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28 November 2019 - NW1388

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What number of chief executive officers has? (a) Eskom, had since 1 January 2009; (2) (a) what number of the specified chief executive officers were (i) permanent appointments and (ii) temporary appointments in each specified entity and (b) for what period was each specified appointment in each entity; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(1)(a) Eskom had 12 Chief Executives since 2009.

(2)(a)(i)(ii) and (2)(b) Table 1 below provides the nature of appointments of Eskom Chief Executive Officers and the period of each appointment

Table 1: List of Acting Chief Executive and Chief Executives since 2009

Name

Designation

Period

Nature of appointment

P J Maroga

Designate CE

01/02/2007 - 31/04/2007

Permanent

 

Chief Executive

01/05/2007 - 30/11/2009

 

M Makwana

Acting CE

01/12/2009 - 30/06/2010

Non-executive Director

 

 

 

Non-Permanent

B A Dames

Chief Executive

01/07/2010 - 31/03/2014

Permanent

M C Matjila

Board Member

28/06/2011 - 01/04/2014

Non-executive Director

 

Acting CE

01/04/2014 - 30/09/2014

Non-permanent

 

Board Member

01/10/2014 - 31/12/2014

 

T J Matona

Chief Executive

01/10/2014 - 31/05/2015

Permanent

Name

Designation

Period

Nature of appointment

Z Khoza

Interim CE

13/03/2015 - 19/04/2015

Non-executive Director

 

 

 

Non-permanent

B Molefe

Seconded CE

20/04/2015 - 24/09/2015

 

 

Chief Executive

25/09/2015 - 31/12/2016

Appointed on a 5 year contract

M M Koko

Interim CE

01/12/2016 - 21/06/2017

Permanent

J A Dladla

Acting CE

22/06/2017 - 04/10/2017

Permanent

S Maritz

Interim CE

06/10/2017 - 28/02/2018

Permanent

P S Hadebe

Interim CE

22/01/2018 - 31/05/2018

 Interim

 

Chief Executive

01/06/2018 - 31/07/2019

Appointed as a contractor

J A Mabuza

Acting CE

01/08/2019 -

Non-executive Director

(3) It is clear to the Department that the attrition rate of CEOs at Eskom has been extra-ordinarily high and is a concern. The appointment of a new CEO, is the beginning of stabilizing the leadership at Eskom.

28 November 2019 - NW1122

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the unserviceability of SA Air Force (SAAF) aircraft, which is a problem made worse by the backlog of maintenance on the specified aircraft coupled with the challenges experienced by Denel, what (a) is her department doing to mitigate the challenges which, if not addressed urgently, might reduce the SAAF's capabilities to that of only a dismal Airwing status and (b) are the relevant details of the point at which certain types of aircraft will have to stop flying?

Reply:

a) Engagements between the Department of Defence and National Treasury are taking place to address the funding challenges of the SANDF in general. Capabilities will gradually come to a grinding stop if both State Owned Entities like Denel and the DOD are not adequately resources to fulfil on their various mandates. The decision to stop flying will be determined by airworthiness and aviation safety considerations. The SAAF has qualified personnel that monitor and certify aircraft airworthiness and safety.

28 November 2019 - NW1411

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Which types of functions or skills have been declared non-core in Eskom, (b) What is the budget attached to the non-core functions and/or skills as declared by Eskom and (c) How does Eskom intend to deal with the functions and/or skills that have been declared non-core?

Reply:

Accordingly to the information received from Eskom

a) Eskom does not have specific functions that have been declared non-core. However, a general view of the business refers to the Generation, Transmission and Distribution businesses as core and critical, while functions such as Human Resources, Finance, Information Technology and similar functions as non-core. However, it has to be noted that even functions referred to as non-core are essential to the functioning of the business and will always be required by Eskom. Therefore the use of core and non-core business in classifying functions will mainly be referring to primary business operations and support functions respectively. The primary business operations mainly refers functions such as the design, engineering, construction, operations and maintenance of plants and supply of electricity to end users.

b) Based on the above definition of Eskom critical workforce segments, it is not possible to provide budget details.

c) As explained above, the non-core functions are required by the business to support the operations.

28 November 2019 - NW1413

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of key vacancies at the National Health Laboratory Service that were not filled, (b) what are the details of the (i) irregular expenditure and (ii) material irregularities incurred by the entity for the previous financial year and (c) how is his department ensuring that the entity’s (i) expenditure and (ii) procurement processes are in line with applicable legislation?

Reply:

a) 297

b) (i) Irregular expenditure

IRREGULAR SPEND

2018/19 (R’000s)

Opening balance

4 445 560

This relates to expenditure on valid contracts that expired. This relates mostly to reagents and consumables

1 690 132

In terms of the NHLS Delegations of Authority, the Board needs to approve all contracts with a value of more than R10 million. The previous CEO and CFO was found guilty of entering contracts for more than R10 million which they were not allowed to do in terms of their delegated authority

104 770

In certain instances, goods were procured without any tender procedures being followed. This relates to items that NHLS classify as “catalogue” items. It is a practice that originated many years ago, but that the new management only became aware of in the last year. Processes are underway to correct this

800 671

In certain instances, the contract value that was approved had been exceeded by more than the allowed 15%. This relates mostly to reagents where there was an unanticipated spike in the number of tests that needed to be performed

361 810

Although evidence exist of a valid tender process and award, the actual contract confirming the award could not be found. It relates to one contract only

19 470

Cases were found where expenditure was incurred after the award of a tender but before the actual contract was signed (normally due to the urgency of the situation). Standard contract wording has now been changed to prevent this from recurring

18 282

In one Region, the Manager authorized several separate tenders for the same product on the same day. This was erroneously done in an effort to allocate the expenses easier to various cost centers. Procedures have been put in place to prevent this from happening again

1 707

Less: Amount Condoned

-2 310 258

Total

5 132 144

(ii) None

(c) (i) The Department has put in place the following mechanism to ensure that expenditure is in line with applicable legislation:

  • The Minister has approved the NHLS Materiality and Significance Framework in terms of Sections 50 and 55 of the PFMA and Treasury Regulation 28.3, which define significant, material and parameters of transaction that the institution is authorised to approve. The purpose of the Framework is to regulate the disclosure of material facts by public entities to the Executive Authority. This includes information to be provided in terms of the Annual Report and financial statements, as well as requests for approval from the Minister to participate in certain significant transactions, and
  • The Department monitors NHLS’s budget on a quarterly basis to ensure that the actual expenditure is aligned to the budget.

(ii) The Department has put in place a mechanism to ensure that the NHLS report on quarterly basis on the level of compliance to the PFMA which includes the following:

  • Ensuring that NHLS has a delegation of authority that define powers entrusted or delegated to officials within the organisation,
  • Ensuring that NHLS takes appropriate disciplinary steps against employees who have made or permitted irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure,
  • Ensuring that NHLS has an appropriate procurement and provisioning administration system, which is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective, and

Ensuring that NHLS has mechanisms in place to prevent irregular, fruitless, and wasteful expenditure.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1214

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) legislative prescripts did she rely on when she appointed the Transitional Board of the Estate Agency Board on 5 July 2019 and (b) is the duration of service of the transitional board?

Reply:

(a) The term of office of the Board of the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) expired on the 5th of July 2019. The date of expiry coincided with the final stages of Parliamentary approval of the Property Practitioners Bill (2018). In order to avoid the existence of a possible governance vacuum at the Estate Agency Affairs Board during the approval process of the Bill, the term of office of the current Board was extended.

(b) The transitional board was appointed with effect from 6 July 2019 until the Property Practitioners Act, Act No. 22 of 2019, comes into effect. The said Act will be operational once the regulations have been finalised early next year.

 

28 November 2019 - NW1412

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of key vacancies at the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority that were not filled, (b) what are the details of the (i) irregular expenditure and (ii) material irregularities incurred by the entity for the previous financial year and (c) how is his department ensuring that the entity’s (i) expenditure and (ii) procurement processes are in line with applicable legislation?

Reply:

a) 92

b) (i) Irregular expenditure

  • Three (3) written quotations were not approved by the delegated official R63235
  • Payment made to supplier is in excess of the quoted amount (difference R12, 750) R97750
  • Supplier unqualified based on the awarding of the quotation was not fair, transparent, competitive and cost effective which is in contravention of Section 16A3 of the Treasury Regulation and the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act of 2000 which therefore results in irregular expenditure R1045800;

(ii) None

(c) (i) The Department has put in place the following mechanism to ensure that expenditure is in line with applicable legislation:

  • The Minister has approved the SAHPRA Materiality and Significance Framework in terms of Sections 50 and 55 of the PFMA and Treasury Regulation 28.3, which define significant, material and parameters of transaction that the institution is authorised to approve. The purpose of the Framework is to regulate the disclosure of material facts by public entities to the Executive Authority. This includes information to be provided in terms of the Annual Report and financial statements, as well as requests for approval from the Minister to participate in certain significant transactions, and
  • The Department monitors SAHPRA’s budget on a quarterly basis to ensure that the actual expenditure is aligned to the budget

(ii) The Department has put in place a mechanism to ensure that the SAHPRA report on quarterly basis on the level of compliance to the PFMA which includes the following:

  • Ensuring that SAHPRA has a delegation of authority that define powers entrusted or delegated to officials within the organisation,
  • Ensuring that SAHPRA takes appropriate disciplinary steps against employees of who have made or permitted irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure,
  • Ensuring that SAHPRA has an appropriate procurement and provisioning administration system, which is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective, and
  • Ensuring that SAHPRA has mechanisms in place to prevent irregular, fruitless, and wasteful expenditure.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1425

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of (i) nurses who are employed at the Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital in Rustenburg, North West and (ii) vacant positions and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled?

Reply:

(a) (i) Nurses employed at Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital in Rustenburg, North West is 578.

(ii) Vacant positions is 106 (vacancy rate of 15%).

(b) The vacancies will be advertised before the end of this financial year (2019/2020), and filled during the 2020/2021 financial year.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1275

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether Eskom has any relationship with a certain news site (Daily Maverick); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the nature of the relationship and (b) which staff of the specified news site is advising Eskom and/or the Chairperson of the Eskom Board of Directors?

Reply:

Accordingly to the information received from Eskom

(a)

Eskom would like to confirm that its relationship with the Daily Maverick is no different from its relationship with any other publication or media house. We categorically place on record that we do not have any special arrangements with any media house, including the Daily Maverick.

(b)

There is no media house or publication that consults or provides any communication services to Eskom, with the exception of reporting on our business operations.

28 November 2019 - NW1429

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has found that there are enough beds at Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital in Rustenburg; if not, (a) on what date will the hospital receive extra beds and (b) what number of beds will be delivered?

Reply:

We are aware that there not enough beds at Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital.

a) The Hospital is expecting additional beds by the end of this financial year;

b) The number of beds to be delivered is 20.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW670

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

On what date will his department publish the promised policy position paper on the future of the energy sector in the Republic, with particular reference to the future structure of Eskom?

Reply:

The Special Paper on the Roadmap for Eskom in a Reformed Electricity Supply Industry was published on 29 October 2019.

27 November 2019 - NW1517

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the status of implementation of the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act, Act 54 of 2003, (b) what budget has been allocated for the implementation of the specified Act in the 2019-20 financial year and (c) what amount in savings has been realised by monitoring spatial data contracts across the different departments and spheres of government as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has undertaken the following with regard to the implementation of the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act (Act 54 of 2003):

(i) The Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) Act was assented on 28 January 2004 as Act 54 of 2003 (Gazette No. 25973 published 4 April 2004).

(ii) The operationalization of the SDI Act was done in phases. This was to ensure that systems and processes are in place to avoid legal liabilities.

(iii) SDI Act sections 1-11, 13, 19-22 commenced 28 April 2006 (Gazette No. 28788 published 28 April 2006). Remainder of sections 12, 14 to 18 of the SDI Act came into operation on the 23rd of April 2015 (Gazette No. 38822 published 29 May 2015).

(iv) Regulations for section 5 were published to allow the Minister to call for nomination of the Committee for Spatial Information (CSI) (Gazette No. 29134 published 25 August 2006). The first CSI was appointed in June 2010.

(v) The second CSI was appointed in May 2016. Its term was extended until end of May 2020. The Department will soon release a call for nomination for the third CSI.

(vi) The Department published the Base Data Set Custodianship Policy and the Policy on the pricing of spatial information products and services as national policies for SASDI in 2015 (Gazette No. 38474 published 16 February 2015).

(vii) The SDI Regulations and the National Land Cover Standard documents were published in 2017 (Gazette No. 41203 published 27 October 2017 and Gazette No. 40919 published 15 June 2017 respectively).

(viii) With the assistance of the CSI, the Department has rolled out the implementation of the prioritized ten base data set themes. The themes include inter alia; the Administrative boundaries, Imagery, Geodesy, Land Cover, Land Use, Hydrology, Transport, Conservation, Social statistics and Cadastre, (please refer to Annexure A for more details). To date, the CSI has appointed 10 base data set coordinators who continuously contribute to the delivery of base data sets for the themes allocated for.

(ix) The CSI is currently reviewing the list of the themes to align with the fourteen Global Fundamental Geospatial Data Theme of the United Nations Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) as adopted in 2018.

b) The Directorate: National Spatial Information Framework (NSIF) which is responsible for providing administrative support has a budget allocation of R5, 023, 000 for compensation of employees and other related support for the implementation of the Act.

c) Currently the Department has not quantified the savings with regard to the monitoring of spatial information contracts across the different departments and spheres of government. The compliance with Regulation 5 of the Act is still very minimal. Organs of state still continue to embark on exercises to capture spatial data and/or information without receiving the necessary permission from the CSI as required in terms of Regulation 5. As a result, the Department together with the CSI is engaging National Treasury to develop a cost-saving model that will be achieved by implementation of Regulation 5.

27 November 2019 - NW1225

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)In view of the absence of funding to provide for replacement, maintenance and upgrading of strategic defence assets and the soon-to-be-depleted Special Defence Account, (a) what does the (i) SA Army, (ii) SA Air Force and (iii) SA National Defence Force plan to do to stay relevant and be able to protect the integrity of the Republic and the safety of our citizens and (b) what are the contingency plans of the department in respect of deploying the army during disasters; (2) whether she has found that the (a) SA Army, (b) SA Air Force and (c) SA National Defence Force are able to (i) execute their operational mandates and (ii) sustain the Republic’s defence capabilities under the current funding levels?

Reply:

The question requires a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence as it relates to the ability of the Defence Force to execute its Constitutional mandate.

27 November 2019 - NW949

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her answer to oral question 44 on 4 September 2019 in the National Assembly, what serious challenges does the SA Air Force have with (a) airlift capabilities and (b) the serviceability of our aged aircraft fleet, which is threatening the sovereignty of South Africa, in view of the fact that the essential aircraft maintenance was previously provided by Denel?

Reply:

 

a) The information requested in part (a) of this question refers to SANDF capabilities and can only be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence.

(b) Underfunding has a direct effect on:

  1. Denel Aeronautics losing key personnel
  2. The continual degradation of maintenance and repair capability and capacity has a pronounced effect on the Air Transport Fleet of the SAAF.
  3. Inability to fully fund all maintenance contracts has direct effect on survival of local industry like Denel ito the Maintenance and Repair Organisation (MRO) of the C130
  4. SAAF not fully funded to operate aged and new fleet

 

27 November 2019 - NW1525

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)(a) Why has the content in textbooks and the course structures for both the National Accredited Technical Diploma and the National Vocational Certificate (NCV) not been reviewed and revised for more than 20 years to address the needs of the current economy and its impact on the Fourth Industrial Revolution of the syllabus and (b) what are the plans going forward to remedy the situation; (2) whether there are there any plans in place to review the Life Skills component in the Life Orientation course for NCV and make it focus on computer skills and readiness for the world of work?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department has constantly upon request by industry partners’ revised curricula over the years in the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC (V)] and lately in the National Accredited Technical Diploma/Report 191 programmes. In the NC (V) programmes, e.g. Electrical Infrastructure and Construction (EIC) and Information Technology and Computer Science (IT&CS), revisions have been conducted and implemented on a phase-in by phase-out process. Other reviewed programmes and subjects include Safety in Society, Mathematics and Office Data Processing (ODP), which were revised on request from the security cluster, especially the South African Police Service with which the Department has a Memorandum of Understanding.

Through the Quality Council for Trades and Occupation, six subjects in finance and accounting, public administration, municipal administration, labour relations, travel office procedure and mercantile law where revised in the Report 191/NATED programmes. This was followed in 2018 by a review of Management Communication and Communication N4 curriculum. The review of a curriculum will naturally prompt the review of student textbooks, which results in the screening of textbooks and annual updating of the Department’s national textbook catalogue.

(b) In 2018, the Department identified and prioritised Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college programmes that required immediate curriculum review and update, in line with the current needs of industry and the changing digital skills needs of the economy. Curriculum Support Teams, which comprise of lecturers who are subject experts and industry stakeholders, were established to undertake reviews of specific programmes in the following fields, i.e. Information Technology (IT) and Computer Science (National Certificate (Vocational)), Business Studies (NATED), Mechanical Engineering (NATED), Mechano-Technics (NATED) and Hospitality and Tourism (NATED). In some instances, partnerships were established with industry role players such as the Cisco Networking Academy to enhance the quality of the new curricula.

The Department has also worked with the IT Faculty at the Tshwane University of Technology to develop a Robotics specialisation in the IT and Computer Science National Certificate (Vocational) programme. The reviews and updates are complete and the textbooks on the revised curricula have been commissioned and evaluated. The revised curricula will be implemented in 2021.

Of the 38 subjects that were prioritised in the NATED curricula, 22 have been reviewed and updated, and are currently undergoing a quality assurance process. The remaining 16 are in the final stages of curriculum review with Curriculum Support Teams. The revised curricula of the 38 NATED subjects are envisaged to be phased in during 2021 and 2022.

The opening of 26 Centres of Specialisation at 19 TVET colleges have ensured that TVET colleges are starting to address the demand for priority trades required by the economy and needed for implementation of government’s National Development Plan in general and national infrastructure plan more in particular. There are 797 apprentices currently being trained as artisans in 13 selected priority trades.

The Department has also commissioned research in the areas of curriculum relevance and responsiveness, as well as partnerships between TVET colleges and the world of work. These studies will provide data that will assist in enhancing the responsiveness of TVET programmes to the needs of industry and the South African economy.

(2) The Department and Cisco have a partnership to collaborate in reviewing and updating the ICT related TVET curricula through the Cisco Networking Academy. Life Orientation in the NC (V) programme has two components, i.e. Life Skills and ICT (Computer) Skills. In partnership with Cisco, the Department has mapped and matched the ICT Skills curriculum with the Cisco Network Academy curriculum. From 2020, the mapped curriculum, which has been aligned with latest ICT developments required for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, will be offered at TVET colleges as part of Life Orientation with lecturer training starting in January/February 2020. Students completing an NC (V) Level 2 certificate with Life Orientation will also receive a Cisco Networking Academy accredited certificate on the latest ICT developments in areas such as Get Connected, Introduction to Internet of Things, and Introduction to Cybersecurity. Furthermore, TVET colleges are currently registering as Cisco Network Academy Centres for the purpose of lecturer training and the implementation of the programme.

27 November 2019 - NW1204

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) total number of hectares of unsurveyed and unregistered land in the Republic and (b)(i) annual target to survey and register land, (ii) number of hectares that have been surveyed and registered in each year since 1 April 2014 and (iii ) total cost in each year?

Reply:

a) The result of the 2017 Land Audit indicates a figure of 7 701 605 hectares of land that is unregistered trust state land. This figure consists of both un-surveyed and unregistered land in the Republic.

b) (i) None. The role of the Department through the Office of the Surveyor-General is to regulate surveying in the Republic by ensuring the correct implementation of the Land Survey Act, Act 8 of 1997 not the actual surveying. From time to time, the Department would perform state land surveys and not privately owned land.

(ii) None.

(iii) No costs were incurred since there were no land surveys done.

27 November 2019 - NW1560

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of research projects related to HIV/Aids vaccines are currently being funded by his department in the Republic?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

The Department is currently not funding any research projects related to HIV/Aids vaccines.  However, the Department through Higher Health (previously known as HEAIDS) is implementing HIV mitigation programmes at public Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges and universities.

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION:

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) has a flagship programme that coordinates and manages innovation projects focused on the development of prevention, treatment and diagnostics tools for HIV/AIDS. There are currently five projects within the HIV prevention portfolio that deal with different aspects of HIV vaccine research and development.

27 November 2019 - NW81

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Gardee, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to the reply of the former Minister of Finance to question 1086 on 19 May 2016, he has since learnt of any senior officials in the National Treasury and Finance Ministry that had met with any members of the Gupta family from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each specified case, (a) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (b)(i) on what date and (ii) where did each such meeting take place and (c) what was the purpose of each meeting?

Reply:

As replied by the former Minister of Finance to question 1086 on 19 May 2016, the Minister of Finance is not aware of any senior officials in the National Treasury and Finance Ministry having had a meeting with any members of the Gupta family from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available.

The Minister of Finance is aware, as replied to question 3498 on 16 November 2018, that the current Director-General of National Treasury in his then position as the Chief of Staff: Ministry of Finance provided support capacity to the then Minister of Finance in a meeting requested and attended by Mr. Anil Ambani. At that meeting, was accompanied by one of the Gupta brothers who was then present during the meeting. The meeting details are as follows:

a) Anil Ambani, Pravin Gordhan, Dondo Mogajane and one of the Gupta brothers

b) (i) One Sunday morning around June 2010

(ii) Villa Sterne Tshwane

c) The purpose of the meeting was for Mr. Ambani from the Reliance group of companies in India to meet with the Minister of Finance as he was an international investor and was considering a possible MTN transaction.

26 November 2019 - NW1482

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

Why does the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) apply clause 7.2.2. of the SABC Freelance Contract, which offers the principal performers 2% of the profit to be shared amongst them, and ignore clause 7.2.1 which requires the SABC and the principal performers to first endeavour to agree on a lump sum amount before applying clause 7.2.2?

Reply:

I have been advised by the department as follows:

There are two reasons why the SABC applies clause 7.2.2

a) The SABC is not forced to (or must) negotiate a lump sum in terms of clause 7.2.1. It is merely an option available to the SABC. The SABC therefore prefers to opt for clause 7.2.2 which refers to the 2% profit share.

b) It also becomes practically impossible and a protracted process to negotiate individually with the performers once the SABC has commercialized a production. Therefore, the implementation of clause 7.2.2 is applicable, see below.

cid:image003.png@01D59A2D.266A1570

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

26 November 2019 - NW1093

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to the approximately R364-million framework agreement contract between the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) and Micro Focus, (a) why did the Micro Focus terminate the two-year contract with Afrocentric Projects and Services after just eight months, (b) what was the reason for appointing a X-Telecoms in place of Afrocentric Projects and Services for the remainder of the contract and (c) what role did her Department’s Deputy Minister Pinky Kekana, play in the decision to change small, medium and micro-sized enterprises contractors and appoint X-Telecoms instead?

Reply:

                                                                                  

I was informed by SITA as follows:

a) According to the letter from Microfocus, Afrocentric fulfilment agreement was terminated for convenience in accordance with the agreement between the parties. After insisting on reasons, SITA was informed that there were some irregularities that led to the on-boarding of Afrocentric, which SITA is currently investigating. No further information was given to SITA which tend to prove or disprove this allegation.

SITA embarked on a preliminary investigation following the reports in the media. Subsequent the allegations purported in the media, the Agency received formal correspondence from Microfocus dated 01 October 2019. SITAs Internal Audit Unit initiated a forensic investigation on 03 October 2019, which is underway.

b) SITA has ensured that the onboarding of SMMEs is addressed by clause 12.2; 12.3 and 12.4 of the SITA Framework Agreement. In addition, there’s Annexure J of the agreement that governs the relationship between SITA and Microfocus states that Microfocus agrees to make use of the selection criteria for the purposes of selecting a black owned Small, Medium and Micro Enterprise (SMME) to develop and empower. It is with this provision that InnovD (Afrocentric) was onboarded as a fulfilment agent to Microfocus. To date SITA has not onboarded any additional fulfilment agent. SITA received an email correspondence dated 21 August 2019 from Microfocus communicating they have identified a fulfilment partner. This was followed with official correspondence from Microfocus dated 02 September 2019, communicating details of the identified fulfilment partner. SITA has not implemented the recommendation. As an interim arrangement SITA is engaging directly with Microfocus and not utilising any of the fulfilment partners.

SITA through the office of the Acting Executive SCM raised an objection to this appointment as per the clauses that govern this agreement on the 3rd September 2019.  A meeting was convened on 25th September 2019 and a follow up was held on the 11th October 2019. SITA and Microfocus agreed that a process which is compliant with PFMA will be used for the appointment of Fulfilment Agents going forward. 

It is envisaged this process should be finalised at the end of November 2019.

(c)   SITA has never received any instruction from Deputy Minister to on board SMMEs to the Framework Agreement.                                                                                       

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

26 November 2019 - NW1466

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Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she has been informed of the complaint against the members of the SA National Defence Force by members of the community at Phongolo in KwaZulu-Natal (details furnished); if so, what action does she intend to take; if not, (2) whether she intends to institute an internal investigation; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) on what date will the investigation take place? NW2732E

Reply:

(1) The SANDF received a report of complaints from some community members of Phongolo in KZN with allegations of illegal house raids and searches that were conducted by members of the SANDF. The allegations central issue was the fact that the SANDF conducted the house raids illegally without the SAPS and or search warrants and are also alleged to have ill-treated some community members during the raids. The affected community members opened criminal cases at the local Police Station and laid charges of illegal conduct, theft and assault by these SANDF members.

(a) The SANDF duly responded by conducting an internal investigation and verifying these allegations and community complaints. The internal investigation found the allegations to be true and the complaints of the community members to be genuine.

(b) The SANDF will allow the legal process to take its course as per the criminal cases currently in the hands of the SAPS. The SANDF has already commenced with the internal Military Disciplinary processes on those involved and those found responsible will be dealt with accordingly and to ensure that such unbecoming conduct does not happen again.

The Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, and the SANDF, unreservedly condemns this unbecoming conduct by these members and condemns it in the strongest terms. This is not how we conduct our business and, we as the organisation charged with the responsibility to protect and defend the people of South Africa, tender our sincere apologies to the affected community members as well as to the entire community of the area of Phongola.

We can assure the citizens of this country that the SANDF members deployed to conduct operations are given the necessary training on all aspects relevant to their tasks during the conduct of operations. Furthermore, continuous training is conducted on the conduct and discipline expected of all members of the SANDF. We will not allow a few members to tarnish the good work done by the bulk of our dedicated and disciplined members.

As a consequence of this incident, the Minister of Defence has directed the CSANDF to ensure that effective disciplinary actions are undertaken against those found to have been responsible. Furthermore, the CSANDF is to ensure that effective measures are put in place to prevent similar incidents in future.

26 November 2019 - NW1521

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether her department has organised a mid – term conference in Dubai; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of mission’s will be attending and (b) is the total projected cost of the conference; (2) How have mid – term reviews in the Dubai region been handled historically?

Reply:

1. The Department of International Relations and Cooperation organised a mid – term review in Dubai, (a) thirty(30) missions attended the mid – term review in Dubai and (b) total projected cost for the review meeting is R 1, 566, 367.00

2. Mid – term reviews are conducted annually and are held in countries that are central and easily accessible for the region.

25 November 2019 - NW1090

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) number of investigations have been launched into matters at the SA Social Security Agency (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019, (b) number of the specified investigations have been concluded, (c) costs have been incurred in conducting each specified investigation, (d) number of persons have been implicated in wrongdoing in finalised investigations and (e) disciplinary action has been taken against the specified persons?

Reply:

(a)(i)

Financial misconduct cases(i.e irregular expenditure, fruitles and wasteful expenditure as well as damages and loses)

Financial year

Number of investigation launched

2014-2015

929

2015-2016

723

2016-2017

823

2017-2018

908

2018-2019

348

Total

3731

Labour Relations

Financial year

Number of Investigations launched

2014-2015

11

2015-2016

70

2016-2017

131

2017-2018

364

2018-2019

357

Total

933

Fraud Investigations

Financial year

Number of investigation launched

2014-2015

1328

2015-2016

1122

2016-2017

511

2017-2018

446

2018-2019

565

Total

3972

 

(a)(ii)

Financial misconduct cases(i.e irregular expenditure, fruitles and wasteful expenditure as well as damages and loses)

Financial year

Number of investigation launched

1 April 2019 to 30 September 2019

99

   

Labour Relations

Financial year

Number of investigation launched

1 April 2019 to 30 September 2019

157

   

Fraud Investigations

Financial year

Number of investigation launched

1 April 2019 to 30 September 2019

223

   

(b)

Financial misconduct cases (i.e. Irregular expenditure, fruitless and wasteful expenditure as well as damages and loses)

Financial year

Number of specific investigation concluded

2014-2015

182

2015-2016

317

2016-2017

216

2017-2018

231

2018-2019

47

1 April 2019 to 30 September 2019

18

Total

1 011

Labour Relations

Financial year

Number of specific investigation concluded

2014-2015

11

2015-2016

70

2016-2017

126

2017-2018

295

2018-2019

311

1 April 2019 to 30 September 2019

152

Total

965

Fraud Investigations

Financial year

Number of specific investigation concluded

2014-2015

1328

2015-2016

1122

2016-2017

510

2017-2018

442

2018-2019

556

1 April 2019 to 30 September 2019

200

Total

4158

(C)

Financial Misconduct and Labour Relations Cases

  • SASSA mainly utilises internal investigating officers for financial misconduct and labour relations cases and they are compensated through subsistence and travel allowance where necessary.
  • In the main desktop investigations where the affected officials submit written representation to conclude on the cases, cost are only limited to travel and subsistience.

Fraud Investigations

  • SASSA does not track expenditure per case/investigation, however the Total expenditure on Fraud investigations excluding COE over the above period of years up to 30 September 2019 is R 77 885 201.00

(d)

Financial misconduct cases(i.eirregular expenditure, fruitles and wasteful expenditure as well as damages and loses)

  • For the above financial years up to 30 September 2019, 411 officials were found negligent and liable for commiting financial misconduct

Labour Relations

  • 943 officials have been implicated in wrongdoing in finalised investigations

Fraud Investigations

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

9 beneficiaries, 337 officials, 5 Doctors, 5 private persons and 3 former SASSA officials

1 beneficiary, 22 officials and 3 private persons

38 beneficiaries, 195 officials, 53 money lenders, 7 private persons and 1 CPS official

73 beneficiaries, 52 SASSA officials, 5 former SASSA officials, 5 private persons. 1 CPS official and 6 public works officials

(e)

Financial Misconduct

  • With regards to financial misconduct cases, the officials found negligent were only held liable for the losses and not necessarily taken through disciplinary process. It is now recently that National Treasury issued the Irregular Expenditure Framework in May 2019 and Fruitless and Wasteful Expenditure framework effective 01 November 2019 requiring that the disciplinary process be taken against officials who committed financial misconduct. The Agency is in the process of implementing the said frameworks.

Labour Relations

  • Disciplinary action has been taken against 813 officials for different acts of misconduct.

25 November 2019 - NW1194

Profile picture: Breedt, Ms T

Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) projects have been contracted to the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (Sanral) by each province since 1 April 2014 and (b)(i) are the details of each contract, (ii) is the location of each contract, (iii) is the monetary value and (iv) are the (aa) planned and (bb) actual completion dates of each project; (2) what are the details of contracts awarded by Sanral for temporary operators of weighbridges in each province?

Reply:

1. (a) There are 2 projects that have been contracted to SANRAL by provinces since 1st April 2014.

(b) (i) DNND2 Moloto Rand/Gauteng Province and DNNS2 provicial rural roads please refer to the table 1.

(b) (ii) Gauteng and Eastern Cape please refer to table 1.

(b) (iiI) R1908 492 7891, R15672 222.46,R403 800 470.91 please refer to table 1.

(b) (iv) Please see table 1 for planned (aa) 31 December 2024 and 31 Dec 2024.(bb)30 July 2017- 30 July 2017.

2. SANRAL only appoints operators on a contract basis for the limited Weighbridge facilities that are owned by SANRAL (most weighbridges along national routes are owned by provincial/local authorities). These SANRAL owned weighbridges are mostly located on the toll concession routes due to the specific requirements in these toll concession agreements with regard to overload enforcement by the Implementing Agency (SANRAL) that is representing Government of South Africa. The Province covered by SANRAL are the following; Northen Province, Gauteng, and Kwa-zulu Natal Please see Table 2 for the relevant project details.

Table 1: Provincial Projects Contracted to SANRAL since 2014 with relevant details

Project Number

Project Name

High Level Project Scope

Province

Municipality

Budget

Actual to Date

% Complete

Planned Completion

Actual Completion Date

Comments

P.002-023-2017/1

DNND2: Moloto Road Gauteng Province

New dual carriageway freeway

Gauteng

City Of Tshwane

R1 908 492 781.91

R15 672 222.46

1%

31 December 2024

31 December 2024

Engagements between SANRAL and Gauteng Province underway for a possible transfer of the Gauteng section of Moloto Road to SANRAL.

P.003-016-2016/1

DNNS2: Provincial Rural Roads Project

New single carriageway road

Eastern Cape

Elundini Local Municipality

R403 800 470.91

R403 800 470.91

100%

30 July 2017

30 July 2017

 

Table 2: SANRAL Projects for Weighbridge Operations

Number

Award Date

Service Provider

Project Number

Project Name

High Level Project Scope

Province

Municipality

Budget

Actual to Date

% Complete

Planned Completion

Actual Completion Date

1

01-Oct-16

Bakwena Pty Ltd

N.001-230-2006/1

MOTOC: Montsole TCC Operations

Toll overload control

Northern Province

Bela Bela Local Municipality

R231 458 387.06

R157 782 034.31

68%

30 September 2021

30 September 2021

2

01-Oct-16

Bakwena Pty Ltd

N.004-130-2008/9

MOTOC: Bapong TCC

Toll overload control

Gauteng

City Of Johannesburg

R246 867 986.01

R153 935 003.88

62%

30 September 2021

30 September 2021

3

01-Oct-17

Zimele Pty Ltd

N.003-110-2018/1

MOTOC: Heidelberg TCC Operations

Toll overload control

Gauteng

Lesedi Local Municipality

R135 013 341.63

R26 191 007.15

19%

01 April 2024

01 April 2024

4

11-Apr-16

Telegenix Trading 799 (Pty) Ltd

N.003-040-2015/1

MOTOC: Mooi River TCC Operations

Toll overload control

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Mooi Mpofana Local Municipalit

R31 453 726.14

R27 915 526.25

89%

30 April 2020

30 April 2020

5

06-Sep-16

Mpofana Municipality

N.003-040-2016/1

MOTOC: Mooi River TCC Mpofana Contributi

Toll overload control

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Mooi Mpofana Local Municipalit

R8 814 787.94

R7 054 787.94

80%

02 September 2022

02 September 2022

6

11-Oct-16

Telegenix Trading 799 (Pty) Ltd

N.002-290-2017/1

MONOC: eTeza TCC Operations

Toll overload control

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Mtubatuba Local Municipality

R43 740 756.26

R35 664 743.94

82%

23 July 2020

23 July 2020

25 November 2019 - NW1408

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to (a) certain items (details furnished) during the period 1 April 2017 up to 31 March 2018 and (b) another certain other item (details furnished) during the period 1 April 2018 to 30 September 2018 on the Schedule of Specialised Audit Services’ Investigations and Performance Audits dated 26 October 2018 received from the National Treasury, in each case, what are the details of the (i) purpose of each investigation and audit and (ii)(aa) findings and (bb) recommendations?

Reply:

i) The details of purpose of investigation or specialised performance audit conducted is reflected as the title of each report, as listed in Annexure A of Parliamentary Question 3072, dated 26 October 2018, as attached.

(ii) (aa) The details of findings are contained in the detailed reports of the organ of state concern and should be required from the relevant organisation.

iii) (bb) The details of recommendations are contained in the detailed reports of the organ of state concern and should be required from the relevant organisation.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: 3072 [NW3436E]

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 26 OCTOBER 2018

OFFICE OF ACCOUNTANT-GENERAL: Specialised Audit Services’ Investigations and performance audits

Reporting Period: 1 April 2017 until 30 September 2018

No

Nature of assignment

Organ of state

Report title

Period completion

(i) Financial Year: 1 April 2017 until 31 March 2018

1.

Forensic Investigation

Richmond Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

June 2017

2. 

Forensic Investigation

Disobotla Local Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

June 2017

3.

Forensic Investigation

Department of Women

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2017

4.

Forensic Investigation

National Department of Transport

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2017

5. 

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Department of Human Settlements

Irregularities in Land Acquisition

September 2017

6. 

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Department of Social Development

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2017

7. 

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – (WTSO Medical Suppliers)

September 2017

8. 

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – (Dr. Dithebe Medical & Dental Suppliers)

September 2017

 9. 

Forensic Investigation

Mnquma Local Municipality

Municipal Corruption

September 2017

10. 

Forensic Investigation

Moses Kotane Local Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2017

11.

Forensic Investigation

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

12.

Forensic Investigation

OR Tambo District Municipality

Fraudulent Payments

December 2017

13.

Forensic Investigation

Bushbuck Ridge Municipality

Fraudulent Payments

December 2017

14.

Forensic Investigation

Department of Arts & Culture

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

15.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Office of the Premier

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

16.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Office of the Premier

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

17.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Office of the Premier

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

18.

Specialized Performance Audit

National Treasury

OAG- Operational Plan 2018/19 Phase 1

December 2017

19.

Forensic Investigation

Council for Geoscience

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

20.

Forensic Investigation

Limpopo Department of Transport

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

21.

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Gopolang

December 2017

22.

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Adcarden

December 2017

23.

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – CQW

December 2017

24.

Forensic Investigation

National Treasury

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – RT5

December 2017

25.

Forensic Investigation

City of Matlosana Local Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

December 2017

26.

Specialized Performance Audit

Bergrivier Local Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

March 2018

27.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Office of the Premier

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – mobile classrooms

March 2018

28.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Office of the Premier

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – mobile classrooms

March 2018

29.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Office of the Premier

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – school furniture

March 2018

30.

Specialized Performance Audit

National Treasury

OAG Operational Plan

March 2018

31.

Performance Audit

Government Pensions Administration Agency

Supply Chain Management unit Review

March 2018

32.

Specialized Performance Audit

Government Pensions Administration Agency

Supply Chain Management unit establishment

March 2018

33.

Specialized Performance Audit

Government Pensions Administration Agency

Supply Chain Management policies and Procedure Manual

March 2018

34.

Specialized Performance Audit

Government Pensions Administration Agency

Supply Chain Management Process and Procedures

March 2018

35.

Specialized Performance Audit

Government Pensions Administration Agency

Supply Chain Management unit Performance Management

March 2018

36.

Forensic Investigation

Kimberley Mental Hospital

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

March 2018

37.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Department of Social Development

Financial Mismanagement – ECDC Centers

March 2018

38.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Department of Social Development

Financial Mismanagement – Co-operatives

March 2018

39.

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities - Afrollah

March 2018

40.

Forensic Investigation

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

March 2018

41.

Forensic Investigation

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Financial Analysis

March 2018

42.

Forensic Investigation

Department of Trade and Industry

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Employment Creation Fund

March 2018

43.

Forensic Investigation

Limpopo Department of Cooperative Governance

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

March 2018

44.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Cooperative Governance

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Dr Beyers Naude Municipality

March 2018

45.

Forensic Investigation

National Treasury

Supply Chain Management Irregularities –RT50

March 2018

46.

Forensic Investigation

Moses Kotane Local Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – ICT Continuous Contract

March 2018

         

(II) Financial Year: 1 April 2018- 30 September 2018

1.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Department of Human Settlements

Fraud & Corruption -

June 2018

2.

Forensic Investigation

National School of Government

Conflict of Interest

June 2018

3.

Forensic Investigation

Department of Women

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Phase 2

June 2018

4.

Specialized Performance Audit

Department of Trade & Industry

Irregular Administering of Employment Creation Fund

June 2018

5.

Forensic Investigation

Passenger Rail Agency South Africa (PRASA)

PPP Supply Chain Management Irregularities

June 2018

6.

Forensic Investigation

National Treasury – Government Technical Advisory Center (GTAC)

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – Appointment

June 2018

7.

Forensic Investigation

Northern Cape Department of Transport, Safety & Liaison

Irregular Transfer of Grant Funding by RTMC

June 2018

8.

Forensic Investigation

Eastern Cape Department of Social Development

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

June 2018

9.

Forensic Investigation

Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO)

Review of Forensic Investigation Reports

September 2018

10.

Specialized Performance Audit

Bergrivier Local Municipality

Audit of Completeness of Pre-paid electricity sales – Phase 2

September 2018

11.

Forensic Investigation

National Treasury

Irregular appointment of service providers on the RT25 (mSCOA) by Municipalities.

September 2018

12.

Forensic Investigation

Limpopo Department of Health

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2018

13.

Forensic Investigation

Modimolle Local Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2018

14.

Forensic Investigation

National Treasury

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2018

15.

Forensic Investigation

North West Department of Rural Environment & Agriculture Development

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2018

16.

Forensic Investigation

Amathole District Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities

September 2018

17.

Forensic Investigation

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

Supply Chain Management Irregularities – IPTS (phase 4)

September 2018

25 November 2019 - NW1124

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(a) What is the name of each (i) Director-General and (ii) Head of Department who failed to submit mid-term reviews by 31 September 2019 as agreed to in the performance monitoring system for the 2018-19 financial year and (b) in which (i) national and (ii) provincial government department is each specified Director-General and Head of Department employed?

Reply:

Non-submission of 2018/19 DGs/HoDs midterm review

No.

National/

Provincial

 

Department

 

Name of HoD

 

Half-yearly

Review 18/19

1

 

Eastern Cape

 

Econ Affairs, Env &

Tourism

 

Mr B Gxilishe

 

Not submitted

2

)

Eastern Cape

)

Health

 

)

DrT Mbengashe

)

Not submitted

3

 

Eastern Cape

 

Local Gov

Affairs

& Traditional

 

Ms G. Gumbi- ”

Masilela

 

Not submitted

  1. Eastern Cape Roads & Public Works
  2. Eastern Cape Rural Development &

Agrarian Reform

Mr J Mlawu Mr L Ngada

Not submitted Not submitted

6

Eastern Cape

Sport, Recreation, Arts

& Culture

Mr M Matutu

Not submitted

7

Eastern Cape

Transport

Ms Irene

Mpolweni

Not submitted

8

Free State

Office of the Premier

Mr KF

Ralikontsane

Not submitted

9

Gauteng

Agric & Rural

Development

Mr. Nhlakanipho

Nkontwana

Not submitted

10

Gauteng

Community Safety

Ms. Yoliswa

Makhasi

Not submitted

11

Gauteng

E-Government

Mr B Ngobeni

Not submitted

12

Gauteng

Health

Prof. Mkhululi

Lukhele

Not submitted

13

Gauteng

Human Settlements

Ms Mathilda

Gasela

Not submitted

14

Gauteng

Infrastructure

Development

Mr 8

Netshiswinzhe

Not submitted

15

Gauteng

Cooperative

Governance & Traditional Affairs

Ms. Thandeka

Mbassa-Sigabi

Not submitted

16

Gauteng

Office of the Premier

Ms Baleni

Not submitted

17

Gauteng

Social Development

Mr M.Mampuru

Not submitted

18

Gauteng

Sport, Arts, Culture &

Recreation

Ms. Monica

Newton

Not submitted

19

Gauteng

Treasury

Ms. Nomfundo

Tshabalala

Not submitted

20

KwaZuIu-

Natal

Econ Dev, Tourism &

Env Affairs

Ms P Ncapayi

Not submitted

21

Limpopo

Econ Dev, Environment

& Tourism

Mr Solly

Kgopong

Not submitted

22

Limpopo

Cooperative

Governance, Human Settlements & Traditional Affairs

Ms NR Dumalisile

Not submitted

23

National

Agric, Forestry &

Fisheries

Mr MM

Mlengana

Not submitted

24

National

Co-operative

Governance

Mr DM

Mashitisho

Not submitted

25

National

Correctional Services

Mr Arthur Fraser

Not submitted

26

National

Defence (Secretary for

Dr Sam Gulube

Not submitted

   

Defence)

   

27

National

Environmental Affairs

Ms N Ngcaba

Not submitted

38

National

Health

Ms P Matsoso

Not submitted

29

National

Higher Education &

Training

Mr G Qonde

Not submitted

30

National

Home Affairs

Mr M Apleni

Not submitted

31

National

Independent Police

Investigative Directorate

Mr R McBride

Not submitted

32

National

Justice and

Constitutional

Development

Mr V Madonsela

Not submitted

33

National

Labour

Mr TM Lamati

Not submitted

34

National

National Treasury

Mr D Mogajane

Not submitted

35

National

Office of the Chief

Justice

Ms M

Sejosengwe

Not submitted

36

National

Sport and Recreation SA

Mr EM Moemi

Not submitted

37

National

Government Pensions

Administration Agency

Mr K G Sukdev

Not submitted

38

Mpumalanga

Community Safety,

Security& Liaison

Mr Mthombothi

Not submitted

39

Mpumalanga

Education

Mrs MOC

Mhlabane

Not submitted

40

Mpumalanga

Treasury

Ms NZ Nkamba

Not submitted

41

Mpumalanga

Health

Dr S. Mohangi

Not submitted

42

Mpumalanga

Human Settlements

Mr Masange

Not submitted

43

Mpumalanga

Public Works, Roads &

Transport

Ms SP Xulu

Not submitted

44

Mpumalanga

Social Development

Mr MV Mahlalela

Not submitted

45

North West

Community Safety &

Transport Management

Ms BA Mofokeng

Not submitted

46

North West

Culture, Arts &

Traditional Affairs

Mrs SR Bapela

Not submitted

47

North West

Economy & Enterprise

Development

LG Tshikovhi

Not submitted

48

North West

Education & Sport

Development

SM Semaswe

Not submitted

49

North West

Health

Dr AT Lekalakala

Not submitted

50

North West

Local Govt & Human

Settlements

Mr PE Motoko

Not submitted

   

Office of the Premier

Dr Keneilwe L

Not submitted

     

Sebego

 

52

North West

Public Works & Roads

Mr P Mothupi

Not submitted

53

North West

Rural, Environment & Agricultural Development

Dr Mokaila

Not submitted

54

North West

Social Development

Ms PD Mothobi

Not submitted

55

North West

Tourism

Adv Hope Fiona

Neo Sephoti

Not submitted

56

Northern

Cape

Agriculture, Land

Reform & Rural Development

Mr WVD Mothibi

Not submitted

57

Northern

Cape

Cooperative Gov,

Human Settlement & Trad Affairs

Mr B Lenkoe

Not submitted

58

Northern

Cape

Health

Mr S Jonkers

Not submitted

59

Northern

Cape

Sports, Arts & Culture

Ms R Palm

Not submitted

60

Northern

Cape

Transport, Safety &

Liaison

Mr MP Dichaba

Not submitted

DRAFTER OF THE REPLY

Name:

Designation:

Contacts:

Recommended / Not recommended

Director-General (DPME) Date:

Approved / Not approved

Minister in The Presidency

Date: ,’

MINISTER IN THE PRESIDENCY: REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

Private Bag X1000, Pretoria, 0001, Union Buildings, Government Avenue, PRETORIA Tel: (012) 300 5200, Website: www.theDresidency.oov.za

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NUMBER: 1325

DATE OF PUBLICATIONS: 25 October 2019

1325. Dr L A Schreiber (DA) to ask the Minister in The Presidency:

With reference to his reply to question 834 on 2 October 2019, what is the detailed breakdown of the amounts spent on each former principal and spouse since 1 April 2016 in terms of (a) hotel accommodation, (b) private accommodation, (c) alcohol, (d) catering, (e) entertainment, (I)(i) commercial and (ii) military flights, (g) vehicle transport and (h) security?

NW2537E

Response

Benefits applicable to Former Presidents and Former Deputy Presidents are prescribed in the Policy on the Benefits of Executive Office, dated March 2009. Benefits that are paid for from The Presidency budget in respect of Former Presidents and a Former Deputy Presidents include the following:-

    • Accommodation
    • Commercial flights
    • Vehicle transport

The travel and accommodation are paid in accordance with the policy, as former Presidents and Deputy Presidents support government programmes inside and outside the borders of the Republic of South Africa. The benefits are irrespective of whether or not the former Presidents and Deputy Presidents are on official or private duties as they are de facto ambassadors of the people of South Africa.

Military flights and Security services are paid for by the South African National Defence Force and South African Police Service respectively.

The policy is in line with what obtains in comparable countries the world over.

Please find attached breakdown of the amounts spent on each former principal and spouse since 2016

DRAFTER OF THE REPLY

Name: K Mashapha

Designation: Director Financial Administration

Contacts: 012 300 5998

Recommended

Director-General — The Presidency Date: /J //

Ap roved / NQ

n. Jackson Mthembu, MP Minister in Th Pre 'dency Date: g/ /

Question

Total

FY2016-17

{

FYZ01&19

Former

President de Klerk

Spouses

Former

President de Klerk

Spouse

Former

President de Klerk

Spouse

President de Klerk

Former

President de Klerk

Spouse

                   

R R R R R R R

R

130987.32

R R R R R R R R

R

66437.12

R R R R R R R

R

46985.14

R R R R R R R R

R

12643.30

R R R R R R R R

R

16S64.92

R R R R R R R R

R

R R R R R

R 50 768.32

R R

R

R -

R -

R -

R -

R -

R 37 538.88

R -

R -

R -

R R R R R

R 16 248.94

R R

R

R R R R R

R 16 254.94

R R

R

  1. For the period 01 April Z016to date, what is the detailed breakdown of amounts spent on each Former Principal and Spouse, in terms of
    1. Hotel accomodation
    2. Private accomodation
    3. Alcohol
    4. Catering
    5. Entertainment I)(i) Commercial flights f(i)(i) Military flights
  1. Vehicle transport
  2. Security

  1. For the period 01 April 2O16to date, what is the detailed breakdown of amounts spent on each Former Principal and Spouse, in terms of

Total

FY2016-17

FY2018-19

FY201S-20

Former President Mbekl

Spouses

Former President Mbekl

Spouse

Former President Mbeki

Spouse

Former President Mbekl

Spouse

Former President Mbekl

Spouse

    1. Hotel accomodation

R

628 994.67

R

62 727.62

R

233 750.66

R

41 422.96

R

228 855.87

R

-

R

116 017.34

R

21 304.66

R

50 370.80

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

176 875.99

R

266 754.60

R

38 723.86

R

102 559.04

R

19 661.68

R

48 915.81

R

11 615.72

R

64 438.18

R

106 874.73

R

50 841.57

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

468 777.42

R

117 848.19

R

106 112.02

R

35 961.32

R

110 539.17

R

387.77

R

56 851.50

R

62 509.96

R

195 274.73

R

18 989.14

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 
    1. Private accomodation
    2. Alcohol
    3. Catering
    4. Entertainment I)(i) Commercial flighU f(i)(i) Military fiighU
  1. Vehicle transpon
  2. Security

Question

Total

 

FY2017-18

FY2018-19

FY2019-20

Former

President

Motlanthe

Spouses

Former

President Motlanthe

Spouse

Former

President Motlanthe

Spouse

Presldent Motlanthe

Spouse

President Motlanthe

Sgouse

                   

R

392 370.98

R

 

R

24 329.7S

R

 

R

120 170.43

R

 

R

106 245.00

R

 

R

141 625.80

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

573 708.01

R

548 609.31

R

288 092.85

R

159 063.64

R

134 79S.04

R

126 602.50

R

7s szg.s6

R

183 794.95

R

71 490.26

R

79 148.22

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

2 074 516.35

R

341 007.94

R

203 380.47

R

 

R

804 646.26

R

 

R

691 775.20

R

341 007.94

R

374 714.42

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

For the period 01 Aprll 2016 to date, what is the detailed breakdown of amounts spent on each Former Principal and Spouse, in terms of

  1. Hotel accomodation
  2. Private accomodation
  3. Alcohol
  4. Catering
  5. Entertainment

I)(i) Commercial flights f(i)(i) Military flights

  1. Vehicle transpon
  2. Security

Question

Total

FYZ016-17

FY2017-18

FY2019-20

President Zuma

Spouses

Former President Zuma

President Zuma

Spouse

Former President Zuma

Spouse

Former President Zuma

                   

R

32299.75

R

 

R

R

R

 

R

R

32 299.75

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

R

R

 

R

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

R

R

 

R

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

R

R

 

R

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

R

 

R

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

285001.39

R

122248.47

R

R

R

20717.34

R

R

174839.55

R

43 305.55

R

89 444.50

R

78 942.92

R

 

R

 

R

R

R

 

R

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

15052.27

R

 

R

R

R

14780.27

R

R

 

R

-

R

272.00

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

R

R

 

R

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

For the period 01 April Z016 to date, what is the detailed breakdown of amounts spent on each Former Prindpal and Spouse, in terms of

  1. Hotel accomodation
  2. Private accomodation
  3. Alcohol
  4. Catering
  5. Entertainment

f)(i) Commercial flights f(i)(i) Military flights

  1. Vehicle transpon
  2. Security

For the period 01 April 2016 to date, what is the detailed breakdown of amounts spent on each Former Principal and Spouse, in terms of

         

Former DP Mlambo- Ngcuka

Spouses

Former DP Mlambo- Ngcuka

Spouse

Former DP Mlambo- Ngcuka

Spouse

Former DP Mlambo- Ngcuka

Spouse

Former DP Mlambo- Ngcuka

Spouse

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

249 163.84

R

66 114.89

R

55 311.22

R

23 055.67

R

50 891.93

R

674.95

R

103 653.84

R

21 445.08

R

39 306.85

R

20 939.19

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

524.00

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

524.00

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

-

R

 

R

 

R

 
  1. Hotel accomodation
  2. Private accomodation
  3. Alcohol
  4. Catering
  5. Entertainment I)(i) Commercial flights I(i)(i) Military flights
  6. Vehicle transport
  7. Security

Quenlon

FY2016-17

FY2017-18

FY2018-19

FY2019-20

fiormer DP

Mbete

spouses

Former DP

Mbete

Spouse

Former DP Mbete

Spouse

Former DP Mbete

Spouse

Former DP Mbete

Spouse

                   

R

R R R R R R R

R

R

R R R R R R R R

R

R R R R R R R R

R

R R R R R R R R

R R R R R R R R

R R R

R R R R

R

R R R R R R R R

R

R

 

R

           

R

R

 

R

Q

           

R

R

R

R

 

R

R

           

R

R R

R

 

R R

R

           

R

R R

  1. For the period 01 April 2016 to date, what is the detailed breakdown of amounts spent on each fiormer Principal and Spouse, in terms of
    1. Hotel accomodation
    2. Private accomodation
    3. Alcohol
    4. Catering
    5. Entertainment I)(i) Commercial flights I(i)(i) Military flights
  1. Vehicle transpon
  2. Security

25 November 2019 - NW1362

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details attached) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did the National Treasury do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(i)(ii) No

25 November 2019 - NW1401

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

In view of his reply to question 934 on 9 October 2019, (a) what then is the justification of retaining the e-tolls project and (b) why is the fact that there is no money owed that is directly ascribable to the Gauteng Freeway Improvement District not supported by abolishing e-tolls?

Reply:

As explained in the reply to question 934, financing the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) is done on a corporate finance basis and not a project finance basis. Borrowing for toll roads are done on the basis that there is a revenue stream to finance the debt. A significant portion of the South African National Roads Agency’s existing debt was to finance the upgrade of roads on GFIP and it requires a revenue stream to finance it, so e-tolls cannot be abolished without a revenue stream to finance existing commitments.

25 November 2019 - NW1548

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) In light of recent criticisms made by sections of organised business and organised labour regarding the efficacy of the National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac), has he found that Nedlac is fit-for-purpose to deal with the unemployment crisis in the Republic and (b) what measures are put in place to strengthen the institution?

Reply:

Whilst the criticism is acknowledged, it should be noted that these social partners together with civil society and government constitute what is NEDLAC and therefore such criticism could be regarded as criticism of our collective contribution towards the success of NEDLAC.

NEDLAC and its constituent parties has worked endlessly to address the efficacy as well as the relevance of the organization in the current debates whether economic, developmental and Labour issues. The honourable member needs not be reminded that the organization is currently seized with trying to address a number of critical issues such as the Presidential Jobs summit, the Eskom Leadership task team, amongst others. The honourable member should also take note that these social partners are also busy addressing governance structures and underlying founding documents in order to position the organization to go beyond being representative but also systematized such that it is more responsive and more agile to tackle emergent issues.

The question therefore as to whether the organization is fit for purpose should therefore be answered in the affirmative. As has been pointed out the organization is currently engaged in a governance discussion. Currently it is loaded with the task of being a designated home of the Presidential Jobs Summit, that is amongst other.

25 November 2019 - NW1071

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the statement made by the National Treasury Deputy Director-General, Mr Ismail Momoniat, in a meeting of the Standing Committee on Finance held on 7 September 2019, where he said that the SA Revenue Service needs an intrusive unit to deal with illicit financial flows of money, (a) what are the details of the nature of the unit that he was referring to, (b) on what legislative provisions will the establishment of the unit be based and (c) how will the work of the unit be different from the work done by the intelligence services?

Reply:

I want to refer the Honourable Member to the submission made by the National Treasury in its submission to the Nugent Commission on 29 August 2018, which I fully endorse: “Enforcement powers that are also intrusive are necessary for any tax collection agency. Whilst most taxpayers seek to comply, there are cases of taxpayers who are less cooperative when declaring income or have a clear incentive to withhold key facts about the nature of income-generating activities of the person or business. In such cases it is necessary for SARS to have intrusive enforcement capacity to deal with such evasion.” (“Tax Policy input”, 29 August 2018, pg. 2, Document available on wwww.inqcomm.co.za).

While it is not required of me to infer or elaborate the meaning of Mr. Momoniat’s statement at the Standing Committee on Finance meeting on 17 September 2019, I am informed that Mr. Momoniat was responding in general terms to the Honourable Member’s questions about surveillance capacity of SARS after presenting on progress made on the implementation of the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry into Tax Administration and Governance by SARS (the Nugent Commission). It is not clear to me why the Honourable Member did not ask Mr Momoniat any further questions for clarification at that meeting. I am in agreement with his view on the general requirement for intrusive capacity for a well-functioning revenue-collection authority. I am sure the Honourable Member will also agree that SARS must have significant intrusive powers, not only to deal with taxpayers concealing information on income received, but also to counter illegitimate trades (and financial flows) in commodities such as tobacco, liquor and counterfeit goods.

Seeing that Mr Momoniat’s response was on the principle, rather than on any specific unit within SARS, questions (a) to (c) do not apply. Indeed, since SARS is a semi-autonomous revenue authority which determines its own internal organization, it is the Commissioner, and not the Minister or any official at National Treasury, who can provide any information on any unit within SARS. I am sure the Honourable Member is also aware that the Nugent Commission’s final report points out that there is “no reason why SARS was, and is not entitled to establish and operate a unit to gather intelligence on the illicit trades, even covertly, within limits.” (p76 par [9]) Indeed, the Nugent Commission has noted that any such unit is not unlawful. Indeed, SARS must not be a toothless tiger when dealing with tax evasion and illegitimate trades and financial flows.

25 November 2019 - NW1303

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In view of the fact that the proposed General Education Certificate advocates for skills development and learnerships programmes, how will his department collaborate with the Department of Basic Education to ensure skills certification for Grade 9?

Reply:

Skills Development and learnership programmes were transferred to the Department of Higher Education and Science and Technology through a Presidential Proclamation in 2009 from the Department of Employment and Labour.

The Department of Employment and Labour provides free employment services to work-seekers and can extend these counselling services to those who are still within the schooling system. We will collaborate with the Department of Basic Education through these programmes to assist young people intending to join the labour market post Grade 9 to make better subject choices.

Having stated the above, there is no skills certification for Grade 9, what is being proposed is General Education Certificate which basically opens a way for career pathing.

Government is moving towards the creation of different paths for learners after they have obtained General Education Certificate. The plan whose trial is scheduled to be completed at the end of July 2020, is aimed at moving away from a single narrow path for learners, but opening up three streams model which have the academic, technical/ occupational pathways.

It is important to equip the learners with values, knowledge and skills that will enable or enhance their meaningful participation in society, to contributing towards developing sustainable communities, provide basis for further education and training and establish a firm foundation for skills development that must prepare learners for labour market.

25 November 2019 - NW1526

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What was the total cost of travel incurred by the National Treasury in bringing officials of the National Treasury to a joint meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs and the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation on (i) 29 October 2019 and (ii) 5 November 2019 and (b) what number of officials from the National Treasury were present at each of the specified meetings?

Reply:

a) The travel costs for the National Treasury official who attended the joint Portfolio Committee meetings on (i) 29 October 2019 was R14 536.72 via Pietermaritzburg (the official had a meeting at the Msunduzi Local Municipality on the 28th October and travel arrangements were made for him to catch a flight from Pietermaritzburg to Cape Town) and (ii) 5 November 2019 was R8 224.22.

b) Only one (1) official attended both meetings..

22 November 2019 - NW1375

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

(a), (b) and (c) The Department of Social Development did not do business with any person, companies and trusts mentioned in the Parliamentary Question.

22 November 2019 - NW1395

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to reports that some shebeen owners confiscate the SA Social Security Agency cards of their patrons to keep the cards as surety for alcohol bought on credit, what plans does she have in place to ensure that grants are not continuously abused for purposes they are not meant for?

Reply:

Studies have shown that, in the main, the funds provided for social grants are utilised for the purposes intended. However, there will always be exceptions to this rule. It is the responsibility of every citizen to report abuse of social grants, wherever this is seen. All reports of grant abuse are followed up.

Where abuse is confirmed, SASSA has legislated powers to either stop payment of the grant, or to arrange for a procurator or welfare organisation to administer the grant on behalf of the beneficiary.

The retention of the SASSA card as surety for any debts is illegal. SASSA works closely with law enforcement agencies to address this wherever it is reported. There has been some success in addressing this, through arrests and criminal prosecution of people found in possession of multiple SASSA cards.

SASSA has implemented various measures to address possible abuse of social grants. Primary amongst these is the introduction of the new SASSA card, which prohibits EFT debits and stop orders off this account. This has addressed previous challenges, where the value of the grant was being eroded by debt and unauthorised deductions.

SASSA therefore appeals to all citizens to assist in the reporting of the abuse of social grants so that action may be taken.

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

22 November 2019 - NW1292

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With regard to High Court review applications initiated in respect of failed asylum claims, what number of (a) such High Court review applications have been initiated against (i) his department, (ii) him and/or (iii) the Director-General in each of the past 10 years and (b) the specified applications have been successful; (2) what amount has his department spent on litigation costs associated with (a) High Court review applications in respect of failed asylum seekers and (b) asylum seekers in general, including litigation related to High Court reviews, as well as any other refugee and asylum seeker rights litigation in each of the past 10 years?

Reply:

(1) The Department does not have a system in terms of which applications received are specifically categorized. Matters received are captured on a Word Document as and when they are received, and in most instances the cases cite both the Minister of Home Affairs and the Director-General of Home Affairs.

Based on the latest available information, 2493 matters were registered in 2017 and 3706 in 2018.

(2) The Department does not have a system in terms of which litigation costs for a specific category under Immigration Services can be determined. As of the 2018/2019 financial year, the Department put in place a system in terms of which the relevant Branches from where the litigation emanates have to pay the litigation invoices, i.e. Immigration Services, Civic Services and Human Resources Management and Development.

The total spend on litigation costs from the 2009/2010 financial year to the 2017/2018 financial year was R366,493,161.00

In 2018/2019, the total spend on litigation fees was as follows:

Immigration Services – R31,705,547.57

Civic Services – R3,697,484.45

Human Resources Management & Development – R3,477,323.15

Legal Services – R7,373,119.37

END

22 November 2019 - NW1055

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he has found that all correctional centres conform to the requirements prescribed in terms of section 7(1) of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998; if not, (a) why not, (b) which correctional centres have been found not to conform to the prescribed requirements and (c) what steps is his department taking to ensure conformity with the prescribed requirements in all correctional centres?

Reply:

1. Not all the correctional centres conform to the requirements of Clause 7(1) of the Correctional Services Act 111 of 1998 which stipulates the following:

7 Accommodation (1) Prisoners must be held in cells which meet the requirements prescribed by regulation in respect of floor space, cubic capacity, lighting, ventilation, sanitary installations and general health conditions. These requirements must be adequate for detention under conditions of human dignity.”)

(a) The reasons for the non-conformity are:-

(ii) The Department’s correctional centres are made up of a range of facilities built over an extended period of time and they cater for a variety of different purposes to suit the thinking that was prevalent at the time of their construction. Many of centres were not designed to fulfil the objective of inmate detention under conditions of human dignity as is prevalent in the current correctional system;

(iii) Overcrowding in correctional centres which causes accelerated dilapidation of facilities, faster than new facilities can be constructed or the existing ones repaired;

(iv) Backlog of maintenance due to financial and human capacity constraints within both the implementing agent department (DPWI) as well DCS.

(b) There are fifteen (15) correctional centres that do not conform to the requirements (marked by * in the table below).

(c) The department is instituting corrective actions by upgrading existing correctional centres where funds permit, as well as planning the construction of new correctional centres as follows:-

 

Correctional centre

Status

Corrective action

1

Glencoe*

Completed 2019/20

Upgrading contract for a section of the centre was completed in June 2019; Contract 2 is in planning for the remainder of the centre

2

Tzaneen*

Under construction

Construction of a new 500 bed correctional centre to replace zinc structure is underway, due for completion during 2019/2020

3

Lichtenburg*

Planning

Planning for an upgrading project to create additional 234 bed spaces and replace zinc structure is at an advanced stage; construction to commence in 2020/2021

4

Leeuwkop*

Planning

Planning for a new correctional centre to create 1,000 bed spaces and replace zinc structure is at site clearance stage

5

Voorberg*

Planning

Planning for a new correctional centre to create 1,500 bed spaces and replace zinc structure is at site clearance stage

6

Zeerust*

Planning

Planning for a new correctional centre to create 500 bed spaces and replace zinc structure is at site clearance stage

7

Makhado*

Zinc construction

Planning will commence when funds are available

8

Atteridgeville*

Zinc construction

Planning will commence when funds are available

9

Drakenstein Medium B*

Zinc construction

Planning will commence when funds are available

10

Pollsmoor Medium B*

Zinc construction

Planning will commence when funds are available

11

Groenpunt Medium*

Zinc construction

Planning will commence when funds are available

12

Brandvlei Medium*

Zinc construction

Planning will commence when funds are available

13

Brandvlei Maximum*

Closed

Closed. Repair and renovation project is in planning stage

14

Umzimkhulu*

Closed

Closed. Repair and renovation project is in planning stage

15

Geluk*

Closed

Closed. Planning will commence when funds are available

16

Standerton

Completed 2019/20

Upgrading and addition of 787 bed spaces, completed during 2019/20

17

Estcourt

Completed 2019/20

Upgrading and addition of 309 bed spaces, completed during 2019/20

18

Parys

Under construction

Upgrading and addition of 176 bed spaces commenced in 2019

19

Burgersdorp

Planning

Planning for an upgrading project to create 311 additional bed spaces is at an advanced stage; construction to commence in 2020/2021

20

Bethal

Planning

Planning is underway for a major repair and renovation project under the DPWI “Planned Maintenance” budget

21

Mahikeng

Planning

Planning is underway for a major repair and renovation project under the DPWI “Planned Maintenance” budget

22

Port Shepstone

Planning

Planning is underway for a major repair and renovation project under the DPWI “Planned Maintenance” budget

22 November 2019 - NW1016

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether any persons have been appointed to the National Council for Correctional Services in terms of section 83(2)(h) of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, since 1 January 2014; if not, why not; if so, (a) who was appointed to the National Council for Correctional Services, (b) what is each person’s area of expertise and experience and (c) on what date was the Portfolio Committee on Justice and Correctional Services consulted on the appointments of the specified persons?

Reply:

No, the then Minister appointed the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS) for a period of five (5) years with effect from 1 March 2010 until 28 February 2015.

(a) who was appointed

(b) each person’s area of expertise and experience

(c) date the Portfolio Committee on Justice and Correctional Services consulted

Appointed with effect 1 March 2010 for a period of five (5) years ending 28 February 2015. These appointments were extended for a period of three (3) months until 31 May 2015

Dr KJ Kometsi

Ms LUZ Rataemane

Dr M Mako

Clinical Psychologist

 

Ms B Ngobeni

Community Development Expert

 

Ms L Smit

NGO promoting Social Re-integration of offenders back into society

 

Dr M F Randera

Medical Doctor

 

Mr S Nkanunu

Practicing attorney

 

Appointed on 1 June 2015 for a period of 12 months ending 31 May 2016

Dr VR Chetty

CRIMINOLOGIST:

Dr Chettys’ specialty, specifically during the parole consideration process by the NCCS, is the identification of crimogenic factors within offenders profiles and whether such needs have been addressed before such offender can be released back to society.

11 November 2015

Ms AL Vilakazi

ATTORNEY:

Ms Vilakazi is a practicing attorney and Director of Buthelezi Vilakazi Inc, a firm of attorney based in Sandton. Her specialty on the Council is that of ensuring compliance with applicable legislation (Constitutional Act, Criminal Procedure Act and the Correctional Services Act).

 

Ms N Gwayi

Dr RM Mgudu

Ms BN Ngobeni

COMMUNITY DEVELOPERS AND EDUCATORS:

Ms. Nondumiso Gwayi

Her main focus and interest is the importance of family and community support as a key element in the successful reintegration of offenders into society.

Mr. Richard Mzoxolo Bhunga Mgudu

His interest, by virtue of his profession, in the skilling, rehabilitation programmes and academic development of offender.

Ms. Busi Ngobeni

Ms. Ngobeni is an educator by profession. Has been serving as a member of the NCCS since 2010 and has over the years facilitated training conducted by NCCS members to Social Workers, Psychologists and Parole Boards.

 

Appointed on 1 June 2016 for a period of 36 months ending 31 May 2019

These appointments were extended by the Minister until 30 November 2019, pending the re-advertisement of the call for nominations, the consultation and appointment process.

(a)who was appointed

(b) each person’s area of expertise and experience

(c) date was the Portfolio Committee on Justice and Correctional Services consulted

Mr IL de Klerk

Ms ST Monyemane

Ms LUZ Rataemane

Experts in clinical psychology

18 May 2016

Adv KA Mahumani

Rev JP Clayton

Representatives of non-governmental organisations working within the field of Correctional Services

 

Ms AL Vilakazi

Dr VR Chetty

Academics with expertise in criminal law, criminology, penology or restorative justice.

 

Mr N Nkopo

Expert in community justice systems

 

An appointment process has been initiated with positions due to be advertised during the month of October 2019.

22 November 2019 - NW807

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the number of (a) registered early childhood development (ECD) centres, (b) registered ECD practitioners and (c) unregistered ECD centres in the Republic?

Reply:

(a) Registered early childhood development (ECD) centres.

Provinces

Status

1. Eastern Cape

2 795

2. Free State

971

3. Gauteng

1 717

4. Kwa-Zulu Natal

3 324

5. Limpopo

3 397

6. Mpumalanga

1 516

7. Northern Cape

351

8. North West

1 205

9. Western Cape

1 545

Totals

14 026

(b) Registered ECD practitioners

Practitioners are not registered with any Professional body. The below listed are practitioners employed within ECD centres.

Provinces

Status

Eastern Cape

2741

Free State

3 585

Gauteng

5 587

Kwa-Zulu Natal

5 887

Limpopo

4 229

Mpumalanga

4051

Northern Cape

639

North West

3 615

Western Cape

n/a

Totals

27 593

(c) Unregistered ECD centres in the Republic?

Provinces

Status

Eastern Cape

750

Free State

745

Gauteng

2 055

Kwa-Zulu Natal

493

Limpopo

139

Mpumalanga

491

Northern Cape

42

North West

600

Western Cape

2 321

Totals

6 886

22 November 2019 - NW1302

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of social grant pay points were (a) closed since 1 January 2017 and (b) in existence as at 30 June 2019?

Reply:

(a) As at 1 January 2017, SASSA had a total of 9 937 cash pay points. By April 2018, the number of pay points reduced to 7 963, with the removal of inactive and duplicated pay points. The duplication in counting came about as some pay points are serviced on more than one day per month and were counted per day rather than as distinct pay points. A total number of 6 223 pay points have been closed since April 2018, with a balance of 1 740 remaining active as at April 2019.

(b) As at 30 June 2019, a total of 1 740 registered cash pay points remain. However, in October 2019, 1 611 are still actively serviced.

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

22 November 2019 - NW1216

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the reasons that the soup kitchen sponsored by her department in Loeriesfontein has been closed since March 2019; (2) what are the reasons that the soup kitchen sponsored by her department in Calvinia is investigated by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation?

Reply:

1. In terms of funding allocation, Loeriesfontein Soup Kitchen was approved for a three year funding (2017/18-2019/20) and the allocation was done as follows:

2017/2018 – Allocated amount of R107 652.

The organisation’s business plan was approved and a first tranche payment of R53 826 was paid on the 28th of August 2017. In order to process the 2nd tranche, the organisations are expected to submit the claims, but the organisation in question did not submit the required information. In that instance, the Department could not transfer funds as the organisation did not submit the necessary claim.

2018/2019 – Allocated amount of R154 812.

The first tranche payment of R77 406 was paid on the 5th of June 2018. Upon submission of quarterly report, and subsequent monitoring visits, there were concerns with the spending of funds. The organization was requested to submit evidence for utilization of funds with transactions totalling R65 942.76 from the period April 2018 to September 2018. By the end of the financial year, the organization failed to submit the required proof for utilization of funds, and also did not submit the required claim for the second tranche. For this reason the second tranche payment could not be released due to pending documents that were requested by the Department.

2019/2020 – Provisionally allocated amount of R156 612.

In an endeavour to assist the said organization, an amount of R156 612 was earmarked for the organization on condition that its status has improved. There were several attempts by the department to assist the organization to implement corrective measures and controls for better management of the organisation. However, the status of the organisation remained the same as they failed to implement the recommended corrective measures. Such a situation renders this organisation to be non-compliant.

It is on this basis that the funds that were earmarked for Loeriesfontein Soup Kitchen for 2019/20 were withheld as no proof was provided to convince the Department that the previous funding allocations were utilized towards the intended purpose. There are no justifiable reasons to allocate funding in such an instance as there is potential mismanagement of funds and failure by the organisation to comply with the funding requirement. The organization failed to comply with the financial and governance prescripts and the provisions of the SLA entered into with the department.

2. The Hantam Soup Kitchen (Calvinia) was approved for a three year funding and the allocation was as follows:

2017/2018 - An amount of R107 652 was approved for the soup kitchen. The first tranche payment of R53 826 was paid to the organisation for Soup Kitchen.

An amount of R485 400 was approved for Isibindi Stipends and a first tranche of R262 692 was paid.

An amount of R104 560 was approved for the Youth Service Centre and a first tranche of R52 280 was paid to the organisation.

The first tranche payment totalling an amount of R368 798 was transferred to the organisation for all their programs during the 2017/18 financial year.

On the 29th of May 2018 an internal investigation was conducted. The findings revealed that an amount of R82 676.88 was mismanaged by the Treasurer of Hantam Soup Kitchen (Calvinia). A case was registered with the South African Police Services with case number CAS 99/12/2017 hence the organisation is under police investigation.

Following the on-going investigation, the Department withdrew any further funding until their investigations are completed.

22 November 2019 - NW1405

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

By what date will the vacancy of Director-General of her department be (a) advertised and (b) filled?

Reply:

a) The post will be advertised by 30 November 2019.

b) The filling of the post of Director-General is anticipated to be finalised by 31 March 2020.

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

22 November 2019 - NW1197

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With regard to litigation against his department, what was the contingent legal liability of his department in terms of (a) Core Business: Immigration & Civic Affairs, (b) labour disputes, (c) Finance and Supply Chain Management, including disputed tenders and contracts, and (d) other matters in the past two financial years; (2) what is the total number of legal proceedings against his department in respect of (a) immigration, (b) Asylum Seeker Management, (c) Civic Services, (d) summonses and (e) labour matters in the past two financial years; (3) what were the total legal fees spent by his department in the past two financial years?

Reply:

1(a)

Immigration: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – R10 890 433.84

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – R11 815 000.00

Civics: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – R56 000 000.00

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – R7 300 000.00

1(b)

Labour: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – R72, 478.886

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – R93, 858 592.59

1(c)

Tenders and Contracts: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – R0

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – R0

Other Matters: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – R894 378.00

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – R2 426 271.53

2(a)

Immigration: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – 508

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – 413

2(b)

Asylum Seekers / Refugee: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – 1 318

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – 1 935

2(c)

Civic Services: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – 487

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – 251

2(d)

Summons: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – 31

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – 43

2(e)

 

Labour: 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – 38

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – 16

3

1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 – R85 159 025.38

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 – R7 373 119.3

END

22 November 2019 - NW1493

Profile picture: Keetse, Mr PP

Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

In view of the fact that more than 400 students at the University of the Western Cape did not get their book allowances from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) this year, despite the fact that their applications were successful, what (a) steps will he take to address the situation, given the fact that exams have already begun and (b) kind of consequences will his department impose on NSFAS should the specified students underperform?

Reply:

All universities pay student allowances directly. The Department followed up with the University of the Western Cape (UWC) on receipt of the Parliamentary Question. UWC is not aware of 400 students that are alleged not to have received book allowances. According to the information provided by UWC and the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, the only students that have not received book allowances are students who are registered for one or two modules and repeating from the 2018 academic year. These students do not qualify for a book allowance for these repeated modules.

21 November 2019 - NW1391

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What was the total amount of litres of water lost due to leaking reservoirs and pipes in the 2018-19 financial year in each municipality in the Republic; (2) does her department have strategies and action plans in place to ensure that municipalities keep their water infrastructure intact; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department will take action against a municipality that does not keep its water infrastructure intact; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) The latest report on water losses and Non-Revenue Water (NRW) in South Africa (Includes 2017/18 data) estimates the real losses at 1 150 079 000 m³/a refer to Annexure A. Real losses are defined as physical losses from a pressurised system, up to a point of measurement of customer use. This includes losses from reservoirs and pipe leakages. Refer to Annexure B for water losses per Water Services Authority (WSA). Monitoring and reporting on water losses is a mandate of a WSA as per Water Services Act, (Act No 106 of 1997), and hence the response refers to Water Services Authorities and not per municipality.

(2) The National Water and Sanitation Master Plan provides the schedule of interventions, programs, plans, and projects (including but not limited to infrastructure) that will be implemented to elevate the current situation in the sector to its desired future state. This schedule contains, for each action, specific deliverables, execution times, responsible parties and required budgets. The plan allocates responsibilities to the various tiers of government and other stakeholders for implementation to achieve efficiencies in investment planning, implementation of actions and evaluation of achievements.

Furthermore, the Department is in the process of implementing 5 (five) year water and sanitation reliability implementation plans that will ensure a pipeline of projects that will provide services that are sustainable and keep the municipal infrastructure functional. The Department is also conducting annual municipal business health checks which include the management of municipal infrastructure. Based on the outcome of the business health check the Department assists municipalities to develop 5 year municipal actions plans to address areas that require attention, including assets management, operation and maintenance of assets.

The Department is continuously monitoring and analysing the progress made with the implementation of Water Conservation and Water Demand Management and targets set during the updating of Reconciliation Strategies, at Water Services Authority level, within the eight large water supply systems. All the relevant stakeholders meet twice a year to report progress on the implementation of various strategies which will ensure the sustainability of water resources.

The No Drop Programme, which is an incentive based regulatory tool, entails a comprehensive assessment and audit of planning, finance, technical skills and performance criteria which gives an inclusive view of the Water Demand Management business of the Water Services Authority. The No Drop Programme enables the Department to measure the performance of Water Services Authority and subsequently to reward (or penalise) the institution based upon evidence of their excellence (or failures) according to the minimum standards or requirements that have been defined.

(3) The Department regulates the municipal performance on Water Conservation and Water Demand Management, which includes asset management (as key criteria) as part of the No Drop Programme. The results of the No Drop assessments will indicate whether the WSA should be penalised or rewarded for performance.

Through both the National Water Act (Act 36 of 1998) and Water Services Act (Act 106 of 1997), the Minister may issue Letters, Notices, Directives and enforcement letters for non-compliance to the set regulatory tools (e.g. water use authorizations and Regulations).

(4) The Department is continuously assessing Non-Revenue Water and water losses in South Africa. Therefore, The Minister, from time to time, at particular place, in any prevailing condition may make statement regarding Water Conservation and Water Demand Management in general.

21 November 2019 - NW1310

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department has put any measures in place to provide his department’s services, especially relating to the application and collection of new smart identity cards, to the residents in the (a) Karoo Highlands Local Municipality and (b) Hantam Local Municipality, who can currently only make use of his department’s offices in Calvinia; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a & b) The Department has identified Louriesfontein in the Hantam Local Municipality for the high impact service delivery program using mobile trucks provided by Head Office (with emphasis on smart card application and collection). The Department has thus far planned the outreach program at Louriesfontein and an additional town (to be announced) in Karoo Highlands Local Municipality is also being considered for a similar high impact service delivery program.

END

21 November 2019 - NW1309

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the physical location of each parcel of land acquired by her department for human settlement and housing purposes in each province (a) in each of the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019?

Reply:

(a) & (b) Consistent with my reply to question 813, we have an obligation to protect the information sought and cannot publicise the physical location of each of the land parcel that we have acquired for the provision of human settlements and housing as requested by the Honourable Member. Doing so would escalate the risk of potential land invasions and have other unintended consequences.

 

21 November 2019 - NW1286

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Why are the (i) Magogong and (ii) Buxton clinics in the Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality, North West, without medication for chronic illnesses such as (aa) HIV, (bb) diabetes and (cc) hypertension and (b) by what date will he ensure that the specified clinics have the required medication?

Reply:

 

(a)  (i) Magogong clinic

(aa) There have been no stock outs of any HIV medicines at the clinic this year. (bb) There has been a National challenge with the supply of metformin. Until supply is normalized facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(b) Supplies were delivered to the clinic on 28 Oct 2019.

(cc) There has been a National challenge with the supply of enalapril. Until supply is normalized facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(a) (i) Buxton clinic

(aa) There have been no stock outs of any HIV medicines at the clinic this year. (bb) There has been a National challenge with this supply of metformin. Until supply is normalised facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(b) Supplies were delivered to the clinic on 4 Nov 2019.

(cc) Hypertension medicines

There has been a National challenge with the supply of enalapril. Until supply is normalised facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(b) Supplies were delivered to the clinic on 28 Oct 2019.

END.

21 November 2019 - NW999

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to her reply to question 303 on 4 September 2019, (a) by what date will the work to restore the Mondeor Post Office after years of neglect commence, (b) what is the (i) scope and (ii) cost of the work and (c) which company, contractor or department has been authorised to carry out the work?

Reply:

 

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

(a) The contractor officially took over the site on 12 November 2019 to commence with work. Demolition work has already started. SAPO delegation and the contractor met on site on 14 November 2019, to finalize the project plan. A meeting with the local Councilor was on 15 November 2019. The work is scheduled to be completed by 7 December 2019.

(b)(i) The scope of work entails the total refurbishment of the Mondeor Post Office building which includes electrical works, plumbing works, shop fitting, roof repair and reinstallation of post boxes etc.

(ii) The total cost of work is R776 228, 46 excluding VAT, however there could be variations due to unforeseen structural defects.

(c) The appointed contractor is Sewele SA RE Phoo Business Enterprise

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS MINISTER

21 November 2019 - NW1301

Weber, Mr WL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has taken or plans to take any steps to ensure that the mining by Hlelo Mining (Pty) Ltd on portion 24 of farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS in Mpumalanga, that is allegedly taking place illegally in a wetland area, does not pollute or poison the water that ultimately runs off into Middelburg’s main source of drinking water, the Rondebosch Dam; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation is aware of the mining activities on Portion 24 of the Farm Boschmanspoort 159 in Mpumalanga. A site inspection was conducted on 9th October 2019 and departmental officials discovered the following:

a) Lunathi Mining (Pty) Ltd is conducting mining activities in a wetland area, which forms part of a drainage area towards the unnamed stream that feeds into Klein Olifants River, and into the Middelburg Dam.

b) Lunathi Mining (Pty) Ltd does not have a Water Use License.

c) The mining rights belong to Hlelo Mining but the mine is being operated by Lunathi Mining (Pty) Ltd

In line with Section 3 of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act, Act no 3 of 2000, a notice of Intention to issue a directive in terms of Section (19(1) and 53(1) was issued to Lunathi Mining (Pty) Ltd to afford the company an opportunity to make representation in writing to the Department within fourteen (14) working days. Should there be no response, a Directive will be issued compelling the mining company to:

(a) Cease the mining operations.

(b) Appoint an independent environmental consultant to compile and submit a Wetland Rehabilitation and Remedial Plans with clear timeframes for Departmental approval, in order to rectify the contraventions.

(c) The mine must appoint a water specialist to conduct water quality analysis of the unnamed stream at the confluence (where the unnamed stream and Klein Olifants river meet), Klein Olifants River and the Middleburg Dam. The finding of the water quality tests must be submitted to the department.

(d) Upon approval of the Plans, to implement all the recommendations contained in the Wetland Rehabilitation and Remedial Plans within thirty (30) working days of the departmental approval of the Plans.

 

21 November 2019 - NW1350

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the current total number of (a) funded positions and (b) vacant funded positions in the public health sector in each (i) province, (ii) health category or specialty and (iii) health facility?

Reply:

The table attached indicates a summary of (a) funded filled positions and (b) vacant funded positions in the public health sector in each (i) province, (ii) and for all health categories or specialities.

Province

Health related Funded Filled / Vacant posts as at end September 2019

 

Filled

Vacant

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

26311

85

26396

Free State

12340

22

12362

Gauteng

41042

135

41177

KwaZulu-Natal

44992

108

45100

Limpopo Province

31589

57

31646

Mpumalanga

12644

19

12663

North West

11466

28

11494

Northern Cape

4279

13

4292

Western Cape

20042

107

20149

Grand Total

204705

574

205279

END.

21 November 2019 - NW1198

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to water supply to the town of Utrecht in KwaZulu-Natal, what are the details of the (a) reasons that there was no water available from 30 September 2019 to 8 October 2019, (b) action has been taken against officials who were responsible for the nonavailability of water, (c) action taken to prevent any further disruptions of water supply and (d) demands made by the Utrecht community; (2) whether all the demands of the community have been agreed to and met; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The KwaZulu-Natal regional office of the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is aware that there was a water supply interruption from 30 September to 8 October 2019 in the town of Utrecht. The interruptions were as result of a labour dispute between the Amajuba District Municipality and their employees, relating to benefits that were paid and later deducted from employees’ salaries. Following a settlement in the dispute, water supply was restored on 8 October 2019.

(2) It is suggested that the Honourable Member refer the question to the Minister of CoGTA and Traditional Affairs who will be in a better position to respond to additional questions regarding the matter.