Questions and Replies

13 July 2017 - NW1501

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) a certain company (name furnished) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such payments?

Reply:

(a),(b)(i),(ii),(aa),(bb),(cc),(dd),(ee),(ff) Please refer to the table below.

11 July 2017 - NW1974

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Has the Special Investigation Unit (SIU) ever conducted any investigations into a certain person (name and details furnished); if so (a) when was the investigation(s) commissioned and (b) what is the current status of the specified investigation(s); (2) whether he will furnish Ms T E Baker with copies of the reports of the investigation(s); if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Head of the Special Investigation Unit that a similar question was posed to the Presidency during May 2017, a copy of which is attached hereto, where-in the SIU answered as follows:

1. It would appear that the Proclamation referred to, issued by the Presidency to commence with investigations, relates to Proclamation R35 of 2008. This Proclamation related to the Mhlatuzi Water Board in Richards Bay, of which Ms Myeni was the Chairperson at the time.

   a) The investigation was proclaimed in 2008.

    b) The investigation was duly completed and the report was submitted to the Presidency in April 2013.

2. The Honourable Member is advised to direct the request to the Office of the Honourable President, for a copy of such Report, as such Reports are neither submitted to nor kept by the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services.

11 July 2017 - NW1894

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

I have been informed that neither the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development and Department of Correctional Services nor its entities reporting to me has appointed transaction advisors for tenders during the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016.

11 July 2017 - NW1805

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Which entities reporting to him (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

1. The information, in relation to the entities reporting to the Minister of Justice and Correctional Service that have Boards in place, is detailed as follows.

A) LEGAL AID SOUTH AFRICA

(a) Legal Aid South Africa has a Board appointed, in terms of Section 6 (1) of the Legal Aid South Africa Act No. 39 of 2014, by the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services.

(i) (aa) the dates of appointment of the Directors as members of the Board are as follows:

Appointed in terms of which section of the Act

Name

Period of Appointment

   

Start Date

End Date

1.  Section 6(1)(a) of the Legal Aid South Africa Act, 2014 (Act No. 39 of 2014)

Chairperson:

Mr Justice D Mlambo

1 March 2016

28 February 2019

2.  Section 6(1)(b) and Section 8 (1) of the Legal Aid South Africa Act, 2014 (Act No. 39 of 2014)

Deputy Chairperson:

Mr Justice M Makume

17 October 2017

28 February 2019

3.  Section 6(1)(b)

Seven (7) non-executive members:

  1. Professor Y Vawda;
  1. Mr F Mvundlela;
  1. Ms T Mhlungu;
  1. Ms N Mgadza;
  1. Ms M Naidoo;
  1. Mr M Leseilane; and
  1. Ms A Chowan.

1 March 2016

28 February 2019

4.  Section 6(2)

Two (2) non-executive members to serve as alternative members to the members appointed in terms of Section 6(1)(b):

  1. Ms A Rhoda; and
  1. Mr L Mtshali

1 March 2016

28 February 2019

5.  Section 6(1)(c)

Ms V Vedalankar, ex officio in her capacity as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

1 March 2016

Until her period of appointment as CEO expires

6. Section 6(1)(d)

Three (3) executive members

  1. Advocate B Nair;
  1. Mr P Hundermark; and
  1. Mr J Makokoane

1 March 2016

28 February 2019

7. Section 6(2)

One (1) executive member to serve as an alternative member to the members appointed in terms of Section 6(1)(d)

Ms R Hlabatau

1 March 2016

28 February 2019

8.  Section 6(1)(e)

The Director-General: Department of Justice and Constitutional Development or his or her nominee

Advocate PA du Rand (Nominee)

1 March 2016

28 February 2019

(bb) the term of office for the Board members is three (3) years as shown above.

(ii) (aa) The Board of Legal Aid South Africa has a total of fourteen (14) Board Members made up of ten (10) Non-Executive Directors and four (4)

Executive Directors. There are also three (3) Alternative Board Members.

(bb) the Board of Legal Aid South Africa has five (5) females (plus 2 Alternative members).

B. COUNCIL FOR DEBT COLLECTORS

The Council for Debt Collectors has a board or Council Members appointed, in terms of Section 3 of the Debt Collectors Act 1998 (Act No. 114 of 1998), by the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services. The Council, appointed in terms of the Act, consists of ten (10) members, of which three (3) members are females.

The table below provides details of Council Members, i.e. Names, capacity and term of office:

Name

Appointed in terms of which section of the Act

Capacity

Period of Appointment

     

Start Date

Start Date

1. Ms L S Machaba

Section 3(2)(a)

Chairperson

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

2. Ms J Ntshingila

Section 3(2)(b)(i)

Member

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

3. Mr J C Janse van

Rensburg

Section 3(2)(b)(ii)

Member

4 March 2017

3 March 2020

4. Mr B Maseko

Section 3(2)(b(iii)

Member

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

5. Mr A Olivier

Section 3(2)(b)(iii)

Member

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

6. Mr S Lindsay

Section 3(2)(b)(iii)

Member

4 March 2017

3 March 2020

7. Mr M Lamola

Section 3(2)(b)(iii)

Member

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

8. Adv. P A du Rand

Section 3(2)(b)(iv)

Member

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

9. Mr C Senzani

Section 3(2)(b)(iv)

Member

4 March 2017

3 March 2020

10. Ms M M Viljoen

Section 3(2)(b)(v)

Member

4 March 2015

3 March 2018

C. SOUTH AFRICAN LAW REFORM COMMISSION

(a) (i) The South African Law Reform Commission (SALRC) is one of the entities reporting to the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services which has a Board/Commission in place.

Appointed in terms of which Section of the Act

Name of Members Appointed

Capacity

Period of Appointment

     

Start Date

End Date

Section 2(2) of the South African Law Reform Commission Act 19 of 1973

Judge Jody Kollapen of the Gauteng North Division of the High Court

Chairperson

April 2015

September 2018

 

Professor V Jaichand (WITS)

Member

September 2013

September 2018

 

Advocate M Sello (Practicing Advocate)

Member                            

September 2013

September 2018

 

Mr IBW Lawrence (Practicing Attorney)

Member

September 2013

September 2018

 

Ms NT Siwendu (Practicing Attorney)

Member

September 2013

September 2018

 

Professor Annet Wanyana Oguttu (UNISA)

Member

January 2015

September 2018

 

Professor Marita Carnelly (UKZN)

Member

January 2015

September 2018

(ii) The Board of the SALRC consists of seven members, and four (4) of the

Commissioners are females.

D. RULES BOARD FOR COURTS OF LAW

(1)(a) The Rules Board is accountable to the Minister in terms of the Act, and has a

Board in place. The table below provides further details in respect to the members and term of office:

Appointed in terms of which Section of the Act

Name of Members Appointed

Capacity

Period of Appointment

     

Start Date

End Date

In terms of Section 3 of the Rules Board for Courts of Law Act of 1985 (Act No. 107 of 1985)

  1. Judge SA Majiedt
  1. Judge FE Mokgohloa
  1. Ms Jakkie Wessels
  1. Mr Patrick Hundermark
  1. Ms Nosidima Ndlovu
  1. Adv McCaps Motimele SC
  1. Adv. Paul Farlam, SC
  1. Adv. Anthea Platt SC
  1. Prof. Mohamed Paleker
  1. Mr Graham Bellairs (LSSA)
  1. Mr Mashudu Kutama (LSSA)
  1. Mr Asif Essa (Alternate: LSSA)
  1. Mr Rodney Isaacs (DoJ&CD)
  1. Ms Elmarie de Klerk (Magistracy)

Chairperson

Vice- Chairperson

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Alternate Member

Member

Member

Member

Alternate

Member

Member

Member

01 January 2012

6 March 2017

01 January 2012

01 January 2012

01 September 2014

01 January 2012

01 January 2012

01 January 2012

01 January 2012

01 January  2012

01 September 2014

01 September 2014

1 January 2015

1 January 2012

31 December 2017

6 March 2022

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

31 August 2019

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

31 December  2017

31 August  2019

31 August 2019

31 December 2020

31 December 2017

(ii) There are twelve (12) Board members plus 2 alternates, in the Rules Board for Courts of Law, five (5) of the members are females.

E. SOUTH AFRICAN BOARD FOR SHERIFFS

Appointed in terms of which Section of the Act

Name of Members Appointed

Capacity

Period of Appointment

     

Start Date

End Date

In terms of section 9(2) (a) of the Sheriffs Act, 1986 (Act No. 90 of 1986)

Mrs C Mabuza (Sheriff)

Ms P Roodt (Sheriff)

Ms Nomajwara Soga (Sheriff)

Ms Mmathotho Lephadi (Sheriff)

Mr Ignatius Klynsmith (Sheriff)

Chairperson

Member

Member

Member

Member

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

In terms of section 9(2) (b) of the Sheriffs Act, 1986 (Act No. 90 of 1986)

Advocate Hishaam Mohamed

Mr Thamsanqa Tembe Sec. 9(2)(c)

Mr Lesiba Mashapa Sec. 9(2)(d)

Prof. Lovell Fernandez Sec 9(2)(e)

Mr Meko Magida Sec. 9(2)(e)

Ms Khunjulwa Sigenu Sec 11(2)(a)

Member and Deputy Chairperson

Member

Member

Member

Member

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

1 March 2015

14 April 2016

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

28 February 2018

(b) The following entities reporting to me do not have Boards, and no Boards are envisaged to be appointed:

(i) SPECIAL INVESTIGATING UNIT

Due to the critical work that the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) does, the SIU does not have Board as it is a Schedule III Public entity, with the Accounting Authority fulfilling the role of the Board.

For ease of reference, section of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) is quoted below:

Section 49 2 (a) & (b) of the PFMA.

“2. if the public entity -

(a) has a board or other controlling body, that board or controlling body is the accounting authority for that entity or

(b) does not have a controlling body, the chief executive officer or the other person in charge of the public entity is the accounting authority for that public entity unless specific legislation applicable to that public entity designates another person as the accounting authority.”

Furthermore, the SIU’s legislation (the Special Investigating Units and Special Tribunals Act, No 74 of 1996) also does not require the establishment or appointment of a Board. Should the SIU want to appoint a Board, this will require amendments to the Act.

The Head of the SIU has informed me that he is of the opinion that if the Standing Committee on Public Accounts (SCOPA) sees the need for a Board to be established, it can advise, and the recommendation will be considered.

11 July 2017 - NW1761

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Does (a) he, (b) his Deputy Ministers or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to him make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) and b) My security arrangements and those of the Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development, as well as the Deputy Minister of Correctional Services remain the responsibility of the South African Police Service (SAPS) in terms of the Ministerial Handbook.

c) The response in respect of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to the me is as follows:

  1. The Chief Justice, Deputy Chief Justice and the Judge Presidents do make use of security services paid for by the State through South African Police Service as required in terms of the Ministerial Handbook.
  2. National Prosecuting Authority – The National Director of Public Prosecution make use of services paid for by the State through the South African Police Services at the moment.
  3. Legal Aid South Africa – The Head of Legal Aid South Africa does not make use of security services.
  4. Special Investigation Unit – The Head of the Special Investigating Unit does not make use of security services at the moment.
  5. The Director General of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development does not make use of security services at the moment.
  6. The National Commissioner of Department of Correctional Services does use security services at the State expense.
  7. The Secretary-General for the Office of the Chief Justice does not make use of security services at the moment.

(i) There are no security services that are rendered to the family members on all of the above.

(ii) There are members of the Judiciary, National Prosecuting Authority and some support staff that make use of security services and the services are not extended to family members.

(aa) In all of the above, the reasons for the provision of security services, where applicable, are informed by the threats received due to their legal duties.

(bb) (i) Those members that are indicated in the Ministerial Handbook as stated above, the budget for the provision of the security services required is being paid from the South African Police Service’s budget.

(bb) (ii) The other affected members of the Judiciary, National Prosecuting Authority and supporting staff making use of security services are paid for by the State through the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.

(bb) (iii) The National Commissioner for the Department of Correctional Services’ security services are paid for by the relevant Department of Correctional Services.

(cc) The relevant details about protection services as indicated above is mainly informed by the heightened threats, risks and vulnerability assessments that are inherent in their legal duties which cannot be ignored in the interest of justice and other constitutional requirements. Therefore, it is advisable that the details pertaining to each member be not disclosed for safety and security reasons. Furthermore, the doctrine of separation of powers dictates consideration in relation to the provision of protection and security services to members of the Judiciary and National Prosecuting Authority.

11 July 2017 - NW1930

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Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1)(a) On what date was the public participation for a certain mine housing development (name furnished) conducted and (b) how was the notice for public participation communicated; (2) whether a proper environmental impact assessment (EIA) was conducted; if so, what process has been followed since the specified EIA; (3) whether any objections were registered against the specified development; if so, what number of objections were lodged; (4) (a) how were the objectors notified of the tribunal hearing and (b) what was the outcome of the specified hearing?

Reply:

1. The Ekurhuleni Municipality and Gauteng Department of Agricultural and Rural Development are in position to advice on public participation for land use development as they are the custodians of land use. The Department’s mandate is to comment on impediment between mining and development and advise accordingly.

2. Environmental Impact Assessment is only submitted to Municipality and Gauteng Department of Agricultural and Rural Development, for land use development purposes. Developers’ use their discretion whether to submit the EIA to the department as it is not mining related.

3. The Department has not received any objection in writing from any interested and affected parties as yet

4. No objections in relation to the development from ERPM to DMR in writing has been received.

 

Approved/Not Approved

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2017

11 July 2017 - NW1606

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, in light of the Constitutional Court ruling in 2011 that the practice of repossessing homes without having the claims tested by a judge is illegal and the allegedly looming fifth eviction of Ernest Mashaba and his family from a fully paid-up house by a certain bank (name furnished), his department has intervened to ensure the illegal repossession of the house does not take place?

Reply:

It is not the responsibility of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to approach individuals whose Human Rights have been allegedly violated and to take up litigation on their behalf.  Bodies such as Legal Aid South Africa and the Human Rights Commission are there to provide assistance to such individuals.

The Legal Aid South Africa (SA) has informed me that the Legal Aid SA has no records showing receipt of an application for legal aid relating to Mr Mashaba’s matter. The particulars of Mr Mashaba’s case came to Legal Aid SA’s attention when the GroundUp article of 29 May 2017 was published. Legal Aid SA has made contact with the Lungelo Letho Human Rights Foundation (LLHRF), the organization currently assisting Mr. Mashaba, to obtain his contact details and/or for LLHRF to facilitate contact with Mr. Mashaba. Legal Aid SA will consult with Mr. Mashaba, if he agrees to accept Legal Aid SA’s assistance, in order to obtain the relevant and necessary information where after assessment of what legal assistance can be rendered to ensure compliance with the Constitution and the relevant laws applicable to this matter and thereby ensure that Mr Mashaba’s rights are protected. Current Legal Aid Policy only permits assistance in civil matters where the matter has reasonable prospects of success based on all available evidence.

 

 

The Secretary-General of the Office of Chief Justice has furthermore informed me that following the Constitutional Court case of Gudwana v Steko Development CC, Case No: CCT44/10 delivered on 11 April 2011, in terms of which the Court ruled that it is unconstitutional for a Registrar of a High Court to declare immovable properties specially executable when ordering default judgment under Rule 31(5) of the Uniform Rules of Court to the extent that this permits the sale in execution of the home of a person, All the divisions of High Court issued Practice Notes to the effect that applications for an order declaring primary residence specially executable should only be heard by the court and not by the Registrar.

11 July 2017 - NW1900

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

No transaction advisors for tenders were appointed by my Department or each entity reporting to me for the period 01 January 2012 to 31 December 2016.

---00O00---

11 July 2017 - NW1811

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Which entities reporting to her (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many(aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

a) Refer to Annexure A for information regarding board members of each water boards.

b) The Minister of Water and Sanitation is responsible for appointing board members and my Department is in the process of appointing a new board.

---00O00---

Annexure A

(a) Entity reporting to her, have a board in place

(b) Entity reporting to her, do not have a board in place

(i)(aa)when was each individual board member appointed

(bb) when is the term for each board lapsing

(i)(aa) how many board members are there in each board

(bb) of those board members of each entity are female

Amatola Water

 

Nokulunga Mnqeta (Chairperson)

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

8

3

   

Sizwe Hadebe

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   
   

Lynette Louw

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   
   

Brian Hollingworth

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   
   

Mphoko Nzimande

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   
   

Abraham le Roux

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   
   

Eugene Jooste

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   
   

Tebogo Maenetja

01 February 2016

30 January 2020

   

Bloem Water

 

Phitsane, TB

(Chairperson)

28 April 2009

31 March 2018

9

3

   

Matete, P

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Van der Merwe, J

28 April 2009

31 March 2018

   
   

Maboe, MSS

28 April 2009

31 March 2018

   
   

Mokhesi, N

01February 2005

31 March 2018

   
   

Bomela, LR

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Phetwe, CM

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Ellman, MJ

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Mkiva, Z

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   

Lepelle Northern Water

 

Mr. MPK Tshivhase(Chairperson)

01 April 2016

31 March 2020

9

5

   

Mr. MI Phasha

01 April 2016

31 March 2020

   
   

Mr. NH Matsepe

01 April 2010

31 March 2020

   
   

Ms. LLC Malamba

01 April 2010

31 March 2020

   
   

Ms. MM Ntsaba

01 April 2016

31 March 2020

   
   

Ms. JM Letsoalo

01 April 2010

31 March 2020

   
   

Mr. BP Sebola

01 April 2010

31 March 2020

   
   

Ms. TTC Hlongwa

01 April 2016

31 March 2020

   
   

Ms. MA Mphahlele

01 April 2016

31 March 2020

   

Magalies Water

 

Adv. MM Petlane

(Chairperson)

01 May 2014

30 April 2018

12

7

   

Ms. PN Nkwinika

01 July 2009

30 April 2018

   
   

Mr. DR Sibanda

01 July 2009

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms. MA Hlahla

01 July 2009

30 April 2018

   
   

Mr. TT Mohapi

01 March 2012

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms. TF Zondi

01 July 2009

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms. N Mufamadi

01 May 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms. TD Monewe

01 March 2012

30 April 2018

   
   

Mr. FP Vilakazi

01 May 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms. F Saloojee

01 May 14

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms. S Lebeko-Ratlhagane

01 June 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Kgosi SV Suping

01 June 2014

30 April 2018

   
 

Mhlathuze Water

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Overberg Water

 

Mr Mpumelelo Ncwadi (Chairperson)

1 September 2009

30 April 2018

7

3

   

Mr Noel Bastiaan

4 April 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms Melinda Zass

4 April 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms Kim Montgomery

4 April 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Ms Nirvani Dhevcharran

4 April 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Advocate Derick Block

4 April 2014

30 April 2018

   
   

Mr Adriaan Smuts

4 April 2014

30 April 2018

   

Rand Water

 

Adv Faith Matshidiso Hashatse (Chairperson)

01 April 2009

31 March 2018

11

6

   

Ms Sophie Molokoane-Machika (Deputy Chairperson)

12 June 2012

31 March 2018

   
   

Ms Busiswa Cwengile Bam

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Mr Dawood Coovadia

01 April 2005

31 March 2018

   
   

Ms Lakela Kaunda

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Mr Lefadi Makibinyane

01 April 2009

31 March 2018

   
   

Ms Nomsa Georgina Mbileni

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Mr Isaac Mmushi

01 April 2014

31 March 2018

   
   

Prof Frederick Otieno

01 April 2005

31 March 2018

   
   

Mr Ramateu Monyokolo

17 February 2016

31 March 2018

   
   

Ms Rene Aloise Kenosi

17 February 2016

31 March 2018

   

Sedibeng Water

 

Mr MD Dikoko

30April 2017

30Apr 2021

6

2

   

Mr EA Gaborone

30April 2017

30Apr 2021

   
   

Mr CD Mboweni

30April 2017

30Apr 2021

   
   

Mr MM Mthombeni

30April 2017

30Apr 2021

   
   

Dr PE Molokwane

30April 2017

30Apr 2021

   
   

Ms KG Sereko

30April 2017

30Apr 2021

   

Umgeni Water

 

Mr Andile Mahlalutye (Chairman)

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

10

3

   

Prof Imtiaz Vally

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Ms Ziphozethu Mathenjwa

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Mr Teboho Nkhahle

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Mr Graham Atkinson

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Dr Takalani Dube

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Ms Thokozile Shezi

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Ms Nompumelelo Chamane

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Mr Visvin Reddy

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   
   

Mr Thabani Zulu

01-Jul-09

2013-06-30. Minister extended the term until a new board is in place.

   

Trans Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA)

 

Ms Monhla Hlahla

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

9

4

   

Mr Jacob Modise

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

   
   

Ms Zodwa Manase

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

   
   

Mr Simphiwe Khondlo

01 July 2006

30 November 2018

   
   

Mr Satish Roopa

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

   
   

Dr Michael Ellman

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

   
   

Ms Sijabulile Makhathini

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

   
   

Ms Tsepiso Mohlaoli

01 December 2015

30 November 2018

   
   

Mr Muziwandile Chonco

02 August 2016

30 November 2018

   

Water Research Commission (WRC)

 

Dr Mjoli

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

9

5

   

Prof Vil-Nkomo

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Dr Makgae

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Mr Ndhlovu

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Dr Nala

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Ms Mbonambi

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Ms Msezane

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Prof Stroebel

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   
   

Mr I Patel

01 February 2016

31 January 2020

   

11 July 2017 - NW1779

Profile picture: Robinson, Ms D

Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Does (a) she, (b) her Deputy Minister or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to her make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Deputy Minister and myself make use of the security services paid for by the State as provided for by the Ministerial Handbook.

(2) No members of my family, nor those of the Deputy Minister and the Entities reporting to me; have made use of security services paid for by the State. No staff members either of the department or its entities have made use of security services paid for by the State.

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11 July 2017 - NW1667

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) name, (b) location, (c) nature of work done and (d) total cost of each dam safety project undertaken by a certain company (name furnished) in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for the name, location, nature of work done and total cost of each dam safety project undertaken by Sigodi Marah Martin Management. The total project cost stated in the table below is for the execution of the works (i.e design costs and construction costs). Sigodi Marah Martin Management was appointed in November 2013 to October 2016 on a time cost basis contract.

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NO.

PROVINCE

NAME OF PROJECT

NATURE OF WORK / REHABILITATION SCOPE OF WORK

TOTAL PROJECT COST

SIGODI MARAH MARTIN - SCOPE OF WORK

1.

Eastern Cape

Elandsdrift Barrage

Rehabilitation of the auxiliary spillway and mechanical gates (radial gates)

R 312 232 338

Approved Professional Person

2.

Eastern Cape

Cata Dam

Refurbishment of the outlet works and rehabilitation of earth embankment.

R 50 612 689

Project Management & Approved Professional Person

3.

Limpopo

Chuenispoort Dam

Rehabilitation to address slope instability of the earth embankment& mechanical refurbishment

R 120 392 232

Project Management (Mechanical works only)

4.

Eastern Cape

Mnyameni Dam

Refurbishment of the outlet works and rehabilitation of earth embankment.

R 21 154 201

Project Management & Approved Professional Person

5.

Eastern Cape

Ncora Dam

Rehabilitation of twin 1,8 m diameter concrete pipes

R 1 654 462

Project Management

6.

North West

Rietspruit Dam

Rehabilitation to address slope instability of the earth embankment

R 3 763 305

Project Management

7.

Limpopo

Mashashane Dam

Rehabilitation of the earth embankment

R 21 595 394

Site supervision

8.

Free State

Orange-Riet Dam

Increasing storage capacity of the balancing dam

R 273 599 750

Project Management

9.

North West

Taung Dam

Mechanical refurbishment of the outlet works

R 20 467 225

Project Management & design optimisations of mechanical outlets

10.

Western Cape

Stompdrift Dam

Rehabilitation of the concrete arch component of the dam

R 98 004 332

Project Management (Mechanical works only)

11.

Limpopo

Nsami Dam

Increasing the spillway capacity of the dam & mechanical refurbishment

R 154 642 237

Project Management& design optimisations of mechanical outlets

12.

Eastern Cape

Kouga Dam

Geotechnical investigations and monitoring of the dam’s micro movement.

R 3 321 556

Structural Safety Analyses (Ambient Vibration Monitoring)

13.

Limpopo

Vaalkop II Dam

 

R 92 014 083

Approved Professional Person

14.

Free State

Welbedacht

Mechanical refurbishment of the inlet and outlet works.

R 12 416 710

Project Management & design optimisations of mechanical outlets.

15.

Various Provinces

  1. Gariep Dam
  1. Kogelberg Dam
  1. Greater Brandvlei Dam
  1. Rockview Dam
  1. Welbedacht Dam
  1. Heyshope Dam
  1. Morgenstond Dam
  1. Tshakuma Dam.

Compilation of 5 yearly Dam Safety EvaluationsforCategory III Dams.

 

Approved Professional Person

Sigodi Marah Management’s expenditure per financial year is as follows:

  • 2013/14 – R 3 418 333.04
  • 2014/15 – R 20 935 669.35
  • 2015/16 – R 58 223 703.77
  • 2016/17 – R 1 632 465.35

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11 July 2017 - NW1600

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has any (a) partnership or (b) bilateral agreement with any government entity in Israel; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how many Israeli companies are involved in these (i) partnerships and (ii) agreements?

Reply:

 

No, my Department does not have any partnership or bilateral agreements with any government entity in Israel.

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11 July 2017 - NW1563

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the full details of each contract awarded by the Trans Caledon Tunnel Authority (a) in each of the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2017, in each case specifying (i) the name and (ii) cost, (2) (a) did each contract go out on tender, (b) who was awarded each tender, (c) how is each project funded and (d) what is the current status of each project; (3) whether each project complies with the regulations of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, as amended; if not, in each case, why not?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for the breakdown responses.

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ONTRACTS AWARDED BY TCTA FROM 2014/15, 2015/16 AND 2016/17 FINANCIAL YEARS

  1. (i)

Contract Description

  1. (b)

Date Awarded

2(b)

Contractor/ Supplier

(ii)

Contract Amount

2(a)

Open Tender or Close Tender or Exception

2(c)

Where applicable, How is each project Funded

2 (d)

Status of the project

(3)

Compliance with regulations of the Public Finance Management Act (Yes or No)

Maintenance of UPS System, Generator, Access control and CCTV

Apr-14

M Projects

R 1 044 0000

Single Source recommended for maintenance of the equipment which were installed by the same service provider who was appointed through an open tender process.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

Construction of AMD facilities at Eastern Basin

May-14

CMC-PG JV

R 1 122 241 835.91

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Complete

Yes

Audio Visual Equipment

May-14

Sumsung Business Solutions

R 1 620 0000.00

Single Source for maintenance of the equipment which were installed by the same service provider who was appointed through an open tender process.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

Land Valuation Services for Sludge Disposal for the Central Basin, Eastern and Western Basin

Jun-14

Griffiths Valuations

R 185 811.25

Single Source from the database which was set up after an open tender process.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Complete

Yes

Independent Environmental Auditor for AMD Eastern basin

Sep-14

EP3

R 179 013.33

Quotation Process

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Complete

Yes

Disaster Recovery Services

Sep-14

Continuity South Africa

R 2 870 008.34

Single Sourcing

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Expired

Yes

Health and Safety Consultant at AMD Eastern basin

Oct-14

Nemai Consulting

R 417 764.40

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Complete

Yes

Mobile Phone Services

Dec-14

Vodacom

R 3 320 955.40

Single Source-negotiated route after failure of a close tender process.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

Operation and Maintenance for AMD facilities at Central Basin

Jan-15

Group Five

R 215 863 561.66

Contract extension.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Complete

Yes

Construction of AMD facilities at Western Basin

Jan-15

Group Five

R 92 000 000.00

Single Source, followed after the open tender process failed.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Current

Yes

Appointment of Corporate Insurance Service provider

Feb-15

GIB Insurance Brokers

R 102 444.00

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

Treasury Management System

Jun-15

Fikon

R 6 131 034,00

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current-implementation

Yes

Rental of Multi-Function Printing Devices for 36 Months

Dec-15

Konica Minolta

R 3 848 349.70

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

SCM, Financial Accounting System

Jan-16

ICT Works

R 15 170 305.98

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

HRM System

Jan-16

ICT Works

R 6 270 000.00

Single sourcing followed after the open tender process failed.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

Short term operation and maintenance of AMD Central basin

Apr-16

Intelligent Water Solutions (IWS)

R 55 146 662,91

Single Source

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Current- open tender process underway.

Yes

Operation and maintenance of AMD facilities at Eastern Basin

Aug-16

CMC-PG JV

R 80 000 000.00

Contract extension to provide operations and maintenance services to allow conclusion of an open tender process.

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System and 67% refundable from the fiscus

Current

Yes

Procurement of pool vehicles

Jan-17

Nissan

R 498 914.03

National Treasury Transversal Contract

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Once-off.

Yes

Psychometric Assessments

Feb-17

Work Dynamics

R 982 708.76

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Current

Yes

Travel Management Service

Mar-17

Travel With Flair

Management fee (R 7 000 000.00)

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Extended by six months until September 2017

Yes

Travel Management Services

Mar-17

Gemini

Management fee (R 4 400 000.00)

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

Extended by six months until September 2017

Yes

Total Soft Services Contract for facilities Management

Mar-17

Afri Services

R 7 395 031.02

Open Tender

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

 On going

Yes

VAT Consulting Services

Mar-17

PWC

R 160 000.00

Single Source

Commercial funding which is repaid via water tariffs from the Vaal River System

On-going.

Yes

11 July 2017 - NW1599

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Given South Africa’s water crisis and findings by the World Resources Institute that South Africa will be one of the world’s most water stressed countries by 2040, as compared to countries such as Somalia and Sudan, what is her department doing to promote innovation and development in the water saving sector, in terms of (a) money spent and (b) plan of action?

Reply:

(a) My Department is spending a budget of R1,2 Million in the financial year 2017/18 to promote development of innovation in water sector through programmes such as South African Youth Water Prize is a Science and Technology based project, facilitate installation of Water Administration System at the irrigation schemes and the use of Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication to enable electronic water measurement in the irrigation sector.

(b) The plan of action is to continue to enhance the research innovation development work my Department is doing. This further entails strengthening relationships with stakeholders and partners in the Water Sector such as Department of Science and Technology (DST), Water Research Commission (WRC), Agriculture Research Council and various organized Industry Sectors .i.e. Pulp and Paper Association, Food and Beverages Association and Chamber of Mines. My Department also plans to enhance the already existing innovations by hosting exhibitions in collaboration with WRC and DST. My Department is consistently uploading new innovations on the Departmental website to ensure dissemination of information in addition to national road shows and visiting of public schools as part of raising awareness.

Currently, what needs to be done in earnest is to encourage all water users in the Republic of South Africa) to use water sparingly and do everything within their means to stop leakages. In that regard, my Department is training youth in the War on Leaks programme to assist Municipalities in combating water losses.

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10 July 2017 - NW1268

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

What is the total number of (a) land restitution claims that were submitted in each province since the inception of his department’s land restitution programme in 1995, (b) the specified claims that have been finalised to date and (c) the specified claims that have been settled through (i) financial compensation and/or (ii) land transfers?

Reply:

(a) 

Province

Total Lodged

Eastern Cape

16,716

Free State

2,682

Gauteng

13,162

KwaZulu-Natal

16,394

Limpopo

3,489

Mpumalanga

3,400

North West

3,902

Northern Cape

3,852

Western Cape

16,099

TOTAL

79,696

(b)

Province

Total Finalised

   

Eastern Cape

17,489

Free State

3,239

Gauteng

11,164

KwaZulu-Natal

740

Limpopo

4,095

Mpumalanga

2,822

Northern Cape

2,887

North West

2,112

Western Cape

16,502

TOTAL

61,050

 

(c ) (i) 68 661, Annexure A

(ii) 7 478, Annexure B.

 

10 July 2017 - NW1611

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether there is evidence that agricultural production has decreased as a result of land transfers from white land owners to black land owners; if so, how many (a) farms have been transferred and (b) hectares have been left derelict as a result of land transfers from white farmers to black farmers?

Reply:

No. The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform did not pronounce that the agricultural production has decreased as result of land transfers.

a) Falls away.

b) Falls away.

10 July 2017 - NW1734

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

(a),(b)(i),(ii),(iii),(aa),(bb),(aaa),(bbb) Please refer to the table below.

Financial Years

Department/ Entities

(aa)

(bb)

(i) 2014/15

(a) Department

(aaa) Names

(bbb) Professional Designation

(aaa) Detail of Contract Awarded

(bbb) Amounts

   

Mr Johannes Siphamandla Mtonga

Registry Clerk

Supplier Name: Rhino JZ Catering and Projects

State Entity: Gauteng PSSC

Contract Description:

Catering Services

R20 030.00

 

(b) Entities

(aaa) Names

(bbb) Professional Designation

(aaa) Detail of Contract Awarded

(bbb) Amounts

 

Deeds Trading Account

Mr Peter Rakoli Machika

Senior Deeds Registration Officer

Supplier Name: Machi-ra 73 Trading Enterprise CC

State Entity: Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

Contract Description: Supply of Geysers

R 28,606.00

       

Supplier Name: Machi-ra 73 Trading Enterprise CC

State Entity: National Department of Public Works

Contract Description: Supply of Office Furniture

R 61,392.00

   

Ms Nancy Tebogo Mushi

Deeds Registration Clerk – Contract (lapsed 30.06.2015)

Supplier Name: Sinethamba Construction

State Entity: Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

Contract Description: Could not be determined

R 39,004.50

   

Mr Bongani Brian Sibuyi

Programmer - Resigned

Supplier Name: Optiflex Trading and Projects

State Entity: South African Social Security Agency

Contract Description: Could not be determined

R 700.00

   

Mr Ziphozonke Professor Nkosi

Deeds Registration Clerk – Contract (lapsed 30.06.2015)

Supplier Name: Prosam Trading

State Entity: eThekwini Metro

Contract Description: Could not be determined

R 25,000.00

   

Ms Sbongile Mpandana

Deeds Registration Clerk

Supplier Name: Bongiwe Majola Trading Enterprise

State Entity: Eastern Cape Social Development and Special Programme

Contract Description: Could not be determined

R 101,000.00

   

Ms Nontokozo Renaisence Mhlongo

Deeds Registration Clerk – Contract (lapsed 30.06.2015)

Supplier Name: Malungi Multi Service

State Entity: Kwazulu Natal Department of Education

Contract Description: Could not be determined

R 308,252.72

   

Mr Sibusiso Rhoda-Cathe Mpangane

Provisioning Clerk

Supplier Name: Praktkal-Con

State Entity: Department of Defence

Contract Description: Supply of Groceries

R 21,253.00

(ii) 2015/16

Department

N/A

N/A

N/A

R0

(iii) 2016/17

Entities

N/A

N/A

N/A

R0

10 July 2017 - NW1855

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

With reference to the reply to question 642 on 10 April 2017 regarding the beneficiaries of Somhlolo Trust in Lothair, Mpumalanga, what (a) is the role of Government in the trust, (b) role would Government play in assisting the beneficiaries of this trust and (c) was the role of the Mpumalanga provincial government in the reply to the specified question; (2) whether there are officials of the Mpumalanga government who are beneficiaries or trustees of the board of Somhlolo trust?

Reply:

( 1 ) (a) No role, the Trust run its own affairs.

(b) The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights together with the Trustees are currently in the process of verifying the beneficiaries again with the aim of organising an election AGM to elect new Trustees.

( c ) No role, The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights responded to some questions and other questions were responded to by the Trustees.

( 2 ) Not to our knowledge

10 July 2017 - NW1524

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether she has found that a certain company (details furnished) can be held contractually liable for not ensuring that all visa applications it processed are fully available for adjudication on her department’s visa systems; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. It has not been necessary for the Department to exercise its rights on such a contractual condition as the service provider is under obligation to ensure applications are managed within the agreed timeframes. The Service Level Agreement allows for action to be taken against the service provider where there is a breach of contractual obligation.This is monitored and verified by the department through established business processes that reconcile application data with records uploaded to the department’s Visa Adjudication System (VAS). Any discrepancies are identified and are subject to further investigation and monitoring processes which are managed through a project governance standard.

10 July 2017 - NW1739

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Lotriet, Dr A to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) name and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

The State Security Agency (SSA) awarded no contracts or agreements to personnel of the Agency to conduct business with any state entity in the years stated above.

10 July 2017 - NW1790

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Mr MQ

Ndlozi, Mr MQ to ask the Minister of State Security

Which entities reporting to him (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place , (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term of each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) With reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

In terms of the National Intelligence Services Act 65 of 2002, as amended by the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act 52 of 2003, there are no boards that should be established by the Minister of State Security.

10 July 2017 - NW1612

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether she has found that the number of single-medium Afrikaans schools has displayed an upward trend since 1994; if so, (a) what number of schools in each year since 1994 occurs (i) separately in each province and (ii) in total throughout the country and (b) what are the reasons for this in each case; (2) whether she has found that the number of schools displayed a downward trend in the specified period; if not, what are the full relevant particulars; if so, what steps she will take to protect the specified schools?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)

Please note that the data for 1994 is not available. However, the earliest date for which the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has reliable information is 2002. Table 1 below shows the number of Afrikaans single medium schools over 10 years using 2002 as a baseline. In 2002, there were 1 814 Afrikaans single medium schools in South Africa. The majority of these schools were found in the Western Cape, followed by the Northern Cape with 289 schools.

(1)(b)

(i) The demographics in the area of some schools have changed. In response to the growing number of learners wanting English as the Language of Learning and Teaching (LOLT), the schools have introduced English as second language of instruction.

(ii) Declining number of Afrikaans speaking learners forces the schools to revert to parallel-medium (English/Afrikaans) schools.

(2) The number of Afrikaans single medium schools shows a decrease from 1 814 in 2002 to 1 234 in 2016. The major decrease took place in 2010 where the number of Afrikaans medium schools dropped by 158 schools.

Note that the only increase in the number of Afrikaans medium schools occurred between the years 2005 – 2008. The rest of the years recorded indicate a decrease.

Table 1: Number of Afrikaans single medium schools, by province, between 2002 and 2016

Province

2002

2005

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

EC

221

 214

212

202

203

192

173

193

164

173

168

FS

113

 98

91

70

69

68

76

75

77

79

74

GT

266

 186

254

252

222

217

188

168

182

183

108

KZ

45

 19

31

30

18

15

14

12

12

3

3

LP

39

 31

45

44

41

26

24

22

24

26

27

MP

27

 53

95

91

69

61

58

28

25

28

23

NC

289

 221

248

231

182

247

245

231

237

201

174

NW

78

 102

95

100

64

58

64

52

55

54

41

WC

736

 802

687

681

675

666

649

648

635

626

616

Total

1814

 1 729

1758

1701

1543

1550

1491

1429

1411

1373

1234

Source: 2002-2015 Annual School Survey and 2016 LURITS

10 July 2017 - NW1663

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with regard to the presentation by her department to the Portfolio Committees of Basic Education and Transport entitled Scholar Transport Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 23 May 2017, the (a) Eastern Cape, (b) KwaZulu-Natal, (c) Limpopo, (d) Mpumalanga, (e) Northern Cape and (f) North West provincial governments have requested additional funding from the National Treasury to cover the shortfall in their 2017-18 scholar transport budgets identified as totalling R639 943 941?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(d)(e)(f) Information received from the said provinces indicates that the said provinces have not as yet requested additional funding from the National Treasury to cover the shortfall in their 2017-18 scholar transport budgets. However, discussions are underway within the Provincial Departments to seek mechanisms to address the shortages from their respective provincial budgets.

10 July 2017 - NW1710

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether regular maintenance is being undertaken on information technology facilities and systems within the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa; if not, (a) why not (b) what steps have been taken to change this (c) why have no officials been (i) charged and/or (ii) suspended for not ensuring that these systems and facilities are maintained; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

PRASA does undertake regular maintenance of its information technology.

(a) Financial constraints at PRASA have resulted in key technical vacancies that have affected the maintenance in certain areas of Information Communication Technology (ICT).

(b) PRASA is exploring a partnership with other SOE’s in particular Transnet and Broadband Infraco for support in fibre maintenance. This is an interim measure while PRASA is building internal capacity to carry out the maintenance.

(c) There has not been any reason to charge employees; the challenges are structural and not related to ill-discipline.

(d) Skills and funding (operational funding) over and above the infrastructure Capital outlay remains a challenge. As PRASA modernizes, many of its ICT projects are in various stages of implementation and the full maintenance implications from an Operational funding point of view are still unclear.

10 July 2017 - NW1743

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

Department

(a) No employees were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the:

(i) 2014-15 – none

(ii) 2015-16 – none

(iii) 2016-17 – none

(aa)(aaa) – not applicable

(bbb) – Not applicable

(bb) (aaa) & (bbb) – not applicable

Air Traffic Navigating and Services (ATNS)

a.N/a

b.N/a. ATNS has not awarded any contracts or agreements to its employees to conduct business with any state entity

(i) 2014-15 : Nil

(ii) 2015-16 : Nil

(iii) 2016-17 : Nil

aa (aaa) : N/a

(bbb): N/a

bb (aaa) : N/a

(bbb) : N/a

Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA)

Not applicable.

ACSA policies do not allow for contracts to be awarded to staff members.

South Africa Civil Aviation Authority (SACCA)

(a)Not applicable, and (b), (i), (ii), and (iii): The South African Civil Aviation Authority is not aware of any staff member being awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity, nor has it granted an approval to any of its staff members to conduct business with any state entity during the 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 financial years.

As such questions: (aa), (aaa), and (bbb); and (bb), (aaa), and (bbb) are not applicable.

Roads Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(b) No staff member at RTMC was awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (ii) 2016-17 financial years.

(aa)(aaa) N/A

(bbb) N/A

(bb)(aaa)N/A

(bbb) N/A

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) Staff of the Road Accident Fund (RAF) who perform external remunerative work are required to obtain prior written permission to do so in terms of the RAF’s applicable policies and procedures, however the RAF would not know, beyond the prescribed declarations of interest forms completed by bidders in respect of the RAF’s own tenders and supply chain management policies and procedures, whether any staff member was awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with other state entities in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; consequently, the RAF is unable to respond to questions (aa)(aaa), (aa)(bbb), (bb)(aaa) and (bb)(bbb).

South Africa National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(b) (i)(ii) SANRAL’s employee contracts prevent any employee from receiving any secondary income for goods or services, unless authorised by the CEO. Additionally, staff are required to declare their interest in any entities. To the best of SANRAL’s knowledge and in terms of the declaration of interests received from staff annually, SANRAL is not aware of the award of any contracts or agreements to SANRAL staff, to conduct business with SANRAL or any other state entity, in any of the financial years listed herein.

Roads Infringement Agency (RTIA)

N(b) umber of staff awarded contracts

(i) 2014/2015=0

(ii) 2015/2016=1

(iii) 2016/2017=0

(aa) (aaa) Names and professional designations:

2014/2015=0

2015/2016 (1) =Mr K Maeyane (Risk Management Specialist)

2016/2017=0;

(bb) (aaa) Details of the contracts:

2014/2015=0

2015/2016=Audit Committee Member/Consultant to Fetakgomo Municipality.

2016/2017=0;

(bbb) Amounts in each case:

2014/2015=R0,00

2015/2016=R5721,00

2016/2017=R0,00

Cross Border Roads Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b) In terms of declaration of interest records, no employee disclosed any financial interest with state entities during (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years.

The external audit for 2015-16 financial year revealed that the companies with which some of the employees affiliate, had conducted business with state entities. The relevant information as per the audit management letter is in the table below.

(aa)(aaa) Names

(bbb) Professional designations

(bbb) Amounts

Siphiwinhlanhla Nkala

Road Transport Inspector

R 27 657.41

Patrick Mathebula

Manager Training Ext. Act Coordinator

R 173 462.40

Sharon Mkhize

Manager: Business Planning and Performance

R 333 000.00

(bb) (aaa) The Agency does not have the details of the contract (s) and/or agreement (s) awarded as the information was not disclosed in the declaration of interest forms by the employees.

South Africa Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

From a review of the Contract Register as well as the Declaration of Members Interest, there were no employees (including executive members) or Board members awarded contracts or agreements to conduct business with the South African Maritime Authority (SAMSA) during the 2014/15, 2015/16 or 2016/17 financial years.

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

Ports Regulator secretariat staff has not conducted business with state entities in the 2014/15-2015/16 financial years (this has been audited by the Auditor General) and to the best of our knowledge, no staff has conducted business with state entities in the 2016/17 financial year (based on verbal verification with staff members).

Railway Regulator Safety (RSR)

(b) (i) (ii) (iii) No. None of the RSR staff have conducted business with any state entities in the financial years mentioned.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA has discovered that certain employees were conflicted with regards to certain contracts. Please see annexure for details.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2001

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Does the Road Accident Fund (RAF) make use of external organisations to process claims; if so, what (a) are the names of the organisations, (b) is the extent of their involvement, (c) is the basis of the contractual agreement(s) in terms of functional role and scope, (d) is the duration of agreement(s) and (e) are the terms of contract(s) value; if not, (2) did the RAF enter into the specified agreements with the external organisations in the past five financial years; if so, (a) what is the name of each organisation, (b) what services did each organisation provide and (c) for how much?

Reply:

(1) The RAF does not currently make use of external organisations to process claims; therefore questions (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) are not applicable, however,

(2) The Road Accident Fund Act, No. 56 of 1996 (the Act) provides in section 8 for the appointment by the Board of agents to investigate and settle claims contemplated in section 17(1) of the Act (identified claims), similar to comparable sections contained in the Act’s predecessors. However, an appointment made under section 8 of the Act would constitute a public private partnership (PPP) under Treasury Regulation 16, where the full RAF function is outsourced. Considering the technicalities, timing and cost associated with PPPs the RAF Board elected instead to insource administrative capacity to assist the RAF to process the backlog of claims. Service providers were appointed following a compliant supply chain management process in respect of an open tender (RAF/2013/00027) advertised in the Government Tender Bulletin on 8 August 2013. The contracts commenced on 9 January 2014 and expired on 8 January 2017. Importantly, throughout the appointments the RAF remained responsible to approve the final settlement mandate in respect of the claims administered by the service providers, (a) the RAF appointed the following service providers (i) Ernst & Young Consortium [comprising of Ernst & Young Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd and A2A Kopano Incorporated and Alexander Forbes Compensation Technologies (Pty) Ltd (who subsequently left the consortium)] and (ii) Medscheme Holdings (Pty) Ltd, (b) to assist the RAF with the validation and verification of claim information; investigation and assessment of merits; investigation and assessment of medical records and reports relating to injuries sustained by claimants; investigation and assessment of quantum; negotiation of settlements based on approved mandates by the RAF; dealing with all litigation arising on a specific matter after instruction; keeping accurate records and reporting timeously; and communicating with claimants, attorneys and the RAF, (c) for the amounts as set out in the table below:

COSTS INCURRED – SERVICE PROVIDER INVOICES

Number

Description

Ernst & Young Consortium

Medscheme

Total

1

Paid invoices

R116,288,436

R184,175,692

R300,464,128

2

Outstanding invoices

R5,293,672

R2,856,544

R8,150,216

Total invoices received

R121,582,108

R187,032,236

R308,614,344

 

3

# Quotation for withheld reports

R22,365,349

R12,815,390

R35,180,739

Total

R143,947,457

R199,847,626

R343,795,083

# Note: The service providers incurred expenditure in obtaining expert reports and other information and, or documentation prior to termination of the contracts. The service providers requested re-imbursement for such expenditure and withheld the reports, subject to reimbursement. The contracts did not make provision for reimbursement for such expenditure. Approval by National Treasury, subject to certain conditions, has been obtained for the RAF to pay for additional reports. Re-imbursement is also subject to Board approval. The process to obtain Board approval has commenced.

 

 

10 July 2017 - NW2002

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount was spent on the Road Accident Benefit Scheme (RABS) brand development with regard to (a) marketing and brand-promotion projects, (b) advertisements in the media, (c) billboards, (d) mounted stickers and advertisements in lifts and malls, (e) promotional articles such as key rings, (f) printed booklets and pamphlets and (g) the RABS website?

Reply:

Parliament has consistently over recent years, starting in 2014/15, approved, on the recommendation of the Portfolio Committee on Transport an objective in the Road Accident Fund’s (RAF) Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plans, which objective provides for alignment of the RAF’s administrative dispensation with the RABS Bill, in order to prepare for the transition to RABS.

In addition to approving the objective, Parliament also approved, on the recommendation of the Portfolio Committee on Transport, the RAF’s annual budgets in relation to work to be performed in relation to the objective.

The objective is sensitive to Parliament’s consideration of the Bill and the Department of Transport’s responsibility in respect of formulating legislation for consideration by Parliament.

In 2014/15 the objective was for the RAF to support the Department of Transport to draft the Bill, Rules and Regulations as per the approved RABS policy. 

In 2015/16 the focus moved from the legislative process to readying the RAF to administer claims under the proposed Bill.  The focus was on internal readiness in terms of the business architecture and design.

In 2016/17 the focus was on developing a Transition Plan that is intended to assist the RAF in the transition. The plan is a conceptual document designed to enable the RAF to prepare for the administration of claims under the proposed Bill.  

The RAF spent the following amounts in relation to RABS, although not necessarily in respect of brand development:

With regard to -

in the 2014-15,

2015-16

and 2016-17 financial years:

(a) marketing and brand-promotion projects,

R Nil

R Nil

R 80 109.10

(b) advertisements in the media,

R2 896 662

R5 404 190

R6 365 666

(c) billboards,

R Nil

R Nil

R Nil

(d) mounted stickers and advertisements in lifts and malls,

R Nil

R Nil

R 4 300

e) promotional articles such as key rings (although no costs was incurred in respect of key rings, but in relation to mouse pads, CD’s and T-Shirts),

R 363 126

R 27 103

R 73 319

(f) printed booklets and pamphlets, and

R Nil

R Nil

R47 982

(g) the RABS website

R Nil

R Nil

R Nil

 

Advertisements in the media were published on mass-reach media platforms, for example radio, print and television. All expenditure took place following procurement in accordance with the provisions the RAF’s policies and the PFMA.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2003

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the relevant details of the breakdown of the payments to e-tag procurement from third parties with regard to the (a) names of the third parties, (b) payments received and (c) relevant service and/or obligation in each case; (2) what is the annual breakdown of payments towards invoice printing and posting for e-toll collection in each year since its inception; (3) what are the details of the kiosk rental agreement with regard to the (a) amount per unit, (b) number of units and (c) beneficiary or beneficiaries within the current e-toll structure?

Reply:

1. E-tag procurement from third parties:

(a) Names of third parties:

The parties that were contracted for the provision and maintenance of e-tags were:

  • Kapsch Trafficom AB - Sweden;
  • Q-Free ASA – Norway.

(b) Payments received:

The above parties have received the following payments for e-tag’s provided:

  • Kapsch Trafficom AB: R167 220 930.96 (Excl VAT)
  • Q-Free ASA: R58 317 748.41 (Excl VAT)

(c) Relevant service and/or obligation:

The above parties were contracted for the supply and maintenance of e-tags in accordance with SANRAL specifications and in accordance with the required specifications of an international CEN-278 standard. The e-tags were procured in batches in accordance with demand in terms of the e-toll registration for the GFIP project and for the conventional toll plazas country wide.

2. Payments towards invoice printing and posting:

The annual breakdown of payments towards invoice printing and posting for e-toll collection as per SARS and AARTO requirements is as follows (excl VAT):

  • 3 December 2013 to 31 December 2014: R124 635 007.73
  • 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2015: R58 422 869.55
  • 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2016: R112 289 632.03
  • 1 January 2017 to May 2017: R32 043 385.45

3. Kiosk rental:

(a) Amount per unit:

The amount per unit differs between “temporary” kiosks and “permanent” kiosks, and from shopping mall to shopping mall, depending also on kiosk floor area.

  • The monthly rental for a temporary kiosk currently ranges between R7 000 and R22 680 per month (excl VAT).
  • The monthly rental for a permanent kiosk ranges between R15 226.09 and R78 797.24 per month (excl VAT).

(b) Number of units:

  • There are currently five temporary kiosks in operation.
  • There are currently 17 permanent kiosks in operation.

(c) Beneficiary or beneficiaries within the current e-toll structure:

There are no beneficiaries from kiosk rental within the e-toll structure (i.e. the e-toll Operator - ETC). The kiosks are rented from the various owners of the shopping malls. ETC receive 2.5% of the rental for arranging and managing the rental agreements in terms of their contract. This percentage was tendered by ETC as part of the competitive tender for this contract.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2026

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Airports Company of South Africa has any contracts with a certain company (name furnished); if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the (i) cost and (ii) description of each specified contract?

Reply:

Airports South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

ACSA does not have any contract with the respective supplier.

 

07 July 2017 - NW1844

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to government schools in each province, how many are (a) currently operational, (b) mud schools and (c) built with informal structures; (2) how many (a) schools will be closed in the 2017-18 financial year and (b) of these schools are mud schools in each province; (3) how many of the (a) mud schools and/or (b) schools built with informal structures will be refurbished in each province to meet the standards and norms for school infrastructure in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Table 1 below indicates that, in 2016, there were 23 718 public schools that are operational. Majority of these schools are situated in KwaZulu-Natal (5 895) followed by the Eastern Cape with 5 468 schools.

Table 1: Number of operational public schools, by province, in 2016

Province

Number of schools

EC

5 468

FS

1 214

GP

2 083

KZ

5 895

LP

3 867

MP

1 725

NC

544

NW

1 472

WC

1 450

Grand Total

23 718

Source: 2016 Master list

1 (b)(c) The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Department and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

2(a) (b)

The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Department and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

3 (a)(b) The information has been requested from all the Provincial Education Departments and will be provided as soon as it received.

07 July 2017 - NW1310

Profile picture: Terblanche, Ms JF

Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the Cabinet statement issued on 11 May 2017 (details furnished), what interventions has her department undertaken in Vuwani, Limpopo, to ensure that learners are (a) back in class and (b) able to catch up on missed teaching time?

Reply:

a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE), working with the Limpopo Department of Education, has held numerous engagement meetings with key stakeholders to ensure that normality is restored for learners to be back in classes in Vuwani, Vhembe District. The intention of these engagements has primarily been to enlist support to advocate for the upholding and respect of the right to a basic education. The stakeholders that have been involved include the following: teacher unions operating in the areas: National Professional Teachers Organisation South Africa (NAPTOSA), Professional Educators Union (PEU) and South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU); Principals of schools; Chairpersons of School Governing Bodies (SGBs); Department of Social Development; Department of Health; the Education Forum; the Pastors’ Forum; the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT); and the Business Forum. The stakeholders have worked tirelessly to engage communities in assisting the DBE to restore normality. The Education Forum, Pastors’ Forum, school governing body formations, the NECT, traditional leaders and teacher unions took a unanimous decision to support all efforts aimed at restoring education services in Vuwani. The LP DoE has been tracking the attendance of both teachers and learners, and attendance rates have been improving, which suggests that learners and teachers are responding to the call.

During the 2016 disruptions:

  • Parolees as well as Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) workers were utilised for the cleaning of the schools, rubble removal and clearing of ground for mobile classes. Parents and SGBs of affected schools formed part of the cleaning team.
  • Donations were received from various donors. Donations received included textbooks, stationery, photocopiers, data projectors and laptops, sanitary towels and toiletries, eating utensils, brooms and mops, Science Kits and desks and these are being put to good use. All these collectively came from the following donors: NECT, Game and Massmart, Mvula Trust, Stats SA, Letaba Estate, Leda and KLM.

In reality, the Department of Basic Education does not have the capacity and means to take measures to prevent and control organised and co-ordinated disruptions of learning and teaching processes, considering the reasons for the Vuwani crisis. However, the Department has taken measures to mitigate the impact of the disruptions, including the provision of mobile classrooms, school furniture, textbooks and stationery as well as feeding for learners where necessary.

b) The LDoE has developed a catch-up plan for Vuwani to ensure that learners can return to the normal routine as far as the school calendar is concerned. According to the catch-up plan, recovery teaching and learning will run (in the morning and afternoon from Monday to Thursday; and on Saturdays) until learners write the May/June Examinations. For Grades 1 to 11, the programme includes chunking of the content to ensure that the work is covered over the available period. Pace setters are being used to identify any backlog in curriculum coverage per school, per subject, with the view of implementing an accelerated programme to catch up. E-learning solutions (from Vodacom) are being used particularly for Grade 12. Enrichment camping sessions have also been organised for Grade 12 learners, where targeted content in designated subjects will be offered by District Lead Teachers. Learners will also be exposed to examination guidelines and coached on answering difficult questions in order to ensure adequate preparation.

The implementation of the catch-up plan in schools is being monitored and supported by multidisciplinary teams. The aim is to ensure that the plan is effective and adequate as a mechanism for ensuring that learners and teachers can cover work lost during disruptions. Teacher unions, in particular, have been very supportive in supporting the catch-up plan by encouraging their members to volunteer their services, even after normal working hours.

Counselling services have been made available for affected learners, teachers and parents to make sure effective teaching and learning in schools take place. These counselling support sessions will be available for teachers, learners and affected parents until the May/June examinations. These sessions are provided by the Pastors’ Forum, Department of Health and Department of Social Development.

07 July 2017 - NW1304

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether each province developed a formal provincial scholar transport policy; if not, (a) which provinces have not done so and (b) what are the reasons for not doing so, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b) Yes, each province has a formal provincial scholar transport policy. Policies developed are in line with the national policy and addressing provincial mandates.

07 July 2017 - NW1972

Profile picture: Majola, Ms T

Majola, Ms T to ask the Minister of State Security

How many security threat assessments has his department and/or any entity reporting to him made recommending the assigning of (a) Protection and Security Services and/or (b) Presidential Protection Services to individuals (i) in the (aa) 2010-11, (bb) 2011-12, (cc) 2012-13, (dd) 2013-14, (ee) 2014-15, (ff) 2015-16 and (gg) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017?

Reply:

The State Security Agency (SSA) is mandated by the National Strategic Act of 1994 (Act No. 39 of 1994), and as amended by the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act of 2013 (Act No. 11 of 2013), to conduct and coordinate counterintelligence (CI). In fulfilling this legislative mandate the SSA is required to “put in place or institute measures and conduct activities to neutralise the effectiveness of foreign or hostile intelligence operations, to protect intelligence and any classified information, to conduct vetting investigations and to counter any threat or potential threat to national security” (GILAA, Act No. 11 of 2013).

The SSA performs threat and risk assessments (TRAs) as per request from the South African Police – Directorate for Protective Services (DPSS) which includes the VIP services and the Presidential Protection Services (PPS). Threat assessments are also provided in support of the security deployment detail of the NATJOINTS. These assessments are provided to support the SAPS Crime Intelligence Division, and on the whole, the SSA provides the assessments on a routine basis as part of its Counterintelligence mandate.

The table below outlines the number of Threat and Risk Assessments provided to the SAPS Protection Services and/or the Ministry for State Security for visits by VIPs.

Year

Number of Assessments

2010-2011

5

2011-2012

5

2012-2013

39

2013-2014

42

2014-2016

86

2015-2016

109

2016-2017

60

2017-to-date

13

07 July 2017 - NW1326

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with regard to the death of a Siphamandla Choma, a learner at Manyano Primary School in Mhluzi, following an alleged assault by the school principal, counselling has been made available for learners and educators at the specified school; if not, why not; if so, what form of counselling was made available?

Reply:

The District-Based Support Team at Ekangala District, during the week leading up to the funeral of the said learner, provided counselling to the learner’s classmates and the class teacher. Beyond the classroom, considering the limited human resources for the counselling, a broad screening assessment was undertaken in the school to identify and target learners and educators that may require psychosocial support the most. In addition, the family members were also given psychosocial support.

07 July 2017 - NW1321

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether each school has an appointed educator to provide counselling, support and advice to pupils who fall pregnant; if not, (a) why not and (b) what is the total number of schools that do not have an educator allocated to play this role; (2) what process is followed when selecting educators to fulfil this role? NW1463E

Reply:

1. Schools currently do not have allocated educators who provide counselling, support and advice to pregnant learners. Schools currently manage learner pregnancies through their respective codes of conduct, with guidance from the School Management Team. The Draft Policy on Prevention and Management of Learner Pregnancy, once approved, will provide guidelines to the School Management Team on how best to identify and allocate educators to carry this responsibility.

2. Educators volunteer to take up this responsibility.

07 July 2017 - NW1741

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether any staff of (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

a) Whether any staff of her department were awarded contracts

 
  1. 2014-15
  1. 2015-16
  1. 2016-17

(aa)

(aaa) What are the names

  • Requests for disclosure are regulated by the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000 (PAIA).
  • Section 34(2) of PAIA prohibits disclosure of the information of a third party, unless if that third party has consented to such disclosure.

N/A

Not available

e-Disclosure verification pending.

(bbb) Professional designations of the staff members

Refer to (aa) (i) above

N/A

N/A

(bb)

(aaa) Details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded

Contracts awarded by:

  • Media Information and Communication Technologies SITA
  • Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality
  • FS: Health
  • Independent Development Trust

N/A

N/A

(bbb) Amounts in each case

  • Media Information and Communication Technologies SITA – R0
  • Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality – R61 350
  • FS: Health – R34 210
  • Independent Development Trust – R87 501

N/A

N/A

b) No staff from SA Tourism were awarded any contracts.

 
  1. 2014-15
  1. 2015-16
  1. 2016-17

(aa)

(aaa) What are the names

N/A

N/A

N/A

(bbb) Professional designations of the staff members

N/A

N/A

N/A

(bb)

(aaa) Details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded

N/A

N/A

N/A

(bbb) Amounts in each case

N/A

N/A

N/A

07 July 2017 - NW1816

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Which entities reporting to her (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed? NW2024E

Reply:

1. (a) SA Tourism

(b) N/A

(i) SA Tourism Board

Name of Board Member

(aa) Date of Appointment

(bb) Date of End of Contract

Dr T Abrahamse

(Chairperson)

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Thebe Ikalafeng

(Deputy Chairperson)

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Dr Ayanda Ntsaluba

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Graham Wood

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Judi Nwokedi

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Michelle Constant

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Chichi Maponya

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Colin Bell

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Amor Malan

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Oregan Hoskins

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Mmaditonki Setwaba

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Yacoob Abba Omar

21 November 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Mmatsatsi Ramawela

26 August 2016

31 May 2018

Mr Enver Duminy

26 August 2016

31 May 2018

(ii) (aa) 14

(bb) 7 Female members

2. (a) N/A

07 July 2017 - NW1905

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

a) The department

  1. No transaction advisors for tenders were appointed for the mentioned period.
  2. Not applicable
  3. Not applicable
  4. Not applicable

b) SA Tourism

SA Tourism appointed transactional advisors for tenders within the period in question.

  1. Grant Thornton PS Advisory (Pty) Ltd
  2. Sourcing a Strategic partner to operate SA Tourism’s owned Exhibitions i.e. INDABA and MEETINGS AFRICA. The potential strategic partnership was to exclusively manage the 2 trade exhibitions and bring with it extensive tourism trade exhibition experience including an existing network of buyers, technology systems, capital investment, risk sharing arrangements and global brand strength.
  3. Strategic partner to provide equity investment as well as share risk and profits
  4. R 68 536.80

07 July 2017 - NW1941

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the (a) details of her department’s plans to work together with other government departments to consider what relief measures can be implemented in the medium term to revive the tourism economy following the devastating fires in Knysna and (b) timelines in this regard?

Reply:

a) From discussions between the Department of Tourism, South African Tourism, Provincial and Local authorities and the Knysna Tourism Organisation, it is clear that the extent of damage to tourism infrastructure is yet to be fully assessed and defined. Based on preliminary assessments and needs, in the interim, the Department of Tourism will provide support through the Working for Tourism Expanded Public Works Programme to absorb employees from the affected establishments into short-term further training (with stipends) programmes in hospitality. SA Tourism will communicate positive messaging, both locally and internationally towards restoring the tourism image of Knysna. The Department of Tourism in partnership with the provincial and local authorities, the Department of Labour and Home Affairs has also facilitated the processing of Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) and Identity Document applications for affected Knysna residents.

b) Initial meetings between the Department of Tourism, SA Tourism and provincial and local authorities took place in the weeks of the 5th and 12th June 2017. At present, local authorities are still compiling reports on the impact of the fires on communities, private and public property. The immediate priorities are to care for the destitute and homeless. It is anticipated that a clearer picture of the support required by the tourism sector will emerge towards the middle of July 2017, where after further plans can be developed.

07 July 2017 - NW1852

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)How many pupils are (a) currently registered as learners in (i) public and (ii) private schools in each province and (b) in (i) primary and (ii) high school; (2) how many (a) high school, (b) pre-primary and (c) primary school teachers are currently employed in schools but do not teach any classes in each province; (3) how many teachers are currently employed in (a) private and (b) public schools in each province?

Reply:

1. (a)(i)(ii)(b)(i)(ii)

Note that 2017 data is not yet available. Table 1 below indicates the number of learners in 2016 by sector. It shows that there were 12 932 565 learners in 2016, majority (7 509 476) of these learners were in primary schools.

Table 1: Number of learners in ordinary schools, by province and phase, in 2016

Province

Sector

Pre-Primary

Primary

Secondary

Grand Total

EC

INDEPENDENT

6 211

38 011

18 497

62 824

 

PUBLIC

134 381

1 137 136

627 206

1 898 723

 

Total

140 592

1 175 147

645 703

1 961 547

FS

INDEPENDENT

1 405

10 294

4 938

16 637

 

PUBLIC

37 412

407 072

227 228

671 712

 

Total

38 817

417 366

232 166

688 349

GP

INDEPENDENT

27 304

160 881

89 433

278 026

 

PUBLIC

108 017

1 228 212

707 006

2 048 558

 

Total

135 321

1 389 093

796 439

2 326 584

KZ

INDEPENDENT

6 411

36 378

26 487

69 337

 

PUBLIC

189 296

1 569 955

1 048 909

2 808 207

 

Total

195 707

1 606 333

1 075 396

2 877 544

LP

INDEPENDENT

5 205

34 093

19 532

58 830

 

PUBLIC

121 727

907 668

677 289

1 706 725

 

Total

126 932

941 761

696 821

1 765 555

MP

INDEPENDENT

2 483

16 371

9 264

28 118

 

PUBLIC

64 363

597 045

384 616

1 046 234

 

Total

66 846

613 416

393 880

1 074 352

NC

INDEPENDENT

649

1 838

1 589

4 080

 

PUBLIC

18 834

175 612

92 960

287 435

 

Total

19 483

177 450

94 549

291 515

NW

INDEPENDENT

1 874

12 158

5 136

19 207

 

PUBLIC

50 345

487 710

273 231

811 340

 

Total

52 219

499 868

278 367

830 547

WC

INDEPENDENT

5 446

29 947

17 780

53 223

 

PUBLIC

65 701

659 095

337 572

1 063 349

 

Total

71 147

689 042

355 352

1 116 572

National

847 064

7 509 476

4 568 673

12 932 565

Source: 2016 SNAP Survey

(2) (a) (b) (c)

All teachers employed in schools are allocated classes to teach. If teachers, for whatever reason which may include ill-health, suspension due to misconduct, etc. are unable to teach, a substitute educator is allocated to the school accordingly.

(3)(a)(b) Number of state-paid public and independent schools educators, in 2017

Province

Number of educators in Independent schools (a) (2016)

Number of educators Public Schools (b) (2017)

EASTERN CAPE

3 257

51 597

FREE STATE

1 058

20 674

GAUTENG

18 986

62 385

KWAZULU-NATAL

4 989

87 437

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

2 768

49 992

MPUMALANGA

370

31 768

NORTH WEST

1 232

24 902

NORTHERN CAPE

295

9 125

WESTERN CAPE

4 264

30 942

Grand Total

37 219

368 822

Source 1(public) PERSAL, March 2017

Source 2 (independent schools): 2016 SNAP

07 July 2017 - NW1848

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether a school for hearing impaired learners has been built in Mpumalanga as promised by her department (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Information from the Mpumalanga Department of Education is that the school for the hearing impaired has not been constructed by the department as yet. When the project was identified, the Department commenced with the search for a site for the school for the deaf and the criteria for the site selection was proximity to a hearing institute and a provincial hospital for the purpose of the routine assessments of the learners. Four (4) sites were identified and all were found to be unsuitable due to reasons including inadequate size, distance from an ear institute and provincial hospital and unsuitable terrain. Further, assistance was solicited from Mbombela Local Municipality and Mpumalanga Economic Growth Agency (MEGA) without success. However, it in the absence of the site, the Department proceeded with benchmarking the curriculum delivery and infrastructure delivery models with other provinces, namely KZN, Gauteng and Western Cape. In addition, the Department proceeded and completed the generic designs for the proposed school and is only waiting for adaptation to a site, once available. A suitable site has subsequently been identified in Kaapsche Hoop, 25km outside Nelspruit. Negotiations have ensued in an effort to secure the land as the stakeholders and the MPDoE is satisfied with the suitability of the site. A budget has been allocated in the 2017/18 financial year Infrastructure Plan for environmental assessment, geotechnical investigations, topographical survey and the subsequent adaptation of the generic designs onto the site layout plan. Construction of the school is projected to commence 2018/19 financial year.

07 July 2017 - NW1641

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she has established the reasons why the average length of stay to 4,3 nights and resulting bed nights has grown in 2016 compared to 2015, despite the fact that the number of trips declined by 0,7% over the same period; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The decrease in domestic trips in 2016 was largely driven by the shift in holidays, negatively impacting on the number of trips taken with a purpose of visiting family and friends. Although fewer trips were taken in 2016 compared to 2015, domestic tourism survey indicates that tourists stayed longer relative to 2015. The average length of stay per trip increased by 1.6%, leading to an increase in the total number of bed night by 0.9%. The reasons for this increase despite the decline in the total number of trips was due to the fact that during 2016, more public holidays were close to weekend resulting in domestic tourists opting to combine the holidays with those weekends for their trips, hence the longer duration of stay for those who undertook the trips.

07 July 2017 - NW1547

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate decline of 37% of tourist arrivals from the Russian Federation to South Africa between 2014 and 2016, (b) to what extent is this below average growth in arrivals due to changes in advertising spend in the Russian Federation and (c) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) What are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate decline of 37% of tourist arrivals from the Russian Federation to South Africa between 2014 and 2016?

The new South African Visa Regulations that were introduced in 2015 requiring in-person visa application for Russians and the lack of visa processing centres impacted the tourist arrivals from Russia into South Africa.

Russia’s GDP also declined between 2013 and 2016 as the country went into recession, impacting all outbound travel from Russia.

b) To what extent is this below average growth in arrivals due to changes in advertising spend in the Russian Federation.

As an investment market, SA Tourism’s marketing spend in Russia has been minimal. SA Tourism leveraged on tactical opportunities with DIRCO and with South African trade.

c) What are the further relevant details in this regard

A media and trade engagement was conducted in 2016 in partnership with the South African Embassy in Russia. In the same year, SA Tourism also attended a roadshow to Moscow and St Petersburg organised by a South African tour operator, Follow Me to Africa. The purpose of the roadshow was to introduce South African Trade to Russian trade for purposes of doing business. Russian trade were also hosted in South Africa in 2015 and 2016 during Indaba to build relationships with South African trade.

Recent changes in the visa regime between Russia and South Africa mean that Russian passport holders no longer require a visa to enter South Africa, removing a key barrier to travel into South Africa.

07 July 2017 - NW1799

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms M O

Mokause, Ms M O to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

(1) Which entities reporting to her (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

PSC

  1. (a); (b); (i)(aa);(i)(bb);(ii)(aa); (ii)(bb): Not applicable to the Public Service Commission (PSC) as the PSC is not an entity in its nature and does not have a board. The PSC is a Constitutional body accountable to the National Assembly.
  2. (a) and (b): Ditto (Not applicable to the PSC).

CPSI

  1. The Centre for Public Service Innovation does not have a board
  2. The CPSI is not required to have a board as it is not a Public Entity but a Government Component

DPSA

The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have a board. 

NSG

  1. (a) The National School of Government does not have a board. It is established as schedule 1 December by the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended read with Proclamation No. 43 of 2013
  2. The National School of Government does not have a board. It is established as schedule 1 December by the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended read with Proclamation No. 43 of 2013

END

07 July 2017 - NW1400

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What percentage of small, medium and micro enterprise bed and breakfast establishments are currently owned by black entrepreneurs, (b) how is the percentage expected to change by the end of the (i) 2017-18, (ii) 2018-19 and (iii) 2019-20 financial years and (c) what amounts has her department allocated in the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term expenditure framework to accelerate transformation in this segment of the industry?

Reply:

a) The total number of Bed and Breakfast (B&B) establishments in the country is currently unknown and so is the demographic information about them. However, through the grading system, 884 B&B establishments were graded as of 31 May 2017. Furthermore, updates of the National Tourism Database, which currently relies on voluntary updates by establishments, indicates that an additional 29 B&B establishments which were not graded also updated their information.

The department recognises the need for a comprehensive database that is not solely dependent on the updates from establishments in order to support planning, growth and development of the tourism sector. In this regard, the Department, working with Provinces; Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; Municipalities; Industry and other related agencies is embarking on a process to build a comprehensive tourism database for the country through a “census” of establishments during the current financial year.

b) (i),(ii) & (iii) There is no forecast on the increase of Bed & Breakfast establishments in the country. The department’s initiatives in the form of enterprise development support as well as capital and other incentives are aimed at growing existing and start-ups businesses with the aim to increase participation of black enterprises in the tourism sector. However, as government, our responsibility is to create a conducive environment and appropriate support mechanisms to enable entrepreneurs to succeed.

c) What amounts has her department allocated in the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term expenditure framework to accelerate transformation in this segment of the industry?

Small enterprise development and sector transformation are central to most of the department’s programmes. The following budget allocations have been made to specific programmes that focus on enterprise development, market access support, capital investment (i.e. Tourism Transformation Fund) and energy efficiency retrofitting (i.e. Green Tourism Incentive Programme) over the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term expenditure framework. These programmes would contribute to sector transformation.

Programme

Estimated budget allocation (‘000) over medium term expenditure framework (MTEF) period

 

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Enterprise Development

17 882

16 420

14 361

Market Access Support (international)

13  000*

15 318*

13  125*

Market Access Support (Hidden Gems)

13  000*

15 318*

13  125*

Tourism Transformation Fund (TFF) - in collaboration with NEF.

40  000**

40 000**

40 000**

Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) - in collaboration with IDC)

30 000**

45 000**

67 500**

* Allocation estimate in line with Estimates of National Expenditure

** Provisional allocation in line with memoranda of agreement with the relevant development finance institution –

amounts may increase or decrease dependant on programme uptake and availability of funds

The eligibility and qualifying criteria included in the programme guidelines for the market access support and the energy efficiency retrofitting (i.e. GTIP) programmes gives preference to, and offer increased benefits to small and transformed enterprises. The incubator initiatives under the enterprise development and capital investment (i.e. TTF) support programmes specifically focus on black owned enterprises.

It is further important to note that the TTF that will be administered by the National Empowerment Fund (NEF) is a dedicated support mechanism aimed at unlocking investment by black investors in the tourism sector. The department’s contribution of R120 million over the MTEF period will serve as a grant component. This will be complemented by equal contributions of R120 million in debt finance and R120 million in equity contributions from the NEF over the same period. Through the collaboration with NEF, the total value of the Tourism Transformation Fund will therefore be R360 million over the MTEF period.

07 July 2017 - NW1888

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms M O

Mokause, Ms M O to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

DPSA

The Department of Public Service and Administration has not appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016.

CPSI

The Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI) did not appoint transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016

  1. N/A
  2. N/A
  3. N/A

NSG

(a) and (b) National School of Government did not appoint transaction advisors for tenders

(i) Not applicable

(ii) not applicable

(iii) not applicable

PSC

The Public Service Commission is an independent Constitutional body, accountable to the National Assembly. It is therefore not an entity or body reporting to the Minister of Public Service and Administration MPSA.

END

07 July 2017 - NW1249

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether he has put any plans in place to implement the provisions of the Financial Intelligence Centre Amendment Act, Act 1 of 2017; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) by what date will (a) each provision, (b) each category of (i) accountable institutions and (ii) transactions and (c) the specified Act in its entirety come into effect?

Reply:

(1) Yes, I have gazetted the dates for the coming into operation of most clauses in the Act, and our plans to facilitate implementation of the Act. Together with the Government Notice No. 563 in Gazette No. 40916, now technically amended by the attached Notice No. 601 in Gazette No. 40939, published on Tuesday, 13 June 2017, the National Treasury issued the attached Press Statement informing the public that I have signed and gazetted the implementation of the Financial Intelligence Centre Amendment Act of 2017 (“the FICA Act”). The Press Statement was accompanied with more detailed information in the following attached documents:

(i) Government Notice containing the two commencement dates of 13 June 2017 and 2 October 2017 for most of the provisions in the Act. I expect the remaining provisions to be in operation no later than 1 April 2018. These provisions relate to the freezing of assets related to UN Security Council decisions and to private companies doing business with Government. They require some preparatory work before they can be implemented.

(ii) A roadmap document, titled “Roadmap for the Implementation of the Financial Intelligence Centre Amendment Act, 2017 (Act No. 1 of 2017) for supervisors and accountable institutions”.

This important document (also) details the various FICA Act provisions and their categories which took effect on 13 June 2017, those taking effect on 2 October 2017, and lastly those intended to take effect (or full effect) after 2 October 2017 (which I expect to be no later than 1 April 2018) (see pages 3 to 9). This document also contains timelines on various actions which must be undertaken from June to December 2017 (see page 12).

(iii) A high-level National Treasury document, for public consultation, titled “A new approach to combat money laundering and terrorist financing”.

This document sets out the vision and strategy on the implementation of the new risk-based approach and a more consultative and consumer-friendly approach in relation to regulatory and policy issues like financial inclusion and the approach towards Prominent Influential Persons.

(iv) Draft Government Notices, for public consultation, on withdrawal of exemptions and amendments to the Regulations, and Draft Guidance, also for public consultation, from the Financial Intelligence Centre, providing draft guidance on how the new measures contained in the FICA Act can be implemented.

(2)(a) Please refer to the attached commencement Notice, Press Statement and the roadmap document on commencement dates, which provide more detailed information.

(2)(b)(i) The provisions of the FICA Act will apply to all accountable institutions. There is, though, an acknowledgement that not all of them will be in the same state of readiness; for example, the banks, by being at the centre of facilitating (legitimate) financial flows and combating illicit financial flows, are or will likely be more ready than other institutions.

(2)(b)(ii) The only two outstanding areas, namely on freezing of assets and prominent influential persons in the private sector would be implemented and operationalised, respectively, no later than 1 April 2018, though I hope it is even sooner. These relate to sections 17, 20, 21(b) and 39 of the FICA Act and paragraph (b) of the list of domestic prominent influential persons in Schedule 3A, inserted by section 59 of the FICA Act, requiring a Ministerial notice to set a threshold. These provisions require consultations within Government, systems upgrades by both supervisors and / or accountable institutions, including the ability to generate appropriate databases on or develop systems capability to search persons doing business with Government above a certain rand value threshold.

(2)(c) No later than 1 April 2018, or hopefully sooner if all processes can be concluded faster.

07 July 2017 - NW1979

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) How many special needs schools impose school fees in each province and (b) is there a set tariff across all provinces; (2) whether any learners with disabilities in full service schools are exempted from paying school fees; if so, how many learners have been exempted; if not, how many learners have not been exempted?

Reply:

The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Departments and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

06 July 2017 - NW1916

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the full report on the maintenance of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college infrastructure as reported by his department in its submission to Parliament in June 2017 is publicly available; if not, why not; if so, where can a copy be obtained; (2) what were the main findings contained in the report; (3) did the report quantify the annual budget needed to maintain and replace the infrastructure in order for the TVET colleges to keep up with the maintenance requirements of their infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the full amounts (a) transferred in the (i) 2015-16 and (ii) 2016-17 financial years and (b) allocated in the 2017-18 budget to TVET colleges for the maintenance of infrastructure?

Reply:

1. – (3) The report on the maintenance of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college infrastructure is not yet available. The Department has secured donor funding from the European Union to enable a full audit and verification of TVET college infrastructure. Due to challenges experienced with regards to the appointment of a service provider to assist with the audit, it is envisaged that the process will re-commence during the 3rd quarter of 2017.

4. (a)

 

(i) 2015/16

(ii) 2016/17

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2015/16

R’000

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2016/17

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

4 943 262

1 140 945

6 084 207

5 168 971

1 274 848

6 443 819

(b)

2017/18

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2017/18

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

5 535 383

1 328 096

6 863 479

Note:

Compensation of Employee Costs are salary related costs of all college employees who are appointed to offer Ministerial approved programmes, i.e. National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED programmes. The budget is retained by the Department to pay for the salaries related to these employees.

Subsidy Allocation: This allocation is transferred to the colleges to cover for operational costs. In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges, colleges are required to set aside 10% of their subsidy allocation to cover costs towards maintenance.

It should be noted that since 2009, no earmarked capital infrastructure allocations have been received from National Treasury. Colleges are therefore expected to prioritise for the maintenance of infrastructure from their subsidy allocation, which is insufficient to provide for the effective maintenance and upkeep of infrastructure.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen

EXT: 5458

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1916 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1918

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

For each calendar year since 2010, how many learners were registered on the National Learner Record Database having achieved a full qualification on levels (a) 2, (b) 3, (c) 4 and (d) 5, excluding those achieving the National Senior Certificate and National Certificate (Vocational)?

Reply:

According to information obtained from the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for each calendar year since 2010, the number of learners whose achievements were recorded on the National Learners’ Records Database (NLRD) as having achieved a full qualification on National Qualifications Framework (NQF) levels (a) 2, (b) 3, (c) 4 and (d) 5, excluding those achieving the National Senior Certificate and National Certificate (Vocational), are tabulated below.

NQF Level

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 *

2

16 458

8 691

14 931

8 902

9 128

7 483

2 869

3

25 819

26 292

28 177

32 586

35 973

39 172

10 598

4

22 021

24 461

21 715

19 025

18 422

23 944

12 095

5

28 310

30 522

43 564

38 599

31 425

37 240

17 590

* As at June 2017, some information is still outstanding.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr J Samuels

EXT: 012 431 5106

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1918 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE: