Questions and Replies

12 September 2018 - NW2707

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Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether any consultants were contracted for the drafting of the Integrated Resource Plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the (a) name of each consulting company, (b) name of each director of each specified company and (c) value of the contract that was awarded?

Reply:

Yes, the details of the consultants are illustrated below:

Name

Directors

Contract Value

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

Role:

For the compilation of the technology costs used in assumptions

EPRI is an independent, nonprofit organization for public interest energy and environmental research, focusing on electricity generation, delivery, and use.

www.epri.com

R0.00

Eskom is a member

CSIR

Role:

For the development of the electricity demand forecast

www.csir.co.za

R0.00

Used existing agreement with Eskom

Africa Power Ventures (Pty) Ltd

Role:

For the development of the electricity price path for the scenarios tested by the DoE during IRP update.

Maree Roos, Karl Lawrenz and Marc Goldstein

www.afripow.co.za

R224 440

Formeset

Role:

For language editing of Draft IRP report compiled by the DoE

www.formeset.co.za

R29 445

12 September 2018 - NW2715

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and IndustryQuestion

What number of South Africans are employed in each Special Economic Zone as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

The reported employment data provided for the 6 (six) SEZs (Coega, East London, Dube Trade Port, Richards Bay, Maluti-A-Phofung and Atlantis) that have operational investments, indicates an aggregate cumulative number of direct jobs created by investors to be at 13 722, as of the end of Q1 of the 2018/19FY. The employment contribution per zone is as follows:

  1. Coega – 7243
  2. East London – 3435
  3. Dube Trade Port - 2655
  4. Atlantis – 312
  5. Richards Bay – 63
  6. Maluti-A-Phofung – 14

The available employment data that is currently provided by the companies located in each operational SEZs does not classify employees along countries of origin or nationalities.

12 September 2018 - NW2509

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Social Development

Why (a) is her department failing to pay non-profit organisations on time and (b) has her department’s funding to non-profit organisations been reduced while her department underspent on its budget in the first quarter of the current financial year?

Reply:

a) In the 2018/19 financial year National Department has introduced a new approach for funding NPOs over a period of three (3) years. A call for proposals for multi-year funding (2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21) was issued by the National Department of Social Development in order to solicit services of suitable NPOs to assist the Department in the implementation of various programmes in line with the core mandate of the Department.

This new approach resulted in delays as funding templates and internal processes had to be amended to accommodate the three year funding approach. This approach is expected to result in improved timing in the 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial years and payments will be made on existing contracts and the processes for call for proposals, shortlisting, contracting will not be repeated.

In addition, delays in transfers to NPOs was due to the National Treasury Circular 21 on classification of expenditure as either transfer payments, goods and services or capital assets, the Department has to review its transfer payments budget as some of the planned transactions with NPOs should be classified as goods and services rather than transfer payments. This may result in shifting of funds from Transfer Payments to Goods and services. The Department is still in discussions with National Treasury for the way forward to resolve these challenges.

However, the delays in the transfers for HIV/AIDS organisations amounting to R62, 560 million has been proposed to be shifted to goods and services. The process is underway for National Treasury to effect such changes.

b) The Department’s transfer payment budget has not been reduced. The budget has increased from R132, 614 million in the 2017/18 financial year to R154,191 million in the 2018/19 financial year.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

12 September 2018 - NW2482

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the appointment of the Chief Operations Officer (COO) at SA Social Security Agency (Sassa), what number of candidates were shortlisted for the position of COO at Sassa; (2) will she provide a (a) comprehensive report on the appointment procedure and processes followed and (b) a list of names and details of the scoring panel members who participated in the appointment of the new COO of Sassa; (3) if no panel existed, did she seek advice before making the appointment; (4) what rule in the Ministerial Handbook did she use to appoint her advisor to act as COO at Sassa, if no proper recruitment processes were followed; (5) whether she has been informed of any wrongdoing by the current COO of SASSA in previous positions in Government; if not, why not, if so, what are the further relevant details? NW2633E

Reply:

Not applicable

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

12 September 2018 - NW2576

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case? NW2866E

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(aa) The total number of deputy directors-general employed in an acting capacity is one (1).

(1)(a)(ii)(aa) There are no chief directors appointed in an acting capacity.

(1)(a)(i)(bb) The total number of deputy directors-general employed in a permanent capacity is six (6).

(1)(a)(ii)(bb) The total number of chief directors employed in a permanent capacity is twenty-six (26).

(1)(b) The total number women employed in a permanent capacity as deputy directors-general is three (3) and as chief directors fourteen (14).

REPLY: NDA

(2)(a)(i) The total number of chief executive officers in NDA is one (1)

(2)(a)(ii) The total number of Directors is ten (10)

(2)(b) Chief Executive officer is One (1)

Directors who are women is seven (7)

REPLY: SASSA

(2)(a)(i) The total number of chief executive officers is one (1)

(2)(a)(ii) Not applicable

(2)(b) Chief Executive Officers is zero (0)

Not applicable (0)

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

11 September 2018 - NW2014

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What are the details of the (a) number of accidents that vehicles owned by her department were involved (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) cost for repairs in each case and (c)(i) number of and (ii) reasons for vehicles being written off in each case; (2) whether all vehicles owned by her department have tracking devices installed?

11 September 2018 - NW2419

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What programmes for the Continuous Professional Training and Development of teachers at special needs schools are (i) currently being implemented and (ii) planned for future academic years and (b) what number of teachers are trained or will be trained in each programme?

Reply:

a) The development of inclusive education competence begins in initial teacher education programmes, and deeper specialisation is developed through continuing professional development programmes.

Universities offer initial teacher education and continuing professional development qualification programmes for teachers based on the policy requirements stipulated in the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications (PMRTEQ) (Department of Higher Education and Training 2011, revised in 2015).

The PMRTEQ makes it possible for universities to offer the following initial teacher education programmes:

  • Bachelor of Education (BEd) (480 credits, NQF level 7); and
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) (120 credits, NQF Level 7).

The PMRTEQ requires that all BEd and PGCE graduates “must be knowledgeable about inclusive education and skilled in identifying and addressing barriers to learning, as well as in curriculum differentiation to address the needs of individual learners within a grade.”
(PMRTEQ, page 25 and 29)

The PMRTEQ specifies 11 basic competencies for beginner teachers. One of the competencies requires that “Newly qualified teachers must understand diversity in the South African context in order to teach in a manner that includes all learners. They must also be able to identify learning or social problems and work in partnership with social providers to address these.” (PMRTEQ, page 62)

To support the implementation of these policy directives, the Department is implementing the Teacher Education for Inclusive Teaching (TEfIT) Project. This project involves the collaborative development of knowledge and practice standards for inclusive teaching and supporting curriculum frameworks, courses and course materials that universities can use for the development of new and existing teachers’ inclusive teaching competence. The goal is that all new teachers graduating from initial teacher education programmes are able to address inclusive education competently in their practice.

A further component of the TEfIT Project involves support for three universities to develop as centres of specialisation for special needs education in three areas. The University of Pretoria is being supported to develop as a centre of specialisation for Visual Impairment Studies, the University of the Witwatersrand for Deaf Studies, and the University of Johannesburg for Neurological-Developmental Learning Needs. These centres will have the function of training specialist teachers who work/will work in special schools, special schools resource centres and full-service schools, and of leading research in these areas to inform policy and practice.

The three universities are developing programmes aligned with the PMRTEQ and Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework.

Table 1: Continuous Professional Development programmes under development by the three universities

University

Programmes under development

Target date for offering of programmes

University of Pretoria

Advanced Certificate: Inclusive Education (Barriers to Learning: Learning Difficulties)

2020

 

Bachelor of Education (Honours):

(Special Needs and Inclusive Education)

2020

 

Advanced Diploma in Education: Visual Impairment Studies

2020

University of
the Witwatersrand

Post Graduate Diploma in Deaf Education (South African Sign Language as a language specialisation )

2020

 

Bachelor of Education Honours

(Deaf Education)

2020

University of Johannesburg

Advanced Diploma in Education: Remedial Education

2020

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Inclusive Education)

2020

Other universities are also active in this area. The latest audited 2016 data received from universities indicates the following Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE) programme offerings.

Table 2: Headcount Enrolments (HC), Full-time Equivalent Enrolments (FTE) and Graduates (Grads) in active inclusive education/special needs education in 2016.

University and ACE Specialisation

HC

FTE

Grads

Nelson Mandela University

Education: SNE: Remedial

3

1

3

North West University

Learner Support

209

68

97

University of South Africa

Inclusive Education

41

15

28

University of Pretoria

Special Needs Education

71

41

50

The number and range of ACE programme offerings were much higher a few years ago, and many teachers completed their ACE qualifications with an inclusive education/remedial education/special needs education focus. The number of graduates are now declining because the ACE is not aligned to the HEQSF and being phased out. Universities will replace the ACE specialisations with Advanced Diplomas in Education and Postgraduate Diplomas in Education.

The scale at which the new Advanced Diplomas and Postgraduate Diplomas will be offered will be dependent on the extent to which the Department of Basic Education signals a need for them and teachers are supported to enrol for the specialist programmes.

It is not possible for the Department of Higher Education and Training to predict future numbers of teachers who will undertake these specialist programmes. This is dependent on the extent to which teachers choose to do these courses, or are specifically supported by the Department of Basic Education and provincial education departments to register for these programmes.

11 September 2018 - NW2622

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Mulder, Dr PW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 2397 on 28 August 2018, which 23 products have been designated for local production in terms of the 2017 Preferential Procurement Regulations; (2) By what date(a) does he expect his department’s guidelines for the local procurement of non-designated products to be finalized and (b) put into effect; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The table below provides a list of products that have been designated for local production with minimum local content thresholds. The table also provides commencement dates in which the National Treasury circulated instruction notes which regulate the environment within which government departments and public entities may advertise, evaluate, adjudicate and procure designated products.

 

Designated Products

LC Threshold

Date

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.

23.

Railing Stock

Power Pylons and Substation Structures

Bus Bodies

Canned/ Processed Vegetables

Textiles, Clothing, Leather & Footwear Sector

Certain Pharmaceutical Products

Set-top Boxes

Furniture Products

Electrical and Telecom Cables

Valve Products and Actuators

Working Vessels (Boats)

Residential Electricity Meters

Steel Conveyance Pipes

Transformers and Shunt Reactors (class 04)

Two Way Radio Terminals

Solar PV (components)

Rail Signaling System

Wheelie Bins

Solar Water Heaters

Fire Fighting Vehicles

Steel Products and Components for Construction

Rail Per way (Track) Infrastructure

Pumps & Medium Voltage Motors

65%

100%

80%

80%

100%

Per tender

30%

85-100%

90%

70%

60%

90%

80-100%

10-90%

60%

15-90%

65%

100%

70%

30%

100%

90%

70%

16-07-2012

16-07-2012

16-07-2012

16-07-2012

16-07-2012

07-12-2011

26-09-2012

15-11-2012

08-05-2013

06-02-2014

01-08-2014

01-08-2014

28-09-2015

28-09-2015

30-06-2016

30-06-2016

30-06-2016

18-08-2016

19-07-2012

21-11-2016

13-01-2017

13-11-2017

12-12-2017

2. Both the dti and National Treasury’s teams have worked together in finalising the draft guidelines the local procurement of non-designated products. The guidelines were approved by the Minister of Trade & Industry for onward transmission to the Minister of Finance in March 2018. The National Treasury, as the custodian of supply chain policy in government is vested with the powers to circulate the guidelines to the organs of state.

11 September 2018 - NW2590

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Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) (a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to him and (b) what is the total number of women in each case? NW2881E

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)

DPE

TOTAL No.

Permanent

Acting DDGs

Acting CDs

WOMEN

DDG

3

1 male

2 females

3

1 male

2 females

4

4 males

0 females

0

2 (67%)

0 Acting

CD

31

31

0

1

1 female

5 (16%)

1 female acting

TOTAL

3 DDGs

31 CDs

3 DDGs

31 CDs

4 male acting DDGs

0 female DDGs acting

1 female

Acting CD

2 female DDGs

6 females CDs

(2)(a) (i) (b): The details of the total number of Directors on the State Owned Company (SOC) Boards of the DPE portfolio, namely Alexkor, Denel, Eskom, Transnet, SA Express and SA Airways are listed on the table below. Note that the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the entity is a member of each Board. Hence, the total number of Directors on each Board includes Non-Executive Directors (NEDs), the CEO and CFO, with the exception of SAA, where the Interim CFO is not a member of the Board. In addition, the composition of the SAFCOL and Alexkor Boards are under review. The vacancies listed in the column for Directors refers only to NED vacancies.

SOC

BOARD

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO)

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

(CFO)

DIRECTORS

WOMEN

ALEXKOR

1 male

1 female

7

(3 vacancies)

3 (42%)

DENEL

1 male

(Interim)

1 male (interim)

16

(no vacancies)

6 (37.5%)

ESKOM

1 male

1 male

(Interim)

14

(1 vacancy)

6 (43%)

SAFCOL

1 male

1 male

(Interim)

10

(2 vacancies)

3 (30%

SA EXPRESS

1 Female (Interim)

1 male

(Interim)

12

(no vacancies)

5 (42%)

SA AIRWAYS (SAA)

1 male

vacant

10

(4 vacancies)

2 (20%)

TRANSNET

1 male

1 male

(Interim)

14

(no vacancies

6 (43%)

TOTAL

6 Males and 1 Female

6 males and 1 female

83

(10 vacancies, 12%)

31 (37%)

11 September 2018 - NW2404

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether the departure of the SA Airways flight that was due to carry Cuban technicians from Waterkloof Air Force Base to Cuba on or around 23 July 2018 was delayed; if so, what are the details of the (a) person(s) who determined that the departure of the aircraft should be delayed and (b) reasons why the departure of the aircraft was delayed; (2) What are the details of the full cargo on the specified flight; (3) Whether the specified flight has subsequently taken place; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date is it expected to take place; if so, what are the details of the flight’s (i) date and (ii) cargo? NW2652E

Reply:

This response is according to information received from South African Airways:

1. The aircraft was delayed due to delays in insurance approvals. The Defence training similators also required cargo permits from OR Tambo and not Waterkloof as was in the permit documentation.The similators were initially authoritised and permit issued to depart from Waterkloof Airport in Pretoria.

Once the departure point for the flight changed and was scheduled to depart from OR Tambo, the place of departure on the permit was not in complaince with insurance approvals and regulations.

This resulted in the delay. However, the simulators were no longer transported by SAA.

(2) The cargo on the flight was passenger luggage.

(3) Once insurance was obtained, SA2952 - Charter left on the 27th July and had passenger luggage/cargo.

11 September 2018 - NW2410

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Has the University of Cape Town (UCT) begun to (a) plan and/or (b) construct the new art gallery promised at the time of the Fees Must Fall protests; if not, (i) why not and (ii) by what date will planning and construction begin; if so, what progress has been made in each case; (2) has UCT made overtures to, or offered an apology to, artists whose artworks were damaged, destroyed or censored during the Fees Must Fall protests; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the name of each artist with whom communication was made and (b) are the details of the communication that has taken place in each case; (3) (a) what number of artworks remain censored at UCT, either through being physically covered up or placed out of sight and (b)(i) which category of artworks remain censored and (ii) what is the name of each affected (aa) artist and (bb) artwork?

Reply:

The University of Cape Town (UCT) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

  1. UCT intends to construct an Art Gallery. However, this has not yet materialised due to competing capital projects and other priorities.
  2. UCT has not made any apologies to individual artists. However, UCT has condemned the vandalism and violence that led to the destruction of the Art Gallery.
  3. UCT does not censor artwork. Where artworks have been removed from public spaces on campus, this was to protect the artwork against possible damage during times of tension and facilitate on-going consultative processes around curatorial policies that are informed by the context of the university’s public spaces, which have become a subject of contestation.

UCT welcomes these debates while recognising the moral rights of artists and the need to balance the rights of various parties. The University does not acquire artwork with any condition, requirement or understanding that it will be on display forever. It remains the University’s prerogative to determine when, where and for how long it will display the artwork.

In respect of the Sarah Baartman sculpture, UCT will host an exhibition at the Ritchie Gallery from 20 September 2018 to 4 October 2018. In preparation for this exhibition, the sculpture has been removed from the Chancellor Oppenheimer Library. UCT remains committed to its programme of public debates about the display of artwork.

11 September 2018 - NW2218

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

Whether he has engaged with the Minister of Trade and Industry and the Minister of Health on the viability of decriminalising and commercialising the growth and cultivation of hemp farming in South Africa; if not, on what date will engagement with the specified Ministers take place; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 In terms of the current legislation, the mandate for regulating hemp lies with the Department of Health in terms of the Medicines and Related Substances Act of 1965 as well as the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development in terms of the Drugs and Drugs Trafficking Act of 1992. Thus, the Department of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries’ has mainly engaged these two departments.

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) is leading the inter-departmental team that is developing a new regulatory framework for hemp. The team is made up of the following departments: DAFF, Health, Trade and Industry, Environmental Affairs, Justice and Constitutional Development as well as the South African Police Services. The team also include state owned entities (SOEs) like Agricultural Research Council (ARC) and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). The engagements between DAFF and other departments as well as SOEs take place through this platform. Much progress had been made in terms of dealing with technical matters regarding production of hemp, research and technology development, commercial feasibility and other related matters.

DAFF and the Department of Health are developing guidelines for regulating the cultivation and manufacturing of hemp and hemp products. As a result of the ongoing engagements amongst the different departments, DAFF has already formally requested the departments of Health and Justice and Constitutional Development to consider the necessary legislative amendments to allow for the commercialisation of hemp in South Africa. DAFF awaits a response from these departments.

11 September 2018 - NW2402

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What are (a) the number of persons who participated in the SA Airways (SAA) Youth Careers Summit hosted from 11 to 14 June 2018, (b) are the details of the educational achievements of the summit, (c) are the (i) educational institutions and schools that participated in the summit and (ii) reasons for selecting the specified educational institutions and excluding others and (d) are the reasons for hosting the summit during the school term; (2) What is the total cost and detailed breakdown of the costs incurred to host the summit, including any cash disbursements to participants, costs of accommodation, transport, catering and materials used for the summit; (3) What (a) are the names of service providers that were contracted to render services for the summit and (b) amount was each service provider paid, (ii) are the details of the competitive bidding processes followed to award contracts to each service provider and (iii) are the details of any relationship between the service providers with any persons associated with SAA and/or any of its subsidiaries? NW2650E

Reply:

This response is according to information received from South African Airways:

(1)(a) 2000 learners and 8 exhibitors participated in the summit.

(1)(b) The summit is aimed at making previously disadvantaged learners aware of various career opportunities within the aviation sector. SAA currently has an apprentice in SAA Technical who applied after attending the summit in the past.

(1)(c)(i) The institutions that participated in the summit are: Ekurhuleni East College TVET; Ekurhuleni West TVET College; Ratanda and Lesedi-Khanya High Schools both in Lesedi, Heidelberg; Fumana High School in Katlehong; Siyabonga High School in Soweto and Umqhele High School in Tembisa.

(1)(c)(ii) SAA with other organisations in the aviation sector are members of the Department of Transport’s Joint Aviation Awareness Program (JAAP) which works closely with the Department of Education and Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) in taking aviation to previously disadvantaged schools. The institutions and schools invited during the June summit are selected through the JAAP process, based on proximity, and to cover schools that have never been reached during the JAAP country-wide visits as SAA strives to cover all disadvantaged learners.

(1)(d) The summit is aimed at commemorating National Youth Month, and to make it relevant, SAA only hosts the summit during the final week of June when grades 9 – 11 learners have concluded their exams and before the June holidays, as the learners are not available during the holidays.

(2) No cash was disbursed to any suppliers for either transport, catering or materials as these costs were covered by TETA and other partners. There were no accommodation costs as learners are from Gauteng. The material used and distributed during the summit was printed at SAA Technical and also brought by the exhibitors.

(3)(a) The following were contracted to render services for the summit:

- TETA sponsored transport for learners;

- Birchwood contributed food packs;

- MTKR contributed sound;

- Airchefs contributed refreshments for exhibitors;

- Material provided to learners was printed internally for SAA, and provided at own cost by exhibitors.

(3)(b)(i) There were no cash disbursements; Birchwood Hotel and MTKR were offered 20 non-revenue tickets and 12 non-revenue tickets respectively as a token of appreciation.

(3)(b)(ii) SAA requested sponsorship from various companies and these were the ones that responded positively.

(3)(b)(iii) TETA provides funding for the SAA Technical Apprentice Program and one of SAA’s Technical officials, Mr. Saki Tlou, serves on the TETA board.

11 September 2018 - NW2530

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Is the information and communication technology system of his department synchronised with the SA Police Service’s systems for biometric identification; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, SAPS have access to the HANIS system via the interface between Integrated Justice System (IJS) and Department of Home Affairs (DHA). DHA has developed a “DHA-IJS HUB” used by SAPS for verification or identification of SAPS clients whose biometrics are stored on HANIS.

If the person of interest’s biometrics are stored in HANIS, the following fields are returned as requested:-

Person Name; Person Facial Image; Person Contact Information; Person Birth Date; Person Birth Country Code; Person Living Indicator; Person Death Date ; Person Gender Code; Person Marital Status Code; Person Marital Type Code ; Person Marriage Date; Person Identification; Person Residential Address; Person Postal Address.

11 September 2018 - NW1245

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What are the full details of the amounts spent by her department on entertainment (details furnished) (a) in the past four financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

 

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

since 1 Apr

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

ATTACHÉ ACCREDITATION

3,360

973

2,485

761

1,229

144

ENTERTAINMENT EXPENSES

6,111

1,944

2,301

3,783

2,513

778

TOTAL

9,471

2,917

4,786

4,544

3,742

922

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

Entertainment Expenditure by Financial Year

 
   

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS.

Entertainment Expenditure by Financial Year

           
 

2013/14 FY

2014/15 FY

2015/16 FY

2016/17 FY

2017/18 FY

2018/19 FY

2019/20 FY

2020/21 FY

   
 

Audited AFS

Audited AFS

Audited AFS

Audited AFS

Unaudited

Budget

Budget

Budget

   

R'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Budget

478

669

264

-

-

105

111

117

   

Actual

42

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

   
                     

11 September 2018 - NW2466

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of rape incidents took place at each institution of higher learning in 2017?

Reply:

The Department does not collect such information as a matter of routine.

The Department requested all universities and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college to respond to the question. The table below provides the responses received from 20 universities.

University

Number of rape incidents

1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

1

2. University of Cape Town

9

3. Central University of Technology

0

4. Durban University of Technology

1

5. University of Johannesburg

4

6. University of Limpopo

0

7. Mangosuthu University of Technology

0

8. University of Mpumalanga

0

9. Nelson Mandela University

5

10 North-West University

1

11. University of Pretoria

1

12. Rhodes University

2

13. Sol Plaatje University

0

14. University of South Africa

1

15. Stellenbosch University

0

16. Tshwane University of Technology

6

17. University of Venda

0

18. Walter Sisulu University

7

19. University of Western Cape

2

20. University of the Witwatersrand

1

The table below provides the responses received from 4 TVET colleges.

TVET College

Number of rape incidents

1. Umfolozi TVET College

1

2. Majuba TVET College

2

3. Vuselela TVET College

1

4. Northlink TVET College

3

11 September 2018 - NW2384

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) were the (i) circumstances and (ii) reasons that informed the decision to place the National Student Financial Aid Scheme under administration and (b) are the terms of reference of such administration?

Reply:

a) (i) The Minister has through engagement with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in 2018, raised serious concerns about the failure of NSFAS to effectively confirm funding for students and disburse funding timeously to students in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and universities. The Department with experts from the sector and support of the Board has provided support to the entity during 2017 and 2018. However, despite this support, the entity continues to face serious challenges in its business processes, IT systems, capacity, policies and controls.

(ii) These challenges have had a grave effect on the student-funding environment since 2017 and have been exacerbated in 2018. Should these matters not be addressed urgently, the challenges facing the entity will continue to negatively impact on the effective implementation of government funding for poor and working-class students to enable them to access higher education and training, and succeed in their studies.

(b) The Administrator will take over the governance, management and administration of NSFAS for one year. The general and specific Terms of Reference of the Administrator during this period will be to:

  • Ensure the effective close out of the 2017 and 2018 student-funding cycles. This involves resolving data integration challenges as a matter of urgency, finalising all necessary funding decisions, ensuring reconciliation of funding data between universities and TVET colleges and NSFAS, ensuring that all the necessary agreements are in place, students are accurately funded and recorded, and ensure that all NSFAS qualifying students receive funding;
  • Oversee the opening of the 2019 online applications process, ensure that all necessary partnerships for managing the applications process are in place and can be effectively monitored, and develop and manage a communications plan for the application period;
  • Develop, in consultation with the Department, universities and TVET colleges, an effective and realistic plan for the 2019 funding cycle and ensure that all parties understand all their roles and responsibilities, and any necessary implementation support is made available as needed;
  • Ensure that the entity pays adequate attention to both TVET colleges and universities in all aspects of its core business processes;
  • Put in place the necessary management and governance controls to ensure that all risks for the 2019 student funding cycle are appropriately managed, with the support of the Department and institutions as necessary;
  • Ensure that adequate plans are in place to make funding decisions at the earliest possible time of the year and as close to the period of registration as possible;
  • Manage the day-to-day work of the entity, and steer NSFAS to address its operational challenges fully. This will include the strengthening of structures, systems and policies that will ensure good governance and effective management of the core operational mandate of NSFAS;
  • Oversee all necessary forensic and other investigations necessary for the effective operation and management of the entity;
  • Work closely with the Ministerial Committee of Inquiry appointed by the Minister to review the business processes of the entity and make long-term recommendations on the future models, structures, systems and business processes necessary for an effective NSFAS; and
  • Maintain a close and productive working relationship between NSFAS and universities and TVET colleges, with a view of re-establishing a NSFAS presence on campuses from 2018 onwards.

The Administrator will report to the Minister of Higher Education and Training or her delegated officials. In addition to other forms of communication and interaction with the Ministry and Department, the Administrator is expected to submit a written report every three months on the progress made regarding the issues mentioned above. The Administrator may appoint technical experts where necessary to assist in the different areas.

11 September 2018 - NW2392

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

What legislative or regulatory amendments is his department considering to implement in order to ensure that the transportation of live farm animals from the country to Mauritius is conducted in a manner that is consistent with best humane live farm animal transport practices and the welfare of animals during transit from farms, aboard sea vessels and at the receiving ports of destination?

Reply:

The department has started engaging in the drafting of a new Animal Welfare Act since the current legislation in South Africa (the Animal Protection Act, 1962 and the Performing Animals Protection Act, 1935) which are the principal Acts governing the protection of animals are outdated and do not comprehensively address some animal welfare issues and are also not compatible with international standards.

The draft Animal Welfare Bill is still to undergo consultation and other legislation development processes and once promulgated its regulations and schemes will be implemented as per the objectives of the Act. The transporting of live animals will form part of the identified areas that need to be well encompassed in the legislation review process.

Until the time the new Act is promulgated, the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) has committed to draft guidelines on key identified areas, and these include the transportation of animals by sea. These guidelines will be based on the OIE minimum standards which include key aspects that seek to address the exporter competency as well as the vessel requirements that transport the animals.

11 September 2018 - NW2379

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether she intends to support a presidential pardon for the convicted Fees Must Fall activists since the Government has agreed to the principle that education must be free?

Reply:

There is no provision in the relevant laws and regulations which allows for intervention or support by Ministers in the processing of Presidential pardons.

10 September 2018 - NW2436

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

RESPONSE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION:

(a) The Department does not own any land.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(ii) N/A

Umalusi Response

(a) (ii) There is no investing campany that has invested on land owned by Umalusi.

SACE Response

(a) (ii) SACE has no investing company, which has invested on land owned by it.

(b) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

10 September 2018 - NW2416

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What was the (i) budget for and (ii) actual expenditure on Learning and Teaching Support Materials and (b) what percentage of the required materials was delivered in each province in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

a) (i) According to the information received from the Provinces the budgets on LTSM for each province for the 2017-18 financial year were as follows:

Province

Total Budgets

Budget for LTSM- 2017-18 Financial year

   

Stationery

Textbooks

EC

R526 661 340.00 Combined

FS

R116 185 754.00 Combined

GP

R986 724 340.09 Combined

KZN

R884 339 622.04 Combined

LP

 R575,343,000.00 Combined

MP

R280 488 516. 97 Combined

NC

R84 748 480  

R48 323 480.00

R36 425 000

NW

R536, 183 000.00 Combined

WC

R177 713 000.00 Combined

a) (ii) The expenditure on Learning and Teaching Support Materials is as follows:

Province

Expenditure-2017-18 Financial year

 

Stationery

Textbooks

EC

  R298 000 000

 R111 875 617.66

FS

R14 190 809.84

R41 335 130.00

GP

 R287 817 616.59

 R  3 897 650 894.87

KZN

R379 002 695

R505 336 926.88

LP

R165,912,983.84

R400,673,084.69

MP

R  231,833,301.64

 R  48,655,215.33

NC

R48 323 480.00

R28 897 438.7(this excludes accruals from the 2016/17 financial year)

NW

R190 981 000

R263 639 000

WC

R 49 925 269.03

 R131 757 759.76

b) The percentages of delivery for 2017-18 financial year were as follows:

Province

Delivery percentage of the LTSM

 

Stationery

Textbooks

EC

100%

100%

FS

100%

100%

GP

100%

100%

KZN

100%

100%

LP

100%

100%

MP

100%

100%

NC

100%

100%

NW

100%

99.8%

WC

100%

100%

10 September 2018 - NW2415

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether teachers are given specific extra training to enable them to teach a multigrade class; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what plans does her department intend to implement in order to reduce the number of multigrade classes and (b) by which date will the specified plans be implemented? NW2663E

Reply:

(1) Most teachers in Multi-Grade schools have no formal training in Multi-Grade teaching and consequently have limited skills in managing different content at different levels as well as classroom management of multiple groups. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) jointly with the Provincial Education Departments has since 2010 been training teachers in Multi-Grade teaching. In March 2018, the DBE in c ollaboration with Teacher Unions trained 2 083 teachers and 214 subject advisors in Multi-Grade teaching and the Multi-grade Toolkit. The training is geared to equip teachers with skills and knowledge that they require to mediate the curriculum effectively and efficiently in Multi-Grade schools. The training covers concepts such as Introduction to Multi-Grade teaching; Teaching strategies; Classroom management; Classroom organization; Timetabling; Display techniques; School Based Assessment; Lesson management; and the Multi-Grade toolkit.

(2) (a) The PEDs supported by the DBE are immersed in the rationalisation process that is aimed at discontinuing schools that have become unviable due to enrolment decline, while still guaranteeing the right to basic education of all learners as enshrined in section 29(1) (a) of the Constitution. Some schools with Multi-Grade classes with very low enrolment fall in this category. In order to strengthen the rationalisation process, the DBE has developed and adopted Guidelines on Rationalisation. The workshop on these Guidelines was conducted in all the provinces.

All provinces have drawn up plans with timeframes indicating the number of schools targeted for both merger and closure.

(b) Plans are being implemented by the respective provinces and there are dates already decided and unlikely to change on which the rationalisation processes must be concluded.

10 September 2018 - NW2230

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he has put any plans in place to reduce the long queues and waiting times at his department’s offices; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what has he found to be the causes for the long queues and waiting times at his department’s offices?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department has drafted a strategy and action plan to address and reduce the long queues including waiting times at its offices. The action plan would be rolled out with short, medium to long term interventions. The Department held a media briefing on 22 April 2018, to pronounce to the public the “War on Queues” campaign, as part of its plans to ensure that notwithstanding the high volumes experienced amidst inadequate physical infrastructure, unstable systems and general lack of resources, our clients are served at the shortest possible time.

The action plans put in place encompass the following critical components, namely:-

 

  • Assessment report on immediate interventions at identified offices (Alexandra, Soweto, Pietermaritzburg and Umgeni) showing reductions in waiting times and what has been done in ensuring people are not waiting outside offices to be served.
  • Categorising of offices based on performance in order provide interventions at such offices.
  • The Department has introduced a steering committee that sits every two weeks to monitor all offices that are still experiencing long queues and make interventions where required.
  • Some interventions include but is not limited to; a one-stop workstation that takes fingerprints and photographs, a streamline of processes and a reduction of time clients spend in Home Affairs offices.
  • Revisiting the working hour arrangements negotiations with labour; to address the issue of unpredictable walk-in clients and inadequate resources.
  • Proposals on how to measure customer experience and waiting times in offices, and on how to deal with structural challenges of long waiting times.

The Department, informed by the action plans, is finalising a customer satisfaction survey, it commissioned to get the client contact centre
working optimally, find a solution for unpredictable walk-in clients and for
front office space, explore possibilities of a new shift system, attend to the unstable system, scale-up unannounced visits by senior managers to offices, improve workflow and beef-up communication with clients.

2. Long enduring queues emanating from high client volumes caused by unpredictable walk-ins, discontinuation of Saturday working hours, inadequate footprint and front office space, unstable systems (networks and applications), inefficient work flow process and uncoordinated communication strategies.

10 September 2018 - NW2414

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the maximum number of grades that may be taught in a single classroom at the same time as part of a multigrade class and (b) what number of schools in each province have classes in which (i) two, (ii) three and (iii) four or more grades are taught in a multigrade class?

Reply:

a)  The combinations of grades and the number of grades that are taught in a single classroom vary from one province to the other. The recommendation that the Department of Basic Education has made is that schools can only have a maximum of three grades in single classroom; and where applicable the Grade R and Grade 7 classes should always be standalone classes. The combinations should be in terms of the phases as follows:

  • A foundation Phase Class (Grades 1, 2 and 3);
  • An Intermediate Phase Class (Grades 4, 5 and 6);
  • Senior Phase Class (Grades 7, 8 and 9) where it is applicable.

b) The data on the various combinations of grades in each province is not available. That information can be obtained from the Provincial Education Departments.

10 September 2018 - NW2418

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) Which provincial departments of education procured sanitary pads to be distributed to learners in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) what was the total cost of the procurement in each case; (2) whether the sanitary pads were distributed to learners in each case; if not, why not; (3) whether any investigations into irregularities in the procurement of the specified sanitary pads are being conducted; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department Of basic Education (DBE) does not provide senitary towels to schools and neither has such provision been budgeted for . The hounourable member is advised to request the infomation directly from the provinces.

10 September 2018 - NW2312

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) twenty (20)

(ii) None

(b) Causes of each dispute

-Unfair discrimination:

Early recall from mission abroad = 01

Equal pay for work of equal value = 02

Claim for awarding surrogacy leave outside prevailing policy = 01

Unfair disciplinary action short of dismissal = 01

Overlooked for posting = 01

-Unfair suspension:

Suspension pending disciplinary action = 01

Unilateral change of terms and conditions of employment:

Implementation of shift system for security officers = 01

Suspension of cellphone benefits= 01

Interpretation/ application of collective agreement:

interpretation of Resolution 1 of 2003 = 01

Unfair Labour Practice:

Leave pay = 02

Promotion = 01

Unfair dismissals:

Disciplinary actions= 03

Review of the Arbitration award = 04

(c) Nature of each dispute

-Unilateral change of terms and conditions of employment = 02

-Interpretation/ application of a collective agreement = 01

-Unfair suspension = 01

-Unfair discrimination = 06

-Unfair Labour Practice = 03

-Unfair Dismissal = 07

(d) (i) date each was reported

- Unilateral change of terms and conditions of employment = 04/05/2018

- Unilateral change of terms and conditions of employment = 14/08/2018

- Interpretation/ application of a collective agreement = 10/08/2018

- Unfair suspension = 06/03/2017

- Unfair discrimination = 04/10/2016

- Unfair discrimination = 18/02/2016

- Unfair discrimination = 28/09/2016

- Unfair discrimination = 14/12/2016

- Unfair discrimination = 12/07/2017

- Unfair discrimination = 21/08/2014

- Unfair Labour Practice = 18/07/2017

- Unfair Labour Practice = 20/04/2017

- Unfair Labour Practice = 13/08/2018

- Unfair dismissal = 24/02/2017

- Unfair dismissal = 09/07/2015

- Unfair dismissal = 25/03/2014

- Unfair dismissal = 06/07/2017

- Unfair dismissal = 14/03/2013

- Unfair dismissal = 02/07/2013

- Unfair dismissal = 03/03/2016

(ii) resolved = None

(2) (a)(i) four (04)

(ii) -Unbecoming behaviour and causing damage to the state vehicle = 01

-Allegations of fraud: falsified matric certificate = 01

  • Abscondment = 02

(b)(i) none

(ii) Not applicable

10 September 2018 - NW2431

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

The Department and entities responded as follows:

(i) Department of Home Affairs

(a-b) The Department of Home Affairs does not own any land and therefore the question as to who invested on land owned by the Department cannot arise.

(ii) Government Printing Works

  1. None
  2. Not applicable

(iii) Electoral Commission

  1. None
  2. Not applicable

10 September 2018 - NW2370

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Mchunu, Ms S to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

In view of the recent 6th BRICS Education Ministers’ meeting that was held in Cape Town recently under the theme Deepening BRICS Education Partnerships and Exchanges, where the Ministers reflected on the successes and challenges related to earlier education commitments made by the BRICS countries, how has she found the reflections made by the BRICS partners on university partnerships, technical and vocational education and training, work-based learning and digitisation can assist in strengthening the country’s post-school education and training system?

Reply:

The Department hosted the 6th BRICS Education Ministers Meeting on 10 July 2018 under the theme “Deepening BRICS Education Partnerships and Exchanges”. The meeting aimed to reflect on the successes and challenges related to earlier education commitments made by the BRICS countries. The meeting ensured the exchange of best practices to improve education and training systems as well as pursuing opportunities for skills development.

Collaboration in higher education and training with BRICS countries is based on mutual learning and knowledge sharing. The cooperation facilitates the exchange of skills, expertise and knowledge between BRICS countries and various agencies in the education system to build long-term relations of mutual benefit. BRICS cooperation also promotes system-to-system cooperation whereby policymakers, institutions, academics and students have access to relevant, high-quality international practices, research, experiences and expertise.

The meeting reflected on how Workplace-Based Learning can support improved learning and employability and shared their best practice models. The meeting also highlighted the importance to develop innovative approaches to vocational education provision, guaranteeing workforce integration into the future labour market and consequently, increase economic productivity and social inclusion.

The meeting also discussed experiences on digitisation where India developed a massive Open Online Course platform known as the SWAYAM (Study Webs of Active – Learning for Young Aspiring Minds). This is a holistic learning platform, which can be accessed anytime. It comes in an e-Content self-instructional material, e-Books, illustrations, case studies and presentations.

This experience together with international research strongly suggest that in pursuing the shift towards an open learning orientation will also encourage the post-school sector towards taking on board evident changes in the way a new generation of learners are beginning to view learning, education and training as well as how they are using technology in teaching and learning.

The meeting noted that Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) provision has a direct role in supporting the skills needs of industry, and the employment and career needs of workers, however, TVET- industry partnerships in South Africa have been weak. The BRICS platform will assist members in positioning TVET in a way that not only addresses the skills sets required to improve productivity and economic growth but also to reduce poverty and inequality in society. As such, workers need to have both general and more defined skill sets, with the capacity to adapt these skill sets in the face of evolving industry demands.

The interaction was aimed at promoting university partnerships with the need to strengthen academic exchange and student mobility among the BRICS member states. A representative of the BRICS Network University indicated that successful collaboration of the BRICS universities on research and teaching, student and staff exchanges is already a significant contribution to global knowledge production. South Africa is already receiving scholarship offers from BRICS countries and have students studying in China, Russia and India. Negotiations are underway way with Brazil.

Through its teaching partnerships, the BRICS Network University will promote academic programmes that produce the kind of graduates that can lead the BRICS societies into the future. The thematic areas for the BRICS Network University, i.e. energy, information security, climate change, water resources and pollution treatment have been carefully selected to exploit the knowledge strengths of the BRICS member states.

The work of the BRICS Network University is in alignment with that which the post-school education and training system is aiming to accomplish; that is to build a stronger and more cooperative relationship between education and training institutions and the workplace. BRICS gives a real opportunity for effective learning and knowledge diplomacy to make a difference to the lives of its citizens.

The BRICS Education Ministers meeting resulted in the signing of a joint declaration with tangible outcomes in different areas. Brazil offered to host a workshop on innovation among TVET institutions in BRICS countries. India offered to develop a proposal, which will focus on e-learning across BRICS countries, and share best practices, South Africa offered to develop a doctoral BRICS Network Programme, and lastly, Russia offered to put together a proposal for the establishment of a coordinating process for the BRICS Network University.

10 September 2018 - NW2367

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Wolmarans, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the SA Human Rights Commission Report on Transformation at Universities which recommended that her department takes a leading role in the transformation of institutions of higher learning and that universities should report annually on their state of transformation, what work has been put in to address recommendations which have not yet been addressed?

Reply:

In 2014, the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) promulgated
the revised Regulations for Reporting by Public Higher Education Institutions
(R464, Government Gazette No. 37726 of 9 June 2014) which impose a duty on all university councils to report on transformation in their annual reports. In terms of the Regulations, public higher education institutions are required to adopt, implement and report on policies that promote transformation in their respective institutions. This report on transformation must clearly indicate initiatives that seek to advance people from historically disadvantaged backgrounds, women and people with disabilities. It should also indicate any transformation measures implemented with regard to teaching, learning and research activities. In addition, public higher education institutions are required to monitor the effectiveness and impact of policies implemented to address transformation in their respective institutions. All this information must be submitted to the Department annually.

Upon receipt of the South African Human Rights Commission’s report in December 2016, the Department circulated the report to all University Vice-Chancellors for their consideration and action. Universities were requested to respond to the report by submitting their implementation plans to the Department in which they demonstrate how they intend giving effect to the recommendations outlined in the report, including the resolutions of the 2015 Higher Education Transformation Summit held in Durban in October 2015.

The Ministerial Committee on Transformation in Public Universities (TOC) has conducted an analysis of both Universities’ annual transformation reports as well as the transformation implementation plans, and it is currently in the process of compiling a report on the state of transformation in the higher education system. The envisaged report will identify barriers to substantive transformation in the sector, and will include recommendations to the Minister on appropriate interventions and initiatives to be effected in order to accelerate the pace of transformation in the sector.

Subsequent to its appointment in July 2017, the TOC developed and is currently implementing a three-year action plan which is informed by, among others, the recommendations of the SAHRC report. The TOC’s primary mandate is to monitor transformation in the sector and to advise the Minister on appropriate policies and other interventions required to accelerate transformation of the higher education sector. The Department and the TOC hold regular meetings with Universities South Africa which represents all twenty-six (26) public Universities, with the intention of addressing transformation challenges confronting the sector and to collaborate on sectoral transformation activities.

10 September 2018 - NW2317

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved;

Reply:

  1. (a)(i) There are 56 disputes currently faced by the Department.

(ii) There are 50 disputes currently faced by the entities reporting to the Department.

(b)-(d) The details of the cause, nature, date of dispute reported and resolved of each dispute are provided in the table below:

Department:

Number of Conciliations

(b) Cause of dispute

(c ) Nature of dispute

(i) Date reported

(ii) Date resolved

Employee 1 (Head Office)

Allegation of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

26/04/2018

26/04/2018 Unresolved

Employee 2 (Lovedale TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair Conduct - benefits

11/06/2018

11/06/2018 Unresolved

Employee 3 (Lovedale TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair Conduct - benefits

11/06/2018

11/06/2018 Unresolved

Employee 4 (Motheo TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair Conduct - benefits

18/04/2018

18/04/2018 Withdrawn

Employee 5 (Motheo TVET College)

Allegations of failure to promote

Unfair Conduct - promotion

26/04/2018

26/04/2018 Settlement agreement reached

Employee 6 (Head Office)

Allegations of failure to promote

Unfair Conduct - promotion

30/04/2018

30/04/2018 Unresolved

Employee 7 (Northlink TVET College)

Allegations of unfair conduct related to promotion, demotion, training, probation and benefits

Unfair Conduct - promotion, demotion, training, probation and benefits

07/05/2018

07/05/2018 Unresolved

Employee 8 (Lovedale TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair Conduct - benefits

24/05/2018

24/05/2018 Withdrawn by the Applicant

Employee 9 (College of Cape Town)

Allegations of unfair conduct related to promotion, demotion, training, probation and benefits

Unfair Conduct - promotion, demotion, training, probation and benefits

31/05/2018

31/05/2018 Withdrawn by the Applicant

Employee 10 (Eastern Cape CET)

Allegations of demotion

Unfair Conduct - demotion

07/06/2018

07/06/2018 Unresolved

Employee 11 (Port Elizabeth TVET College)

Equal pay for equal value of work

Unfair Discrimination

20/04/2018

20/04/2018 Unresolved

Employee 12 (Motheo TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation or Application of Collective Agreement

26/04/2018

26/04/2018 Unresolved

Employee 13 (Central Johannesburg TVET College)

Allegations of refusal to disclose information

Protected disclosure of information

04/05/2018

04/05/2018 Unresolved

Employee 14 (Head Office)

Equal pay for equal value of work

Unfair Discrimination

01/06/2018

01/06/2018 Unresolved

Employee 15 (Coastal TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair Conduct - benefits

10/04/2018

10/04/2018 Settlement agreement reached

Number of Arbitrations

(b) Cause of dispute

(c ) Nature of dispute

(i) Date reported

(ii) Date resolved

Employee 1 (Coastal TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

01/04/2018

01/04/2018 Settlement reached

Employee 2 (Head Office)

Allegation of unfair suspension

Unfair Suspension

03/04/2018

03/04/2018 Settlement reached

Employee 3 (Ikhala TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

05/04/2018

Pending

Employee 4 (Taletso TVET College)

Allegations of non-renewal of fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

12/04/2018

18/06/2018 Arbitration award in favour of Respondent

Employee 5 (Buffalo City TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

12/04/2018

Pending

Employee 6 (Eastcape Midlands TVET College)

Allegations of failure to provide conditions of service in terms of Basic Conditions of Employment Act

Provisions of basic conditions of employment act

12/04/2018

Pending

Employee 7 (Ekurhuleni West TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

13/04/2018

Pending

Employee 8 (Letaba TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

17/04/2018

08/05/2018 Arbitration award in favour of the Department

Employee 9 (Ehlanzeni TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

19/04/2018

30/05/2018 Arbitration award in favour of the applicant

Employee 10 (Port Elizabeth TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

23/04/2018

30/05/2018 Dispute withdrawn

Employee 11 (South West Gauteng TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice- benefits

24/04/2018

24/04/2018

Settlement reached

Employee 12 (South West Gauteng TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

30/04/2018

Pending

Employee 13 (Orbit TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

02/05/2018

Pending

Employee 14 (Maluti TVET College)

Allegations of unfair suspension

Unfair suspension or disciplinary action

04/05/2018

Pending

Employee 15 (Free State CET)

Allegations of termination of service based on Public Service Act Section 17(3) B

Termination of employment in terms of Public Service Act Section 17(3) b

04/05/2018

04/05/2018 Matter dismissed

Employee 16 (Ingwe TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice: benefits

07/05/2018

07/05/2018 Default award issued against the applicant

Employee 17 (Department of Education)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

08/05/2018

Pending

Employee 18 (Head Office)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

10/05/2018

Pending

Employee 19 (Tshwane South TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

10/05/2018

Pending

Employee 20 (Ehlanzeni TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

14/05/2018

Pending

Employee 21 (Westcoast TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

15/05/2018

Pending

Employee 22 (Majuba TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

17/05/2018

Pending

Employee 23 (Tshwane South TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

17/05/2018

Pending

Employee 24 (Lovedale TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice- benefits

17/05/2018

17/05/2018 Settlement agreement reached

Employee 25 (Tshwane North TVET College)

Allegations of failure to promote

Unfair conduct : promotion

18/05/2018

Pending

Employee 26 (Ekurhuleni West TVET College)

Allegations of failure to promote

Unfair conduct : promotion

18/05/2018

18/05/2018 Matter withdrawn

Employee 27 (Eastcape Midlands TVET College)

Allegations of non-renewal of fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

22/05/2018

Pending

Employee 28 (Mnambithi TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice- benefits

23/05/2018

Pending

Employee 29 (Maluti TVET College)

Allegations of failure to interpret and apply collective agreement

Interpretation and application of Collective Agreement

22/05/2018

22/05/2018 Settlement agreement reached

Employee 30 (Umfolozi TVET College)

Non-renewal of fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

04/05/2018

Pending

Employee 31 (Port Elizabeth TVET College)

Allegations of unlisted unfair labour practice

Unfair labour practice- other

05/05/2018

Pending

Employee 32 (Majuba TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal based on employers operational requirements

Dismissal based on employers operational requirements

06/06/2018

27/06/2018 Award in favour of applicants

Employee 33 (Majuba TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

08/06/2018

08/06/2018 Applicant withdraw dispute

Employee 34 (Central Johannesburg TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related promotion

Unfair labour practice- promotion

19/06/2018

Pending

Employee 35 (Ikhala TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

20/06/2018

Pending

Employee 36 (South Cape TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice- benefits

20/06/2018

20/06/2018 Default award against the Department

Employee 37 (Lovedale TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice- benefits

21/06/2018

Pending

Employee 38 (Tshwane South TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

21/06/2018

Pending

Employee 39 (Ekurhuleni East TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

22/06/2018

Pending

Employee 40 (Ikhala TVET College)

Allegations of unfair labour practice related benefits

Unfair labour practice- benefits

25/06/2018

Pending

Employee 41 (Letaba TVET College)

Allegations of unfair dismissal

Unfair dismissal

26/06/2018

Pending

Entities reporting to the Department:

Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) – 4

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of dispute
  1. Date of dispute
  1. Reported
  1. Resolved
  1. Failure to declare personal interest / conflict of interest

Dishonesty and breach of employment conditions.

01/2015

07/2015

Pending - CCMA

  1. Bringing the employer into to disrepute

Violation of code of conduct.

06/2015

04/2016

Pending -Labour Court

  1. Gross insubordination

Abuse of authority and failure to take reasonable instructions.

06/2015

08/2015

Pending - Labour Court

  1. Failure to execute reasonable instruction

Poor work performance, intimidation and failure to execute a reasonable instruction.

04/2018

Pending

Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) – 9

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute
  1. Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

04/2013

05/2013

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

08/2014

09/2014

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

05/2015

09/2015

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

05/2015

07/2015

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

05/2015

11/2015

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

07/2015

11/2015

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

09/2015

112015

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

01/2016

02/2016

  1. Labour Relations matter

Misconducts: Disciplinary Hearing

10/2013

10/2013

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA) – 1

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute
  1. Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Dereliction of duties

Employee challenging final written warning

03/2018

Pending -CCMA

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDPSETA) – 9

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute
  1. Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Dismissal

Unfair dismissal

09/2015

04/2016

  1. Transfer to Another Unit

Alleged unfair demotion

05/2016

07/2018

  1. Non Signing of Internship Agreement

Constructive dismissal

10/2016

09/2017

  1. Non-Renewal of Internship Agreement

Unfair dismissal

01/2017

05/2017

  1. Non-Payment of Performance Bonus

Unfair labour practice (Bonus)

10/2017

11/2017

  1. Acceptance of Repudiation of Contract

Constructive dismissal

11/2018

01/2018

  1. Non-Payment of Performance Bonus

Unfair labour practice (Bonus)

11/2018

02/2018

  1. Acceptance of repudiation of Contract

Constructive dismissal

01/2018

06/2018

  1. Non-Signing of Internship Agreement

Unfair labour practice

08/2018

Pending

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA) – 1

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i) Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. 13th Cheque

Protected Strike

11/2016

03/2017

Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET) – 3

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i) Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Failure to adhere to SCM policies and

Failure to adhere to SCM policy, non-adherence to recruitment and selection policy

01/2018

08/2018.

  1. Withdrawal of incorrect appointment

Withdrawal of job offer

02/2018

Pending -CCMA.

  1. Poor performance and misrepresentation of information

Poor performance, failure to meet crucial deadline.

08/2018

Pending

Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Training Authority
(FOODBEV) – 4

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute
  1. Reported
  1. Resolved
  1. Misconduct

Unfair dismissal

12/2014

04/2016

  1. Misconduct

Unfair dismissal

08/2017

06/2018

  1. Misconduct

Unfair dismissal

11/2014

Pending -Labour Court

  1. Retrenchment

Unfair dismissal

11/2017

Pending - CCMA

Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) – 1

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i) Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Employee was unsuccessful in the interview

Unfair Labour Practise

03/2017

08/2017

Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT) – 4

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute
  1. Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Non-renewal of fixed-term contract

Unfair dismissal

04/2018

Pending - CCMA

  1. Change in retirement age

Unfair labour practice

10/2016

Pending - Labour Court

  1. Misconduct

Unfair dismissal

04/2013

Pending - Labour Court

  1. Misconduct

Unfair dismissal

03/2018

Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA) – 2

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i) Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Dismissal

Challenging fairness of his dismissal

06/2017

Pending - CCMA

  1. Dismissal

Challenging fairness of her dismissal

07/2018

Pending - CCMA

Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) – 2

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i)Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Refusal to accept job placement

Unfair labour practice

06/2018

Pending

  1. Dissatisfaction with the procedure and substance of the disciplinary hearing proceedings leading to dismissal

Unfair dismissal

08/2018

Pending

Services Sector Education and Training Authority (Services SETA) – 1

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i) Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Interpretation of Labour Law

NEHAWU unhappiness with implementation of organisational realignment decision

10/2017

Pending

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) – 1 labour dispute

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date dispute

(i) Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Unfair labour practice

Non-shortlist

03/2018

Pending - CCMA

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) – 1

  1. Cause of dispute
  1. Nature of Dispute
  1. Date of dispute

Reported

(ii) Resolved

  1. Alleged acts of gross misconduct

Misrepresentation of financial disclosure and Performing extra work/private work for own benefit, during the employer’s working hours without the permission of the employer.

07/2018

Pending (Employee is on suspension, investigations are in progress)

National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) = 5 labour dispute

(1)(b) Cause of dispute

(1)(c) Nature of dispute

(1)(d) Date of dispute

(d)(i) Reported

(d)(ii) Resolved

Grievance lodged against the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) by BRICS Programme Coordinator for alleged bullying, harassment, victimisation, intimidation, discrimination and bullying

11/2017

Pending, independent investigative report to be tabled to the NIHSS board for final decision making

Grievance lodged against the Acting BRICS/Research Director by the BRICS Programme Coordinator for alleged harassment, bullying, badgering, victimisation and intimidation

11/2017

Pending, independent investigative report to be tabled to the NIHSS board for final decision making

Grievance lodged against the Acting BRICS/Research Director by the BRICS Programme Coordinator for alleged harassment, bullying, badgering, victimisation and intimidation

11/2017

Pending, independent investigative report to be tabled to the NIHSS board for final decision making

Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) arbitration lodged by APSA trade union obo Programme Administrator against Senior Human Resource (HR) Manager and Acting Director, BRICS/Research for unfair labour practice

07/2018

Pending, awaiting date of hearing at CCMA

CCMA arbitration lodged by APSA trade union obo Senior Administrator against Senior HR Manager and Chief Financial Officer for unfair labour practice

08/ 2018

Pending, awaiting date of hearing at CCMA

CCMA Arbitration lodged by APSA Trade Union against NIHSS for alleged infringement of organisational rights

08/2018

Pending, awaiting date of hearing at CCMA

South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) = 3 labour disputes

(1)(b) Cause of dispute

(1)(c) Nature of dispute

(1)(d) Date of dispute

Reported

Resolved

Dismissal after failing to make probation after the probation period was extended

Labour Court

10/2015

SAQA is waiting for judgement after the matter was heard on 16 August 2018

Fraud / deliberately supplying incorrect or falsified information and Committing an act which undermines the financial management and internal control system of the organisation

Disciplinary hearing

08/2018

Set for hearing on 29 August 2018

Dissatisfaction with performance review outcomes

Grievance

08/2018

Pending

  1. (a) (i) Total number of employees who were dismissed by the Department in the past five years is 35. The table below provide a breakdown of employees dismissed:

Number of employees dismissed from
01 January 2018 to 30 June 2018 = 11

Reason for dismissal for each employee

Employee 1 (National Skills Fund)

Collusion

Employee 2 (Ikhala TVET College)

Gross insurbordination

Employee 3 (Buffalo City TVET College)

Abuse of sick leave

Employee 4 (Tshwane South TVET College)

Causing prejudice to the administration of the College

Employee 5 (Mthashana TVET College)

Failure to comply with the rules or regulations

Employee 6 (False Bay TVET College)

Unauthorised absence, poor time keeping and neglignce

Employee 7 (Motheo TVET College)

Gross insubordination, gross negligence and bringing the Collleg name and image of the into disrepute

Employee 8 (False Bay TVET College)

Gross negligence, contravenining of cash management policy, bringing the name and image of the college into disrepute and contravenining staff code of conduct policy

Employee 9 (Ikhala TVET College)

Racism

Employee 10 (False Bay TVET College)

Gross insurbordination and dereliction of duty

Employee 11 (Motheo TVET College)

Gross insurbordination or dereliction of duty

Number of employees dismissed from
01 January 2017 to December 2017 = 7

Reason for dismissal for each employee

Employee 1 (South West TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 2 (Westcoast TVET College)

Assault

Employee 3 (Northern Cape Rural TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 4 (Northern Cape Rural TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 5 (Northern Cape Rural TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 6 (Goldfields TVET College)

Racism

Employee 7 (Motheo TVET College)

Wilful mismangement of funds

Number of employees dismissed from
01 January 2016 to December 2016 = 12

Reason for dismissal for each employee

Employee 1 (South West TVET College)

Poor performance other than incapacity

Employee 2 (Head Office)

Gross dishonesty, threatening of a superior and insubordination

Employee 3 (Tshwane South TVET College)

Theft

Employee 4 (Taletso TVET College)

Theft

Employee 5 (Ehlanzeni TVET College)

Corruption

Employee 6 (Northlink TVET College)

Fraud

Employee 7 (Umfolozi TVET College)

Abuse of college vehicle

Employee 8 (Ehlanzeni TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 9 (Western TVET College)

Racism

Employee 10 (Taletso TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 11 (Tshwane South TVET College)

Gross dishonesty

Employee 12 (Ingwe TVET College)

Mismanagement of funds

Number of employees dismissed from
01 January 2015 to December 2015 = 5

Reason for dismissal for each employee

Employee 1 (Westcoast TVET College)

Gross insurbordination

Employee 2 (South West Gauteng TVET College)

Gross dishonesty

Employee 3 (Ehlanzeni TVET College)

Abscondment

Employee 4 (Motheo TVET College)

Procurement irregularities and fraud

Employee 5 (Lovedale TVET College)

Collecting money from students without authority

Total

5

*Number of employees dismissed from 01 January 2014 to 30 December 2014 = Employees not yet migrated to the Department, no figures available.

10 September 2018 - NW2369

Profile picture: Mavunda, Mr RT

Mavunda, Mr RT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the 23 member Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Reference Group which was recently appointed as part of the implementation of Phase 1 of the Recognition of Prior Learning Coordination Policy, to what extent will the work and implementation of the RPL Coordination Policy be underpinned by the findings and recommendations of the 2013 RPL Ministerial Task Team Report?

Reply:

The Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Coordination Policy was published on
31 March 2016. The conceptual framework for the RPL policy was the findings and recommendations contained in the Report of the Ministerial Task Team (MTT). The MTT for RPL recommended that RPL must be used for access and credit, and advancement. The RPL policy establishes these as principles of RPL. The establishment of the RPL Reference Group was one of the recommendations of the MTT Report. The Terms of Reference (ToR) of the RPL Reference Group draws from the MTT Report, in aspects such as advising the Minister on how to fund RPL for the public, develop a strategy and implementation plan for the establishment of a coordinating mechanism for RPL, collaborate and support RPL centres, and advise the Minister on the professionalisation of RPL practitioners. The work of the RPL Reference Group is aligned to the ToR set out in the RPL Policy attached as an Annexure.

10 September 2018 - NW2368

Profile picture: September, Ms CC

September, Ms CC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

In view of the Centres of Specialisation Artisan Programme which was launched at the beginning of 2018 as an initiative that involves the provision of apprenticeships for young people by employers, the provision of training by colleges and the provision of funding by her department to support the initiatives through funding, how will the specified partnerships strengthen the link between education and the workplace which include areas of work such as artisan trades and the apprenticeship system?

Reply:

The Centres of Specialisation (CoS) Programme has two key objectives; firstly, to accelerate the rate at which 13 priority trades are produced; and secondly, to build the capacity of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges to play their part in delivering these priority trades. The 13 priority trades were identified after a period of intensive research into the skills required for the large government infrastructure projects as well as for the Phakisas and War on Leaks. The trades are auto mechanic, boilermaker, bricklayer, carpenter and joiner, diesel mechanic, electrician, fitter and turner, mechanical fitter, millwright, pipefitter, plumber, rigger and welder.

Each of these trades is to be delivered using the newly registered Occupational Qualifications on the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) sub-framework. These qualifications have three interwoven components, i.e. theory, practical in a simulated sense and real workplace experience. The role of the TVET colleges is to provide the theory and practical components in partnership with workplaces.

The partnership between the education and workplace is effected through an apprenticeship contract. For CoS, all apprentices must have such apprenticeship contracts with employers before they enrol at a TVET college. This cements the partnership between the TVET college and industry.

Two colleges were selected to deliver each one of the 13 priority trades. In practice, 19 colleges are participating in the CoS programme, as 7 colleges have two trades each (albeit at different campuses). Every province has at least one college participating in the CoS.

What makes CoS different from many other initiatives is that learners must have apprenticeship contracts before they enrol at the college. This has required a considerable amount of work amongst employers, work that commenced at the beginning of this year. CoS has a target of 30 learners/apprentices per college, meaning that 780 apprenticeship contracts have to be signed. On 10 August 2018, the Department received reports indicating that there were 1 053 expressions of interest from employers wishing to take up apprentices for particular trades in the vicinity of selected colleges. The Sector Education and Training Authorities are being asked to consider these expressions of interest and where employers qualify, to allocate apprenticeship grants to them.

With apprenticeship grants, learners have a far greater chance not only of completing their trade test but also of securing employment either with the company with which they have been contracted or with another company in the network. Furthermore, companies have a better chance of finding the skills they need and ensuring that the skills trained are in line with their needs.

10 September 2018 - NW2462

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) name, (b) location, (c) capacity and (d) population of each prison in each province?

Reply:

The relevant information pertaining to correctional centres that were operational as on 23 August 2018 is reflected in the table below.

PROVINCE

(a) NAME OF CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

(b) LOCATION

(c)

CAPACITY

(d) INMATE POPULATION

Limpopo

Kutama-Sinthumule

Thohoyandou

3024

3024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makhado

Makhado

324

637

 

Modimolle

Modimolle

364

477

 

Polokwane

Polokwane

557

1782

 

Thohoyandou Female

Thohoyandou

134

211

 

Thohoyandou Medium A

Thohoyandou

691

1236

 

Thohoyandou Medium B

Thohoyandou

219

588

 

Tzaneen

Tzaneen

67

128

 

Mpumalanga

Barberton Farm Maximum

Barberton

845

1179

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barberton Medium A

Barberton

137

188

 

Barberton Medium B

Barberton

631

946

 

Barberton Town

Barberton

517

413

 

Belfast

Belfast

58

70

 

Bethal

Bethal

771

1068

 

Carolina

Carolina

110

160

 

Ermelo

Ermelo

513

633

 

Lydenburg

Lydenburg

81

84

 

Middelburg

Middelburg

317

371

 

Nelspruit

Mbombela

816

1277

 

Piet Retief

Piet Retief

261

446

 

Standerton Medium A

Standerton

265

312

 

Volksrust

Volksrust

211

276

 

Witbank

Emalahleni

1278

1568

 

North West

Christiana

Christiana

107

114

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Klerksdorp

Klerksdorp

1098

1397

 

Lichtenburg

Lichtenburg

291

261

 

Losperfontein

Brits

808

1025

 

Mafikeng

Mafikeng

108

120

 

Mogwase

Mogwase

572

656

 

Potchefstroom

Potchefstroom

867

1800

 

Rooigrond Medium A

Mmabatho

757

1016

 

Rooigrond Medium B

Mmabatho

266

261

 

Rustenburg Medium A

Rustenburg

629

318

 

Rustenburg Medium B

Rustenburg

182

97

 

Wolmaranstad

Wolmaranstad

105

145

 

Zeerust

Zeerust

143

134

 

Free State

Goedemoed Medium A

Aliwal North

813

966

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goedemoed Medium B

Aliwal North

539

732

 

Bethulie

Bethulie

51

46

 

Edenburg

Edenburg

72

49

 

Fauresmith

Fauresmith

57

53

 

Zastron

Zastron

64

54

 

Groenpunt Maximum

Vereeniging

1418

1916

 

Groenpunt Medium

Vereeniging

734

690

 

Groenpunt Youth

Vereeniging

281

263

 

Frankfort

Frankfort

165

109

 

Heilbron

Heilbron

58

93

 

Parys

Parys

84

109

 

Sasolburg

Sasolburg

349

438

 

Vereeniging

Vereeniging

699

835

 

Grootvlei Medium A

Bloemfontein

890

1532

 

Grootvlei Medium B

Bloemfontein

244

289

 

Brandfort

Brandfort

141

140

 

Boshof

Boshof

60

45

 

Ladybrand

Ladybrand

47

47

 

Wepener

Wepener

147

82

 

Winburg

Winburg

148

154

 

Mangaung

Bloemfontein

2928

2928

 

Bizza Makhate Medium A

Kroonstad

1447

1133

 

Bizza Makhate Medium B

Kroonstad

528

793

 

Bizza Makhate Medium C

Kroonstad

216

208

 

Bizza Makhate Medium D

Kroonstad

67

34

 

Bethlehem

Bethlehem

180

280

 

Ficksburg

Ficksburg

87

76

 

Harrismith

Harrismith

267

392

 

Hennenman

Hennenman

210

590

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hoopstad

Hoopstad

92

54

 

Lindley

Lindley

78

56

 

Odendaalsrus

Odendaalsrus

453

731

 

Senekal

Senekal

128

109

 

Venterburg

Venterburg

254

200

 

Virginia

Virginia

415

590

  

Northern Cape

Colesberg

Colesberg

186

224

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

De Aar Male

De Aar

264

343

 

De Aar Female

De Aar

33

29

 

Hopetown

Hopetown

51

61

 

Richmond

Richmond

61

61

 

Victoria West

Victoria West

92

123

 

Kimberley

Kimberley

801

918

 

Tswelopele

Kimberley

3021

2548

 

Barkley West

Barkley West

61

51

 

Douglas

Douglas

297

312

 

Upington Males

Upington

725

867

 

Upington Females

Upington

73

42

 

Kuruman

Kuruman

316

308

 

Springbok

Springbok

150

123

  

Gauteng

Baviaanspoort Maximum

Pretoria

349

560

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baviaanspoort Medium

Pretoria

759

1161

 

Emthonjeni

Pretoria

640

331

 

Boksburg Medium A

Boksburg

2000

2508

 

Boksburg Juveniles

Boksburg

274

350

 

Heidelberg Male

Heidelberg

553

837

 

Johannesburg Medium A

Johannesburg

2630

4230

 

Johannesburg Medium B

Johannesburg

1300

2293

 

Johannesburg Medium C

Johannesburg

329

508

 

Johannesburg Female

Johannesburg

605

1007

 

Krugersdorp

Krugersdorp

1645

2765

 

Leeuwkop Maximum

Johannesburg

785

1197

 

Leeuwkop Medium A

Johannesburg

1057

1048

 

Leeuwkop Medium B

Johannesburg

706

847

 

Leeuwkop Medium C

Johannesburg

719

1137

 

Modderbee

Benoni

2492

4421

 

Devon

Devon

679

517

 

Nigel

Nigel

333

436

 

Kgoši Mampuru II Local

Pretoria

2171

2385

 

Kgoši Mampuru II Central

Pretoria

1563

2513

 

Kgoši Mampuru II Female

Pretoria

166

284

 

 

 

 

Odi

Mabopane

891

1443

 

Atteridgeville

Pretoria

609

1162

 

Zonderwater Medium A

Cullinan

872

1402

 

Zonderwater Medium B

Cullinan

773

1080

  

KwaZulu/Natal

Durban Medium A

Durban

2501

2754

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Durban Medium B

Durban

1975

3408

 

Durban Medium C

Durban

689

999

 

Durban Female

Durban

251

354

 

Durban Youth

Durban

629

527

 

Umzinto

Umzinto

477

720

 

Ingwavuma

Ingwavuma

109

83

 

Stanger

Stanger

133

142

 

Empangeni

Empangeni

307

377

 

Mtunzini

Mtunzini

161

159

 

Eshowe

Eshowe

642

761

 

Maphumulo

Maphumulo

77

79

 

Qalakabusha

Empangeni

1392

2217

 

Glencoe

Glencoe

666

416

 

Dundee

Dundee

113

135

 

Pomeroy

Pomeroy

88

78

 

Ladysmith

Ladysmith

344

504

 

Bergville

Bergville

29

41

 

Greytown

Greytown

105

72

 

Kranskop

Kranskop

113

92

 

Ebongweni

Kokstad

1440

1035

 

Port Shepstone

Port Shepstone

150

288

 

Kokstad Medium

Kokstad

340

541

 

Matatiele

Matatiele

83

100

 

Umzimkulu

Umzimkulu

66

0

 

Nongoma

Nongoma

54

70

 

Ncome Medium A

Vryheid

487

825

 

Ncome Medium B

Vryheid

753

1196

 

Melmoth

Melmoth

46

56

 

Vryheid

Vryheid

273

339

 

Nkandla

Nkandla

36

44

 

Pietermaritzburg Medium A

Pietermaritzburg

2499

3379

 

Pietermaritzburg Medium B

Pietermaritzburg

356

517

 

Sevontein

Pietermaritzburg

831

1428

 

New Hanover

New Hanover

231

321

 

Ixopo

Ixopo

165

258

 

Waterval Medium A

Utrecht

603

1010

 

Waterval Medium B

Utrecht

613

1059

 

Utrecht

Utrecht

38

46

 

 

Newcastle

Newcastle

283

333

 

Ekuseni

Newcastle

600

463

 

Eastern Cape

Fort Beaufort

Fort Beaufort

168

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grahamstown

Grahamstown

309

654

 

King William's Town

King William's Town

536

608

 

Middledrift

Middledrift

646

1194

 

Stutterheim

Stutterheim

50

74

 

East London Medium A

East London

836

1525

 

East London Medium B

East London

543

857

 

East London Medium C

East London

273

300

 

Mdantsane

Fort Jackson

582

1556

 

Graaff-Reinet

Graaff-Reinet

63

137

 

Jansenville

Jansenville

31

35

 

Kirkwood

Kirkwood

787

1175

 

Somerset-East

Somerset-East

167

217

 

Bizana

Bizana

47

95

 

Elliotdale

Elliotdale

49

16

 

Flagstaff

Flagstaff

37

117

 

Lusikisiki

Lusikisiki

109

295

 

Mount Ayliff

Mount Ayliff

85

0

 

Mount Fletcher

Mount Fletcher

86

224

 

Mount Frere

Mount Frere

32

94

 

Mqanduli

Mqanduli

107

131

 

Nqgeleni

Nqgeleni

108

172

 

Tabankulu

Tabankulu

64

156

 

Mthatha Remand

Mthatha

634

809

 

Mthatha Medium

Mthatha

720

1481

 

Barkly-East

Barkly-East

67

115

 

Burgersdorp

Burgersdorp

149

303

 

Butterworth

Butterworth

266

209

 

Cofimvaba

Cofimvaba

101

69

 

Cradock

Cradock

253

453

 

Dordrecht

Dordrecht

92

112

 

Engcobo

Engcobo

99

123

 

Idutywa

Idutywa

62

163

 

Lady Frere

Lady Frere

46

95

 

Middelburg

Middelburg

317

413

 

Nqamakwe

Nqamakwe

39

0

 

Queenstown

Queenstown

125

243

 

Sada

Whittlesea

261

446

 

Sterkspruit

Sterkspruit

62

74

 

Willowvale

Willowvale

52

83

 

St Albans Maximum

Port Elizabeth

1468

1715

 

 

 

 

St Albans Medium A

Port Elizabeth

706

1387

 

St Albans Medium B

Port Elizabeth

929

1790

 

Patensie

Patensie

353

490

 

Port Elizabeth

Port Elizabeth

625

534

 

Western Cape

Allandale

Paarl

336

824

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawequa

Wellington

208

218

 

Obiqua

Tulbagh

234

424

 

Staart van Paardeberg

Paarl

261

355

 

Brandvlei Medium C

Worcester

693

537

 

Brandvlei Youth

Worcester

346

411

 

Brandvlei Maximum

Worcester

960

696

 

Drakenstein Medium A

Paarl

556

778

 

Drakenstein Medium B

Paarl

474

623

 

Drakenstein Maximum

Paarl

386

562

 

Stellenbosch

Stellenbosch

71

81

 

Beaufort-West

Beaufort-West

76

176

 

George

George

563

1019

 

Knysna

Knysna

179

378

 

Ladismith

Ladismith

54

103

 

Mosselbaai

Mosselbaai

346

508

 

Oudtshoorn Medium A

Oudtshoorn

300

625

 

Oudtshoorn Medium B

Oudtshoorn

78

105

 

Prince Albert

Prince Albert

52

82

 

Uniondale

Uniondale

52

100

 

Goodwood

Goodwood

2115

3043

 

Buffeljagsrivier

Swellendam

245

415

 

Caledon Remand

Caledon

215

277

 

Helderstroom Medium A

Caledon

755

1178

 

Helderstroom Maximum

Caledon

589

853

 

Malmesbury Medium A

Malmesbury

1392

1569

 

Malmesbury RDF

Malmesbury

178

354

 

Riebeek-West

Riebeek-West

205

198

 

Pollsmoor Remand

Cape Town

1786

2519

 

Pollsmoor Medium A

Cape Town

1111

2111

 

Pollsmoor Medium B

Cape Town

437

1653

 

Pollsmoor Medium C

Cape Town

577

690

 

Pollsmoor Females

Cape Town

485

787

 

Calvinia

Calvinia

41

63

 

Vanrhynsdorp

Vanrhynsdorp

492

469

 

Vanrhynsdorp Females

Vanrhynsdorp

32

22

 

Voorberg Medium A

Porterville

534

518

 

Voorberg Medium B

Porterville

1560

1887

 

Dwarsrivier

Wolseley

232

364

 

 

 

 

Robertson

Robertson

234

364

 

Warmbokkeveld

Ceres

520

503

 

Worcester Males

Worcester

573

932

 

Worcester Females

Worcester

142

251

07 September 2018 - NW1112

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) number of consulting firms or companies are currently contracted by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her and (b)(i) is the name of each consultant, (ii) are the relevant details of the service provided in each case and (iii) is the (aa) start date, (bb) time period, (cc) monetary value in Rands of each contract and (dd) name and position of each individual who signed off on each contract?”

Reply:

The details of consulting firms or companies that are currently contracted by the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD), and its entities (the Small Enterprise Development Agency [SEDA] and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency [SEFA]) are attached as Annexure A.

07 September 2018 - NW2447

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

The Economic Development Department, ITAC, Competition Commission and Competition Tribunal do not have land investments.

Attached as Annexure ‘A’ is information on land owned by the IDC. The properties are part of the IDC’s overall portfolio.

-END-

07 September 2018 - NW2337

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package?

Reply:

(i) Department of Tourism

1. (a) Number of labour disputes: None

(b) Cause of each dispute: N/A

(c) Nature of each dispute: N/A

(d) (i) Date dispute was reported: N/A

(ii) Date each dispute was resolved: N/A

2. (a) (i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department the past 5 years:

3 employees.

(ii) For what reason was each employee dismissed: 2 for Abscondment and 1 for theft.

(b) (i) What number of the specified employees were paid severance packages: 1 employee

(ii) What was the monetary value of each severance package? R138 648.23

(ii) SA Tourism

1. (a) Number of labour disputes: None

(b) Cause of each dispute: Not applicable

(c) Nature of each dispute: Not applicable

(d). (i) Date dispute was reported: Not applicable

(ii) Date each dispute was resolved : Not applicable

2. (a) (i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department the past 5 years?

Three (3) employees were dismissed in the past five years

(ii)For what reason was each employee dismissed?

  • Two (2) employees did not follow procedures, unauthorised removal of company assets, dishonesty, Bringing the entity’s name in disrepute
  • One (1) Poor performance

(b)(i) What number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and

None were paid severance packages

(ii)What was the monetary value of each severance package?

Not applicable

 

07 September 2018 - NW2430

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

The National Department of Public Works is the custodian of all immovable assets that vest in National Government and as such is responsible for all facility life cycle management functions. The Memorandum of Agreement was signed in 2015 by Minister of Public Works to transfer the facility life cycle management functions on Defence Endowment Property. (specifically immovable assets). The process is underway to be concluded in the Medium Term. Therefore there is no company invested on any land allocated to the DoD by NDPW.

07 September 2018 - NW2473

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(a) What is the value of each loan offered by the Industrial Development Corporation, (b) on what date was the loan paid out, (c) to whom it was it paid out and (d) what is the value of the amount still owed on the loan?

Reply:

The IDC provides information on business partners that it funds, on the IDC website.

Details regarding investment date, value and shareholder details of IDC clients may be accessed at:

https://www.idc.co.za/images/DISCLOSURE_OF_IDC_FUNDED_BUSINESS_PARTNERS_FROM_1_APRIL_2017_-_31_MARCH_2018.pdf

I also refer the Honourable Member to the reply to Parliamentary Question 1575, of 18 May 2018.

 

-END-

05 September 2018 - NW2202

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has launched any form of inquiry into allegations that secret state spy funds had been used to splash out R10 million on a luxury mansion that could become the new home of the Minister of State Security after she allegedly rejected the house provided by the Department of Public Works; if not, why not; if so, what was the outcome thereof?

Reply:

The President received a full briefing from the Minister of State Security on the matter. Having regard to the details of the briefing and related matters, the President is of the view that there are no grounds to establish a commission of inquiry into the matter.

The Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence, a committee of Parliament, will also receive a briefing on the matter by the Minister as part of its oversight and accountability function.

05 September 2018 - NW2307

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

(1)With reference to the reply of the Minister of Finance to question 45 on 25 June 2018 and the statement issued by the Government Communications and Information System on 14 November 2017, (a)(i) when and (ii) for what reason was the Presidential Fiscal Committee established, (b) how many times has the committee met, (c) on what date did each meeting take place, (d) what is the name of each (i) committee member and (ii) official present at each specified committee meeting and (e) what was the purpose of each specified committee meeting; (2) whether the committee has been disbanded; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2484E

Reply:

  1. The Presidential Fiscal Committee (PFC) was established on 11 October 2017, following the decision of the Extended Cabinet meeting of 28 September 2017, as follows:
  • President of the Republic of South Africa as Chairperson
  • Deputy President
  • Minister of Finance
  • Minister in The Presidency: Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Minister of Science and Technology
  • Minister of Economic Development
  • Minister of Energy
  • Deputy Minister of Finance
  • Director-General in The Presidency and Secretary of the Cabinet
  • Director-General: National Treasury

The position of Chairperson was later delegated by the President to the Minister of Finance.

As detailed in the Government statement of 14 November 2017 that the Honourable Member has referred to, the Committee was mandated to work with the National Treasury and other stakeholders to find creative ways of meeting the country’s fiscal targets and resolving competing priorities. In particular, the PFC was tasked with considering the proposals prepared by the National Treasury to bring the public finances back onto a sustainable path. The Committee was further mandated to make recommendations and to provide advice on spending priorities which may be considered.

The secretariat of the PFC sits with the National Treasury and therefore all secretariat-related questions should be re-directed to the PFC secretariat.

(2) While the Committee has not formally been disbanded, it has not met since 21 November 2017.

05 September 2018 - NW2596

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to him and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

(1)

(a)

(i)

Deputy Directors-General

(ii)

Chief Directors

(b)

Male

Female

(b)

Male

Female

(aa)
Acting

1

1

(aa)
Acting

2

1

Total

2

Total

3

(bb)
Permanent

7

7

(bb)
Permanent

22

31

Total

14

Total

53

Response from the Entities

Entity

2(a)(i)

2(a)(ii)

2(b)

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

The CIPC has one (1) Commissioner

The CIPC does not have a board, therefore it does not have directors

Nil

Companies Tribunal (CT)

The entity does not have a Board but there is the Chairperson who is part time

As from 01 August 2018, the CFO is appointed as Acting COO, the position that has been renamed from Full Time Tribunal member to Chief Operating Officer. The COO post is advertised

One (1) woman

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

The ECIC has one (1) Chief Executive

The ECIC has nine (9) directors

Three (3) women

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

The NCC has one (1) Commissioner

The NCC has one (1) Deputy Commissioner however it does not have a board, therefore it does not have directors

One (1) woman

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

The NCT has one (1) Executive Chairperson

The NCT has five (5) EXCO members

One (1) woman

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

The NCR has one (1) Chief Executive

The NCR has one (1) Deputy Chief Executive however it does not have a board, therefore it does not have directors

One (1) woman

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The NEF has one (1) Chief Executive

The NEF has seven (7) directors

Five (5) women

National Gambling Board (NGB)

The NGB has one (1) Administrator

The NLC does not have a board, therefore it does not have directors

One (1) woman

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

The NLC has one (1) Commissioner

The NLC does not have a board, therefore it does not have directors

One (1) woman

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

The NMISA has one (1) Chief Executive

The NMISA has seven (7) directors

Three (3) women

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

The NRCS has one (1) Chief Executive

One (1) Executive Manager and fifty two (52) Senior Managers

Eighteen (18) women

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

The SABS has one (1) Chief Executive

The SABS has six (6) directors

Three (3) women

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

The SANAS has one (1) Chief Executive

The SANAS has nine (9) directors

Three (3) women

“Except as explicitly stated herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided  is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

05 September 2018 - NW1483

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the President, Mr C M Ramaphosa, to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on 22 February 2018 to implement lifestyle audits, (a) she, (b) senior management service members in her department and/or (c) any of the heads of entities reporting to her have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years; if not, have any plans been put in place to perform such audits; if so, in each case, what are the details of the (i) date of the lifestyle audit, (ii) name of the person undergoing the audit, (iii) name of the auditing firm conducting the audit and (iv) outcome of the audit; (2) whether she will furnish Mr M P Rabotapi with copies of the lifestyle audit reports?”

Reply:

Neither the (a) the Minister of Small Business Development, (b) the senior Management service members nor the (c) heads of entities have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years. However, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) adheres to the system of financial disclosures as prescribed by the Public Service Regulations of 2016 which enables employees to disclose financial interests. This includes disclosure of shareholding, directorships and partnership, equities, income generating assets, sponsorships; remunerative work outside and employees’ formal employment; gifts and hospitality. This is a yearly exercise and the DSBD, like all Departments, are expected to comply with the regulation.

Financial disclosures by senior management service (SMS) are verified by the Public Service Commission (PSC) and by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA). Any findings of possible conflict of interest are identified in this process and communicated with the relevant Executive Authority. Furthermore, the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) has access to financial disclosures of employees by virtue of Section (15) of Public Audit, 2004 [Act No. 25 of 2004]. The AGSA is therefore empowered to conduct an audit on the lifestyle of any public service employees to verify the financial position of such persons and establish conflict of interest.

Although the announcement by the President is acknowledged on the need to conduct lifestyle audits, the Minister of Public Service and Administration (MPSA), Minister Ayanda Dlodlo in her Budget Speech on 16 May 2018, indicated that “In responding to the call by the President, we are developing a framework, which will inform how we institute or conduct lifestyle audits on all Public Service employees. This is in addition to existing measures, which prohibit employees from conducting business with organs of state”. The Small Business Development (SBD) Portfolio that is the DSBD together with its entities; the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) will comply to the DPSA Framework for conducting lifestyle audits when adopted. This Framework will then be embedded in policies of the SBD Portfolio for guidance to ensure compliance.

(2) No. There are no report of such audits, since lifestyle audits, in the strict sense of the terms, have yet to be conducted by the Department in the event of a formalised Framework from the DPSA.

05 September 2018 - NW2242

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Mr D J Stubbe (DA) to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) When was a contract first entered into for the lease of the building that is currently being used as the Rietvale Satellite Police Station in the Northern Cape, (b) at the time of first entering into the lease, (i) to whom did the building belong and (ii) with whom was the lease entered into, (c) what were the original terms of the lease and ( d) what are the costs of the rental agreement; (2) whether, since entering into the lease, the ownership of the building has changed hands; if so, (a) who is the new owner of the building, (b) with whom is the lease agreement currently signed and (c) on what date does the current lease agreement end?

Reply:

(1 )(b)(i) The building belonged to Mrs DJE Pretorius.

(1 )(b)(ii) The lease contract was between Mrs DJE Pretorius, as the lessor and the National Department of Public Works (NDPW), as the lessee.

(1 )(c) The responsibilities of the lessor are as follows:

~ Assessment rates and fixed municipal levies, including all related increases.

~ Any related insurance of the premises and increases, thereof.

~ Normal maintenance and repairs (including painting) of both the interior and exterior of the premises, including the exterior of the premises of the high-rise building.

Attached please find here: Replay continue

:

05 September 2018 - NW2345

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What number of international trips has he undertaken since taking office and (b) who has accompanied him on each trip that is not a member of the Government?

Reply:

a) Twenty two (22) international visits have been undertaken.

(b) The Presidency delegation lists that provide names of people that accompanied the President on each trip do not have anyone who is not a member of government. However the Department of Trade and Industry does put together a list of business people that accompany the government delegation on some international visits. These business delegations are coordinated by the dti.

05 September 2018 - NW2246

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1768 on 8 June 2018, the figures in Table 1 include the total number of decisions taken by Refugee Status Determination Officers (RSDOs) and referred to the Standing Committee for Refugee Affairs (SCRA), or simply those decisions finalised by the SCRA; (2) what number of (a) decisions were taken by RSDOs in each calendar year since 1 January 2008 and (b) the specified decisions were (i) referred to and (ii) decided by the (aa) SCRA and (bb) Refugee Appeals Board (RAB) in each case; (3) what number of the specified decisions referred to the SCRA and RAB were (a) taken on review and (b) set aside following the judicial reviews in each case in each calendar year; (4) whether the (a) RSDOs, (b) SCRA and/or (c) RAB are experiencing any backlogs with the processing of decisions and appeals; if so, what are the full details of the backlogs in each case?

Reply:

(1) Those are decisions finalised by SCRA.

(2)(a)&(b) The information is tabulated in the tables hereunder:

(aa) FOR SCRA

Year

Decisions taken by RSDO (a)

Unfounded (In cases of appeal referred to RAB) (i)

Manifestly Unfounded automatic refer to SCRA (ii)

2008

69114

Not Available

2009

50622

18856

27199

     

Upheld
18239

Set Aside
472

2010

77071

24827

42161

     

Upheld
30995

Set Aside
196

2011

43953

16875

20275

     

Upheld
6680

Set Aside
13

2012

63228

25037

31965

     

Upheld
38628

Set Aside
263

2013

68241

35402

25553

     

Upheld
9404

Set Aside
94

2014

75733

29545

36958

     

Upheld
22972

Set Aside
247

2015

60640

14093

44048

     

Upheld
16884

Set Aside

1777

2016

41241

21693

16391

     

Upheld
24516

Set Aside
1894

2017

27980

6819

18894

     

Upheld
15534

Set Aside
1843

Please note: In 2008 the statistics for rejections were not divided into unfounded and manifestly unfounded.

(bb) FOR RAB:

CASES RECEIVED BY RAB AS UNFOUNDED AND FINALISED

YEAR

UNFOUNDED REFERRED TO RAB (i)

RECEIVED

FINALISED (ii)

2008

Not Available

3877

1550

2009

18856

4601

4139

2010

24827

4879

3420

2011

16875

4362

5434

2012

25037

4958

4886

2013

35402

9413

2743

2014

29545

15452

4466

2015

14093

14475

4993

2016

21693

4455

2670

2017

6819

10117

5261

3(a) The information is as follows:

Year

(aa) Asylum Seeker

(bb) Refugee Status

2013

630

712

2014

399

523

2015

1089

1021

2016

435

792

2017

238

1115

2018

14

758

Total

2805

4921

Grand total of litigation instituted by asylum seekers and refugees to date is 7,726 (2805 + 4921)

3(b) Litigation brought against the Department by asylum seekers is essentially contextualised as follows:-

New Asylum Seekers: These are illegal foreigners detained at Lindela Repatriation Centre (“Lindela”) or Police Stations, seeking urgent court orders to be released from detention on the basis that they are new asylum seekers who want to be afforded opportunity to apply for asylum. In most such cases, courts do not award costs to the applicants and simply order their release, so as to allow them to apply for asylum. This is in line with the Supreme Court of Appeal judgment of BULA and Others / Minister of Home Affairs and Others in which the court held that once intention to apply for asylum is indicated, asylum seeker is entitled to protective provision by the Republic under International Law. These court applications are mostly not settled in both parties favour in that asylum seekers (applicants) are released from detention and afforded the opportunity to apply for asylum and no costs order is made against the Department.

Asylum Seekers Appeals to the Refugee Appeal Board (“RAB”): These are asylum seekers whose applications have been rejected by the Refugee Status Determination Officer (“RSDO) on the grounds that their applications are unfounded. Such asylum seekers may appeal the RSDO’s decision to the RAB. During the period 2013 – 2016, the RAB experienced capacity challenges which led to a huge backlog in finalising the appeals. This resulted in litigation in which asylum seekers whose applications are pending before the RAB would launch court applications compelling the RAB to either furnish them with interview dates and/or finalise decisions. Because of the nature of this litigation, the Department and/or RAB had no legal grounds to oppose them and as a consequence, there were costs orders occasioned by these applications. However, since the capacity constraints have been addressed at the RAB, this nature of litigation has ceased.

Failed Asylum Seekers: These are those asylum seekers/applicants whose applications have either been rejected by the Standing Committee on Refugee Affairs (“SCRA”) or RAB. The rejection by SCRA or RAB renders such asylum seekers illegal foreigners in the Republic and therefore liable for arrest and detention for the purposes of deportation. Upon arrest, failed asylum seekers approach the courts to seek orders to review and set aside the rejections. Such applications are normally brought in two parts, namely, Part A and Part B. In Part A, the applicants seek orders to be released from detention pending finalisation of Part B. In Part B, they seek orders to review and set aside the decision of the RAB or SCRA. Ordinarily, in Part A of the application, there are no orders as to costs. However, in Part B, parties incur costs. Part B is seldom set down for hearing as the intention of the failed asylum seekers is never to prosecute the review, but rather to secure the indefinite stay in the Republic. Costs in these review applications are also reserved pending the finalisation of these review applications.

The nature of litigation instituted by refugees against the Department is mainly two-fold:

(i) Certification in terms of Section 27(c) of the Refugees Act

These applications are meant to compel SCRA to recognise the applicants as indefinite refugees.

(ii) Refugees Identity and Travel Documents

These applications are meant to compel the Department to issue refugees with South African Refugee Identity Documents (“refugee IDs”) and/or Travel Documents.

Ordinarily, the Department does not oppose these applications as there are no legal grounds to oppose them. The applicants merely seek orders to compel the Department to finalise their applications for refugee IDs and/or Travel Documents. In such matters, costs are confined to the issuing of high court applications only.

4(a-c) The information is as follows:

Area of responsibility

2017

Legacy

Total

RSDO

623

997

1620

SCRA

9836

30490

40326

RAB

5246

142548

147794

05 September 2018 - NW2309

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Police

Whether any persons were (a) arrested and/or (b) charged in the City of Cape Town Ward 67 in the period 1 May 2018 and 30 June 2018; if not, in each specified case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:


(a) and (b)

The South African Police Service (SAPS) does not record statistics, based on Wards. The SAPS statistics are registered according to station precincts or geographical blocks.

Reply to question 2309 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER; SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2018-08-23

Reply to question 2309 approved/not approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date: 2018-08/31

Attached please find here: Date of publication internal question paper

05 September 2018 - NW2196

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, Act 12 of 2004, he and the Government have taken any action regarding the utterances of the former President, Mr J G Zuma, on numerous occasions while he was still President, including a gathering of the Congress of South African Students over free tertiary education held at Ethekwini City Hall in Durban, that he was aware of corrupt activities that were committed but he kept quiet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the action taken?

Reply:

Section 34 of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act (Act 12 of 2004) requires that “any person who holds a position of authority” and who knows or ought reasonably to have known or suspected that any other person has committed certain listed offences must report such knowledge or suspicion or cause such knowledge or suspicion to be reported to a Police Official in the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation at the South African Police Service (SAPS).

The Act further defines “any person who holds a position of authority” as:

  1. the Director-General or head, or equivalent officer, of a national or provincial department;
  2. in the case of a municipality, the municipal manager appointed in terms of section 82 of the Local government: Municipal Structures Act, 1998 (Act 117 of 1998);
  3. any public officer in the Senior Management Service of a public body;
  4. any head, rector or principal of a tertiary institution;
  5. the manager, secretary or a director of a company as defined in the Companies Act, 1973 (Act 61 of 1973), and includes a member of a close corporation as defined in the Close Corporations Act, 1984 (Act 69 of 1984);
  6. the executive manager of any bank or other financial institution;
  7. any partner in a partnership;
  8. any person who has been appointed as chief executive officer or an equivalent officer of any agency, authority, board, commission, committee, corporation, council, department, entity, financial institution, foundation, fund, institute, service, or any other institution or organisation, whether established by legislation, contract or any other legal means;
  9. any other person who is responsible for the overall management and control of the business of an employer; or
  10. any person contemplated in paragraphs (a) to (i), who has been appointed in an acting or temporary capacity.

The Act does not place any statutory obligation on the President or Members of the Executive, Members of Legislatures or the Judiciary,

It is important, however, to emphasise that the fight against corruption is a continuous process, which requires the involvement of all citizens and that provided with evidence, the relevant law enforcement agencies would not hesitate to take the necessary actions.

We would therefore encourage all South Africans, regardless of the position they occupy, to provide any evidence of alleged corrupt activities to the SAPS.

 

05 September 2018 - NW2308

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Police

Whether any persons were (a) arrested and/or (b) charged in the City of Cape Town Ward 66 in the period 1 May 2018 and 30 June 2018; if not, in each specified case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

The South African Police Service (SAPS) does not record statistics, based on Wards.
The SAPS statistics are registered according to station precincts or geographical blocks.

Reply to question 2308 recommended


GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date
; 2018-08-23

Reply to question 2308 approved


MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date
: 2018-08-31

Attached please find here: Question 2018

 

04 September 2018 - NW2476

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Mr M M Dlamini (EEF) to ask the Minister of Energy

(a) On what date will the new Integrated Resource Plan be released and (b} where will it be available for public access? NW2733E

Reply:

Cabinet approved the Draft IRP Update for public consultation on 22 August 2018. The gazetted plan was available on 27 August 2018, for written comments to be submitted within 60 days of publication.

04 September 2018 - NW2531

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to the ongoing debate on the expropriation of land without compensation and the nationalisation of the SA Reserve Bank (SARB), (a) on what number of occasions have representatives from his department met with their American counterparts to unpack the unfolding debate on both matters, (b) what has the feedback been from each meeting and (c) what effect has he found that the expropriation of land without compensation and the nationalisation of the SARB had with respect to South Africa’s continued participation in the African Growth and Opportunity Act, 2000?

Reply:

a) The dti officials have met with the US Embassy no less than three times between June and August 2018. All these discussions were aimed at exchanging views and sharing information on bilateral trade and investment issues between South Africa and the US. Discussion on the ongoing debate on land expropriation arose in this context, and was not more prominent than other issues under discussion. The nationalisation of the SA Reserve Bank (SARB) was never raised in the discussions between the dti and the US Embassy.

b) The discussions have been mostly to discuss recent developments such as the US Section 232 tariffs on steel and aluminium imports into the US and their impact on South Africa’s AGOA benefits. In the few instances where the US raised the land issue, the dti provided an update and explained the transparent and responsible approach that will be followed in decision making. The Embassy emphasised that the US government would not be taking sides but had an interest in seeing a legal and constitutional resolution of the issue.

c) In all the meetings with US Embassy, no links were made on land expropriation without compensation and AGOA. The US State Department, as indicated in its statement, recognises the complexities of the land reform programme and its intention to ensure equitable distribution of land in South Africa. There is also recognition that South Africa’s land reform programme will be undertaken through a Constitutional process that is inclusive and transparent and will be carried out in accordance with the laws of the country. The World Bank has also published a study on “Overcoming the legacy of exclusion in South Africa” which states that a well- managed system of land distribution is essential to redressing the country’s economic inequality. The President’s statements on this issue have also assisted to communicate a clear message to all trade partners on the approach to land reform which aims to ensure that the land reform aims to boost the productive use of land to promote sustainable development. Furthermore, land reform will be undertaken taking due consideration of the need to promote food security and the implications for other sectors of the economy. There is also recognition of the ability of South Africa to handle complicated issues of national interest having managed to find a peaceful solution in resolving apartheid and in moving towards a democratic dispensation.