Questions and Replies

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02 September 2021 - NW1925

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the recent remarks by Dr Susan Vosloo discouraging persons from getting vaccinated against COVID-19, which comes at a time when the Republic is facing increased vaccination hesitancy, what (a) are the relevant details of the COVID-19 vaccination education drives planned in the Republic in the coming months, (b) budgets have been set aside for this and (c) are the relevant time frames?

Reply:

a) The COVID-19 vaccination education drive is a multi-faceted programme that involves the public and private sectors across the entire government (all departments and all three spheres) and that has many contributing private companies.

  • High programme visibility: Specific Activities
  • Visible signage of the vaccine roll-out on large key billboards in high transit areas
  • Use of taxi rank TV, Digital Billboards and others to promote vaccination messages
  • Conspicuous telescopic and other large banners at malls, places of worship, taxi ranks, retail stores, schools
  • Conspicuous and recognizable branding and clear signage at vaccine sites
  • Champions: Identifying apolitical vaccine champions that are relevant to the target group and have wide reaching influence (key influential leaders; Traditional Leaders, Faith Based, Business sector, Civil society and Celebrities) e.g. Limpopo targeted ZCC church leader
  • Involvement of Political leaders as champions: Health MEC and other political leaders such as Premiers, Mayors, Ward Counsellors
  • Partnership with private sector to collaborate on media campaigns and vaccine roll-out branding e.g. Medical Aids like GEMS, Discovery etc. and other businesses
  • Information in people’s hands: Specific Activities
  • Guide the community on where they should go to, who they should listen to and which number they should call to get the correct information on anything to do with vaccines
  • Use the time that clients spend at vaccination sites to empower them to be vaccine ambassadors
  • Use the observation time to educate the clients and equip them to be able to answer common misinformation questions e.g. Is it true that people are dying after they vaccinate?
  • Provide comprehensive IEC material on vaccines and adverse events following immunization with the call center number clearly visible that they can refer to and share with others.
  • Share information on the nearest functional vaccination sites; operating hours; dates for outreach with all stakeholders: radio stations, newspapers, community leaders, religious leaders, schools, workplaces, and all social media platforms
  • Use of social media to get the correct information into young people’s hands so that they do not discourage the elderly from vaccinating through sharing of misinformation they consume on social media
  • Use of teachers to get the right information into young people’s hands so that they can correct misinformation from social media and other sources at home
  • Address the play-off between various vaccines and preferences
  • Use of local media: Specific Activities
  • Continuous engagement to reinforce positive messages about vaccinations and to counter misinformation and disinformation
  • Ongoing “human” stories by individuals representing the target group to show authentic stories of registration and vaccination on radio, local newspapers, and all social media platforms
  • Radio stories addressing identified concerns about vaccines in local languages
  • Radio slots to boost confidence in vaccination explaining all the key steps in the vaccination journey
  • Collaboration with local newspapers, Radio stations, leadership, NGOs, Civil society organizations, tertiary institutions, schools, Unions, businesses, private vaccination sites in spreading correct information about vaccines
  • Public health messaging to raise public awareness of the notable fatality rate and potential long-term sequela of COVID-19
  • Weekly local radio station slots for advocacy messaging, adverts in local print media.
  • Local mobilisation and canvassing: Specific Activities
  • Whole society area based (ward-based) approach improving reach and raising capacity through collaboration with other stakeholders i.e. Private sites, Sector engagements (Business, Civil Society, FBOs, Traditional Authorities, Men’s Forum, Older Person’s Forum and people with disabilities e.tc. to be engaged during the month of August)
  • Identify and appoint area-based leads, local civil society activators and communicators who will play the catalytic role of bringing all these people together
  • Out-reach service: share the schedule with the sites, times and dates; plan well with all relevant local stakeholders to ensure that there is sufficient demand creation and social mobilization in the community leading up to the out-reach date including use of loud hailers
  • Identify individuals who can be vaccination ambassadors or champions with vaccine branded clothing with messages like do have any questions about vaccines? ‘Ask me’, who can be easily identifiable as they walk around the community and use local media to inform the community about them and to ask them questions.
  • Use of community WhatsApp groups to communicate correct information and counter misinformation and disinformation.
  • Work with local comedians to create fun videos on platforms like TikTok that can be shared on social media
  • Coordinating all of the community development practitioners, health care workers and resources to intensify the together with Door-to-door, Site visits by Executive Council and Mayors to mobilise communities.
  • Access strategies: Specific Activities
  • Transport: provide transport where possible; ensure that clients know when, how, which number to call, where to go and who is eligible to access this service
  • Home based vaccinations
  • District based promotion of vaccination sites, available assistance at all sites, pop up sites taken to remote areas, ward-based vaccination sites, mass vaccination sites opened across the districts, more sites opened on weekends to provide access to those at work during the week.
  • Increase outreach/mobile sites and strategical place them in areas with low uptake as informed by data
  • Increase sites in underserved areas
  • Increase sites that operate on weekends and make sure they are advertised widely including operation hours
  • Adopt specific strategies like Churches on Sunday, Malls on Saturdays, especially on weekends
  • Build trust in the system by providing excellent client friendly service so that positive reviews spread by word of mouth
  • Use familiar sites as vaccination sites e.g. churches, synagogues, mosques, malls
  • Other Activities
  • Continue with regular feedback and monitoring of daily performance through feedback sessions between Province & districts Mon-Fri
  • Each district, through the district vaccination coordinating committees meets at least three times a week to monitor progress and identify pressure points and problem areas to reaching targets.
  • Retain focus on >60 years as the most vulnerable population group until targets are met
  • Encourage clinicians to counter patients’ anecdotal “bad reaction” stories with “good reaction” stories rather than statistics.
  • Use messaging like “your parents made sure you were vaccinated as a child now it’s your turn to return the favour”, to encourage younger people to bring older people.
  • Coming up with little songs about vaccinations that can be taught at ECDs and Schools and share it through ECD networks (Vaccine, Vaccine on your arm, Will keep you safe from COVID-19).

b) Budgets that have been set aside for this come from all partners. Some are directly budgeted items funded from government departments, including GCIS, but the majority are cash and cash-in-kind contributions from the private sector (through Solidarity Fund and by media houses). We do not have a Rand value for all of these contributions at this stage.

c) The relevant time frames are that several activities have already commenced and all are continuing for the remainder of this year and into 2022.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1804

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the current operational status of Ketlaphela Pharmaceuticals?

Reply:

Ketlaphela SOC Ltd was established as a subsidiary of Pelchem SOC, a subsidiary of South African Nuclear Energy Corporation. These SOCs are part of the Department of Energy and Mineral Resources.

The Department of Health is not the responsible Department for Ketlaphela, the Department can therefore not comment on the current operational status.

 

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1779

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to the vaccine online registration system, also known as the Electronic Vaccination Data System (EVDS), what has he found are the reasons that on 2 May 2021 it was reported that only 500 000 South Africans above the age of 60, out of a group of 5 million persons in this specific age group, have so far registered to be vaccinated; (2) how can persons who are not equipped to register online be assisted by Government to enable them to register on the EVDS system; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The reference date of 2 May 2021 was before the start of the National Vaccination rollout programme on the 17 May 2021. As of 31 August 2021, at 14h50 a total of 3,567,652 individuals older than 60 had registered for vaccination on the EVDS;

2. The response is as follows:

  • There are three options to self-register at no cost to the individual namely:
      • Through the internet at vaccine.enroll.health.gov.za
      • Through WhatsApp by sending a Whatsapp Message – Register to 0600123456
      • Through USSD by dialling *134*832#

    Two options for assisted registration exist namely:

  • Registration points at vaccination sites
  • Dial the National Call Centre Toll free numbers 0800029999, the call centres agents will assist the individual to register while on the call.

3. Yes.

 

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1891

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What are the national minimum standards for (a) air ambulances, (b) helicopters and (c) fixed-wing aircraft?

Reply:

The national minimum standards for provision of air ambulances, regardless of whether is a rotor-wing helicopter or a fixed-wing aircraft used, is prescribed in the EMS Regulations, 2017.

EMS Regulations in relation to aeromedical services indicate that:

  • the provider is required to be registered to provide such services within the category of Aeromedical Services with the respective provincial Department of Health where it is operating from.
  • This registration should also involve the inspection and accreditation of the station/hangar operated from.
  • The aircraft operator must hold the appropriate G7 licence and CATS Part 138 accreditation as specified by the Civil Aviation Authority of South Africa.

An extensive minimum list of equipment is detailed in the attached Annexure B of the EMS Regulations.

With regards to the medical crew:

  • The senior medical staff member on the air ambulance must be registered in the category of a Paramedic or Emergency Care Technician or Emergency Care Practitioner with the Health Professions Council of South Africa, who shall hold valid CAT 138, Aviation Health Care Provider, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Intermediate Trauma Life Support or Advanced Trauma Life Support and Paediatric Advanced Life Support or equivalent certificates.
  • The minimum staffing requirement for the second staff member on an ambulance shall be a person registered in at least the category of Basic Ambulance Assistant with the Health Professions Council of South Africa.
  • All crew are required to practice within their respective scope of practice as approved by the Health Professions Council of South Africa: Professional Board for Emergency Care.

Annexure B

DOH_HiResLogo.jpg

Airway Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Oropharyngeal Airway Nos. 00,0,1,2,3,4

2 each

2 each

2 each

2 each

2 each

2 each

Hard Suction Catheter (Paediatric)

2

2

2

2

2

2

Neonatal Suction Catheters Size No. 5 FG

2

2

2

2

2

2

Neonatal Suction Catheters Size No. 6 FG

2

2

2

2

2

2

Neonatal Suction Catheters Size No 8 FG

2

2

2

2

2

2

Paediatric Suction Catheter Size No. 10 FG

1

1

1

1

1

1

Adult Suction Catheter Size No. 12 FG h

1

1

1

1

1

1

Adult Suction Catheter Size No. 14 FG

1

1

1

1

1

1

Neonatal Suction Catheters Size No. 5 FG

1

1

1

1

1

1

Neonatal Suction Catheters Size No. 6 FG

1

1

1

1

1

1

Neonatal Suction Catheters Size No 8 FG

1

1

1

1

1

1

Paediatric Suction Catheter Size No. 10 FG

1

OPTIONAL

1

1

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Adult Suction Catheter Size No. 12 FG

0

1

0

0

1

1

Adult Suction Catheter Size No. 14 FG

2

2

2

2

2

2

Portable Suction Apparatus (Combination of Battery and Electrically Operated)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Manual Hand Operated Portable Suction Apparatus (As a backup device)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Stethoscope (Combination of diaphragm and bell type head)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Endotracheal Intubation Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Laryngoscope set for adult and paediatric including the following:

           

Handle with batteries in full working condition

0

1

0

0

1

1

Batteries - spare for laryngoscope

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 0 blade

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 1 blade

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 2 blade

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 3 blade

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 4 blade

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 5 blade

0

OPTIONAL

0

0

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Disposable, sterile ET tubes including the following:

           

Size 2.5 mm ID ET tube

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 3 mm ID ET tube

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 3.5 mm ID ET tube

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 4 mm ID ET tube

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 4.5 mm ID ET tube

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 5 mm ID ET tube

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 5 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 5.5 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 6 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 6.5 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 7 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 7.5 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 8 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Size 8.5 mm ID ET tube (cuffed, high volume, low pressure)

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 1

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 1.5

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 2

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 2.5

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 3

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 3.5

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 4

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 4.5

0

2

0

0

2

2

Sub-glottic Laryngeal Mask (LMA), size 5

0

2

0

0

2

2

Endotracheal Intubation Equipment Continued

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Small ET tube introducer

0

1

0

0

1

1

Large ET tube introducer

0

1

0

0

1

1

Gum Elastic Bougie

0

1

0

0

1

1

Magill forceps - Adult

1

1

1

1

1

1

Magill forceps - Paediatric

1

1

1

1

1

1

10ml syringes

0

1

0

0

1

1

20ml syringes

0

2

0

0

2

2

Pair sharp, clean scissors

0

1

0

0

1

1

1m Tape / ET tube securing device

0

2

0

0

2

2

Water soluble lubricant gel

0

2

0

0

2

2

Heimlich type Flutter valves

0

2

0

0

2

2

Heat moisture exchanger valve for ventilated patients

0

1

0

0

1

1

Breathing / Ventilation Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Adult oxygen masks providing 40% inhaled oxygen with tubing

4

4

4

4

4

4

Adult non-rebreather masks providing 100% inhaled oxygen with tubing

2

2

2

2

2

2

Adult oxygen nebuliser masks including tubing and fluid reservoir

2

2

2

2

2

2

Nasal cannula with tubing

2

2

2

2

2

2

Paediatric oxygen masks providing 40% inhaled oxygen with tubing

2

2

2

2

2

2

Paediatric non-rebreather masks providing 100% inhaled oxygen with tubing

2

2

2

2

2

2

Paediatric oxygen nebuliser masks including tubing and a fluid reservoir

2

2

2

2

2

2

Oxygen T-Piece with tubing

2

2

2

2

2

2

Adult Bag-Valve-Mask with Reservoir and adult mask (size 4)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Paediatric Bag-Valve-Mask with Reservoir and paediatric mask (size 1)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Neonatal Bag-Valve-Mask with Reservoir and neonatal mask (size 0)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Oxygen Humidification Device

1

1

0

0

1

1

Oxygen Supply

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Minimum of a portable oxygen cylinder. Size “D”

2

2

2

2

2

2

Portable oxygen cylinder gauge with flow meter

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fitted oxygen cylinder/s, size “F” capable of supplying a minimum of 30 minutes of oxygen at a flow rate of at least 15 litres per minute.

2

2

0

0

0

2

Fitted oxygen cylinder gauge with flow meter

1

1

0

0

0

1

Ventilator

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Mechanical volume cycled ventilator with PEEP valve & pressure relief valve, with appropriate fitting allowing connection to fitted oxygen supply within the ambulance, including the following features (requires annual calibration certification):

0

1

0

0

1

1

• Volume and pressure control:

           

• Volume

           

• Inspiratory Pressure

           

• PEEP

           

• Fi02

           

• Rate

           

• Alarms (Peak Inspiratory Pressure, Low Pressure)

           

Heat moisture exchanger valve for both manual as well as mechanical ventilation methods.

2

2

2

2

2

2

Diagnostic /Therapeutic Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Sphygmomanometer including adult, paediatric and neonatal cuffs

1

1

1

1

1

1

Pupil torch

1

1

1

1

1

1

Glucometer and blood glucose monitoring strips

1

1

1

1

1

1

Pulse Oximeter (if not included as a feature of an ECG monitor or electronic patient monitor)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Automated External Defibrillator (AED) (annual calibration not required due to self-testing and self-calibration of the unit)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Automated External Defibrillator (AED) that is approved by the manufacturer for use in a moving vehicle, To be used in combination with a Vital Signs Monitor that includes visual 3 lead ECG Monitoring and a ECG rhythm printer/recorder feature (Vital Signs Monitor requires annual calibration certification)

1

0

1

1

0

0

OR

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECG monitor and defibrillator featuring 3 lead ECG monitoring capability, 3 lead cable, AED capability, AED pads, manual defibrillation, recorder / printer with paper and hard defibrillation paddles (requires annual calibration certification)

1

0

1

1

0

0

ECG monitor and defibrillator featuring 3 lead ECG monitoring capability, external cardiac pacing, cardioversion, pacing/AED pads, manual defibrillation, recorder / printer with paper and hard defibrillation paddles (requires annual calibration certification)

0

1

0

0

1

1

Defibrillation gel

1

1

1

1

1

1

End Tidal CO2 Monitor – Capnograph (if not included as a feature of an ECG monitor or electronic patient monitor)

0

1

0

0

1

1

Miscellaneous Disposable Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Boxes of disposable examination gloves (S,M,L)

1

each

1

each

1

each

1

Each

1

Each

1

each

Wound dressings 100mm x 100mm

5

5

5

5

5

5

Wound dressings 100mm x 200mm

4

4

4

4

4

4

Hydrogel Burn Dressing 100mm x 100mm

2

2

2

2

2

2

Hydrogel Burn Dressing 200mm x 200mm

1

1

1

1

1

1

Hydrogel Burn Dressing 200mm x 450mm

2

2

2

2

2

2

Gauze swabs (100mm x 100mm)

20

20

20

20

20

20

Roll of 25 mm adhesive tape (zinc oxide)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Roll of 10 mm adhesive tape (hypo-allergenic)

1

1

1

1

1

1

75mm elasticised bandages

4

4

4

4

4

4

100mm elasticised bandages

4

4

4

4

4

4

Sealed maternity pack (including 2 x sealed & sterile surgical blades, 4 x sealed sanitary pads, 2 x sealed space blankets, 4 x sealed & sterile umbilical cord clamps, 1 x sealed & sterile mucous extractor)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Regurgitation bags

Or

Large kidney bowl / receiver (may not be a bedpan)

4

4

0

0

0

4

 

1

1

0

0

0

4

Sealed space blanket

4

4

4

4

4

4

Clear safety goggles

2

2

2

2

2

2

Range of nasogastric tubes, including:

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 5 French

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 8 French

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 10 French

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 12 French

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 14 French

0

1

0

0

1

1

Size 18 French

0

1

0

0

1

1

Urine drainage bag

0

2

0

0

2

2

Foleys catheters FG5, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18

0

1

0

0

1

1

Intravenous Therapy Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Alcohol Swab (30mm x 30mm)

30

30

30

30

30

30

14 gauge intra-venous catheters

2

2

2

2

2

2

16 gauge intra-venous catheters

2

2

2

2

2

2

18 gauge intra-venous catheters

2

2

2

2

2

2

20 gauge intra-venous catheters

2

2

2

2

2

2

22 gauge intra-venous catheters

2

2

2

2

2

2

24 gauge intra-venous catheters

2

2

2

2

2

2

60 micro drops / ml – Administration Sets

2

2

2

2

2

2

Intraosseous needle or device with needle

0

1

0

0

1

1

15 drops / ml or 20 drops / ml- Administration Sets

2

2

2

2

2

2

10 drops / ml – Blood Administration Set

2

2

2

2

2

2

High Capacity 10 drops / ml Administration Set

0

1

0

0

1

1

Volume Control Administration Set (eg. Buretrol, Dosifix)

0

1

0

0

1

1

200ml Normal Saline – IV Fluid

2

2

2

2

2

2

1000ml Ringers Lactate – IV Fluid

Or

1000ml Balsol – IV Fluid

2

2

2

2

2

2

 

2

2

2

2

2

2

500ml Synthetic Colloid e.g. Haemacell / Haes-sterile

1

1

1

1

1

1

Transparent, waterproof, IV securing dressing (e.g. Tegaderm or similar) minimum of 10cm x 12cm dimensions

8

8

8

8

8

8

Infusion flow regulators (eg Dial-a-Flow, Dosi Flow)

2

2

2

2

2

2

3 Way Stopcock

1

2

1

1

2

2

Spencer Wells Artery Forceps

2

2

2

2

2

2

Pressure Infusion Bags

0

2

0

0

2

2

Medicines Therapy Sundries

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

50 ml syringes

0

1

0

0

1

1

20 ml syringes

2

2

2

2

2

2

10 ml syringes

2

2

2

2

2

2

5 ml syringes

2

2

2

2

2

2

2 ml syringes

2

2

2

2

2

2

1 ml syringes

0

2

0

0

2

2

16 gauge needles

4

4

4

4

4

4

20 gauge needles

4

4

4

4

4

4

Medicines

ILS

ALS

 

Medicines to be carried by the on-duty registered practitioner as per HPCSA approved scope of practice for a registered Ambulance Emergency Assistant or a registered Emergency Care Assistant.

Medicines to be carried by the on-duty registered practitioner as per HPCSA approved scope of practice for a registered Paramedic or a registered Emergency Care Technician or registered Emergency Care Practitioner.

Transport and Immobilization Equipment

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Hard/Stiff Neck Cervical Collars – Small

2

2

2

2

2

2

Hard/Stiff Neck Cervical Collars – Medium

2

2

2

2

2

2

Hard/Stiff Neck Cervical Collars – Large

2

2

2

2

2

2

Full set of Soft Cervical Collars (Small, Medium, Large)

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Patient Extrication Device – Adult (e.g. KED)

1

1

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Patient Extrication Device – Paediatric (e.g. KED)

1

1

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Long spine board

1

1

0

0

0

OPTIONAL

Scoop stretcher

1

1

0

1

0

1

Vacuum Mattress

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

0

0

0

1

Set Head Blocks

2

2

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

2

Spider harness

2

2

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

2

Lower extremity traction splint – Adult

1

1

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Lower extremity traction splint – Paediatric

1

1

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

OPTIONAL

Long splints – Leg

6

6

6

6

6

6

Short splints – Arm

4

4

4

4

4

4

Other

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Pillow

2

2

0

0

0

2

Sheet

6

6

1

0

1

1

Blanket

2

2

0

0

0

1

Bedpan/urinal

1

1

0

0

0

OPTIONAL

Waste disposal facility (enclosed container)

1

1

0

0

0

1

Red, medical waste disposal plastic bags

6

6

6

6

6

2

Enclosed, commercially manufactured, disposable sharps container

1

1

1

1

1

1

Suitably manufactured Jump Bag for safe, clean and secure storage and transportation of medical equipment

1

1

1

1

1

1

Suitably manufactured Drug Pouch for safe, clean and secure storage and transportation of medication and administration accessories

0

1

0

0

1

1

Pair rescue scissors

1

1

1

1

1

1

High visibility, reflective vest and / or jacket

2

2

1

2

1

OPTIONAL

Safety helmet

2

2

1

2

1

OPTIONAL

Fire Extinguisher (minimum of 2KG dry powder)

1

1

1

1

1

OPTIONAL

Thermometer (standard)

1

1

1

1

1

1

Casebook or patient record sheet

1

1

1

1

1

1

Map book or fitted GPS device

1

1

1

1

1

1

Requirements for MICU transfers - the following requirements are per station, and not per vehicle (mandatory)

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Vital signs monitor (requires annual calibration certification) - or separate automated NIBP, SpO2, electronic capnograph

0

1

0

0

1

1

Infusion pump including appropriate administration sets (requires annual calibration certification)

0

1

0

0

1

1

Syringe driver including approved syringes (requires annual calibration certification)

0

1

0

0

1

1

Requirements for MICU neonatal transfers – the following requirements are per station, and not per vehicle (optional):

ILS Ambulance

ALS Ambulance

ILS Response Vehicle

Medical Rescue Vehicle

ALS Response Vehicle

ALS Air Ambulance

Automated neonatal ventilator (requires annual calibration certification) - or mechanical ventilator featuring neonatal, paediatric and adult ventilation modes

0

access

0

0

access

1

Transport incubator with backup power and on board alarms (requires annual confirmation of servicing)

0

access

0

0

access

1

Vital signs monitor with neonatal probes (requires annual calibration certification)

0

access

0

0

access

1

Oxygen inspired analyser

0

access

0

0

access

1

Incubator head box

0

access

0

0

access

1

Neonatal SPO2 probe and monitor (if not included as a feature of the vital signs monitor)

0

access

0

0

access

1

 

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1833

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What (a) is the total number of overseas trips that (i) each entity reporting to him and (ii) his department have taken in the past three years, (b) were the reasons for each trip, (c)(i) is the total number of persons that went on each trip and (ii) in what capacity and (d) was the cost of (i) road transport and (ii)(aa) first class and (bb) economy flights and (iii) accommodation?

Reply:

(a). In the past three years my department undertook atotal of forty (40) overseas trips, i.e. 2018 - 19 trips, 2019, 18 trips and only 03 trips in 2020.

(b)-(d). See the attached report on the reasons and number of officials, accommodation roa and flight class used.

(a)(i). The number of overseas trips in the past three year undertaken by Entities reporting to me are:-

The attached spreadsheed contains details of Overseas travel by Public Entities.

02 September 2021 - NW1794

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to reports that the Delta variant has affected a lot of children in the United States of America resulting in overcrowded paediatric wards, his department has made the relevant preparations to ensure that the Republic does not face a similar predicament; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

According to the reports from the DATCOV, in South Africa, children make up a smaller proportion of those tested for SARS-CoV-2, confirmed cases, hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths, despite comprising 37% of the population. The picture here below shows the low rate of infections among children including the data for the third wave, which is why the department has adopted an attitude of alert and caution on the infection and admission rate of children.

Figure 1: Incidence risk of SARS-CoV-2 cases per 100,000 persons, by age group and epidemiologic week, South Africa, 5 March 2020-14 August 2021

Hospital admissions

The records from the DATCOV show that Covid-19 hospitalisation rate is low among children in all three waves, compared to adults. However there was a 44% increase in admissions in children <19 years, in 3rd wave compared to the 1st wave peak. Among individuals under 19 years, the highest rate of hospitalization is in children < 1 year. The reasons for this increased admission is likely testing for non-COVID indications, because clinicians were likely admitting them as a precaution in this younger population group.

cid:image001.png@01D7967D.9B418600

Figure 2: Incidence risk of COVID-19 admissions per 100,000 persons, by age group and epidemiologic week, South Africa, 5 March 2020-14 August 2021

Although there have been slightly more children admitted during the third wave compared to the first, the delta virus doesn't seem to be causing more severe infections in children. It is for this reason that it is unlikely that paediatric hospital bed capacity and critical care capacity will be overwhelmed as has been seen in adults.

Despite these low numbers, the health system has made adequate provision for the increased hospitalisations for all age groups during all various waves of Covid-19 pandemic. With the information having come to our attention, the health system will pay special attention to this possibility during the review of the implementation of the third wave resurgence plans, which will include planning for the fourth wave.

Of the 11 129 COVID-19-associated admissions among individuals aged ≤19 years, 688 (6.2%) were admitted into ICU and 252 (2.3%) were ventilated at some point during admission. Children are generally managed in line with the guidelines on Covid in Children contained in the National Essential Medicine List Standard Treatment Guidelines. A more detailed guideline (Managing Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health during the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa: A clinical guide for health workers and clinical managers) provides additional detail. Children and adolescents with mild disease should be managed at home, whilst those with moderate or severe disease should be admitted in the health facilities. From the previous waves, it has been shown that children and adolescents rarely required admission to ICU.

The public sector has approximately 11,000 paediatric beds and 3,000 neonatal beds (DHIS data). To date there has been sufficient capacity to accommodate the additional workload resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic. Adolescent beds are generally only available in central hospitals, with the result that many adolescents are cared for in adult wards in most hospitals, which are in good supply. Whilst the number of adolescents requiring admission and ICU care in particular remains small, these numbers have been included when planning for surge capacity during all waves.

Afrox, as the service provider for oxygen supply and support, has made provision for all means of supply ranging from different kinds of cylinders to the reticulated bulk oxygen supply. This includes coverage of paediatrics wards.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1920

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Regarding disruption of basic education brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic since its emergence in 2020, what is the (a) Government’s long-term strategy to reduce the impact of COVID-19 disruptions on learning and (b) envisaged outcome of such a strategy; (2) what has the Government learnt from the COVID-19 situation that could help to reduce the impact of future disruptions on basic education teaching and learning?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) The Department of Basic Education has put in place a three year Recovery Annual Teaching Plan for each subject in each grade, to help guide teachers focus on key concepts, content and skills to be taught per subject over the next three year period. The curriculum statement for each grade and subject was evaluated by a panel of curriculum content experts and the content was reduced so as to ensure that only the core concepts, knowledge and skills are taught for each subject and grade. It is anticipated that over the next three years, learners would have covered the core content in the subject and the curriculum statement, post the three year period, would be reviewed to take learners forward in their learning process. The three year recovery period, is tentative at this stage and may be extended if necessary based on the findings from the continuous research, monitoring and support provided by the DBE and PEDs to schools

The DBE has developed guidelines for teachers on fundamental content that must be prioritised and the guidelines will be used on an annual basis, as they are aligned to the curriculum. In terms of this strategy, and given the variation in teaching time across the schools, there is now a higher dependence on the teachers professional judgment. Teachers are provided with a Planner and Tracker, which lists the reduced content to be covered in the week, and teachers must record coverage so as to ensure that every teacher has a record of curriculum coverage, per grade, which will be transferred to the next teacher. This will ensure continuity from one grade to the next. The new strategy also moves the focus to Assessment for Learning (formative assessment) as a teaching strategy.  This implies that the teacher not only assesses at the end of the learning process to make judgment on the learning gains but assess the learner on a continuous basis during the learning process to support the learning process. Assessment weightings in Grades 4-11 have also been adjusted to ensure that optimal time is used for teaching and learning.

The key tenet of the strategy is to reduce the curriculum to focus on key concepts, skills and knowledge that are essential for deeper learning and the development of cognitive skills that will promote creative thinking, problem solving and effective communication. 

(2) The DBE has learnt that plans that are put in place to reduce the impact of future disruptions must be agile and must take into consideration the various school contexts. In accommodating the various school contexts, much is left to the teacher's professional judgment and expertise. Hence, teacher development, training and support is now more crucial in capacitating the teacher to manage his/her classroom context. The DBE has also learnt  that the continuous monitoring of teaching and learning in the classroom is important as the data gathered from such monitoring will help adjust the intervention strategy and the long term plan to recover the teaching losses. The ongoing monitoring will inform the additional support programmes , such as TV and Radio broadcast lessons, that are aligned to the Annual Teaching Plans. Collaboration with stakeholders such as Teacher Unions, School Governing body Associations, Professional Bodies and research institutions is vital as to ensure buy-in, support and input on latest developments as the situation unfolds.

02 September 2021 - NW1898

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the COVID-19 transmissions statistics in each month since the beginning of the National State of Disaster, what is the total number of persons in each province who have contracted COVID-19 in (a) restaurants, (b) gyms, (c) cinemas, (d) parks, (e) bars & taverns, (f) nightclubs, (g) casinos, (h) conferencing, exhibition and entertainment facilities, (i) museums and (j) libraries, archives and galleries?

Reply:

When an individual is exposed and then infected with COVID–19 the signs and symptoms usually appear after 5 to 7 days. If these symptoms are significant the person would then probably seek medical attention. It is at that point usually that a COVID test is recommended and results become available about 2 days later so from the time of infection an individual will be confirmed as positive only 7 to 9 days later. Most infected persons have very limited recollection of all the activities they were involved in a week ago and of those activities it would be impossible for a person to know exactly where or when exactly he/she became infected or the circumstances that lead to them becoming infected. Provincial health departments also report that persons that test positive are either unable to recall or reluctant to share information about their contacts as well which has hampered contact tracing efforts.

We therefore do not have data on exactly where a particular person has been infected.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1840

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a list of the (a) companies appointed by the Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS) who were implicated and/or involved in the R300 million irregular payments, (b) GEMS executives who directly benefitted from such irregular payments; (2) what (a) are the processes, policies and procedures that are in place in GEMS to prevent corruption and fraud and (b) checks and balances are in place to prevent conflicts of interest?

Reply:

1. (a) Please be informed that the Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS) has taken steps against the parties implicated/involved, including civil litigation, as such the matter is sub-judice and we cannot disclose the names of the parties and companies involved in line with the Constitution of the Republic. The matter is now with the Law Enforcement Agencies.

  • The tender irregularities were uncovered in 2016 after whistle-blower complaints were received;
  • A comprehensive forensic investigation, overseen by the Board was launched and was completed early in 2018. At the commencement of the investigation, key stakeholders including the Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) and the Minister for the Public Service and Administration were briefed. Members of GEMS were informed at the Scheme’s Annual General Meeting held on 31 July 2017 and the updates that could subsequently be provided were included in the GEMS Annual Integrated Reports. A copy of the signed 2017 AGM minutes can be provided if required. Stakeholders were kept informed as the investigation unfolded and the finalised forensic reports were handed over to the Council for Medical Schemes;
  • Criminal charges were laid with the SAPS on conclusion of the investigation and the forensic investigation reports were submitted to the SAPS. The matter is with the HAWKS at present;
  • The Scheme bound by the Laws of the Republic is unable to provide the names of the individuals as well as companies until this matter has been heard in court.

(b) With regards to GEMS executives who directly benefitted from such irregular payments -

  • As a result of the investigation by GEMS, disciplinary cases were brought against 7 employees. Of the 7 employees, 5 resigned during the disciplinary hearings in 2017 and 2 employees were dismissed after the hearings, also in 2017. The Scheme terminated all implicated contracts; and
  • The Scheme has taken steps against the parties as indicated above, laying criminal charges (Case number: CAS 244/04/2018 was opened at Brooklyn Police Station). Civil litigation is also underway and as such the matter is sub-judice and GEMS cannot disclose the names of the parties involved in line with the Constitution of the Republic. The matter is now with the Law Enforcement Agencies.

(2) (a) Processes, policies and procedures that are in place in GEMS to prevent corruption and fraud

  • The Scheme strengthened existing controls, implemented new controls and enhanced policies and systems subsequent to the forensic investigation. This includes the implementation of a strengthened ethics management programme and enhanced/new policies regulating supply chain management, vetting of Scheme officers, recruitment of employees and whistleblowing;
  • There was also the introduction of an internal whistle-blowing hotline and the establishment of an internal forensic investigation unit in addition to the systems already in place for investigating member and healthcare provider claims fraud.

(b) Checks and balances are in place to prevent conflicts of interest

The Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS) is registered as a restricted membership medical scheme under the Medical Schemes Act 131 of 1998, as amended.

  • The Scheme is run by a Board of Trustees, where 50% of the Trustees are elected by members and 50% appointed by the Minister for the Public Service and Administration;
  • The Scheme finances and systems are subjected to internal and independent external audit reviews and these are reported to the Board via the Audit Committee and ultimately the Public through the Annual Integrated Report;
  • All GEMS officers, including the Independent Audit Committee members are subjected to vetting. Vetting reports are compared to the Declaration of Interest forms submitted by Scheme officers (and updated annually) and inconsistencies/red flags are followed-up;
  • During the Scheme’s procurement processes, all Board members, Scheme Management and employees involved in the procurement processes are required to complete additional declarations of interest. In this regard, Scheme Officers are provided with a list of bidders, the directors and shareholders of bidders as well the bidders’ employees who would be involved in rendering services should the bidders be contracted. Scheme officers are then required to declare any conflict of interest against this information. Should a potential conflict be declared, the matter is referred for an independent legal opinion;
  • Further to the declarations of interests submitted, checks are performed against a procurement database to rule out any conflict of interest;

The Scheme is also implementing lifestyle audits for executives and has already piloted the new process.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1793

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, in light of a case opened for theft of items estimated at R200 000 at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, he will furnish Ms M D Hlengwa with reasons on how some fire doors were left unguarded when an amount of more than R3 million is being spent on security detail each month at the specified hospital; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the relevant security company is being held liable for the theft; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there is camera surveillance that can aid with the investigation, given that R450 000 is spent on electronic surveillance each month; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Gauteng Health Department reported that immediately after the fire, the City of Johannesburg inspected the facility and found out that the hospital was not compliant in several aspects. The hospital has more than 1500 fire doors, which are at the back of the wards and lead to the fire escape routes. The hospital had to remove burglar doors next to the fire doors and this meant wards were left with no protection on access to the wards. This meant that the risk of criminals entering the wards was high in the wards using the back side of the wards without being detected. Plans are in place to review different options of securing the units without compromising fire regulations policies, including extending the CCTV installation to the fire escape routes.

(2) The hospital entered into a Service Level Agreement (SLA) with the security company. The SLA under schedule of penalties give guidance to parties on handling of violations to any terms contained in the agreement. It has been difficult to apportion the liability to the security company as all hospital staff had to vacate the building due to the uncertainty on the safety of the building, including security personnel.

During the temporary closure of the hospital, the Department of Infrastructure Development (DID) took advantage of the situation and invited contractors to do fire remedial work and some maintenance work in the wards. This meant that the hospital had several contractors on site.

(3) Most of the hospital walkways are covered by camera surveillance except for the fire escape routes as per a response to question number 1. The fire escape routes did not have CCTV coverage, they had bugler proofs. As a result, it was not possible to review that footage in the areas where equipment was stolen.

The monthly payment of R450 000 is for repairs and maintenance of CCTV equipment. The monitoring/surveillance of cameras is done by physical security.

CCTV’s have assisted before in identifying and investigation of criminal activities within the hospital. Where criminals are identified the hospital submitted footage to SAPS and had successful prosecutions before. It is for this reason, that the hospital is now exploring the latest technology to have surveillance in fire escape routes.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1835

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. what are the details of the total projected costs that will be incurred (a) by the various role players involved in and (b) due to the changes in the official geographical names of each of the nine airports, villages, human settlements, cities, and towns in the eastern cape, as announced in government gazette no 44181 on 23 February 2021; 2. what are the details of (a) the public participation process(es) followed before finalising the name changes in each case, (b) the (i) dates on which and (ii) places where each public participation meeting took place and (c) the support and/or objections received in each case for each proposed geographical name change?

Reply:

1. Costs incurred to date for

(i) Advertisements on newspapers is R42 209 19

(ii) Venues for local consultations were provided by municipalities free of charge

(iii) Honoraria paid to the Eastern Cape Provincial Geographical Names Committee is R 23 998.19

(iv) Honoraria paid to the South African Geographical Names Council for its sitting is R147 986.00.

(2) Details of consultations and dates. The Provincial Geographical Names Committee did consultations on all twenty-three names at the same meetings as follows:-

NELSON MANDELA METRO

  1. 13 November 2018 Raymond Mhlaba Sports Centre.
  2. 14 November 2018 Port Elizabeth City Hall.
  3. 20 November 2018 Uitenhage Town Hall.
  4. 21 November 2018 Chatty Community Hall.
  5. 22 November 2018 Nangoza Jebe Hall.

MACLEAR

  1. 27 February 2019 Town Hall.

BUFFALO CITY

  1. 19 November 2010 King Williamstown Town Hall.
  2. 21 November 2019 Berlin Town Hall.
  3. 26 November 2019 East London City Hall.

OBJECTIONS TO THE NAME CHANGES

Objections that were received were for Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality names as community members that lodged objections argued that the processes of public consultations were inadequate, and some were unhappy with change of name of Port Elizabeth to Gqeberha. The main objections were for renaming of Port Elizabeth to Gqeberha.

The Eastern Cape Provincial Geographical Names Committee’s Objections Committee subsequently sat for Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality in 2019 and found the objections to be baseless as the consultation processes were thorough and Gqeberha was for the popular choice.

In relation to Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality, objection was for East London, and for East London Airport, new names were submitted being Steve Biko Airport, King Hintsa Airport and Chief Phato Airport.

The Eastern Cape Provincial Geographical Names Committee subsequently sat for Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality and processes were found to be sufficiently consulted in relation to Qonce, Ntabozuko and King Phalo Airport. However, in relation to East London, the name of Gompo was found to be problematic as there was already a settlement with that name in the city. A new name has to be agreed upon, and the ECPGNC is ceased with this task.

02 September 2021 - NW1894

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the reasons that two certain health professionals (names furnished) are not yet disciplined by the SA Nursing Council and the Health Professionals Council of South Africa for the Life Esidimeni deaths; (2) whether investigations regarding the disciplinary cases of the two health officials are still ongoing; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the reasons for the delays, (b) by what date will the outcomes of the disciplinary proceedings be announced and (c) who is responsible for the disciplinary proceedings?

Reply:

South African Nursing Council (SANC)

1. The SANC is looking into allegations made against Dr Manamela as nurse practitioner, registered in terms of the Nursing Act, 2005 (Act No. 33 of 2005).

The process to discipline nurse practitioners is prescribed in regulations, and the SANC follows the legislated processes to investigate any allegations of unprofessional conduct against nurse practitioners so that where there is evidence of unprofessional conduct, appropriate action is taken.

The time it takes to finalise cases is dependent on the complexity of the matter as well as the number of and co-operation from role players involved in the matter and the timeous submission of the required information to SANC

2. (a) The disciplinary cases of the health official is still ongoing.

There was no delay on the side of SANC. Several correspondences to Gauteng Province were issued as soon as the matter was brought to the attention of SANC to request for further information to enable the relevant committee of Council to conduct the investigation accordingly.

There was, however, a delay in the provision of such information despite several follow ups made by the office of the Registrar at SANC.

(b) This is not possible to predict as it is dependent on many external factors and procedural factors for instance but in no way limited to:

  1. Availability of evidence;
  2. Availability of witnesses;
  3. Any legal challenges against or during the process; and
  4. Volume of the evidence both written and oral to be considered and or canvased

(c) Two committees of Council are responsible for the majority of the process, the Preliminary Investigating Committee, which has finalised the preliminary investigation and the Professional Conduct Committee, to which the matter has been referred, to effect a formal hearing.

The Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA)

1. The HPCSA has taken disciplinary steps against Dr TE Selebano following the report of the Health Ombudsman.

The investigation was conducted and on the 11&12 October 2018 the matter was placed before the Fourth Preliminary Committee of Inquiry of the Medical and Dental Professional Board (“the Committee”).

After deliberations based on the available evidence the committee determined that there are grounds for a professional conduct inquiry into the conduct of Dr TE Selebano and directed that an inquiry into matter be held.

2. (a) The disciplinary cases of the health official is still ongoing

The matter had been set down for hearing on several occasions and had been postponed for a variety of reason including the obtainment of the transcripts from Judge Moseneke’s arbitration, lockdown due to COVID 19 making it impossible to have a physical hearing (and respondent objecting to virtual hearing), the delays in the appointment of new professional boards in 2020, unavailability of respondent legal representative, and inquest proceedings.

(b) The parties have agreed to set the matter down for 13-15 October 2021.

(c) Fourth Preliminary Committee of Inquiry of the Medical and Dental Professional Board.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1905

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1.With regard to his announcement that there would be a forensic investigation to determine culpability and consequences regarding the National Arts Council mismanagement of R300 million, (a) how far is the process of selecting a company to undertake the investigation, (b) what is the name of the law firm, (c) who appointed the law firm, (d) what criteria were used to appoint the firm, (e) what are the terms of reference of the investigation and (f) what steps will be taken to ensure that the investigation is done transparently; (2). whether he has found that the specified firm will be truly independent when undertaking the investigation; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, what are the relevant details; (3). whether the public will get a full report after completion of the investigation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4). whether all those found guilty will be punished; if not, why not; if so, how? NW2133E

Reply:

(1)(a). The Audit firm was appointed on 28 June 2021 through an open tender process.

(b). The law firm appointed is Mazars Forensic Services (Pty) Ltd.

(c). The law firm was appointed by the Council of the NAC.

(d). An open tender process was followed where a tender advert was placed on 21 May 2021 in the National Treasury e-portal and NAC website, the tender closed on 03 June 2021. Tenders received were checked for administration compliance, thereafter functionality was evaluated by the Bid Evaluation Committee (BEC) the functionality criteria comprised of the following criteria: Company Experience (20 points), Capacity (25 points), Methodology (30 points) and Track record/References (25 Points), bidders needed to score a minimum of 80 points in order to be evaluated further on price and preference. Bidders who scored the minimum threshold were evaluated for price and preference, then recommendations were made to the Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC), presentations by the bidders who scored the minimum threshold of 80 points were invited to make presentations. The final recommendations were done and recommended to council for approval.

(e). Terms of reference are as outlined:-

  • Determine if there were any irregularities or inconsistencies in the management, adjudication, and approval of PESP applications received from the sector,
  • Determine if there is any culpability with regard to those entrusted with PESP application and administration process
  • Determine if there has been gross negligence, misconduct, or dereliction of duty in respect of the CEO tasked with the management of the PESP process,
  • Determine if there has been gross negligence, misconduct, or dereliction of duty in respect of the CFO tasked with the management of the PESP process,
  • Determine if there has been gross negligence, misconduct, or dereliction of duty in respect of the Previous Council tasked with the management of the PESP process,
  • Determine if there has been gross negligence, misconduct, or dereliction of duty in respect of the any NAC staff/ Management/ Panel Member/ Council tasked with the management of the PESP process,
  • Performing a reconciliation on PESP related funds, confirming cash on hand.
  • Provide a comprehensive report with recommendations for Council’s consideration and action, where possible.

(f). The NAC informed the Department that the appointment was a fair and transparent process and so when they undertake the investigation, they are an independent firm that will report to council on its findings. Council will then share the findings with the Minister.

(2). The Forensic auditors are working independently from any internal influence by the NAC officials or Council.

(3). The public will get a full report.

(4). Action will be taken on those found to be guilty.

02 September 2021 - NW1841

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What checks and balances will he put in place to ensure that there will be no looting and corruption during the implementation process of the National Health Insurance (NHI) and beyond; (2) whether the allocation of funds to medical schemes will be automated; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) how will (a) his department ensure detailed monitoring of the Government Employee Medical Schemes (GEMS) (i) payments and (ii) claims and (b) GEMS ensure timely pay-outs that are free of glitches?

Reply:

1. The NHI is designed to purchase healthcare benefits directly from public and private providers. All prices will be set nationally and will be published by the NHI Fund for everyone to see what the fund is paying for. The Fund will not purchase any goods (healthcare products) for service providers. The Bill provides for an Office of Health Products Procurement that will describe, set standards and set prices of all products that are required in a national Formulary that is needed to deliver the services according to standard clinical guidelines. The digital systems of the NHI are already under development to manage the benefits, record accreditation of health care providers (establishments and individuals) and to capture the individual data required to process and make payments to providers. The systems are designed to identify any aberrant use patterns by patients, providers or suppliers and to flag them for investigation. This will include outright rejection for abuse to managing utilisation and provision patterns. The NDOH has been working with the SIU to develop the Risk Management Framework for the NHI. The Auditor General (AGSA) is the auditor of all public entities and will be responsible for oversight of systems and governance integrity. All attempted abuse will be reported and where appropriate placed in the public domain. The Bill provides for an Investigation Unit to follow up on identified or reported fraud or abuse. There is also provision for public reporting of Fraud.

2. No funds will be allocated to medical schemes. The Bill provides that medical schemes will be allowed to cover only those benefits that are not covered by the NHI Fund. The NHI Fund will be the ‘single’ purchaser of all benefits that are covered by the NHI.

3. Under NHI the GEMS, will cover only those benefits that are not covered by the NHI Fund. In the interim the department does not monitor any medical schemes as there is an independent regulator, the Council for Medial Schemes, (CMS) responsible for that function. GEMS is an entity of the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA).

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1973

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What is the policy position of his department on providing incentives for the uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations in the workplace; (2) whether his department has (a) a system in place that protects the rights of workers and (b) proper channels to report abuses of workers by their employers on issues of COVID-19 vaccinations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the long-term policy goal of his department on the uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations to reach herd immunity?

Reply:

1. To ensure that there is uptake of COVID-19 vaccination in the workplace, the Department of Employment and Labour issued the Direction on Occupational Health and Safety Measures, which was gazetted on 11 June 2021. The Direction requires employers to give employees paid time off to be vaccinated against COVID-19; and to recover from the side effects of being vaccinated.

Should an employee suffer the side effects as a result of the vaccination, the Direction states that the employer must in accordance with section 22 of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act place its employee on sick leave. They further state that once the sick leave has been exhausted, employees should be given further paid time off if they’re still ill; or a claim may be lodged for compensation in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act of 1993 (COIDA). In terms of the sick leave, the guidelines state that an employer may accept a COVID-19 vaccination certificate issued by an official vaccination site in lieu of a medical certificate.

2. Yes, the Department of Employment and Labour has Health and Safety inspectors who their role is to enforce compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act, including with the COVID-19 Directions issued under this Act.

3. The Department of Employment and Labour believes that the Directions, which were widely consulted with organised business, organised labour and community constituency are suffice as measures in dealing with the challenges posed by COVID-19 and further encourages all workers to vaccinate.

Secondly, in the workplace where COVID-19 may be found to be causing serious challenges, the Directions encourage employers to work together with the employees to analyse carefully, deeply and soberly the danger that they may all be facing, if the situation is left unattended, and without appropriate actions being taken. Approaching it in this manner is to tap on the democratisation of the workplace to work for the benefit of all.

02 September 2021 - NW1951

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) systems does her department have in place to ensure that privately-run schools, such as a certain school (name and details furnished), are compliant with the SA Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and (b) steps has her department taken to deal with the prevailing situation of maladministration, corruption and racism at the specified school?

Reply:

Independent schools are registered in line with terms and conditions laid down by the Department and Provincial Regulations. The Department monitors compliance to the conditions set out during registration through Circuit Managers for support and intervention purposes. This is followed by the deregistration of the independent school should the provided support and intervention fail.

The Provincial Education Department in North West is finalising its investigation at Naledi Christian School. Recommendations will be forwarded to the Head of Department and the Administrator for their final decision on the future of the school, which is still operating with a provisional registration certificate that will be due for review.

02 September 2021 - NW1892

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the current total cost of school vandalism that occurred in the 2020-21 financial year, (b) is the breakdown of the total cost in respect of each province, (c) is the total number of vandalised schools that are (i) not operational, (ii) semi-operational and (iii) fully operational, (d) is the breakdown of learner capacity of the schools that are not operational (i) in each province and (ii) nationally and (e) total number of schools that have been vandalised in the specified period have plans underway to repair damages?

Reply:

The question has been referred to all provincial departments of education for detailed information. The response will be provided as soon as all provinces have submitted and the responses collated.

02 September 2021 - NW1975

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to (a) Micheal Komape and (b) Siyamthanda Mtunu, aged five and six years respectively, who died due to unsafe and dilapidated pit toilets that are reported mostly in Limpopo, what measures has her department taken to ensure that the Limpopo Department of Education eradicates unsafe and unhygienic toilets at rural schools as ordered by the courts; (2) what specific initiatives have been implemented to ensure the safety of children since 2018 when the matter of unsafe and unhygienic toilets was heard in the High Court; (3) what immediate interventions will ensure that parents in the rural areas do not continue to lose their children to unsafe toilets between now and 2026 when the eradication of pit toilets is planned to commence?

Reply:

1.  The SAFE (Sanitation Appropriate For Education) programme was launched to eradicate BASIC PIT toilets.  Countrywide, there are currently 2 913 schools on this programme.  1 159 of these 2 913 schools, appropriate toilets have already been constructed.  In Limpopo, there are 455 schools that form part of the SAFE programme.  Of these 455, 170 projects have already progressed to Practical Completion. 

2.  There are 2 initiatives related to BASIC PIT toilets to ensure the safety of children.  The first is to build appropriate toilets at schools (see progress reported above).  The second is to demolish the old BASIC PIT toilet structures.  This second initiative is driven by the Provincial Departments of Education.  For example, in Limpopo there are 239 schools that have appropriate toilets, but the old BASIC PIT structures were still on site.  At 86 of these 239, contractors have been appointed and the old BASIC PIT toilets have been demolished.

3.  The eradication of BASIC PIT toilets has already commenced with progress as indicated above 

02 September 2021 - NW1839

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the total amount incurred by his department from tender irregularities with regard to the procurement of personal protective equipment that are currently being investigated by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU), (b) is the breakdown of the irregularities investigated in each province and (c) is the total irregular expenditure investigated by the SIU that has been returned to his department; (2) whether any (a) officials, (b) companies and/or (c) businessmen have been charged with and/or held accountable for such tender irregularities, fraud and corruption; if not, why not; if so, (i) who has been charged and/or held accountable and (ii) what is the breakdown of the persons charged in each province in his department?

Reply:

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

1. (a) No tender irregularities with regard to the procurement of personal protective equipment was recorded in the National Department of Health.

(b) and (c) Not applicable.

2. (a), (b), (c) Not applicable.

EASTERN CAPE

1. (a) No tender irregularity findings have been reported to the department to date.

(b) and (c) Not applicable.

2. (a), (b), (c) Not applicable.

FREE STATE

1. (a) No tender irregularities with regard to the procurement of personal protective equipment were found and/or investigated by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU).

(b) and (c) Not applicable.

2. (a), (b), (c) Not applicable.

GAUTENG

1. (a) The Department incurred costs to the value of R2,394,514,261.70 (Two billion three hundred ninety-four million five hundred fourteen thousand two hundred sixty-one rand and seventy cents) for procurement of goods relating to PPE.

(b) The SIU is performing the said investigation by order of the President in terms of Presidential Proclamation R23 of 23 July 2020. As soon as the report are made readily available a determination will be made available.

(c) The SIU is performing the said investigation by order of the President in terms of Presidential Proclamation R23 of 23 July 2020. As soon as the report are made readily available a determination will be made available.

2. (a) , (b) and (c)

Officials and other persons have been charged pertaining to the SIU investigation. The SIU is performing the said investigation by order of the President in terms of Presidential Proclamation R23 of 23 July 2020, the SIU reports directly to the President and for that reason, any questions pertaining to the SIU investigation should be addressed to the Presidency.

3. The SIU is performing the said investigation by order of the President in terms of Presidential Proclamation R23 of 23 July 2020. As soon as the report are made readily available a determination will be made available;

4. The SIU is performing the said investigation by order of the President in terms of Presidential Proclamation R23 of 23 July 2020. As soon as the report are made readily available a determination will be made available.

KWAZULU-NATAL

1. (a) R86,064,628.50 (Eighty-six million and sixty-four thousand six hundred and twenty-eight rand and fifty cents).

(b) Not applicable.

(c) None.

2. (a), (b), (c) None. Special Investigating Unit (SIU) started investigations in June 2021. The investigation is currently still on-going.

LIMPOPO

1. (a) R240 000 (Two hundred and forty thousand rand) has been found to be irregular expenditure.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) None

1. (a) Four officials are undergoing disciplinary processes.

(b) and (c) None.

MPUMALANGA

1. (a) The total amount paid by the Department for tender irregularities is amounting to R18,863,628.50 (Eighteen million eight hundred sixty-three thousand six hundred twenty-eight rand and fifty cents), as investigated by Special Investigating Unit (SIU).

(b) The Department is still awaiting the Final Investigation Report from SIU for the period from August 2020 to 31 March 2021.

(c) There was no amount recovered from the above tender irregularities as there was no element of fraud identified however, there were non-compliance during the procurement processes.

2. (a) Department has suspended two senior officials relating to the same tender irregularities.

(b) and (c) None.

NORTHERN CAPE

1. (a) R77,558,766.53 (Seventy-seven million five hundred fifty-eight thousand seven hundred sixty-six rand and fifty-three cents) are still being investigated for any irregularities.

(b) The breakdown of transactions under investigation are as follows:

No.

Supplier name

Total amount

1.

DNS Supplies

528 195,00

2

C-Med Medicals

7 447 681,00

3

Revolt Headboy

2 947 200,00

4

Asijiki Sound Bytes

13 918 100,00

5

Macronym 37 (Pty) Ltd

26 960 025,00

6

MKV Investments

16 906 667,50

7

Logan Medical

8 850 898,03

Grand total

R77,558,766.53

(c) Investigation is still in progress.

2. (a) On 23rd August 2021, the former Acting Head of Department and the Chief Financial Officer were arrested by the HAWKS.

(b) and (c) None.

NORTH WEST

1.(a) None.

(b) and (c) Not applicable.

2. (a), (b), (c) Not applicable.

WESTERN CAPE

1. (a) None.

(b) and (c) Not applicable.

(2) (a), (b) , (c) Not applicable.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1998

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) is the total number of schools that have been (i) closed and (ii) left abandoned in each province, (b) is the national total number of schools in each case and (c) are the reasons for the school closure and abandonment; (2) what total number of the specified schools have (a) plans underway to get them to an operational standard and (b) no plans underway to get them to an operational standard; (3) what are the further relevant details regarding schools that have no plans underway to get them to an operational standard?

Reply:

The question has been referred to provincial departments of education for detailed information. The response will be provided as soon as all the responses have been received and collated

02 September 2021 - NW1802

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the current status of vaccine availability in the Republic, (b)(i) total number of vaccines are being used and (ii) from which companies and (c) is the current status for approving the (i) Sinovac and (ii) Sputnik V vaccines?

Reply:

a) Covid-19 Vaccines are widely available across all provinces and there are vaccination sites, fixed or mobile in every local municipal area.

b) (i) Two vaccines are presently in daily use

(ii) Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson

c) (i) Sinovac has been conditionally approved by SAHPRA for use in adults. The conditions primarily relate to evidence of efficacy and safety for use in people with HIV & AIDS and evidence of efficacy against Delta variant in a real-life setting (not laboratory Based). The NDOH has conducted an economic assessment and is presently engaged in the preparatory procurement process to obtain a price and availability information from the applicant.

(ii) The regulator has received two applications for Sputnik V vaccine but neither has been approved for use yet..

END.

02 September 2021 - NW2044

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of sexual misconduct cases reported to her department for each grade in each province (i) in the past two financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2021, (b) total number of cases involved (i) teachers and (ii) general workers, (c) number of cases were referred by her department for investigation to the SA Police Service, (d) number of cases were finalized by her department, (e) number of cases were pending in her department, (f) number ended in dismissals by her department, (g)(i) is the extent of the misconduct in each case and (ii) measures were put in place by her department to ensure all cases are reported by principals and teachers in each province?

Reply:

In respect of Question(s): (a)(i) and (ii); (b); (c); (d); (e); (f) and (g)(i):

Sexual misconduct cases are reported to the employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, is the Head of the Provincial Education Department entrusted with the responsibility to enforce the disciplinary code and procedures against all employees employed at the provincial level.

Therefore, the question is more relevant to the provincial administration, since it is the responsibility of the employer. 

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant employer for details and response.

Consequently, the Department has a zero-tolerance against any educator who has committed sexual misconduct towards any learner. 

In respect of Question (g)(ii):

The provision of section 54 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 32 of 2007, (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) and section 110 of the Children’s Act, 38 of 2005, put an obligation on any person who becomes aware of any abuse or incident, involving a child, to report such incident to the South African Police Service (SAPS) or Department of Social Development (DSD);

Section 26 of the Employment of Educators Act and section 26 of the SACE Act, also put an obligation on the employer to report to SACE every case, where disciplinary steps were taken against an educator, resulting in a sanction other than caution or reprimand.

Besides the above legislative provisions, the Department of Basic Education has developed two (2) Protocols, namely, Standard Operating Procedures for the Employers of Educators and Protocol for Reporting and Management of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in schools.  These protocols outline the responsibilities of the PEDs (schools, Circuits and Districts officials), ELRC, SACE, SGBs, including the Department of Social Development and Department of Justice and Constitutional Development on reporting and handling misconduct cases committed by educators, learners and other PEDs employees.

The latest amendment to the Regulations of the Employment of Educators Act, Government Gazette No 44433, dated 09 April 2021, provides that an educator found guilty of sexual misconduct towards a learner, is indefinitely prevented from re-employment in education. 

There is also the ELRC Collective Agreement 3 of 2018 "Providing for Compulsory Inquiries by Arbitrators in Cases of Disciplinary Action Against Educators Charged with Sexual Misconduct in Respect of Learners" which provides for an expedited, independent disciplinary process against an educator for alleged sexual misconduct committed towards any learner.

02 September 2021 - NW1885

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Health

Whether social workers are (a) categorised as frontline workers and (b) prioritised for the vaccination roll-out; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) Yes, Social Workers are front-line workers in the care of the public.

b) Yes Social Workers were prioritised in the vaccination roll-out. After the healthcare workers the vaccination programme embarked on vaccination of workers in the basic education sector, police, social development and several other priority essential services sectors. Social Workers (public and private), along with all Social Service Professions registered with the Council were offered vaccination. The table below provide the details.

NO

CATEGORY / ELIGIBILITY

RATIONALE

1

Group A: DSD National and Provincial Staff (all on PERSAL) (Incl. of SACSSP Staff as well as cleaning and security staff)

Rationale: All frontline staff who are in direct contact with members of the public through NPO registration, monitoring and evaluation, processing of child protection register applications, consultations for adoptions, engagements with CSOs, civil society and stakeholders, incl. distribution of food parcels to the public, customer related queries etc. amongst others.  

2

Group B: SASSA Staff Nationwide (all on PERSAL)

All front frontline staff dealing with grant applications incl. home visitations to assist i.e. the elderly, persons with disabilities, and child support grant beneficiaries amongst others,

3

Group C: National Development Agency: (all on NDA database)

Our staff are in direct contact with the public collecting applications on a daily basis for consideration of grant funding for projects, in addition, they do capacity building training and monitor projects on sites across the republic. Furthermore, they include a cohort of people who assist in manning SASSA queues.  

4

Group D: Social Service Professions; (incl. SW +ASW + CYCCs + ACYCCs +Student Social Workers + CDPs)

Social workers who provide psychosocial support to citizens affected and infected by covid-19 as well as other social ills, conduct site visits and work with DoH across the country. Incl. of CDPs.

Incl. Private sector/ NGO’s / Public Sector etc.

5

Group E: ECD Workforce: (Incl. of entire workforce)

A cohort of educators looking after children at ECD centers which remain open during the current lockdown alert level, and are thus at risk in the a similar manner in which school teachers are.

Data base from ECD PES + ISF (for unregistered ECDs) 

 

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1781

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) state of readiness of the Government’s facilities regarding the cold chain of COVID-19 vaccines and (b) role and responsibilities of the specified facilities; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) Government facilities providing services for childhood vaccination programmes already had cold chain capacity before COVID-19. As a result of the oral polio vaccine program in the country, most public health care establishments already have -20-degree storage capacity plus 2-8 degree storage. A cold chain audit has further assisted in informing procurement of equipment in the provinces. Provincial procurement processes have already taken place.

(b) Roles and responsibilities must be in line with the Rules relating to Good Pharmacy Practice published in terms of the Pharmacy Act 53 of 1974. All sites that store COVID-19 vaccines must have contingency plans to manage power failures, equipment breakdowns, or cold chain breaches.

  1. Store the vaccine in a purpose-built vaccine refrigerator.
  2. Ensure that sufficient cold chain capacity is available for all thermolabile medicines stocked, including Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) vaccines and COVID-19 vaccines.
  3. Products must be stored in a temperature-regulated environment as per the manufacturer's product recommendations.
  4. Enough refrigerator capacity should be available to allow orderly arrangement and air circulation.
  5. WHO-approved/compliant continuous temperature recording devices must be installed.
  6. Regardless of the system used, the temperature should be monitored physically twice daily.
  7. The cold storage area or refrigerator must be connected to a standby generator.
  8. The devices must be connected to an alarm and/or warning system in the event of a power failure or other events that may lead to temperature excursions.

2. Yes.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1805

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the updated number in her department of learners who have dropped out of school from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic to date  and (b) measures has she taken to ensure that those learners return to school?

Reply:

(a) Provinces are verifying data on the drop-out rate, since learners returned to school in the third term.  The verification process has to be carefully executed for a number of reasons, so that learners are not counted as drop-outs, when that is not the case.  Some schools follow a weekly rotation timetabling; learner attendance is marked when it is a learner's turn to come to school.  In some cases, learners are absent for an extended period of time, and this may erroneously be interpreted as a drop-out.  Some learners are physically at school, but are either learning virtually from home or are participating in home education programmes.  As provinces are verifying learner drop-out statistics, they need to consider these issues, which may be construed as drop-out.

(b) Strategies to get all learners back to school include schools supported by districts; and following-up on learners who have not returned to schools.  This includes engaging with parents or caregivers to address the issues that result in learners not going to school.  To minimise learner drop-out, at the national level, the Quality of Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC) is the most effective instrument that is being used, to engage with all relevant stakeholders, including but not limited to parents, schools and local authorities. 

02 September 2021 - NW2020

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there are different procedures to be followed in respect of the appointment of foreign educators, as opposed to South African educators; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the reason for the different procedures and (b) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The procedures in relation to the appointment of foreign nationals in South Africa are regulated in terms of the Immigration Act, 2002 (Act No.13 of 2002, as amended), and the Immigration Regulations  2014 (as amended); with the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) as the custodians.  Therefore, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) established a procedure for the appointment of foreign educators in State-paid posts at public schools.  The procedure is aligned with the provisions of the Immigration Act and its Regulations.  Thus, (a) the procedure in relation to the appointment of foreign educators will differ in that it is subjected to the provisions as stipulated in the Immigration Act and Regulations; and (b) In principle, foreign educators are considered as a last resort, and currently are considered in subjects identified as STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).  A guideline document on the employment of foreign educators, which is aligned with the provisions of both the Immigration Act and Immigration Regulations, has since been adopted, and is implemented when foreign educators are appointed.  A working relationship between the DBE, DHA and the Department of Labour has also been established.          

02 September 2021 - NW1522

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department made any payments to a certain company (name furnished) to co-ordinate its media appearances and interviews relating to the COVID-19 global pandemic and/or any other subject matter and/or function; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the full, relevant details and (b) is the total breakdown of the payments made in each specified case?

Reply:

Yes, the Department did make payments to Digital Vibes.

a) Digital Vibes was appointed on the 15th of November 2019 through a deviation process, which was approved by National Treasury, to provide communication services in relation to the National Health Insurance (NHI) Bill as released by the Cabinet for Parliament consideration. On the 25th of March 2020, the Department extended the scope of work of Digital Vibes to include Covid-19. This was done in accordance with the Emergency Procurement rules issued by National Treasury for COVID-19 Procurement.

b) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1834

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).What (a) are the legal costs incurred by (i) each entity reporting to him and (ii) his department in the past three years, (b) are the reason for (i) the legal action and (ii) the service of a legal representative and (c) amounts have been paid; (2). what are the consultant fees that (a) each entity reporting to him and (b) his department have paid in the past three years

Reply:

1. Details on Legal costs incurred by entities attached.

2. Details of consultant’s fees paid by entities attached.

The legal costs incurred by my department in the past three years are as follows:-

18/19                  19/20                  20/21                 

R5, 4 mill             R8, 2 mill             R3, 1 mill = Total to-date R16, 7 mil

The reasons for legal action ranges from:

  1. Breach of contract – 25 matters
  2. Labour laws and regulations – 7 matters
  3. Ethics and Integrity – 2 matters
  4. Public Interest Matters – 10 matters
  5. Damages – 6 matters
  6. Intellectual Property - 1 matter

(ii) The legal costs incurred by the service of the legal representative are as in roman figure (ii) above.

(c) The amounts that have been paid are as in roman figure (ii) above.

 

02 September 2021 - NW1846

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with the full details of the (a) processes and (b) clear timelines regarding the date on which the amalgamation of councils of the performing arts institutions will take place as he referred to in his speech during the debate on Budget Vote 37 on 13 May 2021; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The Department has drawn up a Process Map; that is made up of the following Phases and Key activities and timelines:

  • PHASE 1: Project Planning including setting up of a Project Management Team; workshopping of the new Council members in affected PAIs; establishment of the Joint Task Team; formulation of terms of reference; appointment of service provider (where applicable); review of applicable legislation for alignment; preparation of public notices for gazzetting: JUNE 2021 – MARCH 2022 (Step one in this Phase has started)
  • PHASE 2: Councils reconfiguration processes implemented as informed by outcome of Phase 2: 4 – 6 MONTHS in 2022/23
  • PHASE 3: Detailed Amalgamation process; including selection of systems, standardised policies and procedures and identification of the necessary steps to implement the amalgamation; consolidation of Stream Plans; Development and implementation of the Change Management Plan; Development and implementation of the Budget Plan; amongst others : 6 MONTHS in 2022/23
  • PHASE 4: Migration to central or standardised accounting and administration systems including supply chain processes and systems; Migration to a single payroll and human resource platform; Standardisation of communication platforms including email and office automation; amongst others: 6 MONTHS in 2023/24
  • PHASE 5: Benefits realisation: This will be determined by the established benefits tracking process which requires reporting on the amalgamation process including the implementation progress and the savings which have been achieved: 6 MONTHS in 2023/24

NB: - The Phases are inter-dependent therefore the projected timelines might change

01 September 2021 - NW1889

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, with reference to the Ward Committee of Ward 38 in the City of Ekurhuleni which requested a permanent station for the Brackendowns SA Police Service (SAPS), with the understanding that the current structure is a temporary structure and has been so for the past 20 years, and in view of the fact that residents of the area also raised concerns about how rape victims are being assisted at the police station, the Brackendowns SAPS have a designated area where anyone who has been raped can report the case; if not, why not; if so, what was the total number of gender-based violence cases that have been reported at Brackendowns SAPS between January and May 2021; (2) whether the police station has adequate rape kits; if not, why not; if so, on what date was the station supplied with rape kits; (3) whether, with regard to the residents of the area raising the need of a permanent police station, he will furnish Ms N K Sharif with the details on how SAPS is planning to establish a permanent police station; if not, why not; if so, on what date 1s it envisaged he will have the budget for a permanent police station structure and (b) what total amount has been set aside for the permanent police station to be built around the Brackendowns area? NW2117E

Reply:

  1. Yes. the Brackendowns Police Station has a designated area at the Victim Empowerment Centre. in room number 39, where victims can report cases in private. A total of 50 cases were reported, between 1 January 2021 and 31 May 2021. The cases comprise 43 domestic violence cases and seven rape cases.
  2. Yes, the police station has sufficient rape kits and the latest consignment was delivered, on 11 July 2021.
  3. (a)(b) There is no plan to build a police station at this stage. The current building is leased. Planning for an alternative leased facility has commenced and the needs assessment was submitted to the Divisional Commissioner: Supply Chain Management (SCM).

Reply to question 1880 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-08-27

Reply to question 1889 approved/

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30

01 September 2021 - NW1686

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the commissioners in the Public Service Commission signed performance agreements; if not, (a) what are the reasons that they do not sign and conclude performance agreements and (b) how is their performance assessed and/or measured; if so, (i) how often are the performance agreements signed and concluded and (ii) with whom do they sign and conclude the performance agreements?

Reply:

The Commissioners in the Public Service Commission (PSC) have not signed any performance agreements.

a) The legislation regulating the employment of Commissioners, i.e. the Public Service Commission Act, 1997 and the Conditions of Appointment (including remuneration and other conditions of service) applicable to members of the Public Service Commission determined by the President, in terms of section 6 (1) of the Public Service Commission Act, do not provide for Commissioners to sign Performance Agreements. The implication of this is that Commissioners are not eligible for annual notch increases and remain on the same notch for the duration of the 5 year term.

The performance of Commissioners was raised by Members of Parliament in dealing with the Public Service Commission Amendment Act, 2019, and the Act makes provision for the renewal of term of a commissioner, based on the commissioner having maintained a satisfactory level of performance in relation to his or her duties. Parliament, being the employer of Commissioners, has to finalise a process in this regard. The PSC is also addressing the matter in the PSC Bill that is being processed.

b) Therefore, no assessment of individual performance is conducted. As the Public Service Commission operates as a single entity, it submits an annual report on its activities to the National Assembly and legislatures as required in section 196 (4)(e) of the Constitution, 1996.

  1. Not applicable
  2. Not applicable

End

01 September 2021 - NW1871

Profile picture: Terblanche, Mr OS

Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

What ate the full relevant details of the (a) arrests of people who allegedly instigated the violent unrest that took place in Gauteng from 9 to 18 July 2021 and (b) progress on the specified cases?

Reply:

(a). The South African Police Service (SAPS), shall not mention the names of suspects, until they are charged in a court of law.

(b). As at 23 August 2021, a total of 16 persons had been arrested, appeared in various courts and are now accused persons on charges, relating to incitement to commit crime.

Reply to question 1871 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-08-27

Reply to question 1871 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30

01 September 2021 - NW1803

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) On what date will his department resolve the issue pertaining to Naledi (details furnished), who had applied for a gender marker, and subsequently a new identity document on 23 October 2020 at the Centurion Home Affairs office and still waiting for his documentation to date and (b) how long does it ordinarily take for (i) new applications to be processed and (ii) documentation to be delivered to persons having done gender marker changes?

Reply:

(a) The application for gender marker was lodged on 07/10/2019 and was finalized on 27/11/2019. Subsequent to finalization of gender marker changes, the client applied for new identity document in October 2020. The system reflect that the client’s application was pending awaiting outstanding supporting documents, which were submitted on 25/05/2021 and the identity document was collected by the client on 07/07/2021.

b(i) Application for a Smart ID Card takes 13 days to be processed, unless there are outstanding documents.

(ii) The Department does not deliver documentations to its clients, clients are expected to visit front offices to collect the confirmation letter for finalised gender marker changes.

END

01 September 2021 - NW1800

hembeni to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his announcement, a few days after the protests that followed the arrest of the former President, Mr J G Zuma, that about 12 suspects were identified for instigating the specified protests, what (a) are the names of the specified suspects and (b) exact number of suspects had been arrested?

Reply:

(a). The South African Police Service (SAPS), shall not mention the names of suspects, until they are charged in a court of law.

(b). As at 23 August 2021, a total of 16 persons had been arrested, appeared in various courts and are now accused persons on charges, relating to incitement to commit crime.

Reply to question 1800 recommended


GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-08-27

Reply to question 1800 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30
 

01 September 2021 - NW1869

Profile picture: Terblanche, Mr OS

Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

Whether the KwaZulu-Natal SA Police Service are investigating him on allegations of corruption and embezzlement of State funds amounting to at least R1 billion, which allegedly took place during his tenure as the Member of the Executive Council of Transport, Community Safety and Liaison in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the case number and (b) progress has been made with the investigation to date?

Reply:

(1). I don't know if I’m investigated by the police on this matter with exception to hear that case has been opened by an Ngo.(a). I don’t have any case number, anyway case number is for the police not for a person who is investigated.

I(b). don’t know as it is investigating team that would know.

Reply to question 1869 Approved


GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-08-27

Reply to question 1869 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30
 

01 September 2021 - NW1916

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

What total number of murder cases where women were the victims of domestic violence has the SA Police Service recorded from 1 January 2021 up to the latest specified date for which information is available? NW2144E

Reply:

The total cases where women were the victims of murder in a domestic related relationship, from 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021, was 177. The table below provides the provincial distribution of cases where women were the victims of murder in a domestic-related relationship.

 

Province

Female

Eastern Cape

22

Free State

24

Gauteng

28

KwaZulu-Natal

44

Limpopo

13

Mpumalanga

7

North West

6

Northern Cape

3

Western Cape

30

Total

177

 

Reply to question 1916 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date
: 2021-08-27

Reply to question 1916 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date
: 30/08/2021

01 September 2021 - NW1773

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Police

(1). Whether he has any relationship with a certain person (name and details furnished) that may influence his official policy decision-making; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the nature of the relationship and (b) does it include discussing Crime Intelligence matters;

Reply:

(1). He is a person I know who can be described as an acquaintance.

(a). As explained above to be acquaintance.

(b). It include receiving information on different matters that may touch my work, which happens to many South Africans on daily basis.

(2). As said from above information has been received and is not classified as Intelligence information since that can be done by competent structures.

(3). Again to me whatever discussion remains information, until it is classified by those who are competent to do so. I have heard that as I was informed.

It has been explained. I receive a lot of information from the members of time community and I don’t check the security clearance status that includes the person you are talking about. Maybe General Khan as an Intelligence person and competent can explain if this was intelligence information and has advised me so.

Reply to question 1773 Approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30
 

01 September 2021 - NW1906

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to case no 422/05/2020 opened at the Booysens Police Station in Johannesburg, (a) who is the complainant in the case, (b) who is the accused and (c) what are the full details of the status of the case; (2) whether the complainant was informed of the status of the case; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date, (b) by what means of communication was the information sent to the complainant and (c) on what date will the case be heard in court? NW2134E

Reply:

(1)(a) The complainant in the case is Mr Malesela William Mookka. (1)(b) To date, nobody has been charged in the case.
(1)(c) The case docket is under investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI). It was taken to court and received back, on 26 July 2021, with further investigation instructions, from the Public Prosecutor.

(2)(a) Yes, the complainant was informed of the status of the case, on 2 August 2021. In addition, a meeting with the complainant Is scheduled, for 26 August 2021.
(2)(b) The complainant was informed telephonically.
(2)(c) The case is still under investigation and the court date has not been scheduled yet,

Reply to question 1906 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-08-27

Reply to question 1906 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30
 

01 September 2021 - NW1801

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he received an intelligence report from the former Minister of State Security about the violence that would follow the arrest of the former President, Mr J G Zuma; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As stated in the Police Portfolio that no Intelligence report that was given, handed over to the Minister. If discussion did take place on different structures that was not conveyed to the Minister.

Position as explained above.

Reply to question 1801 Approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021/08/30
 

31 August 2021 - NW1812

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of schools were recorded by her department to have been affected by the recent acts of destruction in (i) KwaZulu-Natal and (ii) Gauteng, (b) is the extent of the damage and (c) plans are in place for the learners who were studying in these schools?

Reply:

(a) (i) (ii) 144 schools, 8 education district offices and 3 education centres in Kwa Zulu Natal and 54 schools in Gauteng.

(b)  In the majority of the burglaries, the damages to infrastructure were minimal, and learner and teaching equipment was stolen together, especially ICT equipment.  The  most common target areas in schools, were administration blocks - for information and communication technology (ICT) equipment; and nutrition centres - for food items.  Out of 144 schools in KZN, three (3) schools had serious damages, resulting from the burning of infrastructure.  The schools are: In Pinetown district - SIPHOSETHU PRIMARY, which suffered a loss of  3 classrooms; In UMgungundlovu district - SIKHULULIWE, which suffered a loss of 8 classrooms; and at  ILembe district - RADHA ROOPSINGH, which suffered a loss of 7 classrooms.

(c) The damages did not affect teaching and learning; and at the 3 schools, where some classrooms were burnt, mobile classrooms have been provided by the provincial department.

31 August 2021 - NW1825

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any South African (SA) nationals are stuck in Afghanistan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether there are any immediate plans to withdraw SA nationals from Afghanistan; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details? NW2048e

Reply:

1. Yes, there are thirty four (34) South Africans present in Afghanistan according to the reports from the South African High Commission in Pakistan. Thirty (30) South Africans managed to leave Kabul on evacuation flights arranged by the relevant Employers who utilised the United States of America and the United Kingdom evacuation flights. The remaining four South African citizens await evacuation arrangements by the Employers.

2. No, the South Africans are in Afghanistan on private business, mostly working for large multi-national companies, International Organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and international security companies. South African citizens that approached DIRCO and the South African High Commission in Pakistan have been informed that it is the responsibility of the Employer to arrange the evacuation of their foreign staff on special evacuation flights.

31 August 2021 - NW1808

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) intervention has the Government made to persuade King Mswati III to allow democratic reforms to take place in eSwatini and (b) options will she pursue against any continued surppression of voices for democracy in the specified country?

Reply:

a) His Excellency, Mr Mokgweetsi Eric Keabetswe Masisi, the President of the Republic of Botswana, in his capacity as a chairperson of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation invited SADC Troika Ministers to travel to Eswatini on 11 July 2021 to meet with the Government of the Kingdom of Eswatini and political leaderships as well as civil society and academia with a view to support the people of Eswatini towards finding a durable solution to their political challenges.

The SADC Troika Ministers was led by Botswana’s Minister of International Affairs and Cooperation, Dr Lemogang Kwape, in his capacity as a chair of the Ministerial segment of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation and included the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation of the Republic of South Africa, Dr Naledi Pandor, as incoming chair of SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation and the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade of the Republic of Zimbabwe, Mr Frederick Shava.

As part of these developments, SADC Troika Ministers spent two days in Eswatini, which was agreed to be insufficient for the Troika to interface extensively with the people of the Kingdom of Eswatini. In this regard, a SADC sent a Fact Finding Technical Team to Eswatini from 15 to 22 July 2021 and again South Africa participated.

b) Following their visit to Eswatini, the Fact Finding Technical Team submitted a comprehensive report with recommendations to the Chair of Troika. The report has been forwarded to the Government of Eswatini for their consideration.

30 August 2021 - NW1810

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department has conducted any investigation into restaurants that have not complied with the Disaster Management Regulations and the Level 3 curfew; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what action was taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. Inspections were conducted in the food and Beverage as well as the hospitality sector during the period in question, to test the extent to which Covid-19 Directions (linked to the Disaster Management Regulations) were complied with. The table below provides specific details:

Sectors

Compliance

Non-compliance

Total Inspections

% of total inspections

Follow up

Compliance Rate

Non-Compliance Rate

Food & Beverage

198

146

344

2,51%

41

57,56%

42,44%

Hospitality

442

464

906

6,62%

69

48,79%

51,21%

These inspections were conducted in quarter 1 of 2021/22 in OHS. It can be noted that compliance in the two sectors were low.

Reports are developed on a quarterly basis which details challenges and indicates possible solutions.

2. All non-complying employers were served with notices. Employers are recommended for prosecution if they do not comply after the expiry of a notice.

30 August 2021 - NW1831

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to the (a) Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, (b) United Nations, (c) African Union, (d) Southern African Development Community, (e) International Organisation for Migration and (f) any other government administration, both domestically and internationally assisting and/or deporting the refugees currently occupying 24544-RE, Cape Town, which is owned by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, on what dates did his department engage with each specified administration; (2) whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the written minutes of all engagements his department has had with them; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Engagements were conducted between myself, the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure and Premier of the Western Cape in 2020 regarding the provision of shelter at two sites in Cape Town following the removal of the protesters from Greenfield and the Methodist Church in April 2020.

(b) The UNHCR initially provided funding for the tents and ablution facilities for the protestors at the two mentioned facilities, but indicated that they could no longer do so after February 2021. According to the UNHCR, it further provided assistance for persons willing to reintegrate back to the local communities or repatriate to their countries of origin as part of their mandate.

On local reintegration the UNHCR offered a reintegration package to cover basic rentals and necessities for three months, as well as counselling support for those choosing to reintegrate. The project which was originally intended to end on 30 April 2021 was then extended to 15 May 2021, following requests by some of the refugees. With many registering at the eleventh hour, UNHCR consulted with Department of Home Affairs to continue with the reintegration process for those for who registered by the deadline of May 15. UNHCR’s implementing partner, Adonis Musati, assisted with the implementation of the reintegration project that has now reached completion.

The status report of the reintegration indicated that 810 persons have reintegrated back into their communities. A total 761 persons were from Wingfield, and 49 persons were from Paint City. Of the 810 persons, the vast majority were from Democratic Republic of Congo, (739 persons), followed by 26 persons from Congo Brazzaville, Burundi (15 persons), Zimbabwe (8 persons), Angola (6 persons), Cameroon (5 persons), Zambia (4 persons), Somalia (2 persons), and a few single persons from Mozambique, Malawi, Cote d’Ivoire, Tanzania and Nigeria. In terms of gender breakdown, 427 persons are male and 383 persons are female. 334 persons under the age of 18 years and 43 persons have benefitted from a small livelihoods component in the programme.

An additional 50 persons have voluntarily returned to their country of origin, all but 2 are from Paint City, these are mostly women and children. Of this number, 48 persons returned to Burundi, 1 to Democratic Republic of Congo and 1 to Cote d’Ivoire.

In total, in Cape Town, UNHCR project has assisted 860 persons from two sites this year, either to reintegrate or voluntary return to their country of origin. The UNHCR’s voluntary repatriation programme remains active and all new persons at the two sites of Wingfield and Paint City who still wish to reintegrate back into their communities will now be referred back to UNHCR’s regular programme where the partner will conduct individual needs assessment to determine eligibility for assistance.

(c) No engagements with the SADC

(d) No Engagements with AU

(e) On 7 May 2021, a request was made to the IOM Chief of Mission for the organisation to assist in managing and evacuation process in the Western Cape. The total number of 43 families with a head count of 75 undocumented persons. The DHA had already been working with UNHCR to facilitate the dignified departure of those who had indicated an intention to repatriate from the Paint City location of protests.

A list of the names was provided by Asylum Seeker Management (ASM) for verification of status and documentation for effecting direct documentation which could not be conducted via Lindela Holding Facility. Initial engagements were embarked virtually with the Mission to discuss the required operations, phases, timeframes and logistics (including the issue of travel documents in Pretoria). The DHA therefore envisioned a direct deportation from Cape Town – probably through OR Tambo International Airport to their countries of origin.

On 28 May 2021, the IOM Mission advised that it was still coordinating with its head office in Vienna as to whether assistance could be extended to this group in Cape Town. There was also a request for the interviewing and filling of forms with the returnees at Lindela. However, this was not possible due to the space accommodated forcefully by refugees at Lindela since November 2019, though they are not deportees, but were brought in there on humanitarian basis while being documented and assisted with evacuation.

On 1 June 2021, the IOM proposed conducting telephonic interviews and for the completion of forms as the Mission does not have a presence in Cape Town. Thereafter, the documents would be forwarded to their headquarters to assess the cases and eligibility for funding. At the time, the mechanisms of operations of the Mission did not allow for the implementation of the evacuation requests, as there needs to be face to face interaction between the interviewer and the applicant requiring assistance, this includes the completion of documents.

(f) After the UNHCR stopped funding the Department of Home Affairs, on the basis of humanitarian grounds again approached National Treasury and asked for permission to utilise the department’s budget to pay for these facilities (marquee and ablution facilities) at Paint City. The DHA also approached National Treasury for approval to take over the responsibility of providing accommodation and ablution facilities at Wingfield. On 10 March 2021, DHA approached the Mayor of the City of Cape Town to provide ablution facilities for a period of 1 week while the DHA awaited approval from National Treasury. On 11 March 2021, after obtaining approval from National Treasury, the ablution facilities (20 toilets, 20 showers and 10 sanitary bins) were replaced at Paint City by the DHA. The payment for the tent at Paint City was also covered by DHA.

On 26 March 2021, DHA received a letter from the City of Cape Town indicating that they intend to remove the infrastructure (marquee tent and ablution facilities) at Wingfield on 15 April 2021. The City of Cape Town had obtained a negative audit finding by the Auditor-General regarding its continued expenditure at Wingfield. The City of Cape Town took a decision to end its continued payment for facilities by 15 April 2021.

This decision by the City of Cape Town would have disrupted the good work that the UNHCR and IOM were doing. On 15 April 2021, I held a meeting with the Premier of the Western Cape, as well as with the DG of DHA and DG of the Western Cape. This meeting resolved that the DHA and the Western Provincial Government would share the cost of the marquee tent and ablution facilities at Wingfield for a period not more than 2 weeks, ending on 30 April 2021. This decision was taken to avoid a humanitarian crisis. On 19 April 2021, the Minister of Home Affairs announced this joint decision (supported by the UNHCR Representative and Premier of the Western Cape) that the tents and ablution facilities at both Wingfield and Paint City temporary shelters will be removed 2 weeks from the 15 April 2021.

The deportations of the some of the protesters were effected by engaging with the respective governments of some of the protesters in order to obtain the necessary travel documents for their deportation. The governments concerned were Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The engagements with Burundi, Rwanda and DRC were in March 2021. The deportations that have taken place were 15 to Burundi in December 2020 and 17 to DRC in April 2021.

(2) Ms E L Powell can apply through the “Promotion of Access to Information Act” to the various stakeholders to have access to this information.

END

30 August 2021 - NW1921

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In light of the fact that the Unemployment Insurance Fund’s Destroyed, Affected and/or Looted Workplaces: Temporary Financial Relief Scheme has finally been approved through the Government Gazette published on Tuesday 10 August 2021, which has been established to assist workers whose workplaces have been closed due to unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng from 9 to 18 July 2021, resulting in either reduced pay and/or no pay at all, (a) how does his department intend to assist those in informal businesses without the necessary documentation given the debilitating effects this has had on their livelihoods and (b) what are the further full relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Firstly, each and every case is treated according to its own merit. There are a number of particulars that get considered. This is done to ensure that a proper verification process is undertaken. The aim is to provide relief to the deserving, correct and intended workers. So, among others, these are checked, UIF registration number, SAPS Report indicating that indeed the business where the workers are/were employed was destroyed, insurance claim to the extent that this is available, bank documents, employees’ salary slips, contracts, etc.

We must also emphasize that the relief from the Department of Employment and Labour is more towards the affected workers. Other departments such as Department of Small Business and Development (DSBD), Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) handle the other side of business.

30 August 2021 - NW1818

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department will (a) replace the current information technology systems and (b) increase human resources at driving licence testing centres in light of the grace period for renewal of expired vehicle licence discs and driving licences that ends on 31 August 2021 (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Department through its entity, the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), working with the relevant provincial departments in all provinces will replace the Live Enrolment /Live Capture Units (LEUs/LCUs) with Smart Enrolment Units throughout the country. However, the project will first commence in Gauteng Province where the online booking system has been completed.

The RTMC is in the process of refreshing all end-user devices at the DLTCs throughout the country. This is multi-year programme scheduled for completion in March 2022. Additionally, the RTMC is deploying the Computerised Learner’s License Testing (CLLT) Solution at all DLTCs and will be completed by March 2024. The Corporation is also in the process of procuring the new core infrastructure to improve the stability and uptime of the system. This should be completed by end of February 2022.

(b) In all provinces affected by the backlog, working hours have been extended including operations on Saturdays. The RTMC is opening additional DLTCs with more staff working from 7 in the morning and ending at 9 at night for seven days a week. This initiative will increase the capacity in Gauteng by 30%. The initiative can be deployed nationally in consultation with the MECs concerned.

30 August 2021 - NW1807

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What number of cases have been reported by domestic workers since the launch of the Impimpi hotline (details furnished); (2) whether the hotline was publicised enough to be known by all vulnerable workers even in the rural outskirts of the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is her department doing to rescue domestic workers who are allegedly locked in their employers' houses against their will and not paid overtime, as employers fear that when they are permitted to travel home, they may return and infect them with the coronavirus?

Reply:

The Impimpa Hotline was launched by the Minister in March 2020. Due to budgetary constraints, the hotline had to be discontinued in October in 2020. During this time 178 977 calls were logged. 20 346 (11%) of these were from the Domestic sector.

The hotline was publicised via various media channels such as TV and Radio. We believe that the publicity was adequate since these channels have wide reach.

In instances where domestic workers get locked up at their work places against their will, South African Police Services (SAPS) would have to be brought in, due to jurisdictional issues. The Department has not received complaints of this nature yet.

The Department conducts both pro-active and re-active inspections (based on complaints) at workplaces to ensure that employers comply with all labour legislation.

Domestic Workers should contact their nearest Labour Centre and register their grievance against their employers with the view that the necessary labour inspection takes place. The Department also conduct periodic advocacy, stakeholder engagement and awareness campaigns highlighting domestic workers’ rights.

In instances where there are complaints around non-compliance with Employment Laws such as the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, the inspectors would investigate such matters. To this end, the table below provides details on the inspections that were carried out in the domestic sector.

 

Latest Labour Inspections Statistics for the Domestic Workers Sector (2020/21 Financial Year):

Total Number of Inspections

Compliance

Non-Compliance

Notices to Comply issued

Non-Compliance with Notices to Comply

Employers referred for Prosecution

Amount Recovered

5091

4900

191

191

137

54

R669 471 - 78

30 August 2021 - NW1784

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Transport

How many tonnes of manganese ore are the Ports of (a) Ngqura (Coega) and (b) Port Elizabeth (Gqeberha) planning to export this year; (2) By what date will the manganese-quay of the Port of Port Elizabeth be closed down; (3) What is the rail tariff per tonne of manganese ore (details furnished); (4) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The Ports of Ngqura has budget for 2 150 000 tonnes and Port Elizabeth bulk terminal handle 5 002 321 million and Multi-purpose terminal 1 3040 735 tonnes of manganese a year.
  2. The Port Elizabeth manganese terminal will be closed by 2025/27
  3. Rail tariff is R474 per tonne of manganese ore

 

30 August 2021 - NW1811

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) relief packages did her department provide to small businesses affected by the recent violence that followed the imprisonment of former President, Mr J G Zuma, and (b) is the demographic profile of the specified businesses that benefited from the relief packages?”

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has developed the Business Recovery Support Programme in response to the recent spate of public violence, looting and destruction of property in Kwazulu-Natal and Gauteng. The Business Recovery Support Programme focuses on uninsured small enterprises impacted negatively by the unrest, predominantly in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces. The Programme caters for small enterprises that require funding for working capital (including stock), equipment (including delivery vehicles) and furniture, as well as fittings.

The programme offers financial support in line with the Blended Finance approach, which is a combination of a grant (60%) and a loan (40%). The interest rate on the loan component is limited to 5%. There is an initial payment moratorium of up to maximum of 12 months for small enterprises in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng; and six (6) months for other Provinces. The repayment period of a maximum of 60 months applies. Maximum funding available per entity is R2 million.

The DSBD also has the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP), which offers financial and non-financial support to rural and township enterprises. This programme has been in existence before the looting that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces in July 2021. The aim of the programme is to support SMMEs and co-operatives in order to revitalise and improve the economy. The SMMEs that were affected by the looting may also apply for the TREP support.

Furthermore, the DSBD and its entities (Small Business Development Agency [Seda] and Small Business Finance Agency [sefa]) has the Informal Traders Support Programme that is aimed at supporting informal and micro businesses in the informal sector that were affected by looting. The Programme provides business focused support (financial and non-financial) to informal businesses. The Programme will support 17 667 entrepreneurs at R3 000 each (as a once-off grant).

In addition, and linked to the Programmes outlined above, Seda provides Business Development Support (including pre and post investment support), which includes development of business plans where necessary, financial management training, and other business support related aspects.

b) Applications by businesses that were affected by the looting are currently being processed by sefa. These businesses affected by the looting, based in Kwa-Zulu Natal and Gauteng North and South at large, are open to apply for the programmes offered by the Small Business Portfolio (the DSBD, Seda and sefa).

However, the table below outlines the applications received so far at sefa KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng Regional Offices that are currently being processed:

REGIONAL OFFICE

KWAZULU-NATAL

GAUTENG SOUTH

GAUTENG NORTH

TOTAL

Total number of applications received

30

10

19

59

Total value of applications received

R30 000 000

R9 700 000

R8 100 000

R47 800 000

Total number of applications being processed 

13

5

3

21

Total value of applications being processed 

R15 500 000

R2 593 000

R1 500 000

R19 593 000

MS STELLA TEMBISA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER FOR SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

30 August 2021 - NW1876

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) is the estimated expenditure on (i) compensation of employees, (ii) systems development and (iii) other goods and services for each year of the 15-year Border Management Authority implementation project, (b) are the specific implementation milestones for each year and (c) is the target date for the Border Management Authority to take over border co-ordination responsibility from National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure; (2) Whether funding guarantees have been secured for the full 15-year implementation project; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) In terms of the BMA Blueprint estimated expenditure on Compensation of Employees for the fully-fledged BMA Public Entity is R2,974,962,978.00. It is important to note that the estimates included in the cost model would reflect compensation budgets to be transferred by principal departments whose functions are to be transferred to the BMA. However, the realization of additional budgets would be based entirely on availability of funds from the National Treasury.

(a)(ii) As far as estimated expenditure for Systems Development is concerned, notable establishment costs considered to be incurred are as follows:

  • Payroll ICT systems
  • Integrated ICT systems development and installation at Ports of Entry
  • Computer equipment for the NTC and Ports of Entry Surveillance and monitoring

The actual cost for ICT systems is still being determined and given the disparity in prices, an estimate has not been included in cost model.

(a)(iii) In terms of the BMA Blueprint, the estimated expenditure for Goods and Services for a fully operational BMA will be R5,281,133,622.00. It is important to note that the estimates included in the cost model would reflect budgets for goods and services to be transferred by principal departments whose functions are to be transferred to the BMA. However, the realization of additional budgets would be based entirely on availability of funds from the national fiscus.

(b) The BMA Roadmap outlines the following six (6) Phases for the full establishment and integration of the BMA:

Phase 1: Pre-establishment – 2018-2020

Phase 2: Planning, Establishment and Transitional – 2021-2023

Phase 3: Integration and Initial Roll-out – 2024-2025

Phase 4: Integration and Incremental Expansion – 2026-2027

Phase 5: Operate, Review and Full Integration – 2028-2029

Phase 6: Sustainment and Adaptability Phase – 2030

Each Phase will cover each of the following aspects:

    • Key activities and milestones;
    • Identified Ports of Entry and segments of the Land Borderline to transition into the BMA;
    • The proposed transition approach for the Ports of Entry;
    • The maximum timeframe for each Phase;
    • The capability/operating model functions;
    • The roles and structures to support and manage PoEs and Land Borders transitioned into the BMA; and
    • The role of the Implementation Protocols, Multi-Party Agreements, Service Level Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding.

(c) Noting the phases of the Roadmap above, I appointed an Acting BMA Commissioner in January 2021 to drive the process of the implementation of the Act and the incremental roll-out of the BMA. The Department of Home Affairs was, through a Cabinet decision, mandated to coordinate all operational activity at Ports of Entry. However, due to human resource constraints, the Department entered into a Multi-Party Agreement with all departments at the border to afford some of the departments to coordinate activities at Ports of Entry.

(2) No funding guarantees have been secured from the National Treasury yet. The current arrangement with the National Treasury is that the costing for each Implementation Phase and the MTEF Budget Submission. It should be noted that the total cost identified in the BMA blueprint will be incrementally implemented over the identified six (6) Phases in the roadmap. All expenditure incurred will be costed for each Phase against the various cost categories.

END