Questions and Replies

01 April 2019 - NW509

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a) (i) One building

(ii) None

(iii) None

(aa) None

(bb) Public Private Partnership Agreement

(b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) The value of the building is unknown and the purpose is for office accommodation for the Department of Basic Education

(c) (i) The Public Partnership Agreement is for a contract period of 25 years

(ii) The Public Private Partnership is for the Department of Basic Education

(iii) Monthly Unitary fee is R13 731 406.74 excluding VAT

01 April 2019 - NW662

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Energy

What (a) informed the decision to close down the Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa’s NTP facility and (b)(i) impact has the closure of the facility had on the availability of nuclear radioisotopes for nuclear medicine purposes in the country and (ii) is being done to rectify the situation?

Reply:

a) The National Nuclear Regulator cited safety concerns at the facility as its reason for issuing a directive to cease operations in NTP’s Radiochemical Production facility. This initially emanated from a situation in October 2017 when maintenance procedures related to calibration and certain safety protocols in the facility were not adequately followed. Hereafter, following a restricted restart of the facility in early 2018, operations ceased again in May 2018 following exceedance of certain technical specifications.

b) (i) NTP Radioisotopes SOC Ltd group of companies through its operation at Pelindaba produces Mo-99 and I-131 as active pharmaceutical ingredients (API’s) as input material to manufacture radiopharmaceutical products such as Tc-99M generators and I-131 capsules to supply almost 100% of the South African nuclear medicine market needs and selective African countries.

NTP mitigated the impact of the API plant closure on the South African nuclear medicine market by importing MO-99 and I-131 from its global supply partners. This strategy was largely successful with the exception of a few weeks during this outage when NTP’s supply partners also experienced short supply situations due to the unavailability of some nuclear reactors in the global network. Selective local nuclear medicine practices imported product directly from international suppliers during this period.

(ii) NECSA/NTP corrected the immediate safety concerns at the facility and put in place initiatives to improve safety culture and behaviour. NTP and NECSA continue to engage with the Regulator to return the facility to its safe, reliable, and full operational capacity.

01 April 2019 - NW115

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deaf and/or (ii) hearing-impaired learners in each province and (b) what number of the specified learners have been denied access to education due to the lack of resources; (2) how are the deaf learners in Mpumalanga accommodated in view of the fact that no schools for deaf and/or hearing-impaired learners have been built; (3) by what date does her department envisage building a school for deaf and/or hearing-impaired learners, as this issue has been a discussion point for the past two years?

Reply:

Response: (1)(a) (i) (ii)

Table 1: Number of (i) deaf and hard of hearing learners, by province, in 2018

Province

Deaf (i)

Hard of Hearing (ii)

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

722

1 819

2 541

Free State

364

285

649

Gauteng

1 305

510

1 815

KwaZulu Natal

1 359

1 090

2 449

Limpopo

494

189

683

Mpumalanga

191

138

329

North West

290

88

378

Northern Cape

98

46

144

Western Cape

935

219

1 154

Grand Total

5 758

4 384

10 142

Source: 2018 LURITS II

(1)(b) The data on the number of deaf and/or hard-of-hearing learners who may have been denied access to education due to the lack of resources is not available at the Department of Basic Education and should be solicited from Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

(2) Deaf learners in Mpumalanga are accommodated in the following five (5) schools:

  • Marietjie Special School;
  • Wolvenkop Special School;
  • KaMagugu Special School;
  • Silondokuhle Special School; and
  • Bukhosibetfu Full Service School.

(3) The information about the date for the envisaged building of a school for Deaf and/or hard-of –hearing learners should be obtained from a province as schools are established by the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) for education in the province.

01 April 2019 - NW517

Profile picture: Khawula, Mr M

Khawula, Mr M to ask the Minister of Women in the Presidency

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her Office currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

The Department of Women does not own any building and/or property. However, the Department has been renting a building at No. 36 Hamilton Street, Arcadia for oRice accommodation for the past 9 years and eleven months to date. The rental fee for the said building is R997 239.02 per month and the lease agreement with Delta expires in December 2020.

 

01 April 2019 - NW518

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does his department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

a) (i)(aa) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities

None. The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries does not own any buildings, properties or facilities. The Department of Public Works’ mandate is to be the custodian of all national governments’s fixed assets which are vested under Republic of South Africa, for which other legislation does not make another department or institution responsible.

(i)(bb) buildings, (ii)(bb) properties and (iii)(bb) facilities

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries as a tenant is currently occupying 43 leased properties. The Department of Public Works, as custodian of office accommodation and functional accommodation in the Public Service, is leasing the properties for the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and has entered into lease agreement with the concerned landlords.

(b) (i) Value and purpose of each owned property

The Department of Public Works will have to provide the requested information from its records, as the party to the lease agreement signed with respective landlords. The information on its Property Management Information System (PMIS), might include (e.g. Basic property description, ownership, property usage, SG diagrams, locality maps, building plans etc.)

(ii) Value and purpose of rented property

The rented properties that are being rented by the Department of Public Works for the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries are being utilised for office accommodation. The Department or Public Works will have to obtain the value of the leased properties from the concerned landlords.

c) (i) for how long has each property been rented

Refer to attached schedule

(ii) from whom is each property rented

Refer to attached schedule

(iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?      

Refer to attached schedule

01 April 2019 - NW340

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the Ikhwezi Lokusa Special School in Mthatha she has been informed of the (a) general state of disrepair at the school, (b) alleged gross maladministration by the principal, (c) theft of wheelchairs and other material needed by the disabled learners, (d) alleged abuse of staff and (e) the inhumane conditions in which disabled learners are kept; if not, what steps will she take to investigate and take action; if so, what has her department done in this regard?

Reply:

A)  The National Department of Basic Education has not been informed of the general state of disrepair at the Ikhwezi Lokusa Special School in Mthatha. The matter has since been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education for investigation and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the province.

01 April 2019 - NW293

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What are the (i) regulations upon which officials at South African embassies rely to set the approval of curriculums and educational plans as a visa requirement for home-schooled children and (ii) contact details of the section within her department or provincial education departments that is dedicated to deal with the approval of curriculums and educational plans for children of foreign visitors and (b) how long does the section take to evaluate curriculums and educational plans for children of foreign visitors; (2) whether the specified section has a list of approved curriculums and educational plans; if not, what criteria do they use to evaluate curriculums and educational plans; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, in instances where her department does not approve the curriculums and educational plans of the children of foreign visitors who have been home-schooled and who intend to visit South Africa, there are any mechanisms available to appeal against such a decision; (4) are foreigners who apply for a visa informed up front that their visa applications might be unsuccessful if their children are home-schooled and their curriculums and educational plans are not approved by her department?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) Parents who home educate and are willing to register their children with the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) in the Republic of South Africa are responsible and accountable for the education of their children. These parents, who are not citizens of this country, have already complied with the curriculum requirements of their country of origin.

(ii)The departments of education in South Africa does not deal with approval of curricula for citizens from other countries (who are not seeking citizenship in South Africa). However, they are at liberty to contact officials responsible for the implementation of the Policy on Home Education in South Africa, should they wish to do so. The contact details of the officials in South Africa are obtainable from www.education.gov.za, and are as follows:

Province

Coordinator

Tel

Email

Address

National

Ms EM Chaane

Ms LZ Brown

012 357 4105

0122 357 4106

Chaane.m@dbe.gov.za

brown.l@dbe.gov.za

222 Struben Street

PRETORIA

0001

Eastern Cape

Ms N Ndzunga

040 608 4186/ 4342

Nomfundo.ndzunga@ecdoe.gov.za

 

Steve Thswete Complex, Zone 6, Zwelitsha

Private Bag X0032 Bisho 5605

Free State

Mr MJ Ntsala

051 447 0038/ 0037

MJ.Ntsala@fseducation.gov.za

 

P/ Bag X 20565

BLOEMFONTEIN

9300

Gauteng

Ms C Motshwane

011 355 0631

carol.motshwane@gauteng.gov.za

 

Hollard Building (7th Floor)

P. O. Box 7710

Johannesburg

2000

KwaZulu-Natal

Ms D Motloli

033 348 6111/115

dineo.motloli@kzndoe.gov.za

188 Pieter Maritz Street

PIETERMARITZBURG

3200

Limpopo

Ms M Baloyi

015 290 9382

baloyiME@limpopo.edu.gov.za

 

P/ Bag X9489

POLOKWANE

0700

Mpumalanga

Dr M Pieterse

013 766 5875

m.pieterse@education.mpu.gov.za

P/Bag X 111341

NELSPRUIT

1200

Northern Cape

Mr K Mhlom

053 839 6386

Uzondwa@gmail.com

 

P/ Bag X 5029

KIMBERLEY

8300

North West

Ms P Pule

018 389 8204

Ppule@nwpg.gov.za

P/Bag X 2044

MMABATHO

2735

Western Cape

Mr D Louw

021 467 2653

Deon.louw@westerncape.gov.za

P/ Bag X 9114

CAPE TOWN

8000

(b) In terms of the Policy on Home Education, the Head of a Provincial Education Department must take all reasonable steps to respond within 30 days after receipt of the application on the prescribed form.

(2) There is no approved list of curricula and educational plans except for the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 in the department. Parents are free to choose any curriculum that will be of a standard not inferior to that of basic education provided in public schools in South Africa.

(3)A parent may appeal to the MEC within 14 days of receiving a notice. The MEC should take all reasonable steps to respond to the appeal within 30 days of receiving the appeal.

(4) The Department of Basic Education does not have a mechanism for considering curricula and educational plans of foreigners who apply for a visa in South Africa.

 

01 April 2019 - NW331

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teachers have joined the Public Service since 1 January 1996 and (b) is the highest qualification of each specified teacher?

Reply:

PROVINCE

UNQUALIFIED

(Matric)

UNDER-QUALIFIED (Matric plus 1-2)

QUALIFIED (Matric plus 3 and more years)

Grand Total

 

REQV10

REQV11

REQV12

REQV13

REQV14

REQV15

REQV16

REQV17

 

EC

36

10

147

5 071

24 451

2 736

311

24

32 786

FS

33

17

21

1 962

10 061

1 376

228

27

13 725

GP

11

1

64

4 618

35 848

8 031

1 465

126

50 164

KZN

728

7

23

6 231

41 493

11 398

2 714

141

62 735

LP

1

 

7

3 169

20 955

1 199

275

11

25 617

MP

4

 

6

2 472

14 905

2 742

593

27

20 749

NW

   

118

2 779

11 489

1 492

306

14

16 198

NC

96

4

6

1 074

4 451

627

96

8

6 362

WC

86

11

120

1 890

14 458

2 633

487

59

19 744

Grand Total

995

50

512

29 266

178 111

32 234

6 475

437

248 080

Source: PERSAL, January 2019

01 April 2019 - NW667

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Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to reprimand the Minister of Police as directed by the Public Protector for failing to ensure that protection was provided to two whistle-blowers in KwaZulu-Natal who were in danger of assassination; if not, why not; if so, what has delayed him to take action in the matter?

Reply:

The Minister of Police is taking the Public Protector’s report on review.

The Presidency has applied to intervene in the review application instituted by the Minister of Police to ask the court to stay the implementation of the remedial action until the review is determined.

01 April 2019 - NW723

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Women in the Presidency

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by her and/or the former minister (i) in the (aa) 2016-17 and (bb) 2017-18 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

The Department did not purchased any vehicle(s) for use by the Minister in the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years.

 

 

 

Minister on

29 March 2019 - NW301

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Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, in light of the envisaged and widely publicised principle of land and property expropriation without compensation, he has found that there are any economic indications that the specified principle has to date had any negative economic effect on the country’s economy; if not, what are the full relevant particulars as to why no data show any negative impact; if so, (2) with reference to the sectors of the economy that have experienced a negative effect, (a) what steps the Government will take to manage such effect and (b) whether the Government is ready to handle class action claims on a wide front if the value of the assets has decreased because of the specified principle; (3) whether there are any indications that the principle is to any extent going to have a negative effect on future tax income; if not, why no data have envisaged any negative effect; if so, (a) why, (b) what steps the Government is going to take to repair the negative effect and (c) what are the further full relevant particulars?

Reply:

Question 1

1. There are no economic indicators that measure the direct impact of the “land expropriation without compensation” debate on South Africa’s economic performance or its specific impact on the agricultural sector. However, there are indicators that collectively provide insight into the overall performance of the agricultural sector. These include: (i) gross capital formation in agriculture; (ii) profitability (net farm income); (iii) real value added in agriculture, forestry and fishing; (iv) farm mortgages; and the (v) agribusiness confidence index. None of these indicators are able to isolate the direct impact of the “land expropriation without compensation” debate.

1. Real gross fixed capital formation – a proxy for investment – peaked in 2013 and has been on a downward trend since.

2. Net farm income – a measure of farm profitability – has been growing since 2010. The data for 2017 and 2018 are not yet available.

3. Real value added in agriculture, forestry and fishing declined by 4.8 per cent in the first half of 2018 compared with the same period in 2017. Maize production eased following record output in 2017 and the drought continued to weigh down production in the Western Cape. The short-term outlook for the sector has improved due to higher rainfall in the Western Cape. The combined export value of crops such as citrus, grapes and macadamia nuts increased by an annual average of 7.5 per cent over the period 2015 to 2017.

4. New mortgage loans and re-advances granted on farms peaked in 2006 and has remained relatively flat since 2011. At the end of 2017 new mortgages on farms were at similar levels to those observed in 2013.

5. The Agbiz / IDC Agribusiness Confidence index fell to 42 index points in the fourth quarter of 2018 – its lowest level in 9 years. This was largely due to significant declines in the net operating income, general agricultural conditions and turnover sub-indices – suggesting that business conditions are driving changes in sentiment. The capital investment confidence sub-index increased, supported by increases in capital sales (specifically tractor sales which were 9 per cent higher in the first 10 months of 2018 in relation to the same period last year).

It is difficult to isolate the impact of the “land expropriation without compensation” debate on the agricultural sector or the broader economy on the basis of these indicators. Furthermore, the information revealed by these indicators about the agriculture sector is mixed and there are a number of other factors that influence sentiment in agriculture, including the cost of doing business, weather expectations and market conditions.

The government has allocated resources to conduct a general agricultural census (currently underway), to collect information that will provide further data on the dynamics in the sector to better inform policy making and support a viable, inclusive and productive agricultural sector.

2. As indicated, it is not possible to empirically isolate the impact of the debate on “land expropriation without compensation” and therefore not possible, at this stage, to presume any negative impacts on the economy.

3. In light of the above, at this stage it is not possible to assess the potential impact on tax revenues.

29 March 2019 - NW611

Profile picture: Atkinson, Mr P

Atkinson, Mr P to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) Whether (a) the National Treasury and/or (b) any entity reporting to him contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished) in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, what (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case; (2) whether any irregular expenditure relating to the contracts was recorded and/or condoned in each case; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

  1. (a) No

(i)

Number of contracts signed

(ii)

Date on which each contract was signed

(iii)

Duration of each contract

(iv)

What services did the company render?

(v)

Monetary value of each contract in each case

Nil

One purchase order issued

Order issued on 1 June 2015

3 days

Security Services at the Cape Town International Airport for the World Economic Forum

R30 369.60

 

2. No

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board did not contract the services of BOSASA now known as GLOBAL OPERATIONS in any of the past 10 financial years to date.

CBDA

The Co-operative Banks Development Agency has never contracted the services of Bosasa now known as Global Operations.

DBSA

  1. None
  2. None

FAIS OMBUD

Inspection of the FAIS Ombud database has revealed that NO contracts were entered into with the above mentioned supplier for the financial periods ending 1 March 2007 to date.

FIC

(1) The Financial Intelligence Centre did not contract BOSASA or Global Operations for any services in any of the past 10 financial years.

(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v) Not applicable.

(2) Not applicable.

FSCA

The Financial Sector Conduct Authority (and the former Financial Services Board) has not contracted with the mentioned companies during the past 10 years.

GEPF

The GEPF has not contracted the services of BOSASA now known as Global Operations in the past 10 financial years.

GPAA

The GPAA has not done any business with BOSASA (GLOBAL OPERATIONS) for the said period.

IRBA

The IRBA hereby declares that no contracts were awarded to the abovementioned company in the past 10 Financial years.

LAND BANK

Land Bank has never contracted the services of Bosasa or Global Operations.

PFA

(1)(b) The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator has not contracted the services of Bosasa (now known as Global Operations) in the past 10 years.

(2) Not applicable.

PIC

The PIC during the last ten financial years did not contract the services of the company mentioned.

SARS

Question 1

SARS has never contracted with, BOSASA now known as GLOBAL OPERATIONS, for any security related services.

Question 2

N/A

SASRIA

For purposes of the question(s) raised above, Sasria SOC Ltd (“Sasria”) has not contracted the services of Bosasa now known as Global Operations (“Bosasa”), in each of the past ten financial years.

Whilst we have taken care, and exercised the necessary diligence in preparing the requested information, it is necessary that we highlight that, there is no information that seeks to indicate or suggest whether Bosasa was at any point directly or indirectly contracted to Sasria.

It is also common cause, that Sasria provides specialist short-term insurance products to its clients, which include but are not limited to insurance coverage from damage caused by non-political riots, public disorder, including labour disturbances, civil unrest, strikes, lockouts and terrorism, as well as loss in respect of mortgage loans. It would therefore follow, that Sasria would be in a position to have done business with Bosasa in this respect.

In the spirit of this, Sasria has therefore settled various insurance claims to Bosasa, and these are in the ordinary course of our business, and the said payments are neither services sought, nor contracts entered into, as the questions above specifically enquire on services entered into with Bosasa.

We hereby therefore, for purposes of transparency, disclose all the claims Bosasa has had with Sasria, and stress the fact that these are not services nor contracts entered into, but claims payments in the ordinary course of our business, as mandated.

Date (Payment)

Client

Service provided

Rand Value

(Excl. VAT)

Duration

Irregular Expenditure

20 March 2012

Bosasa Operations (Pty) Ltd

Insurance Claim

R 131 578.95

N/A

N/A

14 November 2012

Bosasa Operations (Pty) Ltd

Insurance Claim

R 68 774.30

N/A

N/A

18 December 2013

Bosasa Operations (Pty) Ltd

Insurance Claim

R 318 533.67

N/A

N/A

12 August 2015

Bosasa Operations (Pty) Ltd

Insurance Claim

R 2 010 495.23

N/A

N/A

TAX OMBUD

  1. The Office of the Tax Ombud did not contract any services of BOSASA now known as GLOBAL OPERATIONS in the past 10 financial years.
  2. No irregular expenditure was recorded or condoned that relates to BOSASA now known as GLOBAL OPERATIONS.

29 March 2019 - NW702

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and/or the former minister and (ii) her deputy and/or former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a)-(d) The details of the vehicles purchased for use by the Minister, former Minister and Deputy and/or former Deputy Minister are provided in the tables below:

(i) (aa)

Vehicle purchased

(aaa) 2016/17

(bbb) 2017/18

(bb) Since April 2018

a) Make

None

None

Toyota Land Cruiser Prado

b) Model

None

None

2018

c) Price

None

None

R 854 006.01

d) Date Purchased

None

None

18 September 2018

(ii) (aa)

Vehicle purchased

(aaa) 2016/17

(bbb) 2017/18

(bb) Since April 2018

a) Make

BMW GT

None

None

b) Model

2016

None

None

c) Price

R 727 770.02

None

None

d) Date Purchased

3 July 2016

None

None

29 March 2019 - NW666

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the Government entered into any agreement to assist the government of the Kingdom of eSwatini financially; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the financial assistance?

Reply:

1. The Government of South Africa has not entered into an agreement to provide the government of the Kingdom of eSwatini with financial support.

2. Moreover, should such a formal request be received, it would need to be considered within the context of the challenging macroeconomic climate as outlined in the 2019/20 Budget Review, which highlights the following challenges:

2.1 Subdued economic growth, forecast at 1.9 percent real GDP growth for 2019/20,

2.2 An increasing budget deficit (forecast to increase from 4,2 percent in 2018/19 to 4.5 percent in 2019/20); and

2.3 the resultant fiscal consolidation measures currently being undertaken by government (reduction of baselines by R50.3 billion) to ensure that public finances are returned to a sustainable path.

29 March 2019 - NW437

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Shackleton, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Finance

What are the details of the policy certainty that the Government has strengthened as alluded to in the 2019 Budget Review?

Reply:

Progress has been made on key interventions to restore policy certainty as outlined in the 2019 Budget Review. These include:

1. Visa amendments and immigration reform: Gazetted amendments to the Immigration Act (2002) will waive the requirement of an unabridged birth certificate for children traveling from certain countries. Revised requirements for business visas clarify the documentation and accreditations required. An e-visa system will be launched with New Zealand as the pilot case. It will then be rolled out to other countries. The scarce skills list will be updated by March 2019.

2. Mining policy: Government issued a new Mining Charter. The Minister of Mineral Resources has signaled that controversial amendments to the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (2002) are no longer in keeping with the policy intent. Separate legislation for the regulation of oil and gas is being developed and consultations with various stakeholders are under way.

3. Administered price review: The Department of Energy has invited the public to comment on the basic fuel price review until 31 March 2019. Stakeholder consultations are under way to identify ways to improve the efficiency and reduce the costs of ports and rail, making the country’s exports more competitive.

4. Procurement: The Public Procurement Bill is being finalised. It will consolidate various procurement laws into one national legislative framework. Provisions in the bill will encourage participation from black-, youth- and women-owned businesses in state procurement.

5. Telecommunications spectrum: The impasse on licensing has been resolved and licensing for high-demand spectrum will commence this year, with the process expected to be completed in 2020/21.

Prior to this, the 2018 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement reported progress on longstanding policy issues including:

1. Renewable energy: Eskom’s conclusion of 27 outstanding power-purchase agreements with independent power producers.

2. Energy planning: The reestablishment of a sustainable approach to energy planning by updating the Integrated Resource Plan for consideration by Parliament.

3. Land reform: Creating a panel to advise government on measures to effect fair and equitable land reform that will increase agricultural output and build self-sufficiency in food production.

Government is also acting decisively to mitigate the risks that Eskom poses to the economy and the public finances. The restructuring of the electricity sector and state support for Eskom’s balance sheet are central to a transparent and credible reform of the utility’s business model. This forms part of government’s broader agenda to restore good governance and financial stability at public institutions and state-owned companies.

Collectively, these efforts illustrate the progress made in providing policy certainty.

29 March 2019 - NW714

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Ngwenya, Ms G to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and /or the former Minister and (ii) her Deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

Minister

Deputy Minister

(i) N/A

(ii) Audi

 

(i) N/A

(ii) Q7

 

(i) N/A

(ii) R960 140.00

 

(i) N/A

(ii) 18/05/2017

 

(aaa) N/A
(bbb) N/A

(aaa) N/A
(bbb) 18/05/2017

 

N/A

N/A

 

29 March 2019 - NW582

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury is investigating the hacking of his twitter account; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the investigation covers the period since his appointment as Minister of Finance on 9 October 2018; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. No signs of hacking were found. The possibility that Minister’s twitter account may have been hacked was raised in an interview, during which the journalist asked if Minister’s twitter account had been hacked. The response was that we did not know at the time how Minister had ended up liking the tweet in question, and that we were looking into the matter.
  2. See response to question 1

29 March 2019 - NW409

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he would consider issuing appropriate regulations in terms of section 168(1) of the Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, to ensure that payments by consumers for electricity from Eskom are placed in a separate ring-fenced account, in order to ensure that local authorities do not use it for other unauthorised expenditure?

Reply:

In terms of section 160(1) of the Constitution, a municipal council, makes decisions concerning the exercise of all the powers and the performance of all the functions of the municipality. The Municipal Finance Management Act 56 0f 2003 (MFMA) was issued to provide municipal councils with the financial management legal framework to enable decision making, which includes amongst others, the management of the municipality’s bank account. The MFMA is applicable to both municipalities and municipal entities. The MFMA enables municipalities to open more than one bank account provided that initial allocations to the municipalities flows through the municipality’s primary bank account. The legislation is however silent on the issue of “ring fencing”, however, nothing stops the municipal council from adopting a written policy which enables the ring fencing of funds for purpose of defraying liabilities due towards Eskom.

An Inter-Ministerial Task Team, made up of officials from the National Treasury and the Department of Cooperative Governance, has been established to look at strategies to address the failure by municipalities to pay, amongst others, Eskom and Water Boards.

Over and above the Inter-Ministerial Task Team, both the national and provincial treasuries are assisting financially struggling municipalities to prepare financial recovery plans for implementation. This will assist towards ensuring that the municipalities are financial sustainable. It is also important that issue of regulations are also looked at in the context of the Constitution referred to above, namely, that the executive authority at local government is vested within the municipal councils. The National Treasury can therefore regulate to provide a framework for decision making, but the ultimate and final decision vest with the municipal council.

29 March 2019 - NW565

Profile picture: Shackleton, Mr MS

Shackleton, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Finance

Why (a) was the Large Business Unit of the SA Revenue Service disbanded and (b) is the Unit being re-established?

Reply:

a) The Large Business Centre was decentralized as part of the new operating model that was adopted by SARS in 2016. SARS was of the view that decentralization will allow large businesses to have easy access to SARS offices throughout the country and by this enhance the service offering to the sector.

b) SARS took an executive decision to re-establish the Large Business segment after conducting diagnostic studies that showed the synergies and gains achieved when the Large Business Centre was centralised. The LBC will formally commence operations on 1 April 2019.

 

29 March 2019 - NW564

Profile picture: Shackleton, Mr MS

Shackleton, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) amount has been designated for the purposes of (i) creating jobs and (ii) addressing unemployment in the Government’s national budget for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) are the details of each programme and/or department or entity that will benefit from these designations?

Reply:

What (a) amount has been designated for the purposes of (i) creating jobs and (ii) addressing unemployment in the Government’s national budget for the 2019-20 financial year

Public employment programmes are key components of the government’s drive to alleviate poverty, inequality and unemployment in South Africa. These programmes have a large multiplier effect on vulnerable communities by combining the social, environmental and economic objectives of employment generation, income support, and asset creation. Government has allocated a total of R15.4 billion in the national budget for the 2019/20 financial year towards addressing unemployment. This is mainly comprised of two public employment programmes, namely, the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) (R14.6 billion) and the Jobs Fund now called the Employment Creation Facility Fund (R800 million).

The table below displays the breakdown of funds designated for the purposes of creating jobs in the 2019/20 financial year.

National departments (R'000)

13 807 428

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

4 038 608

Environmental Affairs

4 084 367

Labour

2 289 950

National Treasury

800 073

Public Works

1 812 036

Rural Development and Land Reform

411 153

Tourism

371 241

Provincial Departments (R'000)

1 586 094

Infrastructure Development

314 634

Public Works and Transport

1 271 460

GRAND TOTAL

15 393 522

Additionally, government launched the Youth Employment Service (YES) initiative in March 2018. This is a business-led initiative supported by government. It offers a quality one-year work experience to participating youth, coupled with training (both technical and behavioural) as well as boosting the access to networks relevant for finding the next job. It is complementary with government incentives such as the Employment Tax Incentive as well as custom Broad-based Black Economic Empowerment recognition work to further bolster the programme’s impact. The YES directly contributes to employment creation but does not have a direct allocation from the government.

 

(b) What are the details of each programme and/or department or entity that will benefit from these designations?

Within the EPWP, there are two main modalities through which public employment is funded. The first is through direct budgetary allocations, where public employment is an explicit part of the purpose. The second modality is where focus on employment is not the primary or stated aim of a given programme, but where there is scope for labour-intensive work as part of the programme design. Part of the rationale for the incentive grants is to encourage public bodies to look at their programmes through this prism.

The incentive grants of the EPWP were initiated to expand job creation in specific focus areas, where labour-incentive delivery methods can be maximised. The grants are made up of the following components:

In provinces:

  • Infrastructure sector
  • Environment and culture sector

In municipalities:

  • Social sector
  • Environment and culture
  • Infrastructure

At national level:

  • Environment and culture

While each of the grants vary slightly in terms of design, they share the following purposes:

  • To strengthen job creation outcomes in specific focus areas
  • To maximise the use of labour intensive methods
  • To incentivise increased job creation efforts within public bodies by linking budget allocations from the grant to performance.
  • To use the grant to incentivise increased use if core budgets and other conditional grants for the purposes of job creation.

The EPWP is carried out by the following government departments: Labour, Public Works, National Treasury, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Tourism, Environmental Affairs, Cooperative Governance and Rural Development and Land Reform. The Department of Public Works leads and coordinates the expanded public works programme, as articulated in government’s medium term strategic framework and the national development plan whilst the Jobs Fund is run directly by the National Treasury.

Complementing government’s broader job creation programmes, the Jobs Fund is a specific grant financing instrument that uses public funds to catalyse innovation and investment in activities that contribute to job creation initiatives and longer term employment growth. In March 2018 the Jobs Fund issued its eighth call for proposals which it hopes to complete by the first quarter of the 2019/20 financial year.

 

29 March 2019 - NW176

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Which public technical and vocational education and training colleges did not receive all the results of the November 2018 examinations from Umalusi during the bulk release of marks early in January 2019 and (b) what subjects were affected in each case; (2) (a) which results were still outstanding for each subject at each specified college as at 31 January 2019 and (b) what were the main reasons for the specified delays?

Reply:

1. All the centres that complied with the rules of examination as encapsulated in the policy on the conduct of examinations received their results on 31 December 2018. The tables attached as Annexure A provide the lists of subjects, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges that did not receive all their results from Umalusi for the November 2018 examinations during the bulk release of marks on
31 December 2018.

2. (a) Annexure A also provides the lists of outstanding results for each subject at each specified college as at 31 January 2019.

 (b) The bulk of the outstanding results were released on 04 February 2019, following the first mop-up process by the Department and Umalusi. The main reason for this delay was that TVET colleges had failed to submit their Internal Continuous Assessments (ICASS) and some of the external marks timeously, i.e. Report 190-N1, National Certificate (Vocational) levels 2 and 3. The Department has written warning letters to college Principals for not submitting their ICASS and the external marks on time. During May to June 2019, Departmental officials will be visiting non-compliant colleges to audit the control measures and systems related to the management of internal assessments.

Annexure A

BUSINESS STUDIES OUTSTANDING EXAMINATION MARKS

TVET COLLEGE NAME

CENTRE NAME

SUBJECT NAME

LEVEL

EKURHULENI EAST PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SPRINGS CAMPUS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

ELANGENI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KWA-MASHU CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

ESAYIDI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

PORT SHEPSTONE CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

MAJUBA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

 

CENTRE FOR PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

 

DUNDEE TECHNOLOGY CENTRE NUMBER 2 CAMPUS

COMMUNICATION

N6

MNAMBITHI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ESTCOURT CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

 

EZAKHENI A CAMPUS

 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

   

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

 

LADYSMITH CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

ORBIT PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

RUSTENBURG CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

SEDIBENG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

 

HEIDELBERG CAMPUS

COMMUNICATION

N5

 

SEBOKENG CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

SOUTH WEST GAUTENG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KRUGERSDORP CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

THEKWINI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SPRINGFIELD CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

UMFOLOZI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

RICHTEK CAMPUS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

NCV STUDIES OUTSTANDING EXAMINATION MARKS

TVET COLLEGE NAME

CENTRE NAME

OFFERING DESCRIPTION

BOLAND PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

WORCESTER CAMPUS

AGRIBUSINESS L3

BUFFALO CITY PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EAST LONDON CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT L2

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L2

   

ELECTROTECHNOLOGY L2

 

JOHN KNOX BOKWE CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

FITTING AND TURNING L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

MASONRY L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

CAPRICORN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

POLOKWANE CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

MARKETING L3

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L4

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L2

 

SENWABARWANA CAMPUS

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L3

   

MARKETING L3

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L3

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

 

SESHEGO CAMPUS

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

CENTRAL JOHANNESBURG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

HIGHVELD CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2 - L3

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

COASTAL KZN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

APPELSBOSCH CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MASONRY L3

 

UBUHLE-BOGU CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

COLLEGE OF CAPE TOWN PUBLIC TVET

CITY CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

EASTCAPE MIDLANDS PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

HEATH PARK CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

EHLANZENI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BARBERTON CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L3

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

MAPULANENG CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L3

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

ENGINEERING FABRICATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

WORKSHOP PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L2

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L3

 

MLUMATI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

MTHIMBA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

 

NELSPRUIT CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

EKURHULENI WEST PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

GERMISTON CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L2

   

MANUAL MANUFACTURING L2

   

MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

ELECTROTECHNOLOGY L2

ELANGENI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

NDWEDWE CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L2

   

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA L2

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA AND REGIONAL TL3

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L2

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L3

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L3

   

MATERIALS L3

   

MASONRY L2

   

MASONRY L3

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L3

 

NTUZUMA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

 

PINETOWN CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

QADI CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

PLUMBING L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

ESAYIDI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KOKSTAD CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L4

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L4

   

CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION L4

   

MATERIALS L4

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L4

 

PORT SHEPSTONE CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

UMZIMKHULU CAMPUS

SOIL SCIENCE L3

FLAVIUS MAREKA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SASOLBURG CAMPUS

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

GERT SIBANDE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ERMELO CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

 

EVANDER CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

FITTING AND TURNING L3

   

WELDING L4

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

 

SIBENESEFTHU CAMPUS

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

STANDERTON CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

GOLDFIELDS PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

WELKOM CAMPUS

MARKETING L2

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L2

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L2

   

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

IKHALA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EAST LONDON ALIWAL NORTH CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA L2

 

EZIBELENI CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

INGWE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MALUTI CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

 

MOUNT FRERE CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

MARKETING L4

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L4

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L4

   

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

FITTING AND TURNING L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

NGQUNGQUSHE CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

MATHEMATICS L3

KING HINTSA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

H.B.TSENGWA CAMPUS

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

 

TEKO CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

KING SABATADALINDYEBO PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

NTABOZUKO CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L2

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L2

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L3

 

ENGCOBO CAMPUS

PLANT PRODUCTION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

 

LIBODE CAMPUS

INTRODUCTION TO POLICING PRACTICES L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

MAPUZI CAMPUS(KING SABATADALINDYEBO TVET)

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA AND REGIONAL TL3

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L3

 

MTHATHA CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L2

LEPHALALE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MODIMOLLE CAMPUS

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

LETABA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MAAKE CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L2

   

MATERIALS L3

 

TZANEEN CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA L2

LOVEDALE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EAST LONDON KING CAMPUS

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

MALUTI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BONAMELO CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

ITEMOHELENG CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

APPLIED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

MASONRY L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

 

MALUTI TVET:MAIN CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

 

SEFIKENG CAMPUS

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L3

   

AGRIBUSINESS L3

MNAMBITHI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ESTCOURT CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

   

GOVERNANCE L4

 

LADYSMITH CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

MOPANI SOUTH EAST PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SIR VAL DUNCAN CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

FITTING AND TURNING L4

   

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

   

ENGINEERING FABRICATION - BOILER MAKINGL3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L4

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL4

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L4

MOTHEO PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BLOEMFONTEIN CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

MTHASHANA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KWA-GQIKAZI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

NKANGALA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

C.N. MAHLANGU CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

 

MIDDELBURG CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

 

WATERVAL-BOVEN CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA AND REGIONAL TL3

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L3

 

WITBANK CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L3

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MULTIMEDIA CONTENT L3

   

SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN L3

   

COMPUTER HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE L3

   

PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L3

ORBIT PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BRITS CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

RUSTENBURG CAMPUS

ENGINEERING FABRICATION - BOILER MAKINGL3

PORT ELIZABETH PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BETHELSDORP CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L2

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L2

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L2

 

IQHAYIYA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L2

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

 

RUSSELL ROAD COLLEGE FOR CAREER EDUC

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

MARKETING L2

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L2

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L3

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT L2

   

PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING L3

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

RURAL PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

DE AAR CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

FOOD PREPARATION L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L2

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L3

 

KATHU CAMPUS

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

SOUTH WEST GAUTENG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

GEORGE TABOR CAMPUS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L4

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L4

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L4

 

ROODEPOORT CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

TALETSO PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

LEHURUTSHE CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

THE SOUTH AFRICAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

 

MAFIKENG/MMABATHO CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L3

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

WELDING L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

THEKWINI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SPRINGFIELD CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

 

UMBILO CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

TSHWANE NORTH PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MAMELODI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

SOSHANGUVE NORTH CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L4

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L3

   

PLUMBING L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

WORKSHOP PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L2

 

TEMBA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FABRICATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO POLICING PRACTICES L2

   

THEORY OF POLICING PRACTICES L3

   

INTRODUCTION TO LAW L2

   

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE L2

   

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

UMFOLOZI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ESHOWE CAMPUS(SUB-CENTRE FOR 5517)

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L3

 

ESIKHAWINI CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L3

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L3

   

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L3

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L3

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

MASONRY L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

PLUMBING L3

 

MANDENI CAMPUS(SUB-CENTRE FOR 5517)

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

PROCESS TECHNOLOGY L3

   

PULP AND PAPERMAKING TECHNOLOGY L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L2

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L3

 

RICHTEK CAMPUS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

UMGUNGUNDLOVU PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EDENDALE CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L2

   

PLUMBING L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

 

MSUNDUZI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

 

PLESSISLAER CAMPUS

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

URBAN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KIMBERLEY(MOREMOGOLO) CAMPUS

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

NORTHERN CAPE CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

VHEMBE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MAVHOI CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L3

 

SOUTH CAMPUS(MASHAMBA)

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L2

   

AGRIBUSINESS L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

 

TECHNIVEN CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

VUSELELA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KLERKSDORP CAMPUS

SOIL SCIENCE L2

   

SOIL SCIENCE L3

   

PLANT PRODUCTION L2

   

PLANT PRODUCTION L3

   

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L2

   

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L3

   

AGRIBUSINESS L2

   

AGRIBUSINESS L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L3

 

TAUNG CAMPUS

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

WESTERN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

RANDFONTEIN CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

29 March 2019 - NW410

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2633 on 17 October 2018, she is now in a position to indicate whether her department's higher education language policy, of which the concept was published in the Government Gazette of 23 February 2018, has already been finalised; if not, what (a) processes are still outstanding and (b) is the timeframe for finalisation; if so, by what date will it be published; (2) whether her department has received and considered the submissions of (a) the SA Academy for Science and Arts, (b) the Afrikaans Language Board and (c) Afriforum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether, if the specified policy has not yet been finalised, she will consider holding a symposium to fine-tune it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she has found that the policy is in compliance with her obligation under subsection 6(4) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to manage and monitor the use of the official languages by means of legislative and other measures, since subsection 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997, has the above as underlying basis; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department has not yet finalised the Language Policy for Higher Education, which was published in February 2018 for public comment.

(a) The Department has developed a further draft of the policy taking into consideration all the public comments received. The draft policy will be taken through the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (SEIAS), which is a necessary process for all government policies, bills and regulations before approval for implementation. Parallel to the SEIAS process, a draft will be submitted to the Council on Higher Education (CHE) for advice, as required by the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended). These two processes may invariably take about four months to complete (May-August 2019). Feedback from the abovementioned processes may lead to further amendments to the draft policy and will feed into the development of a final draft for publication and implementation.

(b) The policy will be finalised during 2019 once the above processes have been completed. It is envisaged that the policy will be implemented in 2020 when stakeholders, in particular the universities, have been taken through the revisions.

2. The Department received comments from a wide range of stakeholders. Submissions from all stakeholders have been considered taking into account the values of equity and the need to address the historical marginalisation of African languages as provided for in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (1996).

(a) The Department received a submission from the SA Academy for Arts and Science. The Academy welcomed the revised Language Policy for Higher Education and proposed that specific universities be assigned to develop indigenous South African languages. It called for research to be undertaken to establish guiding principles and procedures for the development of new terminology for African languages. Moreover, the Academy proposed that a core cohort of lecturers proficient in African languages be developed to ensure that there are lecturers who can teach in these languages.

(b) No submission was received from the Afrikaans Language Board.

(c) Afriforum welcomed the review of the policy and called for a funding allocation to be made in support of multilingualism at universities. It underscored the fundamental right of learners/students to receive education in their mother tongue or the language of their choice. It supported the proposed partnerships with the Department of Basic Education in promoting the development of all indigenous languages in South Africa. It further welcomed the explicit reference to Afrikaans as an indigenous South African language in the policy.

3. The Department has already held a number of symposiums and seminars on this matter and is not planning to hold any others before the policy is finalised. However, the Department will continue to engage with universities and other relevant bodies regarding the implementation of the policy once it has been published.

4. The revision of the Language Policy for Higher Education is being done in compliance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended).

5. The Minister will communicate to all stakeholders once the policy has been published in the government gazette for implementation.

29 March 2019 - NW244

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Finance

What has been the impact of manipulation of the Rand on revenue collection?

Reply:

We have no evidence of the manipulation of the Rand, and invite the Honourable Member to provide any evidence he may have of such manipulation. The currency market is a deep and liquid market, and it is difficult to determine any material or long-lasting impact of any one transaction on the level or value of the currency. I am therefore not able to respond to the question on the impact on revenue collection.

It is important to differentiate between the impact of any transaction on consumers and the impact on the value of the rand – current cases before the Competition Commission appear to be related more to the conduct of bank traders towards clients, rather than providing evidence of affecting the actual value of the rand, but let us await the outcome of that investigation before making any conclusions.

 

29 March 2019 - NW627

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 3915 on 9 January 2019, the implementation of the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council resolution included employees in Programme One; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total number of employees in Programme One (i) qualified and (ii) did not qualify and (b) for what reason?

Reply:

Yes, the implementation of the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council Resolution included employees in Programme 1.

(a) (i) 18 employees in Programme 1 qualified; and

(ii) 48 employees did not qualify.

(b) The DPSA Circular 4 of 2014, a Directive on the amendment to the implementation of the PSCBC Resolution 3 of 2009 and the grading of jobs/posts on salary levels 9/10 and 11/12, directed that the automatic upgrades should be implemented for employees who were appointed between 1 July 2010 and 31 July 2012, the 48 employees who did not qualify were appointed after the said date.

The National Treasury consulted with the Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) on the grading of the positions of 48 employees who were appointed on or after 1 August 2012, as per the DPSA Circular 4 of 2014. The affected positions were subsequently verified by the DPSA and retained on salary levels 9 and 11 respectively.

29 March 2019 - NW245

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether he has found that currency manipulation plays a role in illicit financial flows; if so, (2) whether he has found that banks who take part in currency manipulation should have their licences revoked; if not, why not?

Reply:

1. No I have not, since the National Treasury does not have any evidence on whether there is any form of currency manipulation and hence not able to assess the impact of any alleged manipulation on illicit financial flows. The National Treasury has also checked that the South African Reserve Bank likewise does not have such evidence, and would like to invite the Honourable Member to provide any such evidence if she has any.

2. As stated above, neither the National Treasury nor the South African Reserve Bank have any evidence that any bank has taken part in currency manipulation. We are aware that the Competition Commission is investigating a case of price fixing and market allocation in the trading of foreign currency pairs involving the Rand, which it has referred to the Competition Tribunal for prosecution. The currency market is a deep and liquid market, and it is difficult to determine any material or long-lasting impact of any one transaction on the level or value of the currency.

It is also important to differentiate between the impact of any transaction on consumers and the impact on the value of the rand – current cases before the Competition Commission appear to be related more to the conduct of bank traders towards clients, rather than providing evidence of affecting the actual value of the rand, but let us await the outcome of that investigation before making any conclusions.

29 March 2019 - NW532

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

a) (aa) The Department does not own buildings, properties or facilities.

(bb) The table below provides a list of buildings rented by the Department.

Rented Building

(b) Value / Size

(b) The purpose of the rented building

(c)(i) Period of renting the building

(c)(ii) Owner of the building

(c)(iii) Monthly rental fee

1. 123 Francis Baard Street Building

19 024.15 m2

Office Space Accommodation

Month-to-month rental

Bothongo Group

R 3 961 430.53

2. Ndinaye House

11 583.26 m2

Office Space Accommodation

Month-to-month rental

Bothongo Group

R 1 906 457.55

3. INDLELA Training Centre

18 Hectares

Trade Test Service and Office Space Accommodation

State Owned

Department of Public Works

State Owned

R278 373.00

4. Golden Acre (Regional Office Cape Town)

815.68 m2

Office Space Accommodation

5 Years

Paramount Property Fund Ltd.

R 147 712.88

5. 21 Corner Robison and South Street building (Regional Office North West)

637.25 m2

Office Space Accommodation

5 Years

Platinum Crossroads Properties

R 61 552.00

29 March 2019 - NW566

Profile picture: Shackleton, Mr MS

Shackleton, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Finance

On what grounds is the National Treasury’s projection based that the country’s gross domestic product will grow by 1.5 percent in the 2019-20 financial year?

Reply:

Real gross domestic product (GDP) growth is expected to increase from an estimated 0.7 per cent in 2018/19 to 1.5 per cent in 2019/20. Growth is expected to be supported by stronger household spending and private sector investment.

Household spending is projected to strengthen due to gradual improvements in disposable income and credit extended to households. Employment growth is expected to remain weak in the early half of the fiscal year, although real wage growth in the private sector is expected to recover.

Investment growth is expected to remain subdued compared with historical levels, but improving over the medium term. In 2019/20, investment growth is expected to be supported by a rising need to replace worn capital, an expected improvement in certain export commodity prices, and a gradual recovery in business confidence.

The main risks to the economic outlook for 2019/20 concerns Eskom and the potential impact that ineffective implementation of its reconfiguration could have on capital flows; the level of the exchange rate; and investor confidence. Other near-term domestic risks include the potential for disruptive load-shedding, prolonged industrial action and whether a hesitance to investment continues well beyond political events scheduled this year. Government has made progress on restoring policy certainty with many measures being implemented or prepared for implementation. Improved traction on the reform agenda could increase growth, if reforms are well-received by investors and businesses.

Global risks include an escalation of global trade frictions that lead to financial market volatility and undermine international trade and investment. If trade disputes are resolved, the resulting improvement in business and investor sentiment can support global growth. Slower growth in key export markets can further pressure demand for South Africa’s exports while global financial markets remain vulnerable to uncertainties surrounding Brexit and potential banking sector risks in Europe.

29 March 2019 - NW341

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Finance

In light of the fact that the Nugent Commission of Inquiry Into Tax Administration and Governance by the SA Revenue Service (Sars) completed its work and issued a final report on 14 December 2018, (a) on what legal basis is the Commission continuing to be active at Sars after completion it completed its work and (b) on what date was the official last day of the Commission?

Reply:

a) The Commission has operated at all times in terms of a Presidential Proclamation (no 17 of 2018, published in Government Gazette 41652 of 24 May 2018) which set out the terms of reference for the Commission supplemented by regulations set out in Proclamation no 18 of 2018 (published in Government Gazette 41713 on 15 June 2019), as amended. There is no end-date for the Commission, but the terms of reference required a final report by 14 December 2018. Having met this deadline and issued its final report, the Commission is no longer active at this stage in terms of further hearings or reports, but Judge Nugent is concluding logistical arrangements like the cataloging and archiving of the Commission’s work or attending (where required, with other members of the Panel or evidence team) to requests like that of appearing before the Standing Committee on Finance on 13 February 2019. This logistical process commenced after delivery of the final report, and takes place at the premises that SARS made available to the Commission for its work.

b) There is no last day of the Commission, even though it is not actively functioning in terms of hearings or fact-finding. The President is expected to respond shortly to the recommendations of the Commission, and to provide clarity on a formal end-date for the Commission.

29 March 2019 - NW619

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the estimated tax revenue lost over the past 10 financial years due to the illicit cigarette industry?

Reply:

SARS has conducted a research study (tax gap) to estimate the loss of revenue on illicit trade of cigarette using the top-down approach for the period 2014/2015 and 2015/2016 respectively. The estimated loss of tax revenue (tax gap) was estimated at R4.1 billion and R6 billion respectively. However, SARS has not commissioned a research study to quantify the size of the illicit cigarette for the period in question, 2008/2009 – 2017/2018 financial years and as such, SARS is unable to provide an official position to that effect.

SARS is currently undertaking a scientific and evidenced-based research study to identify the businesses operating in the illicit economy with a view to quantify the size of the illicit economy. The research methodologies include both qualitative and quantitative analysis through collaboration with business, field research including a survey for data collection for all tax types. The research study further serve to solicit input from the multidisciplinary stakeholder involved in the illicit economy enforcement to ensure a collective approach is attained. The study is expected to be completed during 2021.

SARS has put measure in place to combat the illicit trade and selling of illicit cigarettes through its Customs enforcement wing and in collaboration with other law enforcement wings from the public (JCPS cluster) and the private including TISA and FITA. SARS is aware of the various studies amongst others IPSOS and Euronomics which has estimated the size of the illicit cigarettes to average R8 billion per annum however, due to the absence of our own research, SARS is unable to quantify or confirm any narrative currently in the public domain.

SARS Enforcement performance, 10 years, 2008/2009 – 2017/2018 financial year

SARS enforcement was involved in 13, 428 seizures in the past 10 years, resulting in 1.7 billion sticks of cigarettes with a Rand value of R1 041 billion calculated at an average street value of R0.60 per cigarette sticks and R1.7 billion when using the industry acceptable average value of R1.00.

29 March 2019 - NW501

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of (a) plumbers, (b) electricians, (c) welders, (d) carpenters, (e) boiler makers and (f) mechanics who graduated from each institution of higher learning in the country in the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

The first phase of training artisans involves an integrated learning process of obtaining fundamental and practical training at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college. The second phase covers the trade theory including workplace training at an accredited workplace. The final phase is taking a National Trade Test in the relevant trade. The table below indicates the training that has taken place from 01 April 2018 to 31 December 2018:

Plumbers

Electricians

Welders

Carpenters

Boilermakers

Mechanics

715

2 291

651

102

703

2 262

Candidates are given three chances to pass the trade test. If they are still unsuccessful, they are placed on the Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning programme, which will assist them in obtaining their trade qualification.

The knowledge components for the trades are currently provided through the Report 191 qualification at N2 level and National Certificate Vocational (NCV) level three on the National Qualification Framework.

The table below indicates the number of students who passed the theory component of the trades through the Report 191 and NCV qualifications in the November 2018 national examination.

Trade Test

Passed

Plumber’s Theory N2

402

Plumbing L3

940

Electrical Trade Theory N2

3 147

Electrical Systems and Construction L3

5 288

Welder’s Theory N2

77

Welding L3

564

Plater’s Theory N2

685

Engineering Fabrication: Boiler making L3

1 054

Carpentry Theory N2

161

Carpentry and Roof Work L3

958

Motor Trade Theory N2

435

Automotive Repairs and Maintenance L3

1 816

Grand Total

15 527

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR JABU NTSHINGILA AND MR JAMES MOGALE

CONTACT: 087 236 9324 / 012 312 6205

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 501.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 501 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

28 March 2019 - NW182

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What are the details of the process followed to appoint a Ranamane Mokalane Incorporated to represent Metrorail in the matter between Mukoma Technologies and Metrorail in the High Court of South Africa, case number 47482/2009 dated 30 January 2017, (b) what are the names of other legal representatives that were considered, (c) on what date was the specified representative appointed, (d) what amount has been paid by Metrorail to the representative to date, (e) in what number of cases has the specified representative represented Metrorail and (f) what was the outcome in each case; (2) whether Metrorail verified the registration details of the specified representative; if not, why not; if so, what are the registration details of the representative; (3) whether Metrorail conducted a background check on the specified representative before appointing it; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the (a) process and (b) outcome; (4) whether the specified representative still represents Metrorail?

Reply:

1. (a) The panel of attorneys was appointed through an open tender process. Once the panel is constituted, work is allocated to the lawyers and the attempt is made to ensure that work is allocated to attorneys in a fair and equitable manner that ensures attorneys are briefed according to their strengths, expertise and experience.

(b) The entire panel is considered when a new instruction is received.

(c) The specific representative was first appointed in 2006 to represent PRASA in the Rail and Road Assessing / Mkhonza matter. In 2009 the representative was appointed to represent PRASA in the Mukoma Technologies matter.

(d) The total amount paid to Ranamane Mokalane to date, amounts to R10,116,561-32.

(e) See table below.

(f) See table below.

Name of Counterparty / Nature of matter

Brief synopsis of the issues in dispute

Status of the matter

Rail & Road Assessing (“RRA”)

Claim for alleged professional services rendered and not paid for in the amount of R3 466 000.00

Matter currently pending before South Gauteng High Court – this matter was placed on the roll and later removed after the plaintiff (RRA) failed to produce documents that it was required to produce at the hearing of the matter and that were required to properly assess RRA’s claim. Because of this failure, the matter was removed from the roll.

Mukoma Technologies (“MT”)

MT was engaged to repair, service, maintain and install CCTV cameras at various train stations on an as-and-when basis. MT has claimed for loss of earnings in the amount of R27 353 474.90

The court of first instance found against MT and granted leave to appeal to the full bench. The full bench denied the appeal. The application for leave to appeal is currently before the Supreme Court of Appeal.

Department of Public Works

PRASA is the plaintiff in this matter and it relates to services rendered to the Department of Public Works. PRASA is claiming R24mil

Matter currently pending before the South Gauteng High Court and the parties are engaging in settlement negotiations

Internal disciplinary hearing for employees alleged to have been engaged in jobs-for-sale

Ranamane Mokalane Attorneys are acting as initiators in these proceedings

Two of the matters have been finalised. Three other matters are nearing finalisation

2. One of the requirements for attorneys to be placed on the PRASA panel of lawyers is a fidelity fund certificate issued by the relevant office of the law society. In this case, the firm had a fidelity fund certificate at the time of appointment.

3. Refer to (2) above.

4. PRASA is still represented by Ranamane Mokalane Attorneys and the attorney working on the matters is Mr Grayne Sekhasimbe. On 12 March 2019, PRASA learned that a criminal charge of fraud has been laid against Mr Grayne Sekhasimbe. This is viewed in a serious light by PRASA. PRASA has started engagements with the necessary persons, including the investigating officer in the case to ensure that PRASA’s rights are not imperilled. PRASA will take a decision on the relationship with Ranamane Mokalane Attorneys and Mr Grayne Sekhasimbe by 20 March 2019.

28 March 2019 - NW679

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why has SSL certification of certain websites (names furnished) lapsed, (b)(i) what is the name of the person who is responsible in this regard and (ii) why has this person not addressed the specified matter on time, (c) on what date will this matter be addressed and (d) what processes, procedures and mechanisms are in place to ensure that this is not repeated in future?

Reply:

RTMC

a) www.rtmc.co.za

The client server encryption was not implemented to this web service as this is purely an information website and no login services are present.  Any available documents to download have to be completed and forwarded per mail and not uploaded to the website itself, which could compromise confidential information.  The RTMC is currently upgrading the website to a latest content management platform and is in possession of a verified wildcard SSL certificate if the need arises to implement on this web service.

www.aarto.gov.za

The aarto.gov.za web service also corresponds to an informational website apart from the service querying fines and submitting elective options to the National Contravention Register (NCR).  The NCR functionality has been implemented using SSL within an iframe running within the web service to eliminate any confidential information being sent across the internet unencrypted. 

b) (i) & (ii) The RTMC manages the www.aarto.gov.za. As per following link https://knowledge.digicert.com/alerts/ALERT2562.html the SSL certificate expired due to a discrepancy between the governing bodies with regard to SSL certification of SSL Certificates. A delay was experienced in reissuing the new SSL Certificate free of charge as the Certificate Authority did not recognize the Corporation as the owner due to the fact that the certificate was procured by the erstwhile NaTIS Contractor. The details have since been updated.

c) The matter has been addressed already and certificates have been replaced.

d) The RTMC ordinarily tracks the expiry of the certificates and follows internal processes to ensure the service is not interrupted. In this instance the SSL certificate did not expire by ordinary effluxion of time but was no longer recognized. The Corporation has implemented a process to monitor the recognition status of all SSL certificates monthly to proactively react to any possible disruptions.

RTIA

a) www.rtia.co.za

The RTIA website has never lapsed.

b) (c) (d) Not applicable

28 March 2019 - NW559

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What investments have been made in each month by (i) his department and (ii) entities reporting to him with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) what was the nature of each investment, (c) why was each investment made in each case, (d) what were the projected returns in each case, (e) who represented the department or entity when negotiating the investments, (f) on what date was each investment made and (g) what returns have been enjoyed to date in each case?

Reply:

Department

a) (i) Department did not make any investment with the Venda Building Society of Bank

(aa) (bb) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

ACSA has not made any investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a) No, the (ii) CBRTA has not made investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) and (g) are not applicable.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a) No, the (ii) RAF has not made investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) and (g) are not applicable.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a) No, the (ii) RTIA has not made investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) and (g) are not applicable

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a) No, the (ii) RTMC has not made investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) and (g) are not applicable

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(a) No, the (ii) SANRAL has not made investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f) and (g) are not applicable

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. ATNS has never invested any funds with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank
  2. Not applicable
  3. Not applicable
  4. Not applicable
  5. Not applicable
  6. Not applicable
  7. Not applicable

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a) (i) Not applicable. (a) (ii), (aa) and (bb) and (b), (c), (d),(e), (f) and (g) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) has not made any investments in the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA):

a) (ii) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa did not make any investments with the Venda Building Society Bank.

(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

e) Not applicable.

f) Not applicable.

g) Not applicable.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR):

a) (ii) The Railway Safety Regulator did not make any investments with the Venda Building Society Mutual Bank.

(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

e) Not applicable.

f) Not applicable.

g) Not applicable.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

a) (ii) The Ports Regulator has never made any investments with Venda Building Society Mutual Bank (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 01 April 2018.

  1. N/A
  2. N/A
  3. N/A
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. N/A

South Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA has never invested in the Venda Building Society Bank.

(b)(c)(d)(e)(f)(g) Not applicable

27 March 2019 - NW292

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) what number of the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

a) (i) One tender briefing was held in 2018 by (i) the Department of Basic Education and it was compulsory.

b) One compulsory briefing session.

UMALUSI

a) (ii) Umalusi conducted four (4) tender briefings in the period 1 April 2018 to date.

b) All four (4) tender briefings were compulsory.

SACE

a) (ii) The South African Council for Educators never held any tender briefing during 2018.

b) No briefing was held and non were compulsory.

27 March 2019 - NW735

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What amount has the Electoral Commission spent on cyber security for the 2019 elections and (b) what human resources are allocated solely towards cyber security for the 2019 elections?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Electoral Commission as follows:

(a) The cyber security plans and operations for elections are unfolding in line with the Electoral Commission’s preparations for the 2019 National and Provincial Elections. However, given the security nature of the cyber security operations and their impact on elections, the Electoral Commission is unable to disclose the requested details at this point. The Electoral Commission will be publishing these details immediately after elections as part of the statutory Election Report.

(b) same as (a) above.

27 March 2019 - NW578

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has found that educators who are not members of teachers’ unions are disqualified from consideration to become markers of National Senior Certificate examinations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All educators that have the appropriate qualification and the relevant grade 12 teaching experience are eligible to apply to mark. Markers are then selected in terms of the criteria listed in the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM).

Membership to a Teacher Union is not a criterion for appointment as a marker and no educator has ever been disqualified from the selection process due non-membership to a Teacher Union.

27 March 2019 - NW577

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether the 2018 National Senior Certificate Business Studies examination paper was remarked nationally or only in specific provinces; (2) whether (a) her department and/or (b) provincial departments of education requested the remarking of the Business Studies examination; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (3) whether individual requests for remarking were made; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The 2018 NSC Business Studies, as with all other subjects, are remarked by all nine (9) Provincial Education Departments and not remarked nationally or in specific provinces. Only in the case of the selected subjects that were marked centrally by the DBE, was the remark also done centrally by the DBE.

2. The remark process is an appeal process that can be utilised by any candidate who wants to confirm his/her marks in the written examination. As such, it is the candidates and not the DBE or the Provincial Education Departments that request the remarking. Candidates are also allowed to request a re-check of their scripts and they could further request to view their scripts after the remark request has been processed.

3. Individual requests for remarking of Business Studies were made. There were a total of 6685 individual requests for the remark of Business Studies that were made.

 

27 March 2019 - NW762

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

((a) On what grounds has he found was the application of a certain person (name and details furnished) for permanent residence rejected and (b) under what conditions would his department reconsider its decision?

Reply:

I have been informed by my Department as follows:

The reference provided, PTACOD01200309, is not a source of reference used by, or within, the Department of Home Affairs. The Names and Surname provided, unaccompanied by other personal details cannot be utilised to obtain any information from the Department’s systems. Neither the Movement Control System nor the Visa Adjudication System can retrieve any permanent residence application using the information provided. As such, the Department is not able to verify such an application for Permanent Residence was ever submitted or received by Home Affairs.

It is requested that should additional information related to the application be available such as date of birth, passport number and full personal details, that such information be provided to the Department for further investigation.

27 March 2019 - NW579

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) learners between the ages of 9 and 14 years old fell pregnant in the past five academic years and (b) the specified learners returned to continue schooling after giving birth?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Please note that the question has been referred to Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). The information will be provided as soon as received from PEDs.

27 March 2019 - NW703

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and/or the former minister and (ii) his deputy and/or former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

I have been informed by my Department as follows:

(a)(b)(c)(d)(i)(ii)(aa)(aaa) No Vehicles were purchased for the Minister in the 2016/2017 financial year.

(a)(b)(c)(d)(i)(aa)(bbb) (a) Lexus (b) RX 350 EX (c) R815 660.88 (d) September 2017 (bbb) 2017-18 financial year.

(a)(b)(c)(d)(i)(aa)(bbb) AUDI (b) Q7 3.0 TDi, (c) R847 676.64 (d) September 2017 (bbb) 2017-18 financial year.

a)(b)(c)(d)(ii)(aa)(bb) (a) No Vehicles were purchased for the Minister since 01 April 2018

(a)(b)(c)(d)(ii)(aa)(aaa)(bbb)(bb) No Vehicles were purchased for the Deputy Minister in the 2016/2017, 2017/2018 financial years and since 01 April 2018.

26 March 2019 - NW819

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to goods imported from Israel, how is his department able to differentiate between goods produced in the occupied territories and those that are not?

Reply:

Response from the NCC:

1. In terms of Notice 380 of 2013 published in Government Gazette No: 36364, on 12 April 2013:

(i) In terms of Section 24 of the Consumer Protection Act 68 of 2008,:

a) No persons may apply a trade description to any goods that is likely to mislead a consumer;

b) The producer or importer of goods must apply trade descriptions disclosing the country of origin of the goods and any prescribed information;

c) An importer, producer, retailer or supplier in RSA must label Israeli goods that emanate from East Jerusalem, Gaza and West Bank as emanating from these areas as “Israeli Goods”

d) The labels must be permanent, legible and conspicuous.

26 March 2019 - NW751

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the current water consumption rates, his department commissioned any study to determine whether the country will have enough water to sustain the population, economic growth and development by (a) 2050, (b) 2075 and (c) 2100; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the findings of the study?

Reply:

a) The Department undertakes various planning studies over 25-year horizons, including the period to 2050 to ensure water security for the country. Such studies include (i) Water Availability Assessment Studies (WAAS), which generate base input information for planning, (ii) long term water resource reconciliation planning studies for large and small demand centres, and (iii) catchment-based studies. These planning studies culminate in strategies that address water needs for the country, which are then continuously monitored and updated every 3 to 5 years to ensure that they remain current and relevant. The outputs of the studies inform the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), the instrument by which the minister gives effect to the National Water Act, as well as the master plans that emanate from the NWRS. The studies are available on the DWS website, at http://www6.dwa.gov.za/iwrp/projects.aspx..

(b) and (c)

For the perspectives 2075 to 2100, the planning horizon is longer, and this is accompanied by a high degree of uncertainty. The studies conducted as mentioned in (a) above provide indicative directions of strategies for the country’s water security, which are continuously firmed up on a progressive basis to make them dynamic high level water resource plans that address uncertainty.

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26 March 2019 - NW512

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minlstar of Social Development

V\/hat number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property.

Reply:

(i) (ii) (iii)

(a) (i) 2 Buildings.

(ii) Leases 2 properties.

(iii) (aa) None.

(bb) 2.

(b) None.

(ii) To accommodate National Department of Social Development and the Social Security Branch at Harlequins Office Park.

(c)(i) The National Department of Social Development has lsased office accommodation since 2001.

Social Security Branch at Harlequins Office Park has leased office accommodation since 2000.

(ii) The National Department of Social Development has leased office accommodation f‹om the Human Science Reach Council (HSRC).

Social Security Branch at Harlequin6 Office Park has leased office accommodation from Delta Properties.

(iii) The National Department of Social Development has leased office accommodation from the Human Science Reach Council (HSRC) for

R2 284 518.83.

Social Security Branch at Harlequins Office Park has leased office accommodation from Delta Properties for R574 589.37

 

 

26 March 2019 - NW812

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Are any microchips produced in the Republic; if so, (a) where are the microchips produced, (b) what is the value of microchips produced and (c) what number of people are employed in the production process?

Reply:

Microchips are produced mainly in Asia and the United States for the global market by companies such as Samsung, Intel and Taiwan Semiconductor manufacturing company. Due to economies of scale considerations, coupled with the quantum of investment required, the capability and the capacity to produce microchips anywhere else in the world is limited. There are therefore no microchips produced in the Republic.

26 March 2019 - NW569

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) On what date was the Rand Water project, Palmiet RW-06, started and (b) what (i) still needs to be done before the project is completed, (ii) are the reasons that the project has stalled for over a year and (iii) is the expected completion date; (2) (a) what (i) is the expenditure to date and (ii) was the original costing of the project, (b) who were the contractors and consultants on the original project, (c) who is contracted to complete the project and (d) what penalties have been requested and paid?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Rand Water project Palmiet RW-06 started in March 2014.

(1)(b)(i) The overall project is currently 90% complete. The overall scope of work for this project is the construction of a 15km pipeline and the portion now to be completed is approximately 700m which includes pipelaying together with the associated concrete chambers. Thereafter tie-ins/cross connections of the entire 15km pipeline will be constructed and this is dependent on the shutdowns.

(1)(b)(ii) The project experienced challenges which were beyond Rand Water and the service provider’s control as follows:

  • All service providers experienced unsuitable ground conditions which included excessive rock and a high water table. These conditions were not predetermined and as such had to be decided upon within the project time lines which then resulted into delays.
  • During implementation, the pipeline route had to be changed to accommodate third party requirements (i.e. restrictions related to working within the vicinity of high voltage ESKOM powerlines and late approval of Water Use Licence (WULA) by the department). This added in the delays experienced by the project.

(1)(b)(iii) The expected completion date is April 2020.

(2)(a)(i) The expenditure to date is R597 396 518.29 excluding Vat.

(2)(a)(ii) The original costing of the project was R668 556 000.00 excluding Vat.

(2)(b) The contractors and consultants on the original project where the following:

Contractors:

  • M&D Construction Group (Portion A pipe laying – 8km)
  • Lubbe Construction (Pty) Ltd (Portion B pipe laying – 7km)
  • Esor / SBM Joint Venture (Portion B pipe jacking)
  • Mapitsi Civil Works (Portion A pipe jacking).

Consultants:

  • Jeffares and Green (Pty) Ltd.

(2)(c) The service providers listed in question (2)(b) above are all contracted to complete the project. Lubbe Construction (Pty) Ltd is currently completing their scope of work on portion B where they are left with 700m of pipelaying against the scope work of 7km.

(2)(d) Penalties have been applied and are being progressively deducted for all contractor delays.

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26 March 2019 - NW629

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Energy

Who are the 10 highest: a) single shareholders; and b) debt providers in terms of (i) percentage and (ii) Rand value for each of the Independent Power Producer Bid Windows?

Reply:

In response to (a)(i) and (a)(ii), as at Financial Close the 10 highest shareholders in terms of percentage and Rand value for each of the Independent Power Producer Bid Windows are provided in the tables below:

As at Financial Close in 2012/13

   

BID WINDOW1 10 Highest Shareholders

 

 

Shareholder Name

Equity Amount (ZAR)

Equity Amount as a % of Total Equity for Bid Window

Abengoa

1 724 186 858

12.41%

Globeleq

1 210 081 705

8.71%

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

980 419 978

7.06%

Old Mutual

784 701 741

5.65%

Government Employee Pension Fund (GEPF)

764 647 675

5.50%

Oakleaf Investment Holdings 83 (Pty) Ltd

640 295 147

4.61%

Pele Green

539 291 875

3.88%

African Infrastructure Investment Fund

534 755 267

3.85%

Thebe Group

447 406 182

3.22%

Newshelf 1152 (Pty) Ltd [Kaxu Community Trust]

390 625 415

2.81%

Total Equity for Bid Window

13 893 807 469

 

     

As at Financial Close in 2013/14

   

BID WINDOW2 10 Highest Shareholders

 

 

Shareholder Name

Equity Amount (ZAR)

Equity Amount as a % of Total Equity for Bid Window

Cennergi (Pty) Ltd

1 293 946 054

15.25%

Government Employee Pension Fund (GEPF)

703 139 811

8.29%

Acciona Energy South Africa (Pty) Ltd

702 087 913

8.27%

ACWA

601 200 000

7.09%

Scatec

395 156 598

4.66%

Innowind (Pty) Ltd

339 719 987

4.00%

Royal Bafokeng Holdings

320 991 013

3.78%

Globeleq

278 948 194

3.29%

Nehawu Investment Holdings

278 948 194

3.29%

GSEATSA (GDF SUEZ Energy Asia Turkey & Southern Africa B.V)

209 150 271

2.47%

Total Equity for Bid Window

8 484 640 803

 

     

As at Financial Close in 2014/15

   

BID WINDOW3 10 Highest Shareholders

 

 

Shareholder Name

Equity Amount (ZAR)

Equity Amount as a % of Total Equity for Bid Window

Enel

5 198 996 899

27.66%

Lekela Power

1 449 624 347

7.71%

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

1 094 745 135

5.82%

Government Employee Pension Fund (GEPF)

1 031 902 826

5.49%

Xina CSP South Africa (Pty) Ltd

1 020 159 759

5.43%

Gibson Bay Wind Farm Community Trust SPV (RF) (Pty) Ltd)

914 580 498

4.87%

Royal Bafokeng Holdings

765 341 182

4.07%

Longyuan South Africa Renewables (Pty) Ltd

745 279 034

3.96%

Grazigystix (Pty) Ltd

521 822 946

2.78%

Pele Green

510 961 026

2.72%

Total Equity for Bid Window

18 796 756 378

 

     

As at Financial Close in 2016/17[1]

   

BID WINDOW3.5 10 Highest Shareholders

 

 

Shareholder Name

Equity Amount (ZAR)

Equity Amount as a % of Total Equity for Bid Window

ENGIE Global Developments B.V. (EDV) (33161737)

1 738 966 649

28.93%

Government Employee Pension Fund (GEPF)

954 920 103

15.89%

ACWA

848 964 953

14.12%

Subrotouch (SIOC Community Development Trust)

448 187 281

7.46%

Lereko Metier REIPPP Fund Trust

412 332 298

6.86%

CEF (SOC) Ltd

363 842 123

6.05%

Investec Bank Limited

268 912 368

4.47%

Solar Reserve

254 689 486

4.24%

Pele Green

242 561 415

4.04%

Kathu Local Community Trust

89 637 456

1.49%

Total Equity for Bid Window

6 011 112 396

 

 

As at Financial Close in 2018/19

   

BID WINDOW4 10 Highest Shareholders

 

 

Shareholder Name

Equity Amount (ZAR)

Equity Amount as a % of Total Equity for Bid Window

Enel

2 083 686 489

16.58%

Old Mutual

1 049 847 382

8.35%

BTSA Netherland Cooperatie U.A. (Biotherm)

1 014 275 889

8.07%

Pele Green

961 712 960

7.65%

H1 Holding

912 439 031

7.26%

Lekela Power

897 924 503

7.14%

Brezza Africana (RF) (PTY) LTD

682 396 348

5.43%

Scatec

634 065 319

5.04%

Thebe Group

633 922 430

5.04%

Elawan Energy S.L (Gestamp)

385 125 628

3.06%

Total Equity for Bid Window

12 569 964 925

 

In response to b(i) and b(ii), as at Financial Close the 10 highest debt providers in terms of percentage and Rand value for each of the Independent Power Producer Bid Windows are provided in the tables below:

As at Financial Close in 2012/13

   

BID WINDOW1 10 Highest Debt Providers

 

 

Lender Name

Debt Amount (ZAR)

Debt Amount as a % of Total Debt for Bid Window

Standard Bank

8 237 096 287

23.31%

First Rand

7 895 318 954

22.34%

DBSA

4 281 916 770

12.12%

Nedbank

4 067 376 148

11.51%

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

2 670 049 828

7.55%

ABSA

2 571 099 743

7.27%

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

1 575 182 997

4.46%

International Finance Corporation (IFC)

1 536 352 143

4.35%

European Investment Bank (EIB)

559 997 010

1.58%

Old Mutual Specialised Finance (Pty) Ltd

429 666 347

1.22%

Total Debt for Bid Window

35 342 134 277

 

     

As at Financial Close in 2013/14

   

BID WINDOW2 10 Highest Debt Providers

 

 

Lender Name

Debt Amount (ZAR)

Debt Amount as a % of Total Debt for Bid Window

Standard Bank

5 432 949 856

21.83%

Nedbank

5 039 054 480

20.25%

First Rand

2 843 107 340

11.43%

Investec

2 773 188 458

11.14%

ABSA

2 519 159 962

10.12%

OPIC

1 856 142 000

7.46%

IDC

1 770 061 231

7.11%

IFC

1 002 696 553

4.03%

ACWA Power Africa Holding Proprietary Limited

593 851 725

2.39%

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

580 136 986

2.33%

Total Debt for Bid Window

24 882 921 841

 

     

As at Financial Close in 2014/15

   

BID WINDOW3 10 Highest Debt Providers

 

 

Lender Name

Debt Amount (ZAR)

Debt Amount as a % of Total Debt for Bid Window

ABSA

7 760 452 670

26.37%

Nedbank

6 357 378 727

21.60%

DBSA

4 010 761 713

13.63%

IDC

3 961 310 502

13.46%

First Rand

2 247 899 802

7.64%

Standard Bank

1 828 866 461

6.21%

AfDB

1 377 175 767

4.68%

Public Investment Corporation (PIC)

599 997 500

2.04%

Investec

527 905 939

1.79%

IFC

455 418 678

1.55%

Total Debt for Bid Window

29 427 167 759

 

As at Financial Close in 2016/17[2]

   

BID WINDOW3.5 10 Highest Debt Providers

 

 

Lender Name

Debt Amount (ZAR)

Debt Amount as a % of Total Debt for Bid Window

Nedbank

3 151 216 167

21.35%

First Rand

2 000 000 000

13.55%

Investec

1 596 057 123

10.81%

ABSA

1 593 984 531

10.80%

DBSA

1 524 904 751

10.33%

Standard Bank

1 500 000 000

10.16%

KfW IPEX Bank

972 000 000

6.58%

IFC

709 920 000

4.81%

Credit Agricole

493 000 000

3.34%

Natixis

493 000 000

3.34%

Total Debt for Bid Window

14 760 963 517

 

     

As at Financial Close in 2018/19

   

BID WINDOW4 10 Highest Debt Providers

 

 

Lender Name

Debt Amount (ZAR)

Debt Amount as a % of Total Debt for Bid Window

ABSA

11 694 541 538

27.71%

Nedbank

10 118 303 081

23.97%

DBSA

3 903 391 534

9.25%

Standard Bank

3 840 688 425

9.10%

Old Mutual Specialised Finance (Pty) Ltd

3 681 073 341

8.72%

First Rand

2 938 683 301

6.96%

Vantage

2 561 333 993

6.07%

Investec

713 611 516

1.69%

Liberty Group Limited

600 000 000

1.42%

Sanlam Capital Markets Ltd

600 000 000

1.42%

Total Debt for Bid Window

42 209 452 546

 

  1. The last remaining BW3.5 project Redstone has not reached Financial Close and is expected to reach Financial Close in Apr 2019. Until FC is reached, only Bid Submission figures are available.

  2. The last remaining BW3.5 project Redstone has not reached Financial Close and is expected to reach Financial Close in Apr 2019. Until FC is reached only Bid Submission figures are available.

26 March 2019 - NW698

Motshidi, Ms T to ask the Minister of Energy

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and the former minister and (ii) the former deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(i) Minister

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Price

  1. Date of Purchase

(aaa) 2016/2017

(bbb) 2017/2018

(bb)

Since 1 April 2018

Audi A-8

(Inherited from the former Minister)

2017

R 970,161,66

August 2017

N/A

2017/2018

N/A

 

(ii) Former Deputy Minister

Audi Q-7

2018

R 1,039,954.74

March 2018

N/A

2017/2018

N/A

 

26 March 2019 - NW818

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Since his reply to question 1791 on 14 August 2018, how many households currently use bucket toilets?

Reply:

The following beneficiary towns (see table below) from the Bucket Eradication Programme are still using bucket toilets as the construction of bulk infrastructure that will allow toilets to flush are currently in process.

 

PROVINCE

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

BUCKET ERADICATION TOWN

TOILETS NOT YET FLUSHING

Free State Province

Setsoto

Ficksburg

218

   

Senekal

2,435

   

Clocolan

3,379

 

Nketoana

Arlington

1,192

   

PetrusSteyn

960

   

Reitz

739

 

Tokologo

Dealesville

1,279

Northern Cape Province

Siyancuma

Griekwastad

387

   

Campbell

596

 

Tsantsabane

Maranteng

134

   

Postdene

149

 

Sol Plaatjie

Motswedimosa

656

   

Fraser Moleketi

97

TOTAL:

 

12 221

---00O00---

26 March 2019 - NW813

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether any computer parts are produced in the Republic; if so, (a) what computer parts are produced in the Republic, (b) where are the computer parts produced, (c) what is the value of computer parts produced and (d) what number of people are employed in the production process?

Reply:

Even though South Africa has capabilities in computer manufacturing, the Intellectual Property (IP) rests with the Original Equipment Manufacturers, all of which are foreign. Companies which are involved in computer manufacturing are mainly involved in assembly and contract manufacturing. There is a huge downstream opportunity in the value chain for some parts which could be sourced from local manufacturers for components which make up a computer. For example, the casings are made of plastic which could be sourced locally.

26 March 2019 - NW531

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of teachers graduated from each of the country’s institutions of higher learning in 2018?

Reply:

The universities start identifying their graduates for the 2018 academic year once all the supplementary and postgraduate examinations have been completed. Thereafter they will commence with the auditing of this data. The 2018 audited Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) data from all 26 public universities is due at the end of July 2019. The audit reports will be checked and data verified by the end of October 2019. Verified graduate data for the 2018 academic year will only be available in November 2019.