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25 November 2021 - NW2287

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, given that her department leases a property from the City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality which houses the Brackendowns Police Station, and given that in 2019 a bus terminus on the specified property burnt down and has not been repaired and, seeing that this structure housed the police reservists that are linked to the Brackendowns Police Station, the cause of the fire at the bus terminus in May 2019 has been established; if not, why not; if so, on what date will the structure be refurbished to allow the police reservists to once again utilise the property;

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. I have been informed by the Department that the structure that burnt down was not part of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) leased properties. SAPS had made its own arrangements to occupy and utilize the space. The DPWI did not investigate the cause of the fire because it is not leasing nor does it own the structure that burnt down. As this property is not part of the DPWI portfolio, the DPWI will not be refurbishing the property.
  1. There is an extension of lease in place.
  1. Payments for the lease are up to date.

(4) DPWI has not received an instruction to purchase the property from SAPS. The decision to purchase the property should originate from SAPS. The current lease is extended to 31 March 2028.

25 November 2021 - NW2408

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)What is the total number of member organisations that are currently affiliated with the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA); (2) whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a database of the organisations affiliated to CCIFSA; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) whether CCIFSA has a membership form that a member organisation is required to sign; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

This question was forwarded to CCIFSA to answer and we are still waiting for their response. As soon as CCIFSA provide me with the information, I will furnish the Hon. Member.

25 November 2021 - NW2433

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1(a). On what date did his department start funding the Liliesleaf Farm Museum in Rivonia, Johannesburg, (b) how was the funding given to the museum by his Department from 2017 to 2021 and (c) what was the funding for; 2 Whether the Liliesleaf Farm Museum accounted for the money it was given by his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, 3. Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with an audited financial statement for the (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21 financial years; if not, why not; if so; what are the further relevant details, 4. Whether he and/or his department will save Liliesleaf farm from closing down; if not, why not; if so, how?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department started funding the Liliesleaf Farm Museum in Rivonia, Johannesburg from the 2002/2003 financial year. (b) No funding was provided for the Liliesleaf Farm Museum during the 2017 to 2021 period. (c) No funding was provided by the Department during the above-mentioned period.

2.The Liliesleaf Farm Museum has accounted for the previous funding received from the Department in the years. It was only in 2015 after receiving funding for exhibition infrastructure development that the Museum failed to account to the Department as per the agreement signed which stated that the funds were for exhibition infrastructure development and not for the Museum’s operations. The Department communicated to the Board of Trustees of the Lilies Leaf Trust of the Museum management’s inability to account for the money received from the Department. The Board of Trustees informed the Department that an investigation will be instituted and the Department will be updated of the outcome of the investigation. A meeting was held with the Board where the Board informed the Department that it is handling the matter in accordance with the outcomes of the investigation.

(3) The Liliesleaf Farm Museum is not a Declared Cultural institution that is obliged to submit their annual financial statements to the Department.

(4) The Department Sport Arts and Culture (DSAC) has for the past years supported the Liliesleaf Trust on several projects ranging from capital funding to construct the facility, infrastructure refurbishments and exhibitions. DSAC is unable to provide annual operational funding to the Liliesleaf Trust as the museum has not been declared by the Minister in terms of the Cultural Institutions Act, No 119 of 1998 as a Declared Cultural Institution and a Schedule 3 A Public Entity in terms of the PFMA.

Should the site be so declared, and depending on the availability of funds, I will in consultation with and with the assistance of the Minister of Finance set aside an annual subsidy that would be transferred to the institution for operational purposes. The Department has also not received a request for assistance from Liliesleaf for any of the Presidential COVID-19 relief funding opportunities the Department has made available for struggling institutions in the sector.

25 November 2021 - NW2279

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What interventions has she put in place to salvage the 10 bankrupt municipalities in the Eastern Cape, which are at the brink of collapsing and told the Auditor-General they cannot carry on and (b) who will be held liable for the collapse of the specified municipalities?

Reply:

a) The Auditor-General Report for 2019/20 identified the following ten (10) municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province as they indicated in their Annual Financial Statements that they are a going concern uncertainty, and their total current liabilities exceeded the total current assets.

Out of the ten (10) municipalities, the following six (6) municipalities (Makana, Amahlathi, Raymond Mhlaba, Amathole, Enoch Mgijima and Walter Sisulu) were included by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA) in the list of dysfunctional municipalities in the Eastern Cape and draft Municipal Support and Interventions Plans have been developed for these municipalities taking into consideration an analysis conducted by National Treasury.

Three (3) out of the ten (10) the municipalities identified in the Auditor-General report have been placed under Section 139 intervention and they are Makana and Enoch Mgijima and have FRPs in place and they are jointly monitored on a monthly basis whilst the Amathole FRP has just been approved and will be implemented and monitored.

Dr Beyers Naudé, Koukamma and Inxuba Yethemba local municipalities, have been engaged by the province to participate in a financial management support programme in partnership with the National Business Initiative to address their financial challenges, part of the initiatives in the NBI include:

  • Group coaching of financial management personnel within municipalities.
  • Deployment of support staff from the pool of consultants from NBI
  • Training of municipal officials on financial reporting.

Dr Beyers Naudé, Koukamma and Inxuba Yethemba local municipalities also are set to benefit from the partnership with the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) and the projects include development of revenue enhancement strategies for municipalities and assisting them with the embedded energy generation to overcome the high cost of electricity.

King Sabata Dalindyebo, Walter Sisulu and Amahlathi have also been approved by DBSA for funding on embedded energy generation and for the development of revenue enhancement strategies.

b) Out of the ten (10) municipalities, the provincial department instituted investigations in line with Section 106 of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act in seven (7) of the municipalities (Makana, Amahlathi, Raymond Mhlaba, Amathole, King Sabata Dalindyebo, Emoch Mgijima and Inxuba Yethemba). Investigations are at various stages. Further, the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks) is conducting investigations in two (2) of the municipalities (King Sabata Dalindyebo and Makana).

25 November 2021 - NW2395

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the details of the measures that his department intends to put in place to review and resolve concerns that members of sports council are recycled, especially those who have been performing poorly in other sports councils as well as those who have been historically implicated in wrong doing where they served previously? 2. What a) consequence management is there from the side of his Department towards council members who are implicated in investigated reports and b) are there reasons the department allowed people to serve on other Boards when they leave while being implicated and or before the outcomes of the investigation in previous boards are concluded?

Reply:

1. The Sports Councils where they still exist are primarily at the Local Government Level. At the Provincial Level there are Provincial Sports Confederations. The Provincial Sports Confederations are members of the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC). SASCOC is a National Confederation recognized by the Minister in terms of Section 2(1) of the National Sport and Recreation Act. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Schedule 5, lists “Provincial Sport” as a Functional Area of Exclusive Provincial Legislative Competence. Therefore, the administrative and governance matters relating to the Sports Councils fall within the jurisdiction of the Local Government as well as Provincial Government.

2(a) and (b) Considering the response in (1) above should there be any matter, allegations or complaint against Sports Council Members such may only be referred to the Provincial Department concerned.

25 November 2021 - NW1201

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of (a) prison escape attempts that implicated prison staff has his department noted in the past two years and (b) arrests have been made in this regard?

Reply:

a) it should be noted that in 2019/20 a total o f28 attempted escapes were reported, whilst a total of 22 were reported om 2020/21. Based on investigations conducted no officials were implicated in these incidents.

b) No arrests were made as no staff was implicated in these attempted escapes.

END

25 November 2021 - NW2409

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)Whether board members of the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) get paid; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount do members of the Board of Directors receive as an allowance; (2) In view of the fact that, since 2019, the CCIFSA board has had a board, which has not been representing the South African creative industry, what are the reasons that CCIFSA has no diversity on its board of directors? (3) On what date will the next CCIFSA Annual General Meeting be held?

Reply:

1. This question was forwarded to CCIFSA to answer and we are still waiting for their response. As soon as CCIFSA provide me with the information, I will furnish the Hon. Member.

25 November 2021 - NW2375

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1.What number of artists have benefited from the presidential employment stimulus package; 2. Whether he will furnish Mr. B S Madlingozi with a list of all the names of the artists who benefitted; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)(a). National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) supported beneficiaries as follows;

Beneficiaries

Number

Stream 1: Production

133

Stream 2: Skills Development

43

Stream 3: Industry

26

Stream 4: Business Recovery

11

Total

213

(b). With regard to the National Arts Council, 1 309 projects (or lead beneficiaries) were supported. Within these 1 309 supported projects 20 221 Beneficiaries were verified by the end September and these numbers includes artists and other industry practitioners.

(c). The South African Cultural Observatory (SACO) supported 893 beneficiaries.

(d). Public Art programme supported 200 beneficiaries from Iziko Museum, National Museum and KZN Museum combined.

(e). Banking with the arts supported 151 beneficiaries through the Arts Bank and CCIFSA (Cultural and Creative Industry Federation of South Africa).

2. List with names of artists is attached as annexure A.

 

IZIKO MUSEUM


 

 

 

Ms

D

Danica

Barends

Mr

M

Malibongwe

Bonakele

Mr

L

Liso

Bonile

Ms

L

Lecardia

Eleni

Ms

T

Tamryn

Joseph

Mr

S

Sizwe

Kwezi

Ms

L

Lumka

Mangena

Mr

S

Siyabulela

Mana

Mr

C

Chadwyn

Matthews

Ms

N

Nonkuleleko

Mbili

Mr

T

Thobani

Mnconywa

Mr

S

Sandile

Mzimela

Ms

Z

Zintathu

Nogengela

Ms

L

Lusanda

Paul

Mr

A

Ayabulela

Stevens

Ms

N

Ncuthukazi

Tshotyana

Mr

Y

Yanga

Zaba

 

 

 

 

25 November 2021 - NW2314

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, with regard to the Kwa-Thema Police Station leased by her department from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, she has been informed that (a) in terms of the lease agreement the responsibility for the maintenance of the facility rests with her department, (b) the Department of Employment and Labour has closed off large sections of the station as they are deemed to be an unsafe working environment and (c) if the station closes, the Kwa-Thema community will not have a police station; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) what are the reasons that her department does not track the state of infrastructure for which it is responsible; (3) on what date will critical maintenance and repairs be undertaken and expedited so that her department is not the cause of the community losing access to police services?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1, 2 and 3

I’ve been informed by the Department that in terms of the lease agreement the Lessor is responsible for the repairs and maintenance. The Department of Labour and Employment has closed the detectives’ offices which has been substituted by park homes.

The Department approached the Municipality on the 09th of October 2018, requesting approval to place additional park homes as a temporary solution. This request of placing additional park homes has not yet approved by the Municipality. Furthermore, the Department approached the municipality on the 04th of December 2017 to consider disposing the building to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure so that full maintenance and upgrades can be performed by this Department.

The Department will send out a team of building inspectors on 24 November 2021 to do an assessment report, and will be guided by the report regarding the urgent maintenance requirements.

25 November 2021 - NW2240

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference her reply to question 1486 on 18 August 2020, what are the (a) names of the service provider(s) who were contracted to carry out the refurbishment of the 13 buildings handed over to the Department of Social Development for the purpose of being used as shelters in terms of the Victim Empowerment Programme, (b) full names of the owner(s) of the specified service provider(s) and (c) full names of the foreman on site during each specified refurbishment?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I have been informed by the Department that the question refers to 13 buildings, however the actual number of buildings refurbished is 12.

The table below indicates the 12 buildings handed over to the Department of Social Development for the purpose of being used as shelters in terms of the Victim Empowerment Programme. The table provides (a) names of the service provider(s) who were contracted to carry out the refurbishment, (b) full names of the owner(s) of the specified service provider(s), and (c) full names of the foreman on site during each specified refurbishment.

Region:

Building:

(a) Service provider(s):

(b) Full names of the owner(s):

(c) Full names of the foreman:

Cape Town

Heldelberg:92 Van Riebeek Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Albertina: 8 Aalwyn Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Laingsburg: 39 Voortrekker Road

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Aurora: 179 Main Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Aurora: 180 Main Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

331 Moorreesburg

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office

Johannesburg

Observatory: 37 Frederick Street

  • Unified Plumbing Services
  • Siyaphambili
  • Hassim Reyaaz Hajee
  • Mr S. Moodley
  • Gerald Percival Anthony Breda
  • Mrs S Balgobind
 

Cyridene: 48 Aida Street

  • Unified Plumbing Services
  • Siyaphambili
  • Hassim Reyaaz Hajee
  • Mr S. Moodley
  • Gerald Percival Anthony Breda
  • Mrs S Balgobind

Pretoria

Salvokop

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office
   
  • SEAMIED Electrical and Building Construction CC – For electric fence
  • Michael Machete
  • Michael Machete
   
  • Jorud Solutions - For Structural Palisade fencing installation and razor barbedwire
  • Mr Matole Malatjie
  • Mr Matole Malatjie
 

Kordaat Avenue, Pretoria

  • Babereki projects - Garden Services
  • Mr Vincent Mphahlele
  • Mr Walter Mkhabela
   
  • Provide the Best – Building Services
  • Marcie Mogale
  • Marcie Mogale
   
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office
 

103 Mountain View Road, Pretoria

  • Babereki projects - Garden Services
  • Mr Vincent Mphahlele
  • Mr Walter Mkhabela
   
  • RM 7 – Building Services
  • Mr Ramoboa
  • Mr Ramoboa
   
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office
 

5 Adina Street, Waterkloof

  • Babereki projects - Garden Services
  • Mr Vincent Mphahlele
  • Mr Walter Mkhabela
   
  • Clamsy Construction – Building Services
  • Jonas Manyemula
  • Jonas Manyemula
   
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office

25 November 2021 - NW2351

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture;

(1) What is the current status of Downtown Music Hub and (b) how successful is the specified project; (2) (a) what total amount has been spent by his department on maintaining the Downtown Music Hub project and (b) since what date has Downtown Music Hub been receiving financial support from his department annually; (3) whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the (a) financial reports and (b) business plan(s) upon which the project was funded; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The Downtown project is very important in the history of our music industry. It is the most sacred place where most of our well-known musicians and producers from across the racial divide busied themselves, creating top local and international hits. For many years, the studios remained a haven of these legendary musicians who also were instrumental in the progressive politics of this country, when they used their music to further the objectives for the emancipation of our people, thereby bringing the atrocities of apartheid to the eyes and ears of the world. It was for this reason that the Department saw it fit to preserve its legacy, when that opportunity was presented to us by Gallo Records when they took a decision to sell the asset.

The studios boast, inter alia, a collection of historical artifacts including gold and platinum discs covering what SA had produced over the past years, an accomplishment for which we should be immensely proud of. The Department aligns itself with the notion that, a generation which ignores its history has no past and no future.

Since it was purchased, the asset had been transformed from just being a mere studio into a Music Industry Hub for people to be empowered as we also ensure accessibility to recording opportunities. Certain parts of the building were renovated, and the recording facilities were also upgraded to be one of the best spacious control room and large versatile studio area, making it the flagship studio ideal for large ensembles and is now regarded as one of the best in the entire continent. A permanent exhibition has been set up on the first floor of the Hub titled A Glimpse of South African Music Industry.

The exhibition includes a presentation of old multi-media recordings, historical landmark recording equipment’s and information about many musicians who went through the Downtown Studios such as the late Mama Miriam Makeba and many others. The exhibition is accessible to many students, among others, who want to get further information about the development of the SA music sector. The Hub has also been used to provide educational information for many practitioners and has hosted workshops and master classes in areas such as sound engineering and general music business insight.

The studio section of the Hub has recorded over 1500 recordings per annum and such services are provided at a more affordable rate to benefit the historically disadvantaged, especially those with talent who cannot afford the exorbitant fees charged by some of the prime studios. This speaks to the access to quality recordings that the industry now has. Recent recordings from Downtown have won well known accolades such as the South African Music Award, and a Grammy.

Although not yet at the level that we have envisaged, the Downtown project plays a significant role in nurturing the development of all forms of South African music from traditional sounds such as Maskandi, Isicathamiya, choral and other genres. Therefore, investing in this project is one way of contributing to the upliftment of the lives of our people, in particular, assisting many local investors to move from the periphery economy into the more mainstream, while also preserving the history of our music industry.

2. The Department has either directly or indirectly through the National Arts Council (NAC) provided just over R60 million to support the Downtown project since its inception in 2008. The total amount includes funds allocated for the purchasing of the assets (both immovable and movable), refurbishment of some spaces in the building, installation of recording studio equipment’s and for the day-to-day operations and management.

Abiding by the parameters laid down in the Promotion of Access to Information Act, the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA) and other relevant legislation/s and all protocol observed, the Department would be in a position to furnish or provide access to honourable Mrs Van Dyk of the relevant information that is in its custody.

25 November 2021 - NW2365

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What interventions has she and/or her department made to stop the water cuts in the (i) Matjhabeng Local Municipality and (ii) Nala Local Municipality, following the millions of rands owed by both municipalities to Sedibeng Water and (b) which officials have been held to account by her department for non-payment of the specified services?

Reply:

a) A joint national and provincial intervention was undertaken by the Deputy Minister of CoGTA, the Minister and Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation and the MEC responsible for CoGTA in the Free State province which resulted in a series of engagements with the Sedibeng Water Board and its management team aimed at resolving the challenges impacting on water interruptions due to the debt owed by Nala and Matjhabeng Local Municipalities to Sedibeng Water Board. The national and provincial interventions undertaken resulted in payments made by both Nala and Matjhabeng local municipalities to the Sedibeng Water Board. Discussions are ongoing between Sedibeng Water and the Nala and Matjhabeng municipalities to finalise realistic and affordable payment plans to address the debt owed to Sedibeng Water.

b) The Municipal Managers are appointed by the Municipal Councils, and it is therefore the responsibility of the Mayor and municipal council to hold officials to account for any practices relating to maladministration or misconduct.

25 November 2021 - NW2374

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps has he taken to alleviate the plight of the creative sector, who have engaged with the offices of his department repeatedly, trying to meet with officials in order to resolve the longstanding challenges faced by this sector in the republic?

Reply:

The officials from the department are engaging the creatives through various meetings, with the latest having been held on the Monday 22nd November 2021.

25 November 2021 - NW2241

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference her reply to question 1486 on 18 August 2020, what is the (a) total cost to her department of the refurbishment of all 13 buildings, (b) the total amount paid to each service provider to date and (c) outstanding amount to each service provider?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I have been informed by the Department that the question refers to 13 buildings, however the actual number of buildings refurbished is 12.

The following 12 buildings renovations were completed. The table, below, indicates (a) total cost of the refurbishment of all 12 buildings, (b) the total amount paid to each service provider to date and (c) outstanding amount to each service provider.

The PQ refers to 13 buildings, however the actual number of buildings refurbished is 12.

Region:

Building:

(a) Total cost:

(b) Progress payment to date:

(c) Outstanding amount to date :

Cape Town

Heldelberg:92 Van Riebeek Street

R 155 287.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Albertina: 8 Aalwyn Street

R 102 839.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Laingsburg: 39 Voortrekker Road

R 147 344.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Aurora: 179 Main Street

R 218 381.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Aurora: 180 Main Street

R 179 779.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

331 Moorreesburg

R 223 270.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

Johannesburg

Observatory: 37 Frederick Street

R 822 760.29 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Cyridene: 48 Aida Street

R 424 466.59 (All inclusive)

100%

None

Pretoria

Salvokop

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 5500 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Electrical fence installation: R 22 087.46 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Structural Palisade fencing installation and razor barbwire: R301 000.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Kordaat Avenue, Pretoria

Garden services: R29 382.50

100%

None

   

Building work: R 109 800.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 26 000 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

103 Mountain View Road, Pretoria

Garden Services: R20 585.00

100%

None

   

Building work: R 99 00.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 37 000 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

5 Adina Street, Waterkloof

Garden Services: R20 930.00

100%

None

   

Building work: R 110 000.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 21 000 (All inclusive)

100%

None

25 November 2021 - NW2394

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture´

1. What is the (a) total number of (i) vacant managerial positions in each entity reporting to him and (ii) the specified positions where a staff member is acting and (b) a breakdown of the vacancies according to (i) positions and (ii) each entity. 2. Whether he will furnish Mrs V Van Dyk with (a) number and (b) details of council members who are serving in different boards, also indicating (i) acting capacity and (ii) the names of entities.

24 November 2021 - NW2057

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant facts that has been recorded by her department regarding the effects of the dry winter season on water reserves in all affected provinces?

Reply:

South Africa receives both summer and winter rainfall, with most Provinces falling within the summer rainfall area; whereas the Western Cape Province receives its rainfall mainly in winter. As a result, annual water allocation decisions for the summer rainfall areas are made in May or June when most of the summer rainfall is believed to have been harvested. On the other hand, the decision date for the winter rainfall areas is November.

The water reserves in most Provinces have been generally sufficient due to good rains received during the past summer rainfall season. The state of water storage in dams as at 30 August 2021 per Province is indicated in the table below:

Water availability and supply situation is determined by undertaking an Annual Operating Analysis (AOA) of the relevant water supply systems in the Provinces. The AOA determines the amount of water that can be supplied sustainably and equitably over the coming year considering the amount of water in storage at the decision date of the system. Water restrictions are implemented in cases of inadequate water availability.

The provinces with relatively less water availability, as indicated by low Dam levels, are located in the Eastern Cape and parts of the Western Cape Provinces. Dam levels in the Western Cape winter rainfall area are generally good and still increasing given that the Province is still in its rainfall season.

The main two water supply systems in the Eastern Cape experiencing water shortages are the Algoa and Amathole Water Supply Systems (WSS). The Algoa WSS supplies water to the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipal Metro (NMBMM), Kouga Local Municipality and the irrigation sector. On the other hand, Amathole WSS supplies the Buffalo City Local Municipality and Amatola Water Board in East London and surrounding areas; as well as the irrigation sector.

On river systems that have been found to have inadequate water availability for the season, water restrictions are proclaimed in the government gazette to curb water abstractions in order to prolong supplies, especially for essential use. The Provinces with water restrictions on a number of systems/dams are listed below as:

Eastern Cape Province

The Algoa Water Supply System, which supplies the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro area, comprises of 5 Dams and is also augmented by the Orange-Fish-Sundays transfer scheme from the Orange River System in the Free State. There are currently restrictions imposed at 80% on irrigation supply and an overall 30% on the domestic sector. Specific restrictions for the different dams are indicated in Table 2.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Churchill

35.24

23.07

19.55

50% Domestic & 80% Irrigation

Impofu

105.76

15.04

16.99

 

Kouga

125.91

4.22

5.44

70% Domestic & 80% Irrigation

Loerie

3.03

37.16

32.8

 

Groendal

11.64

26.64

21.81

80% Irrigation

Total System

281.6

11.92

12.51

30% Domestic and 80% Irrigation

Note: A supply of 58 million m³/a from the Orange-Fish-Sundays transfer scheme to the NMBMM

is not restricted

The Amathole Water Supply System, which supplies the Buffalo City area comprises of 6 Dams as detailed in table 3 below – 10% Restrictions are required on the domestic water supply and 30% on irrigation.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Rooikrantz

4.79

97.14

77.59

10% on Domestic & 30% on irrigation

Laing

18.90

99.57

100.65

 

Bridle Drift

97.92

26.59

21.15

 

Wriggleswade

91.47

19.06

14.88

 

Nahoon

19.26

42.00

28.86

 

Gubu

8.52

85.76

79.36

 

Total System

240.88

34.19

28.81

 

 

Stand-alone Dams in Eastern Cape Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 4 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Nqweba

44.7

8.0

6.7

20% domestic

Howiesonspoort and Settlers Dam

6.4

Not known - no information received from the municipality

20% domestic & 70% irrigation

Sandile

29.7

56.0

50.7

30% irrigation

Xilinxa and Gcuwa

14.2

20.4

7

20% domestic

Kliplaat

57.1

26.9

24.3

30% irrigation

Mhlanga

1.6

13.2

35.1

10% domestic

 

Western Cape Province

Stand-alone Dams in Western Cape Province that are experiencing water shortages and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 5 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage level at decision date 1 June 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Gamka

1.82

45.1

32.62

10% domestic

Oukloof

4.19

0.0

0.00

90% irrigation

Karee

0.95

14.9

21.00

50% domestic

 

Mpumalanga Province

Stand-alone Dams in Mpumalanga Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 6 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

% Storage decision date - 1 May 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Mkhombo

204.6

10

7.6

10% domestic, 40% irrigation

Rust de Winter

28.2

100

99.65

10% domestic, 40% irrigation

Ohrigstad

13.5

100

57.6

10% domestic and irrigation

Limpopo Province

Stand-alone Dams in Limpopo Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 7 below.

Table 7: Stand-alone Dams in Limpopo Province

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

% Storage decision date 1 May 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Middle Letaba

171.9

11

7.79

35% domestic, 70% irrigation

Nsami

21.9

90.5

71.46

35% domestic, 70% irrigation

---00O00--

24 November 2021 - NW2254

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is his department’s current (a) national backlog for the installation of boreholes in rural municipalities and (b) time frame for completing the (i) installation of boreholes and (ii) building of dams in this regard?

Reply:

a)  The installation of boreholes falls under the mandate of municipalities in line with Section 84(1)(d) of the Municipal Structures Act which mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water within their areas of jurisdiction.

(b) (ii) As per the Department of Water and Sanitation Annual Performance Plan and funding for the 2021/22 financial year, progress for the following construction of the following dams is as follows:

No

Project

Progress

Estimated date of completion

1

Raising of Hazelmere Dam

96% construction

August 2022

2

Raising of Clanwilliam Dam

12% construction

April 2026

3

Raising of Tzaneen Dam

10% construction

June 2023

4

Mzimvubu Water Project

20% construction (Advanced Works-Access Roads)

Completion to be confirmed on finalisation of construction drawings

5

New Nwamitwa Dam

  • Procurement completed
  • Designs completed

Completion to confirmed on sequencing of the work packages and availability of long term funding

6

Lusikisiki Regional Water Supply Scheme: Zalu Dam

  • 43% design completion with estimated
  • 100% design completion

Date of completion to be confirmed on finalisation of specialist services appointment

6

Algoa Water Supply System: Corney Dam

0% Design stage

October 2022 for completion of designs

7

Umkhomazi Water Project

Project preparation stage

2027

---00O00---

 

 

24 November 2021 - NW2157

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the status and/or condition of all the bulk water and sanitation infrastructure that his department handed over to municipalities in the Republic as at the latest date for which information is available?

Reply:

 

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is responsible for assisting the municipalities with provision of water and sanitation services to communities. In this regard, the DWS provides assistance to municipalities through conditional grants such as Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the following:

  • Building new infrastructure
  • Refurbishment and upgrade of the existing water and sanitation infrastructure.

In accordance with the implementation protocols, the DWS is responsible for implementation of the infrastructure projects and the municipalities are responsible for Operation and Maintenance of the infrastructure. Upon completion of projects, the assets are handed over to the municipalities. Municipalities are therefore obliged to ensure that the infrastructure is operational and delivers water or sanitation services as intended.

Requesting the Honourable Member to refer to the table below for details on bulk projects implemented and completed from 2012/13 financial year to date as well as the status thereof.

Status of completed projects from 2012/13 to 2021/22 financial year

Name of the project

Name of the WSA/district municipality

Status of the project

Reasons/comments on non-functional projects

EASTERN CAPE

Mount Ayliff Bulk Water Supply

Alfred Nzo DM

Functional

None

Greater Mbizana Regional Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Alfred Nzo DM

Functional

None

Mncwasa Bulk Water Supply

Amathole DM

Functional

None

Ibika Bilk Water Supply

Amathole DM

Not Functional

Water rationing due to drought around Butterworth and shortfall of funds to complete the project

Xonxa Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Chris Hani DM

Functional

The contractor is busy with snags on the pumpstation

Coffee Bay Bulk Water Supply Scheme

OR Tambo DM

Functional

None

KSDPI Bulk Sanitation

OR Tambo DM

Functional

None

Steytlerville Bulk Water Supply

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

Functional

Due to extreme drought. the plant is struggling to obtain water from the Poort where water abstraction is taking place.

Graaff Reinet Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

Functional

None

Paterson BWS Phase 1 to 5A

Sundays River Valley Local Municipality

Functional

None

MPUMALANGA

Acornhoek Bulk Water Supply

Bushbuckridge LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Functional

None

Botleng Wastewater Treatment Works

Victor Khanye LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Balfour Wastewater Treatment Works phase 2

Dipaleseng LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Amsterdam/Sheepmoor phase 1 & 2

Mkhodo LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Delmas Wastewater Treatment Works phase 1

Victor Khanye LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Lushushwane Regional Bulk Water Supply phase 1 to 4

Chief Albert Luthuli LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Hoxani Bulk Water Supply

City of Mbombela LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Not functional

Waiting for the City of Mbombela to finalise the Mechanical & Electrical components that were funded through co-funding by the Municipality

Northern Nsikazi Bulk Water Supply

     

Bushbuckridge Water Services (Cunningnore) phase 1

Bushbuckridge LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Functional

None

Empuluzi phase 3A, 4A & 8

Chief Albert Luthuli LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Refurb & Upgrade of Ermelo Water Treatment Works

Msukaligwa LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Refurbishment of Emalahleni Water Treatment Works

Emalahleni LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Balfour/Siyathemba Regional Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Dipaleseng LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Not functional

Awaiting the completion of the Upgrading of the Balfour Water Treatment Works in Fortuna (known as the Balfour/Siyathemba phase 2)

GAUTENG

Upgrade of Hannes van Niekerk WWTW

Rand West City Local Municipality (formerly Westonaria Local Municipality)

Partially Functional

Some process units of the new module are dysfunctional due to poor maintenance, theft and vandalism.

Upgrade of Rothdene Pump Station

Midvaal Local Municipality

Functional

None

Upgrade of Sebokeng Wastewater Treatment Works Module 6

Emfuleni Local Municipality

Functional

None

KWAZULU-NATAL

Jozini

uMkhanyakude DM

The scheme is functional. The plant is producing 20Ml/day. Bulk pipeline to Ngwavuma with 12 zonal areas completed. Zone 1 to zone 5 completed and operational with reticulation

The municipality is currently implementing zone 6 under MIG programme

Dukuduku Resettlement

uMkhanyakude DM

Functional with minor operational challenges in some areas.

Portion of the settlement with proper reticulation. UKDM has improved most of the unreliable areas through WSIG

Hlabisa

uMkhanyakude DM

The scheme is functional

There is currently not enough water coming from Mandlakazi scheme which is currently under construction. UKDM has improved most of the unreliable areas through WSIG

Emadlangeni

Amajuba DM

The scheme is functional

None

Greater Eston

uMgungundlovu DM

The scheme is functional

None

uMshwathi Phase 1-3

uMgungundlovu DM

The scheme is functional

None

Mhlabatshane

Ugu

The scheme is functional

None

Lower Tugela

iLembe

The scheme is functional

None

FREE STATE

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Construction of Sterkfontein WTW

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: The construction of Escol Reservoir.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Rising main to Escol Reservoir.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 2: Escol pipelines.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 2: Raw water supply system at Sterkfontein Dam.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Makwane Scheme.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Northern Bulk Storage Stage 1.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Northern Bulk Storage Stage 2.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Sealing and waterproofing of the Uniqwa Reservoirs.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Bulk interconnection pipeline: Uniqwa Reversal.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 4: QwaQwa Borehole project Stage 1: Drilling and testing of 60 operational boreholes.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply BWS, Phase 4: QwaQwa Borehole project Stage 2: The equipping of 5 priority boreholes.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Partially functional

From the five (5) priority boreholes, one (1) has been severely vandalised, and two (2) are not being operated.

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 1A: Upgrading of the Reitz WTW

Nketoana LM

Partially Functional

The some components are not working fully.

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3A: Ground Water Study in Nketoana, and Development of Boreholes in Arlington, Petrus Steyn and Lindley

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3B: Upgrading of the Lindley WTW

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3C: Upgrading and refurbishment of Lindley and Arlington Water pump Stations

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Refurbishment of Clarens Sewer Pump Station

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of La Provence Sewer pump station Rising Main

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of Bethlehem Water Treatment Works: Replacing of Asbestos Cement Pipeline from Abstraction point at Sol Plaatjies Dam to Water Treatment Works

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of Fouriesburg (Carolina) Pump Station

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of 4 sewer pump station in Bethlehem/Bohlokong

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC pipes to PVC pipes in Memel

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC pipes to PVC pipes in Warden

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of sewer rising main(asbestos) for Ezenzeleni Area and construction of new sewer station with outfall sewer

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of the WTW in Vrede & Memel Water Treatment Works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC water pipes to PVC in Vrede – Phase 1

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni 3ML reservoir and appurtenant works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni raw water pump station and pipelines

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Non-functional

The pump station was vandalized and some equipment at the pump station were stolen. Currently under Construction funded under RBIG 5B COVID19 project to render it operational.

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni Water Treatment Works and construction of the civil structure and associated works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Non-functional

The water treatment works depended on raw water pumped from the vandalized pump station within the same scheme, making it non-functional. However, currently under construction to render it operational funded under RBIG 5B. COVID19 project.

The Upgrading of the 1,5km clear water raising main line from the WTP to Marquard Reservoir

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Setsoto BWS Phase 1: Sand River Abstraction, Borehole refurbishment, Construction of the pipeline from Caledon to Meulspruit – Clocolan and Marquard

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Setsoto BWS Phase 2: Construction 630mm raw water pipeline from Meulspruit to Ficksburg Water Treatment Water

Abstraction of raw water from the Caledon Riverbed

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Ngwathe Bulk Sewer (Vredefort)

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Non-functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance.

Moqhaka Bulk Sewer

Moqhaka LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Not functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance. Currently the DWS, Provincial office and Municipality are implementing a project to refurbish the plant.

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply – Construction of concrete reservoir at Edenville

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply – Construction of pump house and equipping of boreholes in Edenville

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Partly functional

Not all boreholes are operational due to vandalism

Mafube Bulk Sewer Phase 1 of 2 - Construction of Namahadi Pump Station

Construction of Geelhout (Britz) Pump Station

Refurbishment of Seagull Street Pump Station and Associated Works

Mafube LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Moqhaka Bulk Water Supply - To construct a 9.5 km pipeline with a booster pump station

Moqhaka LM in the Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Bulk water pipeline to hospital

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of 6 Boreholes

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of Two Boreholes within 10km Radius10km Radius Phase 2A (Exploration)

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of Two Boreholes within 10km Radius – Phase 2B

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Equipping Of Boreholes and Upgrading

Of Pump Station in Excelsior

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Excelsior: Design and Construction Monitoring Water Tower, Raw Bulk Pipeline and Pumpstation- Phase 2

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Masilonyana Bulk water Supply Phase 1 of 2

Lejweleputswa DM/ Masilonyana LM

Functional

The project is functional but being a raw water pipeline, some repairs has been highly necessary to undertake through a WC/WDM project, considering water leakages in the line and mechanical / electrical issues in the high lift pump stations associated to this pipeline

Tokologo Bulk Water Supply Phase 1 of 3

Lejweleputswa DM/Tokologo LM

Functional

The project is functional, but Municipality is facing operational issues with lack of spares in the installed raw water pumps in the abstraction point.

Tswelopele Bulk water Supply Phase 1 of 2

Lejweleputswa DM/Tswelopele LM

Functional

None

Wesselsbron / Monyakeng Bulk Sewer

Lejweleputswa DM/Nala LM

Non-functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance.

Jagersfontein /Fauresmith BWS Phase 1

Xhariep DM/Kopanong LM

Functional

The project is complete and functional connected to phase 2 which is at practical completion stage

WESTERN CAPE

Worcester Bulk Water

Breede Valley

Functional

None

Grabouw Wastewater Treatment Works

Theewaterskloof

Functional

None

Paarl Bulk Sewer

Drakenstein

Functional

None

Drakenstein Wastewater Treatment Works

Drakenstein

Functional

None

Swellendam Wastewater Treatment Works

Swellendam

Functional

None

Citrusdal Wastewater Treatment Works

Cederberg

Functional

None

George Bulk Water

George

Functional

None

Stellenbosch Wastewater Treatment Works

Stellenbosch

Functional

There is a challenge on the inlet works but municipality is sorting matter.

Lamberts Bay

Cederberg

Non-functional

There is a need to complete the installation of the sea outfall. The contractor has been appointed and the anticipated completion date is end of February 2022

Tulbugh BWS

Witzenberg

Functional

There is a need to complete the construction of the dam and tributaries. The contractor has been appointed and the anticipated completion date is end of June 2024

LIMPOPO

Mogalakwena Phase 1

Waterberg

Non-functional

The challenge is with the water abstraction point that has not been developed as yet

Polokwane BWS

Capricorn

Functional

None

NORTH WEST

Koster Wastewater Treatment Works

Kgetleng river

Functional

None

Tlokwe phase 1

Tlokwe

Functional

None

Pilanesburg phase 1

Moses Kotane /Rusternburg

Functional

None

Pilanesburg phase 2

Moses Kotane /Rusternburg

Functional

None

Madibeng /Britsphase 1

Madibeng

Functional

None

Maqussi hills WWTW/BWS

Maquassi

Functional

None

Moretele south phase 1

Moretele

Functional

None

Greater Mamusa phase 1

Mamusa

Functional

None

Taung Naledi phase 1 Podumong

Dr Ruth Mompati

Functional

None

NORTHERN CAPE

Colesburg Wastewater Treatment Worksulk

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Hopetown Water Treatment Works

Thembelihle / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Niekershoop Bulk Water Supply

Siyathemba / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Kathu Wastewater Treatment Works

Gamagara / John Toalo Geatsewe

Functional

Functional, but need to be upgraded again

Colesburg Water Treatment Works

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Vanderkloof Wastewater Treatment Works

Renosterberg / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Norvalspont Bulk Water Supply

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Noupoort Bulk Water Supply

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Britstown Oxidation Ponds

Emthanjeni / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Van Wyksvlei Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Kareeberg / Pixley Ka Seme

Functional

None

Marydale Bulk Water Supply

Siyathemba / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Strydenburg Bulk Water Supply

Thembelihle / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Kalahari East Pipeline phase 1

Dawid Kruiper / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Homevale Wastewater Treatment Works

Sol Plaatje / Frances Baard

Non-Functional

The plant is currently not fully functional due to poor Operation & Maintenance, theft, and vandalism

Ricthie Bulk Water Supply

Sol Plaatje / Frances Baard

Functional

None

Loeriesfontein Bulk Water Supply

Hantam / Namakwa

Functional

None

Brandvlei Bulk Water Supply

Hantam / Namakwa

Functional

None

Williston Bulk Water Supply

Karoo Hoogland / Namakwa

Functional

None

---00O00---

24 November 2021 - NW2156

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether he has disbanded the advisory committee that was set up by the former Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the progress reports which had been compiled by the advisory committee were collected, given that these were compiled from taxpayers’ money; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The contracts of the advisory committees that were set up by the former Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation, were linked to her term of office in the Department of Water and Sanitation. Due to the fact that the tenure of the former Minister ended on 5 August 2021, the advisory committees was given 30 days’ notice from this date and terminated on 4 September 2021.

2. The Chairpersons of the respective committees were requested to prepare and submit close-out reports. The Water Services Advisory Committee has submitted its close-out report. The other Committees will table their reports when they meet with the Minister.

 

---00O00-

23 November 2021 - NW2357

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether institutions of higher learning such as the (a) University Cape Town, (b) University of the Witwatersrand and (c) Stellenbosch University have sought engagement with his department prior to enforcing mandatory vaccines as a prerequisite for student registration; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what is his department’s position regarding mandatory vaccines and their impact on the right to education?

Reply:

The matter of whether vaccination for COVID-19 should be made compulsory for physical access to university campuses is something that is currently under consideration within the university system. Universities South Africa (USAf) has prepared guidelines for universities to consider and guide them in their discussions. At the end this is a matter that is decided upon by university Councils, who have the responsibility, within the framework of the Constitution and the Higher Education Act, to determine institutional policy.

As far as I am aware there have been no formal requests for consultation with the Department. However, I am aware that universities have sought legal advice on the matter and that in some universities discussions were held with their stakeholders prior to making decisions on this matter, which is a critical part of considering any vaccination strategy and any requirement for access based on proof of vaccination.

Higher Health, working with the Department of Health, Department of Higher Education and Training, universities, TVET and CET colleges has been actively working to establish vaccination sites for the post-school education and training system and the number of sites has grown significantly. It is also working closely with institutions to promote scientific information about the vaccination which can also address vaccine hesitancy within the post-school population.

Higher Health has indicated to the Department that they believe that it is extremely vital currently to promote vaccination through every communication channel. The priority for now is to mobilise and persuade people to volunteer to be vaccinated. Higher Health’s 15 000 campus-based peer educators are tasked to explain all about the vaccine and respond to people’s anxiety and are encouraging a peer-to-peer dialogue.

This will continue to be the focus for the current period, until the vaccination programme has had time to reach a majority of staff and students. I note the public attention on this matter, given the tension between individual rights to choose and the responsibilities of educational institutions to ensure the safety of students and staff. Ultimately, it is important that stakeholder discussions on this matter continue at the current time.

23 November 2021 - NW2347

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What measures does the Government intend to take in order to ensure that King Mswati III implements comprehensive democratic reforms in Eswatini?

Reply:

His Excellency, President Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa, in his capacity as chairperson of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Organ on Politics, Defence, and Security Cooperation, is seized with the engagements to bring about lasting solution to the political challenges in Eswatini.

To this effect, President Ramaphosa dispatched SADC Organ Troika Special Envoys to Eswatini from 21-22 October 2021, to engage with His Majesty King Mswati III, the Eswatini Government, civil society stakeholders, and diplomatic community on the ground, on ways to de-escalate the situation and chart the way forward. The Special Envoys were duly supported by the SADC Secretariat.

As a follow up to the visit of the SADC Organ Troika Special Envoys, the President visited Eswatini on 02 November 2021 to further engage with King Mswati III. Consequently, Emaswati agreed to undertake, with the assistance of SADC, a national dialogue process which will be initiated and owned by all stakeholders.

 

23 November 2021 - NW2362

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps will she and/or her department take against the principal of a certain school (name furnished), who instructed the recently appointed Education Assistants to clean toilets, classes, offices and pick up trash, which is outside the scope of their stipulated job description?

Reply:

The Department has requested the Province to investigate and provide a report on the matter.  A response will be furnished upon receipt of the requested report. 

22 November 2021 - NW2276

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)With reference to the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) Fidelity Fund, what is the status of the forensic audit and/or forensic investigation into the EAAB Fidelity Fund; (2) In respect of the specified audit and/or investigation, (a) what total amount has been spent on forensic services to date and (b)(i) which consultancies and/or firms have (aa) been mandated to conduct the audit and/or investigation and (bb) resigned and/or terminated their services in this regard and (ii) for what reasons in each case.

Reply:

(1) The forensic audit has not yet commenced.

(2)(a) None.

(2)(b)(i)

(aa) & (bb) Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo & Grant Thornton Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd have been mandated to conduct the audit

and/or investigation.

(bb) Grant Thornton Advisory Services Pty Ltd.

(2)(ii) It was discovered that a potential conflict of interest exists as Grant

Thornton was contracted by the Estate Agency Affairs Board to conduct an audit of the Fidelity Fund in 2017. The Department will appoint a substitute forensic auditor by 31 December 2021.

22 November 2021 - NW2401

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What are the details of the progress made by his department with regard to e-visas?

Reply:

The development of the eVisa phase 1 was completed in 2020/2021 financial year but the deployment of the system was delayed due to COVID19 lockdown and suspension of international travel. The eVisa system has been piloted in Kenya and India already. As at 29th September 2021, the eVisa system has been deployed in a phased approach and operational for the following countries, namely: Kenya, Cameroon, Philippines, DRC and Saudi Arabia.

It must be considered however, that the current eVisa module is designed for tourists only, and further modules of the solution for other categories of visas will be developed and deployed in line with the stabilization of the launched version of the eVisa module. As the system matures, the department will implement a more extensive deployment plan structured and sub-divided across African countries and the Rest of the World to be undertaken during the outer years of 2022-2025.

END

22 November 2021 - NW2338

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) On what date was the Tender Bulletin last published; (2) whether there have been any delays in the publication of the bulletin; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what were the causes of the delay in each case and (b) on what date is it envisaged it be published next?

Reply:

(1) The last Tender Bulletin was last published on 29 January 2021.

(2)(a) The delays on the publication of the tender bulletin was as a result of the power surge that hit the GPW data centre on 4 February 2021, which damaged critical servers, resulting in the crashing of the eGazette systems and disabling the publishing of all Government gazettes, including the Tender Bulletin.

(2)(b) GPW had to work on manual mode to publish the National and Provincial gazettes. However due to its format, sensitivity and complexity of its content the Tender Bulletin could not be processed manually.

GPW has appointed the service provider to rebuild and automate the eGazette system and also work on the back-up systems. The project milestones are expected to have been achieved by the 31st March 2022, and then publishing of the Tender Bulletin will resume.

END

19 November 2021 - NW1795

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

During the civil unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July 2021, what steps were taken by his department to safeguard human rights as provided for in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, with reference to observing the rights of an accused person to be brought before a competent court within specific timelines under the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977; (2) with reference to the protection of the right to property during the confiscation of allegedly looted goods, what safeguards were put in place by his department to ensure that courts provide access to persons who were deprived of their legitimate property, where they could have an opportunity to ensure their legitimate rights to their property is upheld through a court of law?

Reply:

1. The rights of the arrested, detained and accused persons are clearly indicated in Section 35 of the constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. This include the right of the accused:

a) to be brought before a court as soon as reasonably possible but not later than 48 hours after the arrest, or the end of the first court day after the expiry of the 48 hours;

b) to be charged or informed of the reasons for the detention to continue or to be released; and

c) to choose and consult with the legal representation.

During the civil unrest in Kwa-Zulu Natal and Gauteng, the Bill of Rights was observed. The magistrates in which the civil unrest cases occurred managed to process all matters brought before the court in line with the Constitution. Cases were reported and enrolled to the following courts as the consequences of civil unrest:

No.

Name of the Court

No. of Cases Enrolled

1

Pietermaritzburg

30

2

Impendle

4

3

Mooi River

4

4

Ladysmith

34

5

Newcastle

15

6

Dundee

6

7

Paulpietersburg

1

8

Nqutu

30

9

Durban And Branch Courts

256

10

Empangeni

40

11

Ngwelezane

12

12

Kwambonambi Periodical Court

2

13

Richards Bay Branch Court

8

14

Kwamsane

6

15

Mtubatuba

3

16

Ongoye

12

17

Hlabisa

3

18

Hluhluwe

4

19

Mtunzini

1

20

Nyoni Periodical Court

10

21

Stanger

19

22

Verulam Including Branch Courts

100

23

Emlazi

19

24

Emzumbe

21

25

Scottburgh

17

26

Umbumbulu

16

27

Vulamehlo

6

28

Sawoti

1

29

Port Shepstone

20

30

Harding

9

31

Ramsgate

15

32

Ixopo

68

33

Phungashe

15

34

Matatiele

7

35

Izingolweni

29

36

Umzimkhulu

30

 

Total Number No. of Cases Enrolled

873

The JCPS Steering Committee was established in which the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development participates. The above mentioned Steering Committee includes key stakeholders such as the South African Police Service, Legal Aid South Africa and National Prosecuting Authority. The mandate of this Steering Committee was to ensure that all cases are processed promptly and in observance of the Bill of Rights enshrined in the Constitution.

2. There was no record of any confiscation of property which was discussed by the Integrated Task Team which was established to monitor the civil unrest. This does not exclude the possibility that if such information could have been reported to various Police stations, the matter will be placed on the agenda of the Integrated Task Team, and should it emerge of any confiscated property during unrest, an appropriate solution will be discussed by the relevant law enforcement agencies

19 November 2021 - NW2419

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What recourse exists for beneficiaries of structurally unsound housing units constructed by (a) provincial and (b) municipal housing departments?

Reply:

All new houses constructed with the use of the National Housing Subsidy must be enrolled with National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC). All Provinces and Municipalities must also in terms of required NHBRC regulations enrol the projects within which houses are constructed. The enrolment with the NHBRC ensures that the houses have a five-year warranty from the day of occupation. The warranty covers the following:

(1) Minor defects within 3-months from date of occupation.

(2) Roof leaks within 1-year from date of occupation and

(3) Major structural defects within 5-years from date of occupation.

Where a defect is detected, the housing consumer should as an initial step notify the home builder of any complaint(s) within a reasonable period. It is expected that the home builder will attend to the complaint again within a reasonable timeframe.

Where the Province or Municipality are the developer and enrolled the project and house, then the complaint maybe lodged with the Province or Municipality. If the compliant is not attended to or resolved between the parties, then the complaint maybe escalated to the NHBRC.

In terms of legislation and regulations, the NHBRC has the responsibility to protect the interests of homeowners, and this includes resolution of complaints received from homeowners against a home builder.

19 November 2021 - NW1843

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with (a) a maintenance schedule for the properties of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) in terms of (i) cutting the grass, (ii) picking up litter and (iii) the maintenance of fences and (b) a schedule and plan on how Transnet and Prasa plan to secure residents of Transnet and Prasa railway properties against crime; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 2) on what date will the missing fences around the specified properties be replaced?

Reply:

1. (a) (i & ii) A schedule for grass cutting and cleaning at Station and Workplace

facilities is on a periodic basis as reflected in table 1 below. The grass cutting service is included as one of those performed by the contractors as PRASA does not appoint a contractor for one specific service but covers a range of services included in the table below.

AREA

TASK SPECIFICATION

FREQUENCY

 

Waste Collection and Disposal

Empty and clean all waste baskets, receptacles

Continuously

   

Remove all waste to a specified and designated area

Continuously

Platforms &

Railway tracks

 

 

 

 

 

Platform areas

 

Sweep platforms

daily

   

Remove papers and other foreign objects

Continuously

 

 

Sweep the railway tracks.

Every three months

 

Railway tracks. Note: Commuters work under protection on tracks and only during the off-peak)

Remove papers and other foreign objects – Clean the railway tracks up to 200m beyond the edges of both sides of the platforms

daily

 

Grass and weeds

Remove Grass and Weed

Weekly

Table 1: Schedule for grass cutting and cleaning at Station and Workplace facilities

(iii) After the unprecedented levels of vandalism and theft of assets, PRASA’s strategy to maintain fences at station level includes putting in place 3 years fencing maintenance contracts which will attend to all maintenance issues related to fencing.

These will support the stations which are due to receive improvements under the National Station Improvement Programme (NSIP) and the Alternative Building Technology (ABT) Projects. Stations earmarked to receive improvements are in the 12 priority corridors.

The tenders for these programmes have been advertised on various platforms such as eTender. These will then be evaluated and awarded to successful bidders for execution and are due to be completed before end of March 2022.

The purpose of these projects is to restore functionality at stations which includes the repairs or replacement of fences, painting of platform lines, lighting, provision of water and working toilets, ticket offices among other functional requirements.

(b) Security is not deployed at leased houses. The few that are not leased we do checks on these properties on the routes by security. Limited security is however deployed at commercial buildings that are not leased. The deployment will increase over the next month as it forms part of our total security deployment plan and intervention which will have a total of 4500 extra security guards excluding our internal guards, totalling 7000 people on the ground covering PRASA assets and infrastructure.

2. The 3 years fencing maintenance contracts will then be used to maintain these newly restored fences. The tenders for the three (3) years fencing maintenance contracts will be advertised before end of the financial year.

19 November 2021 - NW1996

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) are the reasons that the National Conventional Arms Control Committee (NCACC) did not consider applications on a monthly basis, (b) is the backlog in terms of the number of applications that have not been processed, (c) is the monetary value of the backlog for armament export applications and permits, (d) is the date on which it is anticipated that the backlog will be something of the past and (e) are the reasons that export permits were withdrawn with regard to existing orders and permits issued especially to the United Arab Emirates; 2) whether the NCACC has considered (a) the damage to the Defence Industry when the Republic can least afford to lose export orders and market and (b) that the groups protesting the export of munitions may base their complaints and protest on false narratives and ulterior motives; if not, why not, in each case; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details; 3) whether the NCACC has determined any violations of the End-user Certificate (EUC) conditions; if not, why not; if so, 4) whether the NCACC (a) is familiar with the respective exporters and (b) has interacted with these exporters and the host nation’s government for EUC inspections; if not, why not in each case; if so, in each case, on what date will they allow non-implicated exporters to proceed with the export shipments in order not to lose more critical export markets?

Reply:

1. The NCACC is scheduled to meet every last Thursday of the month. These meetings are planned to take place from February to November. In the event that the Parliamentary Program and some important matters present challenges as regards meetings being held as scheduled, the NCACC makes up for such events. To date the NCACC does not have any outstanding meetings and meeting schedule is under control.

2. The NCACC applies the criteria as envisaged in the Act, Regulations and Policy considerations. The protests or reports as alluded to have no bearing on the decision of the NCACC. When an applications is kept in abeyance (under consideration) pending authorization, it for the NCACC to satisfy itself that outstanding issues about such an application are resolved prior to authorization.

 

3. It is never or it should not be a consideration to seek to harm the Defence Industry and certainly the NCACC would not subscribe to such a notion. The Permits that are Under Consideration have a value of R15,8 Million for Saudi Arabia and R3,8 Billion for the United Arab Emirates, respectively.

4. When a matter is placed under consideration (UC) the risk as identified by the review process must have a corresponding risk mitigation response in place with satisfies the minimization of such risk to a residual risk in order to proceed with a recommendation to consider authorization.

5. It is anticipated that the matters outstanding as regards Saudi Arabia and the UAE will be resolved in September 2021. However, the NCACC authorizes the Categories of Controlled items that fall outside the circle of risk identified. It never or ought not to be a consideration to seek to harm the Defence Industry and certainly the NCACC would not subscribe to such a notion, as it is not sustainable on any grounds.

6. The assertion or otherwise of End User Certificates violations remain unproven to date. However, should there be violations by entities registered under the Act, the NCACC will not hesitate to act against such transgressors of prescripts.

  1. I as Chairperson and on behalf of my Committee remain seized of matters of the NCACC in order to resolve and effectively manage Conventional Arms Control as mandated under the Act.

END

19 November 2021 - NW1778

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the settlement of the class action on 11 December 2019 between Transnet and the Transnet pensioners who are members of two pension funds, namely the Transnet Second Defined Benefit Fund and the Transport Pension Fund, he has been informed that in spite of the implementation of the specified settlement in 2020, it has still not been implemented for members of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa Sub Fund, notwithstanding a court order (details furnished) to the effect; if so, (a) what is the reason for this and (b) by what date will the delay be addressed, with an indication of the necessary deadlines in order to prevent legal action from being taken against his department for disregarding the specified court order; if not, (2) whether he will soon take steps to determine the reasons for the delays and how to address them, with an indication of the necessary deadlines in order to prevent legal action from being taken against his department for disregarding the specified court order; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) The court order has not yet been implemented. This court order will be

implemented by the PRASA Sub Fund of the Transport Pension Fund upon the approval of the Fund Rule amendments this implies.

“In terms of the Transnet Pension Fund Act (Act 62 of 1990 as amended), the responsibility to approve amendments to the Special Rules of the PRASA Sub Fund of the Transport Pension Fund rests with the Minister of Public Enterprises with concurrence by the Minister of Finance. The relevant proposed amendments to the Special Rules of the PRASA Sub Fund is currently receiving attention by the Minister of Public enterprise.”

(b) In terms of PRASA protocol, all rule amendments for the pension funds are channelled through Transnet. The proposed amendments to the PRASA Special Rules were circulated to the Office of the Transnet Chief Financial Officer on 12 April 2021.

2. Regular follow ups have been made with Transnet and the matter will now be escalated to the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) for intervention as the submissions were made in April 2021 already.

3. I will not be making any statement on the matter.

19 November 2021 - NW2412

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) Since the establishment of the Military Veterans Housing Assistance Programme (MVHAP), what was the age of the youngest recipient of the MVHAP at the date on which the house was awarded?

Reply:

(1) The youngest recipient of the Military Veterans Housing Programme was 35 years old when she was allocated a house on the 10th December 2019.

19 November 2021 - NW2411

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) What criteria regarding (a) membership and (b) the legislative process does this department rely on in order to classify a potential housing beneficiary as a military veteran in terms of the Military Veterans Housing Assistance Programme?

Reply:

1. The criteria regarding

a) Memberships is informed by the 2011 Military Veterans Act, the Military Veterans Regulations Number 11 of 2014 and the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the two Ministries to provide decent housing for Military Veterans.

According to Section 1(a) of the Military Veterans Act 18 of 2011,

"military veteran" means any South African citizen who (a) rendered military service to any of the military organizations, statutory and 15 non-statutory, which were involved on all sides of South Africa's Liberation War from 1960 to 1994; (b) served in the Union Defense Force before 1961; or (c) became a member of the new South African National Defense Force after 1994, 20 and has completed his or her military training and no longer performs military service, and has not been dishonourably discharged from that military organization or force: Provided that this definition does not exclude any person referred to in paragraph (a), (b) or (c) who could not complete his or her military training due to an injury sustained during military training or a disease contracted or associated with military training;

b) The list of potential beneficiaries eligible for the housing benefit is provided by the Department of Military Veterans on an annual basis. The list is signed off by the Accounting Officer/ Director General of the Department of Military Veterans after all verification processes from DMV are concluded and it includes both the statutory and non-statutory forces. The list is then captured on the Housing Subsidy System (HSS) and immediately thereafter dispatched to Provinces.

19 November 2021 - NW1970

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) measures has his department implemented to reconcile the recent budget cuts with the key cost drivers of his department and (b) is the envisaged outcome of such mitigation measures in the short term?

Reply:

a) The following efficiency measures were implemented by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to absorb the cut:

i) Reduction of the personnel headcount by only filling critical vacant posts in order to manage the compensation of employees’ budget within the set budget ceiling.

ii) Paced down the construction of new courts and prioritised the refurbishment as well as upgrading of existing infrastructure.

iii) Constrained expenditure on cost containment items such as catering, travel and subsistence, venue hire, etc. by maintaining a negative growth on its allocation, each year.

iv) Strengthened controls on the management of service providers’ performance to seal the expenditure leaks.

v) For high value procurement, allowed the participation of departmental entities and sister departments under the Ministry of Justice and Correctional Services in order to take advantage of economies of scale.

vi) Reviewed Annual Performance Plan targets to focus on high impact outcomes.

b) The measures implemented with regards to compensation of employees are short term until the economy in the country stabilizes. These measures will have a negative impact on service delivery where a reduction in frontline services is implemented. Managers are required to put mitigation measures in place to reduce the impact on the public.

a) The Office of the Chief Justice (OCJ) has implemented the following measures to reconcile the recent budget cuts with the key cost drivers of the Department:

  • Reprioritization and filling of only critical vacancies; and
  • Reprioritization of operational expenditure to provide for virtual operations.
  1. (b) These mitigation measures negatively impact on the capacity of the OCJ to resource the Superior Courts in relation to human resources, ICT equipment and replacement of ageing ICT infrastructure which has a detrimental effect on judicial functions (case processing / adjudications); court modernisation and access to justice due to a reduction in the number of circuit courts.

19 November 2021 - NW2320

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)(a) Which provinces have opened shelters for victims of gender-based violence and femicide following provision of necessary facilities by the national Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and (b)(i) what is the total number of (i) the specified shelters in each province and (ii) shelters that are functioning; (2) (a) what is the breakdown for each shelter with regard to the (i) uptake and (ii) capacity for each shelter and (b) which shelters have established partnerships with nonprofit organisations?

Reply:

1 (a) The Western Cape is the only province that has established six (6) shelters for victims of gender-based violence and femicide following provision of necessary facilities by the national Department of Public Works and Infrastructure. The other provinces have conducted site verification and prepared costing for operationalisation of the shelters in the coming financial year (2022/23) due to the budget constraints experienced by the provinces.

(b)(i) Countrywide, there are 140 Shelters established and functional by Government in partnership with Civil Society Organisations

In terms of the National Public Works and Infrastructure partnership the Western Cape Government operationalised six (6) shelters.

(ii) The Shelters that are functioning and established by government in partnership with Civil Society Organisations are 134. However only Six (6) shelters in Western Cape from the facilities donated by the National Public Work and Infrastructure are operational

(2) (a) Below is the reflection of the breakdown for the (i) Government shelters in partnership with Civil Society Organisations with regard to the (ii) uptake:

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SHELTERS PER PROVINCE

BED CAPACITY

GAUTENG

25

605

FREE STATE

07

47

KWAZULU-NATAL

20

274

MPUMALANGA

22

144

NORTHERN CAPE

08

20

EASTERN CAPE

13

88

WESTERN CAPE

15

361

NORTH WEST

SHELTERS 02

SAFE HOUSES 20

108

LIMPOPO

02

40

TOTAL:

134

1687

Below are what is the breakdown for each shelter established through the National Public Works and Infrastructure in the Western Cape with regard to the (i) uptake of the shelters:

Shelter

District/ Municipality

Quarter 1 (1April – 30 June 2021) new Admissions

Quarter 2

(1 July – 30 September 2021) new Admissions

Shelter 1

(Launched on 7th May 2021)

West Coast/ Swartland

2

5

Shelter 2

(Launched on 26th March 2021)

Eden Karoo/ Central Karoo

1

7

Shelter 3 & 4

(Launched on 7th May 2021)

West Coast/ Bergriver

11

23

Shelter 5

(Launched on 27th August 2021)

Eden Karoo/ Hessequa

6

6

Shelter 6

Launched on 27th August 2021)

Eden Karoo/ Hessequa

2

14

Total:

22

55

(ii) capacity for each shelters

Shelter

District/ Municipality

Bed Capacity

Shelter 1

West Coast/ Swartland

8

Shelter 2

Eden Karoo/ Central Karoo

6

Shelter 3&4

West Coast/ Bergriver

16

Shelter 5

Eden Karoo/Hessequa

8

Shelter 6

Eden Karoo/Hessequa

8

2 (b) All shelters are established in partnership with NPO service providers.

18 November 2021 - NW2340

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with regard to the recent roll-out of the electronic proof of vaccination for COVID-19 in the Republic, except for international travel purposes, the Government (a) intends to use the electronic proof of vaccination and/or any other proof thereof, to regulate who accesses services and facilities in the public sector and (b) will allow the private sector to regulate access to goods and services and employment, among others, using the proof of vaccination; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for what purposes and/or ends will the electronic proof of vaccination be deployed in the Republic?

Reply:

a) The Digital Vaccination Certificate is a digital version of the paper vaccination card that can be verified by a third party through the scanning of the QR code to establish the validity of the Vaccination Certificate. Government does not intend to use proof of vaccination to regulate access to public sector services and facilities.

b) Within the borders of South Africa, the primary use of the vaccine certificate could be used for third parties to allow vaccinated people to access certain rewards or incentives. This may include access to events such as sports, entertainment, and religious events, or to benefit from discounts or other rewards (such as entry into a lucky draw) offered by retailers or other private businesses.

The Department of Labour and Employment is responsible for regulating workplaces. Government's current position is that employees should be encouraged to vaccinate. However, employers may require employees performing certain functions, where not being vaccinated poses a risk to the employee, other employees, or members of the public, to be vaccinated. All existing legislation and regulations must be followed in dealing with situations where employees chose not to be vaccinated. 

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2372

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that his department continues to prohibit hospital visits by families of those who are admitted to hospitals, noting that the Republic is now on Alert Level 1 lockdown?

Reply:

The Department of Health is taking serious precautionary measures by prohibiting hospital visits by the families of the patients that are admitted within the facilities because the threat of Covid-19 virus is still real. While the country in alert level 1, we remain concerned about the possible increase in infections especially because there are still a number of cases on infections that are reported through our laboratories, although very low.

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2344

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What total number of clinics situated in townships in (a) Gauteng and (b) the Eastern Cape offer (i) occupational therapy and (ii) speech therapy for children with speech challenges?

Reply:

a) Gauteng

(i) Occupational Therapy services

There are seventy-nine (79) clinics that are situated in the townships in Gauteng that offer occupational therapy onsite and forty-four (44) on outreach basis

(ii) Speech Therapy services for children with speech challenges

There are seventy-nine (79) clinics that are situated in the townships in Gauteng province that offer speech therapy onsite and forty-four (44) on outreach basis for children with speech challenges.

b) Eastern Cape

(i) Occupational Therapy

There are fifty-one (51) clinics that offer occupational therapy on outreach basis that are situated in the townships in Eastern Cape Province.

(ii) Speech Therapy

There are seventy-nine (79) clinics that are situated in the townships in Eastern Cape province that offer speech therapy on outreach basis for children with speech challenges.

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2348

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department conducted any comprehensive investigation into the allegations of the Tembisa decuplets as reported by the Independent Media Group; if not, why not; if so, what has been the findings in relation to the existence of these babies?

Reply:

Gauteng Provincial Department of conducted the investigation about the allegations made about the Tembisa decuplets and produced a report in this regard, that confirms that Ms Gosiame Thamara Sithole was never pregnant. It is therefore not necessary for the national Department of health to conduct further investigations. The report is confidential in terms of the law.

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2300

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION NO. 2300-2021 WRITTEN REPLY INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 23 –2021, DATE OF PUBLICATION 5 NOVEMBER 2021: Mr T W Mhlongo (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture; What are the details of the conference resolutions during which the department set aside R5 million for the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) to implement the programmes coming out of their policy conference; whether the specified resolutions were communicated with the sector at large; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) where can one access the information? NW2618E REPLY: The department only funded the policy conference and no other amount was given for programmes stemming out of the conference. Engagements with the Department continue to lobby for funds for proposals presented subsequent to the conference. The release of the policy conference was hampered by the delay in the payment of service providers. As a result, the conference report was withheld. Having already settled the payment, the submitted reports have been shared with provincial task team coordinators. Once all information has been verified, the report will be circulated with the sector at large.

Reply:

1. The department only funded the policy conference and no other amount was given for programmes stemming out of the conference. Engagements with the Department continue to lobby for funds for proposals presented subsequent to the conference.

2.  The release of the policy conference was hampered by the

delay in the payment of service providers. As a result, the conference report was withheld. Having already settled the payment, the submitted reports have been shared with provincial task team coordinators. Once all information has been verified, the report will be circulated with the sector at large.

18 November 2021 - NW2378

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that the Bloemanda Clinic in Kimberly is without immunisation for children, which forces parents to seek immunisation from private healthcare providers?

Reply:

According to the report from the Northern Cape Provincial department of health, the clinic that is referred to as Bloemanda is Masakane Clinic.  Masakhane Clinic has been without immunisations for children. This clinic does immunisations daily and this has been verified through stock visibility system which has not shown any stock outs for vaccines.

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2301

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture;

1(a). What are the reasons that the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) is not visible, as there is neither an active website nor social-media platforms for the national structure and (b). where is the head office of CCIFSA situated in the Republic?

Reply:

1. (a). CCIFSA has old media pages and websites that requires revival and professional upkeep and management. At the moment, the federation does not have operational budgets to actualise these activities.

(b). CCIFSA currently does not have an operational space (office), however, one has been identified in Gauteng (Johannesburg) and once budgets allow, this will be secured.

18 November 2021 - NW2396

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What is the total breakdown for lawsuits against his department for medical negligence in public hospitals (a) nationally and (b) in each province?

Reply:

The information provided is for the 2020/21 and 2021/22 Financial Years. The 2020/21 Financial Year is an update of the information that was submitted in March 2021. The information submitted in March 2021 was for Five Financial Years from 2015/16 Financial Year to 2020/21 Financial Year. The Information on 2020/21 Financial Year is now updated as when the information that was submitted in March was before the end of the Financial Year hence the submission of the updated information of the 2020/21

2020/21 FINANCIAL YEAR

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF NEW CASES RECEIVED

AMOUNT CLAIMED BY THE PLAINTIFFS[1]

Eastern Cape

Outstanding

Outstanding

Free State[2]

47 Cases

R 512 674 171.29

Gauteng[3]

77 Cases

R 873 785 433-55

KwaZulu Natal

329 Cases

R 727 706 522.00

Limpopo

215 Cases

R 1 764 652 099.00

Mpumalanga

132 Cases

R 1 058 442 000.00

North West

66 Cases

R 469 960 350.00

Northern Cape

15 Cases

R 531 716 811.04

Western Cape

65 Cases

R 529 995 591.10

TOTAL

   

 

2021/22 FINANCIAL YEAR

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF NEW CASES

AMOUNT CLAIMED BY THE PLAINTIFFS

Eastern Cape

Outstanding

Outstanding

Free State

21 Cases

R 246 850 920.00

Gauteng

53 Cases

R 560 370 586-90

KwaZulu Natal

205 Cases

R 1 578 054 150.00

Limpopo

167 Cases

R1 498 238 059.00

Mpumalanga

69 Cases

R 472 379 000

North West

31 Cases

R 215 496 610. 00

Northern Cape

11 Cases

R 169 616 789.42

Western Cape

39 Cases

R 319 202 451.00

TOTAL

   

END.

iThese are the amounts that the Plaintiffs think they are entitled to and they are not the amounts awarded by the Courts. Most of these cases are defended by the Provinces and the final payment or award if any will differ from the claimed amount.

iiThe information from Free State has been revised from 2015/16 Financial Years after data cleansing as follows: 26 cases for 2015/16, 34 Cases for 2016/17, 42 Cases for 2017/18, 42 Cases for 2018/19, 44 Cases for 2019/20 and 47 Cases for 2020/21.

iii.The information for Gauteng has been revised to 77 cases.

18 November 2021 - NW2371

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the worst global pandemic, in which we have seen public health overstretched and demands on private health going beyond this sector’s capacity, what (a) has he found will be the consequences of the decisions by the Council for Medical Schemes which are outlined by Circulars 80 and 82 of December 2019 and Circular 56 of 2015 and (b) impact will this have on the ability of low-earning households to have access to quality medical care?

Reply:

a) The Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) issued circulars 80 and 82 in December 2019 based on two sets of research results at its disposal. The main message contained in these circulars was directed at the industry indicating that the exemption that had been granted to the primary insurance products that had applied to the CMS previously may not be granted again at the end of March 2021 if there were no significant improvement and changes made to primary insurance products and low-cost benefit options (LCBO). This was based on research conducted by a group of economists on behalf of Council, indicating the undesirability of these primary insurance products and the Low-Cost Benefit Option in the medical schemes industry. These research results indicated that:

  1. These products are targeting individuals that are already tax-exempt based on their low income. Expecting these individuals to spend more of their remaining disposable income contributing to health products with thin benefits did not make sense
  2. The introduction of the Low-Cost Benefit Option and related products will be adding yet another set of benefit options in an industry with too many options that are already making rational purchasing choices difficult for the consumer. This goes against the Health Market Inquiry recommendations
  3. The Low-cost Benefit option will also require some tax subsidies and credits and further burden the fiscus during a period of economic constraints
  4. There is no evidence that these options will ensure that relief is provided to the over-burdened public health system, given the fact that their beneficiaries still primarily rely on the state for the provision of the greater part of their health benefits.
  5. The burden of disease in the lower income groups is often higher than your high income earners, and providing a low benefit option is counter-intuitive

 

The second set of research results indicated that the primary health insurance products that were subjected to analysis had serious structural shortfalls in the following areas:

  1. The greater part of the contribution made by policyholders was spent on broker fees and administration instead of the relevant health benefits
  2. The marketing of these primary insurance products was misleading, promising unlimited GP consultations when in fact, the entitlements are no more than 3 per annum
  3. These products were experienced a significantly low claims ratio due to members were not aware of the extent of cover or benefit entitlements
  4. These primary insurance products are also unlikely to reduce the over-burdened public health system on the basis of lack of comprehensive cover

b) The impact of circulars 80 and 82 on the primary insurance products in the market has been minimal as no product has been discontinued as a result of these circulars:

  1. The CMS undertook an extensive stakeholder roadshow following the issuing of circulars 80 and 82. The purpose of these engagements that took place in the more significant part of January and February 2020 was to ensure that these primary insurance products demonstrate a significant shift towards complying with the Medical Schemes Act
  2. The agreement reached with the key stakeholders was that further engagements were necessary and that a Low-Cost Benefit Framework will need to be developed that will assist these primary insurance products to migrate into the medical schemes environment
  3. There was also an appreciation that the regulator cannot perpetually exempt these primary insurance products from complying with the Medical Schemes Act and its Regulations as this is the only legislation that is at its disposal for regulatory purposes
  4. The engagements in these Advisory Committees are proceeding well and have included three workstreams:
  • Schemes and administrators
  • Insurance providers and brokers
  • Service providers, policyholders and consumers

Circulars 80 and 82 of December 2019 and Circular 56 of 2015 have no bearing on the ability of low-earning households to have access to quality medical care other than providing a guide for medical schemes to report better-managed services. However, a more relevant circular to low-earning households' affordability of care is circular 56 of 2020. The objective of circular 56 of 2020 was to provide an overall update regarding establishing the LCBO Advisory Committees and developing the Low-Cost Benefit Guidelines and notice of extension of exemption period to 31 March 2022.

The Advisory Committees were tasked with addressing the challenges faced by primary health insurance providers in complying with the Medical Schemes Act:

  • The need for medical schemes to develop options for low-income earners.
  • They would also develop a roadmap leading to the end of March 2022.
  • Provide inputs on the LCBO framework before the CMS submits it for approval by the Minister of Health
  • The Charter and Code of Conduct were issued to nominees during June/July 2020.
  • A regulatory workshop with the National Department of Health, National Treasury, Prudential Authority, Financial Sector Conduct and the Council for Medical Schemes was held on 29 September 2020;
  • Introductory workshops were held with interested parties and nominees during October 2020, whereafter the Charter and Code of Conduct was adopted.

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2319

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Following the recent United Nations report on climate change which clearly sets out the projected impact of climate change on the environment going forward, including the rise in sea level, what steps are being taken to (a) evaluate the impact of the rise in sea levels on the Republic’s coastal communities and (b) develop contingency plans with the relevant local communities and authorities; (2) (a) which areas of the coastline of the Republic has she found are deemed to be most at risk from the rise in the level of the sea over the coming 50 to 100 years and (b) what are the details of the envisaged impact; (3) whether changes in the temperature of the ocean and the consequent impact on the coastal fishing industry is being evaluated; if not, why not; if so, (4) whether these findings will be made available to Mr D W Bryant; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

 

  1. (a) The Depa#ment developed a National Coastal Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment in 2019, a decision support tool to assist coastal planning and response to physical hazards attributable to climate change, such as sea level rise, flooding, erosion, or storm events. The National Coastal Climate Change Assessment Report and the Geo-Spatial Index for coastal climate change vulnerability of South Africa's coastline and estuaries are available. http://mapservice.environment.oov.za/CoastaI%20Viewer/

(b) The Department has been rolling out training and capacity building for municipalities and has completed seven (7) sessions with coastal municipalities (Metropolitans and Districts) on the use of the data generated to support the decision making process of authorities. Both an on- line and offline tool have been developed and shared with all coastal municipalities and provinces. Coastal provinces have also been working with their respective municipalities to develop Coastal Management Lines (CMLs) for their coastline to deal precisely with coastal risk within their programmes, plans or strategies to address the sea level rise impact.

2. (a)(b)

Less risk - west coast

    • A general decrease in rainfall in the western and southern part will reduce the risk of flooding in river catchments (apart from the Orange River with its far inland reaching catchment).
    • The expected decrease of storm frequency and intensity will reduce the likelihood and intensity of sea storms. This means that the risk of coastal flooding and erosion on the west coast might be decreasing.

More risk - east coast

    • In contrast, the east coast is likely to become more affected by climate related weather events. The expected increase in the occurrence of storms and cyclones in northern KwaZuIu- Natal can increase the damage through direct wind impacts.
    • The department is currently partnering with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) on the green book, and part of the implementation will include identifying possible areas that require long-term adaptation measures to facilitate and achieve sustainable coastal development in South Africa.
  1. In 2021 the department published three reports which deal with climate change and fisheries in South Africa. These three reports are the results of national workshops that were held as part of a larger project under the umbrella of the Benguela Current Commission. The first of these evaluated the sensitivity of different fishing sectors to climate change, the likely impact that climate change would have on these sectors, how adaptable the sectors are likely to be, and how vulnerable they are. The second report evaluated possible adaptation measures for the different fishing sectors, indicating the likely threats to each sector and detailing possible adaptation measures and evaluating these in terms of their feasibility, priority and timescales. The third report

evaluated existing research for fisheries adaptation to climate change and identified areas where additional research is required going forwards. The reports can be made available on request to the communications unit of the Department.

  1. The science observations on temperature and other key features can be accessed at https://www.environment.oov.za/documents/research#oceans The findings are available in three reports, and copies of these can be provided.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 19/11/2021

18 November 2021 - NW2398

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What is the duration of vaccine immunity of the (a) Pfizer, (b) Moderna and (c) Johnson & Johnson vaccines?

Reply:

Conclusive evidence regarding the duration of immunity following immunisation against Covid-19 is not currently available.

Vaccine effectiveness has been shown to be maintained over time for severe/critical disease, but does diminish for mild-moderate disease. The durability of a particular vaccine is dependent on the variants of concern circulating at the time, and the durability of the immune response of the primary vaccine series.

It is also currently not known whether immunity induced by one vaccine will last longer than that induced by others. The vaccine effectiveness of the Moderna, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson vaccines has remained relatively stable over time for protection against hospitalisation and death. There have been mild declines in effectiveness over time for hospitalisation and death for older people and those who are immunosuppressed. This has led to recommendations to provide booster doses to older people and those who are immunosuppressed and health care workers.

Such recommendations are country specific. Although vaccine effectiveness has remained durable over time for severe/critical disease, vaccine effectiveness against infection declined in the USA in the period when the Delta variant became dominant as compared to the pre-Delta period. This has led to the recommendation to provide booster doses as mentioned above.

It is difficult to extrapolate evidence of vaccine effectiveness from other regions to South Africa for the following reasons:

  • their vaccine programmes started 4-6 months before the South African programme
  • different variants have dominated in South Africa
  • the high HIV prevalence in South Africa.

In South Africa, durability of effectiveness of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine against severe/critical disease during the Beta and Delta period was demonstrated in health care workers through the Sisonke study. The durability of the Pfizer vaccine during the Delta period has also been demonstrated. Ongoing monitoring is required to measure the duration of protection following immunisation with these vaccines.

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2311

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What are the reasons that only girls and not boys are being vaccinated as part of the Human Papillomavirus vaccine roll-out and (b) on what scientific evidence does the approach rely?

Reply:

The Human Papillomavirus vaccination programme was implemented in South Africa in 2014 with the aim of reducing the incidence of cervical cancer. A recently published study showed that women - now in their 20s - who were vaccinated against HPV in England at age 12 or 13 years experienced an 87% reduction in cervical cancer compared to the expected rate among unvaccinated women[1].

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that cervical cancer, which comprises 84% of all HPV-related cancers, should remain the priority for HPV immunisation programmes. For the prevention of cervical cancer, the WHO-recommended primary target population for HPV vaccination is girls aged 9-14 years, prior to them becoming sexually active[2]. The South African HPV vaccination programme targets Grade 5 girl learners 9 years and older in public schools, and is therefore aligned with these recommendations.

Vaccination of secondary target populations (such as girls 15 years and older, and boys) is only recommended by WHO if this is feasible, affordable, cost-effective and does not divert resources from vaccinating primary target population or from effective cervical cancer screening programmes.

Global cost-effectiveness analysis informed by country-based evidence suggests that vaccinating pre-adolescent girls is usually cost-effective, particularly in resource-constrained settings where alternative cervical cancer prevention and control measures often have limited coverage. However, if the HPV vaccination coverage in girls is greater than approximately 50% (as is the case in South Africa), then gender-neutral vaccination (targeting boys and girls) is unlikely to be cost-effective. [3],[4]

END.

  1. Falcaro M, Castañon A, Ndlela B, et al. The effects of the national HPV vaccination programme in England, UK, on cervical cancer and grade 3 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia incidence: a register-based observational study. The Lancet. 2021.

  2. World Health Organization. Human papillomavirus vaccines: WHO position paper, May 2017. Weekly epidemiological record. No 19, 2017, 92, 241–268

  3. Modelling estimates of the incremental effectiveness & cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Available at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/meetings/2016/october/07_Modelling_HPV_immunization_strategies.pdf?ua=1.

  4. Fesenfeld M, Hutubessy R and Jit M. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries: a systematic review. Vaccine. 2013 Aug 20;31(37):3786-804.

18 November 2021 - NW2317

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to the collaboration between the Government and the Mozambican government that remains an essential aspect of the war on poaching in the Kruger National Park (KNP), what are the full details and minutes of all (a) meetings and (b) initiatives in the past three years between SANParks and/or KNP and the Mozambican authorities in this regard; (2) whether there has been any collaboration between her department and the Ministry of Police to work together to address the criminal networks that are allegedly operating via Mozambique; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Minutes of joint safety and security meetings are confidential and cannot be shared, as these documents contain sensitive security-related content, including details about anti-poaching campaigns.

(b) The South African National Parks (SANParks) engages with the Republic of Mozambique through a number of forums established in accordance with the International Treaty signed in 2002 between South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. This includes the Greater Lebombo Conservancy (GLC) Security Forum which consists of:

a. Kruger National Park(KNP);

b. Mozambique — Administration of Conservation Areas (ANAC);

c. Mozambique — Environmental Police; and

d. Mozambique — Private Concessions (Karangani, Ferreira, Masintonto and Sabie Game Park).

Before the COVID-19 Pandemic, meetings were held quarterly in Xinavane, but have since been held virtually or along the South Africa/Mozambique Boundary. Various high-level visits have taken place between South Africa (SA) and Mozambique, and this includes a Mozambican delegation visit to KNP in October 2019. The delegation consisted of ANAC and Park Managers from Mozambique. It is also important to understand that at an operational level, the relationship between KNP Rangers and their Mozambican Counterparts (whether government or neighbouring concessions) does not function on the basis of scheduled meetings, but rather on daily communication and co-ordination via telephone or radio. The success of the current relationship and the efficiency it brings to law enforcement efforts is based on the building of trustful relationships informed by a shared vision. This has developed over time. This partnership informed the development of a Joint Safety and Security Plan for the Greater Lebombo Conservancy, Kruger I ationaI Park and Limpopo National Park.

There are also structures in place to give effect to the 2002 Treaty to support the policing structures on combating crime, as well as the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the department and ANAC signed in 2014 on Cooperation in the Field of Biodiversity Conservation and Management. These include the following:

a. GLTFCA Joint Management Board

b. Joint Management Committee (JMC)

c. Support to the structures aligned to the Southern African Regional Police Chiefs Coordinating Committee (SARPCCO)

d. Forum of SADC Chiefs of the Armies, South Africa and Mozambique in which SANParks participates through the department.


(2) SANParks’ Environmental Crime Investigations (ECI) Unit has, since 2013, had a working relationship with the Mozambique Police in Maputo and Gaza Provinces as well as ANAC in Maputo. Since the start of this collaboration, SANParks officials have visited Mozambique on a regular basis and vice versa. Information pertaining to wildlife crime, including rhino, elephant, lion and pangolin poaching is shared during these sessions. Members of the aforementioned Mozambican departments have, on many occasions, visited Nelspruit and Skukuza Police Stations to obtain details or statements from arrested Mozambican suspects to better understand wildlife crime networks in Mozambique. This co-operation has led to a number of successes in the fight against wildlife crime.

In addition to the ongoing collaboration that is taking place with the Mozambique Police, both with SANParks ECI (as indicated above) and SAPS (through the police co-operation structures that are in place), the depa#ment also works very closely with ANAC to ensure that information on wildlife crimes is shared timeously; linkages between the countries are understood and support in relation to investigations is provided. Where confiscations of rhino horn take place in Mozambique, samples of these horns are transported to the SAPS Forensic Science Laboratory in Pretoria so that analysis can be undertaken and linkages can be determined to poaching scenes, stockpiles or live animals in South Africa.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF F RESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE:19/11/2021

18 November 2021 - NW2318

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether, with reference to the report of the High-Level Panel of Experts for The Review of Policies, Legislation and Practices on Matters of Elephant, Lion, Leopard and Rhinoceros Management, Breeding, Hunting, Trade and Handling, which mentions that the ongoing hunting of leopard will be looked into going forward, and in view of the fact that leopards are notoriously difficult to count while it is important to know what the current numbers are so that any hunting of leopard can be properly legislated, she will advise what (a) the current estimated numbers of leopard are in the (i) Republic in general and in (ii) Kruger National Park in particular and (b) steps are being taken to promote the use of artificial leopard skin replacements for traditional ceremonies and activities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

  1. (i) Leopards are generally considered uncommon in South Africa, however, estimates of the size of the national population vary widely from 2 185 to 23 400 leopards (Friedmann & Traylor-Holzer, 2005; Martin & De Meulenaer, 1988; Swanepoel et al., 2014b). None of these estimates are based on rigorous population counts at regional scales and their confidence intervals are so wide,

indicating the need for more information (for example, 2 813 to 11 632 leopards estimated by Swanepoel et at., 2014b).

ii) Leopards are very difficult to survey accurately, especially in the dense bush found in the Kruger National Park (KNP). A mark-recapture survey using camera traps gave an estimate of between 1 630 and 2 860 leopards in the KNP in 2011. SANParks is confident that there has not been much fluctuation in respect of leopard numbers in the KNP year on year since the survey was conducted.

  1. Given the concerns around the current state of conservation of leopards, the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) is of the view that all options for the conservation and sustainable use of leopards should be explored. The use of artificial skin is an option that was introduced by NGOs in an effort to reduce the poaching of leopards for their skin. To date, it has not yet been promoted by the DFFE and may be considered by the Leopard Forum (a forum to coordinate the work of leopard management from various role players towards the development of the Leopard Biodiversity Management Plan) if it is deemed a viable option for the promotion of the conservation and sustainable use of leopards. The DFFE, however, continues to educate and raise awareness throughout the country on the threats to the survival of the species and the impact of the illegal and unsustainable use of leopards, including the unsustainable harvesting of skin and other derivatives from leopards. More importantly, the DFFE is engaging with rural and urban communities on legal ways to source skins to ensure compliance with the legislation.

SANParks has engaged with the Panthera Foundation on sourcing artificial leopard skins to be used by traditional leaders for ceremonial purposes. The Panthera Foundation has committed to providing SANParks with 20 artificial leopard skins. Upon receipt of these skins, SANParks will engage with the traditional leaders to map a way forward.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 19/11/2021

18 November 2021 - NW2397

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the minimum requirements and/or competencies for senior management positions in public hospitals; (2) with reference to senior managers employed at each Gauteng public hospital, what (a) are their (i) names and (ii) current qualifications, (b) is the total number of managers who are currently not meeting the minimum requirements and (c) is being done to address the requirement mismatch?

Reply:

(1) The minimum requirements/competencies for senior management in the Public Hospital are as prescribed by the DPSA directive on minimum entry requirements for Senior Management Service (SMS).

Minimum Qualifications for entry into SMS positions

For a Director and Chief Director - an undergraduate qualification (NQF Level 7) as recognized by South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) in Public Health/Management.

For Deputy Director-General and Head of Department – an undergraduate qualification and a post graduate qualification (NQF Level 8) as recognized by SAQA.

Minimum Years of Experience as an Entry Requirement into the SMS

SMS Level

Relevant Experience (wef 01 April 2015)

Entry (Level 13)

5 years of experience at a middle/senior management level

Level 14

5 years of experience at a senior management level

Level 15

8-10 years of experience at a senior management level

Level 16

8-10 years of experience at senior management level (at least 3 years of which must be with any organ of State as defined in the Constitution, Act 108 of 1996)

Pre-Entry Certificate into the SMS

A further requirement for appointment at SMS level is a successful completion of the Senior Management Pre-Entry Programme as endorsed by the National School of Government.

Competencies

Strategic Capability and Leadership; People Management and Empowerment; Programme and Project Management; Financial Management; Change Management; Knowledge Management; Service Delivery Innovation; Problem Solving and Analysis; Client Orientation and Customer Care; Communication; Sound Knowledge of the Relevant Legislation such as National Health Act, Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), Public Service Act.

(2) (a) (i) See the attached list (Annexure A)

(ii) Kindly see the attached list (Annexure A)

(b) None

(c) Not Applicable

END.

18 November 2021 - NW2315

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What (a) progress has been made by his department to ensure that the infrastructure at Robben Island is maintained at international heritage status, given the procurement agreement between Robben Island Museum and the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and (b) turn-around financial strategy has been successfully implemented after the specified museum has been severely impacted by a lack of tourism due to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reply:

(a). The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is the Custodian of the Robben Island and therefore responsible for the maintenance. DPWI has developed a new strategy and approach to improve the effectiveness and efficiency on rendering maintenance services known as the Total Facilities Management (TFM) programme.

The TFM solution combines services streams across the “hard” (technical maintenance) and “soft” (cleaning, hygiene, security, etc.) services under the management of a single Service Provider (SP) who also manages sub-contractors.

Known alternatively as a one -stop-shop, the benefits of TFM include minimizing management and task duplication, effecting improvement in service reliability and efficiency, and streamlining interoperability of facility services thus reducing the operational and maintenance expenditure while optimizing delivery.

DPWI is currently busy with the finalization of the procurement process of the TFM contract for a period of 36 months. The procurement process will be finalized before the end of December 2021. The TFM contract will guarantee that all maintenance needs are attended on a regular basis and will ensure that UNESCO international heritage status for the Robben Island is also maintained.

In the interim, DPWI is maintaining the facility through various term contracts. This is carried-out by DPWI Cape Town regional office.

(b). The Robben Island Museum is currently busy with implementing financial turn-around strategies to deal with a challenge of financial constraints. The measures implemented has so far been successful in preventing job losses at the Museum. This process is ongoing and the entity still faces major obstacles to recovery and will be dependent on the opening of tourism activities until a final strategy is in place informed by the development of RIM’s business model.