Questions and Replies

09 December 2016 - NW2651

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether he is aware of the incident that allegedly took place on 1 April 2016 at the Barberton Maximum Security Prison in Mpumalanga, where one inmate, with prison registration number (details furnished), allegedly assaulted a Mozambican citizen, with prison registration number (details furnished), with a razor blade inside the prison kitchen; if not, why not; if so, (2) has any investigation been undertaken in this regard; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will an investigation be launched; if so, what are the (i) full relevant details and (ii) outcomes of the specified investigation; (3) what interventions and/or support services is his department rendering to (a) assist the victim, (b) prevent the occurrence of similar incidents in the future and (c) appropriately deal with the alleged perpetrator?

Reply:

(1) Yes, Management is aware of the incident that took place on 01 April 2016 between inmates (perpetrator details furnished) and (victim details furnished)

(2) Yes, a departmental investigation was instituted.

(2)(a) N/A

(2)(b) The Investigation was concluded on 28 April 2016.

(2)(i) The nature of injury according to medical register G336 entry (2016/04/01) ref (50/16) inmate (victim details furnished) suffered deep laceration on his forehead to the nose.

(2)(ii) It was evident that inmate (perpetrator details furnished) has committed a disciplinary infringement as stated by Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, as amended and Section 23(1)(h) by committing an assault on a fellow inmate. The investigation recommendation was that disciplinary action be taken against the perpetrator.

(3)(a) The victim was taken to maximum correctional centre hospital for medical treatment and he was assisted to open a criminal case against the perpetrator.

(3)(b) The perpetrator is currently undergoing psychiatric sessions for unacceptable behaviour. Further interventions will follow after the recommendations by the Psychologist and the Case Officers. The search for unauthorized items has also been intensified, supervisors are promoting the maintenance of security awareness at centre level and Management functionaries must inculcate security awareness in all officials by means of a scheduled programme (daily/weekly/monthly) in order to ensure that every official realizes the importance of his/her role in ensuring the safe custody of prisoners. Lastly, identified tendencies/frequencies must be approached in a spirit of participative management.

(3)(c) The Case Management Committee degraded the privileges of the perpetrator from B category to C category with applicable restrictions of amenities.

09 December 2016 - NW2668

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Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Energy

(1)(a) Who were the buyers of the Strategic Fuel Fund’s sale of 10 million barrels of crude oil, (b) what portion of the specified number of barrels did each buyer buy and (c) what amount did each buyer pay; (2) have all payments in respect of the specified sale been made to date; if not, why not; if so, by what date was each payment made; (3) whether her department reserves the right to reverse the sale if found to have been illegally transacted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The information is provided in the table below:
  1. CUSTOMER
  1. CRUDE OIL (BASRAH)

(b) CRUDE OIL (BONNY)

(c)TOTAL REVENUE

(US$ )

 

Volume sold (bbls)

Volume sold (bbls)

 

Venus/Glencore

-

3 000 000

$90 224 970

Vitol

3 000 000

-

$78 606 000

Taleveras

2 000 000

2 000 000

$112 000 000

TOTAL

 

$280 000 000

2. Yes all the payments for the products sold have been made.

Customer

Payment receipt date

Venus/Glencore

04 March 2016

Vitol

11 March 2016

Taleveras

25 February 2016

3. The contract review currently underway will assist in determining the options for SFF.

09 December 2016 - NW2667

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Energy

With reference to her reply to question 2179 on 11 November 2016, why did the Strategic Fuel Fund indicate on page 51 of its 2015-16 annual report that an amount of R2,1 billion was transferred to the Equalisation Fund, which the specified fund’s 2015- 16 annual report confirms?

Reply:

The Strategic Fuel Fund compiles its Annual Financial Statement in accordance with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) that prescribes that an entity must account for transactions not only on a cash basis but also on an accrual basis.

Therefore the Transfer in question is an accrued expense as a result of the application of the provisions of Section 3(A)(c) of the CEF Act applicable to the sale of Strategic Stock and that was yet to be transferred to the Equalisation Fund.

09 December 2016 - NW2665

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether the National Energy Regulator of South Africa will furnish Mr P van Dalen with copies of Eskom’s week on week energy availability factor, demand and energy reports since 1 January 2016; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

Honourable van Dalen is requested to direct the question to the Minister of Public Enterprises as the information requested belongs to Eskom which reports to the Minister of Public Enterprises.

08 December 2016 - NW2368

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) provided any form of (a) funding, (b) assistance, (c) sponsorships and/or (d) assets to the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) since the establishment of the specified federation in 2014; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, (i) what was the value of the funding, assistance, sponsorships and/or assets provided to the CCIFSA, (ii) for what purposes and (iii) has the SABC satisfied itself that the specified purposes were met; (2) Whether the CCIFSA submitted a copy of its constitution to her; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (3) Whether the CCIFSA submitted annual financial statements for the (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16 financial years; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date(s) were the specified annual financial statements submitted to her?NW2703E

Reply:

The SABC has not provided any funding assistance and sponsorships to the above-mentioned entity.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2472

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether (a) the Chief Executive Officer, (b) each executive and (c) each board member of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSETA) submitted reports for each international trip they undertook (i) in the 2015 calendar year and (ii) since 1 January 2016; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date; (2) whether he will make the specified reports available to Ms T E Baker; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (3) whether any staff members of the CATHSETA were formally appointed to act in the positions of the persons who travelled internationally; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are (a) the names of each staff member who was appointed in an acting position in the specified period and (b) further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

1. The Board was dissolved and the SETA was placed under Administration. In 2015, the Administrator undertook one trip and a report was submitted.

2. Yes, the report is available on request.

3. No staff member was appointed to act in the position of the Administrator whilst he was travelling.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2472 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 December 2016 - NW2628

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the detailed breakdown of his department’s budget for universities in terms of the size of each component of the (a) block grants, (b) earmarked grants and (c) any other relevant grant awarded (i) in each of the past 10 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

In terms of a detailed breakdown of the Department’s budget for universities in terms of the size of each component of the (a) block grants, (b) earmarked grants and (c) any other relevant grant awarded (i) in each of the past 10 financial years, please refer to the 2015 Public Report on the State Budgets for Universities (Annexure A). As seen in the report, the state budget for universities, including allocation for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) increased from R9.878 billion in 2004/05 to R30.338 billion in 2015/16.

(ii) For the financial year starting 1 April 2016, the following table reflects the updated budget from National Treasury for 2016/17 as per the updated Ministerial Statement issued in July 2016 (Annexure B). As seen in the table below, the block grant increased from R19.561 billion in 2014/15 to R25.3 billion in 2017/18, earmarked grants increased from R4.589 billion in 2014/15 to R6.241 billion in 2017/18, and grants to institutions such as NSFAS increased from R3.914 billion in 2014/15 to R7.551 billion in 2017/18.

see the link for the table: http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2628TABLE.pdf

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2628 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 December 2016 - NW2320

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, in respect of the Auditor-General’s 2015-2016 Annual Financial Report and with specific reference to her department, and in view of the general perception that public servants find it easy to be involved in fruitless litigation cases mainly because the State funds the cases and not the individuals behind them, there is a policy regulating the management of the litigious matters of her department; if so, who is responsible for litigation processes within her department; (2) how does her department account for the amount of R205 million regarding potential liability; (3) how many court cases is her department involved in; (4) whether her department conducts a risk profiling of the cases in order to assess their chances of success; (5) whether a cost-benefit analysis is done when cases are allowed to go to court; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Question 1: Whether, in respect of the AG’s 2015-2016 Annual Financial Report and with specific reference to her department, and in view of the general perception that public servants find it easy to be involved in fruitless litigation cases mainly because the State funds the cases and not the individuals behind them, there is a policy regulating the management of litigious matters of her department; if so, who is responsible for litigation processes within the department?

Answer 1:

Yes, the department has a “Policy on the Management and Administration of Civil Claims (Including Legal Representation and Legal Opinion) in the Department of Military Veterans”. The Director Legal Services is responsible for litigation processes within the department.

Question 2: How does her department account for the amount of R205 million regarding potential liability?

Answer 2: It is reported as a contingent liability in Note 16.1 to the 2015/16 Annual Financial Statements.

Question 3: How many court cases is the DMV involved in?

Answer 3: The DMV is involved in eight court cases; Of the eight cases, two relate to labour relations and six are contract related.

Question 4: Whether the department does conduct a risk profiling of the cases to assess chances of success?

Answer 4: Legal Services does determine the merits of each case and also attempts to mediate a matter in order to resolve it amicably without having to resort to litigation. This is done in conjunction with the State Attorney, where applicable.

Question 5: Whether there is a cost benefit analysis done when cases are allowed to go to Court, if so, what are the relevant details, if not, why not?

Answer 5: Yes a cost benefit analysis is done for all cases involving the department. The cost benefit analysis is also addressed in the mediation process where the department attempts to settle matters amicably without resorting to court. When a letter of demand is received the process starts to resolve the matters without court processes. Where summons was issued and parties have entered into a settlement agreement, the settlement agreement is then made an Order of Court. It is only in exceptional cases where matters are referred to Court for a decision.

08 December 2016 - NW2371

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to the findings of the Auditor-General in respect of the Annual Report of her department for the 2015-16 financial year, (a) there are claims that are being made and linked to the reported tender contract dispute on health and wellness services that was awarded to a certain company (name furnished), which is currently in court, as reported by her department; if so, what is the status of the commitment made by a certain person (details furnished) regarding the resolution of the dispute; (2) whether a risk assessment was done in relation to the specified court case with regard to the potential financial and human costs?

Reply:

Response (1):

Dates for the hearing of court cases are set by the judiciary. The department is finalizing its papers in this matter and hopes that a court date will be set for early 2017.

(2) Whether a risk assessment was done in relation to the specified court case with regard to the potential financial and human costs? NW2707E

Response (2): The merits of the case where looked into and the human and financial costs were taken into consideration by the before the matter was referred to Court.

08 December 2016 - NW2372

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the alleged legal dispute between the Department of Military Veterans and ZEAL (details furnished), and the march of the military veterans to her department on 6 April 2016 demanding health care (details furnished), how does she reconcile the return by her department of R234m to the National Treasury with the current reported expenditure of R67 million by end of the 2015-16 financial year under this sub programme;

Reply:

Response

The matter is sub judice and therefore no further comment is possible at present in terms of Rule 89 of the National Assembly which says, “No member may reflect upon the merits of any matter on which a judicial decision in a court of law is pending.”

(2) whether a certain person (name furnished) or any official of her department involved in the alleged irregular contract has been called to any disciplinary enquiry given the devastating consequences of the dispute; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response

The Public Service Commission is busy with an investigation into this contract and the processes followed in awarding it. DMV is awaiting the outcome of the investigation.

(3) whether she has found that corruption might be the real reason behind the dispute and these serious allegations levelled against a certain person (details furnished); if so,

Response

DMV is awaiting the outcome of the Public Service Commission investigation and will act on its recommendations.

(4) has her department investigated these serious allegations of corruption; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response

DMV is awaiting the outcome of the Public Service Commission investigation and will act on its recommendations.

(5) whether her department provided protection for the whistle-blower in this matter as provided for in the Protected Disclosures Act, Act 26 of 2000; if so, (a) what steps has her department taken to ensure that the whistle-blower is not targeted and (b) what are her department’s plans to fight corruption? NW2708E

Response (5)

The investigation into the Zeal contract arises from internal processes of the department and steps I took as the Executive Authority in October 2015, after the matter was brought to my attention, to request the Public Service Commission to begin an investigation.

The Public Protector has confirmed in writing that an official of the DMV lodged a complaint to their office on 3 June 2016. As this disclosure was made long after I asked the Public Service Commission to investigate the matter, I am taking advice as to whether this can be considered a protected disclosure in terms of the Protected Disclosure Act of 2000.

08 December 2016 - NW2379

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, in light of the amount paid for services consumed in the 2015-16 financial year, as well as the suspended contract and the acknowledged inability of the SA Military Hospitals to meet primary health care needs (details furnished), the goal or objective of providing health and wellness services to military veterans was achieved in the specified year under review by merely stating the number of military veterans allowed to access services that they did not access; (2) why does her department link the increased expenditure in this subprogramme to the increased number of persons insured or assured to access services when neither was possible nor the reported expenditure is linked to the needs of the 14 666 military veterans?

Reply:

1) The Annual Performance Plan of the DMV for 2015/16, which was adopted by Parliament, set the target of providing 8000 military veterans with access to health care. As of 31st March 2016, 8 264 military veterans were authorised to access health care services adding to a total accumulative number of 14 666 as from the 2013/14 financial year to the 2015/16 financial year. This is the indicator the department reports on in the Annual Report and is aligned with Section 5 (1)(i) of the Military Veterans Act, Act 18 of 2011, which of speaks to “access to health care.” As part of its strategic planning processes the department is discussing other indicators which can be used to measure access to health care.

2): The expenditure incurred is for military veterans who have received the healthcare services.

08 December 2016 - NW2380

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With regard to the Military Veterans Health Practitioner’s Association (MVPHA), which was contracted by her department to deliver health and wellness services under a contract that was declared as irregular in the Auditor-General’s report for the 2013-14 financial year, (a) who is the MVPHA and (b) why was the specified company’s contract allowed to continue until the end of the 2014-15 financial year, despite the finding of illegality against it; (2) what is her department’s position with regard to the perception of double standards on how it deals with perceived or actual irregular service provider contracts, given the dispute on the current service provider contract that is currently in court; (3) whether she has found that there are personal relationships between the owners or managers of the company and current senior managers of (a) her department and/or (b) her Ministry; if so, (i) what is the nature of the relationship and (ii) has this been disclosed in any way; (4) (a) what amount was paid to the MVHPA and (b) when was the last payment made to them; (5) whether she has found that there are military veterans who might have died as a result of lack of access to health care services; if not, what has been done to investigate whether the lack of access to health care contributes to the deaths of military veterans; if so, how many military veterans have died as a result of lack of access to health care services?

Reply:

(1) (a) MVHPA is the Military Veterans Health Professional Association, a network of service providers which provided military veterans with access to primary healthcare services prior 2014.

(b) The Department of Military Veterans signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Military Veterans Health Professional Association (MVHPA) on the 23rd May 2013. This was followed by a partnership between DMV, South African Military Health Services (SAMHS) and MVHPA on a program to conduct healthcare assessment for all qualifying military veterans in order to obtain their disease profile as well as provision of related treatment and referral for appropriate level of healthcare. An agreement existed between MVHPA and SAMHS but no Service Level Agreement was in place to formalize the arrangement between DMV and MVHPA and hence the finding by the Auditor-General that the relationship was illegal, which rendered all payment transactions made to MVHPA irregular.

However the service still had to be rendered until another service provider was appointed.

Question (2)

What is her department’s position with regard to the perception of double standards on how it deals with perceived or actual irregular service provider contracts, given the dispute on the current service provider contract that is currently in court;

Response (2): The question refers to matter that is currently in court and is consequently sub judice. In terms of Rule 89 of the National Assembly, “No member may reflect upon the merits of any matter on which a judicial decision in a court of law is pending.”

Question (3)

whether she has found that there are personal relationships between theowners or managers of the company and current senior managers of (a) her department and/or (b) her Ministry; if so, (i) what is the nature of the relationship and (ii) has this been disclosed in any way;

Response (3):

No personal relationships have been disclosed and the department is not aware of any. The department is awaiting the outcome of a Public Service Commission investigation into this matter.

Question (4)

(a) what amount was paid to the MVHPA and (b) when was the last payment made to them;

Response (4):

(a) Total amount paid is R14 883 532.00. (b) The last payment was made on 17 October 2014.

Question (5)

whether she has found that there are military veterans who might have died as a result of lack of access to health care services; if not, what has been done to investigate whether the lack of access to health care contributes to the deaths of military veterans; if so, how many military veterans have died as a result of lack of access to health care services? NW2711E

Response (5):

The Department entered into an MoU with SAMHS to afford military veterans access to health care. The department is not aware of any cases where Military Veterans have died as a result of lack of access to health care services. If the honourable member knows of such cases he is encouraged to report them to the Minister.

08 December 2016 - NW2491

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What steps has she taken to (a) monitor and (b) correct (i) the tangible capital asset register (ii) irregular expenditure (iii) organogram and (iv) reported failures as indicated by the Auditor-General in respect of the corporate services branch of her department; (2) has she called the Deputy Director-General to account for the poor performance in the corporate services; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) is there a policy regarding consequences for poor performance; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) has the irregular expenditure indicated in the 2015-16 report of the Auditor-General been reported to the National Treasury, if so, what action has been taken regarding the individuals responsible for the specified expenditure?

Reply:

(1) What steps has she taken to (a) monitor and (b) correct (i) the tangible capital asset register (ii) irregular expenditure (iii) organogram and (iv) reported failures as indicated by the Auditor-General in respect of the corporate services branch of her department;

Response:

(i) Assets Management:

(a) Monitoring: A permanent assets management unit has been approved by the Executive Committee. This unit will ensure that all assets of the department are fully accounted for all the times.

(b) Correction: During 2015/16 Financial Year, the assets register was reconstructed and reconciled with annual financial statement. The remaining item is the finalisation of the verification process which is currently at 80% completion.

(ii) Irregular expenditure:

(a) Monitoring: The registers have been compiled for each of the years and these are reconciled to the annual financial statements.

(b) Correction: The Irregular and Fruitless and Wasteful expenditure dates back to 2013/2014 financial year. The Financial Misconduct Panel has been formed and approved by the Accounting Officer. The Panel has been tasked to expedite the investigations. The timeline given by Executive Authority is 15 January 2017.

(iii) Organogram

(a) Monitoring: The organogram is closely monitored by HR with continuous engagements with branches concerned.

(b) Correction: The ideal organogram has been developed by the Department and continuous engagements with DPSA are in place.

(iv) Reported failures by AGSA

General failures as noticed by AGSA are as follows:

  • Percentage of staff attending training
  • Lack of consequence management to staff without Performance Agreements.
  • Vacancy Rate on funded posts
  • Non adherence to 30 days payment rule

(a) Monitoring: All of the above are presented at monthly management meetings. Where gaps may exist, action plans are put in place to correct such.

(b) Correction: The skills audit will be completed by the end of quarter four. All SMS performance agreements except for one, are in place. With the current funded structure where posts favours administration, a rebalancing exercise is being undertaken by the Department to address capacitation of Service delivery branches. This is being done whilst a consultative process is in place with DPSA. The issue of 30days payment rule is being addressed by re-looking and changing the invoice handling exercise.

08 December 2016 - NW2492

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the summary report which indicates that her department is still busy with investigations of irregular expenditure that occurred in 2015-16 financial year, (a) how far have the specified investigations gone and (b) by what date can a report on the specified investigations be expected; (2) what steps has she taken with regard to her department’s disregard of the recommendations of the Auditor-General and concerns of the Portfolio Committee on Defence; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what steps is her department taking to ensure that there is no poor performance with regard to rendering services to the destitute military veterans whilst the officials of the department receive performance bonuses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) does her department have a policy to hold officials personally responsible for delinquency or dereliction of duties; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) how does her department justify the approval of bonuses while there are outstanding performance contracts?

Reply:

(1) with reference to the summary report which indicates that her department is still busy with investigations of irregular expenditure that occurred in 2015-16 financial year, (a) how far have the specified investigations gone and (b) by what date can a report on the specified investigations be expected;

Response:

(1)(a) The Financial Misconduct Committee of DMV is busy considering each of the incidents. They will be reported to the Accounting Officer for action.

(1)(b) Scopa has given the Department till the middle of January to report on the investigations and consequent management actions taken. The Accounting Officer is aiming to complete these actions by the 15 January 2017.

(2) what steps has she taken with regard to her department’s disregard of the recommendations of the Auditor-General and concerns of the Portfolio Committee on Defence; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response:

(2) I am not aware of what issues the Honourable Member is referring to. However the Portfolio Committee has developed a dashboard of issues for the department to report on and the department is following this plan.

Question (3)

What steps is her department taking to ensure that there is no poor performance with regard to rendering services to the destitute military veterans whilst the officials of the department receive performance bonuses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response: I have ensured that a full complement of DDGs, a new CFO and an acting DG have been appointed. They have entered into performance agreements to which they are being held responsible.

The department is in the process of reviewing the organisational structure to address capacity issues. In addition to that the department has developed its service delivery model to enhance service delivery.

(4) does her department have a policy to hold officials personally responsible for delinquency or dereliction of duties; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response:

(4) The Department utilises the Public Service Prescripts; Public Service Act, SMS Handbook and Public Service Regulations to hold officials accountable. Regarding Finance and Supply Chain Management the PFMA and National Treasury Regulations are utilised.

(5) how does her department justify the approval of bonuses while there are outstanding performance contracts?

Response: The level 1-12 employees were paid performance bonuses after being assessed by their respective managers and supervisors. The department did not award performance bonuses for SMS Members. By direction of the then Acting Director-General employees were instructed to submit their Performance Agreements. All except one SMS member have submitted Performance Agreement by 1 December 2016.

NW2714E

08 December 2016 - NW2558

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the 2015-16 report of the Auditor-General in respect of her department, which indicates that morale is low among employees, what has she found to be the cause and what is she and senior officials doing to improve the morale; (2) given the reported lack of relevant expertise on skills in the specified report, does her department have a policy regarding the recruitment of senior managers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) does her department have a fair and transparent recruitment policy that prevents patronage and allows capable candidates to be appointed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) by what date will existing vacancies be filled and (b) what is the cause of the delay in the appointment of a permanent director-general?

Reply:

Response

Question (1):

The department is busy with an employee satisfaction survey in order to identify issues affecting morale amongst employees. The department is also conducting a skills audit to ensure that employees are placed appropriately according to their skills. These will be reported once they are completed.

The newly appointed Acting Director-General has begun a process of interacting with employees to inform them key developments in the department engage in team building and improve morale.

Question (2) Given the reported lack of relevant expertise on skills in the specified report, does her department have a policy regarding the recruitment of senior managers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response

The Department has a Recruitment Policy and it is implemented in line with Public Service Commission requirements for Public Service Recruitment practices.

Question (3) Does her department have a fair and transparent recruitment policy that prevents patronage and allows capable candidates to be appointed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Response

All appointments within the department are done through the Public Service Regulations, Part VII. Procedures for Appointment, Promotions and Termination of Service. Our recruitment policy is transparent and fair.


Question (4): (a) By what date will existing vacancies be filled and (b) what is the cause of the delay in the appointment of permanent director-general

Response

(a) The department is in a process of filling all the posts and priority is being given to the two service delivery branches – Socio-Economic Support and Empowerment and Stakeholder Management. It is hoped this will be completed by the end of the financial year.

(b) The interview and evaluation processes for the appointment of the Director-General was completed. However, due to administrative challenges between DPSA and DMV the process was stalled. It is hoped that this post will be permanently filled soon.

08 December 2016 - NW2617

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Why do the security cameras at the (i) duty room of the Logistics/Procurement Division and (ii) soccer field of the Youngsfield Military Base in Wetton, Cape Town, remain dysfunctional, (b) (i) which company supplied the cameras and (ii) is there any warranty or guarantee on the faulty cameras, (c) what was the total cost of procuring the cameras and (d) what are the specifications of the cameras; (2) what are the reasons that no security cameras have been installed at the armoury which is considered a high risk; (3) after the findings of the assessment were reached, what are the details of the recommendations regarding the installation of security cameras after the assessment was concluded?

Reply:

Due to the security implications of this question, a response can only be provided in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence.

08 December 2016 - NW2623

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether a certain person (name furnished), stationed at the Youngsfield Military Base in Wetton, Cape Town, has taken regular sick leave; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of sick leave taken by the specified person for each of the past three financial years in terms of the (a) duration, (b) nature of the illness, (c)(i) sick certificates issued and (ii) name of medical practitioner(s) who issued the certificates and (d) sick leave cycles?

Reply:

Details as to the member’s medical condition cannot be disclosed as it would be a violation of doctor and patient privilege.

08 December 2016 - NW2362

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether there are any limits on the number of times that funding is allocated to a small community print media project through the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how many times can funding be allocated to one small community print media project, (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard and (c) how are the specified projects which receive funding more than once monitored; (2) Whether the MDDA has allocated more funding to small community print media projects than what the applicants requested (a) in the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) why and (ii) what (aa) are the names of the small community print media projects, (bb) amounts were (aaa) requested and (bbb) allocated and (iii) motivation was provided for the variance in each case?

Reply:

1. There is no limit on the number of times funding is allocated to a small community print media project through the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA). Funding is allocated after a detailed assessment has been conducted on the basic needs of the applicant and a situational analysis by the MDDA. Consideration is taken based on available budget in each financial year.

 a) There is no limit on the number of times funding is allocated to a small community print media project through the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA). The current funding cycle is allocated to cover a period of 12 months, however the grant agreement is signed to cover 18 months in order to allow ample time for reporting, capacity building and compliance.

 b) Details are covered in the grant in aid agreement and a sample of an existing agreement can be made available on request. Funding is allocated in tranches to ensure compliance and monitoring.

 c) Projects that are recommended for additional support must have demonstrated good management practices and have complied with the previous grant agreement. Monitoring is an ongoing process taking place in various forms, including desktop and telephonic assessment, validation of reported information and site visits.

2.

a) Yes, the MDDA has in instances in the past five financial years allocated more funding to small community print media projects than what the applicants requested.

b) Yes, the MDDA has in instances since 1 April 2016 allocated more funding to small community print media projects than what the applicants requested.

  (i) The MDDA Board considers and approves additional support to that requested by the project based on an in depth assessment of the needs of the applicants, and taking consideration amongst others the socio economic challenges of the applicant.

(ii)

(aa) For Q1 and Q2 of 2016/2017, the MDDA did not allocate more funding to the small community print media projects than what the applicants requested. However, the Board approved increases to the recommended budgets submitted by the project team in the following cases: Seipone News, Ikhwezi News, Seipone Times, Glimpse Magazine, Disability Magazine, Amandla Magazine, and Lekunutu News. The Board approved these increased amounts based on needs assessment during adjudication.

(bb) The amounts (aaa) requested and (bbb) allocated and (iii) motivation for the variance in each case are provided in the table below.

 

Project Name

District Municipality

Province

Amount Requested

(aaa)

Amount Approved

(bbb)

Board Motivation for the variance in each case

(iii)

Small Commercial

(Strengthening)

Seipone News

Capricorn District

Limpopo

R1 306 000

R 663 400

  • Include stipends for 2 journalists

Small Commercial

(Strengthening)

Ikhwezi News

OR Tambo District Municipality

Eastern Cape

R645 695.04

R 557 312

  • Include stipends for 2 journalists

Small Commercial (New)

Seipone Times

Thabo Mofutsanyane District

Free State

R818 000

R 659 600

  • Include stipends for 2 journalists

Small Commercial (New)

Glimpse Magazine

Ngaka Modiri Molema District

Northwest

R1 307 340.01

R 414 176

  • Include stipends for 2 journalists

Community Print (Strengthening)

Rise & Shine Disability Magazine

Buffalo City

Eastern Cape

R758 430

R 427 700

  • Include stipends for 2 journalists

Community Print (Strengthening)

Amandla Magazine

City of Cape Town

Western Cape

R1 495 000

R 547 000

  • Include Social Media Platform @ R12,000 requested
  • include Reading Groups/Amandla Forum (the project to choose to implement any) @ R120,000

Community Print (New)

Lekunutu News

Waterberg District

Limpopo

R1 056 600

R 467,561.64

  • Include stipends for 2 journalists

Small Commercial Print (New

Ganyisa

Dr Ruth Mompati District

North West

R778 6000

R536 600

  • Approved as recommended

Small Commercial Newspaper

(New)

KZN Community Newspaper

City of Ethekwini

Kwazulu Natal

R 1 582 620

R 843 000

  • Approved as recommended

Community Print

(New)

Malatsi Media

City of Tshwane

Gauteng

R 2 000 000

R 700 000

  • Approved as recommended

Small Commercial Newspaper (Strengthening)

Winelands Echo

Cape Winelands District

Western Cape

R1 219 524.74

R 723 696

  • Approved as recommended

Small Commercial Newspaper (Strengthening)

Nthavela News

Capricorn District

Limpopo

R1 169 300

R 765 600

  • Approved as recommended

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2363

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) What amount in advertising revenue did each small community print media project which is supported by the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) generate (a) in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and (v) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; (2) Whether the MDDA has put any succession plans in place to assist small community print media projects in mitigating instabilities affecting the delivery of planned targets; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) (i), (ii), (iii), (iv) and (v) The MDDA publishes advertising revenue generated by each small community print media project which is supported by the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) via the Milele Group and the Government Communication Information System (GCIS) in its annual report. These are available on request. The MDDA does not have direct access to detailed advertising income until it receives annual reports from media buyers and the GCIS. To provide a comprehensive breakdown per community print project requires a survey in order to give justice in responding to this question as we do not have readily available information within the specified time.

(b) Information on advertising revenue generated by each small community print media project which is supported by the MDDA via the Milele Group and the GCIS is consolidated on an annual basis for publication in the MDDA annual report. The MDDA does not have direct access to detailed advertising income until it receives annual report from media buyers and the GCIS. To provide a comprehensive breakdown on advertising revenue generated per community print project since 1 April 2016 requires a survey in order to give justice in responding to this question as we do not have readily available information within the specified time.

2. (a) Yes, the MDDA has succession plans in place to assist small community print media projects in mitigating instabilities affecting the delivery of planned targets, via established partnerships to capacitate the print sector on content development. These partnerships include arrangements with Soul City, AIP, SAASTA and SEDA, ongoing engagement with the Big4, ongoing engagement with the GCIS on media buying and planned engagement with SALGA and all state organs on media buying.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

08 December 2016 - NW2537

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

What were the monthly (a) listenership and (b) advertising revenue figures for each SA Broadcasting Corporation radio station since 12 May 2016?

Reply:

(a) Radio audiences are measured quarterly and not monthly. There was a significant change in radio audience research methodology during the period in question (from previous SAARF RAMS to BRC RAM) and the findings are thus not comparable. The following graphic was derived from the first BRC RAM research released in August 2016.

 

(b) Advertising revenues are presented excluding Agency Commission, Credit Notes, and Compensation. The revenues received by the organisation fluctuate according to available spend by advertisers.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2538

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

What have been the monthly (a) viewership and (b) advertising revenue figures for each television station of the SA Broadcasting Corporation since 1 July 2016?

Reply:

(a) The SABC monitors television audiences in terms of monthly audience share.

(b) Advertising revenues are presented excluding Agency Commission, Credit Notes, and Compensation. The revenues received by the organisation fluctuate according to seasonality and available spend by advertisers.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2539

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

What (a) was the purpose of her attendance at the NexTV CEO Africa 2016 Summit in Mauritius on 29 and 30 September 2016, (b) are the (i) names and (ii) positions of persons who accompanied her and (c) was the (i) total cost and (ii) detailed breakdown of such costs of the specified trip?

Reply:

(a) NexTV CEO Africa 2016, was an exclusive event that brought together the Anglophone and Francophone markets of Sub Saharan Africa to discuss strategic ventures, regulatory issues and will be a fantastic accelerator for business and for lobby in the broadcasting industry going forward. Minister Faith Muthambi was invited to participate and give a keynote address at the opening session of the two-day summit, where she addressed delegates on the digital television revolution in Africa.

(b) (i) & (ii)

  • Ms Basani Baloyi: Chief of Staff;
  • Mr Sandile Nene: Special Advisor to the Minister; and
  • Mr Nthambeleni Gabara: Assistant Director: GCIS SANews Unit.

(c) (i) R 184 420.44

    (ii) Accommodation: R44 949.50

        Flights: R 121 459.66

        Travel allowance: R18 011.28

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2540

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) How many (i) international and (ii) domestic trips were undertaken by each (aa) senior manager and (bb) board member of each entity reporting to her in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (b) in each case, what (i) class of travel was used and (ii) is the detailed breakdown of costs incurred?

Reply:

  1. Brand South Africa

2014/15

 

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

35

36

15 business

20 economy

29 business 7 economy

R 1 023 666

R 210 257

Board Members

4

8

Business

Business

R 585 067

R 465 491

2015/16

 

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

26

53

12 business

14 economy

17 business

36 economy

R 787 680

R 354 074

Board Members

N/A

N/A

-

-

-

-

2. Film and Publication Board

2014/15

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

7

64

7 business

All domestic

R1 394 568

R602 755

Board Members

4

13

4 business

All domestic

 

R99 885

2015/16

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

9

81

8 business

1 economy

All domestic

R1 533 248

R644 238

Board Members

6

18

6 business

All domestic

 

R123 396

3. Independent Communications Authority of South Africa

2014/15

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

18

59

13 business

5 economy

59 economy

R 637 984

R 399 444

Board Members

29

40

29 business

40 economy

R 806 054

R 254 697

2015/16

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

35

100

20 business

15 economy

100 economy

R 764 140

R 536 455

Board Members

14

26

14 business

26 economy

R 617 475

R 203 923

4. Media Development and Diversity Agency

2014/15

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

0

90*

-

Economy

-

361,839.38

Board Members

0

53*

-

Economy

-

249,010.22

*These numbers are subject to verification

2015/16

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

2

82*

Economy

Economy

65,663.74

328,164.42

Board Members

1

91*

Economy

Economy

61,304.72

366,308.68

*These numbers are subject to verification

5. South African Broadcasting Association

2014/15

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

35

36

Business X 15 Economy X 20

Business X 29 Economy X 7

1,023,666

210,257

Board Members

4

8

Business

Business

585,067

465,491

2015/16

Delegation

International trips

Domestic trips

Class International trips

Class Domestic trips

Cost International trips

Cost Domestic trips

Senior Managers

12

179

Business

Business x 60 Economy x 119

1,091,146.67

1,971,593.75

Board Members

0

33

N/A

Business x 32 Economy x 1

N/A

312,996.73

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2613

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) Board approved the alleged (a) R10 000 payments made to SABC employees and (b) R50 000 payments made to 185 music legends by the former Chief Operating Officer, Mr Hlaudi Motsoeneng; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) from which budget(s) were the specified payments made, (ii) what criteria were used to determine who the 185 music legends are and (iii) were the payments tax deductible?

Reply:

This matter forms part of the enquiry therefore the SABC cannot at this stage respond to this question.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2614

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether the former Chief Operating Officer of the SA Broadcasting Corporation received any form of bonus for concluding the contract with a certain company (name and details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount did the specified person receive, (b) what are the terms of payment of the bonus, (c) what criteria were used to determine the extent of the bonus, (d) who approved the specified bonus and (e) from which budget(s) was the bonus paid; (2) Whether any actors have received any remuneration generated from the airing of the specified channel; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The disclosure of employee remuneration is against employee regulation. Any payments made in the current financial year will be disclosed in the 2016/17 Annual Report.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2664

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to remarks made by the Group Chief Executive of Corporate Affairs of the SA Broadcasting Corporation, Mr Hlaudi Motsoeneng, at The New Age Business Briefing on 27 October 2016, that he allegedly met a certain person (name furnished) at an unknown hotel, (a) what are the names of each person who attended the specified meeting, (b)(i) on what date and (ii) where did the meeting take place, (c) what was the purpose of the meeting and (d) what were the decisions at the meeting?

Reply:

This matter is a subject of an on-going legal case and therefore sub-judice. Thus, the SABC cannot at this stage respond to the question.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2016 - NW2444

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James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the total number of grants that were paid out by the Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority in the 2015-16 financial year, (b) which institution was each grant awarded to, (c) how many students completed the training courses offered and (d) what qualification did each of the specified students receive?

Reply:

At the end of 2014/15, the Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) had an over commitment of R292 million and an operational deficit of R174 million. There were also serious problems regarding non-compliance with the Skills Development Act in the awarding of Discretionary Grants. As part of the administration process, policies and standard operating procedures were developed to govern the awarding of Discretionary Grant funding. As a result, SASSETA only began to implement most of its Discretionary Grant awards in the last two quarters of 2015/16, and as a result most of the learners will only complete their courses in 2016/17.

a) 47 Grants were awarded.

b) The following institutions were awarded grants:

  • Mopani South East TVET College
  • Department of Defence in partnership with the Tshwane South TVET College
  • Department of Defence in partnership with the Northlink TVET College
  • Department of Correctional Services
  • Umfolozi TVET College
  • Department of Justice and Constitutional Development
  • National Prosecuting Authority
  • Umgungundlovu District Municipality
  • Independent Police Investigative Directorate
  • Majuba TVET College
  • NPA with Kalideen Management Services (Pty) Ltd as the accredited training provider
  • Empower Training Services with Enforce as the accredited training provider
  • Servest Security (Pty) Ltd
  • NPA with Ramazwi Security Services and Training Agency (Pty) Ltd as the accredited training provider
  • EEL Protection Services
  • Nomaduku Security Services
  • Vuco Security and Umgungundlovu Municipality
  • OR Tambo District Municipality with PE Traffic College as the accredited training provider
  • Department of Justice and Constitutional Development with in house accredited Justice College as the accredited training provider
  • Fidelity Security
  • Popo Protection Services
  • Department of Correctional Services in partnership with North West University
  • Mapheto Business Enterprise
  • Department of Correctional Services in partnership with North West University
  • NPA in partnership with University of Pretoria.
  • Romula Security
  • Department of Correctional Services with Lesedi Guarding & Training Services as the accredited training provider
  • Sharks Protection
  • Department of Justice in partnership with University of Pretoria
  • Security for U
  • SAPS in partnership with University of Pretoria
  • Department of Home Affairs
  • Various Accredited Institutions of Higher Learning
  • Various Public Tertiary Institutions
  • University of Pretoria
  • UNISA
  • National School of Government
  • University of Witwatersrand
  • University of Witwatersrand
  • Various TVETS and at SAPS, DOJ and Home Affairs

c) 1 589 Learners completed their training programmes.

d) The following qualifications were received:

  • 1 year NQF
  • 3 year NATED Levels to N1 - 3
  • 1 year Learnership NQF Level 4
  • Service Certificates
  • University WIL Service Certificate
  • National Certificate Road Traffic Law Enforcement
  • University Certificate as a module in post graduate diploma
  • Firearm certification in terms of the Firearm Control Act
  • Degrees and Diplomas
  • National School of Governance Certification
  • University Certification in Defence and Security Management
  • Diploma in Nursing
  • Postgraduate Diploma

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2444 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 December 2016 - NW2588

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

(1)With reference to his replies to questions 2137 and 2138 on 11 November 2016, on which date did he reprimand the Minister of Mineral Resources, Mr M J Zwane; (2) Whether the specified Minister received a letter of reprimand; if not, (a) why not and (b) what form did the reprimand take; if so, (i) when was the specified letter sent to the Minister and (ii) why was the letter not tabled in Parliament; (3) Whether he will table the letter in Parliament; if not, why not; if so, by which date? NW3001E

Reply:

The reprimand was in the form of a letter to the Minister of Mineral Resources dated 23 September 2016. The Minister apologised for his statement.

07 December 2016 - NW2514

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) current total debt and (b) detailed breakdown of the total debt into (i) local currency denominated debt and (ii) foreign currency denominated debt of each state-owned company?

Reply:

ALEXKOR SOC LTD

(a)

R NIL

(b)

(i)

R NIL

 

(ii)

R NIL

DENEL SOC LTD

Rb’s

Local currency denominated debt

3 717

Foreign currency denominated debt

0

Total debt

3 717

(a)

R 3 717 000 000.00 (Three Billion Seven Hundred and Seventeen Million Rands).

(b)

(i)

R 3 717 000 000.00 (Three Billion Seven Hundred and Seventeen Million Rands).

 

(ii)

R NIL

ESKOM SOC LTD

Rb’s

Local currency denominated debt

218

Foreign currency denominated debt

115

Total debt

333

(a)

R333 000 000 000.00 (Three Hundred and Thirty Three Billion Rands).

(b)

(i)

R 218 000 000 000. 00 (Two Hundred and Eighteen Billion Rands).

 

(ii)

R 115 000 000 000.00 (One Hundred and Fifteen Billion Rands)

     

SAFCOL SOC LTD

Rm’s

Local currency denominated debt

73.138

Foreign currency denominated debt

0

Total debt

73.138

(a)

R 73 138 033.84 (Seventy Three Million One Hundred and Thirty Eight Thousands and Thirty Three Rands and Eighty Four cents).

(b)

(i)

R 73 138 033.84 (Seventy Three Million One Hundred and Thirty Eight Thousands and Thirty Three Rands and Eighty Four cents).

 

(ii)

R NIL

SA EXPRESS SOC LTD

Rm’s

Local currency denominated debt

1077

Foreign currency denominated debt

147

Total debt

1224

(a)

R 1 224 000 000. 00 (One Billion Two Hundred and Twenty Four Million Rands).

(b)

(i)

R 1 077 000 000.00 (One Billion and Seventy Seven Million Rands).

 

(ii)

R 147 000 000.00 (One Hundred and Forty Seven Million Rands).

TRANSNET SOC LTD

Rb’s

Local currency denominated debt

94.90

Foreign currency denominated debt

24.10

Total debt

119

(a)

R 119 000 000 000.00 (One Hundred and Nineteen Billion Rands).

(b)

(i)

R 94 900 000 000.00 (Ninety Four Billion Nine Hundred Million Rands).

 

(ii)

R 24 100 000 000.00 (Twenty Four Billion One Hundred Million Rands).

07 December 2016 - NW2643

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether each time frame set for each target of her department’s Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative programme has been reached since it was launched in the 2011-12 financial year; if not, (a) why not and (b) how were the specified time frames amended in each case; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether any contractors working on the specified programme were blacklisted for nonperformance since the announcement by her deputy, Mr M E Surty, to this effect in the meeting of the Standing Committee on Appropriations on 20 February 2013; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details; (3) (a) what is the (i) total expenditure on the programme and (ii) detailed breakdown of the expenditure (aa) in each financial year since the 2011-12 financial year and (bb) on each project in each province to date and (b) how was the programme funded to date; (4) whether her department will amend the programme’s (a) targets and/or (b) time frames again; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (5) whether she has put any measures in place to ensure that the programme’s targets are delivered timeously; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The time frames have not been met in every case. ASIDI is a multi-year programme and the building of a school takes, on average 12 to 15 months. Prior to that is the process of procurement, which must follow laid down procedures, and design, planning and construction. A project cycle does not necessarily follow a financial year.

2. Implementing agents blacklist non performing contractors and send the list to Construction Industry Development Board.(CIBD).

3. The expenditure on the programme to date is detailed below:

Inappropriate Structures

       
     

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Eastern Cape

 

63 984 913

643 912 612

790 329 040

1 358 016 195

976 037 703

Free State

 

-

17 746 043

146 775 703

518 183 195

187 121 154

KwaZulu-Natal

 

-

-

1 000 000

13 994 772

7 033 233

Limpopo

   

-

-

32 188 714

89 036 857

12 415 992

Mpumalanga

 

-

-

32 188 714

89 036 857

18 139 438

Northwest

 

-

-

8 349 205

86 219 551

15 062 193

Northern Cape

 

-

 

3 960 685

15 751 841

6 439 904

Western Cape

 

 

 

533 019 000

396 697 000

262 049 000

     

63 984 913

661 658 655

1 547 811 061

2 566 936 268

1 484 298 617

               

Water & Sanitation

           
     

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Eastern Cape

 

7 843 987

35 431 692

265 153 466

140 788 186

98 471 455

Free State

 

1 232 657

10 760 350

3 355 713

831 166

-

KwaZulu-Natal

 

-

34 441 881

64 772 375

120 082 396

33 512 363

Limpopo

   

-

36 542 858

67 409 852

29 322 070

5 818 007

Mpumalanga

 

-

-

-

43 236 964

29 025 376

Northwest

 

-

-

-

17 378 852

-

Northern Cape

 

-

 

3 960 685

10 869 214

-

     

9 076 644

117 176 781

404 652 091

362 508 848

166 827 201

               

Electricity

             
     

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Eskom (All Provinces)

-

22 900 834

3 334 927

53 202 521

24 806 781

               

Total Capital Expenditure

73 061 557

801 736 270

1 955 798 079

2 982 647 637

1 675 932 598

               

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE SINCE INCEPTION WITHOUT WC

 

7 489 176 141

               

4. The programme is amended in keeping with performance cycles and implementing agent capacity. Implementing Agents have agreed to bolster their internal capacities and are geared to complete the programme by the proposed new completion dates.

5.The ASIDI programme is now planned to be completed at the end of the 2017/18 financial year. 126 schools are at different phases of implementation and 216 schools are the subject of a completed rationalisation and mergers exercise. The DBE will now go in to a period of procurement, planning and design before construction can begin in earnest.

RESPONSE TO NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION 2643

COMPILER:

MS J MODIPA

EXT: X 4272

DATE:

MR T KOJANA

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: SECTOR INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR–GENERAL

DATE:

QUESTION NA 2643 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

MR ME SURTY, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

MRS AM MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER

DATE:

07 December 2016 - NW2644

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to her statement on the progress of the Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public Schools Infrastructure on 14 November 2016, when will the (a) 66 remaining schools without sanitation, (b) 81 schools without water and (c) 571 schools without electricity be provided with these resources?

Reply:

a) With regard to 66 remaining schools without sanitation, all the schools are currently at different stages of implementation and will be completed during the current 2016/2017 financial year.

b) With regard to 81 remaining schools without water, all the schools are currently at different stages of implementation and will be completed during the current 2016/2017 financial year.

c) With regard to 571 remaining schools without electricity, all the schools are currently at different stages of implementation and will be completed during 2017/2018 financial year.

07 December 2016 - NW2669

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1099 on 8 July 2016, she has received the outstanding information from the SA Council of Educators (SACE); if not, why not; if so, by what date will the information be communicated; (2) how many (a) cases of teacher misconduct were reported to SACE in each province in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and (v) 2015-16 financial years and (b) of the specified cases related to (i) fraudulent qualifications, (ii) sexual misconduct and (iii) physical assault?

Reply:

1. The information has been requested from the South African Council of Educators (SACE) and regular follow-up on this has been done with them. To date, we have not received this information from the SACE.

2. The SACE has provided the DBE with the following information:

The total number of educators struck-off the roll during (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13, (cc) 2013-14, (dd) 2014-15 and (ee) 2015-16 is as follows:

2011/12

Educators struck off indefinitely: 31

Educators struck off but may re-apply after a certain period: 01

2012/13

Educators struck off indefinitely: 27

Educators struck off but may re-apply after a certain period: 01

2013/14

Educators struck off indefinitely: 03

Educators struck off but may re-apply after a certain period: 06

2014/15

Educators struck off indefinitely: 10

Educators struck off but may re-apply after a certain period: 18

2015/16

Educators struck off indefinitely: 25

Educators struck off but may re-apply after a certain period: 05

The information received from SACE does not give a provincial breakdown of cases, nor does it indicate the nature of the cases that have been struck-off the roll.

 

RESPONSE TO NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION 2669

COMPILED BY:

MS S GEYER

CHIEF DIRECTOR: EDUCATION HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

DATE:

MR T KOJANA

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: TEACHER AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

QUESTION 2669: APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED

MR ME SURTY, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

MRS AM MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER:

DATE:

07 December 2016 - NW2703

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Was there any public participation and consultation with regard to the new SA Bureau of Standards policy on number plates; if not, why not; if so, (a) in what form did the participation and consultation take place, (b) which organisations participated and (c) on what dates did the participation and consultation take place; (2) (a) when will a national standard be concluded, (b) where can the original specifications be accessed, (c) what testing has been conducted on number plates in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (d) what were the test results in each of the specified years?NW3194E

Reply:

1. Yes, there was public participation and consultations with affected stakeholders in the number plate industry.

(a) Participation and consultation took place in the form of meetings with affected stakeholders.

(b) The number plate industry, comprising number plate blankers/manufacturers and embossers participated in the meetings with the SABS. The industry was represented by South African Number Plate Association, the Number Plate Association of South Africa, the Retail Motor Industry Organisation(RMI) and the companies Uniplate, New Number Plate Requisites and ARGA. Meetings were also held with all the provincial transport departments except those of the North West and the Western Cape provinces.

(c) Meetings were held on 8 February 2016, 10 February 2016, 06 April 2016 and 18 April 2016 with the various stakeholders mentioned in (b) above.

2. (a) Number plates are controlled by the existing South African National Standard (SANS) 1116. There are no new national standards being developed to control number plates.

(b) The original specifications that are contained in SANS 1116 can be assessed through the SABS Sales Office in Pretoria and also through the SABS regional offices. These specifications can also be assessed on the SABS online webstore.

(c) Responses to the following sub questions: i, ii and iii and also (d) are all captured in tabular form below.

Summary of tests conducted in 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16

Tests conducted according to SANS 1116-2 and 4

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Current failures

License Numbers (characters)

   

X

X

Setting out characters

   

X

 

Color and luminance factors

   

X

 

License number and border

   

X

 

Graphics

   

x

X

Workmanship

   

x

 

Retro-reflective material

   

x

 

Resistance to weathering

   

x

 

Resistance to scratching

x

x

x

 

Resistance to bending

x

x

x

 

Resistance to impact (applies only to plastic number plates)

x

x

x

 

Resistance to abrasion (applies to aluminium number plate)

x

x

x

 

Packing

   

X

X

07 December 2016 - NW2293

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether any (a) internal and/or (b) external forensic reports pertaining to (i) her Department and/or (ii) each entity reporting to her were completed from 01 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what is the (aa) name, (bb) subject matter and (cc) date of conclusion of each of the specified forensic reports?

Reply:

The results of forensic related investigations are often detailed in a forensic report.

These reports are often used for several purposes. It is important to take note of the legally privileged and confidential information contained in forensic reports. Due process and protocols of releasing such information should be followed especially if such reports have not been released to the public domain.

It is advisable that a note which reads: “this document is intended only for the use of the person named herein and may contain legally privileged and confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient of this document, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this document is strictly prohibited”.

The member should therefore be aware that Government departments and its entities accounts for such related information by tabling annual reports every year and this document, inclusive of this line item (i.e. Disciplinary action/termination) are audited by the Auditor General, who makes recommendations on any findings. Annual Reports are widely available to the public.

---ooOoo---

07 December 2016 - NW2634

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Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to reported allegations (details furnished), he is aware of any bribe money paid by the Russians in relation to the procurement of nuclear generating capacity for the Republic of South Africa?

Reply:

The Procurement of the Nuclear New Build Programme (NNBP) has not yet started and the Request for Proposals has yet not been issued. Various organs of state involved in the Programme are currently doing preparatory work related to the procurement process, including the development of a governance and management framework for the Programme with the different roles and responsibilities being articulated.

Government is not aware of any bribe and/or money that has been paid by any prospective bidder(s) for the Nuclear New Build Programme. Government is committed to a fair and transparent procurement process for the NNBP and will act against anyone who compromises the integrity of the process by acting unlawfully or improperly. The Nuclear New Build Programme is central to the country’s long term energy plans in order to reduce greenhouse emissions, ensure security of electricity, and contribute to economic development and job creation.

06 December 2016 - NW2575

Profile picture: Khoza, Mr NP

Khoza, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Police

What is the status of the request for transfer of a certain person (name and details furnished) from the Duduza Police Station in Gauteng to any other police station in Limpopo, particularly in the Vhembe area?

Reply:

The member in question has not applied for a transfer and when engaged in this regard, he indicated that he is in the process to do so. The transfer application will receive the necessary attention when submitted.

06 December 2016 - NW2515

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) total value of contingent liabilities and (b) detailed breakdown of each contingent liability into (i) type, (ii) institution, (iii) exposure amount or amount drawn against the guarantee and (iv) total amount on the latest date for which information is available?

Reply:

Government obligations

Government guarantees and exposure

Government issues guarantees to various state-owned companies. As at 30 June 2016, these guarantees amounted to R469 billion. Of the total guarantee portfolio, 67 per cent is issued to Eskom and 13 per cent to the South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL).

Table 1: Guarantees and exposure amount

see the link: http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2515TABLE.pdf

Source: National Treasury

Only the portion of the guarantees that these companies have borrowed against – known as the exposure amount – is a contingent liability to government. Creditors can call on government to service or pay off the guaranteed debt on which an entity has defaulted. Exposure amounts increased from R264 billion as at 31 March 2016 to R266 billion as at 30 June 2016. Most of the increase is accounted for by Eskom (R2.3 billion), Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) (R20 million) and Land Bank (R88 million).

As part of the bailout of African Bank in 2014/15, the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) provided support on the back of a government guarantee constituting an explicit contingent liability of R7 billion. As at 30 June 2016, the guarantee amount has declined to R3 billion and the Reserve Bank has not realised any exposure against this guarantee.

Power-purchase agreements between Eskom and Independent Power Producers (IPPs) are now categorised as contingent liabilities. This change adds about R200 billion to contingent liabilities in 2016/17. The agreements oblige Eskom to buy power from these producers over a 20-year period at a price agreed to by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa. Government provides support in the form of guarantees to Eskom. In the event that Eskom is unable to purchase power as stipulated, government must buy the power on Eskom’s behalf. The probability of default is low, since the regulator generally approves tariff increases that accommodate these agreements. However, significant deterioration in Eskom’s financial position may increase government’s risk exposure.

In Public Private Partnerships (PPPs), contingent liabilities only arise where contract termination would require the state to reimburse the private partner. As at 30 June 2016, the inclusion of PPPs adds R9 billion to contingent liabilities, of which national PPPs account for 37 per cent and provincial PPPs 63 per cent. Given that none of the contingent liabilities in this category have been realised since the first PPP contract was entered into, they are considered very low risk.

Other contingent liabilities

Government’s other contingent liabilities include the actuarial deficits of social security funds – the difference between the claims owed by these entities and their total assets. Government commitments to the Export Credit Insurance Corporation of South Africa – the net underwriting exposure of the company and its total assets – also fall into this category, as do claims against government departments, and post-retirement medical assistance to government employees.

Other contingent liabilities were projected at R286 billion in 2015/16, R34 billion higher than in 2014/15, due to an increase in claims by exporters and increased exposure of the Road Accident Fund. Over the medium term, these contingent liabilities are projected to increase to R323 billion

06 December 2016 - NW2631

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) How many (i) large, (ii) medium and (iii) small businesses that have contracts with the State suffered losses and (b) how many of the specified businesses (i) in total and (ii) since 2011 had to close because the State and state institutions did not meet their payment obligations within 30 days; (2) (a) how many complaints were submitted to the Chief Procurement Ombudsman since the inception of the institution, (b) what types of complaints have been received and (c) how many of the complaints (i) were resolved and (ii) were not resolved?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) (ii) the Instruction Note 5 of 2016/17 does not require the supplier to indicate the size or their business. (iii) each supplier get contracted with individual organs of state.

(b) Suppliers have started in July 1, 2016 to directly report their non-payment to government through formal channels, as a result the National Treasury does not have information prior to 1 July 2016 that could have contributed to the closure businesses.

2. (a) A total of 4041 valid invoices were unpaid, to the value of R439 283 025, 63 were received since 1 July 2016. (b) the complaints vary from undisputed invoices to work performed without a contract or purchase order in place. (c)(i) 1342 invoices to the value of R103 541 992,10 were resolved (ii) 2699 to the value of R335 741 033,53 are still not resolved. Annexures attached per Organ of State (procuring entity) from 1 July 2016.

06 December 2016 - NW2654

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)     Whether any forensic investigations (a) have been conducted or (b) are currently being conducted into the Municipal Councillors Pension Fund (MCPF); if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of specified investigations; (2) whether any (a) disciplinary or (b) criminal charges have arisen from the investigations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he is aware of the allegations against the (a) Chairperson, (b) other trustees and (c) any senior official of the MCPF regarding the alleged misuse of the fund’s resources for personal activities and gain; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what action has he taken in this regard?

Reply:

(1) (a) National Treasury has not conducted any forensic investigations relating to the Municipal Councilors Pension Fund (MCPF)

     (b) This matter was never brought to National Treasury for consideration.

(2) (a) & (b)

It is the responsibility of the organisation concerned to take corrective action, including commissioning of an investigation when allegations of corruption or fraud are reported or uncovered.

(3) (a), (b) & (c)

If the Honourable Member has any information on the allegations relating to this matter, I would encourage him to pass the information onto the relevant law enforcement agencies so that the matter can be investigated.

06 December 2016 - NW2675

Profile picture: Chance, Mr R

Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Finance

What was the contribution in (a) rands and (b) percentages of the (i) private, (ii) public, (iii) nonprofit and (iv) co-operative business sectors to the Gross Domestic Product in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The sectoral contributions to gross value added are presented in Table 1, over the period requested. As official national accounts data are not published by organisational type, it is not possible to provide the requested breakdown according to the above categories using publicly available data. Private business enterprises dominate economic activity in most sectors, except in the electricity, gas, and water sector, as well as general government services, which are largely concentrated by the public sector. There is also sizeable participation of the public sector in the transport services sector. Nonprofit firms are largely found in the community, social, and personal services sector. Based on estimates from the Annual Financial Statistics Survey 2015 (Statistics South Africa, 2016), co-operative firms contributed little over R10 billion (or 0.12%) to total turnover in 2015, most of which is generated in the trade services sector.

More information on sector level contributions can be obtained from Statistics South Africa.

Table 1: Sectoral composition of total gross value added, 2015-2016

Industry

Gross value added

(R million, current prices, 2015-161)

Contribution to total value added

(%, 2015-16)

Agriculture, forestry and fishing

89,328

2.5%

Mining and quarrying

285,489

7.8%

Manufacturing

479,595

13.2%

Electricity, gas and water

132,811

3.6%

Construction

146,333

4.0%

Trade, catering and accommodation

549,210

15.1%

Transport, storage and communication

371,604

10.2%

Finance, real estate and business services

750,708

20.6%

General government services

624,277

17.1%

Personal services

215,121

5.9%

1 Total over the period between 2015Q2 and 2016Q1

Source of basic data: Statistics South Africa

06 December 2016 - NW2583

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Why does her department make use of a vehicle rental agency to rent vehicles for various departments, Ministers and judges instead of using the services of a certain service provider (name furnished)?

Reply:

The Department of Transport, following a detailed feasibility study recommendations, facilitated a fleet management Public Private Partnership(PPP) agreement, under Regulation 16 of the PFMA, the Public Private Partnership (PPP) practice note Number 02 of 2004 “South African Regulations for PPP’s” which applies to government departments, constitutional institutions, public entities listed or required to be listed in schedules 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D to the PFMA and subsidiaries of such public entities of the PFMA.

This Transversal Fleet PPP contract (DOT/34/2005/GMT) was awarded toPhakisaworld Fleet Solutions.

The contract is for the provision of full maintenance lease (long term vehicle rentals) and short term vehicle rental services. The Department of Transport with other 14 national departments is a participant to this PPP contract for both full maintenance lease and short term rentals of vehicles. Each participating department will place their own vehicle orders with the service provider based on their requirements. The participating departments are listed below:

  1. Companies and Intellectual Property Commission
  2. Statistics South Africa
  3. Department of Economic Development
  4. Office of the Public Protector
  5. Department of Health
  6. Department of Higher Education and Training
  7. Department of Transport
  8. Department of Trade and Industry
  9. Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries
  10. Department of Water Affairs
  11. Department of Correctional Services
  12. Department of Public Service and Administration
  13. Department of Women, Children and People with Disabilities
  14. Department of Public Works

Ministerial vehicles, including incidental vehicles are procured as per the prescripts of the Ministerial Handbook by each department. Departments participating in the Public Private Partnership for national vehicle fleets, makes use of the contract for the rental of incidental vehicles as and when required.

The provision of vehicles for Judges is prescribed by the Judges Handbook. All decisions related to these vehicles, the procurement thereof, including short term vehicle rentals falls under the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development and the Office of the Chief Justice and not the Department of Transport.

06 December 2016 - NW2606

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

What were the reasons that the recently appointed senior police officer (name and details furnished), was (a) suspended and (b) transferred to the Tembisa Police Station; (2) What are the reasons that the person was subsequently transferred back to the Edenvale Police Station?

Reply:

(1)(a) The mentioned officer was not suspended.

(1)(b) The mentioned officer was not placed at Tembisa Police Station at any stage.

(2) The Station Commander of Edenvale Police Station retired from the South African Police Service on 31 July 2016 and not to compromise service delivery, the mentioned officer was placed in this critical post due to his experience, expertise and familiarity with the Edenvale policing precinct.

06 December 2016 - NW2636

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him set the employment equity targets; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) what are the employment targets set and (ii) have the specified targets been met in each.

Reply:

a) Yes, my department has set the employment equity targets.

b) In respect to entities reporting to me, as the Honourable Member might be aware that I have 26 of them to solicit and verify the information from them requires time well beyond the limited time provided by Parliament. I will therefore submit this information as soon as I get it.

c) The department currently employs 12 people with disabilities which represent 2% of the staff complement. The department also complies with the 50% of Women at Senior Management Staff (SMS) level of the target as set by the cabinet in 2005.

d) Yes the specified targets have been met in the department.

06 December 2016 - NW2615

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his repeated statements that he stands by the findings of his report on Nkandla on the basis that the technical findings were made by security experts, why did he not advise the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, to subject the Public Protector’s Secure in Comfort report to judicial review for alleged flawed findings; (2) whether each of the specified security experts were employees of the SA Police Service; if not, (a) at which organisation(s) was each of the experts employed and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard; if so, (i) what are the (aa) names and (bb) ranks of each of the experts and (ii) in which (aa) divisions and/or (bb) components did each of the experts work?

Reply:

  1. The mandate of the Minister of Police with regards to Nkandla upgrades was in terms of the ad hoc committee report adopted by a resolution of the National Assembly in November 2014. According to this resolution, the Minister of Police was to consider, in the light of the Public Protector’s findings, what constitutes security and non-security feature to determine the personal liability of the President if any. It was not part of the brief of the Minister of Police to advise the President, Mr J G Zuma on the legal steps that needed to be taken.
  2. In compiling the report, information, analysis and contextualisation were solicited from, among other experts, security experts within the South African Police Service and State Security Agent. The Minister is of the view that names, ranks and divisions of the said experts are not relevant as they were representing the organisations that they work for and not acting in their personal capacities.

05 December 2016 - NW2610

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) How many government-subsidised houses that were built in each of the past five financial years remain (i) unoccupied and (ii) partially unoccupied in each province, (b) how long has each of the specified houses been unoccupied and partially unoccupied in each case, (c) why are the houses unoccupied and partially unoccupied, (d) how much did it cost to build the houses and (e) what plans have been put in place to address the nonoccupation of the houses?

Reply:

The Provincial Departments of Human Settlements provided information as follows:

 

Number of houses built 1 April 2011 to 30 September 2016

Number of houses Unoccupied

Number of houses

Partially occupied

Period unoccupied/ partially unoccupied

EC

73 207

258

None

Verification is being conducted

FS

34 135

The Provincial Department is in the process of procuring a service provider to conduct an occupancy audit to determine amongst other the occupancy rate

Verification is being conducted

Verification is being conducted

GP

100 223

Verification is being conducted

Verification is being conducted

Verification is being conducted

KZN

140 739

None

Verification is being conducted

Verification is being conducted

LP

45 028

377

0

Not available

MP

42 562

924

0

1 year

NC

13 356

0

0

0

NW

65 081

After completion the structure is the responsibility of the Municipality so the Provincial Human Settlements Department does not have any numbers in this regard

Verification is being conducted

Verification is being conducted

WC

60 082

None

None

None

(c)

Province

Why are houses unoccupied or partially unoccupied?

EC

Due to the unavailability of approved beneficiaries

FS

Verification is being conducted

GP

Not available

KZN

Not applicable

LP

Due to the unavailability of the approve beneficiaries

MP

The Lekwa and Mbombela Municipalities are struggling with the provision of bulk (sewer and water) infrastructure

NC

Not applicable

NW

Not applicable

WC

Not applicable

(d)

Province

Cost to build houses

EC

R42.5 million

FS

Verification is being conducted

GP

Verification is being conducted

KZN

Verification is being conducted

LP

Verification is being conducted

MP

R 93 million has been spent to build the 924 houses

NC

All houses are built according to the subsidy quantum band approved for that specific financial year

NW

Not applicable

WC

Not applicable

(e)

Province

Plans to address non-occupation

EC

Names of beneficiaries will be advertised in local media and if still unavailable, the beneficiaries will be deregistered on HSS and replace with beneficiaries from destitute list

FS

The department is in the process of procuring a Service Provider to conduct an occupancy audit in the Province.

GP

Not available

KZN

Not applicable

LP

The Provincial Human Settlements Department is using Ward Committees to trace beneficiaries and advertise in the print media calling beneficiary to claim their house.

MP

The Department has timeously been working with the respective Municipalities to resolve the matter of bulk infrastructure. The Department made R 9 million available from their equitable share to assist Lekwa Municipality with the construction of two sewer pump stations to address the bulk sewer problem in Standerton Ext 8. In terms of the Mbombela Municipality the Department has transferred R 80 million from the equitable share to deal with the bulk issues in Thekwane North and other integrated human settlement projects.

NC

At completion of a house the contractor hands the house over to the beneficiary who then signs a happy letter with occupation

NW

Not applicable

WC

Not applicable

05 December 2016 - NW2649

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) How many (i) appeals were received by the Refugee Appeals Board (aa) in each of the past five financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016 and (ii) of the specified appeals were finalised, (b) what are the causes of the delays in adjudicating the appeals and (c) by what date will the backlog in the appeals be cleared?

Reply:

(a) Appeals received and finalised by the Refugee Appeal Board (RAB) in the past five financial years and from 01 April 2016 to date is tabulated hereunder:

 (aa - bb) FINANCIAL YEAR

(i) RECEIVED

 (ii) FINALISED

April 2011 - March 2012

5452

4248

April 2012 - March 2013

5655

922

April 2013 - March 2014

11098

4978

April 2014 - March 2015

16830

1705

April 2015 - March 2016

9321

1331

April 2016 – Nov 2016

3251

555

(b) The causes for the delay in the adjudication of appeal cases is as follows:

  • Most asylum applications received by the Refugee Reception Offices in South Africa are rejected as unfounded and they end up at the Refugee Appeal Board (RAB). Presently the RAB has one member based in Cape Town and an Acting Chairperson based in Pretoria as three RAB Members resigned early this year. The process to identify and appoint the Chairperson and the three members is continuing.
  • In the past members of the Refugee Appeal Board (RAB) used to sit as single members for each appeal hearing. However, in the Western Cape Court judgement of November 2011( Harerimana v Chairperson of the RAB and others) the RAB was ordered to sit as a quorum of 50 percent plus one of the members for each appeal hearing or at least two members.
  • The high number of appeals lodged on daily basis makes it difficult for the few RAB members to hear and determine cases without delay. Some cases are simple and straight forward and can be determined without delay, however, a lot of cases are complex and take some time to determine. The decision making process requires extensive research on latest possible country of origin information, International Refugee Law and Case Law because of the complexity of most cases that have to be adjudicated and it is not always easy to get access to these sources of information
  • The RAB normally hears between five and ten appeal cases per day, depending on the profile and complexity of each case, from Monday to Thursday. On Fridays determinations on appeals heard are normally written. The RAB visits the regional Refugee Reception Offices for hearings, sometimes for up to three weeks. As much as the Board makes efforts to adjudicate appeals already heard, there is also a high number of appeals scheduled to be heard by the Board. The RAB tries to balance the number of cases it hears with those that are adjudicated.
  • The RAB decisions need to be carefully constructed because sensitive human rights issues are being dealt with; some of which in their nature are matters of life and death. The RAB has to apply its mind to the facts of each case in compliance with Public Administrative Justice Act, The Constitution, The Refugee Act, International Refugee Law and other Human Rights Instruments before coming to a particular decision.

(c) At this stage the RAB is not in a position to provide the date on which the appeals backlog will be cleared. It is presently estimated that the RAB has around 145 414 appeal cases nationally defined as a backlog and around 80 315 of these cases appear to be active in the National Immigration Information system.

During the Republic of South Africa – UNHCR High Level Bilateral Meeting in Geneva, July 2015 the two parties agreed to the development of a backlog project to address the outstanding RAB appeal cases, However the project has not taken off in earnest due to financial constraints. The project was planned to continue for three years, until 2019. Provided enough human capacity and financial resources are made available, the backlog could be cleared within three years.

05 December 2016 - NW2641

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

What (a) was the total amount of the acquisition of a certain company (name furnished), (b) were the terms of the specified acquisition which were accepted by the liquidator to the creditors and (c) was the amount owed by the specified company to its creditors? 2. Has any of the accounts been outstanding for more than 30 days; if so, for how long has each account been outstanding? 3. What was the impact on the employment benefits and conditions of all the employees who were re-employed by the South African Post Office?

Reply:

I have been informed by the South African Post Office (SAPO) as follows that:

1(a) This is an intra-group transaction for the transfer of all the company’s assets and liabilities to SAPO and as such no cash payment will be made.

1(b) The provisional liquidation order against the company was dismissed by the High Court on 30 September 2016. The only creditor item approved by the provisional liquidator was the transfer of the company’s employees to SAPO. As the company is no longer in provisional liquidation, it is in the process of finalising the intra-group sale of business transaction with SAPO.

1(c) Creditor balances as at 31 October 2016, amounted to R250 million, of which R46 million relate to third party creditors and the balance of R204 million is owed to SAPO.

2. All outstanding creditor accounts are more than 30 days overdue. SAPO is in the process of finalising the transaction and will then submit for Ministerial approval in terms of Sections 54 and 66 of the Public Finance Management Act No. 1 of 1999 (PFMA). SAPO has also advised that once the transaction has received the requisite approval in terms of the PFMA, it will ensure that all amounts owing to third party creditors are paid in full.

3. In terms of the agreement concluded between SAPO and all employees under Section 197 (6) of the Labour Relations Act No 66 of 1995, all employees were transferred to SAPO on 01 September 2016, on the same employment terms and conditions applicable to all SAPO employees including membership access to the SAPO pension and medical aid fund schemes. The length of service and accumulated leave of all employees were also preserved and transferred to SAPO. Employees also received a once off non-pensionable and taxable ex-gratia payment in lieu of unpaid salary increases during the period April-August 2016, which was part of the resolution of the previous long outstanding labour settlements.

05 December 2016 - NW2600

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)     Whether he had any discussions with two certain persons (a) Mr Eric Wood and (b) Mr Ian Whitely regarding the use of municipal assets to secure debt financing either (a) before and/or (b) after his appointment as the (i) Minister of Finance and/or (ii) Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) what was the nature of each discussion and (bb) why did he have discussions with the specified persons; (2) whether he made any considerations to (a) the persons and/or (b) any organisation associated with the persons in return for their input; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether he will make a statement in this regard?

Reply:

The Honorable Member is kindly advised that this matter is subjudice.

 

05 December 2016 - NW2601

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any payments have been made to any former councillor in terms of the once-off gratuity that was promised to former councillors before the 2016 local government elections; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the specified gratuities be paid to the former councillors; if so, (i) what is the total amount that was paid out in gratuities to the former councillors, (ii) how many of the former councillors still need to receive their gratuities and (iii) what is the total amount of gratuities that are still outstanding?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance was advised that payments of the once-off gratuity to eligible non-returning councillors after the 3 August 2016 local government elections could only be made after the Independent Commission for the Remuneration (“the Commission”) of Public Office Bearers published their recommendations in this regard.

On Friday, 11 November 2016:

  • The Commission published their recommendations in this regard in Government Gazette No. 40422; and
  • The Local Government MinMEC resolved that the Minister finalise the payment model for the once-off gratuity after having considered the recommendations of the Commission and the resolutions taken at the MinMEC meeting that was held on 2 September 2016.

The payment model was finalised on Tuesday, 16 November 2016.

Yes, payments of the once-off gratuity has commenced.

(i) In the process of payment, the Department is busy with the necessary preparations, calculations and verification of the payments to eligible non-returning councillors.

   An amount of R309 million was appropriated for this purpose. The total amount that will be paid out will be determined after the payment have been finalised.

(ii) As at 28 November 2016, more than 4000 former councillors, still need to receive their gratuities.

(iii) The total amount of gratuities for the more than 4000 former councillors are still outstanding. This amount is still to be determined based on the payment model (including the formula) that was approved on the 16 November 2016.

05 December 2016 - NW2688

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to page 264 of the 2016 Adjusted Estimates of National Expenditure regarding his department, (a) what is the reason for the R200 000 virement for the Progressive Youth in Business, (b) what is the specified amount intended for, (c) what process was followed in awarding the amount and (d) who are the (i) directors and (ii) office-bearers of the Progressive Youth in Business?

Reply:

(a) the dti received a proposal for the development of a Mobile Application from Regoapele Capital Wealth Engineering. During the Adjustment Estimates of National Expenditure, a virement of R200 000.00 was requested with an intention to provide funding towards projects for youth economic empowerment. Of the R200 000.00, R100 000.00 was allocated to Regoapele Capital Wealth Engineering in-line with the dti sponsorship policy. The remaining R100 000.00 will be used for other strategic core functions in-line with the mandate of the dti.

(b) The amount was meant for a Mobile based Application initiative that will serve as a platform to connect youth led initiatives with government departments, DFIs, JSE listed companies amongst others in providing access to information, technical and expert advice as well as improved access to incentives.

(c) the dti policy, process and procedures for sponsorship was followed.

(d) The Executive Director for Regoapele Capital wealth Engineering is Mr O Moshori.