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25 March 2024 - NW502

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1) Whether she made any specific recommendations and/or interventions to mitigate the poor performance and budget deficit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what steps will she take during the period 1 April to 29 May 2024 to devise a framework within which such critical issues are dealt with proactively by the new administration?

Reply:

 

Find reply here

25 March 2024 - NW254

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, given that Adv Shamila Batohi, the National Director of Public Prosecutions, made a presentation to Parliament on 1 June 2022, explaining that progress on the National Prosecuting Authority’s Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) Commission investigations are monitored and divided into three categories (details furnished), he will furnish Mr B N Herron with an overview of the progress of the specified cases, in relation to the total number of cases carried by each of the TRC's 10 divisions (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

1. For ease of reference firstly find an updated summary of the total number of matters under investigation as at January 2024.

DIVISION

TOTAL MATTERS UNDER INVESTIGATION

DPP: WC

11

DPP: FS

3

DPP: MTHATHA

10

DPP: EC

12

DPP: NW

11

DPP: KZN

27

DPP: MPUMALANGA

8

DPP: NC

5

DPP: JHB

23

DPP: PTA

14

DPP: LMP

13

UNKNOWN DPPS/JURISDICTION

 

TOTAL

137

(2) Herewith the total number of cases carried by each of the divisions at the following phases:

(a) Phase A (0-33%) – available evidence, locating or compiling of docket, inquest reports, witness statements, detainee statements, location of SAPS 14 or Mortuary reports etc.

(b) Phase B (34-65%)- Expert reports, engagements with experts to obtain reports or to perform reconstruction of scenes.

(c) Phase C (66-100%) – Stages nearing completion of investigations and /or decision making based on evidence and expert reports.

NO

DIVISION

A

B

C

Total

1

WC

2

0

9

11

2

FS

0

0

3

3

3

MTHATHA

1

0

9

10

4

MKHANDA

6

0

6

12

5

NW

6

0

5

11

6

KZN

16

2

9

27

7

MP

6

0

2

8

8

NC

4

0

1

5

9

JHB

21

0

2

23

10

PTA

8

0

6

14

11

LMP

12

0

1

13

         

137

25 March 2024 - NW183

Profile picture: Engelbrecht, Mr J

Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)With regard to the 16 472 inmates who were released in terms of the special remission programme, what total number of the inmates completed (a) rehabilitation and (b) re-integration programmes; (2) What total number of the released inmates who have reoffended completed (a) rehabilitation and (b) re-integration programmes; (3) Whether he has found that the rehabilitation and re-integration programmes are effective and sufficient to prevent reoffending; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The total number of inmates completed (a) rehabilitation programmes are 7912.

(1)(b) The total number of inmates completed (a) re-integration programmes are 11697.

(2)(a) Total number of the released inmates who have reoffended completed rehabilitation programmes are 382.

(2)(b) Total number of the released inmates who have reoffended completed re-integration programmes are 51.

(3) Yes, the rehabilitation and re-integration programmes are effective and sufficient to prevent re-offending. Out of the total number of 16 472 inmates who were released on the special remission programme only 433 has re-offended as on 29 February 2024.

END.

25 March 2024 - NW470

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to the Rooiwal Communal Property Association (CPA), she will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a copy of their (a) constitution, (b) financial statements since the 2015-16 financial year, (c) updated membership register and (d) title deed from the Regional Land Claims Commission to the Rooiwal CPA; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a)(b),(c) Any member of the Communal Property Association (CPA), can make a request to the CPA executive to access CPA information. A request must be formally made to the CPA executive committee and the Department can assist if the Committee fail to provide the copy of the constitution, financial statements, and updated membership register.

(d) A request must be formally made to the Land Claims Commission to obtain copies of the title deeds.

25 March 2024 - NW506

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1) Whether, with reference to her statement at the Three-Sphere Planning Session of the National Council of Provinces held that our National Development Plan must prioritise improved livelihoods as the true measurement of meeting development targets such as economic growth, she has implemented any specific measures and/or policies to achieve an increase in improved livelihoods that resulted from economic growth and economic inclusion; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) how is she fostering collaboration between the public and private sectors to enhance improved livelihoods flowing from economic growth and development outcomes?

Reply:

Find reply here

25 March 2024 - NW328

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the full details of all (a) sponsorships, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purposes to (i) her, (ii) her department and (iii) officials of her department by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available?

Reply:

(a),(b),(c) None.

(i)(aa),(bb),(cc) (ii)(aa),(bb),(cc) (iii)(aa),(bb),(cc) Falls away.

25 March 2024 - NW270

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)In light of the recent mass resignations and suspensions following the report of the Department of Correctional Services on the investigation into the escape of Mr Thabo Bester from the Mangaung Correctional Centre (MCC) in May 2022, (a) what impact will this have on the ability of the Mangaung Correctional Centre (MCC) facility to operate as a centre for correctional services and (b) do the specified resignations involve critical staff who may now leave the institution open to security threats; (2) whether there is a plan to recruit replacement staff within a period of 60 days to fill all vacancies; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The resignations have not impacted operations as the Contractor has built-in a capacity to train more that required security staff for any disturbance that may arise at the Centre.

(1)(b) The affected staff was from security the Contractor has accordingly trained enough staff for security functions and it is therefore easy to replace the resigned and dismissed staff.

(2) The current available plan is designed to replace the resigned and dismissed staff within a period of a month (30 days). There are people who underwent security training and were vetted by the authorised institution as well as DCS Training Standards. The trained officials await vacancies that may arise from the Centre as and when they arise, details of these individuals are provided to DCS for certification, it is only after certification has been granted by DCS that the Contractor appoints the individuals.

 

END

25 March 2024 - NW505

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she has engaged with King Misuzulu Sinqobile kaZwelithini and the Minister of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform (a) to find solutions to the problems besetting the Ingonyama Trust and (b) about the desirability of King Zwelithini taking the chairpersonship of the Trust?

Reply:

No, the Minister has not engaged with King Misizulu Sinqobile kaZwelithini and the Minister of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform because –

a) the administration of the Ingonyama Trust Act rests with the Minister for Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, who is in terms of the provisions of the Act, the competent Executive Authority regarding the affairs of the Ingonyama Trust.

b) The Minister is also not a competent authority in relation to the issue of the desirability of the King taking the Chairpersonship of the Trust. The composition of the Board falls within the purview of the Minister for Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development.

End.

25 March 2024 - NW433

Profile picture: Breedt, Ms T

Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the recent docking of the ship Al Kuwait carrying 19 000 live cattle in Cape Town and the attending reports of cruelty to animals on the specified ship, what measures and regulations will she and her department put in place to manage the welfare of future exports of live animals on ships from the Republic, in order to safeguard the welfare of the animals and prevent the abuse of the animals transported; (2) whether the existing non-mandatory Guidelines for the Exportation of Live Animals by Sea version 1 will be converted into enforceable regulations; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date will this be implemented and (b) what are the relevant details thereof, including the (i) requirements for pre-boarding veterinary care and inspection, (ii) independent monitors on board for the duration of the voyage, (iii) on-board automated monitoring of ambient conditions and (iv) transparent reporting on the ambient conditions and welfare of animals during the voyage and upon arrival at their destination; (3) whether there will be any prohibition of live export by sea during certain times, such as exclusion during the Northern Hemisphere summer, as prohibited in the existing regulations and in Australia's regulations, but not adhered to in terms of the shipment that took place in July 2023; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) The AI Kuwait that docked in Cape Town was ferrying 17500 heads of cattle from Rio Grande, Brazil to Iraq. A South African Company, acting on behalf of their customer, approached the Department with a request to allow the vessel that was transporting 17500 heads of cattle to dock in Cape Town to load 2000 tons of animal feed. Detailed specifications of the vessel were provided, ensuring stringent measures to prevent contamination. Loading procedures for the feed were outlined, involving the use of conveyor belts. No livestock from South Africa was carried on this vessel.

Relating to the cases of exports from South Africa, the current laws, standards, and international norms and standards that are used for the exports of live animals from the Republic, already serve to provide assurances for animal welfare. The department is, however, working on beefing up the regulatory framework by introducing regulations for the export of animals by sea.

(2) Yes.

(a),(b) The first draft will be finalised by the end of April 2024. This will be followed by the formal legislation development processes including a socio-economic impact assessment, public consultation, and review of the comments from the public. Once the process has been completed, the document will be presented to the Minister for consideration and promulgation. It is envisaged that the second part of the process will be completed in the second quarter of the next financial year.

(i),(ii),(ii),(iv) The regulations will include the appropriate measures.

(3) Any possible prohibitions will be considered during the drafting of the regulations.

4. No.

25 March 2024 - NW398

Profile picture: Makesini, Ms M

Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

How many houses has her department built since 1 January 2019?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements manage to build two hundred and forty-five, five hundred and eighty-seven (245 587) houses since 1 January 2019 to date (which is only for quarter one to quarter three of the current financial year. These houses were built throughout the nine provinces as per the breakdown on the below table.

Province

18/19

(Q4)

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

23/24

(Q1-Q3)

Total

EC

1 126

8 757

5 427

6 833

5 550

3 455

31 148

FS

761

2 290

1 890

1 647

311

188

7 087

GP

2 593

12 153

9 495

7 354

6 982

4 803

43 380

KZN

4 743

15 737

10 315

12 033

9 325

7 593

59 746

LP

3 954

8 135

4 518

4 269

4 808

6 200

31 884

MP

250

6 710

4 522

2 955

1 900

1 300

17 637

NC

96

620

221

591

173

84

1 785

NW

1 653

6 739

2 847

2 734

3 918

2 768

20 659

WC

3 007

8 184

6 354

6 200

5 665

2 851

32 261

Total

18 183

69 325

45 589

44 616

38 632

29 424

245 587

25 March 2024 - NW466

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether her department has a policy on providing anonymised data from the Personal and Salary System and Multi-Agent System to academics, researchers and/or others in the public domain to enable external analysis, research and advice; if not, why does her department refuse to make the specified data publicly available in so far as it complies with the relevant provisions of the Protection of Personal Information Act, Act 4 of 2013; if so, what is the process for researchers, academics and members of the public to obtain access to the data?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has approved a Manual in terms of section 14 of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000 (Act No.2 of 2000) (PAIA) which, amongst others, deals with and promotes the right to access records held by the DPSA, as a public body and sets out the procedures to be followed by members of the public to access records held by the DPSA.

Furthermore, the DPSA has published, on its website, a Notice in terms of section 15 of PAIA identifying categories of records of the department which are automatically available without a person having to request access in terms of the procedures contained in the Manual.

The Manual and section 15 Notice are available on the DPSA website at the following link: https://www.dpsa.gov.za/paia/

In so far as human resource data and any other information to enable external analysis, research and advice is concerned, such requests are considered and released subject to the provisions of the PAIA and the Protection of Personal Information Act, 2013 (Act No. 4 of 2013) with due regard to the lawful requirements for the further processing of personal information.

End

25 March 2024 - NW385

Profile picture: Mthethwa, Mr E

Mthethwa, Mr E to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)With reference to his reply to question 4137 on 5 January 2024, wherein he requested the details of the case that has been postponed more than 75 times, which has been confirmed as Case: T1619/2021 D928865, what reasons led to the specified case to be postponed for multiple times; (2) what is the total cost of the specified postponements to date; (3) what steps has his department taken (a) to mitigate against these undetectable contributors to the wasteful expenditure by the courts and (b) against officials who allegedly simply report to work to postpone cases for errors committed by the State?

Reply:

1 The reasons for postponements are the following:

  1. The case referred to above is the State v Johannes Mmola and four others as evidenced in Rabie Ridge CAS 106/05/2021 where the accused are charged with murder and malicious damage to property. According to courts records, the case was postponed 59 times not 75 times. Please see the attached annexure A.
  2. The record of the court proceedings was painstakingly scrutinized by the Chief Prosecutor, East Rand and the majority of the postponements were as a result of absent legal representatives or the changing of legal representatives
  3. After various remands for address verification and the sorting out of legal representation for the accused, the bail application commenced on 06 July 2021. Various other remands occurred during the course of attending to the bail application.
  4. On 08 September 2021 the bail application proceeded where the investigating officer gave evidence in opposition to bail being granted. Bail was denied on 22 September 2021 for the first four applicants and the matter was postponed for further investigations. The matter was eventually remanded to 11 October 2021 for the post-mortem report and photo album.
  5. On 08 November 2021, Adv Mudau came on record, handing in a legal brief from Mgiba Noxolo Incorporated. Only accused 5 was at court and the matter was remanded to 12 November 2021 for the other accused’s presence and for Adv Mudau to hand documents to the prosecutor with the intention to apply for bail on new facts.
  6. Following various postponements, the application for bail on new facts for accused 4 was refused on 10 February 2022. Adv Mudau appeared for accused 2-5. The court allowed for a final remand for further investigations to 28 April 2022.
  7. On 28 April 2022, Adv Mudau indicated his intent to bring an application on new facts for accused 5 who was absent as he was hospitalised. The court was then informed on 05 May 2022 that accused 5 had passed away and the case was postponed to 23 June 2022 for the death certificate and instructions from the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP). On 23 June 2022, the case was transferred to the Tembisa Regional Court for 27 June 2022 under case number TRC228/2022.
  8. On 14 July 2022, Adv Mudau informed the court that he had not received financial instructions and the family of the accused requested a postponement until 29 July 2022 to raise the funds.
  9. Adv Mudau was absent on three subsequent court appearances whereupon the accused decided on 12 August 2022 to apply for legal aid on 12 August 2022.
  10. Various postponements occurred in relation to the sorting out of legal representation. On 21 November 2022 it was confirmed that Ms Ledwaba will represent accused 3 and Judicare will be appointed to represent accused 1 and 4. Case was postponed to 08 December 2022 for this purpose. On 14 December 2022 and 16 January 2023, the matter was again postponed for the appointment of Judicare attorneys.
  11. The court was eventually able to postpone the case till 07 March 2023 for disclosure purposes. On 07 March 2023, the matter was set down for trial at the Tembisa Regional Court for 25 May 2023.
  12. On this day, the legal representative for accused 2 was not available as he was attending an urgent bail application in the High Court.
  13. The matter was subsequently postponed to 11 September 2023 for trial. All within the control of the prosecution will be done to ensure that the matter proceed on 11 September 2023.
  14. On 11 September 2023, the accused pleaded not guilty to the charges preferred against them.
  15.  
  16. On the same day, the first state witness, who suffers from a kidney disease, collapsed whilst in court and was rushed to hospital. The matter was rolled over to 12 September 2023 to potentially proceed with the matter, should this witness be available.
  17. On 12 September 2023, the witness was still indisposed. The matter was postponed to 27 October 2023. On this date, the evidence in chief of the first state witness was concluded and the legal representative of Accused 1 started with cross-examination which was not finalised on 27 October 2023.
  18. The matter was postponed to 16 January 2024 for continuation of the cross-examination of the first state witness.
  19. On 16 January 2023, the third legal representative commenced with cross-examination of the first state witness. At this time, the witness requested a postponement due to ill health and having to be hospitalised.
  20. The case was postponed to 08 July 2024 for the continuation of the cross-examination of the first witness.

2. The costs of individual criminal cases are not quantified. The cost of each case is part of the operational costs to run the Courts on a daily basis. The National Prosecuting Authority takes the management of court time seriously, and where prosecutors are guilty of misconduct in causing a case to be postponed unnecessarily, disciplinary/ remedial actions are taken. The only costs that the department incurred is R560.00 that relates to travelling expenses of the witness.

3. (a) Reply to question 1 provide various reasons for postponements. The question raised relating to consequence management does not have regard to the multifarious reasons for postponements which would have been granted by the Presiding Officers. The majority of postponements were not fruitless and wasteful expenditure and thus consequence management is not appropriate for any Legal Aid SA Official save for the double briefing by our Judicare Practitioner, Adv Mhlari, on 23 May 2023, which will be raised with the practitioner for consequence management in accordance with the Legal Aid SA ‘s Judicare accreditation terms and conditions.Save for the few occasions when the State applied for postponements for justified further investigation, the State has always been available and prepared to proceed, but due to external contributing factors, as set out above, the matter was postponed.

(b) From the record of proceedings and information supplied by the prosecutor, there is no indication of any undue delays occasioned by the State.

END

22 March 2024 - NW642

Profile picture: Mkhwebane, Adv BJ

Mkhwebane, Adv BJ to ask the Minister of Finance:

What (a) action has been taken by the National Treasury to deal with the case reported in September 2023 to the National Anti-Corruption Hotline, with reference number OBK06229092023, which is related to the alleged payment of R10 million by the Development Bank of Southern Africa to a service provider that did not meet the project deliverables and (b) are the full details of the consequence management that was meted out to the individuals implicated in the specified case?

Reply:

The investigation is still underway and will be finalised by the end of March 2024.

22 March 2024 - NW432

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether an assessment of all public hospitals has been undertaken to determine if their equipment and consumable needs will be met within the budget of R848 billion allocated to his department over the Medium-term Expenditure Framework by the Minister of Finance, Mr E Godongwana; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

On 21st February 2024, the Minister of Finance announced 2024 MTEF allocation of R848 billion for the health sector which is inclusive of the following obligations:

  • Payment of current employees and the impact of the wage bill agreement
  • Provision of the health services in all facilities
  • Medical equipment and consumables
  • Maintenance and construction of new facilities

The consolidated assessment of equipment and consumables was not undertaken, however, health facilities do develop a demand plan for their equipment and consumables. Upon the budget allocation by the Provincial Treasury, Provincial Departments of health allocates the budgets and develop annual procurement plans.. The total allocated budget over the 2024 MTEF is R15,5 billion for machinery and equipment combined and R7.2 billion for consumables of which are medical supplies and laboratory services. Due to budgetary constraints, it is possible that the equipment and consumables needs will not be met based on the allocated budget.

END.

22 March 2024 - NW634

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What total amount has his department incurred on litigation to date as a result of his removal of the Board of Directors of the State Information Technology Agency?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:-

The total counsel fees, as paid for by the Office of the State Attorney to date, is R738 875,00.

Authorised for submission by

______________________________________

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

 

Recommended/not recommended

 

 

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. MONDLI GUNGUBELE, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

22 March 2024 - NW569

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with regard to the implementation of Remote Work Visas, changes to the Income Tax Act, No. 58 of 1962 would be needed if applications come from a double taxation area; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what changes are envisaged; (2) what (a) steps have been taken to implement the SA Revenue Service’s announcement of an online traveller declaration system and (b) is the purpose and benefit of implementing this online traveller declaration system?

Reply:

1. No.

Employees and businesses operating in South Africa are generally subject to taxation in SA on the income derived from those SA activities. This is because the originating cause of the amount being received as income is the physical work that is undertaken to generate that income, which is located in SA (known as income from an SA source). However, most jurisdictions, including SA, also tax persons based on their being resident in those jurisdictions (known as residence-based taxation).

This could result in double taxation for the person concerned, as income may be taxed in SA based on that income being from an SA source while also being taxed in the jurisdiction where the person is a resident. To alleviate the problem of double taxation, SA has entered into a network of 79 tax treaties (23 jurisdictions in Africa and 56 jurisdictions in the rest of the world, mostly with SA’s main trading partners). Although the treaties are based on the OECD and UN models, there are variations between them depending on their age and the outcome of the negotiations between SA and the other jurisdictions. A list of the jurisdictions with which SA has tax treaties is available on the SARS website.

Under SA domestic law, SA will have the right to tax the employment income generated from the services rendered in SA. However, one of the rules generally found in a tax treaty, which will take precedence over domestic law, is that if the remote worker is in SA working for a foreign employer for less than 183 days in a twelve-month period, the employee’s country of residence will have the sole right to tax that income. No tax will be payable in SA and the remote worker should not register with SARS for income tax purposes. There are some exceptions to this rule, such as if the remote worker’s foreign employer has a tax presence (generally, a fixed place of business known for tax purposes as a “permanent establishment”) in SA; or if a South African business carries the cost of the remote worker’s employment by means of, for example, a cost recharge or service fee. In such cases, SA will have the right to tax the remote worker from day one.

Where the remote worker is in South Africa for more than 183 days in a twelve-month period, South Africa has a right to tax the remote worker on the income derived from working in SA, even if the foreign employer has no connection to SA. The remote worker will, therefore, have to register with SARS for income tax purposes and pay tax in SA on that income. As the foreign employer will not be deducting employees’ tax, the remote worker will be required to pay provisional tax every six months. The relevant provisions for the relief from double taxation in the employee’s jurisdiction of residence, set out in the tax treaty or the legislation of the jurisdiction of residence, will then come into play.

If there is no tax treaty between SA and the remote worker’s home jurisdiction, SA will tax the remote worker on the income generated in SA from day one.

A similar but not identical analysis applies if the remote worker is not an employee but instead renders independent personal services, such as a consultant with multiple foreign clients.

2. (a) The 1st phase of the SARS Traveller Management System was implemented during November 2022. As part of the implementation plan, the Communication and Marketing strategy included extensive public and private stakeholders’ engagements with, amongst other, the Department of Tourism; Department of Sports, Arts and Culture; Inter Ministerial Consultative Committee (IMCC); Border Technical Committee; Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO); Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC); Continental and Regional structures such as Southern African Development Community (SADC) and African Union (AU); WesGrow; Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA); and the Southern Africa Tourism Service Association (SATSA).

Furthermore, as part of making it easy for travelers to comply with their legal obligation, SARS also embarked on education and awareness initiatives such as a Traveller management webinar, digital advertising platforms, and a Traveller management webpage. Post implementation feedback sessions were also held with public and private stakeholders as part of continuous improvement.

The system was rolled out to all airports by September 2023 followed by specific land (Beitbridge and Skilpadshek), and seaports (Cape Town harbour) as pilot implementation. We are in process of finalizing roll-out at remaining ports. In order to make compliance easier a mobile app was implemented in December 2023, and we are currently developing additional functionality such as an online payment module, temporary import permits and the registration of goods for reimportation.

At this stage completion of the electronic Traveller Declaration is voluntary, and once the necessary legal provisions have been approved, it will be enforced as mandatory during the course of 2024.

b) The online Traveller declaration system enables travellers entering or leaving the Republic to meet their legal obligation to declare goods including currency in their possession before travelling and paying applicable taxes. The online declaration system is accessible through SARS website, Mobi-App and mobile device applications. Through this approach,

  • The system creates a seamless process for compliant travellers at ports of entry/exit through providing the facility for pre-arrival automated declarations supported through integrated risk management and 3rd party data systems.
  • Provides for the possibility of a coordinated border or whole of government approach to strengthen controls to detect and deter illicit activities such as illicit financial flows, prohibited and restricted goods, etc.
  • Create awareness and provide clarity to build a culture of voluntary compliance.  

22 March 2024 - NW480

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Ms N

Mhlongo, Ms N to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) Whether she has been informed of a Facebook post circulating depicting the logo of a certain political party (name furnished) recruiting young persons to apply to the South African Nationa! Defence Force with the home addresses (a) 4439 Mongale Street and (b) 4233 Phajane street in the Northern Cape, with of one of the Chief of Army in the Military displayed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the reasons that applicants are called upon to apply at a private residence of a Chief of Army and (ii) urgent steps have been taken against such improper application process?

Reply:

Find reply here

22 March 2024 - NW570

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) Whether, with reference to the Auditor-General’s report of 2019 which highlighted that at least 14 infrastructure projects under her department had significant challenges and recommended a forensic investigation on them, she will furnish Ms H Ismail with a detailed list of these 14 infrastructure projects highlighted by the Auditor-General of South Africa; (2) (a) Who were the officials presiding over the infrastructure projects that were under her department during the 2019 period and (b) what were the (i) original project values per project and (ii) reasons for the variance between the fair value and expenditure incurred per project?

Reply:

1. Detailed list of the 14 infrastructure projects recommended for a forensic investigation as highlighted by the Auditor-General’s report of 2019

 

 Project

1

Rock Art Tourism Phase 2, Eastern cape

2

Building of a Guest House 1 & 2, Free State

3

Sentinel Peal Car Access, Free State

4

Mnisi, Limpopo

5

VhaTsonga 1 & 2, Limpopo

6

Kamiesburg, Northern Cape

7

Nyandeni, Eastern Cape

8

Mthonsi Lodge, eastern cape

9

Qatywa, Eastern cape

10

Six Day Hiking Trail, Eastern Cape

11

Muzi Pan, Kwazulu-Natal

12

Sekhukhune, Limpopo

13

Tisane, Limpopo

14

Manyane Lodge, North West

(2)(a) Who were the officials presiding over the infrastructure projects that were under her department during the 2019 period?

Ms Morongoa Ramphela - DDG

Ms Lerato Matlakala – Chief Director

Mr Jonga Kuhlane – Director

Mr Thulani Sibeko – Director

Ms Mbali Zama - Director

Mr Thulani Mhlanga – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

Ms Lufuno Netangaheni – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

Mr Mandisi Mququ – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

Mr Brandon Canham – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

Ms Sandra Mocumi – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

Mr Godukile Mbolekwa – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

Ms Nonkululeko Madela – Deputy Director (Project Manager)

(2)(b)(i) What were the original project values per project?

 

 Project

Budget

1

EC Rock Art Tourism Phase 2

R 4,750,000

2

FS Building of a Guest House 1 & 2

R 34,234,974

3

FS Sentinel Peal Car Access

R 11,432,622

4

LP Mnisi

R 10,940,000

5

LP VhaTsonga 1 & 2

R 9,185,000

6

NC Kamiesburg

R 5,100,000

7

EC Nyandeni

R 7,600,000

8

EC Mthonsi Lodge

R 28,215,000

9

EC Qatywa

R 23,750,000

10

EC Six Day Hiking Trail

R 9,405,000

11

KZN Muzi Pan

R 12,447,480

12

LP Sekhukhune

R 10,622,500

13

LP Tisane

R 18,227,174

14

NW Manyane

R 48,465,113

     

(2)(b)(ii) What were the reasons for the variance between the fair value and expenditure incurred per project?

The reasons as per the AGSA findings include:

  • Payments made to implementer for work not fully done;
  • Ineffective identification, scoping and sourcing of projects;
  • Scope of work changes not evaluated and pre-approve;
  • Reports on Work-in-Progress were not reliable; and
  • Poor quality of work.

22 March 2024 - NW631

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What steps has his department taken to ensure that the SA Broadcasting Corporation has sufficient funding available for the upcoming 2024 national and provincial elections until a new funding model can be developed?

Reply:

I have been informed by the SABC as follows:

The Department has facilitated a government allocated budget of R 35-million for both the editorial and technical requirements, including studio facilities and transmission costs.

The IEC is also supporting the SABC through trade exchange agreements to cater for key marketing and infrastructural elements at the Provincial and National Elections Results Operations Centres.

Authorised for submission by

______________________________________

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

 

 

Recommended/not recommended

 

 

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. MONDLI GUNGUBELE, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

22 March 2024 - NW356

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of the measures that his department has implemented to achieve a significant reduction in cargo traffic through the (a) Port of Durban Harbour and (b) the Port of Richards Bay, particularly concerning cargo bound for Angola and Mozambique, which is now diverted to Port of Lobito?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

Multiple long-term strategies are being employed in the Ports of Richards Bay and Durban to reduce congestion in the port precincts. These include:

a) - Greater emphasis on the use of back-of-port storage facilities to minimize road congestion in the port. Durban is working on a mass container evacuation to the back-of-port facility to free up space and improve efficiencies in the terminal.

  • Better traffic management in the city precincts through the truck appointment systems and cargo tracking app in the container terminals in Durban.

b) - Improving the rail transportation to and from the port thereby decreasing the reliance on road transport. Cargo owners are encouraged to take up rail contracts in Richards Bay for bulk commodities.

  • Optimising terminal operations such as the implementation of a truck staging area in Richards Bay to reduce the number of trucks inside the port precinct.
  • Better traffic management in the city precincts through the truck appointment systems and cargo tracking app in the container terminals in Durban.
  • The root cause of inefficiencies at Richards Bay Multipurpose Terminal (MPT) and Dry Bulk Terminal (DBT) are mainly due to lack of investment in infrastructure. Competition has invested in far superior handling technology while RCB is still using technology from 40 years ago.
  • The DBT will be investing in infrastructure through partnerships for major bulk-handling equipment. The MPT is introducing business process re-engineering and contemporary materials-handling-equipment to produce desired efficiencies.

 

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved/Comments

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

22 March 2024 - NW320

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, in light of the statement on the Government’s official news site regarding the participation of the Republic in the 54th Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) 2024 that took place in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, from 15 to 19 January 2024, which detailed the delegation’s productive engagements, he will furnish Dr D T George with a breakdown of the total costs incurred by the delegation for the trip to the WEF 2024, with particular reference to the expenses relating to (a) accommodation, (b) air travel, (c) ground transportation, (d) entertainment and (e) any other ancillary expenses; (2) whether the National Treasury was responsible for covering the costs of the entire delegation’s expenses; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (3) whether the costs were covered from the budget allocated for his expenditures as Minister; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW363E

Reply:

(1)

(a)

Accommodation

(b)

Air Travel

(c)

Ground transportation

(d) Entertainment

(e)

Other ancillary expenses

R838 576,58

R325 238,64

R260 014,26

-

R125 258,00

(2) National Treasury covered the cost of the department’s delegation only.

(3) The costs were covered from the budget of the Minister and the International and Regional Economic Policy Division.

22 March 2024 - NW621

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)In light of the decline in research funding in the Republic, what plans has he put in place to support and strengthen higher education institutions to resist potential bias in areas such as health research arising from corporate funding; (2) whether there are any ongoing and/or planned initiatives to enhance the capacity of (a) public health academics and (b) research ethics committees to identify and manage conflicts of interest in health research; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The funding of health (including medical) research is managed between the Departments of Higher Education, Science and Innovation and Health and their respective entities. To ensure public good policy goals are coherently promoted across the two systems, there is a high degree of collaboration between the two Departments and its entities. The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) is working with the National Health Research Ethics Council of the National Department of Health, the South African Medical Research Council, as well as the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) to develop guidelines for health research data management. Public funded health research is informed by the priorities that are set by the National Health Research Committee of the National Department of Health in collaboration with the Department of Science and Innovation. Researchers at the public funded Higher Education Institutes should adhere to the set priorities. Should a company want to fund research in line with the national health research priorities, the research proposal needs to be approved by the respective Institutional or provincial health research ethics committee, to ensure fairness and access.

2. The building of the capacity with regards to the research ethics committees is the responsibility of the National Health Research Ethics Council (NHREC) of the National Department of Health. The NHREC is a statutory body established under the National Health Act No 61 of 2003. The Act mandates the Minister of Health to establish the Council and it sets out NHREC’s functions, which involves giving direction on ethical issues relating to health and to develop guidelines for the conduct of research involving humans. The following are the functions of the NHREC as outlined in the Act:

  • Determine guidelines for the functioning of health research ethics committees;
  • Register and audit health research ethics committees;
  • Set norms and standards for conducting research on humans and animals including norms and standards for conducting clinical trials;
  • Adjudicate complaints about the functioning of health research ethics committees and hear any complaint by a researcher who believes that he or she has been discriminated against by a health research ethics committee.
  • Refer to the relevant statutory health professional council matters involving the violation or potential violation of an ethical or professional rule by a health care provider.
  • Institute such disciplinary action as may be prescribed against any person found to be in violation of any norms and standards, or guidelines, set for the conducting of research in terms of this Act; and
  • Advise the national department and provincial departments on any ethical issues concerning research.

22 March 2024 - NW571

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) Whether, with reference to the Auditor-General’s report of 2019 which highlighted that at Least 14 infrastructure projects under her department had significant challenges, all variations/deviations incurred were properly authorised; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether there were any irregular activities in the management of the specified projects; ifso, what (a) are the relevant details of the irregularities, (b) consequence management measures were taken against officials who were responsible for overseeing and/or presiding over these projects and (c) are the specified measures; (3) Whether she will furnish Ms H Ismail with the basic account system payment reports on all projects from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Whether all variations/deviations incurred were properly authorized; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

I have been informed that the details are contained in the Annual Report of 2019 on the Department’s Website: https://www.tourism.gov.za/ResourceCentre/Pages/Reports.aspx

(2)(a) Whether there were any irregular activities in the management of the specified projects; if so, what are the relevant details of the irregularities?

Details of the findings are contained in the Annual Performance Report of 2018/ 2019 as well as in the Auditor General’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on 8 October 2019.

https://www.tourism.gov.za/ResourceCentre/Pages/Reports.aspx.

(2)(b) and (2) (c) consequence management measures were taken against officials who were responsible for overseeing and/or residing over these projects and what are the specified measures;

(i) Disciplinary Process: Seven employees who were directly involved in the management of the projects were charged with gross financial misconduct and gross negligence. Two were not found guilty of the charges preferred against them. The Department has referred these cases to the Labour Court to review the ruling of the Chairperson of the disciplinary hearing. The parties, being the department represented by the State Attorney and the employees, represented by their lawyers are currently exchanging and the cases will be set down for hearing at the Labour Court in due course when pleading has closed.

(ii) Criminal Charges - The Department, following the provisions of the PFMA regarding allegations of financial misconduct, opened criminal cases with the South African Police Services (SAPS), against the implicated officials. SAPS investigations are currently underway.

(3) Will the Minister furnish Ms H Ismail with the basic account system payment reports on all projects from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

The Financial Reports and Audited Financial statements are contained in the Annual Report (s) on the department’s website.

https://www.tourism.gov.za/ResourceCentre/Pages/Reports.aspx

The Department’s Annual Performance Reports older than 2010 are available in Parliament’s Library and will be listed as the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism.

22 March 2024 - NW472

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What total number of (a) applications did the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) receive for the 2024 academic year, (b) applicants (i) qualified and (ii) did not qualify, (c) applications were (i) approved and (ii) rejected and (d) applications of the qualifying students (i) were approved, (ii) are undergoing appeals and (iii) will not be catered for by NSFAS; (2) what were the common reasons for rejection of NSFAS applications?

Reply:

1. (a) NSFAS received 1,936,330 bursary applications for the 2024 academic year (to date i.e. 07 March 2024).

(b) (i) The total number of applicants that qualified is 1 258 509.

(ii) The total number of applicants that did not qualify is 230 669.

(c)(i) Total number that was approved is 1 258 509.

(ii) Total number that was rejected is 230 669.

(d) (i) 1 258 509 of the qualifying students were approved.

(ii) 19 149 have submitted appeals.

(iii) 230 669 will not be catered for as they have been rejected.

2. The common reasons for rejection of the bursary applications at NSFAS are based on the following.

a) financial eligibility criteria where family income is above the NSFAS threshold of R350 000,

b) failure to meet academic eligibility criteria, such as the N+ rule.

22 March 2024 - NW643

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Mkhwebane, Adv BJ to ask the Minister of Finance:

Whether he has found that it is consistent with the procurement policies of the Development Bank of Southern Africa to make material amendments in the requirements after a tender has been adjudicated, as it was allegedly the case with the tender process of the SA National Roads Agency Limited that was awarded to a certain company (name furnished); if not, what is his position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

It is not consistent with the procurement policies of the Development Bank of Southern Africa to make material amendments in the requirements after a tender has been adjudicated.

 

22 March 2024 - NW299

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with reference to National Treasury’s presentation to the Standing Committee on Appropriations on 14 February 2024, has Takatso Consortium provided proof of funds for the Strategic Equity Partnership transaction; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of such proof of funds; (2) whether National Treasury conducted a review of the Strategic Equity Partnership between Takatso Consortium and SA Airways (SAA); if not, why not; if so, will (a) the partnership give rise to any future fiscal obligations for the State, (b) he furnish Mr R A Lees with a copy of the agreement and (c) on what date does he envisage doing so; (3) whether the National Treasury will obtain a fair payment for the 51% of the SAA shares to be sold to the Takatso Consortium; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the relevant details of non-core assets that SAA has disposed of since entering business rescue on 5 December 2019?

Reply:

1. No correspondence has been received by the National Treasury relating to the Sale and Purchase Agreement and the proof of funds necessary for the Strategic Equity Partnership transaction.

2. National Treasury did not conduct a review of the Strategic Equity Partnership transaction as it was not subject to section 54(2) of the PFMA. Once the Sale and Purchase Agreement is received by the National Treasury, it will be reviewed to determine whether it poses risk to the fiscus through fiscal obligations.

3. No details have been received by National Treasury on the compensation to be received by government for the sale of the majority shareholding to the Takatso Consortium. The details are contained in the Sale and Purchase Agreement which National Treasury was not involved in the negotiation thereof. National Treasury currently has no details related to the sale other than what has been made publicly available by the Department of Public Enterprises.

4. SAA submitted PFMA section 54 applications for the disposal of wide-body aircraft and non-core property that formed part of the old Durban International Airport. The Minister of Finance has approved both transactions.

22 March 2024 - NW713

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will furnish Mr W F Faber with a (a) list and (b) full description of all events planned by his department to take place before 29 May 2024 in celebration of the 30 years of democracy in the Republic, including the (i) projected total cost or expenditure of each event and (ii) breakdown thereof in terms of expenditure for (aa) catering, (bb) entertainment, (cc) venue hire, (dd) transport and (ee) accommodation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Regarding (a), (b), (i), (ii) (aa) – (ee), at present, the department has not planned to host events nor allocated any budget for such events taking place before, or on and after 29 May 2024 to celebrate 30 years of democracy in the Republic. All our planned activities are in line with the department’s mandate and operational plans.

 

22 March 2024 - NW572

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) Whether, with reference to the Auditor-General’s report of 2019 which highlighted that at least 14 infrastructure projects under her department had significant challenges, she will furnish Ms H Ismail with a list of the contractors appointed to the projects; if not, why not; if so, by what date does she envisage doing so; (2) Whether any of the contractors appointed have been red flagged for future appointments; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, that are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

1. Will the Minister furnish Ms H Ismail with a list of the contractors appointed to the ​projects; if not, why not; if so, by what date does she envisage doing so?

 

 Project

Implementing Agent

1

EC Rock Art Tourism Phase 2

African Implementation Management Services Pty Ltd

2

FS Building of a Guest House 1 & 2

Phase 1: Nambo Property & Project Manager cc t/a Nombo Mabhele

Phase 2: River Ranger Management

3

FS Sentinel Peal Car Access

Hentig 2715 (Pty) Ltd

4

LP Mnisi

African Implementation Management Services Pty Ltd

5

LP VhaTsonga 1 & 2

African Implementation Management Services Pty Ltd

6

NC Kamiesburg

Ishabi Pty Ltd

7

EC Nyandeni

Nyandeni Development Trust

8

EC Mthonsi Lodge

MBB Consulting Services

9

EC Qatywa

Makhanyeni Housing Estate (Pty) Ltd

10

EC Six Day Hiking Trail

Simply Indigenous cc

11

KZN Muzi Pan

Rich Rewards Trading 34 (PTY) Ltd | Reg No: 2003/022344/07

T / A Sigma International

12

LP Sekhukhune

Mabhucu Construction Suppliers Cc

13

LP Tisane

Baitsenape Investments cc

14

NW Manyane

Re A Aga Infrastructure (Pty) Ltd

2. Whether any of the contractors appointed have been red flagged for future appointments; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

No contractor was red flagged; however, the matters have been reported to the police and civil litigation is being pursued through the Office of the State Attorney.

22 March 2024 - NW453

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of asylum transit visas has his department issued in terms of Section 23 of the Immigration Act, Act 13 of 2002, to asylum seekers in the (a) 2022-23 and (b) 2023-24 financial years?

Reply:

a) During the 2022/23 financial year, the Department of Home Affairs issued 30 asylum transit visas in terms of Section 23 of the Immigration Act, Act 13 of 2002.

b) In the 2023/24 financial year to date, the Border Management Authority issued 61 asylum transit visas in terms of Section 23 of the Immigration Act, Act 13 of 2002.

END.

22 March 2024 - NW358

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

In light of the pending tender for the Trans-Kalahari Railway Project in Namibia, what proactive steps has he taken to prevent further diversion of cargo traffic away from the Republic’s ports and safeguard the interests of Transnet against potential loss of business? NW402E

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

Preliminary competitor analysis demonstrates that the Trans-Kalahari Railway project and port developments in Namibia will have a minimal impact on Transnet Port Terminal’s long term volume growth. This is chiefly due to the following reasons:

  • At the time of commercial operation of the Trans-Kalahari railway project, Transnet would have stabilized its rail and terminal operations as per the approved turnaround plan thus significantly reducing Customer churn rate.
  • Transnet will continue with the implementation of long-term contracting regimes with predictable commercial arrangements. This will ensure volume growth and long-term sustainability for the Iron Ore and Manganese Customers who are targeted by the Trans-Kalahari project.
  • Transnet is future-proofing its operations by creating additional capacity in line with Customer validated demand to neutralize any potential volume and revenue leakage.

Transnet must anticipate competition from other ports and rail corridors and “raise the bar” in respect of both infrastructure maintenance and operational efficiency. This is now taking place under the rubric of the Transnet Recovery Plan, notwithstanding the huge financial, operational and governance damage done during the State Capture period.

 

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved/Comments

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

22 March 2024 - NW437

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What total amount in revenue has been generated through the levy on plastic bags; (2) whether, given that the levies collected were intended to be used for (a) waste management and/or (b) environmental initiatives, any amount of such levies (i) had been ring-fenced for such environmental initiatives and/or (ii) has gone into the fiscus; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) total amount in each case and (bb) are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Question 1

The total revenue collection from the plastic bag levy since its introduction in 2004 amounted to R5.3 billion. Table 1 below shows the revenue collections for the period 2004 to 2023.

Table 1: Plastic bag revenue collection (2004 to 2023)

Fiscal year

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Revenue (R million)

41,2

61,4

75,1

86,3

78,6

110,5

257,1

160,6

150,8

169,2

                     

Fiscal year

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Revenue (R million)

174,3

183,3

231,9

241,3

300,4

317,9

579,8

658,2

679,8

778,4

Question 2

In 2004, government introduced the plastic bag levy as part of a package of measures to promote the reduction, reuse, recycling and diversion of plastic bags away from landfills. These measures included a regulation on the minimum thickness of plastic bags; disclosure and transparency of the costs of plastic shopping bags by retailers; regulation of the type and amount of ink to be used for printing on bags; awareness and market promotion for recycled materials; and prohibition of plastic bag imports.

The levy gives effect to the polluter pays principle and is aimed at internalising the negative environmental and health costs of plastic bag production, use and disposal into the retail price of plastic bags. It contributes towards government’s goal of zero waste to landfill as set out in the 2020 National Waste Management Strategy and target for 100 percent recycled materials in plastic bags by 2027.

i) The ringfencing of tax revenues is not supported. Ringfencing introduces rigidities into the budget process and breaks the link between a budget allocation and efficient spending. Such practices prevent the continuous evaluation and modification of tax and spending programmes and could result in a misallocation of public funds where there may be too much or too little spending on a particular government priority.

ii) Revenues raised from taxes flow into the National Revenue Fund and are allocated to government priorities as part of the budget process. Although the plastic levy is not ringfenced, public funds are allocated to environmental protection and waste management initiatives of the Department of Forestry Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE). Details on the expenditure allocations to the Environmental and the Chemicals and Waste Management programmes are provided below.

  • a) Programme 6: Environmental Programmes

The DFFE coordinates the implementation of green economy projects in the environment sector under the Expanded Public Works Programme and provides monitoring and evaluation support to the programmes. This includes the War on Waste, Working for the Coast, Working for Wetlands, People and Parks, open space management, and the Working for Water, Energy, Fire, and Forests programmes.

Table 2 below shows the spending allocations to the different subprogrammes amounting to about R11.2 billion from 2020/21 to 2023/24 and estimated allocations of R8.7 billion over the medium term up to 2026/27.

Table 2: Environmental Programmes expenditure trends and estimates by subprogramme and economic classification

Subprogramme (R million)

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

Environmental Programmes Management

109,5

293,5

1 057,1

7,9

6,9

7,8

8,1

Environmental Programme Region 1

446,8

471,5

2 041,3

919,5

913,2

987,7

1 119,9

Environmental Programme Region 2

1 557,4

1 249,4

6,1

1 064,6

1 214,9

1 150,7

1 180,9

Environmental Programme Region 3

446,8

471,5

61,9

815,9

553,7

626,1

614,2

Sector Coordination and Quality Management

56,8

100,4

 

112,2

104,8

110,5

117,9

Total

2 617,3

2 586,3

3 166,3

2 920,0

2 793,4

2 882,8

3 041,1

Source: National Treasury

 

  • b) Chemicals and Waste Management Programme

The objectives of the Chemicals and Waste Management programme are to oversee, monitor and evaluate the performance of the waste sector, ensuring that less waste is generated, and existing waste is better managed. Seven (7) subprogrammes for chemicals and waste management, including Integrated Waste Management, Hazardous Waste Management and Licensing, Chemicals and Waste Economy Programme Coordination and the Waste Bureau are implemented.

For the period 2020/21 to 2023/24, about R2 billion was allocated to the chemicals and waste programme, with R1.4 billion allocated to the Waste Bureau, accounting for about 68 per cent of the total budget, as shown in Table 3 below. The estimated allocation to the programme over the medium term from 2024/25 to 2026/27 is R2 billion.

Table 3: Chemicals and Waste Management expenditure trends and estimates by subprogramme and economic classification

               

Subprogramme (R million)

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

Chemicals and Waste Management

6,1

5,9

26,3

7,1

7,6

7,9

8,2

Hazardous Waste Management and Licensing

26,0

29,8

27,1

33,4

37,9

39,5

41,1

Integrated Waste Management

17,3

46,5

113,0

47,3

47,9

49,9

51,1

Chemicals and Waste Management Policy and Specialized Monitoring Services

14,9

60,9

27,8

50,4

52,7

53,8

57,6

Chemicals and Waste Economy Programme Coordination

11,2

16,5

16,7

21,3

21,0

22,1

23,0

Chemicals Coordination

20,6

15,8

18,6

23,2

24,5

25,9

Waste Bureau

300,3

312,6

406,3

406,1

468,9

489,9

512,3

Total

396,3

488,1

617,3

584,2

659,2

687,6

719,2

Source: National Treasury

The Recycling Enterprise Support Programme was established to provide support to small and medium sized enterprises for establishing recycling businesses. Transfers to the Recycling Enterprise Support Programme over the period 2020 to 2026 are estimated at R380,5 million, as shown in Table 4 below.

Table 4: Transfers to Recycling Enterprise Support Programme

R'000

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

Total

Recycling Enterprise Support Programme

2,749

-

92,824

74,506

67,084

70,088

73,309

380,560

The on-budget allocations to the Environmental and the Chemicals and Waste Management programmes of the DFFE exceed the revenue collection from the plastic bag levy.

22 March 2024 - NW281

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether he will furnish Mrs N W A Mazzone with a list of the salary grades of members of each Board of Directors in each state-owned entity reporting to him since 1 January 2023; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

 

The Non-Executive Directors of Boards of State-Owned Entities reporting to the Ministry of Communications and Digital Technologies do not have salary grades except for the Film and Publication Board which is categorised as Category B1 as per the National Treasury Board Remuneration Guidelines.

The salary grades for the Executive Directors of State-Owned Entities where CEOs, CFOs and/or COOs are ex-officio members of the Board are as follows:

 

State Owned- Entity

Executive Director

Salary Grade

Additional notes

Broadband Infraco (BBI)

Chief Executive Officer

Paterson Band F 2

 

The Paterson Job Evaluation System grades jobs based on decision-making complexity, ranging from Bands A to F, with Band F being the highest. Each band, except A, is subdivided into lower and upper parts, with specific subgrades

Chief Financial Officer

Paterson Band E 5

 

Film and Publication Board (FPB)

Chief Executive Officer

Paterson Band F1

 

National Electronic Media Institute of South Africa (NEMISA)

Chief Executive Officer

Level 15

Department of Public Service and Administration Framework for Remuneration of public servants

Postbank

Chief Executive Officer

Paterson Band F2

 

Chief Financial Officer

Paterson Band E4

 

Sentech

Chief Executive Officer

Hay Grade Level: 25

Using the correlation table hay grade level 25 on the following evaluation systems is:

Peromnes: 1++, Paterson: F4/F5

 

Chief Operations Officer

Hay Grade Level: 23

Peromnes: 1, Paterson: F1

 

Chief Financial Officer

Hay Grade Level: 23

Peromnes: 1, Paterson: F1

 

State Information Technology Agency (SITA)

Chief Executive Officer

Above Paterson Band F3, which is equivalent to F4/F5

 

Chief Financial Officer

Paterson Band-F1

 

South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC)

Chief Executive Officer

Paterson Band- F3

 

 

Chief Financial Officer

Paterson Band- F1

 

Chief Operations Officer

Paterson Band- F1

 

South African Post Office (SAPO)

Chief Executive Officer

Paterson band F4/5

 

Chief Financial Officer

Paterson Band F2

 

Chief Operations Officer

N/A

Vacant

Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA)

Chief Executive Officer

Level 15

Department of Public Service and Administration Framework for Remuneration of public servants

 

Authorised for submission by

 

 

 

                                                                       

MS NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

 

 

Recommended/not recommended

 

 

 

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

Approved/ not approved

 

 

 

________________________________           

HON. MONDLI GUNGUBELE, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

22 March 2024 - NW644

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether, with reference to reports that the SA Broadcasting Corporation intends to amend the existing agreements around retransmission payments and/or royalties so drastically that actors and actresses will earn much less for the broadcasting of content they featured on, and at a later stage actors and actresses might earn nothing, there was any consultation with industry representatives and stakeholders regarding such a resolution that will condemn actors and actresses whose content and talent is reused to poverty; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the SABC as follows:

The SABC is in the process of amending the current repeat fee strategy. This process has not been finalised as consultations with all relevant and key stakeholders are ongoing.

The proposed amendments to the current strategy have been approved by the SABC Board in 2018. In its current form, this strategy is unsustainable as payments have been structured in such a way that they are implemented for an indefinite period.

The strategy was introduced in 1996 by the Performers Artists Workers Union (PAWE). The union was established with the aim of engaging the new SABC dispensation to redress the struggles encountered by black actors under the Apartheid regime for not receiving equitable treatment as their white counterparts from mainly white-owned production companies.

In 1997 the SABC’s Department of Programme Policy, Planning and Co-Production agreed with PAWE that content production houses commissioned by the SABC be required to use a Standard Performers’ Agreement when performers entered into contracts. This came into effect on 1 September 1997.

At the time the SABC was the sole commissioner and producer of local content and agreed to a Standard Performers’ Agreement that contained two clauses namely: Clause 5 on repeat fees payable to Principal Performers of drama productions and Clause 7 on exploitation fees payable to Principal Performers on the licensing of commissioned productions.

Twenty-eight (28) years later there is a requirement that the strategy be aligned to the SABC’s various financial and legislative requirements. It must be stressed that intention behind the new proposal is not to disempower performers but to ensure that all parties benefit.

Authorised for submission by

 

______________________________________

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

 

 

Recommended/not recommended

 

 

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. MONDLI GUNGUBELE, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

22 March 2024 - NW436

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With regard to the objectives and purposes of the Skills Development Act, Act 97 of 1998, what total amount has been paid by employers in skills development levies since the inception of the Skills Development Levy, National Skills Fund (NSF) and the implementation of the specified Act; (2) what (a) total amount has been raised by the NSF in reliance upon the Act, in particular section 27, and (b) is the source of the funding in reliance upon section 27(2)(a) to (f); (3) what is the (a) current value of the total amount raised and held by the NSF and (b) total monetary value of unspent skills development levies being held by (i) all the sector education and training authorities and (ii) the NSF; (4) what is the total number of accredited qualifications that have been funded by the (a) skills development levies and (b) NSF; (5) what are the reasons that the money, raised through levies on employers and other sources of funding, has not been spent on skills development?

Reply:

1. With regard to the objectives and purposes of the Skills Development Act, Act 97 of 1998, what total amount has been paid by employers in skills development levies since the inception of the Skills Development Levy, National Skills Fund (NSF) and the implementation of the specified Act;

Employers have the direct relationship through the mandatory grant process. The NSF as a catalytic funder focuses on skills development across the value chain of SA and has a direct relationship with stakeholders and/or implementing agents such as Skills Development Providers, Government Departments, PSET institutions none of which pay a levy to the NSF.

 

2. what (a) total amount has been raised by the NSF in reliance upon the Act, in particular section 27, and (b) is the source of the funding in reliance upon section 27(2)(a) to (f);

The pilot project underway through the Presidency called the Presidential Youth Employment Initiative (PYEI) is the only source of additional funding and this has been included in the MTSF (through DHET).

Background

“Section 27 (1) of the Skills Development Act (SDA) states that the National Skills Fund is hereby established and section (2) further state that the Fund must be credited with:

    1. 20 per cent of the skills development levies, interest and penalties collected in respect of every SETA, as required by sections 8 (3) (a) and 9 (a) of the Skills Development

Levies Act (SDL Act);

    1. the skills development levies, interest and penalties collected by the Commissioner from employers which do not fall within the jurisdiction of a SETA, as required by section 8 (3) (c) of the SDL Act.
    2. money appropriated by Parliament for the Fund;
    3. interest earned on investments contemplated in section 29 (3);
    4. donations to the Fund; and
    5. money received from any other source.”

2 a) The total amount has been raised by the NSF in reliance upon the Act, in particular, section 27.

With reference to the Act and the question raised, the NSF was established in 1999 in terms of section 27 of the SDA without legal persona.

From that period of its establishment to the period of 2010, the NSF was placed under the Department of Labour (DOL) as a chief directorate /Directorate and the total amount that was raised by the NSF during this period was R 8 439 078 000.

In 2010-11 NSF was transferred to the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and in 2011-12 the NSF was listed as Schedule 3A Public Entity in terms of the PFMA, retrospectively effective from 1 April 2012. From the period of 2011 to 2023 the total amount that was raised by the NSF during this period was R49 464 097 000.

In summary and in total considering the period when the NSF was in DOL and the NSF in the DHET, the NSF received a total amount of R57 903 175 000.

 

2 b) The source of the funding in reliance upon section 27(2)(a) to (f)

With reference to the section 27 of the SDA and the question raised, the NSF current main revenue sources are:

  1. 20% of the skills development levies as contemplated in the SDL Act; and
  2. Interest earned on investments held at the Public Investment Corporation (PIC); and
  3. Money received from any other sources - uncommitted surplus from the SETAs and to certain extend interest received from the Skills Development Providers (but the amount is not material).

The NSF may also receive revenue from the following sources as per section 27 of the SDA (but this is not prevalent as NSF has not received any of the amount listed below):

  1. The skills development levies collected and transferred to the NSF, in terms of the SDL Act in respect of those employers or sectors for which there is no sector education and training authority (SETA)
  2. Money appropriated by Parliament for the NSF
  3. Donations to the NSF

With reference to the 20% of the skills development levies as contemplated in the Skills Development Levies Act, 1999 (Act 9 of 1999) (SDL Act) as per section 27 (2) (a), the NSF has accounted for R45 996 000 000.

With reference interest earned on investments contemplated in section 29 (3) of the SDA and as per section 27 (2) (d), the NSF has accounted for R6 789 000 000.

With reference to the funds received as a results uncommitted surplus from the SETAs that are transferred to the NSF in terms of SETA grant regulation 3(12) the NSF has accounted for R4 126 000 000.

With reference to section 27 (1) (f) “money received from other sources” / Other income the NSF has accounted for R 992 000 000 (for example transfers from DHET for special projects and

Finance income from advance payments to skills development programmes and projects)

3 a) Current value of the total amount raised.

The current value from 1 April 2023 to 31 Dec 2023 is the total of R4 152 000 000.

  1. 20% of the skills development levies as contemplated in the SDL Act is R 3 313 000 000 and
  2. Interest earned on investments held at the PIC as per section 27 (2) (d) is R838 000 000.

3b) The total monetary value of unspent skills development levies being held by NSF is R14,916 billion.

in terms of Section 29(3) of the SDA, the unexpended balance in the NSF at the end of the financial year must be carried forward to the next financial year as a credit to the NSF.

The unspent funds are currently invested investments held at the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) as per section 29 (2) of the SDA that state that Any money in the Fund not required for immediate use may be invested in accordance with an investment policy approved by the Director-General that complies with the requirements of the Public Finance Management Act and may be withdrawn when required.

The total value of the unspent skills development levies being held of R14 916 000 000 is intended to be utilised for:

    1. The 200 committed skills development programme and projects that the NSF has entered contract with the cash commitment of R 11 196 000 000.
    2. The 204 earmarked committed skills development programme and projects that have not yet been contract of about R 10 000 000 000.

The NSF in terms of its strategic plan and annual performance plan intends to support and respond to the National Skills Development Plan (NSDP)/MTSF/WP-PSET/NP-PSET and also responding to the other projects of national priorities by funding projects that are :

    1. Identified to increase production of occupations in high demand (skills development programme and projects such Artisanal development etc)
    2. Link education and the workplace (skills development programme and projects - Work integrated learning /Learnerships/ Internships etc)
    3. Improve the level of skills in the South African workforce (skills development programme and projects such Worker education related interventions)
    4. Increase access to occupationally directed programmes (skills development programme and projects with the 50 TVET Colleges / 9 CET colleges / State SOCs such as NECSA etc)
    5. Skills development support for entrepreneurship and cooperative development (skills development programme and projects such SEDA related interventions),
    6. The human resource development strategy (support to the secretariate work of NSA /HRDC)

4. what is the total number of accredited qualifications that have been funded by the (a) skills development levies and (b) NSF;

The National Skills Fund has funded various programmes in relation to the Skills Development Act and National Skills Development Plan. The table below provides the reader with number of qualifications in the financial years 22/23 and 23/24.

 

Qualification

22/23

23/34

 

Number

Number

Learnerships

10775

10818

Apprenticeship / Artisans

7071

5888

Bursaries (incl. Int)

813

1426

 

In addition to the numbers above, as a value add included are learners trained in:

      • Occupations in High Demand (OIHD),
      • Persons with Disability and
      • Beneficiaries coming from rural communities.

5. What are the reasons that the money, raised through levies on employers and other sources of funding, has not been spent on skills development

  1. Currently NSF has skills development programme and projects of contract values of R23 264 000 000 and cash commitments of R11 196 000 000 that still need to be disbursed based on the budget projections beyond 2024 financial year and
  2. The NSF also has earmarked skills development programme and projects of 204 earmarked committed skills development programme and projects that have not yet been contract of about R10 000 000 000 disbursed.

The NSF in terms of its strategic plan and annual performance plan intends to support and respond to the National Skills Development Plan (NSDP)/MTSF/WP-PSET/NP-PSET and responding to the other projects of national priorities by funding projects that are:

  1. Identified to increase production of occupations in high demand (skills development programme and projects such Artisanal development etc)
  2. Link education and the workplace (skills development programme and projects - Work integrated learning /Learnerships/ Internships etc)
  3. Improve the level of skills in the South African workforce (skills development programme and projects such Worker education related interventions)
  4. Increase access to occupationally directed programmes (skills development programme and projects with the 50 TVET Colleges / 9 CET colleges / State SOCs such as NECSA etc)
  5. Skills development support for entrepreneurship and cooperative development (skills development programme and projects such SEDA related interventions),
  6. The human resource development strategy (support to the secretariate work of NSA / HRDC)

22 March 2024 - NW721

Profile picture: Le Goff, Mr T

Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she will furnish Mr T A Le Goff with a (a) list and (b) full description of all events planned by her department to take place before 29 May 2024 in celebration of the 30 years of democracy in the Republic, including the (i) projected total cost or expenditure of each event and (ii) breakdown thereof in terms of expenditure for (aa) catering, (bb) entertainment, (cc) venue hire, (dd) transport and (ee) accommodation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am informed by the Department that no events are planned by the Department of Tourism, before the 29 May elections, to celebrate 30 years of democracy in the Republic of South Africa.

22 March 2024 - NW463

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of technical vocational education and training colleges have vacant principal positions?

Reply:

There are 14 Technical Vocational Education and Training colleges as follows:

NO

REGION

NAME OF COLLEGE

 

Gauteng & Free State

  1. Ekurhuleni
  1. Central Johannesburg
  1. Maluti

2.

Western Cape & Northern Cape

  1. False Bay

3.

Mpumalanga & North West

  1. Gert Sibanda
  1. Taletso

4.

Kwa Zulu Natal

  1. Coastal KZN
  1. Umfolozi
  1. Esayidi

5.

Eastern Cape

  1. Buffalo City
  1. Ingwe
  1. King Hintsa
  1. King Sabata Dalindyebo
  1. Port Elizabeth

22 March 2024 - NW448

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) What is the rationale behind the decision of the Land Bank to advertise the sale of its loan book, (b) what specific criteria were employed to determine which loans would be included in the sale and (c) which clients would be excluded; (2) what is the (a) estimated timeline for concluding the sale of the loan book and (b) anticipated total amount of proceeds expected from the specified sale; (3) whether the sale is an effort to ensure the sustainability of the Land Bank in the long run; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) What is the rationale behind the decision of the Land Bank to advertise the sale of its loan book, (b) what specific criteria were employed to determine which loans would be included in the sale and (c) which clients would be excluded;

Land Bank’s Response:

At the outset, it should be noted that a write-off of non-performing loans is an accounting term and a function of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 9. In terms of IFRS 9 a debt may be written off in its entity “if an entity has no reasonable expectations of recovering the contractual cash flows on a financial asset”. When a debt is written off by the Bank, it does not mean that the Bank can no longer enforce its rights in respect of that particular loan. In addition, it does not mean forgiving the debt. The debtor still owes money to the Bank, however, the Bank has derecognized this asset from its financial statements due to the low prospects of recovery. In case the borrower resumes servicing its debt, or the exposure is sold, a recovered amount would be directly recorded as profit in the books of the Bank.

The Bank issued a tender notice for the sale of its written-off loan assets for the submissions of expressions of interest. This sale relates to accounts where the Bank does not have reasonable prospects of recovering the debt, and where the Bank has consequently written off these amounts in line with the Bank’s policies and applicable laws. The disposal of already written off accounts is a standard practice within the financial services sector and there is nothing unique about the Bank’s intention in this regard. It is also important to note that this written off assets are NOT accounted for as part of the current loan book assets due to the fact that they have been written off, as such this tender does not have any links to the current loan book asset. As stated above, when a debt is written off by the Bank, it does not mean that the Bank will not continue to recover debt owed to it using the normal legal processes within the purview of the country’s laws. In this particular instance, the proceed of the successful sale of these written-off loan assets will be synonymous with the recovery of an amount of the written off assets. The tender process is currently underway and it is expected to be completed in the next few months.

(2) what is the (a) estimated timeline for concluding the sale of the loan book and (b) anticipated total amount of proceeds expected from the specified sale;

Land Bank’s Response:

As stated above, this is a tender process and it is still at its early stage as the closing date for the submissions of expressions of interest was on 23 February 2024. We expect to complete the process in the next few months. Given that the envisaged sale is being conducted through a tender process, the anticipated total amount of the proceeds cannot be disclosed. This is about the recovery from the written off assets which no longer form part of the reported value of the current loan book. Disclosing value of written off assets which the tender aims to recover will have a negative impact on the recovery process of the written off book.

(3) whether the sale is an effort to ensure the sustainability of the Land Bank in the long run; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Land Bank’ Response:

The objective of the sale is to try and maximize the recovery on the bad debt that has already been written off. The proceeds of such a sale will contribute to the augmentation of the Bank’s liquidity position and profitability.

22 March 2024 - NW280

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What has been the latest progress with regard to the status of the rationalisation project in his department since 1 January 2024?

Reply:

I have been informed as follows:

The process of concluding the Broadband Infraco (BBI) acquisition is at an advanced stage pending the revision of BBI’s Turnaround Plan to establish funding requirements. The necessary acquisition processes were concluded with a sale offer by the SENTECH Board that was accepted by the BBI Board. This followed a due diligence inquiry and engagements with relevant authorities such as ICASA, Takeover Regulatory Panel, Competition Commission and National Treasury. There have been ongoing discussions with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), which is a 26% shareholder of BBI, on their role post the acquisition.

To conclude the BBI acquisition by Sentech the following are recommended:

  1. SENTECH and BBI to revise the BBI Turnaround Plan to establish funding requirements.
  2. The State, as the sole shareholder of SENTECH, to provide SENTECH with funding based on the approved Turnaround Plan.
  3. The Minister to approve the sale of 74% of shares of BBI to SENTECH by signing the Sale of Shares Agreement (SSA) submitted by Sentech to the Minister with applicable terms and conditions. Suspensive conditions that can be fulfilled or waived must also be determined.
  4. The BBI Memorandum of Incorporation (MOI) be amended in line with the Sale Agreement.
  5. SENTECH to conclude the integration of BBI as its subsidiary.

SITA, meanwhile, is in the process of developing a roadmap for the review of its business model. The details of the review is expected to be submitted to the Department by the end of the current financial year. Once complete, the implementation of the new SITA business model and roadmap will commence in the new financial year and continue thereafter. The Department would then monitor progress through performance reports submitted by SITA.

 

Authorised for submission by

 

 

                                                                       

MS NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

 

 

Recommended/not recommended

 

 

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

Approved/ not approved

 

 

________________________________           

HON. MONDLI GUNGUBELE, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

 

22 March 2024 - NW611

Profile picture: Le Goff, Mr T

Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the reply of the former Minister to question 96 on 28 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

i) Former Minister MmamolokoNkensaniKubayi, 01 June 2019- 05 August 2021, used vehicles purchased by the Department in 2013 until the purchase of new vehicles in 2020.

 

07 June 2020- 5 August 2021

07 June 2020 – 5 August 2021

a) Make

VOLVO BASED IN CAPE TOWN

VOLVO BASED IN PRETORIA

b) Model

XC60 D4 AWD G/T INSCRIPTION

XC60 D4 AWD G/T INSCRIPTION

c) Year of manufacture

2020

2020

d) Cost

R700 000.00

R700 000.00

e) Purchase date

2020/06/07

2020/06/07

 

01 June 2019 – 7 June 2020

01 June 2019 – 7 June 2020

f) Make

Mercedes Benz

BASED IN CAPE TOWN

Mercedes Benz

BASED IN PRETORIA

g) Model

GL 350 Blue Tech

GL 350 Blue Tech

h) Year of manufacture

2013

2013

i) Cost

R951 626.90

R951 626.90

j) Purchase date

2013

2013

ii) Former Minister Lindiwe Nonceba Sisulu, 05 August 2021 – 06 March 2023, used the same vehicles purchased by the Department in 2020.

 

05 August 2021 06 March 2023

05 August 2021 06 March 2023

k) Make

VOLVO BASED IN CAPE TOWN

VOLVO BASED IN PRETORIA

l) Model

XC60 D4 AWD G/T INSCRIPTION

XC60 D4 AWD G/T INSCRIPTION

m) Year of manufacture

2020

2020

n) Cost

R700 000.00

R700 000.00

o) Purchase date

2020/06/07

2020/06/07

iii) Minister Patricia De Lille, 2023 – to date has continued to use the same vehicles purchased by the Department in 2020.

 

06 March 2023 to date

06 March 2023 to date

p) Make

VOLVO BASED IN CAPE TOWN

VOLVO BASED IN PRETORIA

q) Model

XC60 D4 AWD G/T INSCRIPTION

XC60 D4 AWD G/T INSCRIPTION

r) Year of manufacture

2020

2020

s) Cost

R700 000.00

R700 000.00

t) Purchase date

2020/06/07

2020/06/07

ii Deputy Minister Fish Amos Mahlalela (29 May 2019 to date)

 

18 May 2021- to date

18 May 2021- to date

a) Make

VOLVO XC D4 BASED IN CAPETOWN

VOLVO XC D4 BASED IN PRETORIA

b) Model

XC40 D4-AWD G/T Momentum

XC40 D4-AWD G/T Momentum

c) Year of manufacture

2021

2021

d) Cost

R700 000.00

R700 000.00

e) Purchase date

2021/03/18

2021/03/18

 

8 May 2019 – 18 May 2021

8 May 2019 – 18 May 2021

a) Make

MERCEDES-BENZ BASED IN CAPETOWN

AUDI Q7 BASED IN PRETORIA

b) Model

MERCEDES-BENZ E350

AUDI Q7 SUV

c) Year of manufacture

2015

2015

d) Cost

R762 443.00

R878 700.00

e) Purchase date

2015/03/18

2015/03/18

22 March 2024 - NW683

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, with regard to the licenses and authorisations required for independent power producers (IPPs), his department considered establishing a single portal to expedite the authorisations required for IPPs such as environmental impact assessments with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment, water use licenses with the Department of Water and Sanitation and various land consents which can be used by IPPs and relevant government departments to ameliorate the bottlenecks; if not, (a) how is his department assisting IPPs to expedite these consents and authorisations and (b) will his department consider establishing such a portal; if so, (c) on what date does he envisage the portal to be operational and (d) does his department have buy-in from the various government departments?

Reply:

In July 2023 government launched an Energy One Stop Shop to assist Independent Power Producers (IPPs) with a streamlined process for various authorisations. The One Stop Shop falls under the stewardship of the Department of Trade Industry and Competition (DTIC) and the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) only provides necessary support. To avoid duplication of effort, the DMRE does not intend to establish a similar function within government which will serve the same purpose but will continue to provide support to the DTIC.

22 March 2024 - NW598

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

With reference to his reply to question 87 on 24 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by his department for (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

 

Minister

Deputy Minister

(a)

N/A

i) BMW

ii) BMW

(b)

N/A

i) X3 XDRIVE 20D

ii) X3 XDRIVE 20D

(c)

N/A

i) 2021

ii) 2021

(d)

N/A

(i)12/10/2021

(ii)20/12/2021

(e)

N/A

i) R761 199.40

ii) R768 666.99

22 March 2024 - NW357

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

How does his department plan to mitigate the impact of the Port of Maputo's increasing role in handling container imports into the Republic, as well as the export of coal and other minerals, on the operations and competitiveness of the Port of Durban and the Port of Richards Bay?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

The Port of Maputo serves two roles to South Africa: as an extension of the South African complementary port system and as a competitor.

In the role as an extension of the South African complementary port system, the Port of Maputo provides import and export capacity that cannot be met by Transnet Port Terminals thus assisting with maintaining fluidity in the South African freight logistics system. Transnet allocates cargo to Maputo on an equitable basis to ensure that the system doesn’t choke, i.e., Richards Bay and Durban cannot accommodate all cargo from the hinterland, therefore, the Port of Maputo provides an alternative to execute Customer demand, especially when Transnet Port Terminals are oversubscribed.

Over the past three years, the Port of Maputo recorded significant growth in bulk commodities like Chrome, Coal and Magnetite, and negligible growth in the container business. Transnet is implementing strategies to improve the availability and reliability of plant and equipment to enable the clawing-back of cargo volumes that migrated to Maputo port due to operational inefficiencies.

High-level initiatives to enable volume claw-back include, but are not limited to:

  • long-term partnerships with Original Equipment Manufacturers to reduce response time to plant and equipment failures
  • implementing a reliability-based maintenance regime
  • implementing continuous improvement initiatives as identified in the turnaround plan to drive the achievement of terminals-wide performance norms
  • introduction of the 4th shift operation philosophy to improve throughput, performance levels and ultimately Customer satisfaction.

 

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved/Comments

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

22 March 2024 - NW460

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with reference to the underwater blasting happening close to Simon's Town Naval Base, the boats involved were only from the SA Navy; if not, were there boats from foreign countries who were conducting tests in partnership with the Republic; if so, who is funding the specified tests?

Reply:

Find reply here

22 March 2024 - NW449

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the presentation by the National Treasury to the Portfolio Committee on Finance on 14 February 2024 in which SA Airways (SAA) was reported to have traded at a loss of R761 million for the first three quarters of the 2023-24 financial year, what are the details of the sources of funds that enabled SAA to continue trading despite the losses incurred; (2) whether SAA was solvent as at the 31 December 2023; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. SAA has cash reserves with which the airline absorbs losses incurred. Moreover, several of the expenditure items that contributed to SAA losses are non-cash items and thus would not have a direct impact on SAA’s available cash reserves. Non-cash expenses (Depreciation and Amortisation) amounted to R109 million for the first three quarters of the financial year. During the same period, SAA generated a total income of R4.4 billion which helped defray operating costs and foreign exchange losses.

2. As of 31 December 2023, SAA had Total Assets of R11.309 billion, Total Liabilities of R6.025 billion resulting in a positive equity value of R5.284 billion. The airline’s assets exceeded its liabilities and therefore the indication is that it is solvent.

22 March 2024 - NW576

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to her reply to question 117 on 23 February 2024, on what specific legislative prescripts and/or provisions may minutes of meetings held between the President of the Republic, Mr MC Ramaphosa, and other Heads of State and officials from foreign governments be rendered classified by the Government and withheld from public view?

Reply:

Section 32 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, grants the right of access to any information held by the State and provides that national legislation must be enacted to give effect to this right.

However, the Promotion of Access to Information Act No. 2 of 2000 (PAIA) provides the grounds for refusal of requested information as contemplated in Chapter 4 of the Act. In terms of Section 41, if disclosing information prejudices the defence of the Republic, the security of the Republic and/or the international relations of the Republic, such information is then protected under PAIA.

Section 41 reads as follows:

“41. (1) The information officer of a public body may refuse a request for access to a record of the body if its disclosure—

(a) could reasonably be expected to cause prejudice ~

(i) the defence of the Republic; 25

(ii) the security of the Republic; or

(iii) subject to subsection (3), the international relations of the Republic; or

(b) would reveal information—

(i) supplied in confidence by or on behalf of another state or an international organisation;

(ii) supplied by or on behalf of the Republic to another state or an international organisation in terms of an arrangement or international agreement, contemplated in section 231 of the Constitution, with that state or organisation which requires the information to be held in confidence; or

(iii) required to be held in confidence by an international agreement or customary international law contemplated in section 231 or 232, respectively, of the Constitution.”

PAIA allows access to be refused to information supplied in confidence by, or on behalf of another State or international organisation, or that is required to be held in confidence by an international agreement or customary international law. It is on this legislative basis that the minutes of the meetings held between the President of the Republic, Mr MC Ramaphosa, and other Heads of State and officials from foreign governments, cannot be disclosed.

22 March 2024 - NW378

Profile picture: Mafanya, Mr WTI

Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the breakdown of the budgeted expenditure of about R2 billion for the deployment of the 2 900 members of the SA National Defence Force to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in terms of (a) cost of employment, (b) equipment and (c) operations?

Reply:

 

Find reply here

22 March 2024 - NW655

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he has been informed that the Home Affairs office in Phuthaditjhaba in the Free State closes at 11:00 every morning due to downtime and water shortage, with members of the public being turned away without any assistance; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The Minister of Home Affairs was indeed informed in writing about service delivery challenges at the Phuthaditjhaba office. Water supply to the building was affected by a burnt water pressure pump on the galvanized water tank on top of the building. Municipal water supply was not reaching the building because there was no pressure at all. All bathrooms were not working due to no water supply.

As a result, and due to occupational health and safety considerations, the office started servicing clients from 07h30 in the morning and at 11h00 the office use to take the last group and close the door and serve the clients until they are all served, sometimes up to 14h30 or 15h30. However, the water supply to the building has been resolved and the office operates normal working hours until 16:00.

END.

22 March 2024 - NW601

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to her reply to question 184 on 21 March 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) each Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

(i) No official vehicle has been purchased for use for the Minister since 08 May 2019.

(ii) Approval was obtained for the procurement of official vehicles for both Deputy Ministers on 14 October 2021. Official orders were placed on 01 December 2021 with the approved suppliers for both vehicles:

Deputy Minister Mashego Dlamini

(a) Toyota

(b) Fortuner 2.8 GD-6 VX A/T

(c) 2022

(d) R667 333.50

(e) Vehicle delivered in June 2022

Deputy Minister Botes

(a) Audi

(b) Q5 TDI QUATTRO S TRONIC

(C) 2022

(d) R718 459.99

(e) Vehicle delivered in September 2022

22 March 2024 - NW297

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to his reply to question 3248 on 8 January 2024 stating that SA Airways (SAA) was issued with the International Air Services Licence in February 2020, what are the relevant details of the (i) application and (ii) documentation upon which the International Air Services Licence was issued to SAA; (2) Whether he will furnish Mr R A Lees with records of the management accounts that were used in taking into account the financial capabilities of SAA; (3) Who made the application for an International Air Services Licence on behalf of SAA?

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA:

(1)(i) The license was revised on 14 February 2020 after adding new codeshare destinations to Kenya.

(1)(ii) The basis on which the International Air Services License (IASL) was issued may best be answered by the International Air Services Council.

2. We are unable to share the Management accounts as it contains commercially sensitive information on the airline. The information will be shared once the Annual Financial Statements are audited and tabled in Parliament.

3. The Board remains the accounting authority of SAA. The application was submitted to the International Air Services Council by the Interim CEO, Prof. John Lamola.

The Department and the Board are currently in the process of reviewing all aspects of SAA in order to strengthen its capacity to implement the strategic direction which has been set for it by the shareholder.

 

 

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved/Comments

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

22 March 2024 - NW332

Profile picture: Bond, Mr M

Bond, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) What are the full details of all (a) sponsorships, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purposes to (i) her, (ii) her department and (iii) officials of her department by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 01 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available.

Reply:

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