Questions and Replies

17 October 2018 - NW2815

Profile picture: Kwankwa, Mr NL

Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

By what date will she commit to finalise the payment of the outstanding (a) salary from April 2010 to October 2017, (b) the promised pension arrangement and (c) promised leave gratuity as undertaken by her department on 26 October 2017 to Mr Dyafta (details furnished)?

Reply:

Mr Dyafta is not an employee of the Department of Higher Education and Training. Mr Dyafta was transferred to the Department of Education in the Eastern Cape after the migration process on 1 April 2015. The question should therefore be directed to the Department of Education in the Eastern Cape.

17 October 2018 - NW2799

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) lessons has her department learned during past implementation of the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign and (b) criteria are used to determine the (i) officials and (ii) participants who form part of the campaign?

Reply:

a) Some of the lessons learnt in the implementation of the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC) – For the QLTC and/or social mobilisation to find traction on the ground it must be underpinned by the following approaches:

  1. Engage and secure diverse and strong community participation in the identified programme;
  2. Clearly identify the roles and responsibilities the broader community could play in the execution of the targeted programme;
  3. The community members and/or stakeholders must buy into the programme;
  4. Develop a shared vision with the concerned community;
  5. Jointly conduct the needs analysis of the community at large; and
  6. Constantly monitor, support and report on the progress on the implementation of the programme.

b) Criteria used to determine (i) officials

All teacher unions in the education sector were requested to nominate their senior representatives to serve in the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign Coordinating Team (QCT) to implement the QLTC non-negotiables. There were five Union Officials who have been seconded to the Department of Basic Education (DBE) as follows: 2 from South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU), 1 from National Professional Teachers Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA), 1 from Professional Educators Union (PEU) and 1 from National Teachers Union (NATU). However, the Suid-Afrikaanse Onderwysers Unie (SAOU) resolved to waiver its participation in the secondment arrangement in favour of PEU.

b) Criteria used to determine the (ii) participants who form part of the campaign:

During the launching of QLTC, stakeholders (within and outside the education sector) committed to the QLTC Principles and further pledged their respective roles and responsibilities they could play in strengthening the delivery of quality learning and teaching. The following are the stakeholders in question:

  1. Teacher Unions;
  2. School Governing Body (SGB) Association;
  3. Inter-faith based organisations;
  4. Traditional leaders;
  5. Learner formations including Representative Council of Learners’ (RCL);
  6. Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO’s);
  7. Community Based Organisations (including Councillors); and
  8. Others.

17 October 2018 - NW2758

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has found that students who recently walked out of an examination at the University of Limpopo did so because the examination was deemed too difficult; if not, (2) whether she has found that the walk-out was staged due to a different reason; if so, what (a) was the reason, (b) are the further relevant details of the walk-out, (c) action will be taken to address the situation and (d) consequences will be faced by the students who walked out?

Reply:

1. The University of Limpopo responded to the posed question as follows:

The session was not an examination paper as reported in social and mainstream print and electronic media. It was a scheduled test for the second semester Education Studies (HEDA032) module. While the preliminary outcome of the investigation indicates that the test content was of an appropriate standard, the test cover had mistakes, which resulted in a small number of students disrupting the test session.

(2) (a) and (b) While the Department of Education Studies, in which the module is located, has sufficient summative and formative assessment moderation procedures in place, it was found that the test in question was not subjected to these checks. This unfortunately has been found to be one of the contributory factors that led to the disruptions of the test.

(c) Students and staff (lecturer, invigilators, Head of Department and Director of the School) are being subjected to a formal investigation process.

(d) The matter is still under investigation.

17 October 2018 - NW2688

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in the country (i) have swimming pools and (ii) do not have swimming pools and (b) where is each of the schools with a swimming pool located?

Reply:

a) (i) A total of 562 schools have swimming pools.

(ii) 22707 schools do not have swimming pools.

b) See attached annexure

17 October 2018 - NW2574

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

1.The table below shows the total number of Deputy Directors-General and Chief Directors employed on an acting and permanent capacity in the Department and the total number of women in each case.

 

(aa) Acting

(bb) Permanent

Total Number

(a) (i) Deputy Directors-General

3

3

6

(b) Women

2

2

4

 

(aa) Acting

(bb) Permanent

Total Number

(a) (ii) Chief Directors

7

23

30

(b) Women

1

8

9

2. The entities reporting to the Department have provided the following information to the question posed.

Entity

(a)(i) Chief Executive Officers

  1. (ii) Directors

(b) Number of women

Council on Higher Education

1

7 including 1 in an acting position

4

National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences

1

2

3

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

1

26

9

South African Qualifications Authority

1

11

8

21 Sector Education and Training Authorities

21 (7 filled and 14 vacant with acting CEOs)

184

104

National Skills Fund

1

15

9

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

1

6

3

17 October 2018 - NW2877

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 2479 on 3 September 2018, what is the monetary value of investment in operations at the special economic zones of (a) Maluti-A-Phofung, (b) Musina-Makhado, (c) Saldanha Bay and (d) O R Tambo?

Reply:

There are currently no operational investors in all of the SEZs in question. All these SEZs are working on concluding their respective pipeline investments, which are at different stages of negotiation and development. Two (2) of the SEZs, the OR Tambo and Maluti-A-Phofung SEZs are currently busy with construction of top structures for their signed investors, which are funded through the dti SEZ Fund. The Saldanha Bay and Musina-Makhado SEZs are finalising their investor agreements to enable the process of business infrastructure readiness support to commence.

Below are the projected pipeline investment values for each of the zones:

Pipeline Investment for MMSEZ, SBSEZ, MAPSEZ and ORTSEZ

Name of SEZ

Number of Investment Companies

Estimated Investment Value

Saldanha Bay

3

R484 million

OR Tambo (Gauteng)

4

R323 million

Maluti-A-Phofung

3

R440 million

Musina- Makhado

4

R145 billion

Total

14

R146,25 billion

17 October 2018 - NW2742

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of students who enrolled in (a) community education and training colleges, (b) technical and vocational education and training colleges and (c) universities in each of the past 10 academic years?

Reply:

The total number of students enrolled in Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and universities for the past 10 academic years are provided below:

Academic year

a) CET Colleges

b) TVET Colleges

c) Universities

  1. 2008

*

**

799 490

  1. 2009

*

**

837 776

  1. 2010

*

358 393

892 936

  1. 2011

*

400 273

938 201

  1. 2012

*

657 690

953 373

  1. 2013

*

639 618

983 698

  1. 2014

*

702 383

969 154

  1. 2015

283 602

737 880

985 212

  1. 2016

273 431

705 397

975 837

  1. 2017

262 156

In the process of quality checking for official release in November 2018

1 036 984 ***

* The enrolment data for CET colleges is provided from the 2015 academic year onwards as CET colleges were only established in 2015.

** Enrolment data prior to 2010 resides with the Department of Education.

*** Provisional data as verification will be finalised by 31 October 2018.

17 October 2018 - NW2843

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) is the (i) name and (ii) identity number of each member of the advisory board of the Makhado-Musina Special Economic Zone and (b) are the details of approved projects that received investment from Chinese companies?

Reply:

a) The names and identity numbers of the Musina-Makhado SEZ are stipulated in the following table.

Names and IDs of MMSEZ Board Members

NAME

IDENTITY NUMBER

DESIGNATION

CONTACT DETAILS

  1. Mr. J Morotoba

Director

Cell: 0828518849

jamesmo@foskor.co.za

  1. Prof R Howard

Director

Cell: 0713589695

Rachmond.howard@ump.ac.za

  1. Ms. K Selane

Director

Cell: 0630912363

E.kselane@gmail.com

  1. Mr. K Mphela

Director

Cell: 0733355791

Mphelakj82@gmail.com

  1. 5. Prof H Maserumule

Director

Cell: 083 3835890

E. maserumulemh@tut.ac.za

  1. 6. Mr. P Sebola

Director

Cell: 0739173021

E. sebolatp@yahoo.com

  1. 7. Mr. S Zikode

Director

Cell: 0825637046

E. szikode@thedti.gov.za

  1. 8. Mr Thivhedzo Nathaniel Tshiwanammbi

 

Musina Local Municipality Representative

CELL: 082 046 5101

nathit@musina.gov.za

mimieb@musina.gov.za

  1. 9. Mr Freddy Tshivhengwa

Makhado Local Municipality Representative

Cell: 066 305 8676

freddyt@makhado.gov.za

10. Ms Thivhinda Mufunwa

Vhembe Local Municipality Representative

Cell: 0767822570

mufumuneri@gmail.com

rambadom@vhembe.gov

11. Awaiting Nomination

Vacant

Community Representative

Mulambwane Community Representative

b) There are no approved projects that received investment support from Chinese companies. the dti, LEDET (Limpopo Economic Development Environment and Tourism) and its agency, LEDA (Limpopo Economic Development Agency) are currently finalizing technical due diligence processes with potential investment companies from China.

17 October 2018 - NW2406

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What periods were set from the last examination session for the target dates for the bulk release of examination results for the (a) National Accredited Technical Education Diploma and (c) National Certificate (Vocational) at each public technical and vocational education and training college since the November 2015 examination cycle, (d) how do the periods differ from those set in the previous 10 years and (d) what are the reasons for any changes; (2) whether any delays were experienced in the publication of examination results for the specified programmes since the November 2015 examination cycle; if so, (a) why was the publication of the results delayed, (b) which subjects’ results were delayed, (c) for what amount of time were the results delayed and (d) what mechanisms have been put in place to eliminate these delays in the future?

Reply:

  1. (a)-(c) The dates for the bulk release of examination results for the National Accredited Technical Education Diploma and National Certificate (Vocational) at each public Technical and Vocational Education and Training college since the November 2015 examination cycle are provided in the table below.

Qualification

Examination cycle

Scheduled release dates

Actual dates

(exceptions are given in 2(a) below)

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2015

11 May 2015

22 May 2015

 

August 2015

04 September 2015

04 September 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

Business Studies (BS)

June 2015

17 July 2015

17 July 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2016

10 May 2016

10 May 2016

 

August 2016

06 September 2016

06 September 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2016

31 December 2016

Business Studies (BS)

June 2016

13 July 2016

12 July 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2016

30 December 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2017

30 December 2017

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2017

09 May 2017

09 May 2017

 

August 2017

05 September 2017

05 September 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

Business Studies (BS)

June 2017

18 July 2017

18 July 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

d) The target dates for the bulk release of examination results for the 2015-2017 academic years are more or less the same with insignificant changes due to college recess periods. These dates are in line with those of the past 10 years for both NATED and NC (V) qualifications respectively.

However, there were minor changes to the release date for November examinations. From 2015, the release of results was moved from between the 3rd and 8th January to 31 December. This change was made to afford colleges’ the opportunity to distribute results and conduct candidate registration in time for the new academic year.

To standardise raw marks, the Department is required by Umalusi to capture 95% for a subject to be considered suitable for standardisation. This is an increase from 80% for NATED qualifications.

Largely due to the introduction of an offline data capturing desktop system which provides an easy-to-use mechanism for the capturing of marks, there has been a significant improvement in respect of the timeous release of results compared to the previous ten years. The delays experienced in the release of the results were remnants of challenges inherited with the function shift of the TVET colleges from Provincial Education Departments to the Department of Higher Education and Training.

2. (a)-(c) Despite the general improvement in the timeous release of results there have been exceptions to this.

The Department may only standardise raw marks where the capture rate meets the required 95% as already indicated. In smaller cohorts of students, for example 1 to 14 students, the capture rate needs to be 100% before the subject results can be released.

The Department may not release results for the following reasons:

  • Where an irregularity reported during the conduct of examinations is of such a nature that it affects the overall integrity of the subject, e.g. suspected leakage of papers. In this instance, the results for affected subjects are released as soon as the investigation is completed if nothing wrong is found.
  • Where a candidate is alleged to have engaged in an act of dishonesty during an examination, e.g. copying, ghost writing, and crib notes. The national policy allows for 21 days for the candidate to be informed of the alleged irregularity post resulting and a final decision on the candidate’s status (guilty / not guilty) is made by the National Examinations Irregularities Committee on the basis of reports and evidence submitted and investigations where required. In such instances, the results for the affected candidates are only released where a candidate has been found not guilty.
  • Candidates who wrote examinations starting from the November 2016 examinations without complying with the minimum examination admission requirements (MQ) as indicated in Memorandum 46 of 2015 as well as 80% attendance. These candidates were reflected as MQ in the Schedule of Results released to centres and would therefore not receive a subject result for the affected subject(s). Unfortunately, despite the instruction in Memorandum 46 of 2015, a significant number of candidates who did not meet the requirements were still allowed to write the examinations, which shows that colleges fail to manage the implementation of the minimum examination entry requirements.
  • Where the examination centre has not submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of a subject, the raw marks may not be processed to generate subject results. In instances where a centre submits an outstanding mark (777) the accompanying evidence (scripts, portfolios of evidence) must be verified by both the Department and the quality council before the raw marks can be captured and the results for the affected subjects or candidates are released. This verification process can delay the release of the results of the affected students because Umalusi needs to verify the marks that are submitted outside the examination cycle.
  • Where an examination centre submitted incorrect raw marks and requests the amendment of a mark, the accompanying evidence (scripts, portfolios of evidence) must be verified by both the Department and Umalusi before the raw marks can be amended and the results for the affected candidates are released. This also causes the delay in the release of the results of few affected students.

While the Department is responsible for the entire value chain, some functions are performed by different role players as follows: quality assurance, standardisation and approval of results (Umalusi and QCTO); the development and maintenance of the examination IT system {State Information Technology Agency (SITA)}, processing of examination results (the Department), distribution of results to candidates (TVET colleges).

Generally, the bulk release for the November examination results are released earlier than anticipated to afford colleges an opportunity to begin the new academic year on time. Where the results were not released on the scheduled date, this was due to the non-submission of raw marks on the part of the examination centre; examination irregularities; or due to examination technical IT system challenges.

Delays in the bulk release of 2015 examinations results

A National Examination Irregularities Committee (NEIC) has been established to manage irregularities and to ensure that the results of those found guilty are declared null and void. The core business of the committee is to protect the integrity of the results.

Irregularities can take place at any point in the value chain or organisation and it is always a challenging task to detect the genesis of the irregularities

For the April 2015 examinations all NATED subject results were delayed by approximately 4-9 days due to SITA examination IT processing problems.

For June 2015 examinations all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates except for some subjects where the electronic file submitted by the examination centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. As a result, the outstanding mark sheets/marks were sourced and the “missing” marks were captured at the beginning of the academic year and an updated schedule of results were released on a date following the bulk release date.

For August 2015 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with the exception of the 25 subjects, namely, Electrical Trade Theory N2, Electro-Technology N3, Engineering Drawing N3, Engineering Science N1, Engineering Science N2, Engineering Science N3, Fitting and Machining Theory N2, Industrial Electronics N2, Industrial Electronics N3, Mathematics N2-N3 and Mechanotechnology N3, Engineering Science N4, Electrotechnics N4, Industrial Electronics N4-N6, Mathematics N4-N6, Mechanotechnics N4-N5, Power Machines N5-N6 and Supervisory Management N6 due to alleged irregularities. These results were delayed with approximately 7-22 days due to the nature of examination anomalies, which required a protracted investigation before the release of the results.

For December 2015 examinations, the results of more than 600 subjects were released on scheduled dates. There were delays in releasing the results of NC(V) (i.e. Stored Programme Systems Level 4); and 3 NATED (i.e. Industrial Orientation N3, Motor Trade Theory N3 and Mechanical Drawing and Design N5) subjects’. This was due to Umalusi requesting re-marking of the scripts of these subjects at certain raw mark intervals (i.e. 30-39% and 40-49%).

Bulk release of 2016 examination results

For April 2016 examinations, all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates with the exception of four subjects (4) (i.e. Plating and Structural Steel Drawings N3, Electrical Trade Theory N3, Water Treatment Practice N3 and Waste-Water Treatment Practice N3). The delays were due to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of these subjects. The remaining results were released on 16 May 2016, shortly after the scheduled release on 10th May.

For June 2016 examination all NATED results were released on the scheduled dates, except that there were gaps in the subject results for examination centres where the electronic file submitted by the examination centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates. The outstanding mark sheets/marks were sourced and an updated schedule of results were released on a mop-up date following the bulk release date.

For August 2016 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with the exception of 8 subjects, namely, Engineering Science N3, Mathematics N3, N4, N5, Mechano-Technology N3, Electrotechinics N3 and Engineering drawing N2 due to alleged irregularities. In addition, Plant Operation Theory N2 examination results were not released on the scheduled date owing to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of this subject. A protracted investigation into examination anomalies delayed these results by 1-23 days.

For December 2016 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with exception of Engineering Science N3, Engineering Science N2, Mathematics N5, Building Drawing N3 and Electrical Trade theory N2 due to alleged irregularities. The results of 13 subjects were delayed due to low capture rate: Aircraft Maintenance theory N3, Aircraft Metalwork Theory N3, Building Drawing N3, Building Science N2, Digital Electronics N4, Electronic Trade Theory N2, Engineering Science N3, Logic Systems N3, Mathematics N5, Motor Electrical Theory N5, Refrigeration N3, and Water and Waste-water Treatment Practice N2. These results were released between 4-10 days after the bulk release of results.

Bulk release of 2017 examinations results

For April 2017 examination all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates, except where the electronic file submitted by exam centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates (i.e. it was incomplete) or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. An updated schedule of results were released on a mop-up date following the bulk release date.

For June 2017 examination all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates except, as indicated previously, where the electronic file submitted by exam centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates (i.e. it was incomplete) or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. These were addressed as indicated previously.

For August 2017 examinations all NATED results were released on the scheduled dates with the exception of following subjects, namely, Rigging Theory N2, and Logic Systems N5 owing to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of these subjects. The results for these subjects were released on 10 September 2017 (three days after bulk release).

For December 2017 examinations all results were released on scheduled dates with exception of 5 NATED subjects, where there were alleged irregularities, namely, Engineering Science N3, Industrial Electronics N2, Mathematics N2, N3 and MechanoTechnology N2. In addition, there were delays in the release of results for 2 NATED subjects (i.e. Radio Theory N1 and Motor Bodywork Theory N3); and 4 NC (V) subjects (i.e. Engineering Fabrication-Sheet Metalwork L3, isiXhosa First Additional Language L3, Engineering Fabrication- Sheet Metalwork L4, ixiXhosa First Additional Language L4). These results were delayed by approximately 5 days due to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of this subject.

(d) The Department conducts a mock end-to-end examination process to simulate the examination process in order to diagnose any examination IT system challenges for improvement purposes. The Department has also met with all role players in the value chain and formed a technical task team to look at all examination challenges including certifications in between examinations. The Director-General also instituted weekly meetings with the SITA Chief Executive Officer and both SITA and departmental senior managers responsible for the examinations function. These meetings have been instrumental in ensuring that the pressure is kept on SITA to resolve the exam IT system challenges and is the reason that substantial improvements have been made in resulting in the past two years.

The Department has built capacity to conduct investigations of any reported examination anomalies or irregularities. Papers that are reported to have been leaked are replaced. If the paper has already been written, the scripts of the candidates are audited to assess if there are common responses that may suggest that candidates had prior access to the paper. The Department has made significant progress in eliminating the phenomenon of leakages. Umalusi commended the Department for managing the April 2018 examination leakages; while in August 2018, the allegations were not confirmed and Umalusi approved the results.

The Department issued a non-compliance directive to all public TVET colleges that displayed non-compliance to a lesser or greater extent in respect to the non-submission or incorrect submission of raw marks. This process has resulted in a significant improvement in terms of the timeous release of results compared to the previous ten years.

Finally, the development of the new integrated examination computer system is at an advanced stage and the data migration process, which entails the transfer of the old SITA data to the new system, is ongoing. The Provincial Education Departments and national examination officials have already tested and assessed the completed modules against the user requirements/ specifications

17 October 2018 - NW2623

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether her department’s language policy on higher education, of which the concept was published in the Government Gazette of 23 February 2018, has already been finalised; if not, (a) which processes are still outstanding and (b) what is the timeframe for finalisation; if so, when will it be published; (2) whether her department received and considered submissions from (a) the SA Academy for Arts and Science, (b) the Afrikaans Language Board and (c) Afriforum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether, if the specified policy is not yet finalised, she will possibly consider hosting a symposium in order to refine it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she has found that the policy is in compliance with her obligation under subsection 6(4) of the Constitution, 1996, to regulate and monitor the use of official languages by means of legislative and other measures, as subsection 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997, has the aforementioned as its underlying basis; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department is still in the process of finalising the Language Policy for Higher Education, which was published in February 2018 for public comment.

(a) The draft was a revision of the 2002 Language Policy for Higher Education. The Department received a large volume of submissions/inputs from various stakeholders, mainly universities and agencies interested in language development in South Africa. The Department has analysed these inputs and is in the process of developing a final draft taking into account the various comments received. The following aspects of the policy are still outstanding:

  • Department must submit and request the advice of the Council on Higher Education, as required in terms of the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997); this advice may lead to further policy changes; and
  • Socio-Economic Impact Assessment.

(b) The Department envisages that the final policy will be published by 31 March 2019.

2. The Department received submissions from the SA Academy for Arts and Science and AfriForum. No submission was received from the Afrikaans Language Board. All submissions are being considered to ensure that the language policy is consistent with the Constitution and begins to address the historical marginalisation of indigenous African languages. The relevant details of the submissions are as follows:

The SA Academy for Arts and Science welcomed the revised Language Policy for Higher Education and proposed that specific universities be assigned to develop indigenous South African languages. It called for research to be done to establish guiding principles and procedures for the development of new terminology for African languages. Moreover, the Academy suggests that a core cohort of lecturers proficient in African languages be developed to ensure that there are lecturers who can teach in these languages.

Afriforum generally welcomed the review of the policy and called for funding allocations to be made in support of multilingualism at universities. It highlighted the fundamental right of learners/students to receive education in their mother tongue or language of their choice. It supported the proposed partnerships with the Department of Basic Education in promoting the development of all indigenous languages in South Africa. It welcomed the explicit recognition of Afrikaans as an indigenous South African language in the policy.

3. The Department has already held a number of symposiums and seminars on this matter and is not planning to hold any others before the policy is finalised. However, the Department will continue to engage with universities and other relevant bodies regarding the implementation of the policy once it is published.

4. The revision of the Language Policy for Higher Education is being done in compliance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and the Higher Education Act of 1997
(Act 101 of 1997).

5. The Minister will communicate to all stakeholders once the policy has been published in the government gazette for implementation.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR SIMON MOTLHANKE

CONTACT: 012 312 5260

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 2623.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 2623 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

17 October 2018 - NW2803

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether learners with severe to profound intellectual disabilities in each province have been included in the LURITS or EMIS as required by its agreement with the National Treasury and the Auditor-General of South Africa, as indicated on page 71 of the 2018-19 Annual Performance Plan of her department; (2) by what date will her department gazette and promulgate the final Draft Learning Programme; (3) whether (a) provinces record learners at special care centres on a central database and (b) the centres are provided with an EMIS number? NW3096E

Reply:

1.  The Department of Basic Education is in the process of updating SA-SAMS to include information on Learners with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities which will be provided to Care Centres as their administrative tool. This will enable them to upload data into Provincial Warehouses and thereafter to LURITS. However, this requires all centres to have computers.

In the interim, the Education Management Information System (EMIS) together with Inclusive Education Directorate have developed a survey tool to collect data on Learners with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities, which was uploaded into DBE (MOODLE) platform. This platform serves as a central database for Care Centre Information, though the information is aggregated.

2. The Draft Learning Programme is envisaged to be gazetted and promulgated by 31 October 2018.

3. (a) No, learners at the special care centres are not recorded.

(b) The Department is in the process of registering Care Centres through Provincial Education Departments which will assist in obtaining EMS numbers.

09 October 2018 - NW2223

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he will furnish Mr A R McLoughlin with copies of all written agreements entered into by and between the Public Investment Corporation and Eskom in respect of any loans extended to Eskom from 1 January 2000, including all annexures and schedules to such agreements?

Reply:

Bonds issued by Eskom in which the PIC has invested through a public auction, form part of the Domestic Multi-Term Note Programme (DMTNP) which is registered with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE). The documentation pertaining to these bonds are publicly available. However, the PIC did two private placement transactions with Eskom, one for R20 billion in May 2015 and one for R5 billion in February 2018. The R20 billion private placement is split into four tranches of R5 billion each, of notes maturing between March 2020 and March 2032. The R5 billion private placement was a short-term (one month) bridging facility that was paid back with interest of approximately R30 million, on 1 March 2018. The agreements for these two private placement transactions are confidential and cannot be made public.

09 October 2018 - NW2329

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) the National Treasury and (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by the National Treasury in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

  1. (a)(i) Nine.

No.

(b)

Cause Of Each Dispute

(c)

Nature Of Dispute

(d)

Date Dispute

     
  1. Reported
  1. Resolved

1.

Unfair dismissal

Unfair Dismissal

27/07/17

Not resolved yet - at the Bargaining Council.

2.

Non-approval of bursary

Unfair Labour Practice

14/02/18

 

3.

Non-renewal of contract / permanent appointment

Unfair Dismissal

29/05/18

 

4.

Suspension without pay for 3 months and a Final Written Warning

Unfair Labour Practice

01/07/18

 

5.

Termination of employment contract

Unfair Dismissal

06/08/18

 

6.

Termination of employment contract

Unfair Dismissal

06/08/18

 
  1. (a)(i) Four.

Financial Year

2(a)(ii)

Reason for dismissal

b(i)

Number of employees paid severance packages

b(ii)

Monetary value of each severance packages

2014-2015

Sleeping on duty, security breach and theft.

Nil

Nil

2015/2016

No National Treasury employees dismissed during the year.

   

2016/2017

No National Treasury employees dismissed during the year.

   

2017/2018

No National Treasury employees dismissed during the year.

   

2018/2019

Late coming/time keeping, failure to attend meetings/dereliction of duty. Poor performance of work. Insubordination and disrespectful behavior. Non compliance with existing procedures/leave policy, and contemptuous, disorderly or unacceptable behavior.

   
 

Termination due to null and void of employment contract.

   
 

Termination due to null and void of employment contract.

   

ASB

  1. The Accounting Standards Board does not have any labour disputes currently.

CBDA

(1) The Agency does not have any current labour disputes.

DBSA

  1. Current Labour Disputes

No. of Labour disputes (a)

Cause of each Dispute (b)

Nature of each dispute (c)

Date reported (d)(i)

Date resolved (ii)

5

(CCMA/

LABOUR COURT)

Dismissal for Gross negligence (X1)

Unfair Dismissal – Labour Court

27 November 2017

Pending

 

Dismissal for Unacceptable conduct (X1)

Unfair Dismissal– Labour Court

30 December 2016

Pending

 

Dismissal for Gross negligence (X1)

Unfair Dismissal – Labour Court

25 October 2008

Pending

 

Dismissal for Gross negligence (X1)

Unfair Dismissal – Labour Court

03 August 2012

Pending

 

Dispute regarding retirement age (X1)

Automatically Unfair Dismissal – Labour Court

01 February 2011

Pending

3

(Internal)

Dishonesty and Gross Negligence

Misconduct

21 May 2018

June 2018

 

Failure to comply with company policies and procedures & dishonesty.

Misconduct

25 May 2018

Pending

 

Gross Misconduct

Misconduct

10 May 2018

Pending

FIC

(1) (ii) Financial Intelligence Centre

(a)

Number of labour disputes currently

(b)

Cause of dispute

(c)

Nature of each dispute

(d)

Date reported and resolved

1

Poor performance

Incapacity

  1. Reported: Referred to CCMA, 5 December 2017
  1. Resolved: 13 August 2018

1

Constructive dismissal

The employee has referred the matter for review and setting aside of the arbitration, which was awarded in favour of the Financial Intelligence Centre, on 18 December 2016

  1. Reported: Referred to Labour Court, 20 February 2017
  1. Resolved: Not resolved

FSCA

  1. (ii) Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA): - 2 (two);

(b) Both are breaches of internal disciplinary procedures;

(c) The first dispute relates to misconduct and the second dispute (which is still in process) relates to dereliction of duty;

(d) (i) Case 1. Reported on 20 February 2018

Case 2. Reported on 06 June 2018

(ii) Case 1. Based on the charges brought before the employee, verified by an employer witness and representation made by the employee, the Chairperson found the employee guilty and recommended dismissal with immediate effect. The Chairperson’s recommendations were considered by Senior Management and a resolution was taken to dismiss the employee with a month’s notice pay. The employee has referred the matter to the CCMA for arbitration and a hearing has been set down for 4 September 2018.

Case 2. Case still in progress.

GEPF

  1. The GEPF is not facing any labour disputes at the moment.
  1. (a)(i) Two employees have been dismissed in the past five years

(a)(ii) One employee was dismissed for breach of the Supply Chain Management Policy. One employee was dismissed for gross insubordination, abuse of company property and putting the safety of other employees at risk.

(b) (i and ii) None of the employees received severance packages.

GPAA

  1. (a) The number of disputes is 4,

(b) The cause of each dispute were amongst others:

    • Unfair dismissal
    • Access to Information
    • Two different cases were reported with regards to employees appointed at different salary levels.

(c) The nature of each dispute entailed:

1. Alleged unfair labour dismissal for misconduct

2. The request for information

3. Unfair Labour practice with regards to salary disparities on two matters.

(d) Date reported and resolved

Date reported Date resolved

(1) 30/10/2012 - 30/07/2018

(2) 16/02/2018 - Pending Arbitrator’s ruling

(3) 02/03/2017 - Pending notice of set - down for Arbitration

(4) 12/02/2018 - Pending notice of set - down for a review at Labour Court

IRBA

The IRBA hereby declares that;

  1. There are currently no labour disputes within the entity.

LAND BANK

  1. (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) The Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved?

Current Disciplinary Matters

Nr of Labour dispute (a)

Cause of each dispute (b)

Nature of each dispute (c)

Date of dispute reported (d - i)

Date of dispute resolved (d – ii)

Comments

1

Alleged unauthorized approval by the employee provided to client on a loan agreement. Process for approval not followed.

Gross Negligence

June 2018

Unresolved, matter under investigation

 

2

Disciplinary enquiry regarding non-compliance to Procurement processes

Gross Negligence

Dec 2017

August 2018

Disciplinary process was in progress however employee resigned and resignation was accepted.

3

Breach of PFMA and non-compliance to Procurement

Gross Negligence

May 2018

July 2018

Disciplinary process was in progress however employee resigned and resignation was accepted.

4

Fruitless and wasteful expenditure due to children that turned 23 was not removed from the Bankmed dependency list.

Negligence

June 2018

July 2018

Final Written warning issued to employee

5

Misconduct on I.T relate matters

Suspension

     

Referred to CCMA and Labour Court

Nr of Labour dispute (a)

Cause of each dispute (b)

 

Set-down date

Comments

1

Prohibition of unfair Labour discrimination

CCMA

31 August 2018

Recruitment candidate referred matter to CCMA

2

Unfair Retrenchment

Labour Court

Awaiting Labour Court Date

Matter occurred in 2016

3

Dismissal: Disorderly Conduct and Unacceptable Behaviour

CCMA – Arbitration

27 August 2018

 

FAIS OMBUD

  1. (a) (i) The FAIS Ombud currently faces six (6) labour matters in various fora.
  1. (b) (ii) Four of them were initiated by the former employees challenging alleged unfair dismissal based on a combination of misconduct and poor performance. The fifth referred a constructive dismissal case. The last is an alleged breach of employment contract dispute before the Magistrates’ Court by a candidate whose appointment was revoked on the basis of an undisclosed pending fraud case, discovered through verification checks.

The four disputes were initiated in 2017, the last initiated in 2018. Only the fifth has been resolved by way of settlement of four months’ salary. The monetary value of the settlement figure was R117 859.72

PFA

(1)(a)(ii) The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator currently has two unresolved labour disputes whose details are as follows:

  1. Labour Court: Tando Mbono v OPFA and others JR2285/15

On 4 August 2015, Mr Mbono was dismissed by the OPFA for poor performance (having followed a poor performance process). Mr Mbono referred an unfair dismissal dispute to the CCMA, alleging his dismissal was procedurally and substantively unfair.

The CCMA found that Mr Mbono’s dismissal was fair and issued an arbitration award to this effect. Mr Mbono then applied to the Labour Court to have the arbitration award reviewed and set aside. Whilst the pleading stage in the matter is closed, the matter has not yet been set down for hearing.

The OPFA has very good prospects of being successful in the review application.

  1. Unfair dismissal – CCMA case no. GATW9446-18

A former Admin Assistant, Ms Nthabiseng Maleka, was dismissed in July 2018 due to excessive usage of the OPFA’s telephone for her private and/or personal use. Ms Maleka referred a dispute to the CCMA alleging her dismissal was unfair.

The dismissal was effected following several warnings of misconduct to Ms Maleka for similar misdemeanours, the last of which was a final written warning in September 2017.

In addition, in December 2017 a meeting was held with all staff and employees were specifically warned about excessive usage of the work telephone for private/personal reasons. The conduct from the employee did not stop and excessive usage was once more noticed for the months after the meeting in December 2017. At her disciplinary hearing held in April 2018, the employee pleaded guilty to the misconduct and the chairperson therefore recommended dismissal as the appropriate sanction.

Conciliation was held on 6 August 2018 but the matter could not be conciliated. The matter is now awaiting arbitration proceedings at the CCMA. No date has been provided for these arbitration proceedings.

The OPFA anticipates that it has very good prospects of being successful in defending the arbitration proceedings.

PIC

(1)

 

Nature of misconduct

Outcome

Recorded

Finalised

2015/16

 

 

1

Performance related

Mutual Separation

Feb – 15

Apr - 15

1

Performance related

Mutual Separation

Feb – 16

May-16

1

Absent without authorisation

Dismissal

Apr – 15

May – 15

1

Absent without authorisation

Final written warning

Jun-16

Jul-16

1

Breach of policy

Written warning

Sep-15

Oct-15

1

Dishonesty

Resignation

Jul-15

Aug-15

2016/17

 

 

         

1

Performance related

Mutual Separation

Sep-16

Mar-17

2017/18

 

 

1

Insubordination

Written warning

May-17

Jun-17

1

Breach of policy

Mutual Separation

Nov-17

Apr-18

1

Possession of unauthorised documents

Dismissal

Nov-17

May-18

1

Dereliction of duties

Dismissal

Mar-18

Apr-18

1

Insubordination

Final written warning

Mar-18

Mar-18

(2)

Reason

Number of cases

Monetary value (Rands)

Date

Negotiated Termination

 

 

 

1

1,270,466

Apr – 15

 

1

2,219,191

May – 16

 

1

143,937

Mar – 17

 

1

7,250,000

Apr – 18

Total

4

10,883,594

SARS

  1. (a)(b)(c)(d)(i)

The information provided in this report relate to all labour disputes that are currently being faced and referred to external labour tribunals. The link below provides the number of CCMA disputes SARS is currently facing. The table also refelcts the figures broken down per the nature and cause of the dispute, per financial year of referral:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2329SARS_CCMA_DISPUTE.pdf

The Table below provides the number of labour disputes SARS is currently facing at the Labour Court and/or Labour Appeal Court. The link also refelcts the figures broken down per the nature and cause of the dispute, per calendar year of referral:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2329SARS_Labour_DISPUTE.pdf

(d) on what date was each dispute ((ii) resolved;

The focus of this report is on answering the question of “dispute currently being faced” and therefore those that are open and still in progress at the relevant tribunal. Dates of resoution are therefore not yet availble until these matters are resolved.

(2) (a)(i)(ii)

The Table below provides the number of SARS employees having been dimissed over the past 5 financial years, against the reasons for the dismissals:

Terminations Reasons

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

YTD

Grand Total

Abscondment

2

1

1

1

2

 

7

Discharge Incapacity Ill Health

3

2

4

1

3

 

13

Discharge Incapacity Poor Work Performance

1

1

       

2

Dismissal Misconduct

51

40

25

29

52

15

212

Grand Total

57

44

30

31

57

15

234

(b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and

Terminations Reasons

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

YTD

Grand Total

Severance Package

       

2

 

2

Grand Total

       

2

 

2

(ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package?

Due to confidentiality provisions associated with employees’ personal information, as protected by the Protection of Personal Information (POPI) Act, SARS is not in a posiiton to disclose more detailed information regarding this.

SASRIA

  1. (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by Sasria?

Sasria is currently not facing any labour disputes.

TAX OMBUD

  1. The Office of the Tax Ombud does not have any labour dispute with its employees.

09 October 2018 - NW2494

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Finance

Why has a certain person (name furnished), whose partner (name furnished) passed away on 1 May 2017, not received a spousal allowance more than a year after the spouse passed away?

Reply:

A certain person (name furnished), (applicant) applied for the funeral benefit in respect of the death of the member, (name furnished), during June 2017. At that time there was insufficient evidence submitted to support the application to be recognized as the life partner of (name furnished) and the accompanying related benefits. The applicant was requested to resubmit her application for recognition of a life partner which resubmitted application was received in March 2018. This application however erroneously indicated that (the applicant) was the child of the deceased in which case the applicant cannot be recognized as the life partner.

It was hereafter established that this was an error as applicant was not the child of the deceased. There were however still insufficient and supporting evidence from the family of the deceased to corroborate the existence of the life partnership as the evidence submitted purported to substantiate the factual dependency of the applicant only due to the family of the deceased not wishing to provide verification of the existence of a life partnership. As a result of the conflicting accounts, the matter was submitted to the internal Fraud Unit of the Government Pensions Administration Agency to validate the existence of the life partnership between the applicant and the deceased. The validation investigation was concluded on 3 September 2018 and payment in this matter in recognition of the life partnership application is currently in process.

09 October 2018 - NW2449

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) the National Treasury and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

(a)(i) National Treasury does not own any land and therefore does not have any company investing on land.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii) Not applicable.

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board does not own any land or any other investment property.

CBDA

The Co-operative Banks Development Agency does not own land.

DBSA

No party, other than the Development Bank of Southern Africa, has invested in land owned by it.

FAIS OMBUD

None

FIC

Not applicable to the Financial Intelligence Centre.

FSCA

Financial Sector Conduct Authority - not applicable.

GEPF

As an investor, the GEPF owns a large number of properties within its property portfolio. The property portfolio is divided into directly held properties and indirectly held properties through corporate and listed property companies.

The link below reflects the amount and type of properties that the GEPF directly holds:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2449_GEPF_TABLE.pdf

GPAA

The Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA) does not own any land.

IRBA

IRBA does not own any land.

LAND BANK

No investing company has invested on land owned by the Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa.

PFA

The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator does not own land.

PIC

As an operating entity, the PIC has no investments in land, neither directly held nor through investment companies.

The rest of the question falls away.

SARS

SARS does not have any land that is owned or managed through an investing company.

SARS however owns buildings that have vacant land for possible expansion purposes.

SASRIA

Sasria SOC Ltd does not own land, and as such has no investments on land. Our investments are administered by asset managers, and consist of various asset classes. We are not aware of any of our investment being specifically on land, however, we do carry investments in property bonds.

TAX OMBUD

The OTO does not own any land.

09 October 2018 - NW2709

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Finance

What has been the return on each investment of the Public Investment Corporation over the past 10 years?

09 October 2018 - NW2755

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

What are the details of the appointment of certain persons (names furnished) in terms of the (a) qualifications required for each position, (b) qualifications that each specified person possessed, (c) process that was followed to attract applicants for each position, (d) applicants who applied for each position, (e) reasons each specified person was appointed to each position and (f) remuneration package of each person, including (i) the date of appointment, (ii) remuneration package at the date of appointment, (iii) any salary adjustments, including the amounts, dates on which adjustments were made and (iv) the person(s) who authorised the adjustments?

Reply:

  1. DR BROWN

a) Qualifications required for the position – FFC Chief Executive Officer : Post-Graduate degree in Economics, Finance or Commerce / Business Administration / Public Administration

b) Qualifications of Dr Kay Brown

(i) Senior Certificate at Westering High School, Port Elizabeth, 1985.

(ii) B.Comm with Economics and Accounting as major subjects, University of Port Elizabeth (now the Nelson Mandela University), 1988.

(ii) B.Comm (Honours) in Economics, University of Port Elizabeth, 1989.

(iv) Doctoral Degree in Economics, University of Cape Town, 2001 - (In June 2000 registration for a M.Comm degree was upgraded to a PhD.)

c) Process that was followed to attract applicants – Chief Executive Officer Position

(i) Request For Quotation (RFQ) was awarded to DAV on 17 January 2017 for the recruitment of the Chief Executive Officer.

(ii) A formal briefing meeting was held with FFC Officials and DAV Official. DAV was briefed on :

    • Understanding and appreciating the FFC environment, culture, mission and values;
    • Provided with full job specification
    • The ideal candidate profile;
    • Shortlisting selection criteria and the methodology;
    • The advertising requirements; and
    • Deadlines and delivery dates.

(iii) DAV received the advert sign-off on 2 February 2017 and advertised internally and externally in the Sunday Times on 5 February 2017 with a closing date of 27 February 2017.

(iv) Interviews were scheduled with the above candidates on 6 October 2017.

  • Dr Kay Brown;
  • Dr Patrick Mabuza;
  • Mr Norman Baloyi;

The following candidates withdrew their candidature:

  • Dr Vuyelwa Nhlapo:
  • Ms Zukiswa Potye.

The panel consisted of :

  • Prof Daniel Plaatjies- Chairperson
  • Dr Sibongile Muthwa- Deputy Chairperson
  • Professor Nico Steytler-Commissioner
  • Mr Sipho Lubisi- Commissioner
  • Mr Romeo Adams – Independent Member

In attendance

  • Mr Velile Mbethe- Acting CEO
  • Karen Robertson- Principal Consultant DAV
  • Ansuyah Maharaj-Dowra- Commission Secretary.

Both Dr Kay Brown and Dr Patrick Mabuza were sent for a competency assessment on 12 October 2017.

d) Applicants who applied for each position

(i) A total of fifty-seven (57) applications was received.

(ii) Fourteen (14) applications fitted the shortlist and were shortlisted by a panel which met on 19 May 2017. The panel consisted of:

    • Dr Sibongile Muthwa- Deputy Chairperson
    • Mr Sipho Lubisi- Commissioner
    • Mr Velile Mbethe- Acting CEO( FFC)
    • Ms Ansuyah Maharaj-Dorwa- Commission Secretary
    • Dr Elsie Greyling- Independent Consultant
    • Karen Robertson- Principal Consultant DAV

The following five (5) candidates were shortlisted:

    • Dr Kay Brown;
    • Dr Patrick Mabuza;
    • Mr Norman Baloyi;
    • Dr Vuyelwa Nhlapo: and
    • Ms Zukiswa Potye.

e) Reasons each specified person was appointed to each position

Based on the outcome of the interview and competency assessment process, experience and qualifications, Dr Kay Brown was recommended for the role of the Chief Executive Office at the Financial and Fiscal Commission

f) Remuneration

i. Date of Appointment – 1 April 2018

ii. Remuneration package at the date of appointment – Salary level 15 – R1 544 406.00

iii. 1 April 2018 – Cost of Living Adjustment 5.5% from R1,544,406.00 to R1,629,348.00

iv. Authorised by the Commission Chairperson, as informed by the DPSA directive and Circular No. 17 of 2018.

 

2. MR MBETHE

(a) to (d) MR Mbethe was seconded as per request by the FFC Commissioners to the Financial and Fiscal Commission as the Acting Chief Executive Officer by the former Minister of Finance, the Honourable Minister PJ Gordhan as per the letter signed dated 9 September 2016. His term as Acting CEO ended on 31 March 2018. From 1 April 2018 Mr Mbethe was seconded to FFC as Executive Manager to mainly oversee disciplinary hearings coming out of the forensic investigation report.

(f) (i) 9 September 2016 – Salary level 15 – R1,299,501.00

(ii) 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018- (First Notch – Salary level 15)- R1,370,973.00

(iii) 1 April 2018 – Salary level 15- R1,370,937.00

- Cost of Living Adjustment 5.5% from R1,370,937.00- R1,446,377.00, effective 1 April 2018.

(iv) Authourised by the Chief Executive Officer as informed by the DPSA directive and Circular No. 17 of 2018.

3. MR G PETLELE

a) Qualifications required for the position – Human Resources Specialist: Post-Graduate Diploma or Degree in Human Resources Management or equivalent qualification

b) Qualifications for Mr G Petlele

i. Matric – Tshukudu High School - 1986

ii. BA degree Industrial Psychology and Communication - (UNISA);

iii. Masters Diploma in Human Resources Management ( RAU) Now University of Johannesburg);

iv. Programme in Business Leadership(UNISA–School of Business Leadership); and

v. Master Degree in Business Leadership (UNISA–School of Business Leadership).

c) Process that was followed to attract applicants

The vacant Human Resources Specialist position was advertised internally (FFC) and Externally in the Sunday Times with closing date 15 September 2017. Interviews were conducted on 23 January 2018 consisting of a panel of five (5) members.

i. Mr Velile Mbethe – Chairperson – Acting CEO- FFC

ii. Dr Ramos Mabugu- FFC Research Director

iii. Dr Thembi Ntshakala- Programme Manager – Intergovernmental Fiscal Relation

iv. Mr Mandla Tatana – Human Resources Specialist

v. Ms Chandrika Jugroop – Labour Relations Specialist

d) Applicants who applied for each position

One-hundred and eight (108) applications were received and six (6) candidates interviewed.

    • Mr Gift Petlele;
    • Ms Puleng Ratlabala;
    • Ms Mandidsa Mtyila;
    • Ms Chairmaine Koffman;
    • Mr Anton Zondi
    • Ms Jullena Thanjekwayo

e) Reasons each specified person was appointed to each position

i. M G Petlele possessed the appropriate and relevant qualifications as listed in b) above;

ii. Mr G Petlele possesses relevant in private, public and public service experience, gained from the following organisations/companies:

Industrial Development Corporation, Land and Agricultural Bank, Coca-Cola South Africa, Development Bank of Southern Africa, Civil Aviation of South Africa and National Treasury.

iii. Interview performance – Based on the possessing of the technical human resources experience, demonstrated managerial and leadership experience, Mr.Petlele was recommended as the best suitable candidate for the Human Resources Specialist post.

f) Remuneration

i. The date of appointment – 1 April 2018

ii. Remuneration package at the date of appointment – Salary level 14 – R1,127,334.00

iii. August 2018 – Cost of Living Adjustment 5.5% from R1,127,334.00 - R1,189,337.00, effective 1 April 2018.

iv. Authourised by the Chief Executive Officer as informed by the DPSA directive and Circular No. 17 of 2018

 

09 October 2018 - NW2383

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)In light of the fact that the (a) SA Revenue Service and (b) Customs Office have proven and uncontested knowledge of the tariffs applicable to the imported material (details furnished) and given the fact that he and/or the National Treasury are provided with regular reports about extended demurrage of the specified items and cost for storage to importers, has he found that there are procedures and processes that are problematic and/or overly bureaucratic, which need speedy resolution in the interest of fairness, rationality and lawfulness; if not, how was the conclusion reached; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The South African Revenue Services has a mandate to control the import, export, manufacture or use of goods. SARS Customs is responsible for implementing a wide range of government policies, including revenue collection, trade compliance and facilitation, control over prohibited and restricted goods, protection of cultural heritage and enforcement of intellectual property laws. 

This mandate is inter alia exercised by the risk based assessment and examination (documentary and/or physical) of goods to ascertain whether the provisions of the Customs and Excise Act No. 91 of 1964, (‘the Act”) or other relevant legislation have been complied with. In this regard, the Act makes provision in section 4(8A) for an officer to stop and detain and examine any goods while under customs control in order to determine whether the provisions of the Act or any other law have been complied with in respect of such goods. Section 107(1)(a) of the Act further provides that all expenses of landing, examination, weighing, analysis etc. of imported goods shall be borne by the importer,  owner or other person , whoever is in control of those goods. The Act further provides in terms of section 107(2)(a)  that goods may be released  on provision of security by the client, pending the final outcome of an intervention.  

This policy position is also internationally applied in the customs legislation of other jurisdictions and is very much aligned to acceptable international practice. In instances where the goods are not dealt with in terms of section 107, such goods are transferred to the state warehouse pending the final outcome of the intervention.

All Customs declarations are submitted through automated channels and risk assessed based on a variety of factors that may include commodity type (tariff), value, origin, rebate provisions etc. In this regard, more than 90% of all trade are automatically risk-assessed and released within seconds. The balance is subjected to documentary inspection where the officer will consider the customs declaration against a variety of trade documents in order to establish correctness and any further possible risks or interpretive matters to be considered. This may lead to further physical examination of the goods.

This process does often result in goods for a particular trader being stopped repetitively over a period of time, and accordingly, SARS was approached by trade to explore improved resolution where the importer/exporter, supplier and commodity type is the same. Formal communication was sent to trade during October 2016, outlining a process through which the client can attach supporting documents reflecting outcomes of previous identical cases for documentary inspection purposes. Customs, at the time, committed to consider and review such supporting documents in their approach to mitigate perceived risk which will assist in reducing the likelihood of an intervention that may require physical inspection. This process is being utilised successfully by most traders today, and although documentary inspection do increase the time to release goods, in most cases this process is concluded within 4 hours after trade submits supporting documents. It is to be noted that there are infrequent incidents where goods are stopped for further examination despite the supporting documentation submitted.

In instances where a trader is uncertain of the correct tariff, value or origin to use on the goods being imported or exported, such trader may apply for a firm determination from SARS. A process, which commenced in May 2018, geared at eradicating the historical tariff determination backlogs resulted in related delays been eliminated. Goods subject to tariff disputes may be cleared with SARS following the section 107 route.

Further to this, SARS Customs is in the process of upgrading its risk systems to the effect that it will provide necessary tools to inspectors to enhance their decision making capabilities and reduce unnecessary and repetitive stops.

Clients who experience delays as a result of this can also contact the Customs Contact Centre or e-mail their query to the Customs Escalations mailbox for assistance. Customs further provides a facility for a Client to apply for Release and provide surety pending the final outcome of an intervention.

In addition to this, in acknowledging the opportunities to improve service, SARS have published a Client Charter which holds SARS accountable against its commitments in processing times and resolving queries within published timeframes.

09 October 2018 - NW2754

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What are the details of (a) the date on which a certain person (name furnished) was appointed to a certain position (name furnished), (b) the remuneration package of the specified person at the date of appointment, (c) any salary adjustments awarded to the person, including the dates and amount of salary adjustments and (d) who authorised the (i) original and (ii) any subsequently adjusted remuneration package; (2) what are the details of any reimbursements that were paid to the person for (a) telephone, (b) motor vehicle, (c) travel and (d) accommodation and any other expenses since the appointment date?

Reply:

1. (a) A certain person (name furnished) was appointed as Chairperson of the Financial and Fiscal Commission for a period of five years with effect from 1 July 2017.

(b) R1, 927, 497, 00 (The Chairperson is responsible for his own pension and medical aid contributions and since appointment has not claimed for any incidental expenses)

(c) No adjustment has been made.

(d) (i) The remuneration package was based on the salary level on which the position was advertised and the remuneration he was earning as a Special Advisor to the former Minister of Public Enterprises.

(ii) No adjustment has been made.

2. (a) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

(b) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

(c) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

(d) The Chairperson has not claimed for any reimbursements

09 October 2018 - NW2507

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) amount did each state-owned entity borrow from any entity in China (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board has no loans from any entity in China, nor has it had any loans during the past three years.

CBDA

Co-operative Banks Development Agency has never borrowed from any entity from China.

DBSA

a) (i) NONE

    (ii) N/A

b) N/A

(c) N/A

(d) N/A

FAIS OMBUD

Zero

FIC

(a)(i)(ii) No amount was borrowed from any entity in China in each of the past three financial years since 1 April 2018.

(b)(c)(d) Not relevant to the Financial Intelligence Centre

FSCA

Financial Sector Conduct Authority

(a) +(b) Not applicable

GEPF

The Government Employees Pension Fund has no loans from any entity in China.

GPAA

The Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA) never took any loans with any entity in China since 1 April 2018 and in the past 3 financial years.

LAND BANK

The Land Bank’s borrowings from entities in China in each of the past three financial years and since 1 April 2015 are summarised as follows:

Financial Year

Lender

Loan Conditions

Repayment Period

Loan

       

Amount

Outstanding

FY2016

¹RMB/CCB

Syndicated Loan

To apply the amounts borrowed for general corporate purposes

3 years

CCB R275m

Other R500m

Voluntary Prepaid on 29 September 2017

Amount outstanding: R0

FY2016

Absa/SBSA R2.7bn Syndicated Government Guaranteed Term Loan Facility

To increase the maturity profile of the Land Bank’s funding liabilities

Facility A – 6 years

Facility B – 7 years

Facility A

²BOC R77m

Other R1 527m

Facility B

BOC R77m

Other R1 019m

Facility A (Bullet)

BOC R77m

Other R1 003m (R524m voluntary prepaid on 31 May 2018)

Facility B (Amortising)

BOC R65m

Other R289m (R679m prepaid on 29 June 2018)

FY2017

None

       

FY2018

None

       

YTD

None

       

¹Rand Merchant Bank/China Construction Bank (“CCB”)

²Bank of China (“BOC”)

The table above shows that a total amount of R429m has been borrowed from Chinese entities during the past three financial years and that no borrowings have been raised during the current financial year that started on1 April 2018. As at 31 August 2018, the outstanding borrowings from entities in China amounted to R142m calculated as follows:

Total loans received from Chinese entities: R429m

Voluntary Prepayments: (R275m)

Instalments Paid: (R12m)

Loan Amount Outstanding 31 August 2018: R142m

PFA

a) The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator has not borrowed money from China in the past three financial years and since 01 April 2018.

PIC

The Public Investment Corporation (PIC) has never borrowed any money from any entity in China.

SARS

SARS has not borrowed any amount from any entity in China in the past 3 years or since April 2018 and therefore section b, c and d of the question is not applicable.

SASRIA

Sasria SOC Ltd is self-funded, with no loan facilities and has not held any loan facility in the past three financial years. Therefore, there has not been any borrowings from any entity in China.

TAX OMBUD

The Office of the Tax Ombud has not borrowed money from any entity from China.

08 October 2018 - NW2343

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Works

With reference to his reply to question 3614 on 28 November 2017, what is the extent of the vacant land owned by the Department of Public Works in Ventersdorp?

Reply:

The extent of the vacant land under the custodianship of the National Department of Public Works in Ventersdorp is 488,033 hectares.

_______________________________________________________________________

08 October 2018 - NW2787

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What (a) number of law firms did the Competition Commission brief regarding cartel cases between 1 January 2015 and 1 January 2017, (b) was the name of each law firm, (c) number of cases was each law firm briefed on and (d) was the cost to the commission in each case?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply by the Commissioner of the Competition Commission, Mr Tembinkosi Bonakele, to the question, which follows below:

“The number of law firms briefed by Commission between 1 January 2015 and 1 January 2017 is seven (7). The amount indicated below excludes costs for Council and VAT.”

NO

Name of Law Firm

Number of Cases

Total cost for all cases, excluding costs of Council and VAT

1.

Ndzabandzaba Attorneys

31 cases

R10 018 442,45

2.

KBK Attorneys

1 case

R 130 599,21

3.

Mokwana Incorporated

3 cases

R 191 574,74

4.

Ndobela Lamola Inc

2 cases

R 914 762,64

5.

Cheadle Thompson & Haysom Incorporated Attorneys

5 cases

R 4 191 731,01

6.

Maponyana Ledwaba Attorneys

1 case

R 76 317,54

7.

Knowles Attorneys

1 case

R 17 956,18

-END-

08 October 2018 - NW2355

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department outsourced the provision of male circumcision services at its facilities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, to whom; (2) (a) whether the contract was advertised; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of persons and/or entities who tendered, (b) what is the cost of the contract to his department and (c) why is it not insourced?

Reply:

(1) Yes, transversal contracts were awarded by National Treasury in consultation with the NDOH Medical Male Circumcision programme by means of a closed tender (RT35 2016) to NGO's viz:

1. The Aurum Health Institute;

2. THCA (TB/HIV Care Association); and

3. J.Galt Express).

(2) (a) (i) Yes, the contract was advertised.

1. SWHP (South African Commercial & Textile Workers Union Worker Health programme);

2. SFH (Society for family Health);

3. THCA (TB/HIV Care Association);

4. RTC (Right to Care);

5. JHPIEGO;

6. MaTCH (Maternal Adolescent and Child Health);

7. PHRU (Perinatal HIV Research Unit);

8. CHAPS (Centre for HIV & AIDS Prevention Studies);

9. The Aurum Health Institute;

10. J. Galt Express.

(ii) R194,000,000. The National Treasury RT35 transversal contract covers 24 districts and is over a period of three(3) years. 141 376 circumcisions will be performed as part of the contract at an average unit cost of R1372 per circumcision. 99 778 circumcisions have been performed from inception of the contract (November 2016) till end of July 2018.

(iii) The only way to reach our targets is to contract NGO's to increase our capacity to reach these targets. All the circumcisions performed are recorded in the NDOH standalone MMC register and all transversal contracted partners have been given registers to collect data for the National MMC programme.

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2624

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to his reply to question 379 on 19 March 2018, (a) what is the current status of the judicial inquiry into the death of the specified person (details furnished) in the Ford Kuga case and (b) by what date is the judicial inquiry anticipated to be completed; 2) why does the inquest appear before a magistrate and not a Supreme Court Judge; 3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

I wish to inform the Honourable Member that the Magistrate of George has requested permission from me, in terms of section 6 of the Inquests Act, 1959, to have the inquest heard by a Judge of the High Court.

I have also received follow-up representations from the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions: Western Cape, which I am currently considering.

08 October 2018 - NW2764

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What number of prisoners were released in each province over the past three years and (b) of these, how many had their DNA taken before they were released?

Reply:

a) The following number of offenders were released per financial year:

Financial year: 2015/2016

Province

Sentence Expiry

Parole

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

1590

1733

FREE STATE PROVINCE

1656

1751

GAUTENG PROVINCE

3992

4371

KWAZULU/NATAL PROVINCE

3328

3847

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

328

334

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

1042

1124

NORTH WEST PROVINCE

1110

1227

NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

553

564

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

7483

7840

Financial year: 2016/2017

Province

Sentence Expiry

Parole

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

2059

2215

FREE STATE PROVINCE

1851

1947

GAUTENG PROVINCE

5192

5648

KWAZULU/NATAL PROVINCE

4377

4886

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

355

358

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

1520

1621

NORTH WEST PROVINCE

1488

1617

NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

871

882

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

10844

11232

Financial year: 2017/2018

Province

Sentence Expiry

Parole

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

1863

1962

FREE STATE PROVINCE

1761

1850

GAUTENG PROVINCE

5733

6230

KWAZULU/NATAL PROVINCE

4613

5135

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

342

343

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

1405

1505

NORTH WEST PROVINCE

1773

1930

NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

896

899

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

9592

9992

b) As at the expiration of the two (2) year transitional arrangements period since promulgation of the Criminal Law (Forensic Procedures) Amendment Act 37 of 2013 in January 2017, of the 114 709 Schedule 8 offenders in correctional centres then, a total of 43 717 sample reference numbers of such offenders were captured in the Admission and Release System of the Department of Correctional Services (DCS).

It should be noted that taking of samples and reporting on DNA samples taken, is the obligation of the South African Police Service (SAPS) as they also keep the source documents of samples taken, for among others, audit purposes.

Capturing of the Buccal Kit Sample Reference numbers by the DCS is for purpose of reporting offenders due for release to SAPS in order for their samples to be taken prior to release and to avoid subjecting offenders to the same procedure twice.

08 October 2018 - NW2396

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Public Works

(1) With reference to the identification of R7,4 billion worth of unutilised properties for disposal or letting referred to in his department’s Budget Vote speech delivered on 15 May 2018, based on what criteria does his department decide whether unutilised properties are categorised for permanent disposal and letting; (2) (a) what number of properties have been identified for (i) permanent disposal and (ii) letting in (aa) urban and (bb) rural areas and (b) what number of properties are suitable for agricultural purposes; (3) can the specified properties be made available for land reform; if not, why not; (4) (a) when will his department’s property audit be completed and (b) will the results be made public; if not, why not; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter? NW2643E _______________________________________________________________________________

Reply:

(1) In Line With the Government Immovable Asset Management Act, 2007 (Act No. 19 of 2007), the Department of Public Works consults the User Asset Management Plan (U-AMP), as well as the Custodian Asset Management Plan (C-AMP), which are both long-term accommodation needs documents; to determine whether there is a need for the utilisation of vacant land/properties by user Departments. In addition, the Department consults the client departments directly in order to establish their willingness and intentions to utilise identified vacant properties. All properties that are not required by user departments are categorised as surplus properties and are then set aside for letting out for revenue generation purposes or disposal for the purpose of human settlements or land reform.

(2) (a) (i) 75 and 77 number of properties have been identified for disposal in relation to land reform and human settlements respectively based on the requests received.

(ii) 2973 properties have been identified for letting out.

(aa) Of the Two 2973 properties identified for letting out, an approximately 600 are located in urban areas and;

(bb) approximately 2000 properties are located in the rural areas.

(b) 3659 properties can potentially be subjected to a viability study by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform. (DRDLR) - a compact disk carrying this information is available upon request.

(3) The properties to be released for human settlements and land reform are identified by the requesting Departments of Human Settlements (including Provincial Government, Municipalities and the Housing Development Agency, as well as the Regional Land Claims Commissions through the line Department of Rural Development and Land Reform. The Department of Public Works only facilitates the disposals once requests are received with all supporting documentation from the above-mentioned State organs.

(4) (a) The physical assessment of properties is conducted in phases with a set number verified each year over the 5-year cycle due to the magnitude and complexity of the DPW property portfolio in line with Section 13 (d) of the Government Immovable Asset Management Act (GIAMA) of 2007 and PMTE Immovable Asset Management Policy.

(b) The information on the immovable asset register as per point 4 (a) above including notes to the Annual Financial Statements pertaining to various categories of immovable assets is published in the Annual Report of the Department.

(5) No, the Department of Public Works shall share information with the public as and when the need arises.

08 October 2018 - NW2562

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the alleged corrupt collusion between the State Attorney’s office and claimants of supposed malpractice in the Health Department, (a) what were the circumstances that resulted in this form of fraud to be committed over a protracted period of time without detection, (b) who should have been exercising oversight and (c) what measures have been put in place to ensure this form of fraud does not happen in future?

Reply:

a) I have made a request to the President by means of issued a proclamation for the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) to investigate the said allegations.

The State Attorney`s Office is extermelly under-capacitaed in respect of human resources. Many cases were settled on teh door-steps of the court. It may have been a matter of skills and knowledge fo the law in respect of medical negligence cases. The investigation of the SIU will cover the manner of operation of officials in teh various institutions, namely teh State Attorney`s Offices, teh officials at teh courts, the Department of Health,the Attorneys in Private Prctice and the Advocates. The investigationwill study the case files and all its information to check actual information, the bills of cost and payments done in State Attorney`s offices.

Therefore, the DoJ&CD will only be in a better position to respond to this question once the SIU has finalised the investigation regarding the alleged fraudulent activities.

b) Oversight of files in offices is managed by way of file audits, performance management and stakeholder meetings. Management of files by individual attorneys, who are members of the Law Society governed by the relevant ethical rules, exercises oversight.

c) The establishment of the specialised units in offices is aimed at ensuring that there is improved and effective management and co-ordination of state litigation services.

08 October 2018 - NW2478

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

What process did the SA Reserve Bank follow in order to move clients from VBS Mutual Bank to Nedbank; (2) was a tender to move the clients advertised; if not, what factors were considered for the selection of Nedbank; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the SA Reserve Bank or the curator negotiated any discounts for withdrawal charges; if not, what are the clients currently paying for withdrawal charges compared to what they were paying at the VBS Mutual Bank?

Reply:

No powers vest in the Minister of Finance in relation to operational elements of curatorship, including the movement assets and liabilities of VBS. These powers are conferred onto the curator in terms of section 54 of the Banks Act (1990).

(1) On the 21 August 30, 2018 the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) wrote to the Chair of the Standing Committee on Finance (SCOF) advising him of the manner, basis and modalities of the transfer of depositors from the now defunct VBS to a facilitator bank (Nedbank) to allow for the access of retail deposits.

The purpose of this response is to provide the SCOF with more granular detail pertaining to the criteria applied in the selection process as well as relevant extracts from the curator’s report titled ‘Resolution Plan: Liquidity for Retail Depositors’ dated 31 May 2018.

Following the recommendation of the Registrar of Banks’, the Minister of Finance placed VBS under curatorship, in terms of section 69 of the Banks Act 94 of 1990 read with section 81 of the Mutual Banks Act 124 of 1993, on 11 March 2018. The curator’s subsequent assessment of VBS’s financial position revealed that the bank is not in a position to fully repay its depositors.

The SARB agreed, after consultation with the Minister of Finance, to fund the repayment of certain deposits due by VBS, namely those of its retail depositors up to R100 000 per retail depositor. This amount is in line with the amount that will be covered under the envisaged explicit deposit insurance scheme which National Treasury intends to introduce into the legislative process.

In agreeing to fund the repayment of these retail depositors, the purpose of the SARB and National Treasury was to alleviate hardship and prevent losses to the most vulnerable of VBS’s depositors, being the ordinary retail depositors. These depositors, in the main, comprise of individuals, stokvels and burial societies.

The above-mentioned repayment scheme that the SARB has embarked on in no manner affects the legal dispensation pertaining to the assets and liabilities of VBS; these remain materially unchanged and part of VBS. The SARB paid the amounts owing to the retail depositors on a purely ex gratia basis.

As the agreed arrangement was designed to assist only the retail depositors (up to the agreed level), it was critical that this process was done in such a way that neither VBS nor any of its creditors and / or shareholders acquired any legal right or claim to the amount made available – otherwise the other creditors and / or shareholders would have been entitled to share proportionately in the amount made available. That would have defeated the objective of protecting the most vulnerable customers of the bank.

It was for this reason that the SARB utilised the services of another bank, being Nedbank, to effect payment of the amounts due to the VBS retail depositors covered by the guarantee issued by government. This was achieved by the SARB depositing R257 million with Nedbank for the purpose of effecting payments to 17 380 retail depositors of VBS. In return, these retail depositors agreed to cede to the SARB all their rights and title to their claims against VBS, up to the amount they had received from Nedbank acting on behalf of the SARB.

The VBS retail depositors have one of the following options; the choice is completely at the discretion of each depositor:

  • Withdraw all the funds at any ATM or Nedbank branch.

 

  • Transfer all the funds to another bank account with any bank in the Republic of South Africa.
  • Retain the funds in the Nedbank accounts and use the associated debit card to make payments as and when necessary.

(2) (3) As mentioned at the SCOF meeting on 15 August 2018, at a high level, two major factors were considered when making the decision to use Nedbank to facilitate the repayment of VBS’s guaranteed retail depositors, namely:

    • the location of the branches of the institutions which were being considered; and
    • the costs, specifically the bank fees, which the VBS retail depositors would incur.

The curator recommended to the SARB that the guaranteed depositor funds be urgently made available to the depositors. Given the legal implications associated with VBS, it was not possible to allocate the guaranteed funds to any of the VBS branches. The curator therefore undertook an exercise to consider other institutions which could be utilised for the purpose of facilitating the payment of the guaranteed retail deposits.

Various objective factors were considered in the decision-making process. These included the following:

• proximity of the institution’s branches to VBS branches;

• the lowest service fees on recommended products;

• similar product offerings to the customers;

• whether the selected financial institution was a registered bank; and

• speed of execution.

The information considered when deciding on the bank that would be used to facilitate payment to the retail depositors has been extracted from the aforementioned curator’s report, and has been enclosed hereto as Annexure A.

It is also important to note that the VBS retail depositors covered under the guarantee issued by government are not, in any way, compelled to retain the Nedbank accounts which were used to facilitate the repayment of the guaranteed retail deposits. Nedbank is essentially only a medium through which VBS customers can access their monies with minimum disruption.

Careful consideration was also given to depositor behaviour, costs to the depositors, and the looming crisis of depositors sleeping outside VBS branches.

The decision to use Nedbank was not in any way contrary to any SARB policies for the procurement of services.

08 October 2018 - NW2294

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

What is the (a) optimal and (b) actual number of (i) doctors, (ii) nurses and (iii) other specified health professionals at the Tembisa Hospital?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard.

TEMBISA PROVINCIAL TERTIARY HOSPITAL

       

CATEGORIES

OPTIMAL

ACTUAL

DIFFERENCE

Doctors

310

283

27

Nurses

1400

1013

387

Psychologist

6

4

2

Pharmacists & Assistants

50

46

4

Occupational Therapist

15

10

5

Radiographers

35

25

10

Environmental

3

3

0

Speech & Audiologist

8

6

2

Physiotherapist

16

12

4

Dietician

8

8

2

Optometrist

2

2

0

Total

1853

1412

443

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2751

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 900 on 23 April 2018 regarding the incident on 21 February 2017 at the Kareerand sludge dam near Stilfontein in North West, during which large quantities of sludge were dumped in the Vaal River, his department issued any fines to the company that is responsible for the sludge dam, as was mentioned in his reply; if not, why not; if so, what fines were issued; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) The Department did not issue any fine to the responsible company because the company followed the right procedure as outlined in section 20, “Control of emergency incidents”, sub-section (3) (a) and section 20 sub-section (4) (a-c) of the National Water Act, 1998, (Act 36 of 1998). Further to that, the Department’s Free State Office is closely monitoring the situation to ensure that all preventative and remedial measures outlined by the company in their notification report of 21 February 2017 and the subsequent close out report, dated 19 October 2017, are timeously implemented. Follow up inspections were conducted on the following dates 14 November 2017 and 21 June 2018 which revealed significant progress in both the preventative and remedial actions implemented. Refer to the attached updated progress report in Annexure A.

(2) No statement will be made on the matter.

08 October 2018 - NW2696

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his replies to questions 625, 626 and 627 on 7 May 2018, what is the (a) total number of posts of each specified profession (details furnished) that are vacant in each district municipality in the North West and (b)(i)(aa) name and (bb) location of each institution and (ii)(aa) duration of each vacancy and (bb) date by which each vacancy is envisaged to be filled?

Reply:

(a) & (b) (i) (aa) (bb)

The table below reflects the number of currently vacant specified professional post on the PERSAL system in North West as at August 2018.

(ii) (aa) Unfortunately Vulindlela does not provide the duration period of each vacancy actual date (bb) Since each post was vacated at a different date, it is not possible to mention the specific date that a post will be filled, however, in accordance with the Department of Public Service and Administration directive on reducing the recruitment period and the vacancy rate in the public service dated 08 June 2015, a median period to fill a vacant funded post is six (6) months.

Table

Count of Vacant Post as at August 2018

Vacant

North West

1212

580000 - HEALTH: DISTRICT OFFICE:BOJANALA

337

AUDIOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

1

DENTIST

2

583293 - HEALTH: MORETELE:H/CENTRES:IN EXCESS EMPL

1

583893 - HEALTH: MDSD:MOTHUTLUNG CHC:ORAL HEALTH S

1

DIETICIAN (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

2

580100 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE RUSTEN

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

1

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER (COMMUNITY SERV)

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

1

MEDICAL OFFICER

19

581100 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF 24 H

1

581214 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:ANAESTHESIA

1

581262 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:UNIT MEDICAL SERVI

1

582757 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:L1 INPATIENT CA

1

582758 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:L2 INPATIENT CA

1

582760 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:CASUALTY

1

582766 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:FAMILY MEDICINE

1

582840 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:CASUALTY

1

582841 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:L1 INPATIENT CARE

1

582956 - HEALTH: SWARTRUGGENS HOSP:SECTION CASUALT

1

583086 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:CLINICAL SERVICES

2

583184 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:L1 INPATIENT CARE

2

583188 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:SECTION CASUALTY

1

583474 - HEALTH: MORETELE:MAKAPAN CHC:FACILITY SER

1

583475 - HEALTH: MORETELE:MAKAPAN CHC:OUTREACH

1

583920 - HEALTH: MDSD:LETLHABILE CHC:OUTREACH

1

583988 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:BAPONG CHC:FACILITY SERV

1

MEDICAL OFFICER (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

18

580100 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE RUSTEN

6

580200 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE BRITS

3

580300 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MORETE

2

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

7

NURSING ASSISTANT

70

581130 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:SEC NURS SERVICE

1

581146 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:LABOUR WARD

1

581170 - HEALTH: JS TABANE*HOSP:NURSING SERVICES**

1

581176 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:WARD

1

581198 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICES(1

1

581220 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:THEATRE

2

581224 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:RECOVERY ROOM

1

581892 - HEALTH: MKSD:MOGWASE CHC:CSSD

1

581940 - HEALTH: MKSD:BOIKANYO CLINIC:OUTPATIENT S

1

582076 - HEALTH: MKSD:RUIGHOEK CLINIC:OUTPATIENT S

1

582356 - HEALTH: RUST SD:TLHABANE CHC:CLINICAL SER

2

582361 - HEALTH: RUST SD:TLHABANE CHC:WARD

1

582389 - HEALTH: RUST SD:ANNA LEGOALE CL:OUTPATIEN

1

582488 - HEALTH: RUSD:LUKA CL:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

582492 - HEALTH: RUSD:MAKOLOKWE CLINIC_2ROOM

1

582584 - HEALTH: RUSD:GATEWAY CL:OUTPATIENT SERVIC

2

582680 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATI

1

582683 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF F

2

582691 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:CSSD

4

582692 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:THEATRE

1

582695 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:WARD ADMIN & HO

1

582703 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE

5

582705 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE

13

582709 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:LEVEL 11 NURSIN

3

582711 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:LABOUR WARD

1

582716 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

1

582809 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:MINIMUM STAFF 24H

1

582904 - HEALTH: SWARTRUGGENS HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATI

1

582908 - HEALTH: SWARTRUGGENS HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF F

1

583076 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:MINIMUM STAFF FOR

1

583112 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:NURSING SERVICES

1

583124 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:SEC NURSING SERVIC

6

583678 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:HEBRON CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

583694 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:H/FONTEIN CL:OUTPATIENT

1

583718 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:GATEWAY BRITS CL:OUTPATI

1

583766 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:MABOLOKA CL:OUTPATIENT S

2

583804 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:MAJAK CL:OUTPATIENT SERV

1

583896 - HEALTH: MDSD:MOTHUTLUNG CHC:OUTPATIENT SE

1

583899 - HEALTH: MDSD:MOTHUTLUNG CHC:WARD

1

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

5

581284 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:OCCUPATIONAL THERA

1

582736 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:OCCUPATIONAL TH

3

583160 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:OCCUPATIONAL THERA

1

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

1

PHARMACIST

12

581297 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:PHARMACY PRODUCTIO

1

582208 - HEALTH: RUST SD:BAFOKENG CHC:PHARMACY

1

582746 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:PHARMACEUTICAL

1

582748 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:GENERAL PHARMAC

1

582836 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:PHARMACEUTICAL SE

1

582950 - HEALTH: SWARTRUGGENS HOSP:GENERAL PHARM.S

1

583168 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:PHARMACEUTICAL SER

2

583170 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:PHARMACEUTICAL CLI

1

583172 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:GENERAL PHARM SERV

2

583491 - HEALTH: MORETELE:MAKAPAN CHC:ADDITIONAL S

1

PHARMACIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

4

580100 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE RUSTEN

1

580300 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MORETE

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

2

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

3

581282 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:PHYSIOTHERAPY

1

583162 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:PHYSIOTHERAPY

2

PHYSIOTHERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

1

PROFESSIONAL NURSE

56

580605 - HEALTH: MADIBENG SD:RETIRED NURSES

16

580608 - HEALTH: RUSTENBURG SD:RETIRED NURSES

4

581088 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP GEN OUTPAT NURSING

1

581100 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF 24 H

2

581130 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:SEC NURS SERVICE

2

581240 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:UNIT NURSING STAFF

1

581261 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICES*

1

581926 - HEALTH: MKSD:BUKUBUNG CLINIC:COMMUNITY BA

1

582680 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATI

1

582683 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF F

1

582691 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:CSSD

1

582693 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:RECOVERY ROOM

3

582694 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:ADULT HIGH CARE

3

582696 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:BASIC ADULT ICU

1

582697 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:PAEDIATRIC HIGH

1

582703 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE

1

582712 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:POST-NATAL WARD

1

583086 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:CLINICAL SERVICES

1

583098 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:BASIC ADULT ICU

1

583112 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:NURSING SERVICES

4

583128 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:LABOUR WARD

2

583138 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:PAEDIATRIC CARE

2

583354 - HEALTH: MORETELE:LEBOTL CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

583476 - HEALTH: MORETELE:MAKAPAN CHC:COMMUNITY HE

1

583532 - HEALTH: MORETELE:MATHIBES CL:OUTPATIENT S

1

583623 - HEALTH: MADIBENG SD:IN EXCESS EMPLOYEES

1

583706 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:IKHUTSENG CL:OUTPATIENT

1

PROFESSIONAL NURSE (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

14

580100 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE RUSTEN

3

580200 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE BRITS

6

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

5

PROFESSIONAL NURSE SPECIALITY

62

581096 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE**

2

581130 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:SEC NURS SERVICE

1

581144 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:OBSTETRICS

3

581146 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:LABOUR WARD

3

581160 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:NEONATES

4

581162 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:GENERAL PAEDIATRIC

3

581170 - HEALTH: JS TABANE*HOSP:NURSING SERVICES**

2

581198 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICES(1

1

581220 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:THEATRE

2

581222 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:24HRS SER

1

581224 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:RECOVERY ROOM

1

581256 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:UNIT NURS STAFF

1

581558 - HEALTH: MKSD:MADIKWE:COMMUNITY BASED SERV

1

581582 - HEALTH: MKSD:MABESKRAAL CHC:OPTHALMOLOGY

1

582062 - HEALTH: MKSD:RAMOKOKA CLINIC:COMMUNITY BA

1

582682 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAF

2

582699 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:BASIC NEONATAL

1

582709 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:LEVEL 11 NURSIN

3

582711 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:LABOUR WARD

3

582716 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

1

582810 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

582816 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:CSSD

1

582908 - HEALTH: SWARTRUGGENS HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF F

1

582910 - HEALTH: SWARTRUGGENS HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAF

1

583074 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:ADDITIONAL STAFF

2

583076 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:MINIMUM STAFF FOR

1

583094 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:THEATRE

2

583095 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:RECOVERY ROOM

2

583096 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:ADULT HIGH CARE WA

2

583098 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:BASIC ADULT ICU

1

583116 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:SECTION NURSING SE

1

583124 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:SEC NURSING SERVIC

2

583128 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:LABOUR WARD

1

583132 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:ANTE-NATAL WARD

2

583134 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:NEO NATAL NURSERY

1

583649 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:D/VILLE CL:COMMUNITY BAS

1

583930 - HEALTH: MDSD:LETLHABILE HC:OPTHALMOLOGY S

1

583993 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:BAPONG CHC:MENTAL HEALTH

1

583994 - HEALTH: MADIBENG:BAPONG CHC:OPTHALMOLOGY

1

SPEECH THERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

580400 - HEALTH: BOJANALA COMMUNITY SERVICE MOGWAS

1

STAFF NURSE

65

581096 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE**

2

581124 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:SEC NURS SER*

1

581144 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOS:OBSTETRICS

2

581162 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:GENERAL PAEDIATRIC

1

581170 - HEALTH: JS TABANE*HOSP:NURSING SERVICES**

3

581220 - HEALTH: JS TABANE HOSP:THEATRE

2

581438 - HEALTH: MKSD:PELLA CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH SERV

1

582680 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATI

5

582682 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAF

1

582692 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:THEATRE

2

582703 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE

18

582705 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE

13

582709 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:LEVEL 11 NURSIN

1

582716 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

3

582722 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP: NURSING SERVIC

2

582728 - HEALTH: MOSES KOTANE HOSP:NURSING SERVICE

2

582807 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:GENERAL OUTPATIEN

1

582810 - HEALTH: KOSTER HOSPITAL:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

583116 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:SECTION NURSING SE

1

583124 - HEALTH: BRITS HOSPITAL:SEC NURSING SERVIC

2

583476 - HEALTH: MORETELE:MAKAPAN CHC:COMMUNITY HE

1

590000 - HEALTH: NGKAKA MODIRI MOLEMA DISTRICT OFFICE

260

AUDIOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

592990 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE ZEERUST ARE

1

DENTIST

3

592029 - HEALTH: RMSD:MOSHANA CHC:ORAL HEALTH SERV

1

592070 - HEALTH: MOTSHANA CHC:ORAL HEALTH SERVICES

1

592122 - HEALTH: DINOKANA CHC:ORAL HEALTH SERVICE

1

DIETICIAN (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

2

592980 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE DELAREYVILL

2

MEDICAL OFFICER

21

590146 - HEALTH: UNIT 9 CHC:FACILITY SERVICES

1

590194 - HEALTH: GMSD:RAMATLABAMA CHC:FACILITY SER

1

590278 - HEALTH: GMSD:LEKOKO CHC:FACILITY SERVICES

1

590676 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP CASUALTY MEDICAL SER

2

590774 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP RENAL UNIT WARD

1

590796 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP LIII GEN SURG MEDICA

1

590804 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:ANAESTHETICS

1

590840 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP BAS NEONAT ICU MEDIC

1

590996 - HEALTH: BOPHELONG PSYC:MED AND CLINICAL S

1

591088 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:CLINICAL FORENSICS

1

591124 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:CLINICAL & ANCILLARY SE

1

591578 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:LEV 1 INPATIENT CA

2

591646 - HEALTH: GEN DE LA REY HOSP:WELLNESS CLINI

1

592246 - HEALTH: LDH:MEDICAL SERVICES*

1

592424 - HEALTH: DELAREYVILLE:OUTREACH

1

592529 - HEALTH: DELAREYVILLE CHC: WELLNESS CLINIC

1

592544 - HEALTH: ATAMELANG CHC:OUTREACH

1

592722 - HEALTH: RATLOU SD:FAMILY MEDICINE COORDIN

1

615003 - HEALTH: ITSOSENG CHC:OUTREACH

1

MEDICAL OFFICER (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

4

592980 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE DELAREYVILL

2

592990 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE ZEERUST ARE

2

NURSING ASSISTANT

39

590160 - HEALTH: UNIT 9 CHC:WARD_.

1

590290 - HEALTH: GMSD:LEKOKO CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

590360 - HEALTH: GMSD:GELUKSPAN MOBILE CLINIC

1

590423 - HEALTH: MFK SD:MAKOUSPAN CL:OUTPATIENT SE

2

590456 - HEALTH: GMSD:MIGA C:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

590666 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:GEN OUTP NURSING SER

1

590714 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP LI ACUTE IPC NURSING

1

590736 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:LABOUR WARD

1

590768 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP MDR WARD

1

590810 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:THEATRE

2

591086 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

591100 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:LEVEL I INPATIENT CARE

1

591246 - HEALTH: DSD:POLY CHC:CSSD

1

591282 - HEALTH: DSD:COLIGNY CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

591312 - HEALTH: DSD:TLHABOLOGANG CL:OUTPATIENT SE

1

591400 - HEALTH: DSD:GA-MOTLATLA:CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

591412 - HEALTH: DSD:BOITSHOKO CL:OUTPATIENT SERVI

1

591802 - HEALTH: GOPANE CLINIC:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

591874 - HEALTH: RAMOTSHERE MSD:MOSHWANA 2R FACI B

1

591916 - HEALTH: RAMOTSHERE MSD:SWARTKOPFONTEIN 2R

1

592036 - HEALTH: RMSD:MOSHSNA CHC:WARD

1

592128 - HEALTH: DINOKANA CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

592232 - HEALTH: LDH:NURSING SERVICES*

3

592238 - HEALTH: LDH:MATERNITY NEONATAL & PAED CAR

1

592330 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:GENERAL OUTPATIENTS

1

592334 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:MINIMUM STAFF 24HR SER

2

592348 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:CSSD.

1

592350 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:THEATRE.

1

592358 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:NURSING SERVICES*

2

592680 - HEALTH: LETSOPA CLINIC: OUTPATIENT SERVIC

2

615012 - HEALTH: ITSOSENG CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

615041 - HEALTH: DITSOBOTLA:FAST-LANE CLINIC:OUTPA

1

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

3

590856 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

1

592443 - HEALTH: DELAREYVILLE CHC:REHABILITATION

1

615022 - HEALTH: ITSISENG CHC:REHABILITATION

1

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

591970 - HEALTH: BORAKALALO CHC:RADIOGRAPHY

1

PHARMACIST

3

590865 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:CLINICS

1

590866 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:PHARMACY PRODUCTION

1

591136 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:SUBDIVISION PHARMACY

1

PHARMACIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

5

592960 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE MAFIKENG AR

2

592970 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE LICHTENBURG

1

592980 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE DELAREYVILL

1

592990 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE ZEERUST ARE

1

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

5

590855 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:PHYSIOTHERAPY

1

591130 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:SUBDIVISION PHYSIOTHERA

1

592136 - HEALTH: DINOKANA CHC:REHABILITATION

1

592571 - HEALTH:ATAMELANG CHC:REHABILITATION

1

592863 - HEALTH: MAKGOBISTAD CHC:REHABILITATION

1

PROFESSIONAL NURSE

84

590156 - HEALTH: UNIT 9 CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

590233 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOASTAD CHC:SCHOOL HEA

1

590240 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOASTAD CHC:OUTPATIENT

3

590281 - HEALTH: GMSD:LEKOKO CHC:SCHOOL HAELTH SER

1

590318 - HEALTH: GMSD:DANVILLE CL:OUTPATIENT SERVI

1

590386 - HEALTH: GMSD:LONELY PARK CL:OUTPATIENT SE

1

590408 - HEALTH: GMSD:SETLOPO CL:OUTPATIENT SERVIC

2

590504 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOA CL:OUTPATIENT SERV

1

590522 - HEALTH: GMSD:MOTLHABENG CL:OUTPATIENT SER

2

590538 - HEALTH: GMSD:RAPULANA CL:OUTPATIENT SERVI

1

590674 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP CASUALTY NURSING SER

2

590706 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSPLI CHRONIC IPC NURSIN

2

590714 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP LI ACUTE IPC NURSING

7

590732 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:OBSTETRICS

1

590754 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:GENERAL PAEDIATRICS

1

590790 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP LII GEN SURG NURSING

1

590822 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP ADULT HC NURSING STA

3

590830 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP BAS ADULT ICU NURSIN

1

590843 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP PAEDS HC NURSING SER

3

590849 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP LII RADIOLOGY NURSIN

1

590938 - HEALTH: BOPHELONH PSYC:MEDICAL & CLINICAL

1

590954 - HEALTH: BOPHELONG PSYC:NURSING SERVICES (

1

590986 - HEALTH: BOPHELONG PSYC:NURSING SERVICES(6

1

591080 - HEALTH: GELUKSPAN:GENERAL OUTPATIENTS

1

591520 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:HEALTH PROGRAMS

2

591524 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:WELLNESS CLINIC

1

591530 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:THEATRE

6

591538 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:NURSING SERVICES

2

591834 - HEALTH: RMSD:LEHURUTSHE CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

592206 - HEALTH: LDH:GENERAL OUTPATIENTS.

1

592248 - HEALTH: LDH:NURSING PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT

1

592358 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:NURSING SERVICES*

1

592433 - HEALTH: DELAREYVILLE:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

592490 - HEALTH: SANNIESHOF CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICE

1

592529 - HEALTH: DELAREYVILLE CHC: WELLNESS CLINIC

6

592537 - HEALTH: AGISANANG CLINIC:OUTPATIENT SERVI

1

592768 - HEALTH: LOGAGENG CL:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

592852 - HEALTH: MAKGOBISTAD CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVIC

1

592884 - HEALTH: MAREETSANE CL:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

592896 - HEALTH: MADIBOGO CL:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

595005 - HEALTH: DITSOBOTLA SUB-DISTRICT:RETIRED N

1

595006 - HEALTH: RAMOTSHERE MOILOA SD:RETIRED NURS

4

595010 - HEALTH: MAFIKENG SUB DISTRICT RETIRED NUR

11

PROFESSIONAL NURSE (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

40

592960 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE MAFIKENG AR

14

592970 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE LICHTENBURG

11

592980 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE DELAREYVILL

8

592990 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE ZEERUST ARE

7

PROFESSIONAL NURSE SPECIALITY

33

590159 - HEALTH: UNIT 9 CHC:ADDITIONAL

1

590236 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOASTAD CHC:OPTHALMOLO

1

590242 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOASTAD CHC:ADDITIONAL

1

590336 - HEALTH: GMSD:GELUKSPAN G C:COMMUNITY BASE

1

590380 - HEALTH: GMSD:LONELY PARK CL:COMMUNITY BAD

1

590516 - HEALTH: GMSD:MOTLHABENG CL:COMMUNITY BASE

1

590518 - HEALTH: GMSD:MOTLHABENG CL:FACILITY BASED

1

590552 - HEALTH: GMSD:TSETSE CL:COMMUNITY BASED SE

1

590572 - HEALTH: GMSD:WELTEVREDE CL:COMMUNITY BASE

1

590946 - HEALTH: BOPHELONG PSYC:NURSING SERVICES.

1

590962 - HEALTH: BOPHELONG PSYC:NURSING SERVICES(3

2

590970 - HEALTH: BOPHELONG PSYC:NURSING SERVICES (

2

591268 - HEALTH: DSD:COLIGNY CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH SER

1

591384 - HEALTH: DSDO:HOLCIM CL:OUTPATIENT SERVICE

1

591546 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:MATERNITY NEONATAL

1

591840 - HEALTH: RMSD:LEKGOPHUNG CL:COMMUNITY BASE

1

592102 - HEALTH: TSWELELOPELE :MOBILE SERVICETY

1

592149 - HEALTH: DINOKANA CHC: MOBILE SERVICES

1

592435 - HEALTH: DELAREYVILLE:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

592492 - HEALTH: SANNIESHOF CHC:DELIVERY SERVICES

1

592534 - HEALTH: AGISANANG CLINIC:COMMUNITY BASED

1

592552 - HEALTH: ATAMELANG CHC:MENTAL HEALTH

1

592563 - HEALTH: ATAMELANG CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

592612 - HEALTH: KOPELA CLINIC: COMMUNITY BASED SE

1

592636 - HEALTH: MOFUFUTSO CLINIC:COMMUNITY BASED

1

592654 - HEALTH: OTTOSDAL CHC:DELIVERY

1

592730 - HEALTH: RATLOU SD:IN EXCESS EMPLOYEES(H/C

1

592732 - HEALTH: RATLOU SD:IN EXCESS EMPLOYEES

2

615008 - HEALTH: ITSOSENG CHC:OPTHALMOLOGY

1

615038 - HEALTH: DITSOBOTLA: FAST-LANE CLI:COMMUNI

1

PSYCHOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

592980 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE DELAREYVILL

1

SPEECH THERAPIST AND AUDIOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERV)

1

592990 - HEALTH: NMM COMMUNITY SERVICE ZEERUST ARE

1

STAFF NURSE

14

590233 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOASTAD CHC:SCHOOL HEA

1

590238 - HEALTH: GMSD:MONTSHIOASTAD CHC:OCC HEALTH

1

590674 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP CASUALTY NURSING SER

1

590732 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:OBSTETRICS

1

590798 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP LIII GEN SURG NURSIN

1

590812 - HEALTH: MAF SEC HOSP:24 HOUR SERVICE

1

591218 - HEALTH: DSD:POLY CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH SERVIC

1

591510 - HEALTH: THH:THUSONG DH:GENERAL OUTPATIENT

1

592074 - HEALTH: TSWELELOPELE:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

592220 - HEALTH: LDH:WELLNESS CLINIC*

1

592358 - HEALTH: ZEERUST DH:NURSING SERVICES*

1

592730 - HEALTH: RATLOU SD:IN EXCESS EMPLOYEES(H/C

1

592856 - HEALTH: MAKGOBISTAD CHC:WARD

1

592955 - HEALTH: RATLOU CHC: WELLNESS CLINIC

1

600000 - HEALTH: DR KENNETH KAUNDA DISTRICT OFFICE

411

AUDIOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

604011 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE: WITRAND

1

DENTIST

1

600879 - HEALTH: GRACE MKHOMO CHC ORAL HEALTH SERV

1

MEDICAL OFFICER

50

600134 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP GEN OUTPAT MEDICAL SER

1

600148 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LII ACUTE CARE MEDICAL

1

600240 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII PAED SERV MEDICAL

1

600244 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII TRAUMA CENTRE MED

3

600248 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII UROLOGY MEDICAL S

1

600252 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII VASC SURG MEDICAL

1

600255 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP ANAESTHETICS

8

600277 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP BASIC NEONATAL ICU MED

2

600281 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP PAEDIATRIC HC MEDICAL

3

600480 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:SEC MEDICAL SERVICES

2

600873 - HEALTH: GRACE MOKHOMO CHC OUTREACH

15

601078 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:MEDICAL SERVICE

1

601102 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:CLINICAL FORENS

1

602104 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP DH:SECTION CASUALTY

1

602472 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:L1 INPATIENT C

2

602474 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:L2 INPATIENT C

2

602476 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:CASUALTY

1

603304 - HEALTH: TIGANE CHC:SUBDIV OUTREACH

1

604135 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG FAMILY MEDICINE

1

604163 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG L1 INPATIENT CARE

2

MEDICAL OFFICER (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

604000 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE KT/NIC BO

1

NURSING ASSISTANT

129

600157 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP OBSTETRICS

1

600176 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LII GEN MED NURSING SE

1

600188 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII ACUTE SERV NURSIN

1

600192 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII DERMAT SERV NURSI

1

600219 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII OBSGYNAE NURSING

2

600223 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII ORTHOP SER NURSIN

1

600231 - HEALTH: KERKSDORP LIII R/M NURSING SERVIC

2

600258 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP THEATRE

7

600472 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES

6

600478 - HEALTH: WITRAND:SEC NURSING SERVICES

44

600486 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES*

4

600658 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:ALABAMA CLIN OUTPATI

1

600682 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:EMPILISWENE CL:OUTPA

1

600702 - HEALTH: MAJARA SEPHAPHU CLINIC:OUTPATIENT

1

600744 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:KANANA CLI:OUTPATIEN

1

600756 - HEALTH: MSD:KHUMA CLINIC:OUTPATIENT SERVI

2

600760 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:MAHENSVLEI 2R CLINIC

1

600770 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:ORKNEY CL:OUTPATIENT

1

600782 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:PARK STREET:OUTPATIE

1

600832 - HEALTH: BOTSHABELO CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICE

4

601072 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:NURSING SERVICE

1

601214 - HEALTH: TSWELELANG CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICE

1

601220 - HEALTH: TSWELELANG CHC:WARD*

1

601228 - HEALTH: TSWELELANG CHC:CSSD*

1

601360 - HEALTH: MAQUASSI:WOLMARANSSTAD MOBILE CLI

1

602070 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP DH:SEC NURSING SERVIC

1

602274 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP SD:SETTLEMENTS MOBILE

1

602294 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP S/D:MOGOPA OUTPATIENT

1

602404 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:NURSING SERVIC

3

602416 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:SEC NURSING SE

11

602420 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:LABOUR WARD

1

602422 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:POST-NATAL WAR

1

602424 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:ANTE-NATAL WAR

1

603320 - HEALTH: TIGANE CHC: OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

604138 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG CSSD

2

604143 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG NURSING SERVICES

17

604145 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG CIP NURSING SERVICES

1

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

7

600310 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LII REHAB CEN OCCUPATI

1

600502 - HEALTH: WITRAND HOSP LII REHAB CENT OCC T

2

601232 - HEALTH: TSWELELANG CHC:REHABILITATION

2

602448 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:OCCUPATIONAL T

2

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

604011 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE: WITRAND

1

PHARMACIST

2

602460 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:GENERAL PHARMA

1

603326 - HEALTH: TIGANE CHC:SECTION PHARMACY

1

PHARMACIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

3

604000 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE KT/NIC BO

1

604010 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE POTCH/VEN

1

604011 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE: WITRAND

1

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

3

600309 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LII REHAB CENTRE PHYSI

1

600500 - HEALTH: WITRAND HOSP LII REHAB CENT PHYSI

1

602450 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:PHYSIOTHERAPY

1

PHYSIOTHERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

604011 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE: WITRAND

1

PROFESSIONAL NURSE

100

600133 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP GEN OUTPAT NURSING SER

1

600137 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP CASUALTY NURSING SERVI

3

600145 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP CLINICAL FORENSICS

1

600157 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP OBSTETRICS

1

600158 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP GYNAECOLOGY

1

600159 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LABOUR WARD

1

600166 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LII GEN SURG NURSING S

1

600176 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LII GEN MED NURSING SE

3

600192 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII DERMAT SERV NURSI

1

600201 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII GEN SURG NURSING

1

600243 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII TRAUMA CENTRE NUR

5

600247 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII UROLOGY NURSING S

1

600251 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LEVEL III VASC SURG NU

1

600257 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP CSSD

2

600258 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP THEATRE

6

600340 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP MDR/XDR TB UNIT

2

600385 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP HOSP: IN EXCESS EMPLOY

1

600464 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

600472 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES

5

600478 - HEALTH: WITRAND:SEC NURSING SERVICES

2

600486 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES*

1

600658 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:ALABAMA CLIN OUTPATI

3

600708 - HEALTH: MARCUS ZENZILE CLINIC OUTPATIENT

1

600744 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:KANANA CLI:OUTPATIEN

1

600756 - HEALTH: MSD:KHUMA CLINIC:OUTPATIENT SERVI

1

600770 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:ORKNEY CL:OUTPATIENT

1

600782 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:PARK STREET:OUTPATIE

4

600794 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:STILFONTEIN CL:OUTPA

2

600808 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD:TSHOLOFELO CL:OUTPAT

3

600832 - HEALTH: BOTSHABELO CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICE

2

600875 - HEALTH: GRACE MKHOMO CHC SCHOOL HEALTH SE

1

600882 - HEALTH: GRACE MKHOMO OUTPATIENT SERVICES

3

600922 - HEALTH: JOUBERTON CHC OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

601114 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:QA IC & OH*

1

601214 - HEALTH: TSWELELANG CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICE

1

601276 - HEALTH: LEEUDORINGSTAD CHC:OUTPATIENT SER

1

601280 - HEALTH: LEEUDORINGSTAD CHC:ADDITIONAL STA

1

602162 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP SD:DIV YOUTH CENTRE

1

602222 - HEALTH: JB MARKS CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

602358 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:GENERAL OUTPAT

2

602362 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:ADDITIONAL STA

2

602368 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:SPECIALIST OUT

1

602386 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:ADULT HIGH CAR

1

602390 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:BASIC ADULT IC

3

602394 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:NEONATAL HIGH

1

602416 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:SEC NURSING SE

3

602424 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:ANTE-NATAL WAR

1

603112 - HEALTH: POTCH SD:S TSHWETE CL:OUTPATIENT

1

603168 - HEALTH: POTCH SD:LESEGO CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

603345 - HEALTH: TIGANE CHC: WELLNESS CLINIC

1

604143 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG NURSING SERVICES

1

604195 - HEALTH: MAQUASSI HILLS SD RETIRED NURSES

2

604196 - HEALTH: MATLOSANA SD RETIRED NURSES

6

604198 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP SD RETIRED NURSES

4

PROFESSIONAL NURSE (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

13

604000 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE KT/NIC BO

10

604011 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE: WITRAND

3

PROFESSIONAL NURSE SPECIALITY

48

600157 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP OBSTETRICS

1

600188 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII ACUTE SERV NURSIN

1

600192 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII DERMAT SERV NURSI

2

600196 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII GAST SERV NURSING

1

600201 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII GEN SURG NURSING

1

600204 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII ENT SERV NURSING

2

600208 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII INFEC DIS NURSING

1

600223 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII ORTHOP SER NURSIN

1

600227 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII OPTHALM NURSING S

1

600235 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII P/R NURSING SERVI

1

600243 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII TRAUMA CENTRE NUR

3

600247 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII UROLOGY NURSING S

1

600251 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LEVEL III VASC SURG NU

2

600258 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP THEATRE

3

600338 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP RADIATION ONCOLOGY UNI

1

600472 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES

5

600486 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES*

2

600918 - HEALTH: JOUBERTON CHC OPTHALMOLOGY SERVIC

1

600922 - HEALTH: JOUBERTON CHC OUTPATIENT SERVICES

1

601064 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:SPECIALISED SER

1

601072 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:NURSING SERVICE

1

601206 - HEALTH: TSWELELANG CHC:OPTHALMOLOGY_SERVI

1

601278 - HEALTH: LEEUDORINGSTAD CHC:DELIVERY SERVI

1

602050 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP DH:MINIMUM STAFF FOR

1

602070 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP DH:SEC NURSING SERVIC

1

602146 - HEALTH: VENTERSDORP SD:SEC INFORMATION &

1

602214 - HEALTH: JB MARKS CHC:OPTHALMOLOGY SERVIC

1

602226 - HEALTH: JB MARKS CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

602416 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:SEC NURSING SE

4

603036 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM SD:YOUTH CENTRE

1

603245 - HEALTH: BOIKI TLHAPI CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

603357 - HEALTH: PROMOSA CHC:MENTAL HEALTH*

1

603358 - HEALTH: PROMOSA CHC:OPTHALMOLOGY SERVICES

1

PSYCHOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

3

604000 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE KT/NIC BO

2

604011 - HEALTH: DR KK COMMUNITY SERVICE: WITRAND

1

STAFF NURSE

48

600133 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP GEN OUTPAT NURSING SER

1

600137 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP CASUALTY NURSING SERVI

1

600192 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII DERMAT SERV NURSI

1

600208 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII INFEC DIS NURSING

1

600219 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII OBSGYNAE NURSING

2

600223 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII ORTHOP SER NURSIN

1

600235 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP LIII P/R NURSING SERVI

1

600338 - HEALTH: KLERKSDORP RADIATION ONCOLOGY UNI

1

600472 - HEALTH: WITRAND RH:NURSING SERVICES

3

600478 - HEALTH: WITRAND:SEC NURSING SERVICES

20

600773 - HEALTH: ORKNEY CLINIC: WELLNESS CLINIC

2

600820 - HEALTH: BOTSHABELO CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH SER

1

601064 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:SPECIALISED SER

1

601072 - HEALTH: NIC BODENSTEIN DH:NURSING SERVICE

1

602362 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:ADDITIONAL STA

1

602364 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF

1

602416 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:SEC NURSING SE

4

602424 - HEALTH: POTCHEFSTROOM HOSP:ANTE-NATAL WAR

1

603242 - HEALTH: BOIKIE TLHAPI CHC:OUTPATIENT SERV

1

603308 - HEALTH: TIGANE CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES

1

603345 - HEALTH: TIGANE CHC: WELLNESS CLINIC

1

604143 - HEALTH: TSHEPONG NURSING SERVICES

1

610000 - HEALTH: DR RUTH SEGOMOTSI MOMPATI DISTRICT OFFICE

204

AUDIOLOGIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

613230 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV TAUNG SD AND TAUNG

1

DENTIST

2

610758 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:P/PLESSIS CHC:ORAL HEALT

1

612206 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:GANYESA CHC:ORAL HEALTH

1

MEDICAL OFFICER

13

610239 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:SECTION L2 INPATIENT

1

610242 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:PSYCHIATRIC MEDICAL

1

610243 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:FAMILY MEDICINE

2

610391 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:L1 INPATIENT CARE

1

610393 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:SECTION CASUALTY

1

610648 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP: MEDICAL SERVICES

1

610650 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP:CASUALTY

1

611098 - HEALTH: SCHWEIZER-RENEKE HOSP:CLINICAL FO

1

611234 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: FACILITY SERVICES

1

611552 - HEALTH: TAUNG:TAUNG CHC:OUTREACH

2

611752 - HEALTH: TAUNG:PUDUMONG CHC:FACILITY SERVI

1

MEDICAL OFFICER (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

3

613210 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV KAGISANO MOLOPO & G

2

613230 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV TAUNG SD AND TAUNG

1

NURSING ASSISTANT

86

610128 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATIENTS

1

610134 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF FOR 24

3

610142 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:CLINICAL SERVICES

2

610148 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:CSSD

1

610172 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

5

610182 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP: NURSING SERVICES

9

610208 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:NURSING SERVUCES.

1

610318 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATIENTS

1

610324 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF FOR 24HO

2

610338 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:CSSD

7

610340 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:THEATRE

1

610352 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

7

610359 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:INPATIENT CARE NURSING

1

610361 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:SECTION LABOUR WARD

1

610612 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

1

610780 - HEALTH: PIET PLESSIS CHC:WARD

1

611254 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: OUTPATIENT SERVIC

1

611264 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: DELIVERY SERVICES

1

611266 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: ADDITIONAL SERVIC

1

611268 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: WARD

1

611588 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MMAMUTLA CL:OUTPATIENT SERV

1

611616 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MAJEAKGORO CL:OUTPATIENT SE

1

611624 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MADIPELESA CL:OUTPATIENT SE

1

611656 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MANTHE CHC:WARD*

1

611716 - HEALTH: TAUNG:KHUDUTLOU CL:OUTPATIENT SER

2

611770 - HEALTH: TAUNG:PUDUMONG CHC:OUTPATIENT SER

1

611797 - HEALTH: TAUNG:PUDUMONG CHC:MOBILE SERVICE

1

611808 - HEALTH: TAUNG:DRYHARTS CL:OUTPATIENT SERV

1

611912 - HEALTH: TAUNG:TAUNG STA CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

611937 - HEALTH: TAUNG:BUXTON CL:OUTPATIENT SERVIC

1

612022 - HEALTH: HUHUDI CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

612023 - HEALTH: HUHUDI_CHC:SECTION WARD

1

612028 - HEALTH: HUHUDI CHC:CSSD

1

612049 - HEALTH: HUHUDU CHC:MOBILE SERVICES

3

612065 - HEALTH: NALEDI SD:GATEWAY CLINIC:OUTPATIE

1

612078 - HEALTH: NALEDI SD:COLRIDGE OUTPATIENT SER

2

612100 - HEALTH: NALEDI SD:NALEDI MOBILE CLINIC

1

612212 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:GANYESA CHC:OUTPATIENT S

2

612220 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:GANYESA CHC:WARD

1

612228 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:GANYESA CHC:CSSD

1

612258 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:GANYESA CHC:MOBILE SERVI

1

612298 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:KGOKGOY CL:OUTPATIENT SE

1

612324 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:ECKRON CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

612376 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:TLAKG CHC:OUTPATIENT SER

1

612500 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:MOROKWENG CHC:OUTPATIENT

1

612522 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:MOROKWENG CHC:MOBILE SER

1

612538 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:MOROKW CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

612594 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:SETABENG CL:OUTPATIENT S

1

612866 - HEALTH: MMSD:MAMUSA CHC:WARD

1

612925 - HEALTH: MAMASA:IPELEGENG CL:OUTPATIENT SE

1

612956 - HEALTH: MAMUSA:GLAUDINA CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

613262 - HEALTH: TAUNG SD: RETIRED NURSES

2

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

3

610216 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

2

610378 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

1

PHARMACIST

4

610224 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:PHARMACEUTICAL SERVI

2

611272 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: PHARMACY

1

612224 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:GANYESA CHC:PHARMACY

1

PHARMACIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

3

613210 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV KAGISANO MOLOPO & G

2

613230 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV TAUNG SD AND TAUNG

1

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

2

610218 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:PHYSIOTHERAPY

2

PHYSIOTHERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

613200 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV NALEDI SD & JMM HOS

1

PROFESSIONAL NURSE

25

610132 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

610138 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:HEALTH PROGRAMMES

1

610172 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

2

610196 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

1

610324 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF FOR 24HO

1

610332 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:CLINICAL SERVICES

1

610345 - HEALTH:TAUNG HOSPITAL:BASIC ADULT ICU

1

610366 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

1

610592 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

610656 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP:DIVISION QA IC & OH

1

611054 - HEALTH: SCHWEIZER-RENEKE HOSP:CLINICAL FO

1

611402 - HEALTH: REVH:CLINICAL FORENSICS

2

611532 - HEALTH: TAUNG:SEKHING CHC:ADDITIONAL STAF

1

611554 - HEALTH: TAUNG:TAUNG CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH SER

1

611655 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MANTHE CHC:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

611880 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MAGOGONG CL:OUTPATIENT SERV

1

611912 - HEALTH: TAUNG:TAUNG STA CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

612428 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:PHAPOS CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

612578 - HEALTH: KAGISANO:TSEOGE CL:OUTPATIENT SER

1

612860 - HEALTH: MMSD:MAMUSA CHC:OUTPATIENT SERVIC

1

613066 - HEALTH: LEKWA TSD:BOITUMELONG CLIN OUTPAT

1

613262 - HEALTH: TAUNG SD: RETIRED NURSES

2

PROFESSIONAL NURSE (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

22

613200 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV NALEDI SD & JMM HOS

7

613220 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV MAMUSA & SCHWEIZER

4

613230 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV TAUNG SD AND TAUNG

9

613240 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV LEKWA TEEM BLOEMHOF

2

PROFESSIONAL NURSE SPECIALITY

16

610132 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAFF

1

610318 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:GENERAL OUTPATIENTS

1

610320 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:CASUALTY SERVICES

1

610322 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:ADDITIONAL STAFF

4

610324 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:MINIMUM STAFF FOR 24HO

1

610326 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:CLINICAL FORENSICS

2

610352 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

2

610361 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:SECTION LABOUR WARD

1

610366 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

1

611496 - HEALTH: TAUNG SD:YOUTH CENTRE*

1

611816 - HEALTH: TAUNG:MATLAPANENG CL:FACILITY BAS

1

SPEECH THERAPIST (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

1

613200 - HEALTH: RSM COMM SERV NALEDI SD & JMM HOS

1

STAFF NURSE

22

610182 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP: NURSING SERVICES

6

610196 - HEALTH: VRYBURG HOSP:PAEDIATRIC CARE

1

610333 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP: STEP DOWN CARE

2

610342 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:RECOVERY ROOM

1

610352 - HEALTH: TAUNG HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

5

610612 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP:NURSING SERVICES

2

610616 - HEALTH: GANYESA HOSP: NURSING SERVICES

1

611254 - HEALTH: CHRISTIANA CHC: OUTPATIENT SERVIC

1

611410 - HEALTH: REVH:SPECIALISED SERVICES

1

611756 - HEALTH: TAUNG:PUDUMONG CHC:SCHOOL HEALTH

1

611776 - HEALTH: TAUNG:PUDUMONG CHC:WARD*

1

Grand Total

1212

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2706

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Mrs NKF

Hlonyana, Mrs NKF to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What (i) is the total value of loans that the Industrial Development Corporation had to write off in the past five financial years and (ii) was the value of each loan and (b) who was the recipient of each loan?

Reply:

a) The IDC publishes details of its impairments and write-offs in its Annual Reports, details of which are contained on page 76 of the 2017/18 Annual Report. For ease of reference, the information is set out below:

       

2017/18

 

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

2013/14

Write-offs per annum (net of recoveries) R’million

3 025

 

1 329

2 045

1 363

520

The IDC Board sets an impairment threshold of a maximum of 20% of the value (at cost) of the IDC’s investment portfolio. As of the last financial year, impairments equaled 17,4% of investments measured at cost, following the accounting standard used by the Corporation. However, if measured at market value, impairments equal 10,4% of the current market value of the investment portfolio.

Over the past 5 years, the highest level of impairment at cost was 18,2%, in 2014.

The function of an impairment threshold is to provide the management with the appropriate “risk appetite” that should be followed in approval of projects. :

  • If the IDC had a impairment threshold target that was set too low or at zero, it would need to only lend to, or invest in, projects that are guaranteed to succeed, or which are fully covered by security for its investment. The effect of this would be that the IDC would not be able to support many viable projects that carry a degree of risk.
  • If on the other hand the IDC had a risk threshold that was set too high, it is likely to invest in many more projects, however it is also likely to lose significant sums and eventually would deplete its capital base and become unsustainable.
  • The current impairment level thus seeks to strike a balance and in general is less conservative than the ratios and levels that a commercial bank would apply, as is necessary for a development finance institution.
  • The IDC will write off a loan or investment which has been impaired, in whole or part, where the prospects of recovery is remote, taking into consideration any security which may reduce the extent of the potential loss.

b) With respect to the loan amount and details of recipients, the IDC has advised that it does not disclose the details thereof as these were approved prior to 1 April 2017, when a client confidentiality policy was in place, regarding the companies with which it transacted. Following review, the IDC changed its policy on client confidentiality effective from 1 April 2017.

The IDC has disclosed in their 2017/18 Annual Report, that the single largest write-off is in respect of SCAW South Africa, a steel and engineering company that the IDC has a majority shareholding in during the period.

I draw attention to the following comment in the IDC’s 2017/18 Annual Report, that provides additional information:

“The IDC mini-group recorded a R2.8 billion profit (after capital profits), the same as the previous year. Net interest, dividend and fee income increased by 35% compared to the previous year. Increases in operating costs were contained at 1.5%. The cost-to income ratio (excluding cash resource income, impairments costs, and income from mature listed investments) improved to 39% from 46% in 2017.

Of concern is impairments and write-offs which more than doubled from the previous year. This increase was impacted by Scaw where the introduction of strategic equity partners resulted in a significant write-off (R1.6 billion) and a R1.8 billion impairment of Foskor facilities. Higher levels of impairments resulted in the ratio for impairments as a percentage of the portfolio at cost increasing to 17.4% from 16.7% in the previous year. The interventions currently underway at these two subsidiaries, which both recorded losses higher than expected, as well as the establishment of a dedicated department to monitor and manage subsidiaries and other material investments is expected to address this issue.”

Source: IDC Annual Report, 2017/18

-END-

08 October 2018 - NW2296

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a)(i) was the original costing and (ii) is the current costing of demolishing the Kempton Park Hospital and (b) are the reasons for the huge difference in the costing; (2) given the new costing, will his department consider refurbishing the hospital rather than demolishing it; if not, why not?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) R127, 729, 665. 36

(ii) R127, 729, 665.36

(b) There is no difference in the demolition cost.

2. Yes, this is one of the of the options under consideration

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2569

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; 2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to him and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

1.The table below provides details of the appointments Senior Management Service (SMS) Members of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD).

Name

a) Total number of (i) and (ii)

b) Total number of Women in each

 

Deputy Directors- General

Chief Directors

Deputy Directors-General

Chief Directors

 

Acting

Permanent

Acting

Permanent

   

DoJ&CD

4

4

2

30

5

15

2. Tables 1 and 2 table below provide details of the appointments of SMS Members of the entities reporting to me:

TABLE 1: SMS Members in the NPA are appointed in terms of two (2) dispensations, i.e. The Public Service Act

and NPA Act, as tabulated below:

Name

a) Total number of (i) and (ii)

b) Total number of Women in each

 

Directors of Public Prosecutions and Special Directors of Public Prosecutions

(NPA Act)

Chief Directors

(Public Service Act)

Directors of Public Prosecutions and Special Directors of Public Prosecutions

(NPA Act)

Chief Directors

(Public Service Act)

 

Acting

Permanent

Acting

Permanent

   

NPA

5

8

3

4

4

3

TABLE 2: Legal Aid South Africa and Special Investigating Unit

Name

a) Total number of (i) and (ii)

b) Total number of Women in each

 

Chief Executive Officers

Executive Directors

Chief Executive Officers

Executive Directors

Legal Aid South Africa

1

15

1

5

Special Investigating Unit

1

7

0

2

Office of the Chief Justice

  1. The responses to question 1 are presented in the table below:
  1. (i) Total Number of Deputy Directors- General

(aa) Number of Deputy Directors General in acting capacity

(bb) Number of Deputy Directors- General in permanent capacity

  1. Number of women in each case
  1. Contract

0

0

  1. (a) DDG- 01

(aa) DDG Acting= 00

(bb)DDG Permanent= 00

  1. (ii) Total Number of Chief Directors

(aa) Number of Chief Directors in acting capacity

(bb) Number of Chief Directors in permanent capacity

  1. Number of women in each case

4 Permanent and 1 Contract

2

4

(aa) Chief Directors Acting= 00

(bb) Chief Directors Permanent

2. The Office of hte Chief Justice does not have any entities reporting to it, therefore, the question is not applicable in this regard.

Department of Correctional Services:

The information below is as at 05 September 2018:

The structure of the Department has a total of 14 approved Deputy Directors-General (DDGs) / Chief Deputy Commissioners (CDCs)

(1)(a)(i)(aa) Currently there are four (04) acting Deputy Directors-General (DDGs);

(1)(a)(i)(bb) The total number of permanent DDGs is ten (10).

(1)(b) The total number of women in acting capacity is three (3), and the total number of permanent women is three (3).

(a)(ii)(aa) The total number of acting Chief Directors is five (5).

(a)(ii)(bb) The total number of permanent Chief Directors is twenty six (26).

(1)(b) The total number of females acting is zero (0), and the total number of permanent females is ten (10)

2(a)(i) One (1)Chief Executive Officer is employed under Judicial Inspectorate for Correctional Services (JICS).

2(a)(ii) Not applicable.

2(a)(ii) None.

08 October 2018 - NW2648

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has taken any steps to reduce the increasingly high levels of air pollution in the country in order to limit the negative effect of (a) ambient and (b) indoor air pollution on the health of citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department has put any policies in place to mitigate the negative effect of the increasingly high levels of (a) ambient and (b) indoor air pollution on citizen’s health; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Ambient air pollution

Ambient Air Pollution in the country is legislated by the National Management: Air Quality Act No. 39 of 2004 under the Department of Environmental Health Affairs. In ensuring the compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Management Act, No. 62 of 2008 (NEMA), Part 2, Section (1) (a), all health facilities in the country are no longer utilizing own incinerators within health facilities for disposal of Health Care Risk Waste/medical waste. Currently waste is collected by a service provider who disposes in licensed incinerators. The Department remains with a responsibility to ensure that the cradle to grave principle on management of such waste generated by the Department is adhered to.

Some health facilities are utilizing solar energy to heat water for use in hospitals rather than using the boiler houses which utilize coals and pollute the atmosphere. Bertha Gxowa hospital in Gauteng province is an example that has implemented this and other hospitals are benchmarking.

(b) Indoor air pollution

A Domestic Indoor Air Quality Guideline has been developed to guide municipal health services (environmental health services in municipalities) in addressing indoor air quality. It has been reviewed and in the process of being approved. Activities conducted as per the Guideline are as follows:

  • Create awareness to people at risk on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) risks
  • Provide guidance in undertaking indoor air pollutants assessments in a domestic environment (surveillance of premises)
  • Support IAQ monitoring as part of Air Quality Management Plans/Programmes
  • Support air quality health research studies
  • Give the ability and/or capacity to respond to IAQ complaints
  • To incorporate the behavioural change strategies as a potential to reduce indoor air pollution exposure

(2) (a) and (b)

Yes.

The legislation available for responding to air pollution in the department are as follows:

  • The Constitution in Section 24, 27 and 28 which refers to the basic human rights.
  • National Health Act 61 of 2003 as amended, outlines the role of provincial health to ensure that there is provision of environmental pollution control services. provision of health services, including preventative health care service.
  • Scope of Profession for Environmental Health in terms of Health Professions Act 56 of 1974, lists environmental health functions conducted by Environmental Health Practitioners in relation to air quality monitoring includes environmental pollution control and health surveillance of premises.
  • National Environment Management: Air Quality Act, No. 39 of 2004 – Regulates air quality activities, promote clean air to ensure protection of the environment and human health.
  • The Draft National Air Pollution Strategy (DEA), 2017 map outlines the path that the country needs to take in reducing the impact of air pollution in dense law income communities which includes role of the Department of Health.

The above legislation continues to be implemented as part of the scope of practice for environmental health services rendered within district and metropolitan municipalities which outlines clear roles on protection of the communities regarding ambient air pollution.

A Domestic Indoor Air Quality guideline has been developed to guide municipal health services (Environmental Health Services in municipalities) in addressing indoor air quality which is aligned to the WHO guideline for indoor air quality.

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2786

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(1)What (a) total amount has the Competition Commission paid to Ndzabandzaba since the firm started doing work for the commission and (b) are the details of the (i) scope and (ii) nature of the work that the specified firm has conducted for the commission; (2) whether the work of the specified firm included the active participation in the so-called dawn raids conducted by the commission; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply by the Commissioner of the Competition Commission, Mr Tembinkosi Bonakele, to the question, which follows below:

“(1a) The Commission has paid the firm R 71 686 012.28, which includes payments made to various Advocates as well as VAT, for the period January 2015 to August 2018. The sum comprises of the following components:

Fees paid to attorneys: R50,7m

Fees paid to advocates: R11,8m

VAT: R8,6m

Ndzabandzaba Attorneys was briefed on 31 cartel cases. For completeness, some of these cases involved a number of respondents per case. For example, the Furniture Removal case involved 46 respondents engaged in over 7000 separate instances of collusion, the Automotive Components case involved 61 respondents engaged in 310 separate instances of collusion, whilst the Foreign Exchange (Forex) case involves 23 respondents, among others.

(1b) The nature and the scope of work rendered by the law firm include assisting the Commission with prosecution of cartel cases, negotiating and concluding settlement agreements on behalf of the Commission, giving legal advice on cartel cases and briefing legal counsel to appear at the Tribunal and higher courts on behalf of the Commission. Ndzabandzaba Attorneys has also assisted the Commission with High Court applications for search warrants.

The majority of cartel cases handled by Ndzabandzaba Attorneys have been resolved through prosecution and settlement that were confirmed by the Competition Tribunal. The law firm successfully negotiated settlements to the amount R594 million and has a 100% success rate on prosecutions at the Competition Tribunal thus far.

(2) Yes, the work included active participation in the so-called dawn raids conducted by the Commission. The Commission briefed Ndzabandzaba Attorneys to prepare applications for search warrants in the High Courts.

The firm provided the above mentioned services in respect of the following cases between 2015 and 2017:

  1. CC v Stuttaford Van Lines and Others
  2. CC v Totalgaz Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd and Others
  3. CC v PG Bison (Pty) Ltd and Another
  4. CC v Maersk South Africa (Pty) Ltd and Others
  5. CC v Fresh Produce Market Agents
  6. CC v Beefcor (Pty) Ltd and Others
  7. CC v Wilmar Continental Edible Oils and Fats (Pty) Ltd and Others
  8. CC v Altech UEC South Africa (Pty) Ltd and Others
  9. CC v ASIB and its Members

The High Courts granted all the applications for the search warrant in respect of the above cases made by Ndzabandzaba Attorneys on behalf of the Commission. Where warrants were challenged these were successfully defended except in one case where the decision is still subject to an appeal process.”

-END-

08 October 2018 - NW2318

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package?

Reply:

  1. DEPARTMENT:
  1. Number of dispute
  1. Cause of dispute

(c) nature of dispute

(d) date of dispute

     
  1. reported

(ii) resolved

  1. 5

OSD

Interpretation and application of collective agreement

22/02/2018

23/04/2018

 

Promotion

Unfair labour practice

19/04/2018

03/05/2018

 

PMDS

Unfair labour practice

24/04/2018

Still pending

 

Promotion

Unfair labour practice

23/05/2018

29/06/2018

 

OSD

Interpretation and application of agreement

11/05/2018

20/06/2018

2. DEPARTMENT:

(a)

(b)

(i) number of employees dismissed

(ii)reason for dismissal

(i)What number of specified employees were paid severance package

(ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package

10

4= dismissal in terms of labour relations act

6= dismissal in terms of public service act

None

None

       

1. ENTITIES:

Entity

  1. Number of dispute
  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of dispute
  1. Date of dispute
       

(i)reported

(ii) resolved

South African Medical Research Council

None

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

National Health Laboratory Service

None

None

None

None

None

Council for Medical Schemes

Nine (9)

Misconduct

Fraud, Bringing the Name of Employer into Disrepute, Workplace Harassment; Assault, Incompatibility, Gross Negligence and Absenteeism

3 July 2017

12 October 2017

       

3 July 2017

27 October 2017

       

20 October 2015

2 November 2015

       

22 March 2017

27 June 2017

       

13 July 2017

11 December 2017

       

29 November 2016

21 June 2018

       

July 2017

14 December 2017

       

23 November 2017

12 March 2018

       

9 September 2014

19 December 2014

Office of Health Standards Compliance

Two (2)

Termination of cellphone allowance and outcome of performance assessment

Unfair labour practice

26 April 2018

13 June 2018

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

None

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

(2) ENTITIES

 

(a)

(b)

 

(i) number of employees dismissed

(ii)reason for dismissal

(i)What number of specified employees were paid severance package

(ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package

South African Medical Research Council

Two (2)

Dishonesty and Awol

None

None

National Health Laboratory Service

79

Unlawful removal of NHLS property, fraud, dishonest, AWOL, Gross negligence, abuse of sick leave, nepotism, poor performance, assault, harassment, refusing to obey instruction, misappropriation of NHLS fund, failing tome probation requirements, late coming, putting NHLS name into disrepute

None

None

Council for Medical Schemes

Two (2)

Fraud, dishonesty, harassment, incompatibility

None

Not applicable

Office of Health Standards Compliance

None

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

None

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2723

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(1)What are the details of (a) any loans provided by the Industrial Development Corporation to a certain company (name furnished) or any of its affiliate companies which fall under a certain company (name also furnished) and (b)(i) the total sum and (ii) terms and conditions of each such loan; (2) whether any of the specified loans is now the subject of litigation; if so, what are the details thereof; (3) whether his department is conducting any internal investigations into the maladministration and financial mismanagement of the abovementioned entities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply by the CEO of the IDC, Mr Geoffrey Qhena, to the question, which I quote as follows:

“The IDC approved a total funding amount of R185 million for Glodina Lifestyle (Pty) Ltd (“Lifestyle”) to acquire a division of KAP Homeware (Pty) Ltd (“KAP”). No amount has been approved to affiliates of KAP in so far as this transaction is concerned.

Following a partial draw down by Lifestyle, it was discovered that the shareholder did not conform with the KAP sale and purchase agreement and the IDC loan agreement and the planned sale was therefore cancelled. A forensic investigation was carried out by IDC Internal Audit which resulted in criminal charges being laid in May 2018 against the shareholder in Lifestyle for misrepresentation.

The matter has since been referred to the Johannesburg Commercial Crimes Unit. IDC has since concluded a sale and purchase agreement with KAP with the intention to resuscitate the Glodina business. The IDC’s intention is to start the recommissioning of the plant as soon as possible.”

In addition to the above reply by the IDC CEO, I am advised that the Department reviewed the claims and counter claims of the various parties to the transaction prior to the institution of formal court proceedings. In light of the court proceedings, the Department will monitor their outcome and take any steps that are warranted, based on additional information that comes to light.

-END-

08 October 2018 - NW2604

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether (a) his department and (b) entities reporting to him ever awarded a tender to Bain & Company in the past 15 years; if so (i) on which year was the contract (aa) awarded and (bb) ended, (ii) what was the monetary value of the tender and (iii) for what purpose was the tender procured;

Reply:

DPE RESPONSE

a) The Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) and National Treasury participated in the process of awarding a tender of R12.1 million to Bain and Company after a tender process and evaluation. The two departments entered into a Memorandum of Understanding where National Treasury contributed R10 million and DPE R2.1 million respectively towards the project to develop an optimal group corporate structure for the state owned airlines.

(i) (aa)(bb) On which year was the contract awarded and ended

The contract was awarded in October 2016. The work undertaken by Bain commenced in November 2016 and was completed in March 2017. What was the monetary value of the tender?

The monetary value of the tender is R12.1 million

(ii) For what purpose was the tender procured

The tender was procured for the development of the optimal group corporate structure for the state owned airlines.

ALEXKOR SOC LIMITED:

(a)

Not applicable

(b)

(i)

(aa)

No tender has been awarded to Bains (2003 to current)

   

(bb)

Not applicable

 

(ii)

Not applicable

 

(iii)

Not applicable

DENEL SOC LIMITED:

(a)

Not applicable

(b)

(i)

(aa)

No tender has been awarded to Bains (2003 to current)

   

(bb)

Not applicable

 

(ii)

Not applicable

 

(iii)

Not applicable

ESKOM SOC LIMITED

(a) Not Applicable

(b)

Yes, following Eskom’s procurement process, a tender was awarded to Bain and Company.

(b)(i)(aa)

Eskom awarded a tender to Bain and Company in 2010.

(b)(i)(bb)

The tender ended in the same year, 2010.

(b)(ii)

The value of the tender was R100 000.

(b)(iii)

The purpose of the tender was to provide consulting services to review the Eskom strategy and provide recommendations to Eskom’s executive committee.

SAFCOL SOC LIMITED:

(a)

Not applicable

(b)

(i)

(aa)

No tender has been awarded to Bains (2003 to current)

   

(bb)

Not applicable

 

(ii)

Not applicable

 

(iii)

Not applicable

SOUTH AFRICAN EXPRESS SOC LIMTED:

South African Express Airways has never had relations with Bain & Company.

SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS SOC LIMITED:

South African Airways has not awarded any contracts to Bain & Company in the past 15 years.

TRANSNET SOC LIMITED:

Transnet has not awarded a tender to Bain & Company in the last 15 years.

08 October 2018 - NW2631

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What were the circumstances that led Magalies Water to award a R280 million tender to a certain company (name furnished) for the construction of a pipeline; (2) whether any investigation has been conducted into the tender award; if not, why not; if so, what was the outcome of the investigation; (3) whether any disciplinary action had been taken; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The circumstances are that Magalies Water advertised a call for tenders for the project following the open / public tender process. The process followed was per the Magalies Water Supply Chain Policy and also in line with the National Legislation governing public procurement. After completing the due process of evaluation and adjudication of bids that had been received and which had met the criteria as per the advertisement, Murray & Dickson (Pty) Ltd emerged as the preferred bidder and they were duly appointed.

(2) No investigation has been conducted into the tender award. Magalies Water Board has not received any formal complaint of any wrong doing in relation to the awarding of the tender in question. Therefore, no outcome can be furnished, as required.

At this stage, we would like to also state that one of the bidders who had lost to Murray and Dickson decided - more than once - to bypass Magalies Water Board and took the award on Court Review, alleging irregularities on the process. On two (2) occasions, the Courts declared the Magalies Water’s process to have been above board and dismissed the allegations.

(3) There had been no reasons for Magalies Water Board to institute any disciplinary action against any official on this matter. To emphasize these neither a formal complaint nor any prima facie evidence of any wrong doing by anyone of our staff members had been brought to Magalies Water Board directly by any of the bidders, including the one that approached the Courts.

08 October 2018 - NW2684

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) is the total number of prisoners who are currently (i) enrolled for high school education and/or (ii) registered for university studies and (b) field of study is each prisoner studying?NW2975

Reply:

(a)(i) Total number of prisoners currently enrolled for High School Education is 1519.

(a)(ii) The total number of prisoners registered for university studies is 291

(b)

TOTAL NATIONAL SENIOR CERTIFICATE (new CAPS Curriculum)

14 FULL TIME SCHOOLS AND KUTAMA SINTHUMULE

 

Male

Female

Juvenile

TOTAL

Grade 9

0

0

40

40

Grade 10

165

0

191

356

Grade 11

106

0

134

240

Grade 12

123

0

77

200

Grand Total

394

0

442

836

TOTAL AMENDED SENIOR CERTIFICATE (part time) OLD SYLLABUS SITTING FOR EXAMS IN MAY - JUNE 2018

Male

Female

Juvenile

TOTAL

615

27

41

683

The following are the fields of study for each prisoner studying per region:

FREE STATE AND NORTHERN CAPE REGION (Total 41)

FIELD OF STUDY OF EACH PRISONER

TOTAL

Safety Management

1

Literally Legum Baccalaureus (LLB)

5

Journalism

1

Safety Health & Environment Representative Certificate

1

Safety Health & Environment Representative Certificate

1

Radio Broadcast

1

Diploma In Project Management

1

Diploma In Computer & Information Systems

1

B.Com Accounting

1

Degree In Economics

1

Small Business Management

1

Diploma In Business Management

1

Risk Management

2

BA Criminology

1

Diploma In Policing

1

Higher Certificate In Financial Business Management

1

Degree In Entrepreneurship

1

Paralegal Studies

1

Diploma In Health & Safety

1

Bachelor Of Commerce In Law

1

Higher Certificate In Business

1

Public Management

1

Web Design

1

Business Management

2

Public Management

1

Higher Certificate In Marketing

1

Higher Certificate In Law

2

Higher Certificate In Adult Basic Education & Training

1

Economic Management Science

1

Information Technology

1

African Political Economic

1

Bachelor of Business Admin (BBA)

1

Diploma In Public Relation

1

Dentist Technology

1

LIMPOPO. MPUMALANGE AND NORTH WEST REGION (Total 62)

FIELD OF STUDY

TOTAL

BSC Computer Science

1

Junior Degree Public Administration

1

Psychology

1

Bachelor of Art Communication & Public Administration

1

Bachelor of Arts Psychology

2

Junior Degree Statistics and Computer Science

1

Junior Degree Environmental Management

1

Post graduate Philosophy

1

Post graduate Education

2

Diploma Marketing

1

Junior Degree Accounting

1

Bachelor of Commerce Marketing Management

2

BCOMPT Accounting Science

2

Honours in Education Management & Leadership

1

LLB Criminal Law

1

Post graduate Risk Management

1

Diploma Commerce

1

BSC & BA Environmental Management

1

Post graduate Retail Marketing and Merchandising

1

B A in (Health science and social Service)Psychological Counselling (Maximum)

4

Junior Degree Marketing management

1

Diploma in Law Paralegal

2

Post graduate Human Resource Management

1

Bachelor of Laws Attorney

2

Diploma Computer science

3

Diploma in Security Management Security Management

2

Diploma Music

1

Diploma Engineering

1

Higher Certificate Economics Management Science

1

Bachelor of Arts Communication Science

1

Bachelor of Arts Communication

1

Post graduate Information Resource Management

1

Junior Degree LLB

2

Junior Degree Criminology

1

Diploma Accounting Science

1

Higher Certificate Life and Environmental sciences

5

Higher Certificate Accounting Science

1

Bachelor of Education Intermediate & Senior Phase

1

Junior Degree Psychology

1

Diploma in Law Paralegal

1

Diploma Mathematics and Science

1

Bachelor of Commerce

1

Diploma in Security Management

1

Bachelor of Business Strategy

1

Higher Certificate Economic and Management Science

1

EASTERN CAPE REGION (Total 13)

FIELD OF STUDY

TOTAL

Post Grad Certificate in Security Management

1

Degree in Statistics and Mathematics

1

Commercial Law

1

Psychology

1

Criminal Law

1

BCom Law

1

Diploma in ABET

1

Post Graduate certificate in Education (PGCE)

1

Diploma in Law

2

B.Com: Commercial Law

1

Project Management

1

Community Development

1

GAUTENG REGION (Total 61)

FIELD OF STUDY

TOTAL

Higher Certificate In Education

1

Literally Legum Baccalaureus (LLB)

9

BCom Transport & Logistics

1

Bachelor Of Administration

2

Diploma In Law

1

BA Business Admin

1

Certificate In Law

1

BCom Auditing

1

Master of Law (LLM)

3

Bachelor Of Commerce In Law

1

B.A. (Hons)

1

BA In Supply Chain

1

Bachelor of Commerce (BCom)

4

Computer Science

1

Business Management: Diploma

1

Bachelor of Accounting Science (BCompt)

2

ABET Certificate

1

Diploma Information Technology

1

BA Transport And Logistics

1

ABET Certificate

1

Diploma Safety Management

1

BCom  Generic

1

Hons Business Management

1

Higher Certificate in Law

1

Higher Certificate In Archives & Records

1

Masters Politics

1

Masters In Biblical Archaeology

1

PHD Religious Studies

1

MSC  Degree In Science Of Geology

1

Degree In Community Development

1

Diploma Agriculture Management

1

Diploma Retail

1

Bachelor of Science (BSC)

1

ECom

1

Degree In Administrative Management

1

BA Psychology

1

Master Of Commerce In Business Management (HRM)

1

Psyc /MCom

1

Higher Certificate In Social Work

1

Bachelor Of Accounting Sciences

1

Diploma Mining

1

Certificate Agriculture

1

Diploma In Human Resource

1

Certificate  In Community Journalism

1

Certificate Business Finance

1

Diploma In ABET

1

WESTERN CAPE REGION (Total 32)

FIELD OF STUDY

TOTAL

BCom. (Business Management)

1

Literally Legum Baccalaureus (LLB)

10

Bachelor of Education (Intermediate & Senior Phase)

1

Higher Certificate in ABET

1

Bachelor of Education (FET & Senior Phase)

1

Certificate: Human Resource Management

2

BCom. (Human Resource Management)

1

Hon. Bachelor of Education

1

B.Com Law

1

BA (Human & Social Studies)

1

Certificate: Marketing Management

1

Bachelor of Technology (Btech) Electrical Engineering

1

Diploma in Youth Development

1

Higher Certificate: Tourism Management

1

MSc. (Operations Research)

1

Higher Certificate: Economic & Management Science

1

BA (Communication Science)

1

Certificate: Risk Management

1

Diploma: Public Relations Management

1

BA - Art ( Computer generated media )

1

BA - Art (Health Science and Social Services: Psychological Counseling

1

BsC. Maths + Applied Maths

1

KWAZULU NATAL REGION (Total 82)

FIELD OF STUDY

TOTAL

Economic & Management Science (HC)

4

Program in Early Learning (SC)

3

Bachelor of Education (Degree)

2

Higher Certificate in ABET

9

Bachelor of Theology (Degree)

1

Economics and Management Science (HC)

1

Bcom Marketing (Degree)

3

Extended programme for college of education (Diploma)

1

Political Leadership & Citizen (Degree)

1

Hons Bachelor of Education (Degree)

2

Accounting Sciences (HC)

1

Bachelor of Science (Degree)

1

Literally Legum Baccalaureus (LLB)

5

Master of Education: Education Management and Leadership.

1

Islamic Finance, Banking and Law Programme (Higher Certificate)

)

3

Bible Studies

1

Diploma in Community Development

1

Bachelor of Economics

1

Bachelor of Education Intermediates & Senior Phase

4

Accounting Science

1

Beauty Therapy

1

Creative Writing

1

Safety Management

2

Tourism Management

1

Paralegal Studies

1

Policing

1

Marketing Management

1

Electrical Engineering

2

IT Diploma

1

BA: Disaster & Safety Management

1

Social Work

1

BA: Community Development

1

BCOM Degree

1

BA: Govern Admin & Development

1

BCOM Business Management

1

Psychology

2

Master in Law (LLM)

1

Master of Business Studies

1

Bachelor of education senior phase & FET

5

Business Management

1

B Com Tourism

2

B Com Transport & logistics

1

Diploma Law

1

National Diploma in Marketing

1

Higher certificate law

4

08 October 2018 - NW2740

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) name, (b) organisation and (c) crime of each specified person to whom the Truth and Reconciliation Commission granted amnesty?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is requested to obtain information of each person granted amnesty by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on the following link: http://www.justice.gov.za/trc/.

08 October 2018 - NW2477

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to his reply to question 2162 on 25 June 2018, what are the details of the technical assistance the National Treasury provided to the Department of Energy?

Reply:

The Department of Energy (DoE) approached the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Unit (now within the Government Technical Advisory Centre (GTAC)) of the National Treasury during 2010 for technical assistance in the procurement of new generation capacity from the private sector. This involved support in designing an appropriate procurement process, which was done by the DoE and PPP unit in consultation with the National Energy Reguation of South African (NERSA), Eskom, the Departments of Environmental Affairs, Water Affairs, Trade and Industry, Economic Development, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, and the Presidency. The PPP Unit also provided assistance in regard to planning, modeling of different technologies, and the design of the government support programme in the form of power purchase agreements. The Request for Proposals was developed and launched on 3 August 2011.

Support for the procurement programme was also provided by the Development Bank of Southern Africa, which is responsible for its day-to-day office activities. It is funded through a development fee paid by successful bidders at financial close into a Project Development Fund for alternative energy located in GTAC, an Agency of the National Treasury.

08 October 2018 - NW2470

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) total number of dams that are currently under construction in the country and (b)(i) location, (ii) size and (iii) total cost of building each dam?

Reply:

a) There is a total of Three (3) dams currently under construction, namely:

  • The raising of the Clanwilliam Dam Project;
  • The raising of the Hazelmere Dam Project and
  • The raising of Tzaneen Dam project.

b) Refer to the table below for the location, size and total cost of building the dam:

ITEM

DAM INFORMATION

Name of Dam

Clanwilliam Dam

Hazelmere Dam

Tzaneen Dam

GPS Location

32°11'5.1"S 18°52'28.5"E

29°35'55"S 32°2'36"E

23°47'57"S 30°09'58"E

Province

Western Cape

KwaZulu Natal

Limpopo

River/ Watercourse

Olifants

Mdloti

Letaba

Size/ Capacity (Million Cubic Meters)

125Mm³(Old)

344Mm³(New)

23.9 Mm³(Old)

43.6Mm³(New)

158 Mm³(Old)

193 Mm³(New)

Purpose

Irrigation (Old)

Irrigation & Domestic (New)

Irrigation & Domestic Use

Domestic

Commercial

Estimated Construction Cost

R 2.2 Billion

R 600 Million

R322 Million

08 October 2018 - NW2785

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(1)(a) Which members of the Competition Commission’s executive committee received VIP protection services (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) for what period did each member of the commission’s executive committee receive VIP protection services and (c) what was the total cost to the commission of providing the specified VIP protection services; (2) whether a security threat analysis was conducted by the SA Police Service in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the recommendation of each security risk analysis?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Commissioner of the Competition Commission, Mr Tembinkosi Bonakele, of the following:

1. The Competition Commission undertakes investigations into collusion and cartel activities in the economy and in the course of carrying out its responsibilities, it is privy to commercially sensitive information which may result in significant competition penalties being imposed on affected parties and the possibility of criminal charges being brought against individuals. In addition, significant vested interests in the economy may be affected by the work of the Commission.

2. The Competition Commission and senior staff have been subject to a spate of criminal acts, the source and purpose of which is not yet apparent in spite of these having been reported to the law-enforcement agencies, which warranted in the opinion of the Commission, the provision of security to a limited number of senior officials in order to ensure the safety of persons and sensitive information.

3. The criminal acts comprised of the following:

  • on 25 May 2017 the Deputy Commissioner, while returning from a work assignment, was held at gunpoint and his work computer laptop, tablet and mobile phone, among other things, were taken.
  • On 8 August 2017 there was a security breach at the Commission premises and two laptops containing sensitive evidence were stolen from the Cartels Division. This followed incidents where laptops and mobile phones belonging to, amongst others, the Commissioner were stolen under what the Commissioner described as ‘mysterious circumstances’.
  • On 9 September 2017, the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) was robbed at gun-point.

4. The Commission took measures which included the provision of private security to four senior staff members; terminating the services of the security service provider at the Commission premises; and commissioning a security assessment by a private service provider. The report pointed to some security gaps in the security of the Commissioner, the Deputy Commissioner and the Divisional Manager for Cartels. Further work is also being done on IT security systems and further upgrades will be done subject to budget availability.

5. In addition to the above, and following the request by the Commission, SAPS covers the security of former Chief Justice Ngcobo who is currently heading a panel appointed by the Commission to conduct a Market Inquiry into private healthcare, with the Commission providing vehicles for the SAPS members assigned to the former Chief Justice.

6. The total costs for the various Protection Services amount to R14,9 million, as follows:

  • June 2017 – 31 March 2018 = R 14 607 748.
  • 1 April 2018 – August 2018 = R 373 304.

7. The State Security Agency was approached to further investigate these incidents and it undertook to conduct a comprehensive assessment on the security requirements of the Commission and its report is imminent. The detailed security assessments will inform any further decisions on this matter, including whether to continue with security measures and the appropriate level of such services.

-END-

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

(1c) The total cost for providing private protection services from June 2017 to 31 March 2018 is R14 607 748. Total cost for providing private protection services from 1 April 2018 to August 2018 is R373 304. From June 2017 to March 2018 the cost reflect the amount for outsourced private security services. The security arrangement was revised and there was a reduction on the intensity of the services and most were insourced. The R373 304 is the total for outsourced private security services since 1 April 2018 until 31 August 2018 Total of cost of both period amounts to R14 981 051.

08 October 2018 - NW2599

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(a)(i) What number of employees in his department work on health issues associated with air pollution and (ii) in what capacity does each specified employee work and (b) can he provide Dr S S Thembekwayo with an organogram in this regard?

Reply:

a) (i) Two employees work on health issues associated with air pollution; and

(ii) The Director: Environmental Health is responsible for policy development, review implementation, monitoring as well as support to provinces and municipalities responsible for oversight/monitoring and actual implementation of air pollution related matters respectively, particularly Indoor Air Pollution in collaboration with the Department of Environmental Affairs whose key focus is on ambient air quality.

The Deputy Director: Environmental Health deputizes the Director, drafts policies, guidelines, Norms and Standards that relate to among other things air pollution and provide direct support to Provinces and Municipalities on the subject in close collaboration with Department of Environmental Affairs.

(b) The organogram of the Directorate working on health issues associated with air pollution is attached herewith. The relevant posts are highlighted in green.

END.

08 October 2018 - NW2640

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the raising of the Tzaneen Dam wall as part of the Greater Letaba River Water Development Project approved in September 2011, what is the amendment that was made during the review in November 2015 before announcing the final approval;(2)did construction start in August 2016; if not, why not; if so, on what exact date; (3) (a) what was the initial budget that was approved for the project in 2011 and 2016, (b) what is the total amount spent on the project to date, (c) by what date will the project be finalised, (d) what will be the final cost of the project, (e) what will be the storage capacity of the dam when it is completed, (f) what is the total number of jobs that will be created through the project, (g) who will benefit from the project and (h) on what date did his department do the latest dam safety inspection on the Tzaneen Dam?

Reply:

(1) The Record of Implementation Decision final issue was in May 2013 and there have been no amendments to this document.

(2) A decision was taken, in alignment with funding, to break the project into three (3) implementation phases: stockpiling, demolishing of spillway and main dam raising. A conditional licence to alter for the proposed raising of Tzaneen Dam was issued in August 2016 to allow for the storage of construction materials, development of quarries/borrow pits and demolition of 4 m of concrete from the top of the existing ogee crest. The stockpiling and demolishing has since been completed. An application for a licence to enlarge the dam has not been received by the Dam Safety Office which will be accompanied by a detailed design report with drawings and specifications.

(3)(a) In 2011: At planning stages the budget was estimated to be R88 million. In 2016: On completion of the design and in alignment with funding, the project was broken into three (3) phases; stockpiling, demolishing of spillway and main raising. The revised estimated cost on completion is R600 million.

(3)(b) The total amount spend was R88 531 738.00 (This included the costs for Professional Services, the stockpiling contract and the demolition of the spillway).

(3(c) The project is estimated to be completed in March 2020.

(3)(d) The total estimated project cost on completion is estimated at R600 million.

(3)(e) The storage capacity of the dam when it is completed will be 193millionm3.

(3)(f) The total number of jobs that will be created is estimated at 600.

(3)(g) Mopani District Municipality, Greater Tzaneen and Greater Letaba Municipalities will benefit from the project.

(3)(h) The last Dam Safety Evaluation of Tzaneen Dam by an Approved Professional Person (APP) was carried out in September 2011.         

08 October 2018 - NW2578

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for the response by the Department:

(1)(a)(i)

One (1) acting DDG with a total of 7 permanently employed

(1)(a)(ii)(aa)

A total of eleven (11) chief directors in an acting capacity

(1)(a)(ii)(bb)

A total of 33 permanently employed

(1)(b)

One (1) women is acting as DDG, seven (7) women are acting as Chief Directors, three (3) women are permanently appointed as DDG’s and fourteen (14) women are permanently appointed as Chief Directors

(2) Refer to the table below for the response by the entities:

(2)(a)(i)

(2)(a)(ii)

(2)(b)

Nine (9) Chief Executive Officers (CEOs)

Four (4) CEOs in an acting capacity (Mhlathuze Water, Sedibeng Water, TCTA and Breede-Gouritz CMA)

Total number of Executive Management (excluding CEOs) is sixty five (65)

Two (2) CEOs

Twenty three (23) Executive Management

 

Total number of Non-Executive Directors is 93

Forty four (44) Non-Executive Directors

08 October 2018 - NW2685

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has any programmes in place for the rehabilitation of prisoners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the programmes offered?

Reply:

Yes, the Department has rehabilitation programmes for offenders. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the implementation of Correctional programmes is one of the measures that the Department has in place with the aim to facilitate rehabilitation.

Correctional Programmes are needs-based programmes that address offending behaviour. These programme are non-therapeutic in nature and focus on raising awareness, providing information as well as developing life skills.

Correctional programmes are rendered by Correctional Officials (COs) and offenders who require in-depth therapeutic intervention are referred for specialized services to social workers and psychologists.

The target group for Correctional Programmes is sentenced offenders serving sentences of longer than 24 months. The Programmes are being conducted in line with the offender’s Correctional Sentence Plan.

There are thirteen (13) endorsed Correctional Programmes, namely:

1.  NEW BEGINNINGS

  • Empowering offenders for transition into and adjustment to the correctional centre.
  • The programme enhances their self-awareness; develop their conscience, independent will and creative imagination.
  • It assists them to control and choose their responses to stimuli.
  • It helps them understand and identify the four basic needs of man.
  • It helps them understand the concepts of self-awareness and self-esteem and the common crimes committed in South Africa.
  • It assists them to identify various factors contributing towards criminal behaviour and to understand the implications/ effects of crime. It assists offenders to discover their own role in decision-making and to be able to practice constructive decision-making skills.

2. ANGER MANAGEMENT (ANGER IN ANGER OUT) – TARGETS ALL ANGER RELATED OFFENCES E.G. MURDER AND ASSAULT

  • Raises offender awareness on the causes and symptoms of anger and how to manage anger.
  • Programme assists offenders to unlearn old habits associated with aggression and learn healthy ways of dealing with and expressing anger.

3. CROSS ROADS

  • Equips offenders with the necessary knowledge and skills to enable them to become responsible, law-abiding and productive citizens in to order to facilitate their successful reintegration into society.
  • Basic behaviour modification techniques are utilized in the programme.

4. RESTORATIVE JUSTICE ORIENTATION

  • Orientate offenders on the Restorative Justice System.
  • Prepare Offenders for involvement in Restorative Justice Programmes.

5. SEXUAL OFFENCES (Think Before you Act) – TARGETS SEXUAL OFFENDING BEHAVIOUR

  • To involve sexual offenders in a correctional programme addressing their sexual offending behaviour, through the acquiring of relevant knowledge (e.g. on biological development) and skills.
  • To assist offenders to identify possible causes to their sexual offending behavior.
  • To empower offenders not to re-offend by compilation of a coping plan for the future.

6. SUBSTANCE ABUSE (STOP TO START) - TARGETS ALCOHOL AND DRUG RELATED OFFENCES

  • It is aimed at helping offenders whose offending behavior is related to the use of addictive substances, to gain insight into the negative effects of the substances on their well-being.
  • It equips offenders with Information related to substance abuse and the addiction cycle.
  • It assists offenders to know the signs and symptoms of substance addiction.
  • It assists offenders in developing coping skills.
  • It gives them information on how to restore broken relationships.

7. BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION PROGRAMME ON GANGSTERISM

  • The main objective of this programme is to raise awareness amongst offenders on gang related activities and specifically the negative consequences thereof.
  • The programme empowers offenders with practical skills to change behaviour and cope in a correctional centre without any affiliation to gangs.

8. ECONOMIC CRIME PROGRAMME (FRAUD RELATED) - TARGETS FRAUD AND RELATED OFFENCES

  • The programme addresses offending behaviour, specific related to fraud and related offences within a holistic approach.
  • The programme assists offenders to understand the impact of economic crimes on South Africa, the society, their families, as well as on themselves.
  • It gives them understanding of the various offences that fall within the scope of economic crimes.
  • It assists offenders in making ethical decisions in line with the expectations, norms and values of the community.
  • The programme provides the offenders with information on the different theories related to the reasoning behind economic crimes.

9. ECONOMIC CRIME PROGRAMME (THEFT RELATED) – TARGETS THEFT RELATED OFFENCES

  • The programme addresses offending behaviour, specifically related to theft and related offences within a holistic approach.
  • It assists offenders to acquire practical and applicable life skills
  • It gives them an understanding of the link between alcohol, drugs and crime.
  • It assists offenders in making ethical decisions in line with the expectations, norms and values of the community.

10. PROGRAMME ON MURDER AND RELATED OFFENCES (CHANGING LANES) – TARGETS MURDER AND RELATED OFFENCES

  • The programme assists offenders to have a better understanding on what a human being entails.
  • It empowers offenders to break the cycle of violence.
  • It assists offenders in understanding the link between murder and related offences and weapons.
  • The programme assists offenders in understanding emotional intelligence, the importance thereof and how the apply it.
  • The programme assists offenders to implement a personal action plan to change their behaviour and attitudes related to the offence committed.

11. PROGRAMME ON ROBBERY AND RELATED OFFENCES (CHANGE IS POSSIBLE) – TARGETS ROBBERY AND RELATED OFFENCES.

  • The programme unpacks four theories of human behaviour and the possible links of these theories to the criminal behaviour of the offender.
  • The impact of the crime, the victims of the specific crime as well as the effects of the crime are being addressed.

12. A Correctional Programme for female offenders

The programme was developed specifically for Female offenders is divided into four sub-programmes:

Sub- Programme1 of 4: General Life Skills

  • Explain the role of resilience in emotional health.
  • Encourages woman to appreciate themselves more and able to cope positively with difficult emotions and stressful circumstances.
  • Provides knowledge on how to deal with the mistakes, learn from them and know how to deal with labelling.
  • Helps woman to Know and understand the different techniques to manage behavioral problems of children.
  • Provides knowledge and understanding of parenting goals, understand grants available for children and help them to know the danger of labelling children.
  • Helps woman to recognize a problem and follow the steps involved in problem solving and how to identify barriers in finding the best solution for a problem.

Sub-Programme 2 of 4: Relationships

  • Understand the importance of supportive relationships and positive, true connections in the psychological development of women.
  • Helps female offenders to maintain healthy relationships by identifying the signs and characteristics of a healthy relationship.
  • Promote a better understanding of unhealthy relationships and the impact of domestic violence on women.
  • Provides knowledge on the restoration of family relationships after incarceration.

Sub-Programme 3 of 4: Addictive Behaviour

  • Assist the female offenders to understand the importance of friendship and identify the signs of bad company and bad friendship.
  • Defines Substance Abuse and assist offenders with understanding the symptoms and prognosis of Substance Abuse. Example, ‘Nyaope’ and its negative effects on the society.

Sub-Programme 4 of 4: Career Building

  • Empower offenders with knowledge and skills on career building and planning.
  • Empower them on the importance of setting goals and how to increase their chances for success.
  • Raises awareness on mistakes that people make in goal setting.
  • Provides information on processes that need to be considered in Job hunting like Curriculum vitae and preparation for the interview.
  • Knowledge of cutting expenses and getting out of debt are the main factors of personal finance.

13. PRE-RELEASE

  • Prepare offenders for successful reintegration.
  • Teaching of skills to overcome difficulties associated with reintegration.
  • Ensure that proper support systems are in place before placement.
  • Provision of information about external resources.
  • Assist with the restoration of relationships.
  • Teach offenders to take responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Assistance with the building of the self-esteem and self-confidence.
  • Provision of information on the prevention of re-offending and relapse.

In order to addresses the specific needs of youth offenders, (4) four of the Correctional Programmes have been amended with sound effects and animations in an attempt to ensure the involvement and interest of this category of offenders.

SOCIAL WORK SERVICES

  • Anger Management Programme

It is the programme that is aimed at assisting offenders to develop insight into their behavioral patterns in order to manage their violent and aggressive behavior.

  • Sexual Offender Treatment Programme

The programme utilizes the cognitive behaviour approach which focuses on increasing offenders’ self-control over their offending behaviour.

  • Substance Abuse Programme

It is aimed at targeting behavioral, psychological and emotional symptoms of drug and substance abuse as well as preventing relapses.

  • Substance Abuse Programme

It is aimed at targeting behavioral, psychological and emotional symptoms of drug and substance abuse as well as preventing relapses.

  • Youth Resilience Enhancement Programme

Focuses on empowering youth offenders with skills resilience and attitude to beat the odds whilst inculcating habits geared towards exploitation of all available self-development opportunities

  • Cool and Fit for Life (Youth Programme)

It is aimed at empowering young offenders to make informed decision by developing their interpersonal skills.

  • Elderly Offender Programme

It is aimed at empowering elderly offenders to recognize the skills and wisdom that they have and encourage them to impart such wisdom to the coming generations and help prepare them for successful reintegration into society

  • Sisonke Family and Marriage Care Programme

The programme intends to improve, strengthen and maintain family relationships.

  • Parenting Skills Programme

The programme intends to improve parental relationship skills between offenders and their children and also to equip them with various disciplinary mechanisms.

SPIRITUAL CARE

  • Anger management programme

The programme grants the participants opportunity and the ability to identify and solve problems that trigger anger. Participants are empowered on responsible decision making using critical and creative thinking towards the control of anger. They gain knowledge on how emotions and anger relate to one another as well as appropriate and inappropriate anger. They are also skilled on how to manage anger and enhance personal effectiveness together with self-management.

  • Pre-release programme

This programme aims to guide and empower participants to personal development by helping in these areas: applied basic personal values and ethics. Having Realistic Expectations, Having a check on Friends’ Influence, Meeting and Coping with Resistance, Restoring family relationships, Taking the offender back into the community, Starting afresh, Bringing the offender into a contact with a Spiritual leader.

  • Family firm foundation

The programme unlocks individual historical family background enhancing the participants’ basic understanding of family concepts. It informs participants about a family as a major social institution and focuses on a person’s social activities. It gives the participant an understanding of; the responsibilities that individuals have, the household financial management and daily operations. After completing this programme the participant will be able to accept and appreciate that he/she has a family and know his/her worth to that family. The participant will identify his/her roles and responsibilities in a family.

  • Igugulethu our treasure

Through this programme participants gain knowledge and skills in communication, managing conflict in relationships, personal restoration, emotional stability, personal well-being, social reintegration and how to lead a fulfilling life.

  • Self-image

This programme provides six steps to a better self. Scriptures which focus on self-image are quoted and utilised to help in understanding factors which have to do with physical self-concept, personal concept, and concept of family, friends and self-concept, religious self-concept.

  • Heartlines programmes

Heartlines programmes help one to have a deeper understanding of the common eight values, namely, grace, forgiveness, compassion, acceptance, responsibility, perseverance, honesty and self-control. The Heartlines Values and Money programme targets both officials and inmates especially those who have committed economic offences. These programmes challenge participants to live out the values and they also prepare them for a smooth social integration process.

  • Combating HIV & AIDS through spiritual and ethical conduct (chatsec) programme

The programme is about preventing HIV in the Department of Correctional Services. It focuses on ten key areas which include, capacity counselling and testing, prevention of occupational exposure, health management of sexually transmitted diseases and others.

  • Phomolo life steps

The programme is aimed at equipping the participant with; Spiritual wellness, ability to identify problems, life orientation, personal growth and development, Personal Life Toolkit, Emotions, Behaviour and Character. It helps participants to work effectively with others as members of a team, group, body and community.

  • Pitso-imbizo reconciliation

The programme educates the participants on how to deal with guilt, how to forgive, acceptance of self and others, the impact of fear of rejection, the significance of commitment and determination. It also educates participants on how one can restore self-worth, relationships, trust and hope.

FORMAL EDUCATION

Formal Education offer the following programmes:

  • Pre-Literacy (for those who are illiterate): This programme is offered for offenders who cannot read or write
  • Adult Education and Training (AET) Levels 1-4: This is equivalent to Grades 1-9 in normal mainstream education and it’s for offenders who want to pursue studies in the General Education and Training (GET) Band.

Further Education and Training (FET): Grades 10-12. All those offenders that have successfully completed the above-mentioned programme get an opportunity to pursue studies in the FET Band following a curriculum known as Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS), similar to all external schools within the education system of the country.

Higher Education and Training (HET): After completing their Grade 12 qualification, offenders are afforded an opportunity to advance their education through distant education. In this instance, they are assisted with registration at various institutions of higher learning at their own cost.

Computer Based Training: This programme is offered to promote computer based learning among youth centres and is offered in designated Computer Based Training Centres (CBT) where we offer basic Computer Literacy as well as the advanced International Computer Driver’s License (ICDL).

SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

Skills Development programmes are offered to offenders as per need registered in their respective Sentence Plans: Offenders who, during the assessment process indicate their need to be skilled and to further their education during their incarceration are offered the following skills programmes:

  • Skills training:
  • Entrepreneurial training;
  • Vocational and Occupational training (these programmes are available up to Artisan level).
  • TVET College programmes:
  • Engineering Studies: N1 to N6;
  • Business Studies: N4 to N6;
  • National Certificate Vocational [NC(V)] Level 2 - 4.

The entry requirement for placement in these programmes is Grade 9/ Standard 7 or Adult Education and Training (AET) level 4.

PRODUCTION WORKSHOPS AND AGRICULTURE

The Department has twenty-one (21) farms and one-hundred and fifteen (115) small agriculture sites, as well as nineteen (19) textile workshops, ten (10) wood and ten (10) steel workshops, nine (9) bakeries and one (1) shoe factory.

The production workshops and agricultural activities promote the transfer of skills to offenders by complementing skills development rehabilitation programmes and improving their personal and social functioning (i.e. work ethics) by providing them with skills utilization and skills development opportunities. The products generated/manufactured/produced in the process, are used for self-sufficiency and to ultimately reduce Government expenditure.

The below table illustrates on average offender labour per day at agriculture and production workshops:

Production Workshop and Agriculture

2010/

2011

2011/

2012

2012/

2013

2013/

2014

2014/

2015

2015/

2016

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

Production Workshops

1 693

1 608

1 515

1 690

1 690

1 817

1 765

1 547

Agriculture

2 906

3 215

3 110

3 281

3 276

3 108

3 268

3 308

Development opportunities in Agriculture:

Item No.

Type of Enterprise/ activities

1.

Vegetable production (21 farms and 115 small sites)

2.

Fruit production (13 farms)

3.

Milk production (17 farms)

4.

Red meat production - Beefers (19 farms)

- Small stock (5 farms)

5.

Poultry- broilers (3 farms) and layers (7 farms)

6.

Abattoirs: Red meat (17 farms) and white meat (3 chicken farms)

8.

Piggeries (15 farms)

Development opportunities in Production Workshops:

Item No.

Type of Facility

Products range

Trades / Activities

 

Wood Production

(10 workshops).

  • Office Furniture Products.
  • School equipment.
  • Recreational equipment.
  • Various wood products.
  • Repair/rehabilitation of office furniture & wood products.
  • Cabinet making.
  • Wood machining.
  • Upholstery.
  • Furniture polishing.
 

Steel Production

(10 workshops).

  • Security equipment.
  • Cell equipment.
  • Kitchen and dining equipment.
  • Rehabilitation of steel equipment.
  • Agriculture equipment.
  • Various steel products.
  • Welding.
  • Plate metal work.
  • Fitting & turning.
  • Spray painting and powder coating.
  • Sign-writing
  • Jig tool and die making
 

Textile Production

(19 workshops).

  • Offender uniform.
  • Offender bedding.
  • Various products, i.e. property bags.
  • Garment manufacturing.
 

Bakeries

(9 bakeries).

  • Bread
  • Craft bread baking.
 

Shoe factory

(1 shoe factory).

  • Offender Shoes (male)
  • Shoe manufacturing.
 

Prison Locks –manufacturing workshop

  • Prison locks, locks for courts, South African Police Services and Mental Institutions (for Department of Health).
  • Locksmith
 

Printing workshops

  • Printing of the signage.
  • Graphic Designer

SPORTS, RECREATION, ARTS AND CULTURE

Sport, Recreation, Arts, Culture & Library programmes and services are provisioned in such a manner that they add value to lives of participants and are central to the Rehabilitation Plan of each offender in order to assist them to re-order their lives in a positive manner, taking their social economic and cultural background into account.

The SRAC national programmes are structured and coordinated to be geared towards building and supporting self sufficiency and necessary for reducing the likelihood of offenders becoming involved in criminal activities again. This is done through partnership with Departments of Arts and Culture, Sport and Recreation, Sports Federations and NGOs e.g. Libraries: Library, Library Education Programmes.

The following are the National Projects for 2018/19 Financial Year:

  • Training of male and female offenders on Beadwork and Recycle Project is currently being rolled –out in all the Regions, as part of skills development programme that will contribute positively to their Social Economic and Cultural background. There are more than (± 2 250 trained elderly male and female offenders nationally).
  • Funda Mzantsi Project: This annual programme is aimed at encouraging offenders to develop appreciation and knowledge through reading of books, reviewing, provide analysis and engage in constructive debates on topical issues. The project is in partnership with the Centre for the Book (CFB) a branch of the National Library in the DAC. Offender participation in this programme starts at the Correctional Centre Level, Management Area Level, proceeds to Regional Level and lastly to the National Championships where talents are showcased at a National platform.
  • 67 Blankets for Nelson Mandela Day. The project profiled offender programmes of rehabilitation for re-integration in front of millions of South Africans:
  • The project is a partnership between the Department of Correctional Services and 67 Blankets for Nelson Mandela Day and has yielded DCS great results since its inception in 2015, it is important to mention that it has placed DCS in the Guinness World Records in 2016 by creating the largest crocheted blanket measuring 17 181 m2.
  • The main aim of the project is to ensure that offenders are given the opportunity to reach out to communities outside of prison walls. By hand-making blankets that are donated to 67 Blankets for Nelson Mandela Day, the offenders are afforded an opportunity to make a huge difference in the lives of those living in poverty stricken circumstances.
  • This project is also focussing at skilling offenders, enabling them to realize their full creative potential through nurturing their creativity, expression and innovation. Provide a tool for offender development and to prepare them for their reintegration back to the community.
  • The Massive Mandela Masterpiece (MMM) started in 2017 and 45 Management Areas participated in the project. This project was in line with Madiba’s centenary which is celebrated in 2018, which bears Madiba’s face and could only be seen from the sky due to its size. 67 Blankets provided cameras and screens to enable proper viewing by the audience. The programme saw inmates knitting their way to ensure that DCS is once again put on the World Map. The final product measured ±8000m² and was revealed at Zonderwater Correctional Centre, sports field on 24/04/2018 for the World to view.

Ongoing Crime Prevention Programme: Stories behind bars

Individual and group talents were discovered through a coordinated drama performance by female offenders on a story-line “Stories behind bars”. The outcome of this programme based on the partnership is to expose talent and educate communities on crime prevention, through Grahamstown Arts Festival and Pretoria State Theatre.

08 October 2018 - NW2731

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

What criteria does her department use to determine whether a non-profit organisation should receive funding or not?

Reply:

My Department uses the NPO funding policy and guidelines to determine whether a Non-profit organisation should receive funding or not.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….