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02 June 2021 - NW1141

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the reply by the Minister of Basic Education to question 875 on 13 April 2021, what (a) is the total number of unregistered children in each province born to (i) citizens of the Republic and (ii) foreign nationals in each year from 2013 to 2020 and (b) measures has his department put in place to ensure registration of new-born babies?

Reply:

a) The department will never know the total number of unregistered children in the country, in each Province whether born to nationals or non-nationals. This is because the Department plays no role in the birth of children. Children are born in hospitals and at home and the Department does not conduct any censors in that regard.

The Department depends on individual parents, guardians or authorised person bringing their children for registration. Even with Home Affairs offices being opened in hospitals, it is still the responsibility of a parent to submit their child for registration.

bThe department registers birth within 30 days in terms of Birth and Death Registration Act. There are 412 frontline line offices, and 391 health facilities wherein parents, guardians or any authorised person can register birth and collect certificates on the spots. There is a plan to connect 1 445 by 2023/2024 financial year.

END

02 June 2021 - NW1086

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) At what stage is the funding cut-off for students who keep on studying and failing and then change courses, (b) does the National Student Financial Aid Scheme stop paying for the specified students who sometimes even change universities and (c) at what point is this considered abuse of the funding and/or terms of service?

Reply:

(a) Students can change courses as continuing NSFAS funding is based on the NSFAS funding criteria.  In terms of the criteria, continued funding is based on academic eligibility testing, which includes the N+ rule.  N is the minimum qualification completion time, also known as regulation time specified by the institution for a programme of study funded by NSFAS.  N+1 applies to first-time entering students first registered after December 2017, whilst N+2 applies to students who first registered before January 2018. If a student has transferred from any other public university, regardless of whether they were funded at that university, the number of years already registered for the qualification must be counted as part of the minimum qualification completion time.

(b) No, NSFAS does not stop funding because students change institutions.  NSFAS funding stops when the student fails to meet the academic eligibility criteria and the N+ rule.

(c) A student contravenes the rules when they no longer meet academic eligibility requirements, exceed their N+ time, and move between institutions without declaring this. The expectations of students are outlined in the bursary guidelines. 

01 June 2021 - NW1442

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he received a gift and/or donation on behalf of the Government from a certain person (Mr Solly Noor) at a certain iftar gathering hosted by the Muslim Judicial Council in Cape Town on 6 May 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount of money and/or other goods did the specified person gift and/or donate to the Government, (b) for what purpose was the money and/or other goods gifted and/or donated and (c) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (2) whether he received any other gifts and/or donations on behalf of the Government from any other person in attendance at the specified gathering; if so, (a) what amount of money and/or other goods were gifted and/or donated, (b) from which person and/or entity was each gift or donation received, (c) for what purpose was each gift and/or donation received and (d) what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

At the iftar dinner in Athlone on 6 May 2021, Mr Solly Noor handed the President an award from Global Islam Finance that Mr Noor had collected on the President’s behalf and a letter from Islamia College, where the event was held, thanking the President for his attendance.

No other gifts were received by the President at that occasion.

01 June 2021 - NW1174

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether there are any plans in place to help non-governmental organisations in the disability sector that are struggling financially; if not; whether such plans will be developed; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date and (b) what (i) are the details of such plans and (ii) budget has been allocated in this regard? NW1364E

Reply:

(1) The Department does not provide funding to any organisation of persons with disabilities, however the partnerships with other departments and International agencies assist regularly to a lesser extent. Each department has to fund programmes and initiatives for persons with disabilities according to its mandate, service delivery value chain and specific individual needs of those organisations.

(2)

  1. Plans have been developed and included in the Strategic plan of the Department and will be implemented from the 01 April 2021 to 31 March 2022
  1. (i) The Department has developed an operational plan to accommodate Organisations of Persons with Disabilities and the Annual Performance Plan also have specific target where the Department must report on a quarterly basis. The plans include the following:

The development of the frameworks to implement the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. (Self-Representation and Awareness Raising Campaigns Frameworks)
Constant ongoing consultation with the disability rights sector on the development of Disability Rights Legislation.
Covid-19 response efforts through the work streams of the NCCC. The 365 Awareness Raising Campaigns on disability rights.
Coordination of the Presidential Working Group on Disability and the National Disability Rights Machinery
Compliance reports on inclusion of persons with disabilities in plans of the Department, compliance reports with National and International protocols and analysis of strategic plans of Departments.
Regular consultation with individual categories of disability e.g. Albinism, Deafness, visual impairment and Mental Health.

(ii) The Department is allocated money by Treasury for its own work and activities.

Approved by:

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Minister
Date: 28 May 2021

01 June 2021 - NW1233

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Given the possibility of a third wave of COVID-19 in the coming months, how has his department prepared to balance the 2021 academic year and safety of students?

Reply:

The Minister released directions in the Government Gazette No. 44342, dated 29 March 2021 (attached) to guide public and private higher education institutions for the 2021 academic year.

The directions provide high-level guidance through a national framework and criteria to all institutions in managing operations during the COVID-19 pandemic. This work builds on previous guidance provided in 2020 during the initial lockdown period and over the period that students and staff returned to campus as part of a phased-in approach. It is anticipated that the directions will be utilised by institutions during the academic year, in conjunction with any relevant directions issued as part of the national state of disaster.

In terms of the directions, institutions must maintain institutional plans for the effective management of operations during the pandemic and have in place a COVID-19 response Task Team. Each public higher education institution has also developed a teaching and learning plan, which considers the different circumstances that may arise during the pandemic, drawing on lessons from the 2020 academic year.

In addition, the Department is supported by Higher Health, which works closely with all public post-school institutions to provide guidelines and advice on the management of teaching and learning, and institutional operations during the pandemic and provides many other forms of support, including training and communication on key matters relating to the pandemic, and supporting institutions in the event of cluster outbreaks.

In the case of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, students are continuing with the blended modality of learning, which involves a mix of face-to-face tuition and guided self-study. In short, the protocols put in place during lockdown level 3 are still in place for teaching and learning, and for the conduct of examinations. Both these processes were successfully managed in the 2020 academic year and will continue in 2021. Higher Health is actively involved in colleges to assist with symptomatic staff and students, and the management of positive cases when these are identified. Where the incidence of positive cases is of concern, colleges are given the flexibility to shut down the affected campus for a limited period, in agreement with their respective Councils and Regional Offices, and provide a catch-up timetable for the days lost.

Teaching and learning at Community Education and Training (CET) colleges:

  • The Department has reviewed the 2020 Curriculum Recovery Plan for CET colleges and will adjust in relation to COVID directives.
  • The Department is aware that the implementation of the recovery plan will necessitate amendments to the CET college calendar to ensure that students cover the curriculum. This has financial and labour implications (time for tuition will be increasingly informed by the time lost, implying more hours worked by lecturers) which the Department will deal with internally, e.g. engaging labour organisations and the reprioritisation of the budget.
  • An extra R45 million has been allocated by National Treasury to CET colleges for ensuring the safety of students and staff in compliance with COVID-19 regulations; provision of personal protective equipment, sanitisers and rotation of attendance to ensure social distancing.

01 June 2021 - NW1307

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether, with reference to the investigation of the Special Investigating Unit into corruption in the National Lotteries Commission that he authorised through proclamation, any arrests have been made; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of those arrested, (b) on what grounds were they arrested and (c) on what date were they arrested in each case; (2) whether any official charges have been brought against any persons by the National Prosecuting Authority based on the results of the investigation; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of those charged, (b) what crimes were they charged with and (c) on what date were the charges filed; (3) whether any assets have been seized; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details, including (a) a comprehensive breakdown of all the assets seized, (b) the value of assets seized and (c) from whom they were seized; (4) on what date does he expect that the investigation and a comprehensive report will be completed?

Reply:

The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) is currently investigating several matters in collaboration with the Directorate for Priority Crimes Investigations (DPCI) with respect to the National Lotteries Commission. Due to the fact that investigations are ongoing, there have as yet been no arrests, no charges have been brought against any persons, and no assets have been seized.

The SIU is preparing to refer evidence pointing to criminal action to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) and to approach the Special Tribunal in order to freeze assets belonging to several individuals.

Due to the large number of matters identified for investigation, the SIU has divided the investigation into phases. The first phase, consisting of 14 investigation focus areas, is likely to be completed by 30 June 2021. The second and final phase of the investigation is likely to be completed by 31 December 2021.

01 June 2021 - NW1167

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(a) What (i) did the research on impact of COVID-19 on persons with disabilities which was done in partnership with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights entail and (ii) were the outcomes of the research and (b) what is the breakdown of the spending of the R340 000 budget allocation for the research

Reply:

(a) (i) The research entails details findings on experience of persons with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown regulations. Furthermore, the research report entails how South African government has performed in ensuring promotion, safety and inclusion of persons with disabilities in all measures introduced during the COVID-19 state of national disaster.
(ii) The outcomes of the research are available in the form of recommendations which outlines interventions and measures which must be put in place by government spheres to mitigate challenges faced by persons with disabilities during and for future state of national disasters.

  1. The research project was entirely funded by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, no financial contributions from DWYPD and below is the breakdown of expenditure:

Consultancy fee: R139 200 Transport fees: R67 200

Incentives: respondents / participants: R114 000 Airtime & data: R6 000

Equipments (Tape recorder): R600
Sign Language Interpreters: R10 000 Braille printing: R1000
Incidental costs: R2000

    • TOTAL: R340 000

Approved by:
Ms M
Nkoana-Mashabane, MP Minister
Date
: 28 May 2021

 

01 June 2021 - NW1378

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In response to the criminal and indiscriminate killing of Palestinians by the State of Israel, what are the reasons that South Africa has not terminated any and / or all diplomatic relations with Israel, including the recall of our ambassador to Israel and the eviction of their ambassador in South Africa?

Reply:

South Africa has recently issued a number of media statements strongly condemning the actions of the Israeli Government, where casualties have been mostly innocent civillians, children, women and the elderly.

South Africa recalled its Ambassador accredited to the State of Israel, Mr Sisa Ngombane, in May 2018.

The Government remains seized with the modalities related to its diplomatic relations with the State of Israel. The Department will communicate any further actions still under consideration.

01 June 2021 - NW1379

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What engagements has she had with her American counterpart to ensure that the death of Lindani Myeni in Hawaii in the United States of America is investigated thoroughly?

Reply:

Subsequent to the killing of Mr Lindani Myeni in Hawaii on 14 April 2021, the Department fulfilled its obligation by rendering the necessary consular assistance to the surviving spouse and the family of Mr Myeni in order to ensure the timely return of his mortal remains to South Africa and to follow up on related matters.

Upon learning about the death of Mr Myeni, the Consul-General in Los Angeles immediately informed the South African Ambassador in Washington DC. The Consulate then liaised with the Consular division at the Department to request guidance on the type of assistance that should be rendered by the Mission, after which the Consul-General liaised with Mrs Myeni to brief her accordingly.

The Consulate further communicated with the regional Office of Foreign Missions (OFM) to request a police report, including the return of the personal belongings of Mr Myeni from the Honululu Police Department (HPD). Following a delay in the return of Mr Myeni’s personal belongings by the HPD, the Mission liaised with Mrs Myeni’s attorney and also requested the intervention of the Embassy in Washington regarding this matter. The Embassy forwarded a Diplomatic Note to the State Department on 18 April 2021, in which the serious concerns of the South African Government around the circumstances of the killing of Mr Myeni was conveyed, including a request for full transparency and the release of all available information, including the 911 call that precipitated the shooting.

The South African Ambassador in Washington subsequently had a telecon with the Deputy Assisstant Secretary (DAS) in the Bureau for African Affairs in the State Department who offered his assistance to the Embassy, including to liaise with the City of Honolulu.

The Consul-General in Los Angeles was also in contact with the funeral home where Mr Myeni’s mortal remains were being kept in order to process the required documentation to obtain the death certificate to facilitate the repatriation of Mr Myeni’s remains. The Consular division at Head Office liaised with the Department of Health to process the required import permit and the Consul-General further liaised with the Provincial Government in Kwa-Zulu Natal to update them on the status of the processes underway to return the remains of Mr Myeni. The mortal remains of Mr Myeni arrived in South Africa on 30 April 2021, where it was received by the family and representatives from the Department and the Government.

The Department also conveyed to the US Embassy in Pretoria the concerns of the Government about the lack of a comprehensive report on the circumstances that led to the death of Mr Myeni and the utterances by the Mayor of Honolulu that the police had acted correctly. A request was made that the State Department should intervene to obtain a report as soon as possible and that the personal belongings of Mr Myeni should be returned to the family. A follow up request was later made to the US Embassy for Mr Myeni’s belongings, inluding his mobile phone, to be returned to his family without further delay.

As of 25 May 2021, the Consul-General in Los Angeles reported that the requested police report was still outstanding. The lawyers of Mrs Myeni undertook to inform the Consul-General once there are new developments on the matter.

01 June 2021 - NW1156

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

1.With reference to the report of the Commission for Gender Equality on the Emergency Response Action Plan (ERAP) on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF), which shows that her department failed to meet any of its targets under Thematic Area 4: Strengthen accountability and architecture to adequately respond to the scourge of GBV, what (a) are the reasons that none of the five targets in the specified thematic area were met, when it was the responsibility of her Office to ensure that targets were met and (b) consequence management has she put in place to ensure that the targets will be met; 2. given the fact that her department continues to fail in its role of monitoring and evaluation as highlighted by the lack of systems in place to ensure key departments involved in the ERAP implementation are indeed meeting targets and implementing recommendations on the fight against GBVF, what are the details of the work that she and/or her Office has done to ensure that monitoring and evaluation systems have been put in place? NW1345E

Reply:

  1. The ERAP was a short-term intervention implemented over six months to deal with the heightened levels of GBVF whilst the Interim GBVF Steering Committee (IGBVF-SC) was developing the National Strategic Plan on GBVF (NSP on GBVF). The Department was mainly responsible for playing an oversight, catalytic and supportive role to assist the process of successful implementation of ERAP projects; working in collaboration with the Interim GBVF Steering Committee (IGBVF-SC), including relevant departments. Over and above this, the department had to coordinate the urgent finalisation of the NSP on GBVF to allow for a smooth transition from the ERAP to the NSP on GBVF 2020-2030.

    The targets allocated to the department under Thematic Area 4 had long term interventions that could not be implemented within the 6-months ERAP timeframe. Moreover, budget constraints further hindered the execution of the targets. Some of the targets were started as pilots. For example, in partnership with UN Women, the Interim GBVF Steering Committee (IGBVF-SC) piloted the Rapid Response Initiative (RRI) in the Eastern Cape as a potential vehicle through which to build and expand rapid response to GBVF cases in communities. As we institutionalize the NSP on GBVF, the model is being used by some provinces to establish or strengthen existing RRTs in line with the principles of the NSP on GBVF.

    Conceptualisation and design of a Multisectoral Coordination Structure formed part of the NSP on GBVF development process approved by Cabinet in March, 2020; and now included in chapter 5 of the NSP on GBVF. The multisectoral coordination could not be established before approval of the proposed model by Cabinet.
  1. The ERAP targets that were not met were phased and integrated into the NSP on GBVF; and necessary revisions were made as some of the targets were outside the ambits of my department’s mandate. My department is currently coordinating the establishment and alignment of GBVF structures at province, district and local municipality levels. A lot of progress has been made with most provinces showing urgency in establishing or revitalizing GBVF multisectoral provincial structures; Rapid Response Teams (RRTs); developing implementation plans; and coordinating reporting on progress. The status of the institutionalisation of the NSP on GBVF as it relates to multisectoral structures is illustrated in the below table:
 

Standard Provincial

NSP on

GBVF

Implementation Plan

finalised

Established & Functional GBVF

Coordination Teams

Established GBVF

Provincial Task Teams but not yet

functional

Finalised Provincial

NSP on GBVF

Implementation Plans

Developing Provincial

NSP on

GBVF

Implementation Plans

Have civil society in

Provincial Structures & are submitting

reports

DWYPD

YES

YES

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Western Cape

N/A

YES

N/A

YES

YES

YES

Eastern Cape

N/A

YES

N/A

NO

YES

NO

Northern Cape

N/A

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

Free State

N/A

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

KwaZuIu-Natal

N/A

YES

N/A

YES

N/A

YES

North West

N/A

NO

NO

NO

YES

NO

Gauteng

N/A

YES

N/A

YES

N/A

YES

Mpumalanga

N/A

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

Limpopo

N/A

NO

NO

YES

N/A

YES

(2). A situational analysis of the reporting on the ERAP and NSP on GBVF was conducted as an initial step towards developing an appropriate Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) system. A draft M&E implementation plan for the medium term (2020-2024) is developed for the NSP on GBVF. The M&E plan forms the basis for a functional, seamless, robust, comprehensive, and well-coordinated M&E system. The M&E Plan describes all M&E activities in an M&E system, including: indicators and targets; data collection tools; data flow mechanisms; reporting timelines; roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders; procedures to be implemented to determine whether or not the objectives are met; and expected results of the program and how they relate to goals and objectives.

Since 2020, the department has focused on the institutionalisation of the NSP on GBVF. GBVF is now a standing agenda item in all DG and Cabinet Clusters; and the Parliamentary Oversight Framework for the NSP on GBVF will contribute immensely towards reporting progress on implementation of the NSP on GBVF.

It is noted that for the year 2020, NSP on GBVF priorities were not optimally integrated into strategic plans and Annual Performance Plans (APPs) of national

departments. This made it difficult to monitor the implementation of the NSP on

GBVF. As we are in the new performance cycle, the NSP on GBVF priorities are likely to be prioritised in the Strategic Plans and APPs. In terms of progress, approximately 15 national departments have finalised refinement and integration of allocated NSP on GBVF targets for 2020-2024; and a total of 21 out of 30 national departments submitted progress reports in April 2021. We remain hopeful that as the culture of reporting is inculcated, M&E mechanisms will become much more seamless and systematic.

In addition, the DWYPD in partnership with UN Women and civil society partners has established a multisectoral implementation Collaborative Platform (CP) to foster monitoring and reporting systems. The Collaborative Platform is an organic structure that creates a voluntary platform to mainly facilitate multisectoral engagement and give impetus to the ownership and implementation of the NSP on GBVF. Six Pillar- based teams comprising government and its agencies; private sector, labour federations, research institutions, academia and civil society were established to enhance and assist in fast tracking implementation of the NSP on GBVF. The work of the Collaborative Platform feeds into the progress reports on the NSP on GBVF. The Collaborative Platform has developed a website as a one stop centre for documents and submission of progress reports by the respective pillar teams.

Approved by:
Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP
Minister
Date: 28 May 2021

01 June 2021 - NW1190

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(a) What extraordinary measures have been taken by her Office to cushion the youth from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, given the high rate of unemployment it is facing and (b) how will the proposed plans be sustained in the Post-COVlD-19 period?

Reply:

 

  1. The National Youth Development Agency, an entity of the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities implemented the following programs in the financial year 1 April 2020 — 31 March 2021.
    • A total of over 2200 youth owned enterprises were supported through the NYDA Grant Programme compared to a target of 1500. The number was accelerated by the 1100 youth enterprises assisted by the Youth Micro Enterprise Relief Fund.
    • Over 2665 beneficiaries were supported with business development support services offered by the NYDA.
    • More than 8047 jobs were created and sustained through supporting business entrepreneurs.
    • 5078 jobs were facilitated through placements in job opportunities.
    • Over 2445 young people were capacitated with skills to enter the job market.

In addition to the above, the NYDA has supported the rollout of Phase 1 of the Employment Stimulus which has resulted in the following outcomes as at 30 April 2021:

    • The Department of Basic Education has supported 313 000 young people with jobs who were enrolled as Teacher Assistants and General Assistants in 26 000 public schools between December 2020 — April 2021.
    • The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development supported 74 426 small scale farmers and 2000 agriculture graduates were utilised to verify 130 000 applicants claims.
    • The Department of Social Development is supporting 25 000 Early Childhood Development Centres.
    • The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition has supported 8 000 jobs in the Business Process Outsourcing Sector.
    • The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has appointed 1 886 young people in rural bridges and other programs.
  1. Phase 2 of the Employment Stimulus will commence in June 2021.

Approved by:

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Minister Date: 28 May 2021

01 June 2021 - NW1128

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Will the National Youth Development Agency furnish Mr L Mphithi with a comprehensive list of all companies that were beneficiaries of the Youth Micro Enterprise Relief Fund, including the (a) name of each company and (b) amount disbursed for each province; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

Please refer to Annexure A for responses to part (a) and (b) of the question

Approved by:

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Minister

Date: 28 May 2021

01 June 2021 - NW1157

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth andPersons with Disabilities

Whether, with reference to the R1,6 billion that was allocated to the Commission for Gender Equality to report on the implementation of the Government’s Emergency Response Action Plan on Gender Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) in 2019, her department will furnish Ms N K Sharif with (a) a breakdown of the total amount of the R1,6 billion that has been spent, (b) a detailed breakdown of line items of the R1,6 million that has been spent, including a list of expenditure by her department and (c) the total amount of the R1,6 billion that is left over and where the money is located; if not, why not; if so, what monitoring and evaluation mechanisms has her department used to ensure that the money has been spent on GBVF?

Reply:

The ERAP was resourced through a reprioritization exercise by relevant government departments to the tune of R1,6 Billion. The departments and entities identified approximately R1,6 billion on baseline spending for 2019/20 relevant to the emergency action plan. This was higher than the R1,1 Billion costing for the ERAP. Below is a table of the baseline allocations breakdown across the 5 pillars of the ERAP:

ERAP

Departments and Agencies Baseline Allocation

Intervention Pillar

Estimated Budget

Total

Baseline Allocation Per

Intervention

Baseline Allocation Breakdown

Access to justice for victims and survivors

R 394 849 207

R 881 885 000

DoJ&CD

R 10 515 000

     

NPA

R 871 370

000

 

R 179 188 480

R 481 153 000

GCIS

R 5 715 000

Change norms and behaviour through high- level prevention efforts

   

SRSA

R 178 174

000

     

DSAC

R 12 950 000

     

DBE

R 46 594 000

     

DHET

R 750 000

     

DSD

R 66 000 000

     

Provinces & Sport

Federations

R 170 970

000

     

Communications

R 0

Improved access

to care, support and prevention services and

interventions

R 517 000 000

R 251 377 000

CARA Projects

R 7 108 000

     

DSD

R 244 269

000

     

DoH

R 0

Strengthen

accountability and architecture to adequately respond to the

scourge of GBV

R 20 038 412

R 0

DWYPD

R 0

Total

R 1 111 076 099

R 1 614 415 000

Approved by:
Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP
Minister
Date: 28 May 2021

01 June 2021 - NW1322

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether he has been informed of the ongoing protests by students due to nonpayment of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funds at the Umzikhulu TVET Campus in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how is the matter of non-payment being resolved, (b) on what date will the students with outstanding NSFAS payments receive their funds, (c) how will the campus prevent a recurrence of nonpayment and thus disruption to the academic year going forward; (2) whether all NSFAS students have received the laptops that were promised to them; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department has been informed about the protest of students at Esayidi TVET College, Umzimkulu Campus. However, the students were not protesting over non-payment of allowances but rather over their dissatisfaction with the implementation of the Bursary Rules and Guidelines, particularly the provision on the 60/40 split regarding the awards for travel and accommodation allowances. It should be noted that the matter has been resolved and students are back in class after it was addressed by the college management and the Central Student Representative Council (SRC) together with the campus SRC. 

(a) The majority of student allowances at the college have been paid to qualifying students with the exception of approximately 500 students. These exceptions are being attended to by an official from NSFAS who visited the college during the week of 17 to 21 May 2021 to help the college's financial aid office.

(b)  NSFAS is currently making weekly allowance payments, instead of the usual monthly payments, to reduce the backlog.

(c) The college uses various platforms to share information with students on the administration of NSFAS including through the college financial aid committee, which includes representation of the SRC.  

(2) According to NSFAS, the procurement of laptops has been completed and will be distributed in batches as of May 2021 to all eligible TVET college students. 

01 June 2021 - NW1191

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether her Office took any steps to promote women’s financial inclusion and economic emancipation since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1382E

Reply:

The Department of Women Youth and Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD)  continues to contribute and strategically guide on the inclusion of women into the mainstream economy, by promoting the meaningful participation of women into all socio-economic activities of the country and ensuring that this is done comprehensively and in a financially inclusive manner.

It does this in the following ways:

  1. Promoting an all-inclusive approach to Women’s Financial Inclusion;
  2. Facilitating an enabling operating environment for mainstreaming women’s financial inclusion in government and private sector institutions;
  3. Promoting financial inclusivity through equitable access to ownership and control  of all economic activities for women;
  1. Lobbying the private sector, non-government organisations and international organisations to incorporate the inclusion of women in their policies, programmes, projects and products;
  2. Mobilising resources to support campaigns and programmes that promote the inclusion of women in the economy;
  3. Coordinating, collecting and disseminating information  on best practices  relating to the inclusion of women across all sectors of our economy;
  4. Strengthening the capacity of women in leadership, management, control and entrepreneurship.
  5. Sharing best practices relating to the economic emancipation of women

To this effect the DWYPD has undertaken the following economic empowerment and participation interventions in the previous FY:

DWYPD held a webinar with DFl’s and the ESEID cluster to promote the financial inclusion of women, facilitated the coordination of an Integrated Entrepreneurship Development Programme (IEEDP) to streamline programmes of implementing departments, hosted a capacity building workshop on opportunities within the Sanitary Dignity Programmes Economic Value Chain and coordinated an Enterprise Trade Fair for Women to not only promote inclusivity but further sustainability of Women Owned Businesses.

In the 2021/2022, the department would be embarking on a National Radio Talk Show. It is envisaged to be an impactful awareness raising tool which will reach over 30 million listeners, especially those from communities in rural and township areas. The shows would emphasize the importance of compliance with requirements for business operations in the country as well as raise awareness of opportunities for women owned businesses within public procurement.

Approved by:
Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP
Minister
Date
: 28 May 2021

31 May 2021 - NW1031

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether there are any schools in the Eastern Cape that still have mud structures; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total number of schools and (b) where are they located; (2) whether there are any schools in the Eastern Cape that still do not have proper sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total number of schools and (b) where are they located?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education, and a response will be forwarded as soon as it is received.

31 May 2021 - NW1236

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department is conducting a thorough investigation into the death of 15-year-old Avethandwa Nokhangela from Xolani High School in the Eastern Cape who passed away in a drowning accident while participating in an activity organised by the nongovernmental organisation (NGO) Equal Education; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified NGO (a) disclosed a detailed report of the possible risks involved in their activity and (b) engaged the student body, teachers and parents; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether all the water hazards were researched and communicated to everyone involved prior to the organised activity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Basic Education, together with the Eastern Cape Department of Education, are working together with the South African Police Service to investigate the incident.  A report is expected by the 31 May 2021. The Department will determine the next steps once the report has been studied in detail.

2. It is anticipated that the preliminary investigation which is currently underway will provide clarity in this regard.

3. It is also anticipated that the report from the preliminary investigation which is currently underway will provide clarity in this regard.

31 May 2021 - NW1359

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With regard to the Umkhamba Gardens School in Ladysmith KwaZulu-Natal, (a) what are the reasons that the water attenuation pool and associated equipment are not functioning fully and/or at all, (b) who is being held accountable for the failure of the construction to be completed and operational and (c) what was the construction (i) contract specifications and (ii) contract prices for the water attenuation pool and associated equipment; (2) what are the details of the action that has been taken to ensure that the water attenuation pool and the associated equipment are functioning correctly; (3) by what date will the (a) attenuation pool and its associated equipment be fully operational and (b) damage to the Alfred Duma Local Municipality's infrastructure including Shepstone Road caused by the non-functioning attenuation pool and associated equipment be repaired; (4) what are the details of the (a) damage done to the Alfred Duma municipal infrastructure including Shepstone Road as a result of the attenuation pool and its associated equipment not being fully operational and (b) costs to repair the damage to the Alfred Duma municipal infrastructure including Shepstone Road caused by the non-functioning water attenuation pool and associated equipment, (5) what are the details of any damage claims resulting from the non-operation of the attenuation pool and associated equipment that have been submitted by the specified municipality and/or any other person and/or entity?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

I have been informed by the Department that the project in question was done by the KZN Provincial Department of Public Works, thus DPWI does not have details of the project as it was not done by them. It is therefore recommended that Questions office should re-refer the question to the relevant MEC.

31 May 2021 - NW1068

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, since the adoption of the National Development Plan, her department increased state funding and support to ensure universal access to two years of early childhood development exposure before Grade 1; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As the majority of 4-year olds attend pre-Grade R in Early Childhood Development (ECD) Centres, the responsibility of funding is still with the Department of Social Development.  The Department of Basic Education will only be responsible for this age group, once the ECD programme has been relocated from the Department of Social Development to the Department of Basic Education.

31 May 2021 - NW1488

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether her department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. The department has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year;

(a)–(d) Not Applicable

2. (a) – (b) Not Applicable

31 May 2021 - NW1067

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What rewards did her department issue since the adoption of the National Development Plan, including Action 55, to introduce incentive schemes linked to the Annual National Assessments to reward schools for consistent improvements?

Reply:

There were no rewards issued to schools as incentives. 

31 May 2021 - NW1397

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who default in the services that they render to the SA Tourism dealt with, (b) what number of service providers and suppliers have defaulted in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021, (c) what are the reasons for default in rendering the services, (d) what steps are taken to reduce the default incidences and (e) what financial losses have been incurred in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

a) (i) South African Tourism has never had any suppliers that defaulted in any of the contracts from the past three years and since 1 April 2021.

      (ii) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable since no suppliers defaulted for the past three years and since 1 April 2021.

d) Not Applicable

e) No financial losses have been incurred in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

31 May 2021 - NW1414

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) are the total monthly operational costs of the Gautrain, (b) was the monthly net profit of the specified train from 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2021 and (c) amount the Gauteng municipalities need to subsidise the operational costs of the train in each month?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

The responsibility to monitor the operation of the Gautrain and any other mode of public transport is within the ambit of the National Department of Transport. It is therefore, recommended that Questions office should re-refer this question accordingly.

31 May 2021 - NW1288

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the results of the National Senior Certificate (NSC) in the (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020 academic years, (i) which schools in each province received a zero percent pass rate, (ii) what number of learners (aa) were in each school at the time (bb) repeated the exam or year and (cc) left school in each specified year without completing Grade 12 and (iii) what steps were taken to improve the results of the NSC at each of the affected schools since then?

Reply:

2018

(a) (i) See table (a) – Column A

(a) (ii) (aa) See table (a) – Column B

(a) (ii) (bb) See table (a) – Column C

(a) (ii) (cc) See table (a) - Column D. 

(a) (iii) Response provided below.

2019

(b) (i) See table (b) – Column A

(b) (ii) (aa) See table (b) – Column B

(b) (ii) (bb) See table (b) – Column C

(b) (ii) (cc) See table (b) - Column D

(b) (iii) Response provided below.

2020

(c) (i) See table (c) – Column A

(c) (ii) (aa) See table (c) – Column B

(c) (ii) (bb) See table (c) – Column C

(c) (ii) (cc) See table (c) - Column D

(c) (iii) Response provided below.

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

 

C

D

Exam Date

Province

District

Centre No

Centre Name

Total Entered

Total Wrote

Total Achieved

Repeaters

Total did not write

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

AMAJUBA

5213141

GROENVLEI COMBINED

26

8

0

0

18

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ZULULAND

5112421

KWAMPUNZI COMBINED

9

7

0

0

2

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212110

MAWENI H

12

7

0

0

5

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212223

MPIKAYIZEKANYE SS

27

18

0

0

9

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212419

MZONIWE JS

14

8

0

0

6

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ZULULAND

5112136

NCWECWE SS

2

2

0

0

0

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ZULULAND

5112233

NENDE SS

10

10

0

0

0

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ILEMBE

5413332

SIBONGINHLANHLA SS

10

1

0

0

9

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

KING CETSHWAYO

5113347

VULEKA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF

9

4

0

0

5

201811

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN 2

7042303

LETSHEGA-MALOKWANE SECONDARY

14

12

0

3

2

201811

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE 2

7103306

RAMOROKE SECONDARY

5

2

0

0

3

201811

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7021210

SENWANE SECONDARY

15

12

0

0

3


Response to Question (a)(iii); (b)(iii); (c)(iii) 

In each case, the school was visited by a team comprising of the provincial head office and the district, and an audit was conducted and the reasons for the exceptionally poor performance was established and a turn-around plan would have been established for each school.  The turn-around plan would address each aspect of teaching and learning that would have resulted in the dismal performance.  This plan would have been monitored by both the district and the province in regular accountability sessions and on-site visits, to ensure that the elements of the plan are implemented.  Where there is slow or no improvements, more drastic measures would have been implemented; e.g., replacement of the school principal, or members of the Senior Management Team; and/or the replacement of educators.    

Note:

In terms of question (a)(ii)(cc); (b)(ii)(cc); (c)(ii)(cc), i.e. "the number of learners that left school in each year without completing Grade 12", the data provided refer to candidates who registered to write the examination at the beginning of the year, but did not pitch to write the examination.  It is assumed that these candidates dropped out of school, but it could also imply that these learners were absent from the examination for a valid reason; and would have therefore, registered to write the June examination of the following academic year.  Therefore, the numbers provided in Column D, are estimate figures, and the correct figures can only be determined if an audit is done of each candidate that registered and did not write the final examination.  

Table (a): NSC 2018

 

Table (b): NSC 2019

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

 

C

D

Exam Date

Province

District

Centre No

Centre Name

Total Entered

Total Wrote

Total Achieved

Repeaters

Total did not write

201911

EASTERN CAPE

CHRIS HANI EAST

4261011

DOLOPHINI SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

57

14

0

0

43

201911

EASTERN CAPE

BUFFALO CITY

4321038

HOHO SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

46

22

0

0

24

201911

EASTERN CAPE

AMATHOLE EAST

4301060

NGUBESIZWE SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

8

8

0

0

0

201911

EASTERN CAPE

CHRIS HANI EAST

4261057

ZWELIVUMILE SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

107

7

0

0

100

201911

GAUTENG

EKURHULENI SOUTH

8800008

DESIGNATED CENTRE GALLWAY PRIM SCH

6

4

0

0

2

201911

GAUTENG

TSHWANE SOUTH

8400444

ROSTEC TECHNICAL COLLEGE - PRETORIA

26

6

0

0

20

201911

KWAZULU-NATAL

UGU

5312107

FINGQINDLELA S

3

2

0

0

1

201911

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212217

MAHLOKOHLOKO S

8

2

0

0

6

201911

KWAZULU-NATAL

KING CETSHWAYO

5113339

PHINDIZWE H

10

9

0

0

1

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7091408

KANAMA SECONDARY

5

5

0

1

0

201911

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7023311

KGABEDI SECONDARY

13

13

0

0

0

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE SOUTH

7102307

MAHLABA SECONDARY

15

13

0

4

2

201911

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN NORTH

7043307

MAKAMA SECONDARY SCHOOL

10

3

0

3

7

201911

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN NORTH

7042206

MAKOBATENG SECONDARY

8

8

0

0

0

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7092301

MANAWE SENIOR SECONDARY

14

6

0

0

8

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE SOUTH

7101207

MATSEBE SECONDARY

7

6

0

0

1

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7093202

MOKHULWANE SECONDARY

1

1

0

1

0

201911

LIMPOPO

WATERBERG 2

7011104

ROEDTAN COMBINED

12

10

0

1

2

 

Table (c):  NSC 2020

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

 

C

D

Exam Date

Province

District

Centre No

Centre Name

Total Entered

Total Wrote

Total Achieved

Repeaters

Total did not write

202011

EASTERN CAPE

OR TAMBO INLAND

4292104

KHANYA PRIVATE SCHOOL

10

4

0

1

6

202011

EASTERN CAPE

NELSON MANDELA METRO

4343099

REUBEN BIRIN SPECIAL SCHOOL

3

3

0

0

0

202011

EASTERN CAPE

NELSON MANDELA METRO

4345514

ST JUDES ACADEMY

17

15

0

0

2

202011

FREE STATE

Lejweleputswa

3182008

ED-U-COLLEGE WELKOM CI/S

6

5

0

0

1

202011

KWAZULU-NATAL

HARRY GWALA

5313322

RAMAROBI S

9

6

0

0

3

202011

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212255

SINOTHANDO SECONDARY SCHOOL

7

7

0

0

0

202011

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7091408

KANAMA SECONDARY

9

9

0

2

0

202011

LIMPOPO

MOPANI WEST

7081131

KHESETHWANE REPEAT PART-TIME

22

22

0

1

0

202011

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7023306

KUBUSHE SECONDARY

15

15

0

5

0

202011

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7091411

MAKIDI SECONDARY

5

5

0

2

0

202011

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7023203

MASHUBASHUBA SECONDARY

7

7

0

3

0

202011

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN SOUTH

7031211

MMADITHAKADU SECONDARY

9

9

0

0

0

202011

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE SOUTH

7103412

NGOATOANAPE SECONDARY

6

6

0

0

0

 

31 May 2021 - NW1025

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the extent of bullying in South African schools and (b) steps has her department taken to protect both learners and teachers against bullying?

Reply:

a) The recently released Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) Report (2019) indicates that 29% of Grade 5 learners and 18% of Grade 9 learners reported being bullied on a weekly basis. The most cited form of bullying is verbal, followed by physical, and then cyber bullying.

b) The National School Safety Framework remains the basic education sector's primary strategic response to violence and bullying prevention in schools.  The Department of Basic Education is also rolling out crime awareness campaigns, working with Community Policing Forums and the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign.  Newly elected School Governing Bodies are trained, in order to strengthen School Safety Committees, as well as Codes of Conduct for learners.  The Department of Basic Education is currently implementing a bullying prevention programme, together with a range of government and civil society actors to address the scourge of bullying, including cyber-bullying, in our schools.

31 May 2021 - NW1289

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether she has found that the current criteria used to determine the quintile of a school reflect the true circumstances; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (2) whether the specified NGO (a) disclosed a detailed report of the possible risks involved in their activity and (b) engaged the student body, teachers and parents; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether all the water hazards were researched and communicated to everyone involved prior to the organised activity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Whether she has found that the current criteria used to determine the quintile of a school reflect the true circumstances, if so, what are the relevant details?

The Department has, since 2011, been in the process of reviewing the use of the quintile system, as it relates to the funding of public schools, inclusive of no-fee schools.  A study in 2009 has revealed that there are a noteworthy number of quintile 4 and 5 school principals, who are interested in their school becoming no-fee schools.  This study also revealed that, if public funding, through the school allocation and fee revenue are added, then a large number of quintile 4 and quintile 5 experiences a level of funding that is below the no-fee threshold.  This confirms the reality of a group of schools that is not regarded to be poor enough to attract the higher level of public funding; but on the other hand, is not rich enough to fill the gap with sufficient fee revenue.  Inappropriate quintile classification may be a contributing factor to this situation.  These schools are under constant fiscal pressure, since it has all the financial and administrative obligations of other schools (no-fee as well as fee paying) but are not able to attract the necessary level of funding.

2. Whether her department will revise the criteria for each quintile; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

The following activities were achieved to give effect to the proposed review of the use of the quintile system, and the ultimate phasing out the use of quintiles in relation to the school allocation are the following:

  1. Collapsing of Quintiles 1, 2 and 3; i.e., all no fee schools to be funded at the same (Q1) level.
  2. A choice to fee charging schools (Quintiles 4 and 5) to be voluntarily reclassified as no-fee schools.  This would effectively result in there being only two categories of schools for allocation purposes; i.e., no-fee schools and fee charging schools.

In terms of voluntary reclassification of quintiles 4 and 5 schools, as no-fee schools (2. above); up to now no additional funding could be secured.  Some provinces (GP and WC) have however, to a limited degree, and from their existing funding, offered a choice to selected schools in quintiles 4 and 5 to be voluntarily declared no-fee schools.  Given the current fiscal environment, the proposed voluntary reclassification of Quintile 4 and 5 schools as no fee will, in the absence of securing additional funding, be difficult to implement nationally.

In order to address the challenge, some of the measures implemented by Provincial Education Departments are:

(a)    All Provincial Education Departments are accommodating more learners in no-fee schools than have been provided for by the policy. In 2021, approximately 87% of all schools have been declared as no fee schools, accommodating approximately 82% of all learners nationally; and

(b)  Some Provincial Education Departments are currently providing a funding allocation, which is above that, which is prescribed by the funding policy, to some of their quintiles 4 and 5 schools.

In the absence of additional funding, schools should use the normal communication channels to apply for re-classification to another quintile or to become no fee in line with paragraph 106 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding.  The Head of Department considers each case on its merits, and provides a formal response.  Schools in Quintiles 4 and 5 can apply in writing to the Head of Department to challenge the quintile allocation.  The continued application of these measures however, depends on the available budget within the Provincial Education Department.

The school will be required to submit an appeal in writing on a school letterhead, signed by the principal and SGB chairperson to their relevant district office.  The appeal should clearly indicate the purpose of their appeal; i.e., no-fee status and/or quintile status.  The appeal should be well-motivated including the factors that are placing the school in financial difficulties.  Furthermore, detail must also be provided on the action that has been taken by the school to address these factors.  The application should be sent to the relevant Circuit Manager at the District office.

31 May 2021 - NW1426

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether the (a) Venning Park in Arcadia and (b) Magnolia Dell in Bailey's Muckleneuk are registered on her department’s Immovable Asset Register; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what plans will her department put in place to turn the specified green lungs parks into habitable parks where residents can feel safe and children can make appropriate use of play equipment in the areas; (3) whether her department will enter into a public-private partnership with residents of Tshwane to open an access-controlled botanical-type garden that will generate revenue to the benefit of both the City of Tshwane and her department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

I have been informed by the Department that:

  1. The subject properties are owned and managed by the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality.
  2. The responsibility to maintain and ensure safety within the aforementioned parks is within the ambit of the Municipality.
  3. N/A

31 May 2021 - NW1019

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to his request to the SA Law Reform Commission (SALRC) in 2013 to investigate the possible adoption of a single marriage statute for the Republic, with the discussion paper 152, which was open for public participation from 1 January 2021 to 31 March 2021 and extended for another two months (details furnished), what are the reasons that the Green Paper was submitted by his department in April 2021, as the public participation process with the SALRC was still in progress; (2) what are the reasons that his department submitted the Green Paper prior to obtaining the relevant reports of the SALRC in respect of the discussion paper 152, in view of the financial resources spent by his department in appointing the SALRC to attend to the discussion paper?

Reply:

1. The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) and the South African Law Reform Commission (SALRC) are engaged in two separate processes, albeit related. In the first instance, the Minister of Home Affairs approached the SALRC in 2013 to investigate the possible adoption of a single marriage statute for South Africa. This was prompted by the realisation that Marriages in South Africa are regulated through different pieces of legislation, namely:

a) The Marriage Act, 25 of 1961 (monogamous marriage for opposite sex couples);

b) The Recognition of Customary Marriages Act, 120 of 1998 (polygamous marriages for opposite sex couples who are black South Africans); and

c) The Civil Union Act, 17 of 2006 (monogamous partnerships for both same and opposite sex couples).

However, the current marriage legislation doesn’t enable all South Africans of different religious and cultural persuasions to conclude legal marriages that accords with the Constitutional values of equality, non-discrimination and human dignity. The SALRC's brief or focal area is therefore, to investigate the possibility of having a single statute dealing with all marriages in South Africa. The SALRC conducted a pre-investigation. In April 2019 the Commission of the SALRC approved the first paper of its investigation, namely Issue Paper 35, which was published in April 2019 for general information and comment. Comments were received from respondents which enabled the development of a discussion paper on the matter. In December 2020, the Commission approved the draft discussion paper 152 on the possible adoption of a single marriage statute which was subsequently published for general information and comment in January 2021.

Notwithstanding the mandate assigned to the SALRC, it then transpired that the legislation that regulates marriages in South Africa is not informed by a primary policy, which prompted the DHA to initiate the development of a marriage policy, which policy can then lead to legislation. However, the department is working closely with the SALRC to ensure harmony and synergy between the two processes to inform policy positions and proposals that are aligned and compatible with one another.

2. During the 2019/2020 financial year, the DHA hosted country-wide Ministerial dialogues with various interest groups with the purpose of stimulating discussions and soliciting inputs on the key issues that should be addressed by the Marriage Policy. Following government processes that guides the development of a public policy, the Department produced a Policy Paper (Green Paper) which was taken through the relevant Clusters for approval by Cabinet. The Green Paper on Marriage Policy was approved by Cabinet on 21 April 2021 for public comments, and published in the government gazette on 04 May 2021. The roadmap towards the implementation of the Marriage Policy is as follows:

a) Gazetting of the draft Marriage Policy for public comments by 30 April 2021

b) Submission of the Marriage Policy to Cabinet for approval by 31 March 2022

c) Submission of the Marriage Bill to Cabinet for approval by 31 March 2023

d) Submission of the Marriage Bill to Parliament for approval by 31 March 2024

END

31 May 2021 - NW1154

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What total number of fidelity fund certificates were issued by the Estate Agency Affairs Board in each month in the period 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020; (2) what total number of incoming calls were (a) picked up by the automated welcome voice message, (b) answered by staff members and (c) disconnected without being answered at each specified office of the Estate Agency Affairs Board nationwide in each month in the period 01 January 2020 to 31 December 2020?

Reply:

(1) The total number of fidelity fund certificates issued by the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) in each month in the period 01 January 2020 to 31 December 2020 is as follows:

Month

Number

January

4 431

February

2 298

March

1 234

April

2 027

May

1 613

June

1 259

July

1 048

August

1 352

September

1 942

October

9 573

November

15 429

December

6 819

Grand Total

49 025

(2)(a)&(b) The total number of incoming calls picked up by the automated welcome voice message and those answered by staff members are as follows:

 

Period

2(a) Number of calls picked up by the automated welcome voice message

2(b) Number of calls answered by staff members

January 2020

19 984

11 684

February 2020

19 306

10 922

March 2020

0

0

April 2020

0

0

May 2020

3 806

3 526

June 2020

13 759

12 643

July 2020

17 425

15 592

August 2020

15 859

14 218

September 2020

19 681

16 319

October 2020

23 393

18 412

November 2020

19 750

14 706

December 2020

13 097

9 780

Total

166 060

127 802

(c) It should be noted that on 13 March 2020, the staff of the EAAB and officials from the call centre had to evacuate their respective buildings after personnel members had contracted the COVID-19, which resulted in the suspension of services. The call centre was supposed resume its operations in May 2020, however this coincided with arrangements made to relocate offices from Sandton to Randburg. This explains the zeros for March and April 2020.

The EAAB also makes use of a general email address, namely eab@eaab.org.za and its online query management system for stakeholders to send their complaints and enquiries.

31 May 2021 - NW1479

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; 2) Whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard? NW1684E

Reply:

  1. No, the department has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from 2010/ 2011 up to and including 2020/2021 financial year.
  2. See (1) above.

31 May 2021 - NW1445

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) criteria are used in respect of the funding for the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) paid to provinces and (b) amount was paid to each province in the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii) 2020-21 financial years?

Reply:

a) The allocation of NSNP funds to provinces are based on the poverty index / distribution, and the number of learners in no-fee schools.  Provinces, such as KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo and Eastern Cape, with high levels of poverty, and which are predominantly rural, receive the largest share of the NSNP Grant allocation. 

b) The table below shows provincial allocation over the past three financial years (2018/19 -2020/21)

Provinces(Allocation)

2018/19  (R'000)

2019/20 (R'000)

2020/21 (R'000)

Eastern Cape 

1 216 559

 1 278 365

1 376 343

Free State

   379 369

    400 727

   431 851

Gauteng

   807  454

     849 075

   905 006

KwaZulu-Natal

1 534  878

1 621 292

1 717 512

Limpopo

1 229 299

1 292 010

1 369 485

Mpumalanga 

   651 036

    687 691

   734 414

Northern Cape 

   170 211

   189 224

   202 614

North West 

   456 176

   481 859

   516 114

Western Cape 

    357 097

    385 202

    412 548

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31 May 2021 - NW1453

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What measures and plans does her department, on its own and/or in collaboration with the SA Police Service, intend to put in place to address policing and/or safety and security concerns in light of the negative impact crime has on attracting local and international tourism?

Reply:

The department has introduced a programme called the Tourism Monitors programme. This programme forms part of the Proactive theme of the now finalised National Tourism Safety Strategy. The programme entails the recruitment, training and deployment of young people at key tourist attractions and sites. Some of the key functions of these Tourism Monitors is to;

  • Enhance tourism safety awareness at key tourism attractions/sites;
  • Raise awareness and reduce crime incidents that are directed at tourists who are visiting provinces and the communities that host them.
  • Reduce tourist vulnerabilities and eliminate opportunities for violent crime aimed at tourist operations.
  • Integrate current tourism safety and awareness initiatives into a strategies implemented by the public and private sectors, as well as communities.

Upon recruitment, these young people are vetted through the assistance of SAPS and part of the plan is to also link them with the various Community Policing Forums (CPF) and Provincial SAPS Command centres. SAPS has through the MoU signed with the department also informed their various provincial command centres to work closely with the Tourism Monitors.

Over and above the Tourism Monitors programme, the department also participates at the various safety awareness sessions that SAPS schedules, especially during the festive season and around other major national peak holiday periods like the Easter weekends. The department distributes tourism safety leaflets during such occasions.

As part of the signed MoU between the department and SAPS, a call for police reservists is done especially during the December holiday period, where the Police reservists are deployed in some of the key routes and sites used by tourists.

31 May 2021 - NW1357

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What is the current status of the application for a temporary residence visa, Ref: TRR3123279, (b) what is the reason for the delay in its finalisation and (c) on what date will the application be finalised?

Reply:

a) The application for a temporary residence visa, Ref: TRR3123279 is currently finalised, captured and dispatched on 18 May 2021.

b) The application was delayed due to the backlog that the office is faced with in the processing of temporal residence visas. The unintended consequences of the provisions of the Disaster Management Act and regulations in respect of quarantine by persons infected by Covid, isolation by the contacts thereof and the numerous evacuations of the building has also impacted on the operating capacity of the office.

c) The application was adjudicated on the 11 May 2021, Printed on 12 May 2021 captured on relevant systems and dispatched on 18 May 2021.

END

31 May 2021 - NW1457

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

With regard to the unsuccessful bidders in the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producers (IPP) Procurement Programme, (a) what was the (i) nature of each unsuccessful bid, (ii) amount of electricity each bidder would have provided to the grid, (iii) cost of a kilowatt-hour of electricity generated and (iv) earliest anticipated date the IPP would have been able to supply electricity to the national grid and (b) in each case, what was the reason for the rejection of each bid? NW1660E

Reply:

a) With regard to (a) (i) to (iv), and further to information previously supplied on qualifying bidders in response NO1192E, the list of unsuccessful bidders under the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP) is as follows:

Qualifying Bidders who were unsuccessful on the basis of Price Evaluation

Project Number

Price Bid
(ZAR)

Capacity bid (MW)

Earliest anticipated SCOD

Technology

Bidder 1

2 504.68

217.40

31 December 2022

LPG Gas Turbines and Solar Photovoltaic

Bidder 2

2 661.00

61.00

1 September 2022

LPG Gas Turbines and Solar Photovoltaic

Bidder 3

2 836.65

399.34

1 December 2022

LPG Gas Turbines and Solar Photovoltaic

Bidder 4

2 871.00

112.00

31 December 2022

LPG Gas Turbines, Battery Storage and Solar Photovoltaic

Bidder 5

3 165.00

62.00

1 September 2022

LPG Gas Turbines, Battery Storage and Solar Photovoltaic

Bidder 6

3 414.00

197.40

31 December 2022

LNG Gas Turbines and Solar Photovoltaic

Unsuccessful Bidders that failed to meet Qualification Criteria

Project Number

Price Bid
(ZAR)

Capacity bid (MW)

Earliest anticipated SCOD

Technology

Bidder 7

2 737.17

50.00

1 December 2022

Solar PV, BESS & Thermal

Bidder 8

2 839.00

75.00

31 December 2022

Solar + Thermal Hybrid

Bidder 9

1 300.00

55.00

1 October 2022

Solar PV, BESS, Gas

Bidder 10

1 466.00

55.00

1 October 2022

Solar PV + BESS, Gas

Bidder 11

2 049.37

80.00

1 November 2022

Solar PV & BESS

Bidder 12

2 531.18

80.00

1 November 2022

Wind, Solar PV and BESS

Bidder 13

2 196.76

80.00

1 November 2022

Solar + BESS

Bidder 14

2 519.29

414.72

1 October 2022

Gas fired reciprocating engines

Bidder 15

2 509.76

414.72

1 October 2022

Gas fired reciprocating engines

Bidder 16

2 506.92

414.72

1 October 2022

Gas fired reciprocating engines

Bidder 17

2 613.48

315.40

1 September 2022

Various (LPG to power; wind; solar PV; BESS

b) With regard to Bidders who failed the meet the Qualification Criteria, the reasons were among others as follows:

  • Failure to comply with the Land and Environmental qualification criteria (did not have the necessary permits, authorisations, land rights or Final Scoping Reports for environmental purposes);
  • Failure to meet all the Financial qualification criteria such as debt track records or letters of commitment from the ultimate providers of equity;
  • Failing to meet Technical qualification criteria such as demonstration of secure fuel supply agreements; and
  • Failure to meet the Economic Development criteria such as proof of substantiating the South African Entity Participation or contributor status level and failure to meet designated local content.

28 May 2021 - NW1115

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What happens if an applicant refuses to indicate their race in section B of the Z83 application for employment form; (2) Whether his department classifies the race of an applicant who refuses to indicate their race; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what basis does his department classify a person as (i) Black, (ii) White, (c) Coloured, (iv) Indian and/or (v) Other; (3) What physical characteristics does his department take into account when classifying an applicant as Black, White, Coloured, Indian and/or Other?

Reply:

1. The Z83 application form is a prescribed form. An applicant is required to fill in all sections of this form completely, accurately and legibly. In addition, the declaration at the end of the form requires the applicant to confirm that all the information provided (including any attachments) is complete and correct to the best of his/her knowledge. Therefore it is incumbent on an applicant to complete the form in full. In the event that this information or any other information is not indicated, the application will not be compliant and may result in disqualification.

2. There is no requirement for any department to attempt to classify applicants into racial groups. The information provided on the Z83 form by the applicant is relied upon as correct and true based on the declaration as mentioned above.

3. As neither the DPSA nor any other department is required to determine the categorisation of the race of an applicant, there are no physical characteristics taken into account.

28 May 2021 - NW1114

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether he amended the Z83 application for employment form, as published in notice 627 of 2020 in the Government Gazette of 6 November 2020, to include a new racial category called Other to be listed alongside the existing categories of African, White, Coloured and Indian; if so, (2) what is the legal definition (a) of the category called Other which does not exist in the Employment Equity Act, Act 55 of 1998, and (b) used by his department for the categories of (i) African, (ii) White, (iii) Coloured and (iv) Indian; (3) Whether a person classified as other qualifies as a member of a designated group for the purposes of the Employment Equity Act, Act 58 of 1998, and broad-based black economic empowerment?

Reply:

(1) The Z83 application for employment form was amended extensive public consultations to address, among others, the issue of employees trying to escape disciplinary procedures and accountability by resigning when charges are proffered against them. The revisions empower the Public Service to give effect to section 16B (4) and (5) of the Public Service Act, 1994 which allows for employees to be disciplined for misconduct allegedly committed in their former department, when they are appointed in a new department. In addition other amendments included the race categorisation for ‘other’’.

(2) There is no legal definition accorded to the category of “other”. Under note 3 attached to the information of race as reflected in the Z83 form, it is indicated that the information is to enable the department to comply with the employment Equity Act, 1998. The information provided in respect of the race of applicants is therefore utilised to implement any affirmative action measures that a department may have.

In terms of the Employment Equity Act, “designated groups” is defined to include South Africa citizens who are black people, women and people with disabilities. In the same Act, “black people” is defined to mean Africans, Coloured and Indians. In addition it is also recognised that there are applicants, such as foreign nationals, who do not fall within these definitions provided for in the Employment Equity Act and therefore the category of “other” was introduced.

(3) The Z83 form is for purposes of employment in the public service and does not address broad-based black economic empowerment prescripts. The intention of the Z83 form is to allow the ease of categorisation of persons for employment taking into account the Employment Equity Act. Therefore an applicant who reflects himself or herself within the category of “other” indicates that the applicants does not fall within the other categorisations as contemplated in the Employment Equity Act.

28 May 2021 - NW1295

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY (For written reply) QUESTION NO. 1295 {NW1488E} INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 13 of 2021 DATE OF PUBLICATION: 14 May 2021 Mr D W Bryant (DA) to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment: Whether, in view of the unpoliced night fishing which remains a concern across the country and has been banned in the Breede Estuary, and in light of the purported Ministerial approval for the ban of night fishing across the Republic, which has not yet been gazetted, she has approved a ban on night fishing for implementation across the Republic; if not, why not; if so, (a) how far along is the process of gazetting the ban on night fishing and (b) what agencies will be involved in the (i) policing and (ii) management of a night fishing ban?

Reply:

 

  1. The Department has drafted the regulations prohibiting fishing at night in estuaries in terms of subsections 2(e) and 2(n) of section 77 of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act 18 of 1998). The draft regulations will be published in due course for public comment as part of Phase 2 of the socio-economic impact assessment system (SEIAS). SEIAS aims to minimise unintended consequences from regulations and legislation, including unnecessary costs from implementation and compliance as well as from unanticipated outcomes and to anticipate implementation risks and encourage measures to mitigate them.
  2. (i) Departmental Fishery Control Officers, the Department's patrol vessels, Law Enforcement Agencies forming part of Phakisa Initiative 5 and SAPS will police the night fishing ban.

(ii) The Branch: Fisheries Management and the Branch: Oceans and Coasts through its Chief Directorate: Integrated Coastal Management will be responsible for the management of the night fishing ban in estuaries.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE:

28 May 2021 - NW1296

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) In light of the perceived inability of local authorities to manage plastic waste and its impact on the surrounding environment which remains a huge challenge across the Republic, what steps (a) are being taken by her department to ensure that the Matzikama Local Municipality reduces the amount of plastic waste generated in its jurisdiction and (b) will be taken by local residents to assist in reducing the amount of plastic waste; (2) what statutory obligations are currently placed on municipalities to reduce and manage plastic waste?

Reply:

(1) a) The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) is leading a number of the initiatives to address the problem of plastic waste pollution, some of which are executive in collaboration with civil society and the plastics industry. The initiatives that are led by the DFFE to recover or remove waste and litter from land and aquaic systems include, but are no limited to :

i. National Working for the Coast programme: a job creation initiative targeting women youth and persons with disabilities, focussing on promoting responsible coastal management through, among others, regular collection of litter along South Africa’s beaches and waterways;

ii. Good Green Deeds programme: a nation-wide programme aimed at mobilising the public to clean local communities and raise awareness around illegal dumping and management;
iii. Source to Sea programme: a programme aimed at reducing litter flows into the marine environment by targeting and recovering litter at source (in river catchments and human settlement along rivers) and promoting improved waste management. This project is currently being expanded to all coastal district municipalities as part of a Presidential Employment Stimulus initiative to counter the negative economic impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic;
iv. Operational Clean Sweep; an industry led initiative aimed at reducing the accidental loss of pellets, flakes and powder from processing facilities into the environment;
v. Municipal Cleaning and Green programme (Presidential Economic Stimulus); the aim of this programme is to fight environmental degradation and ensure that our country is free from litter and illegal dumps. This will be done through mass public employment, with a special prioritisations of women, youth and persons living with disabilities;
vi. Provision of Institutional support through:
assisting municipalities to develop 5 year integrated waste management plans (IWMP) to ensure sustainable planning for waste management and to leverage funding;
assisting with the development of municipal by-laws to ensure compliance and enforcement on waste management matters, and
building capacity through training of municipal officials and councillors on Waste Management matters such as waste planning, collecting, collecting, recycling, landfill compliance, etc.
vii. Provision of financial support through assisting municipalities to access the Municipal Infrastructure Grant to improve waste collection, recycling/diversion and landfill compliance; and
viii. Conducting the National Consumer Awareness campaign ( by the Department) on plastic waste, food waste, construction and demolition waste, and waste declaimer integration.
b) The initiative above are targeted at the general public, including Matzikama Local Municipality residents, to reduce plastic waste pollution.

(2) The Constitution places the responsibility on municipalities for refuse removal, landfill site management and waste management. The National Environment Management; Waste Act 2008 (ACT No. 59 of 2008) (NEMWA) requires a municipality to deliver waste management services, including waste removal, waste storage and waste disposal service; in addition, integrating its waste management plans with its integrated development plans and ensuring access to residents for such services. NEMWA requires municipalities, amongst others, to minimise the generation of waste through implementation of the Waste Management Hierarchy. The Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) regulations require municipalities, where applicable, to co-operate with the relevant industry (producers and producer responsibility scheme, to increase the recovery of identified products from municipal waste.

Regards
MS BD CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 28/05/2021


 

28 May 2021 - NW1329

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether (a) a forensic investigation and (b) a disciplinary action have been instituted against officials responsible for the p‹:nr management and adjudication of small-scale fisheries tenders in the Western Caps which led to her decision to intervene by filing an application at the Western Cape Division of the High Court; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

 

a) b) The Department has not instituted a forensic investigation nor disciplinary action. The official that was responsible for the execution of this task and who took all the final decisions has left the Department.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES ACID THE ENVIRONMENT
Date: 28/05/2021

28 May 2021 - NW1297

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1. What are the relevant details of the agencies that have been invoked in the busts confiscation of the significant amount of rhino from at the O.R. Tambo International Airport between July 2020 and February 2021 (details furnished), which have been widely reported in the media; 2. What has happened to the confiscated rhino horn stockpiles; 3.whether the confiscated rhino from stockpiles have been destroyed; if not, what will be done with it if so, what are the relevant details; 4. whether there are any other confiscated chino horn stockpiles; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the plans for the stockpiles?

Reply:

1. The following agencies have been involved in the busts/confiscation of rhino horn at the 0:R. Tambo International Airport between July 2020 and February 2021, which have been widely reported in the media: Private security companies employed by Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) and the warehouse operators I cargo handers who are responsible for manning the x-ray machines.
South African Revenue Service (SARS) Customs.
South African Police Service (SAPS): Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI).
Environmental Management Inspectors from the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE).
2. The seized rhino horns are handled as per the prescribed crime scene standard operating procedures. A chain of custody principle is followed and the seized horns are bagged, sealed and entered into the SAPS evidence register (SAPS 13). From thee, the horns are taken fbr forensic examination and DNA sampling in order to be compared to the DNA samples in. the national database. The hams are then kept in a secure location until the relevant court case is finalised. Thereafter, the horns are moved to another central secure location for storage.
3. Confiscated rhino from stockpiles have not been destroyed. They are stored in a secure location.
4. Yes, there are other seized rhino horn stockpiles, and these are all kept under lock in secure locations.

The High Level Panel (HLP) set up to review existing policies, legislation and practices on matters elated to the management, breeding, hunting, trade and handling of elephant, lion, leopard and rhinoceros recommended the Department develop a stockpile management and disposal policy. This recommendation is currently under consideration.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 28/05/2021

27 May 2021 - NW1232

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools are considered (a) rural and (b) township schools; (2) what (a)(i) total number of learners between Grade 9 and 12 are enrolled in each specified school and (ii) is the location of each school and (b) are the relevant details of enrolment by each grade

Reply:

1 (a)(b)

Province

NOT CLASSIFIED

RURAL

URBAN

EC

 

 2 846

 2 680

FS

 

  163

  986

GT

 

  180

 2 936

KZN

 

 4 315

 1 789

LP

 

 3 436

  484

MP

 1 804

 

 

NC

 

  308

  288

NW

 

  40

 1 525

WC

 

  561

 1 298

Grand Total

 1 804

 11 849

 11 986

Note: Schools were classified into Rural and Urban. Due to not having a formal definition of Rural, Mpumalanga schools were not classified. The detailed list of above is included as Annexure A, with physical addresses of each school for further identification of township schools.

 

2 (a)(i) (ii) and (b)

Refer Annexure B

27 May 2021 - NW936

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to his reply to Question 122 on 16 February 2021 regarding updating the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming, where he stated at the outset that the guidelines have not been updated, but later states that the technical committees of the National Road Safety Steering Committee have updated the National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps as a priority; he will furnish clarity regarding the seemingly contradictory information in the reply; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

It is correct that the National Guidelines for traffic calming have not been updated since 1998, however, it is worth noting that in the process of reviewing the guidelines through the National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC), the committee found no major changes to the present 1998 guidelines. It is for that reason that the NRSSC looked at it as these guidelines will effectively remain unchanged.

 

27 May 2021 - NW738

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that one of the biggest hindrances to the Special Investigating Unit carrying out their mandate with regard to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) was the lack of paperwork and records which have disappeared and cannot be traced, including many of the contracts that were signed between Prasa and service providers, what steps will he be taking to (a) ensure the recovery of paperwork and records of such contracts and (b) investigate how (i) the records went missing in the first place and (ii) payments on contracts were honoured if no records of such contracts exist? NW860E

Reply:

a) PRASA will request all service providers that are currently rendering services where physical contract documentation could not be traced to submit copies of the signed contract agreements with PRASA.

b) (i) PRASA has signed a Secondment Agreement with SIU to investigate all contracts that were identified in the Public Protector Derailed report and flagged also by AGSA as irregular. Such investigation would shed light on how contract documents went missing in the first place and what corrective measures should be taken against responsible individuals. The SIU report would be finalised during March 2021.

(ii) The process to pay for services where contract documentation is missing requires end-user departments to compile the necessary submissions with relevant source documents and confirmation of receipt of goods or services for approval by the GCEO and Finance prior to processing of any payment, especially for goods and services of a critical nature that PRASA cannot afford to operate without. In instances where payments have been processed without the necessary documents, based on the SIU investigation, appropriate corrective action will be taken against responsible individuals.

 

25 May 2021 - NW1231

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Police

In view of the finding in the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) report into the water canon spray in BellVille earlier this year, that the SA Police Service could not find any wrongdoing in their actions, how does he justify the actions of the police officers against vulnerable and ill persons;

Reply:

 

  • IPID investigate cases in terms of its mandate as per section 28 of IPID Act 1 of 2011. This matter was referred to IPID by MEC Fritz of the Western Cape Provincial Government in terms of section 28 (1)(h) of IPID Act 1 of 2011.
  • Based on the investigation of incident in question where IPID found no offence or misconduct was committed by members of SAPS.
  • IPID confirmed that SAPS acted within the law, as they were called for intervention to assist in the crowd management and enforcement of the Disaster Management Act at the SASSA Bellville offices.
  • SAPS intervened upon request by SASSA to assist in crowd management and in execution of their duties ensure the use of non-lethal intervention, managing the crowd; being the grant recipients, in implementing the Disaster Management Act to maintain social distancing and Crowd Control Management.
  • IPID therefore did not recommend any action to be taken against the members as they were acting within confines of the law and no misconduct was committed in terms of SAPS regulations.

 

(2) Whether the IPID report is the final report on this matter; if not, will there be further investigation; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply from IPID:

A. The IPID report is final, there is no further investigation to be conducted on the above complaint herein by IPID.

 

APPROVED

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MS DJ NTLATSENG EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: IPID DATE:

 

Recommend/ Not Recommended/Comments

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

MRCCMATHALE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF POLICE
DATE
:  21-05-2021

 

Approved/ Not Approved

 

 

 
 

 

 

GEN, BH CELE, MP

MINISTER OF POLICE DATE:  24-05-2021

 

 

25 May 2021 - NW1134

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

What action was taken against (a) the security guards who allegedly assaulted and manhandled persons at the White River Police Station, on 28 March 2021 (details furnished), (b) their employer and (c) the police officials on duty who failed to protect the complainants who fled to the police station for safety?

Reply:

  1. The persons that were allegedly invol\led in the assault are not security officers but self-employed businessmen. The following cases were opened and are being investigated:
    • White River, CAS 214/03/2021, common assault, pointing of a firearm and malicious damage to property. This case was opened by Mr Byliefeldt against Mr Maroga, Mr Nkadimeng and others.
    • White River, CAS 196/03/2021, malicious damage to property and crimen injuria. This case was opened by Mr Maroga against Mr Byliefeldt.
    • White River, CAS 74/04/2021, crimen injuria. This case was opened by Mr Masuku against Mr Byliefeldt.
  1. The businessmen, referred to above, are also the complainants in criminal cases, involving the alleged victim of the assault, at White River. Multiple cases are, therefore, being investigated, all of which are still pending.
  1. The misconduct investigation against the members in question, in terms of the SAPS Disciplinary Regulations, 2016, was instituted and finalised. It has been referred to the Office of the Provincial Commissioner, for the implementation of further departmental steps and possible sanctions.

Reply to question 1134 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date:2021-05-19

Reply to question 1134 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 24-05-2021

24 May 2021 - NW1077

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 31 for oral reply on 3 March 2021, regarding the R118 million irregular expenditure on the New York Pilot Project and her admission that her department had nothing to show for the R118 million spent, and in view of the fact that this is now an international embarrassment, he will (a) recall Ambassador Jerry Matjila, who was the Director-General of the specified department during the initiation of the highly controversial project and (b) suspend Minister Nkoana-Mashabane, who failed to exercise her executive oversight as the then Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, resulting in damaging South Africa’s international image; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation that in her Oral Reply to the question posed by the Honourable Member on this matter, she indicated that the Department had brought a review application in 2018 to have the tender award reviewed and set aside, and to request the recovery of the money that had been paid to the service provider. As the Minister also indicated in her Oral Reply, the judgement is still awaited.

Ambassador Jerry Matjila, who was the Director-General of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, is no longer an official of the Department, as the Employer-Employee relationship was terminated on 15 January 2021.

There is no intention to suspend Minister Nkoana-Mashabane.

21 May 2021 - NW1253

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

a) What is the position of the Government regarding the procurement of nuclear energy; b) What quantity of nuclear power is targeted for purchase; c) From whom will the nuclear energy be purchased; and d) By what date will it be procured? NW1444E

Reply:

a)  The Integrated Resource Plan 2019 (IPR2019), Decision 8: directed the Government to commence with the preparations for a nuclear build programme to the extent of 2500 MW, at a pace and scale that the country can afford because it is a no-regret option in the long term. To implement this decision, in June 2020 the Department commenced with the preparations, including issuing a non-binding Request for Information (RFI), to test the market’s appetite for the 2500MW nuclear new build programme.

In terms of the Electricity Regulations Act, 2006 (Act No. 4 of 2006), the Department has submitted the Ministerial Section 34 determination to request the concurrence of the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) for the procurement of additional 2500MW from nuclear energy. The Department is awaiting NERSA’s decision on the Ministerial section 34 determination. Subject to the Regulator’s approval, the Department will issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) for the procurement of 2500MW nuclear new build programme, at a pace and the scale that the country can afford.

b) As indicated in the IRP2019 Decision 8, the Department targets to procure the 2500MW from nuclear energy.

c) The decision from whom to procure the 2500MW nuclear energy will only be known once the procurement process has been concluded and successful bidder(s) appointed. This decision has not been made at this stage because procurement has not started. The Department is still awaiting NERSA’s verdict on Ministerial section 34 determination.

d) To ensure security of energy supply and in line with the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2019-2024, the Department plans to complete the procurement of the 2500MW nuclear new build programme by 2024.

21 May 2021 - NW1349

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) With regard to the successful bidders in the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme, what is the (a) duration of the agreement with the Independent Power Producers, (b) amount of electricity each bidder will provide to the grid, (c) cost to the Republic per kilowatt of electricity generated and (d) earliest anticipated date that each Independent Power Producer will be able to supply electricity to the national grid; 2) Whether any exemptions were granted by either (a) the Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries, (b) the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition and/or (c) the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy; if not, why not; if so, what are the details in each case; 3) Whether public participation was conducted in connection with each successful bidder’s (a) environmental impact, (b) economic impact and (c) social impact; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the details in each case? NW1545E

Reply:

a) the proposed tenure for the Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) is 20 years.

b)

Project Name

Contracted Capacity (MW)

Evaluation Price

(ZAR/kwh)*

Oya Energy Hybrid Facility

128

1.55

Umoyilanga Energy

75

1.72

ACWA Power Project DAO

150

1.46

Karpowership SA Coega

450

1.49

Karpowership SA Richards Bay

450

1.50

Karpowership SA Saldanha

320

1.70

Mulilo Total Coega

198

1.89

Mulilo Total Hydra Storage

75

1.52

*the evaluation price is rounded off to the nearest ten

A further three (3) eligible bidders will only be announced after further value for money propositions have been successfully concluded.

c) See response table above

d) The projects are expected to connect to the grid between June 2022 and December 2022.

2. a) The Department is not aware of any exemptions granted by the Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries.

b) The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition granted exemption from certain designated local content requirements.

c) See response to question (b) above.

3. a) Regarding to environmental compliance, bidders were only were only required to submit a scoping report as part of their response to the Request for Proposal.

b) No public participation was conducted regarding economic impact of successful bids, but bidders have committed to prescribed minimum economic development requirements in line with the PPPFA and the RFP.

c) See response to question (b) above.

21 May 2021 - NW1351

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether any plans are in place to include sign language as one of the official South African languages; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of the plans and (b) total budget has been allocated in this regard? NW1547

Reply:

(a) Yes, after the Constitutional Review Committee of Parliament had recommended that section 6(1) and (5)(a) of the Constitution be amended to include South African Sign Language (SASL) as the 12th South African official language, the Department of Justice and Correctional Services (DoJ) took the necessary steps to kick-start the Constitutional amendment process. The first working session for all national departments to make contributions to the draft 19th Constitutional Amendment Bill was held in March 2021. DSAC and PanSALB as the key implementers of section 6 of the Constitution were working closely with DoJ. A follow-up working session was facilitated by DSAC in April 2021 where all affected stakeholders mainly the deaf community gave input into the draft Bill.

DSAC is also planning to conduct further consultative meetings with all relevant structures of the Deaf Community as users of the South African Sign Language (SASL) to understand their specific needs that will inform the draft implementation plan to give effect to section 6 of the Constitution when it is amended.

In the meantime, PanSALB is workshopping stakeholders on the SASL Charter, which sets out key obligations to improve access to quality services and effective protection of the linguistic rights of deaf people.

(b) There is no budget yet allocated for the SASL as the constitutional amendment process is still ongoing. When SASL is finally adopted as the 12th official language of the Republic of South Africa, DSAC will include it in its plans with cost implications.

21 May 2021 - NW1355

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Reply:

  1. The list of paid beneficiaries of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme that is being rolled out by the National Film and Video, inclusive of the amount is attached as requested.
  2. PESP Phase 1 of the National Film and Video Foundation is not yet completed and it is envisaged that it will be concluded by the end of June 2021. The list of beneficiaries paid is the same as the one provided in question 1 above.
  3. PESP phase 2 has not started. No approval for implementation has been granted yet by the National Treasury.

Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme

           
                 

Split

Allocation

Paid to date

Balance available

Jobs proposed

Jobs projected

Jobs outstanding

   

Stream 1

84 534 772,00

58 764 484,00

25 770 288,00

6 375

5 838

537

   

Stream 2

22 513 038,00

22 263 038,00

250 000,00

1 200

1 187

13

   

Stream 3

12 950 000,00

12 950 000,00

-

705

705

-

   

Stream 4

13 002 190,00

10 502 190,24

2 499 999,76

675

480

195

   

Admin

7 000 000,00

4 531 324,12

2 468 675,88

 

 

 

   

Total

133 000 000,00

104 479 712,24

28 520 287,76

8 955,00

8 210,00

745,00