific projects in each of these priority initiatives are presently being finalised and will be sent to Cabinet for approval.

[An intense session (five weeks) where all stakeholders come together to identify challenges to economic growth and provide initiatives to address those challenges] 

15 March 2017 - NW362

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Labour

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(a) Toyota, Audi & Jeep

(b) Fortuner 3.0 D. A 6 & Grand Cherokee 3.0 D

(c) Toyota Fortuner = R469 450.88, Audi A 6 = R513 508.08 and Jeep R899 241.00

(d) Toyota Fortuner 21 July 2014, Audi A 6 23 July 2014 and Jeep 21

February 2017

(i) Replacement of the Minister’s old vehicle

(ii) New vehicles for newly appointed Deputy Minister

(aa) (aaa) 2014 / 2015 Financial Year

(bbb) 2015 / 2016 Financial Year, there was not procurement done

(bb) Since 1 April 2016, Jeep Grand Cherokee for the replacement of the Minister’s old vehicle

15 March 2017 - NW397

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Labour

What are the names of (a) each National Economic Development and Labour Council member in each of the four chambers and (b) the organisations that each of the specified members represent?

Reply:

 

DEVELOPMENT CHAMBER DELEGATES

NO.

NAME & SURNAME

CONSTITUENCY

ORGANISATION

1

FaniXaba

Business

BUSA

2

Mpumalanga Myataza

Business

BUSA

3

ZinziMgolodela

Business

BUSA

4

Kevin Cowley

Business

BUSA

5

Nomsa Kula

Business

BUSA

6

SharnaJohardien

Business

BUSA

7

ThamiSkenjana

Business

BBC

8

Zama Ndaba

Business

BBC

9

TafadzwaMupeti

Business

BBC

10

Philip Maseko

Business

BBC

11

PhilaFakude

Business

BUSA

12

Herman Tsebe

Community

DPSA

13

Lucas Qakaza

Community

SANCO

14

Lawrence Bale

Community

SANACO

15

Laura Kganyago

Community

WNC

16

MaloseRamashala

Community

FSCC

17

ThulaneMabuza

Community

SANACO

18

Tumelo Zwane

Community

SAYC

19

ThethiswaMakaya

Community

DPSA

20

Adam Mthombeni

Government

DPW

21

Catherine Mavi

Government

DPW

22

NgubeThokwana

Government

DHS

23

NolwaziMgibe

Government

DPW

24

CJ Abrahams

Government

DPW

25

Devan Pillay

Government

DPW

26

Nyanisile Jack

Government

COGTA

27

Shirley Lloyd

Government

DHET

28

Matthew Parks

Labour

COSATU

29

Godfrey Selematsela

Labour

FEDUSA

30

Tom Bacote

Labour

NACTU

31

Busisiwe Mnisi

Labour

NACTU

32

MaloseKutumela

Labour

NACTU

33

LuthandoBrukwe

Labour

COSATU

34

LebogangMulaisi

Labour

COSATU

35

Mpho Kekana

Labour

NACTU

36

Brenda Modise

Labour

FEDUSA

LABOUR MARKET CHAMBER DELEGATES

NO.

NAME & SURNAME

CONSTITUENCY

ORGANISATION

1

KaizerMoyane

Business

BUSA

2

Elize van der Westhuizen

Business

BUSA

3

Jonathan Goldberg

Business

BUSA

4

Lucio Trentini

Business

BUSA

5

MotsamaiMotlhamme

Business

BUSA

6

Tommy Oliphant

Business

BBC

7

Elias Monage

Business

BBC

8

SharnaJohardien

Business

BUSA

9

NavishaMitoo (Alternate)

Business

BBCBE

10

Dr Thuthula Balfour-Kaipa

Business

CHAMBER OF MINES

11

Aruna Ranchod

Business

BUSA

12

Jesse Doorasamy

Business

Group Five

13

Thembinkosi Mkalipi

Government

DoL

14

David Khumalo

Government

DoL

15

Ian Macun

Government

DoL

16

Ntsoaki Mamashela

Government

DoL

17

Setsomi Molapo

Government

DoL

18

Stephen Rathai

Government

DoL

19

Mbongeni Magula

Government

DoL

20

Masilo Lefika

Government

DoL

21

MduduziMbongwe

Labour

COSATU

22

BhabhaliKaMaphikela - Nhlapo

Labour

COSATU

23

Patrick Phelane

Labour

COSATU

24

Johan van Niekerk

Labour

FEDUSA

25

MajakhunameMphahlele

Labour

COSATU

26

MartleKeyter

Labour

FEDUSA

27

TumedisoModise

Labour

NACTU

28

Matthew Parks

Labour

COSATU

29

ZanoxoloMpendu

Labour

NACTU

30

JanekWilimiec

Labour

UASA

31

Louisa Nett

Labour

COSATU

32

Mpho Kekana

Labour

NACTU

PUBLIC FINANCE AND MONETARY POLICY CHAMBER DELEGATES

NO.

NAME & SURNAME

CONSTITUENCY

ORGANISATION

1

Paul Bondi

Business

BUSA

2

Jeff Gable

Business

BUSA

3

Christo Van Der Reede

Business

BUSA

4

Olivier Serrao

Business

BUSA

5

Tyson Sibanda

Business

BUSA

6

StravrosNicolaou

Business

BUSA

7

SelloRasethaba

Business

BBC

8

George Sebulela

Business

BBC

9

Jesse Doorasamy

Business

BBC

10

SelvanNaicker

Business

BBC

11

Hamlet Hlomendini

Business

BUSA

12

Raymond Masoga

Government

National Treasury

13

OlanoMakhubela

Government

National Treasury

14

Basil Maseko

Government

National Treasury

15

Ismail Momoniat

Government

National Treasury

16

Sidney Kgara

Labour

NEHAWU

17

GodukileMacatha

Labour

NUM

18

Matthew Parks

Labour

COSATU

19

Jan Mahlangu

Labour

COSATU

20

Louise Nett

Labour

COSATU

21

SekgotaPhochana

Labour

NACTU

TRADE AND INDUSTRY CHAMBER DELEGATES

NO.

NAME & SURNAME

CONSTITUENCY

ORGANISATION

1

Johan Pienaar

Business

AGRISA

2

Nico Vermeulen

Business

BUSA

3

DanieJordaan

Business

BUSA

4

Michael Lawrence

Business

NCRF

5

John Purchase

Business

AGBIZ

6

HenkLangenhoven

Business

COM

7

DanisaBaloyi

Business

NBBC

8

Olivier Serrao

Business

BUSA

9

Tyson Sibanda

Business

BUSA

10

Kurt Moore

Business

SALBA

11

Gregory Mofokeng

 

BBC

12

Angela Dick

Business

TRANSMAN

13

Deidre Penfold

Business

CAIA

14

Zama Ndaba

Business

BUSA

15

MluGanto

Business

BUSA

16

Faried Adams

Government

DTI

17

Tendani Ramulongo

Government

DTI

18

Jan Magoro

Government

DTI

19

Niki Kruger

Government

DTI

20

TshifhiwaMahosi

Government

DTI

21

MzikayiseMgijima

Government

DTI

22

Tony Ehrenreich

Labour

COSATU

23

Ashley Benjamin

Labour

FEDUSA

24

Abraham Daniels

Labour

COSATU

25

Etienne Vlok

Labour

SACTWU

26

Tony Franks

Labour

NACTU

27

MpheaneLepaku

Labour

COSATU

28

MolefeRadinne  

Labour

COSATU

29

NokanyoYolwa

Labour

COSATU

END

15 March 2017 - NW366

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(i) Minister

The vehicles purchased are as follows:

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Price

(d) Date of purchase

(aaa) FY 2014/2015

(bbb) FY 2015/2016

(bb)FY Since 1 April 2016/2017

Place

Lexus

LEXUS ES HYBRID ES 300H EX C21E

514 649.74

2014/09/26

Yes

N/A

N/A

CPT

Lexus

ES350 EX 36Z

464 819.04

2016/04/20

N/A

N/A

Yes

PTA

(ii) Deputy Minister

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Price

(d) Date of purchase

(aaa) FY 2014/2015

(bbb) FY 2015/2016

(bb)FY Since 1 April 2016/2017

Place

Audi

AUDI A8 4H20BA TDI Q TIP

881 629.99

2014/06/05

Yes

N/A

N/A

CPT

Lexus

LEXUS 460 16 G

808 279.00

2016/09/14

N/A

N/A

YES

PTA

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Mr. Mogokare Richard Seleke Ms. Lynne Brown, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

15 March 2017 - NW473

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

No services were procured and no payments were made to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund.

d(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v)(vi)

Over the past 3 years, a transfer payment of R7 million was paid to the Black Business Council as appropriated. The objective of the transfer payment was to strengthen and promote advocacy and the roll-out of the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Amendment Act 46 of 2013 and in particular, the Black Industrialist Programme.

14 March 2017 - NW310

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) Will she institute disciplinary action against the Board Members of the South African Weather Service (SAWS) found to have been involved in a certain tender (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? (2) whether she will be investigating a case of alleged fraud surrounding a radar project that the suspended Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of the SAWS brought to the SAWS’ Chief Executive Officer (CEO) prior to the CFO’s suspension; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. A complaint was received by the Presidential Hotline on 20 November 2016 relating to Performance Management at theSouth African Weather Service (SAWS) specifically relating to the 2014/15 performance assessment period. The allegations included the following:

a) Unlawful powers of the Executive Committee to change moderated performance scores;

b) Unilateral correction of scores

c) Implementation of performance-based salary increases.

The allegations were referred to the Board of SAWS for further investigation on 28 January 2016.

OMA Chartered Accountants Incorporated (OMA) was appointed to conduct an investigation into allegations made by the complainant. No Board members were involved in the appointment of OMA. The recommendations in the OMA report have been implemented.

 

2. A senior manager of SAWS brought allegations to the Board, on the matter of the guarantee for the radars. A preliminary analysis has revealed no irregularity. Further investigation is underway.

 

14 March 2017 - NW281

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department is currently experiencing any financial difficulties; if so, (a) when was the situation identified, (b) who identified the situation and (c) what steps are being taken to remedy the situation;

Reply:

(1) My Department’s Main Account is not experiencing financial difficulties. However, the Water Trading Entity (WTE) is experiencing temporary cash flow problems due to non-payment of Municipalities and Water Boards. However, the WTE is in a very strong financial position as Assets exceed Liabilities by R72 billion.

During the 2016/17 budget preparation it was clear that, should the debt not be recovered this would negatively impact on the bank balance. This recovery from Municipalities and Water Boards has not happened and the overdraft has been steadily increasing since the start of the financial year.

The WTE is working closely with National Treasury (NT) and NT has sent out letters to Municipalities not paying their debt warning them that they are contravening Section 65(2)(e) of the MFMA and that they should urgently rectify the non-payment of their debt.

(2) My Department’s Main Account has been allocated a budget of R15.5 billion for the 2016/17 financial year, of which R13.6 billion has been spent by 27 February 2017, leaving an available balance of R1.9 billion up to 31 March 2017. The R1.9 billion will be used to pay for salaries (R238 million), direct transfers to Municipalities scheduled for the 8 and 9 March 2017 (R712 million) as well as goods and services and capital expenditures in the normal course of business amounting to R958 million. This is in line with my Department’s planned cash projections, and signals a slight underspending of R99 million anticipated by the end of the financial year from Compensation of Employees.

The Department’s bank account with National Treasury (SARB) is currently at a positive balance of R558 million, and there is still a balance of R1.1 billion which has not been requested from the National Treasury and is due for payment to the Department in the month of March 2017.

The WTE’s current bank balances as at 22 February 2017 are as follows:

 

Reserve Bank

(R 2 989 564 608.84)

ABSA

R 24 872536.05

Standard Bank

R 1 735 342.16

First National Bank

R 420 719.30

SAPO

R 96 644.15

Total

(R 2,962,439,367.18)

14 March 2017 - NW280

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) How many supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by her department for more than 30 days and (b) what (i) is the name of the company and/or supplier, (ii) amounts are outstanding, (iii) is the reason for nonpayment and (iv) is the envisaged date on which the amounts will be paid?

Reply:

  1. The total amount of unpaid invoices is R 677 million. Refer to Annexure A for the details.

(b) Refer to Annexure A for the name of company and/or supplier and outstanding amounts. Below are reasons for the non-payments.

Description

Reasons for the non-payment

Giyani Water Services Invoices

The Giyani invoices of R202 million are being disputed by the Department as they are above the signed contract value, and no authorization was provided by the Department for the service provider to exceed the contract amount.

Drought Interventions Invoices

The Drought Interventions invoices were delayed due to the budget reallocation process within the Department to make funds available as National Treasury only made available R290 million for the Desalination Plant and R50 million for water tankers. All other drought interventions were not funded. The Department has however made funds available to pay the R475 million for drought interventions in the current financial year.

Bucket Eradication Invoices

The Bucket Eradication invoices were delayed due to unavailability of funds within the Bucket Eradication Program. The Department has however reprioritized its budget to pay current invoices on hand, however additional funds are required to complete the Bucket Eradication Program.

 

 

14 March 2017 - NW244

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) Why has the community of (i) Sisonke region, (ii) Umkhanyakude sub-region and (iii) the Harry Gwala District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal been without water for over two years and (b) what is her department doing to ensure that the communities have access to good quality clean water?

Reply:

(a) The communities within the Harry Gwala District Municipality (HGDM) and uMkhanyakude DM (UKDM) have been without water for over two years due to two factors, i.e. severe drought impact which has plagued most parts of the KwaZulu-Natal including some of Harry Gwala and uMkhanyakude areas and secondly it has been due to infrastructure limitations in some areas.

(b) The department provides funding to uMkhanyakude and Harry Gwala District Municipalities in order to try to resolve the water challenges faced by the districts and my department will continue to support the municipalities to ensure that the communities have access to good quality clean water.

Refer to the table below for allocations for UMkhanyakude DM (UKDM):

Grant

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018-19

RBIG

R313 Million

R110Million

R119 Million

None

MWIG

R54 Million

None

None

None

WSIG

None

R70 Million

R50 Million

R65 million

Refer to the table below for allocations for Harry Gwala DM (HGDM):

Grant

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018-19

RBIG

R14 Million

R48 Million

R90 Million

R100 Million

MWIG

R43.5 Million

None

None

None

WSIG

None

R86 Million

R98 Million

R108 million

 

14 March 2017 - NW407

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What amount was (a) budgeted for and (b) actually spent on the maintenance of the E514 tar road in Kiepersol, Mpumalanga, (i) in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14, (cc) 2014-15 and (dd) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016; (2) whether any unspent funds were returned to the (a) National Treasury or (b) Mpumalanga Provincial Treasury; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) on what date was the specified road last worked on?

Reply:

In terms of section 25. (1) of THE SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL ROADS AGENCY LIMITED AND NATIONAL ROADS ACT, the Agency of the Department of Transport, is given the power to perform, all strategic planning with regard to the South African national roads system, as well as the planning, design, construction, operation, management, control, maintenance and rehabilitation of national roads for the Republic. The road referred to by the honourable Mr KP Robertson is not part of the national road network and no budgets was allocated for road because it is part of the Mpumalanga Provincial Road Network.

(1) Falls away

(2) Falls away

(3) Falls away

Additional information for the Minister

However, the question was referred to the province and the following below is their reply:

Can you please provide me with the budget allocations for the E514 over the past five financial years?

The road in question is Provincial road D514 with a total length of 12.6 km, from the R536 between Hazyview and Sabie at the Western end, and road D1035 at Kiepersol at the Eastern end.

It is known that the road is in poor condition, as indicated by the diagram below. Annual assessments are done on all Provincial paved roads as part of the DPWRT’s Road Asset Management System (RAMS).

One of the important metrics that are derived from these assessments is the Visual Condition Index (VCI), which is an overall indicator of the road condition on a percentage scale of 0 – 100%.

The VCI on road D514 varies roughly between 30 and 40, which classifies the road as in “Poor” condition according to the applicable TMH 9 technical manual. (See Annexure 1 for clear graph)

The DPWRT budget for routine road maintenance is allocated to each of the 21 Cost Centres in the Province, broken down into 15 routine maintenance activities like patching, drainage, grass cutting, etc. Thus, the budget is prepared per activity and there is no specific budget allocation for each road separately.

The budget for preventive maintenance (reseal) and capital works like rehabilitation are allocated per road (or project). However, no project has been budgeted for or implemented on D514 during the past five financial years.

In addition, please provide me with the budget spent on E514 over the past five financial years.

The expenditure for each Cost Centre is kept for each of the 15 routine maintenance activities across all roads in the specific area of responsibility. As a result, the expenditure is not kept by individual road and thus cannot be provided for road D514.

No capital projects have been implemented on D514 over the last 5 financial years.

Have there been any unspent budgets and were these sent back to Treasury? If not, how was the budget spent?

No, there has not been any unspent budgets in relation to D514. The DPWRT has utilized 100% of its budget for the past 5 financial years.

Please indicate the last time any department has worked on the E514 project. Could we be provided with an annexure?

Various routine maintenance activities were performed on D514 during the past financial year. Due to the number of potholes, patching is obviously very important. The previous last time patching has been done on road D514 was on 23 January 2017.

A maintenance team is scheduled to do further patching during the week of 27 February, depending on weather conditions.

ANNEXURE

14 March 2017 - NW380

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Women in the Presidency

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

The Department of Women procured an official vehicle for the Minister as follows:

 

(i)(aa)(aaa)

(ii)(aa)(aaa)

 (i)(aa)(bbb) and (ii)(aa)(bbb) and (bb)

(a)

BMW

N/A

No official vehicle was procured during the 2015/ 16 FY and since 1 April 2016

(b)

GT 550

N/A

 

(c)

R926 007.61

N/A

 

(d)

06-Feb-15

N/A

 

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date………………………..

14 March 2017 - NW250

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) How many government departments at (i) national and (ii) provincial level, including state-owned entities, (iii) municipalities and (iv) entities reporting to the municipalities are (aa) using and (bb) not using the central procurement database and (b) what is the name of the department or entity in each case?

Reply:

A.  There are 775 Organs of State (OoS) registered on the CSD as at 2017-02-24.

CSD Utilisation by Organs of State

 

OoS using CSD

(aa)

OoS not using CSD

(bb)

i. National

40

1

ii. Provincial

115

8

iii. State-owned entities

236

73

iv. Municipalities

239

14

v. Municipal entities

16

4

vi. Other

24

5

Total

670

105

B.  Annexure A is hereby attached with the name of Organs of State in each case.

14 March 2017 - NW249

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

What is the total number of poultry farms that have been closed in Limpopo province since January 2016?

Reply:

There are no poultry projects which were closed in Limpopo province since January 2016 to date.

However there are fourteen (14) poultry projects that closed prior to January 2016 due to amongst others:

  1. The distance between the poultry house and the abattoirs which must be less than 100km. Extensive travel to abattoirs leads to weight loss and mortality.
  2. The Lebowakgomo abattoir which has not been operational for some time. This has impacted on poultry farmers especially from the Sekhukhune area.
  3. The closure of Mikes Chicken abattoir in Polokwane.

14 March 2017 - NW340

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to her secondment of Mr Letsoalo as the acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) (details furnished), she intends (a) taking any disciplinary action against Mr Letsoalo and (b) recovering all monies incorrectly paid to Mr Letsoalo; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 2) will there be an investigation into (a) who was responsible for the payment and (b) how the specified person was responsible; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Mr Letsoalo secondment was done in terms of section 15(3) of the Public Service Act. The matter of the remuneration of the secondment allowance is a matter that is being dealt with within PRASA.

a. See background information above

b. See background information above

2. PRASA is investigating the matter

a.  See the background information above

14 March 2017 - NW355

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(i) Minister of Finance

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Price

(d) Date

(aa)

 

(aaa) 2014/15

None

None

None

None

(bbb) 2015/16

None

None

None

None

(bb) April 2016 - current

None

None

None

None

(ii) Deputy Minister of Finance

(aa)

 

(aaa) 2014/15

Mercedes Benz

E200

R661 387.01

27-01-2015

(aaa) 2014/15

Mercedes Benz

E200

R661 387.01

27-01-2015

(bbb) 2015/16

None

None

None

None

(bb) April 2016 - current

None

None

None

None

14 March 2017 - NW418

Profile picture: Figg, Mr MJ

Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to his Budget Speech delivered on 22 February 2017, what amount will be allocated towards nuclear power procurement in the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

No funds have been specifically allocated for nuclear power procurement in the 2017 Budget.

14 March 2017 - NW253

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What action or investigations did the SA Revenue Service (SARS) initiate into a certain matter (details furnished) that has been reported to the SARS customs authorities by a certain aviation company (details furnished) and (b) what has been the role of the State Security Agency in this matter?

Reply:

This information is provided by SARS:

A) We confirm that the certain company (details furnished) did not report this specific incident to Customs.

B) This question must be directed to the State Security Agency.

14 March 2017 - NW269

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) How many Syrian Arab Republic nationals have (a) applied for asylum, (b) been granted refugee status and (c) been denied (i) asylum and (ii) refugee status in each of the past 10 calendar years; (2) has his department placed any limits on the number of asylum and refugee status applications it will receive from nationals from the Syrian Arab Republic; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The information is in the table below:

SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC NATIONALS

YEAR

  1. APPLIED FOR ASYLUM
  1. GRANTED

REFUGEE STATUS

(c) DENIED REFUGEE STATUS

2007

0

0

0

2008

1

Information not available

Information not available

2009

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

2012

5

2

0

2013

11

6

3

2014

40

11

Information not available

2015

27

3

7

2016

20

12

12

2. No

14 March 2017 - NW345

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) (a) Since 1 January 2010, what are the national (i) payment figures (ii) percentages regarding AARTO traffic infringements in relation to the fines issued (b) who are the external service providers at each municipal authority in the country responsible for issuing fines and collecting payments in respect of the violations; (2) what are the nature and extent of the contracts that municipal authorities sign with external service providers; (3) whether (a) the contracts and the appointment of external service providers are in accordance with the appropriate municipal legislation and (b) municipal service providers are entitled to make use of external service providers; if not, why not; if so, what legislation serves as a basis for this; (4) whether there are any provisions included in the service level agreement of the tender agreement that (a) hold the service provider responsible for inadequate service delivery by means of a a penalty clause, (b) authorise additional fees that the external mechanisms are allowed to levy from members of the public and (c) place a prohibition on the use of the data by an external service provider to create an additional product and in so doing exploit the data economically; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Since 1 January 2010, the Department through the Road Traffic Management Agency, responsible for piloting the AARTO Act, issued in total 26 089 730 fines in the City of Tshwane and City of Johannesburg. The break down of this figures are as on the table below:

(i) AARTO payment figures:

Financial Year

AARTO Revenue Collected

2010/11

R 53 506 570.02

2011/12

R 86 553 514.98

2012/13

R 143 185,321.00

2013/14

R 274 398 904.99

2014/15

R 306 993 704.98

2015/16

R 555 459 029.99

(ii) Percentages regarding AARTO traffic infringements in relation to the fines issued:

Financial Year

Number of AARTO Infringements/Offences

% of AARTO Infringements/Offences

2010/11

1 478 265

5.67%

2011/12

1 707 052

6.54%

2012/13

3 474 353

13.32%

2013/14

6 797 128

26.05%

2014/15

6 120 436

23.46%

2015/16

6 512 496

24.96%

Total

26 089 730

100%

2. The honourable member should remember that road and traffic are exclusive Schedule 5A provincial function while municipal roads, traffic and parking are exclusive schedule 5B Municipal function and in contrast, road and traffic is a concurrent function with the National Department of Transport playing largely a facilitating and regulatory role.

It is on this basis that the Department is unable to provide information on (2), however this information can be sources directly from the Municipalities.

3. Please see above (2)

4. Please see above (2)

14 March 2017 - NW358

Profile picture: Topham , Mr B

Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

During the 2014-15 financial year, a BMW 535i sedan was procured for the use of the Minister. The vehicle was procured on 30 January 2015 for the purchase price of R750 122.76. No other vehicles were procured for the Minister or his deputy subsequent to 30 January 2015.