Questions and Replies

17 September 2018 - NW1872

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

1. What (a) is the total number of incidents of racism that were reported to the human resources department/office in: (i) Her department; (ii) The entities reporting to her in (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2017 What (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) Was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigations in each case? (NW2032E)

Reply:

1. The Department of Sport and Recreation has (a) Zero cases of racism incidents reported to its HR Offices….. (i) Her department has zero cases of racism reported and (ii) the entities reporting to her also do not have any such cases that were reported, in the year 2016 and 2017:

No investigation was instituted, as there were not cases of racism reported.

MS T. XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION SA

17 September 2018 - NW2361

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Gardee, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of government employees on (i) national and (ii) provincial level on the PERSAL system are over the age of 60 years and (b) is the breakdown of the specified government employees in terms of (i) age, (ii) department and (iii) salary level?

Reply:

The National Treasury is a custodian of PERSAL System, as such, in a better position to provide the figures

17 September 2018 - NW2349

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Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any municipalities in the country have any agreements and/or contracts with a certain company (name furnished); if so, (a) what is the monetary value of each agreement and/or contract, (b) what services does the specified company offer in each case and (c) for what time period has the company been offering services in each case?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has sent letters to all the Provincial Departments responsible for Local Government to engage municipalities to obtain the relevant information. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

17 September 2018 - NW2324

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Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved;

Reply:

Audited information in this regard will be submitted to parliament through annual reports, which will be tabled in parliament during this month of September 2018 as required by the parliamentary prescripts.

17 September 2018 - NW1485

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Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

Whether, with reference to the reply of the President, Mr C. Ramaphosa, to the debate on the state of the Nation Address on 22 February 2018 to implement lifestyle audits, (a) she, (b) senior management services members in her department and/or (c) any of the heads of entities reporting to her have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years; if not, have any plans been put in place to perform such audits; if so, in each case, what are the details of the (i) date of the lifestyle audit, (ii) name of the person undergoing the audit, (iii) name of the auditing firm conducting the audit and (iv) outcome of the audit? (2) Whether she will furnish Mr. RK Purdok with copies of the lifestyle audit reports?

Reply:

Minister Xasa fully supports the call by President Ramaphosa, for the public service to institute a lifestyle audit mechanism to monitor the lifestyles of personnel in the public service, especially the members of SMS and other senior people in the service of the public, including personnel at the leadership of state entities.

To this end, the Minister has noted the question from the Honourable Purdon (MPL), in relation to lifestyle audits. However, to date, the Minister has not found cause to institute any audits on the lifestyles of any personnel in the Ministry and neither is there cause to institute any such audits on the heads of entities, at this stage.

MS T. XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION SA

17 September 2018 - NW2357

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What numbers of desalination plants are currently (a) in operation, (b) being built and (c) being planned to be built in the country?

Reply:

The number of desalination plants in the country is as follows:

(a) There are 6 in operation;

(b) There is a total of four (4) being built and

(c) There is a total of nineteen (19) under various stages of planning

17 September 2018 - NW2483

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Women in the Presidency

(1)What is the total number of international trips that (a) she and (b) her department’s officials undertook since she took office on 26 February 2018; (2) what was the total costs of each international trip in terms of the airline used, class of travel, travel and subsistence budget and any other related cost; (3) what are the names and other relevant details of members of staff in her Office and other departmental officials who undertook each international trip; (4) what (a) was the purpose of each international trip, (b) were the expertise of the officials attending the international meetings or conferences, (c) value did the officials add to the conferences and (d) were the outcomes of each international trip undertaken; (5) will she provide Ms L L van der Merwe with a detailed report of each conference attended overseas? NW2634E

Reply:

a) The total number of international trips that were undertaken since the Minister took office on 26 February 2018 was five and the Minster attended one.

Refer to table below for response on bullet 2 & 3

No

Date

Destination

Purpose of trip

Officials

Air Travel

Accommodation

(all officials)

Travel and Subsistence

 

 

 

 

Name

Unit

Class

Cost

 

 

1

12 – 23 March 2018

New York

62nd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW62)

Minister BO Dlamini – (10-19 Mar 2018)

Ministry

Business

R91 351

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R1 138 445

R30 475

Thokozani Dlamini - (10-19 Mar 2018)

Adult family member as per the Ministerial Handbook Chapter 6, 3.1

Business

R91 351

R27 712

Ms WR Tshabalala

DDG: Social Transformation & Economic Empowerment

Business

R153 359

R22 075

Ms A Griessel

DDG: Policy, Stakeholder Coordination & Knowledge Management

Business

R153 359

R22 075

L Oliphant

Ministry – Stakeholder

Business

R70 381

R22 075

Ms M Mefolo - (10-19 Mar 2018)

Ministry – Parliamentary Liaison Officer

Business

R118 799

R22 075

Ms E Maluleke

CD: Governance Transformation, Justice & Security

Business

R153 359

R22 075

Ms T Khosa

Dir: International Relations

Business

R153 359

R22 075

2

3 – 4 May 2018

Mauritius

Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) Women’s Economic Empowerment Preparatory Workshop

Mr P Maponyane

Assistant Director: Economic Empowerment & Participation

Economy

R13 788

 

 

R8 400

RR2 726

Ms N Shitlhango

Senior Admin Officer: International Relations

Economy

R13 788

R2 726

3

7 – 9 May 2018

Addis Ababa

3rd Specialised Technical Committee (STC) on Women Empowerment

Ms XV Mathobela

CD: Office of the Director-General

Economy

R32 839

 

R31 000

R4 427

Mr B Thompson

Assistant Director: Strategic Management

Economy

R32 839

R3 830

4

10 – 11 May 2018

Addis Ababa

3rd Specialised Technical Committee (STC) on Women Empowerment - Minister’s Meeting

Ms E Maluleke

CD: Governance Transformation, Justice & Security

Economy

R32 425

R15 500

R2 947

5

27 – 28 June 2018

Kenya

UN Regional Consultation on the Progress to Localize Agenda 2030 on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Ms A Griessel

DDG: Policy, Stakeholder Coordination & Knowledge Management

Economy

R68 345

 

 

R0

Ms ER Mailula

Senior Admin Officer: Office of the DDG – Social Transformation & Economic Empowerment

Economy

R10 974

R4 303

 

 

Refer to table for response on bullet 4

No

Date

Destination

A - Purpose of trip

Official

B - Expertise of official

C – Value add of official

D – Outcome of trip

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 – 23 March 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

62nd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW62)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister BO Dlamini

Executive Authority

Provided strategic direction and leadership at the conference

A CSW report has been compiled and shared with relevant stakeholders, and currently being shared with all relevant government clusters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thokozani Dlamini

Adult family member as per the Ministerial Handbook Chapter 6, 3.1

Adult family member as per the Ministerial Handbook Chapter 6, 3.1

Ms WR Tshabalala

Strategist in gender issues and policy matters

Provided strategic and technical support to the Minister, Deputy Ministers and MECs who attended

Supervised officials on the work programme, and managed content development led the SA negotiation team

Ms A Griessel

Policy developer, analyst and M& E expertise

Provision of technical and content support to the Minister and part of the negotiation team

L Oliphant

Media expertise

Served as media liaison officer in collaboration with GCIS and DIRCO

Ms M Mefolo

Secretarial expertise

Ministerial Aid

D – Outcome of trip

Ms E Maluleke

Gender expert and strategist on mainstreaming

Provided technical support on content development including side events and participated during negotiations

A CSW report has been compiled and shared with relevant stakeholders, and currently being shared with all relevant government clusters

 

 

 

Ms T Khosa

International relations expertise

Provided International relations expertise and liaison with Embassy

2

3 – 4 May 2018

Mauritius

Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) Women’s Economic Empowerment Preparatory Workshop

Mr P Maponyane

An economist

Provided technical support on economic analysis regarding opportunities within the IORA region for women

Ms N Shitlhango

Support staff

Provided administrative support to the assistant director

3

7 – 9 May 2018

Addis Ababa

3rd Specialised Technical Committee (STC) on Women Empowerment

Ms XV Mathobela

Ensure the issues negotiated upon and agreed upon find expression in the strategic plan(s) of the department

A strategic officer responsible for strategic planning in the department

Mr B Thompson

Strategic Planning Officer

An officer responsible for strategic planning in the department

4

10 – 11 May 2018

Addis Ababa

3rd Specialised Technical Committee (STC) on Women Empowerment - Minister’s Meeting

Ms E Maluleke

Gender expert and strategist on mainstreaming

Provided technical support on content development including side events and participated during negotiations

A CSW/62 report has been compiled and shared with relevant stakeholders, and currently being shared with all relevant government clusters

 

5

27 – 28 June 2018

Kenya

UN Regional Consultation on the Progress to Localize Agenda 2030 on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Ms A Griessel

Policy developer, analyst and M& E expertise

Provision of technical and content support to the Minister and part of the negotiation team

Ms ER Mailula

Support staff

Provided administrative support to the Deputy Director General

Apart from the CSW/62 session there are international resolutions agreed upon on all sessions attended and negotiated upon, and are found on the web site of each conference/session.

Reply

 

 

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date………………………..

 

 

 

17 September 2018 - NW2299

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the name of the contactor who currently has the contract for refuse removal in the Kempton Park area within the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality; (2) (a) on what date was the specified contract first awarded, (b) what is the monetary value of the contract, (c) how many persons tendered for the contract and (d) who from the municipality signed the contract?

Reply:

(1) The refuse collection services in Kempton Park Area are provided by the City (council employees using council owned vehicles). The services in this regard are rendered in-house thus there is no private contractor and/or service provider rendering refuse collection services on behalf of the City of Ekurhuleni.

(2) Responses to questions raised under (2) are non-existent as the services referred to are rendered in-house and have not been out-sourced.

17 September 2018 - NW2194

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Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether his department is at all involved in the building of the sewage plant at Rooigrond in North West; if so, in what capacity; (2) with reference to the specified sewage plant, (a) who is the implementation agent, (b) who is/are the project manager(s) and (c) who is the contractor; (3) (a) on what date did the project commence, (b) what was the initial tender amount and (c) to whom was the tender awarded; 4) (a) what is the expected date for the completion of the project and (b) how much do the project costs amount hitherto (5) whether he will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

1 a) The Department is not involved at all in the building of the sewage plant at Rooigrond in the North West. The project is Funded by the Department of Local Government and Human Settlements in the povince through the Provincial Infrastructure Grant (PIG).

2. a) Sedibeng Water Board is the implementing agent.

b) King and Associates Consultant is the Project Management and Consulting Company

c) The contractor is CMS Water Engineering.

3. a) The project commenced on 23 October 2017.

b) The initial tender amount was R47,394,567.00.

c) The tender was awarded to CMS Water Engineering.

4. a) The expected date for the completion of the project is 27 September 2018.

b) The project costs amount to R36 789 380 as at 22 August 2018.

5. No

The project is to provide the bulk water and sanitation services to the existing 1000 households at Rooigrond and to make provision for servicing an additional 2000 low cost houses to be built in future. The overall progress on site is 61 % (As of end July 2018). Total number of local people employed in the project is 19 (14 youth with 13 male and 1 female; 5 adults with 4 males and 1 female).

17 September 2018 - NW2444

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Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration and its entities do not owned land

17 September 2018 - NW2321

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i)what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii)what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2498E

Reply:

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by

(i) her department

The Department does not have dispute currently and not facing any disputes.

(ii) the entities reporting to her

South African Institute for Drug - Free Sport (SAIDS) does not have currently and not facing any disputes

Boxing South Africa (BSA) has five disputes

(b) what is the cause of each dispute

  • Termination of service following outcomes of disciplinary process on ground of misconduct. (4)
  • Dispute lodged by dismissed employee alleging non-payment of acting allowance at a time when employee was still in BSA employ. (1)

(c) what is the nature of each dispute

  • Disputed outcome of disciplinary process and allegations of unfair dismissal was logged. (4)
  • Allegations of unfair labour practice. (1)

(d) on what date was each dispute

(i) reported

four cases were reported in 2015

one case was reported in 2016

(ii) resolved

Five cases not resolved

(2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years

       5 employees were dismissed by the Department in the past five years.

(ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed

    three on abscondment

    one on fraud, corruption and misrepresentation

     one on Theft

(b)(i)what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages

    none

(ii)what was the monetary value of each severance package?

    none

MS. T XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION

17 September 2018 - NW2475

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the pollution levels of each river in South Africa in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

A total of 440 water monitoring sites in the nine (9) water management areas were monitored for chemical monitoring programme in 2017/18 financial year. Salinity levels for rivers were regarded as good to very good indicating moderate to less pollution in 80% of the coverage in the nine (9) water management areas.

17 September 2018 - NW2302

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the total number of Ekurhuleni Metro Police officers who (a) brought and (b) won their cases for promotion at the Johannesburg Labour Court in the past three financial years; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) the specified promotions that are still to be implemented by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and (ii) days that the municipality has in order to implement each promotion and (b) what are the reasons for the delay?

Reply:

1. There are no Labour Court judgements relating to promotions in the Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department that have been issued by the Johannesburg Labour Court or any other Court that has jurisdiction to deal with matters of this nature.

2. Consequently, the City of Ekurhuleni has not received any order coming from the courts directing it to promote any employee in the Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department.

17 September 2018 - NW2365

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Botes, Mr A to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

In light of the fact that one of the intentions of the meeting of Ministers of Sport in the BRICS was to host the Sport Council and finalise the BRICS Sport Charter that will allow the rotation of the BRICS games every four years, (a) what lessons were learnt from the BRICS Sport Council and (b) in what manner will the lessons contribute towards the imperatives of the National Development Plan's 2030 imperatives of (i) equal opportunity, (ii) inclusion and (iii) redress as well as outcome 14 on social cohesion and nation-building?

Reply:

South Africa did not host the BRICS Sport Council of Ministers due to the unavailability of other BRIC Sport Ministers to attend this meeting. However, it’s envisaged that the formation of the BRICS Sport Council of Ministers will assist in providing guidance on how the games should be run going forward. Ministers of Sport from the BRICS Nations responsible for Sport will be able to deliberate and agree on a number of areas pertaining to the games as it was operating in a vacuum since inception in 2016 in Goa, India. The BRICS Sport Charter and the MOU regarding the establishment of this Commission has been drafted and it’s to be deliberated during the BRICS Council of Sport Ministers meeting on the date to be determined by the Minister.

(a) The BRICS Games strengthens the relationship between the BRICS Countries

(b) The games contribute in the following:

(i) equal opportunity,

During the apartheid regime, black South African athletes were not provided/afforded an opportunity to participate in International sporting events to showcase their talents. Thus, the BRICS Games are seen as vehicle to address those disparities to afford our South African athletes an opportunity to compete with the rest of the world.

(ii) inclusion and

Our outcome 14 on social cohesion and nation building indicates that athletes should be afforded an opportunity to compete with the world despite their gender, race and class. Consequently, the BRICS Games seeks to find that balance in sport through the inclusion of every athlete determine to showcase his or her talent.

(iii) redress as well as outcome 14 on social cohesion and nation-building

Outcome 14 emphasized the importance of redress in sport. Redress is essential in sport as it seeks to address the imbalance of the past thereby building a society where opportunities are not defined by race, gender, class or religion.

 

MS T XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION

17 September 2018 - NW2356

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Which municipalities in each province are presently the top 10 water consumers?

Reply:

The municipalities that are presently the top 10 water consumers in each province are listed per table below. In most of the cases there is a direct relation between demand and the population served by a particular municipality. Refer to Annexure A for the top 10 water consumers in each province.

17 September 2018 - NW2501

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Ntombela, Mr MLD to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What progress has been recorded to date in the development of a framework that will inform the management of lifestyle audits in the Public Service?

Reply:

The Development of a framework on lifestyle audits on public service employees is at a consultative stage with sector departments and constitutional institutions such as the Public Service Commission. The consultations will also be extended to relevant stakeholders including labour. These consultations will assist us to produce a sustainable framework on the lifestyle audits, which is consistent with the Bill of Rights enshrined in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa.

The lifestyle audits will further strengthen existing measures, which include declarations by the public service employees, the financial intelligence centres act, amongst others, the aim is to protect public service against any ills.

 

17 September 2018 - NW2193

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Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) With reference to her reply to question 2187 on 18 June 2018, what criteria is followed by her department to determine which public servants can be offered early retirement packages; (2) what number of (a) black, (b) white, (c) coloured and (d) Indian employees in the Public Service comply with the stated criteria; (3) with reference to the number of service years in the Public Service, which is the (a) shortest, (b) average and (c) longest service period to be rendered by public servants in order to qualify for the specified retirement packages; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Details on voluntary early retirement packages have not been concluded yet, consultations in this regard with relevant stakeholders is a work in progress, this consultation will also be extended to labour, once all process have been finalised, a communique will be issued

17 September 2018 - NW2364

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Abrahams, Ms BL to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

In light of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between her department and the Department of Basic Education to rekindle school sport in all the schools in the country, what (a) are the key features of the MOU and (b) measures has she and the Minister of Basic Education put in place to (i) monitor and (ii) evaluate its implementation?

Reply:

a) The key features of the MoU include among other thing:

  • Demarcation of roles: Updated to reflect the assignment of role players from Level 1-6.
  • Roles and Responsibilities: A complete overall of roles and responsibilities reflecting:
  • SGB’s powers need to be revised (Requires amendment to Schools Act)
  • School Committees should be run by teachers (Requires amendment to School Sport Structures policy)
  • Basic Education and Provinces must include School Sport as the strategic output.
  • SRSA and Provinces facilitate the establishment of School Sport structures, while DBE initiates the process.
  • DBE to provide basic sport infrastructure, SRSA to facilitate the provision of infrastructure through Sports Trust, National Lottery, MIG etc.
  • Teacher Unions & SGBs Associations to included in the ex JNTT and ex JPTT
  • Sport Code Committees to have a representation in the School Sport Coordinating Committees
  • Federations to ensure that School Sport has an associate membership in their structure.
  • Establishment of School Sport Coordinating Committee and its composition, Committee to be chaired by SRSA and DBE.
  • Provision of infrastructure and resource: The provision of using MIG to build some of the School Sport infrastructure
  • National School Sport Championships: (The three cycle is being highly contested, especially the break)
  • Discussions are underway to review model of cyclic championships
  • Sporting Codes reduction: The policy on prioritization on codes is being considered and once finalized it will be implemented.
  • Funding: DBE should take full responsibility of funding levels 1-3 whilst SRSA take care of levels 4-6.
  • Communication protocol: Across all levels DBE and SRSA officials should communicate their planned activities.

b) Measures that the Minister of Basic Education has put in place to:

(i) Monitor: Joint National Task Teams and Joint Provincial Task Teams are set up to bring both departments together and monitor progress made in implementing the programme and develop plans to address the challenges. Regular interactions for planning also take place between officials in DBE and SRSA.

(ii) Evaluate implementation: The DBE has various platforms of interacting with stakeholders on sports. However through the provincial departments of education, regular interactions are being held. SRSA gets these regular interactions and briefing from the DBE.

MS T XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION

17 September 2018 - NW2300

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1. With regard to the mega housing project in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, situated in Birchleigh North Extension 4, portion of portion 63 and portion of remaining extent of portion 39 of the farm Witfontein 15-IR to be known as Birchleigh North Ext 4 township, (a) what number of units are to be built and (b) on what date is the specified project set to (i) commence and (ii) be completed; (2) what number of (a) schools, (b) clinics and (c) parks are earmarked for the development

Reply:

(1) (a) Approximately 7195 units are earmarked for the Birchleigh Ext 4 Project, and the project is not ready to commence with construction at this stage. Information towards implementation will be communicated in due course.

(i) Professional Service Providers have been appointed to start with Detailed Designs which will be completed in June 2019. Construction will only commence in July 2019.

(ii) Three thousand units will be completed in 2021 and the rest in 2023.

(2)  The following land uses have been earmarked for the Birchleigh Ext 4 project:

  • 5 School Sites;
  • 1 Medical centre; and
  • 5 Open spaces (2 Parks).

17 September 2018 - NW2059

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Mulder, Dr PW to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

Whether all members of the senior management service (SMS) in her department had declared their interests for the past year as required by the Public Service Regulations; if not, (a) why not, (b) what number of the specified members did not declare their interests and (c) what are the (i) names and (ii) ranks of the specified noncompliant members of the SMS; 2) whether noncompliant SMS members have been charged; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 3) what number (a) of employees in her department at each post level are currently suspended on full salary and (b) of the specified employees at each post level have been suspended for the specified number of days (details furnished); 4) what is the total amount of cost attached to the days of service lost as a result of the suspensions in each specified case?

Reply:

1. Yes all members of the senior management service (SMS) declared their financial interests for the past year.

  1. (a) Not applicable.
  1. (b) Not applicable.
  1. (c) (i) Not applicable.
  1. (c) (ii) Not applicable.

2) No SMS Member charged. All Complied

3) (a) None. No Employee is suspended

3) (b) Not Applicable. No employee has been suspended.

4) Not Applicable. No employee has been suspended.

MINISTER T. XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION SA

17 September 2018 - NW2358

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Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What number of water treatment plants does the Government own, (b) where is each plant located, (c) what number of the specified water treatment plants is operational and (d) what is each water treatment plant’s daily capacity?

Reply:

a) The number of water treatment plants owned by Government is a total of 1137 inclusive of boreholes. Refer to Annexure A.

b) Refer to Annexure A.

c) The number of water treatment plants that are operational is a total of 1084 and 53 are not operational. Refer to Annexure A.

d) Refer to Annexure A.

17 September 2018 - NW2301

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has conducted an audit of all armoury of the Metro Police Department that has gone missing; if not, why not; if so, (a) what armoury has gone missing and (b) in which year was it reported missing; 2. will he furnish Ms T Gqada with a copy of the armoury audit report?

Reply:

(1) A comprehensive audit assessment of all Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department’s firearms is currently being conducted by the directorate responsible for priority crime investigations. The firearms audit assessment findings and the report thereof are expected to be presented to the Council during September 2018.

(2) Once the audit is completed, a copy of the firearms audit report will be made available.

14 September 2018 - NW2680

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What (i) number of bilateral agreements with other governments is the Government engaged in, (ii) are the names of the partner countries in each agreement and (iii) is the purpose of each agreement and (b) on what date was each agreement signed?

Reply:

(a) & (b) Since 1994 the Government of the Republic of South Africa has signed 2029 bilateral agreements with other governments.

The names of the partner countries, purpose of the agreements and the dates that the agreements were signed are reflected in the texts of the agreements. This information is accessible on the DIRCO website, http://www.dirco.gov.za

14 September 2018 - NW2464

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture”

Does the government owe any artists for work that they have done; if so, in each case, (a) to whom is the money owed, (b) what is owed and (c) since what date was the money owed? NW2716E

Reply:

The department owes some artists for the work done as detailed below:-

Artist / Beneficiary

(a)

Amount Owed

(b)

Reason for Owing

(c)

Keller Man Music

R2,000,000.00

Keller Man Music applied to the Department to cover the shortfall of an international tour celebrating the life and legacy of President Mandela. This tour was part of highlighting and celebrating the centenary of President Mandela. The Department agreed to support the tour. As a normal practise that a company will provide a narrative and financial report before a transfer is processed.

Boss Lady Trading

R150,000.00

At the time the beneficiary was approved the company compliancy documentation such as entity forms had expired and this required that a resubmission to National Treasury of the company documents.

Ms Keketso Semoko

R220,000.00

The Department was charged with the responsibility to host the cultural programme of both the Chinese State visit and the BRICS Summit. The initial productions contracted had limitations in the planned showcasing of South African diverse cultures. As a result the Chine state visit performances were cancelled and focus was placed on the BRICS performances. This arrangement meant that new arts practitioners, service providers and new script designed to ensure the showcasing of South African diverse cultures. As a consequence some contracts of artists had to be renegotiated accordingly and this affected almost all preforming contracts of artists and payment schedules.

Mr Gregory Maqoma

R120,000.00

 

Vuyani Dance company

R377,000.00

 

Ms Motlapula Makhate

R30,000.00

 

Ms Lebo Mashile

R50,000.00

 

Ms Mmabato Mogomotsi

R35,000.00

 

Mr Volley Ntshabeleng

R45,000.00

 

Ms Sibongile Notjila

R20,000.00

 

14 September 2018 - NW2348

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Finance

Is the SA Reserve Bank Registrar currently investigating a certain bank (name furnished); if so, (a) what is the bank being investigated for and (b) when did the investigation begin?

Reply:

In line with the requirements of section 33 of the South African Reserve Bank Act, 1989 (Act No. 90 of 1989 ), it is not the policy of the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) to comment on, or provide any details of previous, current or potential investigations, to the extent that such information is not already in the public domain.

As recently stated in Parliament’s Standing Committee on Finance (SCOF); by the SARB officials, name furnished continues to comply with all regulatory requirements set out in law and regulations determined by the SARB.

14 September 2018 - NW2363

Profile picture: Gardee, Mr GA

Gardee, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the total amount that the Government spent on (a) cleaning and (b) gardening services (i) nationally, (ii) provincially and (iii) in the state-owned entities in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

Cleaning and gardening services­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

                                                                                                Outcome

 

Cleaning Services

Gardening Services

R0’00

 2017/18

2017/18

National Department

Provincial

State Owned Entities

153 333

767 050

661 179

32 276

215 651

175 349

Total

1 581 762

423 277

  1. This include minor assets like shovels, mops etc.
  2. These are general government units not state owned
  3. 20% of this data is imputed

The table above shows the distribution of 2017/18 spending on cleaning and garden services for the national and provincial spheres. Also included are state-owned entities, excluding the public corporations and other off-budget entities. National departments spent R153.5 million on cleaning and R32.3 million on garden services, while provinces spent R767 million and R215.6 million, and the public entities R661.2 million and R175.3 million on these services respectively.

Total spent was R1.6 billion on cleaning and R423.3 million on garden services, which is about 0.1% and 0.03% of total consolidated government spending respectively.

14 September 2018 - NW2463

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Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture”

(1). What has been the cost of the #IAMTHEFLAG campaign; (2) Were the contracts put out on tender; if so, (a) who tendered and (b) who won each tender? NW2715E

Reply:

(1) The total cost was R2 859 013,56

(2) Yes, the Department requested its 14 Omnibus Events Management companies for quotations.

(a) Be-Sure Events Solutions and C Squared Consumer Connectedness responded to the call for quotations.

(b) Be-Sure Events Solutions was appointed.

14 September 2018 - NW2362

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Gardee, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Finance

What amount has the State spent on private security services in the past three financial years with regard to (a) national level, (b) provincial level and (c) state-owned entities?

Reply:

Security Services ________________________________

                                           Outcome___________________

R0’00

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

National Department

821 465

842 129

986 303

Provincial

3 981 127

4 437 223

5 087 146

State Owned Entities

1 272 116

1 430 840

1 573 610

Total

6 074 709

6 710 193

  1. 647 059
  1. these are general government unity not state owned operations
  2. 20% of this data is imputed

The table above shows the distribution of spending on private security services for the national and provincial spheres. Also included are state-owned entities, excluding the public corporations and other off-budget entities. On average national departments spent R0.9 billion over the last three years growing at an average of 9.6% per year, while provinces spent an average of R4.5 billion growing at 13% per year, and the public entities spent on average R1.4 billion growing at an average of 11.2% per year.

Total spent was R6.1 billion in 2015/16 rising to R7.65 billion in 2017/18. This is about 0.5% of total consolidated government spending.

14 September 2018 - NW2717

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether the Government has a policy on the conditions and/or circumstances under which South Africa is willing to engage with perceived dictatorial leaders in Africa and beyond; if so, (a) do such leaders have to meet any requirements in order to enjoy the support of the Government and (b) did the Government take the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC) refusal to permit Mr Moise Katumbi, an opposition party candidate, entry into the country into consideration while planning the President’s trip to the DRC, given that it posed an alleged fundamental threat to democratic processes in the DRC?

Reply:

(a) At the heart of South Africa’s foreign policy since 1994 is the promotion of democracy, rule of law, good governance and observance of human rights. South Africa therefore conducts her bilateral relations with the countries on the Continent and beyond desiring to achieve these objectives.

(b) The Working Visit of the President to the DRC was part of his courtesy visit to the region since he assumed office. The purpose of such visits is to consult on bilateral cooperation and issues of common interest. The matter of Mr Katumbi was part of bilateral discussions during which the Government of the DRC explained their national legal requirements that prevented Mr Katumbi from registering in the national elections. The explanation was noted.

14 September 2018 - NW2381

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the Government intends to provide financial assistance or bail-outs to state-owned entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details thereof?

Reply:

Government’s principle is that, as far as possible, any financial support to SOCs should be done in a deficit-neutral manner (i.e. not lead to a widening of the deficit). This can be done through a combination of the sale of non-core assets, reprioritisation of spending, or other revenue measures. Nevertheless – as noted in the 2018 Budget Review – the SOC sector represents a major risk to the fiscal framework, and reforms are required to put these companies on a more sustainable footing. Part of the reform process will involve costing of developmental mandates, to provide government with a better understanding of the level of support required for non-commercial activities. Another part of the reform will require understanding how to bolster their commercial activities, through a combination of efficiency improvements and private sector participation. The budget process is currently under way. Any decisions around financial support to SOCs will be considered as part of this broader process, and be published in the 2018 MTBPS.

14 September 2018 - NW2435

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment? NW2687E

Reply:

(a)(i). My department does not own any land, (ii). the only entity reporting to me that owns land, is the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) and there is a company that invested on the said land:-

As I have indicated before in my response to question 1701 asked by the Honorable Member. The status quo has not changed.

14 September 2018 - NW2456

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Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Department as follows:

DEPARTMENT:

Not applicable to the Department as the department does not own land.

ENTITIES:

Not applicable to all the entities.

Approved/ not approved

Dr Siyabonga Cwele, MP

Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

Date:

14 September 2018 - NW2681

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What (i) number of multi-lateral agreements with other States is the Government engaged in, (ii) are the names of the countries involved in each agreement and (iii) is the purpose of each agreement and (b) on what date was each agreement signed?

Reply:

a) (i) Since 1994 the Government of the Republic of South Africa has signed, ratified or acceded to four hundred and sixteen (416) multilateral agreements.

(ii) & (iii) The information requested by the Honourable Member is available on the Department’s website, http://www.dirco.gov.za.

(b) Please see my response above.

 

13 September 2018 - NW2597

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to him and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) Total number of Deputy Directors-General posts in the Department are 9.

(ii) Chief Director posts in the Department are 36.

(aa) Total number of Deputy Directors-General appointed in acting capacity are 6.

Total number of Chief Directors appointed in acting capacity are 6

(bb) Total number of Deputy Directors-General appointed permanently are 3.

Total number of Chief Directors appointed permanently are 26.

(b) Total number of women acting in posts of Deputy Directors-General are 2.

Total number of women permanently employed as Deputy Directors-General is 0.

Total number of women acting in posts of Chief Director are 2.

Total number of women permanently employed as Chief Director are 6.

13 September 2018 - NW2426

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What number of (i) trains, (ii) coaches and (iii) locomotives have been vandalised (aa) in each month and (bb) in the past three financial years, (b) where did each incident take place and (c) what are the relevant details of the investigations that followed each incident, particularly with regard to the (i) outcomes and (ii) recommendations of each specified investigation?

Reply:

A Metrorail train consist of several motor coaches (electrical powered units) and a number of plain trailers - coaches. Normally a full train set (train) consist of 12 coaches (3 motor coaches and 9 plain trailers). The response reflects the coaches and the equivalent 12-coach Metrorail train sets (trains). Metrorail does not utilize locomotives. Locomotives are used in MLPS and in freight at Transnet.

a) Details of the incidents on vandalism of Rolling Stock has only been kept by Protection Services since December 2016 when vandalism became an endemic problem. The information is kept on the fleet maintenance side as well but is not readily available.

b) File attached.

c) (i) File attached.

(ii) As can be seen from the numbers involved, investigations internally are not done for each and every case. Cases are opened with SAPS with the available information and the results of SAPS investigations is included in (c)(i). The Prasa Rescue plan includes actions to address the protection of assets in the Metrorail environment.

13 September 2018 - NW2601

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the total number of matric results at Mashiyamahle High School that have not been released by (i) the school and (ii) her department in the (aa) 2014, (bb) 2015, (cc) 2016 and (dd) 2017 academic years, (b) what are the reasons that the results have not been released and (c) on what date will her department release the results?

Reply:

a) Mashiyamahle High School was implicated in group copying in 2014 and the examination protocol in terms of results that are compromised due to an irregularity is to withhold the results in subjects that are irregular and conduct a full investigation and a hearing so that a decision can be made on culpability. Hence, in the case of:

(aa) 2014: 106 candidates did not receive their complete results

(bb) 2015: All candidates received their results

(cc) 2016: All candidates received their results

(dd) 2017: 12 candidates were found to be guilty of an irregularity in Mathematical Literacy and their results in Mathematical Literacy were nullified, but the results in the other subjects were released.

b) In the case of 2014 candidates, on 9 June 2015, an investigative team comprising officials from the Provincial Education Department (PED), Department of Basic Education (DBE) and Umalusi arrived at the school to conduct the investigations, after having notified the school. The officials were taken hostage by the parents and learners and this later became violent and resulted in officials’ cars being stoned and their valuables stolen. Departmental officials had to escape from the school, through a hole in the fence and were escorted out of the area by the Police. Subsequently, repeated attempts were made to serve notices on the implicated candidates, inviting them to a hearing and there has been no response. The school engaged the services of a lawyer and this has also contributed to the delay. The Department, approached two local Radio Stations and a local newspaper to publicise a request for the learners implicated in the 2014 examination irregularity at the Mashiyamahle school, to report to the school principal, to facilitate the hearings. The principal subsequently responded that there were no responses.

c) The DBE and Umalusi met with a group of parents and learners from the school on Friday, 24 August 2018, and it was agreed that the learners continued refusal to participate in the hearings has delayed the finalisation of this matter, and given that the learners have in a sense self-imposed a sanction on themselves for the four year period, the results of those candidates that wrote the supplementary examination in 2015, in the subjects that they were implicated, will have these results combined with the uncompromised results of 2014 and released to the candidates on 31 August 2018. Unfortunately, this arrangement to provide the combined, uncompromised results to the candidates was disrupted by a group of candidates that insisted on being provided with their full results of the 2014 NSC examination. The Department has subsequently agreed to have the results made available at the Illembe district office and those candidates who wish to collect the results can do so. The availability of the results at the Illembe district will be published in the local newspapers and the local radio stations.

13 September 2018 - NW2465

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Has her department revised the deadlines of the National Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for School Infrastructure; if so, what are the new revised deadlines?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has not revised the deadlines for the National Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure.

13 September 2018 - NW2499

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Mthethwa, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the future of the country depends on the investment in its youth, what (a) programmes has his department put in place to promote youth development and empowerment and (b) funding has been set aside for these programmes?

Reply:

(a) Below is the list of programmes that the department has put in place to promote youth development and empowerment

MISA’s Capacity Building Programme

1. The Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) has a capacity-building programme that provides opportunities for young people who qualified from TVETs, Technical Colleges and Universities with a civil, electrical, town planning or other related studies, required for infrastructure development and maintenance in municipalities.

2. Since 2012, MISA’s Programme coverage has been of a national magnitude. The biggest component of this Programme has always been the artisan development (Apprenticeship) sub-programme for the purposes of building capacity to operate and maintain existing infrastructure. Between 2014/15 and 2015/16, this sub-programme registered over 400 apprentices. Two hundred and fifty-nine participants qualified as artisans between 2013/14 and 2014/15. The intake for 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years stood at 303 and 230, respectively. In this regard, work opportunities have been offered by MISA to 100 young people in eight (08) targeted municipalities across the Northern Cape, Free State, Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces as Artisans and Water Process Controllers.

3. Experiential Learners referred to the group of candidates pursuing studies to be technicians, yet requiring practice and workplace experience to continue with their academic training. Forty-two of these groups have been registered from March 2014 to March 2016 for experiential learning at qualifying municipalities. They have since completed their required experiential training and have gone back to complete their academic studies. The intake for 2017/18 and 2018/19 experiential learners stands at 90 and 100, respectively.

4. In as far as the Bursary Scheme is concerned, one hundred and eighty-six candidates were registered from 2014, whilst in 2016, one hundred and sixty-four (164) young people have been awarded bursaries for technical infrastructure-related studies. For the current financial year 2018/19, MISA plans to award bursaries to 150 disadvantaged students studying towards town planning, civil and electrical engineering qualifications.

The table below provides a breakdown of the various sub-programme in-takes:

MISA PROGRAMMES

2017/18 FY

2018/19 FY

1.

Experiential Learners

 

90

100

2.

Young Graduates

 

70

150

3.

Apprentices

 

303

258

4.

Artisan Placement Programme

 

100

101

Table 1: MISA’s Capacity Building Programme 2017/18 and 2018/19

The Disaster Management Bursary Programme

1. The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) introduced a Disaster Management Bursary Programme under the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC). The overall objective of the bursary programme is to contribute towards building capacity and skills enhancement in disaster risk management, through advanced education, training, public awareness and research services.

2. In the 2017 academic year, the NDMC successfully awarded 39 bursaries to qualifying students. Out of the 39 students, 33 completed their studies in the 2017 academic year and 5 are still continuing with their studies in the 2018 academic year. In the 2018 academic year, the NDMC successfully awarded 41 bursaries to new applicants and 30 of the recipients were young people. Applications for the Disaster Management Bursary Programme are published annually through print media and the NDMC’s website.

The Community Works Programme (CWP)

1. In addition, the Department is also implementing the Community Work Programme (CWP), as part of the government-wide Expanded Public Works Programme. The CWP’s youth participation rate for the 2017/18 financial year is broken down in the table below:

Total Participation Rate

Total Youth Participants

Youth Female Participants and Percentage

Youth Male Participants and Percentage

264909

 

98954

76950

22004

 

37.35%

29.05%

8.31%

Table 1: Youth Participation in CWP 2017/18 FY

2. The Department is forming partnerships with institutions of higher learning to ensure the up-skilling of participants. Sixteen (16) CWP participants have graduated with a 3 year Grade R Diploma from the North West University. On 8 June 2018, 55 participants in Mahikeng obtained NQF Level 2 qualification in Environmental Practice through training provided by LGSETA. Young participants are also being supported to establish their own cooperatives through training provided in partnership with the Reggio Emilia municipality in Italy. The Department has further partnered with the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) and GIZ to train young participants on crime prevention in Orange Farm, Ivory Park and Khayelitsha; as a result of this, crimes against women and children have been reduced in the pilot sites in these areas.

(b) Funding for the programmes:

(1) Below are the allocations for MISA’s Capacity Building Programmes for the 2018/19 financial year.

Programme Name

Numbers

Budget

Apprentices

258

R 5million

Young Graduates

150

R 30million

Experiential Learners

100

R 5million

Artisans and Process Controllers

101

R 21million

Total

609

R 61million

3. The annual budget for the Disaster Management Bursary Programme is R2million.

4. Young people benefit equally from the CWP budget with other vulnerable groups from poor communities.

13 September 2018 - NW2552

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Have there been any land claims on the Pilanesburg airport or its runways; if so, have any discussions been undertaken with the land claimants; (2) was an offer made to the claimants; if so, (a) why did the land owner not accept the offer and (b) has the issue of expropriation of that land been considered?

Reply:

  1. Yes, there is land claim on part of the airport. Half of the runway is on the claimed land, but the other portion has not yet experienced any claim.
  2. Discussions and negotiation have commenced between the Department of Public Works and Road and Community Safety and Transport Management and the Claimant.

13 September 2018 - NW2551

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What are the details of (i) the passenger throughput and (ii) aircraft movements at the Pilanesburg Airport since 1 January 2010, (b) does the Airports Company South Africa still own and operate the airport and (c) is the airport a national key point; (2) is the airport formally closed; if so, (a) what factors led to its closure, (b) has an economic impact assessment been conducted on the closure of the airport and (c) what is the likely impact of this closure on tourism and the platinum mining sector in the North West?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) There has been an increase in passenger movements, both domestic and international.

(ii) Aircraft movements increased, both domestic and international.

(b) No, the airport is owned and managed by the North West Provincial Government.

(c) Yes.

(2) Yes.

(a) The airport is temporarily closed due to maintenance requirements on runway pavement and security perimeter fence, warthogs are gaining access into the airside causing many runway incursions and accident.

(b) Not yet but certainly will be temporarily negatively affected.

(c) Certainly, negative impact envisaged.

13 September 2018 - NW2526

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the vacancy rate of principals at secondary schools in each province, (b) are the reasons for the vacancies and (c) period have the positions been vacant; (2) what (a) number of disputes in respect of appointments of principals have been declared in each province, (b) are the main reasons for the disputes and (c) is the envisaged time frame for the resolution of the disputes?

Reply:

  1. (a) The table below shows the vacancy rate for principals at secondary schools in each province

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF VACANCIES AS AT THE END OF JULY 2018

NUMBER OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS

VACANCY RATE

EASTERN CAPE

81

847

10%

FREE STATE

14

244

6%

GAUTENG

49

621

8%

KWAZULU-NATAL

172

1 604

11%

LIMPOPO

127

1 352

9%

MPUMALANGA

41

430

10%

NORTH CAPE

9

111

8%

NORTH WEST

24

341

7%

WESTERN CAPE

55

339

16%

NATIONAL

572

5 889

10%

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

(b) Vacancies occur at schools throughout the year mainly as a result of natural attrition with key drivers being resignations, retirements and to a lesser extent deaths. Also to note is that Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) advertise and fill promotional posts, at most, twice a year. Acting appointments are made in promotional posts as soon as the post becomes vacant. In order to address workload challenges, PEDs make temporary appointment against vacant promotional posts where necessary.

(c) About 44% of the posts as at the end of July 2018 were six (6) months or less vacant; 24% vacant of 7-12 months, 9 % up to 24 months and 23% longer than 24 months. Of the posts that were vacant for more than 12 months, about 45% were those in small schools of between one (1) and three (3) teachers some of them on the verge of being closed due to decreasing or consistently low enrolment.

2. The question is more relevant to the provincial administration because it is the responsibility of the Employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act is the Head of the Provincial Education Department, to ensure that vacancies are filled and to attend to any dispute that arises at the provincial level.

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant Employers for details and response.

13 September 2018 - NW2486

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply to question 3817 on 28 November 2017, (a) why are height restrictions of 4,3 m going to be re-introduced, (b) what economic impact analysis has been undertaken in relation to the country’s immediate neighbours, including the countries of the Southern African Development Community, internationally once the specified restrictions have been re-introduced and (c) what are the results of the analysis?

Reply:

(a) There is no re-introduction of the vehicle and load height restriction as provided for in terms of regulation 224 of the National Road Traffic Regulations, 2000 under the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No.93 of 1996) (“the Act”). The height restriction has always been part of the Act. The special dispensation that was granted exempting the operation of motor vehicles transporting ISO Containers from complying with the provisions of regulation 224(b) is lapsing with effect from 1 January 2019. This special dispensation was granted to allow the industry to procure and/or source complaint trailers to transport high cube containers come 01 January 2019. The intention was not to exempt the industry indefinitely.

(b) There is no obligation on my Department to conduct an economic impact analysis because there is no intention to amend Regulation 224 of the National Road Traffic Act. It would go against the established legislative drafting conventions for my Department to conduct an economic impact analysis or research whilst the legislation is in effect. Simply put, research informs legislative drafting not the other way around.

(c) Refer to (b) above.

13 September 2018 - NW2500

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Ntombela, Mr MLD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Has the Local Government Management Improved Model and Assessment Tool been effective in measuring the quality of service delivery that takes place within local government and (b) Has there been improvement in the overall management of local government with the specified tool as a contributing factor?

Reply:

(a) 1. The Local Government Management Improved Model (LGMIM) is under the custodianship of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) and the information provided here was sourced from the DPME. The rollout of the LGMIM is currently in its fifth (5th) year since its inception and pilot. To date, one hundred and forty six (146) municipalities comprising of metropolitan, district and local municipalities participated in the programme. Of the total, twelve (12) were assessed during the 2013/14 financial year in the pilot phase, thirty (30) municipalities were assessed in the 2014/15 and 2015/16 financial years respectively, forty-one (41) municipalities were assessed during the 2016/17 financial year and thirtythree (33) municipalities during the 2017/18 financial year.

2. The logic of the Local Government Management Improvement Model (LGMIM) is that institutions matter and for service delivery and productivity to improve, the quality of institutions is important. To this end the LGMIM is aimed at facilitating the development of an in-depth understanding of the operating environment and quality of management and work place practices of municipalities that are key for improving service delivery.

3. As such the LGMIM does not measure the quality of service delivery per se, but rather the management practices and work place capabilties that are the necessary pre-conditions (or enbaling conditions) for improving service delivery in municipalities. It does this by identifying institutional problems, thereby positioning the senior leadership of municipalities to meet the minimum norms and standards of good institutional performance to deliver on their developmental outcomes. LGMIM does not include an assessment of actual deliverables against planned deliverables.

4. What differentiates LGMIM from other monitoring processes is that it provides an integrated and holistic view of a municipality’s performance across several critical key performance areas, thus making it easier to prioritise areas that are in need of significant improvement and potential support. It may also highlight issues that impact on service delivery in relation to areas of general non-compliance to legislative, regulatory and/or best practice prescripts. For example, it may highlight whether a participating municipality is adhering to a specific management practice or norm such as making adequate provision for refurbishment and maintenance of assets or whether it is producing audit action plans to address the findings from the Audit outcomes.

(b) 1. The LGMIM is one of several initiatives (albeit specialised and focused on the internal operating environment of municipalities) utilized within the local government sphere in an attempt to support and improve the performance of municipalities such as Back2Basics and the the Auditor General’s performance audits, and therefore it is difficult to attribute service delivery improvement solely to LGMIM.

2. The LGMIM is a management information tool intended to assist the municipal leadership to analyse how the organisation works and how it approaches key operational tasks in 6 key performance areas and which performance gaps need to be addressed to ensure the delivery of quality services and improve productivity.

3. The LGMIM is utilised by departments specifically mandated with a support function, such as the Department of Cooperative Governance, sector departments and provincial departments responsible for local government as an additional data source to inform the development and tailoring of support plans and initiatives to facilitate improved service delivery.

4. There is a close relationship between the DPME and provincial departments responsible for local government in conducting the assessments so as to ensure that these departments have direct and real-time access to the assessment results to inform their support initiatives to the various participating municipalities.

 

13 September 2018 - NW2558

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What progress has been made regarding the ratification with other African countries of the Yamoussoukro Decision regarding the Open Skies for Africa policy; (2) what is the Government’s position on the specified decision; (3) in what manner have the delays in implementing the decision affected the air services market in South Africa, with regard to packaging the Southern African Development Community region amongst international arrivals?

Reply:

1. Yamoussoukro Decision is not a treaty to be ratified but an African Civil Aviation Policy for the integration and the establishment of a Single African Air Transport Market to enhance African Intra-Trade and Tourism. In terms of Section 35 of the International Air Services Act 60 of 1993, the Minister may, exercise the delegated authority by the State President to enter into any air transport services agreement with the government or other appropriate authority of another State or Territory regarding the control over and regulation of any class or type of International air services operated or to be operated between the Republic and that State or Territory. In the absence of a continental multilateral institutions to fully regularise air transport, South Africa has concluded thirty-eight (38) Bilateral Air Services Agreements (BASA’s) with willing and able states in line with the principle of Yamoussoukro Decision (YD) awaiting the institutionalisation of a multilateral framework to fully regulate the continental civil aviation. South Africa has further integrated the principles of YD in the National Civil Aviation Policy that has since been approved by Cabinet on the 15th of February 2017.

2. Government is in full support of the integration and establishment of the Single African Air market. South Africa has to date signed the Declaration for Solemn Commitment to the implementation of YD towards the establishment of Single African Air Transport Market (SAATM). The former President, His Excellency Mr. Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma, witnessed the launch of SAATM during the 30th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, in January 2018.

3. Implementation of YD has been slow and limited. The delay has caused South African and rest of the continent to miss out on substantial economic benefits. Some air transport markets between Africa and countries outside of Africa have been liberalized to a significant extent. But most intra-African aviation markets remain closed and regulated through bilateral agreements which limit the growth and development of air services.

Air services arrangements with the South African Development Community (SADC) have been restricted, limiting airline participation in the market. However, of recent, some SADC states are slowly embracing the principles of YD and are progressively liberalizing key elements of the Bilateral Air Services Agreements. Restrictions on designation of airlines on specific routes and limited capacity still exist in air services arrangements with Namibia, Angola, Mauritius, Tanzania, Madagascar and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Reluctance of these states to embrace YD has negatively affected South African airlines desiring to either introduce new services or expanding existing markets. The Government, however, continues to engage these States bilaterally and multilaterally to encourage them to be part of the African Union initiative of creating a single air transport market for Africa.

13 September 2018 - NW2443

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

1. CoGTA does not own land; its head office is accommodated in five (5) leased buildings acquired through the Department of Public Works.

Land owned by CoGTA.

a) None

(i) Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) R0.00

(iii) 0 hectares

2. SOUTH AFRICAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SALGA)

(a)(ii) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

3. MUNICIPAL DEMARCATION BOARD (MDB)

(a)(ii). None, MDB does not own any land nor invested in any land.

(b)None.

4. SOUTH AFRICAN CITIES NETWORK (SACN)

(a)(ii)South African Cities Network is a non-profit organization and has not invested in land.

(b) Not applicable as there are no investments in land.

13 September 2018 - NW2545

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to fire fighters at the fire stations at (a) Edenvale, (b) Kempton Park, (c) Tembisa, (d) OR Tambo International Airport and (e) Boksburg (i) what is the (aa) optimal and (bb) actual number of full-time fire fighters, (ii) what number of the full-time fire fighters have passed the final examinations of the SA Emergency Services Institute, including the written examination and the full set of practical evaluations and (iii) What total number of reservists does each specified fire station currently have? NW2834E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member was provided by the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) from the City of Ekurhuleni (CoE) and the OR Tambo International Airport. Table 1 below outlines the relevant details:

Optimal and actual number of firefighters per station

Name of the Fire Station

(i) (aa) optimal

(bb) Actual number of full-time fire Fighters

(ii) Number of fulltime firefighters who passed final examination of SAESI

(ii) Practical Components completed

(iii) Total Number of Reservists

a) Edenvale

37

28

All completed Fire Fighter 1 & 2

Firefighting components: Hazmat Awareness & Operational

3

b) Kempton Park

37

41

All completed Fire Fighter 1 & 2

Firefighting components: Hazmat Awareness & Operational

12

c) Tembisa

37

36

All completed Fire Fighter 1 & 2

Firefighting components: Hazmat Awareness & Operational

14

d) OR Tambo International Airport (Firefighters are employed by the OR Tambo International Airport)

56

76

All completed Fire Fighter 1 & 2

Firefighting components: Hazmat Awareness & Operational

None

e) Boksburg Leon Ferreira

37

32

All completed Fire Fighter 1 & 2

Firefighting components: Hazmat Awareness & Operational

None

  1.  

1.1 Firefighting is a profession which is one of the most stressful, physically demanding and hazardous occupation. Thus, Firefighters must master a complex mix of three core competencies being foundational knowledge, physical skill and work experience to be successful in their occupation.

1.2 The nature of work carried out by firefighters requires not only adequate training when entering the profession but also continuous professional development to ensure that firefighters stay abreast with the constant technological changes in their working environment.

1.3  It is important to note that training of firefighters must be benchmarked against globally accepted standards. Within the South African context, the Southern African Emergency Services Institute (SAESI) is accredited to provide occupational training for firefighters by the International Fire Service Accreditation Congress (IFSAC) which is based in the United States of America (USA).

1.4 IFSAC is a non-profit, peer-driven, self-governing system of both fire service certifying entities and higher education fire-related degree programs. IFSAC's mission is to plan and administer a high-quality, uniformly delivered accreditation system with an international scope.

1.5 Thus, IFSAC courses which are provided by SAESI such as Firefighter I and II, Hazmat Awareness and Operational are utilised by fire services in South Africa to recruit entry-level firefighters. These courses are based on the American National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standards and are utilised both in the USA and several other countries for the basic training of firefighters.

1.6 The Local Government Sector Education and Training (LGSETA) has also developed a qualification known as the Fire and Rescue Operations, Level 4 in terms of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) based on the same NFPA Standards. Firefighters must obtain formal qualifications in order to progress in their careers within the fire services. Qualifications in Fire Technology are currently provided by the Tshwane University of Technology (TuT) and includes a National Diploma, BTECH Degree and Master’s Degree. These are the qualifications that are also utilised by fire services to recruit senior fire officers in the country.

1.7 The NDMC is finalising the review of the Fire Brigade Services Act, 1987 and as part of the revised legislation and policy framework, a national fire services education and training strategy will be developed to guide the provision of training in the fire service.

13 September 2018 - NW2427

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What rail safety plans are in place in each province, (b) how are the specified plans executed, (c) at what stage is the execution in each province, (d) what monitoring mechanisms are in place in each province, (e) what are the allocated budgets for each province for the current financial year, (f) what budgets were allocated for each province in the past three financial years and (g) what was actual expenditure in each province in the past three financial years?

Reply:

As mandated by the National Railway Safety Regulator Act, No 16 0f 2002, each operator is responsible and accountable for ensuring the safety of railway operations, while the Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) is accountable for providing adequate and appropriate oversight of the safety of railway operations.

a) Railway Operators submit annual Safety Management System Reports (SMSR) to the RSR and at the core of the SMSR is the Annual Safety Improvement Plan. The Annual Safety Improvement Plan contains the operator’s annual railway operational improvement plans that demonstrate how the operator has resourced themselves to mitigate the risks that they identify in their railway operations. The SANS 3000 standards guide the operators on the content of the plans.

Operators throughout the nine provinces have Safety Management Systems as mandated by the SANS 3000 series of standards. The Annual Safety Improvement Plan contains the Operator Risk Assessment, the Controls to reduce or mitigate the risks and the Targets aimed at reducing the incidents. The Action Plans are also found in the Annual Safety Improvement Plan of the operators.

b) The plan would, among measures, indicate how the operator plans to reduce level crossing incidents, people struck by train incidents (PSBT), collisions, derailments, theft and vandalism incidents, etc.

To mitigate the risks identified in each rail operator’s Risk Registers, the operators approve and execute COPEX and CAPEX Projects. For example, the Platform Projects by PRASA are aimed at mitigating the Platform Train Interface (PTI) incidents, the Walling Project at reducing the PSBT incidents, Re-signalling Projects at reducing collisions, etc.

c) Most of the key projects are at construction stages while some are at commissioning stages. The RSR conducts reviews on these projects through all project life cycle phases to ensure that the new works do not introduce new risks to the railway system and where these cannot be eliminated, that necessary mitigation measures are implemented.

d) The SANS 3000-1 standard specifies that incidents must be reported to the RSR. It states which incidents must be reported within 15 minutes, daily, etc. All reported incidents find their way into the Annual State of Safety Report. The RSR conducts Audits and Inspections on the operators to oversee their compliance towards their safety management systems and plans.

e) Not applicable

f) Not applicable

g) Not applicable

13 September 2018 - NW2525

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the vacancy rate for principals at primary schools in each province, (b) are the reasons for the vacancies and (c) period have the positions been vacant; (2) what (a) number of disputes in respect of appointments of principals have been declared in each province, (b) are the main reasons for the disputes and (c) is the envisaged time frame for resolution of the disputes?

Reply:

  1. (a) The table below shows the vacancy rate for principals at primary schools in each province

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF VACANCIES AS AT THE END OF JULY 2018

NUMBER OF PRIMARY SCHOOLS

VACANCY RATE

EASTERN CAPE

370

2 559

14%

FREE STATE

19

644

3%

GAUTENG

76

1 377

6%

KWAZULU-NATAL

356

3 787

9%

LIMPOPO

252

2 407

10%

MPUMALANGA

77

1 013

8%

NORTH CAPE

33

305

11%

NORTH WEST

71

943

8%

WESTERN CAPE

147

983

15%

NATIONAL

1 401

14 018

10%

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

(b) Vacancies occur at schools throughout the year mainly as a result of natural attrition with key drivers being resignations, retirements and to a lesser extent deaths. Also to note is that Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) advertise and fill promotional posts, at most, twice a year. Acting appointments are made in promotional posts as soon as the post becomes vacant. In order to address workload challenges, PEDs make temporary appointment against vacant promotional posts where necessary.

(c) About 41% of the posts, as at the end of July 2018, were six (6) months or less vacant; 19% vacant of 7-12 months, 7% up to 24 months and 33% longer than 24 months. Of the posts that were vacant for more than 12 months, about 65% were those in small schools of between one (1) and three (3) teachers some of them on the verge of being closed due to decreasing or consistently low enrolment.

2. The question is more relevant to the provincial administration because it is the responsibility of the Employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act is the Head of the Provincial Education Department, to ensure that vacancies are filled and to attend to any dispute that arises at the provincial level.

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant Employers for details and response.

13 September 2018 - NW2459

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

Department

(a)(i) The Department of Transport has not invested in any land.

(b)(i)(ii)(ii) Not applicable

Cross-Border Road Transport Agencies

a) (ii) No investing company has invested on land owned by the entity as the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency itself does not own any land.

b) (i), (ii) and (iii) - Not applicable

Road Accident Fund

a) (ii) No investing company has invested on land owned by the entity as the Road Accident Fund itself does not own any land.

b) (i), (ii) and (iii) - Not applicable

Road Traffic Management Corporation

a) (ii) No investing company has invested on land owned by the entity as the Road Traffic Management Corporation itself does not own any land.

b) (i), (ii) and (iii) - Not applicable

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

a) (ii) No investing company has invested on land owned by the entity as the Road Traffic Infringement Agency itself does not own any land.

b) (i), (ii) and (iii) - Not applicable

South African National Road Agency Limited

A table is provided below showing the developments that have taken place on land we have leased to various organisations

SANRAL

a) Name of Investor

b(i) Nature of Investment (all leases of land)

b(ii) Monthly/Annual Rental

b(ii) Estimated Value of Improvements

b(iii) Commencement Date

b(iii) Termination Date

Taylor Burke Projects Pty (Ltd)

Service Station

R46 301.43 PM

R18 Mil

1/08/2015

31/07/2049

Marburg Interchange Development CC

Service Station/Truck Stop

R12 714.05 PM

R12 Mil

01/07/1994

31/03/2024

BKZ Investments

Warehousing

R6 848.47 PM

R5 Mil

01/09/2014

31/08/2031

Engen Petroleum Ltd

Service Station

R373 248.00 PM

R18 Mil

01/10/2015

30/09/2018

Toll Road Concessionaire Pty LTD

Service Station N&S Bound

R17 690.67 PA

R25 Mil

01/01/2004

31/12/2019

LIZALOR Investment CC

Service Station N&S Bound

0.5% of gross turnover generated by sales of Petroleum Products & 1% of gross turnover generated by all other businesses

R25 Mil

27/03/2013

26/02/2053

Petroleum and Retail Properties Midrand Pty LTD (New Road Filling Station)

Service Station and Restaurant

0.5% of gross turnover generated by sales of Petroleum Products & 1% of gross turnover generated by all other businesses

Proposed New Improvements R100 Mil

01/11/1997

01/10/2017 (Option to renew for a further 30 years)

BP Southern Africa Pty LTD (BP Oasis)

Service Station and Restaurant N&S Bound

0.5% of gross turnover generated by sales of Petroleum Products & 1% of gross turnover generated by all other businesses

R25 Mil

29/07/1998

28/07/2018 (Option to renew for a further 30 years)

Vodacom (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R3 161.94 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/06/2014

31/05/2019

Mobile Telephone Networks (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R10 709.89PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

Vodacom (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R5 000.00 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R10 975.00 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R13 157.83 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

Vodacom (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R6 273.37 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/05/2014

30/04/2019

Mobile Telephone Networks (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R11 230.00 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/11/2015

31/10/2020

Cell C (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R8 350.00 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/12/2015

30/11/2020

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R13 789.41 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

Vodacom (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R10 304.10 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/12/2017

30/11/2022

Vodacom (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R35 650.78 PA

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/12/2017

30/11/2020

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R10 136.46 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R12 683.25 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R12 683.25 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R17 251.39 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

ATC South Africa Wireless

Cellular infrastructure

R9 966.45 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

Mobile Telephone Networks (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R10 109.25 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/08/2017

31/07/2020

Mobile Telephone Networks (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R13 367.23PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/03/2018

28/02/2021

Vodacom (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R1 712.93 PM

R250 000.00 Infrastructure on roof of existing building

01/02/2016

31/01/2019

Mobile Telephone Networks (Pty) Ltd

Cellular infrastructure

R2 383.00 PM

R300 000.00 Minimal Infrastructure

01/01/2018

31/12/2020

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

  1. (ii) None.
  2. (i) – (iii) Not applicable

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

Development lease: Un-serviced or excess land or space made available to developer or investor to develop the property on a long terms lease basis where after the property will revert to PRASA. Rental is based on land value. The value reflects the total Market Value.

(a)

Investor / Tenant Name

(b)(ii)

Value Rand

(b)(i)

Nature

(b)(iii)

Length

Metropolitan Life

R70,500,000

Retail development on Denneboom station development lease in Gauteng

50 years

Burnfields

R63,800,000

Office development at Rissik street Station development lease in Gauteng

50 years

Jonny Prop (Pty) Ltd

R19,800,000

Offices and filling station Rissik Station development lease in Gauteng

45 years

Erf 620 Hatfield (Pty) Ltd

R6,700,000

Offices at Rissik Station development lease in Gauteng

50 years

LYTTLETON COMMERCIAL PARK CC

R10,480,000

Industrial Park Centurion Station development lease in Gauteng

50 years

Redefine Properties (Pty) Ltd

R52,300,000

Shopping Centre- Acornhoek station development lease in Gauteng

40 years

Raeco

R12,200,000

Shop Fitting and Woodwork Related Business development lease in Western Cape

40 years

Nu-way Housing Development (Pty) Ltd

R31,700,000

Shopping Centre development lease in Western Cape

45 years

The Bells Trust

R27,300,000

Industrial / Retail development lease in Western Cape

90 years

Momentum Group Limited (Fairvest) / Nyanga Juction (002063)

R15,000,000

Retail Shopping Centre development lease in Western Cape

50 years

Observatory Business Park (Pty) Ltd

R387,500,000

Office Park and Parking development lease in Western Cape

45 years

Campwell Property Holdings CC

R15,100,000

Retail / Office development lease in Western Cape

45 years

Strand Junction Retail (Proprietary) Limited

R6,000,000

Convenience Shopping Centre development lease in Western Cape

45 years

Conlands Properties (PTY) Ltd (Namakwari Trust)

R5,000,000

Industrial development lease in Western Cape

39 years

The Haven Property Trust

R19,000,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

20 Intersite Avenue Pty Ltd

R10,100,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

BIDVEST Properties (Pty) Ltd

R16,400,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Christopher Lee Investments CC

R8,350,000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

Corpclo 486 CC LTD/Lot 422 Umgeni Park CC

R10,000,000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

Dawn Projects & Properties c.c

R10,180,000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

GEOSURE - PROP AF was ceded to GEOSURE

R8,860,000

Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

Glenridge Station Trust

R15,270,000

Church/conference centre development lease in KZN

23 years

Gold Lemon Investments CC

R6,000,000

Offices development lease in KZN

50 years

Haloworx Investments (Pty) Ltd

R33,800,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Henque 2129 CC-ceded to 126 Intersite Avenue

R12,100,000

Entertainment Hall development lease in KZN

50 years

Hirt & Carter Property Trust

R98,300,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Imperilog Holdings (Pty) Ltd

R7,030,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Iraco Family Trust

R4,370,000

Showroom and Workshop development lease in KZN

50 years

Iraco Family Trust

R4,900,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Iraco Family Trust

R7,820,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Iraco Family Trust

R9,160,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Keenland Investment125 (Pty) Ltd

R17,300,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

KwaMnyandu Shopping Centre

R280,000,000

Retail development lease in KZN

17 years

MEGAPHASE ceded from SRITU FAMILY TRUST

R8,230,000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

MJ & JL Investments (Pty) Ltd

R4,600,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

New-Spot Investments (Pty) Ltd( Remainder of Erf 251 Springfield)

R37,020,000

Offices and factory development lease in KZN

50 years

Noriprop 2 (Pty) Ltd. (Erven 412, 413, 414, 415, and 416)

R48,700,000

mini storage facility development lease in KZN

50 years

Quick Leap Investments 346 (Pty) Ltd

R46,900,000

Offices/Retail development lease in KZN

30 years

Rosetree Investments (Pty) Ltd

R11,400,000

Mini – Factory development lease in KZN

50 years

SA Corporate Real Estate Fund

R18,820,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Shaik Iqbal Mustapha Essop

R9.090.000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

Shave Paint Centre (Pty) Ltd

R8.700.000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

Sipan 1 (Pty) Ltd

R32,300,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

The A & M Hirsch Family Trust

R27,400000

Showroom/Workshop/Offices development lease in KZN

48 years

The Emira Property Fund

R11,200,000

Offices and Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

The Emira Property Fund

R13,500,000

Warehouse development lease in KZN

50 years

The Emira Property Fund

R6,190,000

Mini – Factory development lease in KZN

50 years

The Emira Property Fund

R40,300,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

The Haven Property Trust

R19,000,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

The Vallabh Property Trust

R590,000

Offices development lease in KZN

50 years

Townston Properties (Pty) Ltd

R11,500,000

Offices and Filling station development lease in KZN

25 years

UMGENI JUNCTION 2 (PTY) LTD

R14,200,000

Retail development lease in KZN

50 years

Whirlprops 25 (Pty) Ltd

R118,000,000

Warehouse/Factory with Office development lease in KZN

50 years

Arnold Properties (Pty) Ltd.

R237,600,000

Retail development lease in KZN

50 years

Kwazulu FInance & Investment

R76,100,000

Mini - Factory Complex development lease in KZN

50 years

Mergence Africa Property Investment Trust

R22,600,000

Retail development lease in KZN

50 years

UMGENI JUNCTION 1 (PTY) LTD

R69,900,000

Retail development lease in KZN

50 years

Hotel Formula 1 (Pty) Ltd

R530,000

Hotel development lease in KZN

50 years

The Acorn Trust

R5,600,000

Retail/Service Station development lease in KZN

50 years

Lenz Station Mall cc

R21,100000

Mall development at Lenazia station development lease in Gauteng

35 years

Rasbora Investments cc.

R 6 500 000

Retail & workshops development lease in Gauteng

50 years

Mergance Africa Property Investment Trust ceded from Taxi prop Development (Pty) Ltd

R60,300,000

Randfontein Mall development lease in Gauteng

50 years

Discus House (Pty) Ltd

R104,400,000

Retail at Kempton Park station development lease in Gauteng

40 years

Vidual Investments (Pty) Ltd

R7,000,000

Hotel Formula 1 development lease in Gauteng

50 years

Kwamyandu shopping centre Pty Ltd

R250,000,000

22 000m2 of Retail development in KZN. Currently Trading

25 years with 10 year option to renew

Nuway Holdings Pty (Ltd)

R55,000,000

Long term lease: 4 500m2 of retail development at Langa Junction in Western Cape. Currently Trading

45 years

Eris-Accessio JV

R1,5 billion for both phases over a period of 5 years

Long term lease - Development consisting of two phases of approximately 67 000m2 retail and light industrial warehouse units at Umgeni Business Park (KZN) in Construction

40 years with an option to renew for a further 10 years

Mandulo Property Partners

R180,000,000

Long term lease - Retail development of approximately 11 100m2 at Umlazi KZN in Pre-construction

25 years with an option to renew for a further 10 years

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a)(i) (ii) Does not invest to any land

  1. (i) – (iii) Not applicable

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

Not Applicable to SACAA as it does not own any land.

(b) (i) – (iii) Not applicable

Air Traffic Navigation Services (ATNS)

(a) Not Applicable to SACAA as it does not own any land.

(b) (i) – (iii) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)

For ACSA’s portfolio under land leases with third party investors, the following developments refer:

OR Tambo International Airport

  1. RMB Properties (Pty) Ltd
  2. (i) land lease

(b)(ii) Upfront lease premium of R21m; from 14th to 25th anniversary, 15% of Adjusted Net Operating Income; and from 25th anniversary to Termination date, 20% of Adjusted Net Operating Income

(b)(iii) Commenced in 2006 for 40 years

Cape Town International Airport

  1. DHL
  2. (i) land lease

(b)(ii) Upfront lease premium of R6,3m, turnover rental 15% of gross rentals after 12 years (Currently R169,000 pm)

(b) (iii) Commenced in June 2005 for 40 years

  1. Massmart
  2. (i) land lease

(b)(ii) Upfront lease premium of R7,8m, turnover rental 25% of net rentals after 13 years of sub-lease

(b)(iii) Commenced in June 2008 for 40 years

(a) City Lodge

(b) (i) land lease

(b)(ii) The greater of the monthly rental of R13,000 (Currently R54,000 pm) escalating with 10% annually or turnover rental equal to 3% of annual sales when occupancy is less than 85% / 5% when occupancy is more than 85%

(b)(iii) Commenced in March 2002 for 20 years with a 10-year renewal option

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (ii) The Ports Regulator does not own any land, nor has it owned any land in the past. There are no plans either to acquire any land in the future.
  2. (b) (i) – (iii) Not applicable

13 September 2018 - NW2519

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of the interest rates on all outstanding Eskom loans that are being repaid?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

Details of the interest rates on all outstanding Eskom loans that are being repaid are published on pages 82 and 83 of the 2017/18 Annual Financial Statements.

Annexure A is an extract of pages 82 and 83 of the 2017/18 Annual Financial Statements.