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17 May 2022 - NW1217

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether, noting that the families of Mr Phaadiel Orrie and Mr Faizel Samsodien who qualify for parole, have raised concerns that his department has failed to communicate for the past two years with the two inmates on the whereabouts of their profiles and that both inmates (details furnished) qualify for parole under the Phaahla-, Van Vuuren- and Van Wyk judgments, he will take steps to locate the profiles of the two inmates; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether his department will provide clarity on the status of their (a) parole applications and (b) profiles; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. It should be noted that Department of Correctional Services allows offenders to lodge complaints or requests on daily basis, which include enquiring about the status of their profiles. This process has always been available to the mentioned offenders. The whereabouts of the profile reports of both offenders have always been known by the Department. Both profiles are in the final phases of the consideration process.

Both Offenders are serving sentences of life imprisonment. They have benefitted from Phaahla judgment handed down by the Constitutional Court on 03 May 2019, since they were sentenced after 01 October 2004 for offences committed before 01 October 2004. Therefore, they were also allocated maximum credits as per the Van Wyk Judgment. However, this does not mean they qualified for automatic placement on parole.

2(a) The offenders were considered by the Case Management Committee (CMC) and the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board (CSPB) for possible placement on parole.

(b) The profile reports were also considered by the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS) for possible placement on parole. The possible placement of offenders serving life sentences (lifers) is considered by the Minister in line with section 78 of the Correctional Services Act 111 of 1998. Therefore, the Minister will consider each case on its merit and his decision will be made known to both offenders within a reasonable time after the Minister has made a decision.

END.

17 May 2022 - NW1102

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total number of public servants are currently earning a salary at levels (i) 15 and (ii) 16 within the Public Service and (b) is the breakdown of the specified number for each (i) national and (ii) provincial department, including a brief (aa) job title and (bb) description?

Reply:

The (a) total number of public servants earning a salary at (i) level 15 was 467 and (ii) level 16 was 122, as on 28 February 2022. This excludes Defence and State Security Agency. The (b) breakdown per (i) national and (ii) provincial department including the (aa) job title is provided in the table below as it has been captured on PERSAL by departments.

(bb) Public Service Regulations, 2016 (Part I, regulation 39) stipulates that “for each post or group of posts, an executive authority shall establish a job description and job title that indicate, with appropriate emphasis on service delivery –

(a) The main objectives, activities and functions of the post or posts in question; and

(b) The inherent requirements of the job”.

The function to develop job descriptions and job titles for posts, is therefore decentralised to each national and provincial department. The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have access to information on job descriptions.

Number of Public Servants on salary levels 15 and 16

as on 28 February 2022

National/Provincial department and Job title

Salary level

 

15

16

Total

467

122

Eastern Cape

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

DDG-DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVT

1

 

   

DDG-TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Education

CHIEF DIRECTOR:FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG:IOM*

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL_*

 

1

 

Health

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:CLINICAL HEALTH L15

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:CORPORATE SERVICES L15

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L15

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL (HOD) L16

 

1

 

Human Settlements

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Office of the Premier

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

 

1

 

Provincial Treasury

DDG:CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL GOVERN

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:SUST FISCAL RESOURCE MNGMT

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Roads and Public works

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

3

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Safety and Liaison

DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL_OPERATIONS

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

2

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Transport

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

1

Free State

Agriculture

DDG

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: AGRIC AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

 

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

ADMINISTRATOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL`

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Education

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

1

 

   

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER CHIEF

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD HEALTH

 

1

 

Human Settlements

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: MONITORING & EVALUATION

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: FREE STATE PROVINCIAL ADMIN

 

1

   

HEAD: CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION & COORDINATION

 

1

 

Police, Roads and Transport

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:ROADS & TRANSPORT

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Public Works

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

1

Gauteng

Agriculture and Rural Development

DDG: SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: TRANSVERSAL SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DIRECTOR:LEGAL SERVICES

1

 

 

Community Safety

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

E-Government

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Economic Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

 

1

 

Education

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CURRICULUM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: EDUCATION SUPPORT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: GCRA

1

 

   

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1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER(HEALTH

5

 

   

SENIOR MANAGER (ADMINISTRATION)

1

 

 

Human Settlements

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

3

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Infrastructure Development

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

4

 

   

HEAD OF OFFICE

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF DIRECTOR

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD: GAUTENG PLANNING COMMISSION

 

1

   

SPECIAL ADVISER I

1

1

 

Provincial Treasury

CEO/PROJECT DIRECTOR

 

1

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR

2

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

 

1

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: PROJECT FINANCE

1

 

   

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4

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

   

PROJECT ACCOUNTANT

1

 

   

PROJECT MANAGER

1

 

 

Roads and Transport

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1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: G-FLEET TRADING ENTITY

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: ROADS & TRANSPORT

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

CHIEF DIRECTOR

 

1

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

KwaZulu-Natal

Agriculture and Rural Development

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD:AGRICULTURE

 

1

 

Arts and Culture

HEAD: ARTS & CULTURE

1

 

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

1

 

   

HEAD:COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE & TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

 

1

 

Community Safety and Liaison

HEAD: COMMUNITY SAFETY AND LIAISON

 

1

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

DDG: ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

DDG: INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT & BUSINESS REG

1

 

   

DDG: INTEGRATED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

HEAD: ECO DEV TOURISM & ENVIRO AFFAIRS

 

1

 

Education

CHIEF FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT AND DELIVERY

1

 

   

DDG: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Finance

CHIEF DIRECTOR: MUNICIPAL FINANCE

1

 

   

DDG:FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT(PROVINCIAL ACCOUNTANT GEN

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: FISCAL

1

 

 

Health

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1

   

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: HEALTH

 

1

 

Human Settlements

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1

 

   

HEAD: HUMAN SETTLEMENT

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

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1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

2

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Public Works

CHIEF DIRECTOR:CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

HEAD:PUBLIC WORKS

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD:SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

 

1

 

Sport and Recreation

HEAD: SPORT AND RECREATION

1

 

 

Transport

DEPUTY-DIRECTOR GENERAL: TIRS

1

 

   

DEPUTY-DIRECTOR GENERAL: TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY-DIRECTOR GENERAL:CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD : TRANSPORT

 

1

Limpopo

Agriculture and Rural Development

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG:COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

CHIEF DIRECTOR: COMMERCIAL OPERATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: INTER ECONOM DEVELOP SERV

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Education

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF FINACIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:HEALTH SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR:INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING

1

 

   

HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

D-G: PROVINCIAL ADMINISTRATION: NORTHERN PROVINCE

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: PLANNING COORDINATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOP SUPPO

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ASSETS LIABIL & SCM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SERV

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: SUST RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

FINANCIAL SPECIALIST TO OFFICE OF THE HOD

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Social Development

HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Sports, Arts and Culture

HOD

1

 

Mpumalanga

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

1

 

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

 

Education

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: EDUCATION ÝH/O¨

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG:CLINICAL HEALTH SERVICES

1

 

 

Human Settlements

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY

1

 

 

Office of the Premier

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

   

EXECUTIVE MANAGER: CORPORATE STRATEGY

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

HOD:PUBLIC WORKS ROADS AND TRANSPORT

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

National

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

CHIEF DIRECTOR: MONITORING & EVALUATION

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: NATIONAL RURAL YOUTH SERVICE CORPS

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: POLICY RESEARCH

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

CHIEF LAND CLAIMS COMMISSIONER

1

 

   

CHIEF OF STAFF

1

 

   

CHIEF REGISTRAR OF DEEDS

1

 

   

DDG: FOOD SECURITY & AGRARIAN REFORM

1

 

   

DDG: LAND REDISTRIBUTION AND TENURE REFORM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SUPPORT SERVICE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

   

DIRECTOR: PROJECT MANAGEMENT SUPPORT

1

 

   

NATIONAL PROJECT COORDINATOR (CASP)

1

 

   

SPECIAL MASTER

 

1

 

Basic Education

CD: STRATEGIC PLANNING RESEARCH & CO-ORDINATION

1

 

   

CFO

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING AND DELIVERY OVERSIGHT UNIT

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING INFORMATION & ASSESSMENTS

1

 

   

DDG: SOCIAL MOBILISATION & SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: BASIC EDUCATION

 

1

   

PROJECT MANAGER

 

1

 

Communications and Digital Technologies

DDG: GOVERNANCE & ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

DDG: ICT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG:ICT INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS & TRADE

1

 

   

DDG:INFORMATION SOCIETY DEVELOPMENT & RESEARCH

1

 

   

DDG:SOE OVERSIGHT&ICT ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

HEAD:PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION (4IR)

1

 

 

Cooperative Governance

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

1

   

CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL :NATIONAL DISASTER MAN CEN

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICE

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE

 

1

 

Correctional Services

CDC COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS

1

 

   

CDC STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

CDC: REGIONAL COMMISSIONER

6

 

   

CDC:FINANCE(CFO)

1

 

   

CDC:INCARCERATION & CORRECTIONS

1

 

   

CDC:REMAND DETENTION

1

 

 

Employment and Labour

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: IES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: LABOUR

 

1

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

CHIEF DIRECTOR L14

3

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER L15

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL L15

7

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (DEFF) L16

 

1

   

SPECIALIST ADVISOR L15

1

 

 

Government Communication and Information System

CHIEF DIRECTOR: CONTENT AND WRITING

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: ENTITY OVERSIGHT

1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

Health

CD: CCOD & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

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1

 

   

DDG: HEALTH REGULATION & COMPLIANCE

1

 

   

DDG: PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

   

HEAD: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

TECHNICAL SPECIALIST: HEALTH ECONOMIST

1

 

 

Higher Education and Training

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

DDG: COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

1

 

   

DDG: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING POLICY AND STRATEGY

1

 

   

DDG: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Home Affairs

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

1

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

1

   

COMMISSIONER

 

1

   

DDG: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND SUPPORT

1

 

   

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

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1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CIVIC SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: IMMIGRATION SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: INFORMATION SERVICES

1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

   

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1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

 

1

 

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

1

 

 

International Relations and Cooperation

CHIEF OF STATE PROTOCOL

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1

 

   

DDG:PUBLIC DIPLOMACY

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

4

 

   

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3

 

   

DIRECTOR

1

 

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

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1

 

   

CHIEF MASTER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL/MANAGING DIRECTOR

8

 

   

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1

 

   

DEPUTY NATIONAL DIRECTOR PUBLIC PROSECUTION

 

4

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

4

   

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6

 

   

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1

   

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SPECIAL DIRECTOR

5

 

 

Military Veterans

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1

 

   

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2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: MINERAL&PETROLEUM REGULAT

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DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: NUCLEAR

1

 

   

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1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:MINING MINERALS&ENERGY PD

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: MINERAL RESOURCES AND ENERGY

 

1

 

National School of Government

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

 

1

   

PRINCIPAL:NSG

 

1

 

National Treasury

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

 

   

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1

   

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1

 

 

Office of the Chief Justice

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1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SERVI

1

 

   

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1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

   

DIRECTOR: CHIEF/GENERAL MANAGER

1

 

 

Office of the Public Service Commission

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:INTEGRITY & ANTI-CORRUPTIO

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:LEADERSHIP MANAGEMENT PRAC

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:MONITORING & EVALUATION

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC SERV COMMIS

 

1

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

CHIEF DIRECTOR: EDUCATION & SKILLS

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: FRONTLINE MONITORING & SUPPORT

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: HEALTH

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: SOCIAL COHESION PROTECTION & GEND

1

 

   

DDG: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG: EVALUATION EVIDENCE AND KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS

1

 

   

DDG: NATIONAL PLANNING COORDINATION

1

 

   

DDG: SECTOR MONITORING

1

 

   

DEPUTY SECRETARY OF PLANNING

 

1

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Police

COMMISIONER: S A POLICE SERVICE NATIONAL

 

1

   

COMMISSIONER: S A POLICE SERVICE PROVINCIAL=(P)

4

 

   

COMMISSIONER: S A POLICE SERVICE REGIONAL=(P)

14

 

   

COMMISSIONER:S A POLICE SERVICE:DEPUTY NAT=(P)

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

1

 

   

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

1

 

   

PROVINCIAL COMMISSIONER

2

 

   

SPECIAL ADVISEUR III

1

 

 

Public Enterprises

CHIEF SPECIALIST:FINANCIAL ASSES & INVEST SUPPORT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

 

Public Service and Administration

ADMINISTRATOR: INTERVENTION NW OFFICE PREMIER

 

1

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

DDG: E-GOVERNMENT SERVICES & INFORMATION MNG

1

 

   

DDG: GOVERNMENT SERVICES ACCESS & IMPROVEMENT

1

 

   

DDG: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT & DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL DPSA

 

1

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT PLANNING

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:EPWP

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:PROFESSIONAL SERVICES DPW

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL:PUBLIC WORKS

 

1

   

DIVISIONAL HEAD:REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

DIVISIONAL HEAD:REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD OF INFRASTRUCTURE SOUTH AFRICA

 

1

   

HEAD OF PMTE

 

1

   

HEAD:GOVERNANCE RISK AND COMPLIANCE

 

1

   

PMTE:DIVISIONAL HEAD:CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT:EXECUTIVE

1

 

 

Science and Innovation

DDG CORPORATE SERVICE

1

 

   

DDG: SOCIO-ECONOMIC INNOVATION PARTNERSHIPS

1

 

   

DDG:INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION & RESOUR

1

 

   

DDG:TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: IP&S

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Small Business Development

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Social Development

DDG: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: COMPREHENSIVE SOCIAL SECURITY

1

 

   

DDG:CORPORATE SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

4

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL ARTS AND CULTURE

 

1

 

Statistics South Africa

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PRICE STATISTICS

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PROGRAMME OFFICE

1

 

   

DDG:STATISTICAL OPERATIONS & PROVINCIAL COORDINATI

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: ECONOMIC STATISTICS

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: METHODOLOGY STD & RESEARC

1

 

   

STATISTICIAN-GENERAL

 

1

 

The Presidency

CHIEF POLICY ANALYST

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL PRESIDENCY

 

1

 

Tourism

DDG: DESTINATION DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: TOURISM RESEARCH POLICY & INT RELATIONS

1

 

   

DDG: TOURISM SECTOR SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

DEP DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM

 

1

   

SENIOR SPECIALIST - STRATEGIC PROJECTS SL15

1

 

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

CD: INVESTMENT PROMOTION & FACILITATION

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR:CONSUMER AND CORPORATE REGULATION

1

 

   

CHIEF ECONOMIST

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

COMMISSIONER

 

1

   

DDG: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

1

 

   

DDG: TRADE & INVESTMENT SOUTH AFRICA

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CCRD

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ITED

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: TEO

1

 

   

GROUP CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

1

 

   

SA AMBASSADOR TO WTO

1

 

   

SNR SPECIALIST: STRATEGIC INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

 

Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ISC

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: RPL

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Transport

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: INTEGRATED TRANSPORT PLANNING

1

 

   

DDG: MARITIME TRANSPORT

1

 

   

DDG: PUBLIC TRANSPORT

1

 

   

DDG: ROAD TRANSPORT

 

1

   

DDG:CIVIL AVIATION

1

 

   

DDG:RAIL TRANSPORT

1

 

 

Water and Sanitation

DDG: NATIONAL WATER RESOURCE INFRASTRUCTURE

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING & INFORMATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:INTERNATIONAL WATER COOP

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL WATER AND SANITATION

 

1

 

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:STEE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: RPD

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

North West

Agriculture and Rural Development

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=**OLD

1

 

 

Education

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

D-G: PROVINCIAL ADMINISTRATION: NORTH WEST

 

1

   

DDG:ADMINISTRATION

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DDG: FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT/ SUPERINTENDANT GENERAL

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

Northern Cape

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Economic Development and Tourism

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Education

DDG-CURRICULUM EXAMINATIONS&ASSESSMENT

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Transport, Safety and Liaison

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL (HOD)

1

 

Western Cape

Agriculture

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD: AGRICULTURE

 

1

 

Community Safety

HEAD: COMMUNITY SAFETY

1

 

   

PROVINCIAL POLICE OMBUDSMAN

1

 

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

HEAD: CULTURAL AFFAIRS AND SPORT

1

 

 

Economic Development and Tourism

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND TOURISM

 

1

 

Education

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER SR15

2

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY

2

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Local Government

HEAD: LOCAL GOVERNMENT

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD OFFICIAL: PROVINCIAL TREASURY

 

1

 

Social Development

HEAD: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

 

The Premier

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE ASSURANCE

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

   

HEAD: CORPORATE SERVICES CENTRE

 

1

 

Transport and Public Works

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: FINANCE

1

 

   

HEAD:TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC WORKS

 

1

Data source: PERSAL

Compiled by the DPSA

Excluding Defence and State Security Agency

17 May 2022 - NW646

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2699 on 16 December 2021, what (a) number of public servants have been subjected to lifestyle audits as at 1 January 2022 and (b) were the outcomes of the specified lifestyle audits; (2) whether she will furnish Dr M M Gondwe with a breakdown of the specified number of lifestyle audits that were conducted in each (a) national and (b) provincial government department; if not, why not, if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. The lifestyle audits are conducted in three phases namely lifestyle review, lifestyle investigation and lifestyle audit (a) A total number of 21574 public servants have been subjected to lifestyle review, which is the first phase of lifestyle audit, as at January 2022; (b) There were 746 public servants who are undergoing investigation for non-disclosure of assets, vehicles and companies as well as conflicts of interest.

2. The breakdown of the number of lifestyle audits conducted is as follow: (a) National departments’ lifestyle reviews conducted amounts to 12557; and (b) Provincial government departments’ lifestyle reviews conducted amounts to 9017, as at January 2022.

End

17 May 2022 - NW673

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the total cost of the salary increases for members of the Senior Management Service (SMS) to the fiscus for the (a) 2021-22 and (b) 2022-23 financial years as announced in Circular 13 of 2022; (2) Whether she will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a table showing a breakdown of the cost to the fiscus of the salary increases for SMS levels 13, 14, 15 and 16 for the specified financial years; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) Whether she has found the salary increases for highly paid SMS members in the Public Service to be just, equitable and an efficient use of public money in the current economic climate, wherein millions of private sector workers lost their jobs during the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 and with 46% of South Africans currently employed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total cost of the salary increases for members of the Senior Management Service (SMS) for the 2021/22 financial year is R373 165 844. It must be noted that no decision on salary increases for members of the SMS for the 2022/23 financial year has yet been taken.

2. A breakdown of the cost of the salary increases for SMS levels 13, 14, 15 and 16 for the 2021/22 financial year is indicated in the table below:

SMS salary level

Cost (R)

13

243 526 088

14

85 976 406

15

25 203 259

16

18 460 091

Total

373 165 844

3. Yes, the salary increases for members of the SMS in the Public Service are regarded as just, equitable and an efficient use of public money in the current economic climate. The salary adjustments granted to members of the SMS is equitable, considering the fact that it is similar to what was granted to employees below the SMS. If the salaries of members of the SMS are not adjusted, it will result in a situation where employees below SMS will earn more that senior managers. The gap between the maximum salary notch of a Deputy Director on salary level 12 and a Director on the minimum of salary level 13 is already narrow. In some occupation specific dispensations, staff below SMS level already earn more than senior managers. This situation creates a disincentive for competent employees to aspire to become senior managers.

It should be noted that the 2019 Incentive Policy Framework provides for payment of annual pay (notch) progression for eligible members of the SMS. The cost-of-living adjustment for 2021/22 was granted in lieu of pay progression.

Furthermore, the remuneration of the members of the SMS are impacted by the changes in the consumer price index (CPI) that reflect changes in the cost-of-living and which has a direct impact on the “buying power” of their remuneration. As a result, the adjustments are necessary to protect the “buying power” of the salaries of members of the SMS

End

17 May 2022 - NW886

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service has sexual harassment policy in place. As part of the implementation of the policy awareness programmes on management of sexual harassment in the workplace including procedures and processes to be followed in reporting related cases are held. The department also provides psychosocial support through Employee Health and Wellness unit to victims and those affected.

(a) The total number of incidents (i) sexual harassment = 0 and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years = 0 and (bb) since 1 April 2021 =0, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded =0, (ii) were withdrawn =0 and (iii) remain open or pending based on incidents =0 and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty =0.

END

17 May 2022 - NW1385

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) measures have been put in place by his department to deal with the incompetent catering team that fed students food with worms at the University of Sol Plaatjie and (b) steps have been taken by his department in order to ensure that students receive nutritious meals on time in future?

Reply:

Provision of catering services on campuses and university residencies is the responsibility of the University Management.  My department was concerned about the complaints relating to the provision of quality food in the institutions of higher learning. As soon as questions were brought to our attention, Sol Plaatje University was contacted about the incident reported to have happened in one of its cafeterias. 

The University responded that it has contracted with local Kimberley-based service providers to provide catering services in its student dining halls.  These service providers are required to provide food that is of a national standard, and the University holds them to that undertaking.  In the case reported, meals for lunch were prepared in the University 's dining hall and one pack was reported to contain a worm.  It is not clear how the worm entered the pack.  The University took the proactive approach to shut down the cafeteria, and invited a health inspection from the Sol Plaatje Local Municipality who visited the kitchen to conduct an inspection and was accompanied by two members of the SRC, Sol Plaatje University Manager for Soft Services and the Residence Warden.

The Health Inspector could not find fault with the operations of the kitchen, which included the processes of receiving, storing, preparing, cooking and serving meals to students.  Students were given the option to eat in any of the other cafeterias on campus, but they refused to do so, and demanded that the kitchen be re-opened. The kitchen was only re-opened after the go-ahead was received from the health inspector.

The University has instituted additional measures to support food safety in its dining halls. These measures include regular checks by management and student leaders, regular inspections by external experts, and the secondment of experienced staff to its kitchens.

17 May 2022 - NW1258

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With regard to the recent media statement which states that his department has been facing challenges with shortfalls in the allocation of inmate uniforms particularly for remand detainees which is a concern as the wearing of civilian clothes by inmates can create a security risk by making it difficult to distinguish between inmates and civilians working inside a correctional centre, (a) how has his department amended the procurement processes in order to resolve the uniform issue and (b) what additional training for staff has been rolled out to rectify the (i) shortage of staff with procurement skills and/or (ii) lack of familiarity with procurement processes that were also listed as a challenge?

Reply:

(a) A procedure manual has been developed as a tool to assist the officials working at the detention facilities to understand the requirements with regard to the implementation of section 48 (Clothing) of the Correctional Services Act. The procedure manual serves to make provision for consistent standards in terms of issuing, assigning and receiving of remand detainee uniforms and to ensure uniformity within the department.

On a yearly basis, Regions submit their needs for the next financial year, for the ordering of remand detainees’ uniform. It is acknowledged that the uniform for Remand Detainees is not sufficient to cater for all remand detainees due to lack of funding. Since 2019 the budget for Remand Detainees uniform was drastically reduced on an annual basis. In 2019/2020 an amount of R40 049 000.00 was allocated for Remand Detainees uniform. In 2020/2021, an amount of R15 800 000 was allocated and in 2021/2022 an amount of R17 900 000.00 was allocated. The budget is further reduced to R9,5 million for 2022/23 financial year. With the reduced budget the challenge of shortages for Remand Detainees Uniform is going to be even bigger in 2022/23 as the required quantities to be submitted to the National Treasury will also be reduced due to budget cuts.

The provision of uniform to remand detainees has been prioritised and included in the 2022/23 Annual Operational Plan (AOP) with a monthly target of 90%..

(b)(i)(ii) The Department has identified the need for training officials in supply Chain Management and the need was for the past two years among top priorities. During the financial year 2020/21 a total of twenty-three (23) officials received training in Supply Chain Management and a total of forty-one (41) officials were also trained in 2021/22. Training was concluded in all Regions and the Department has again in 2022/23 placed Supply Chain Management training as one of the top training priorities where the number of officials to be trained will be increased.

END.

17 May 2022 - NW1350

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the statement he made during a television interview on the eNCA Power to Truth programme with Dr Onkgopotse J J Tabane on 6 April 2022, wherein he said that when he took Mr Pravin Gordhan in his former capacity as Minister of Finance to the Steve Biko Academic Hospital, they were told that 60% of the women who were giving birth at the specified hospital were not South Africans, (a) on what date did he visit the specified hospital and (b) what is the detailed breakdown of the countries from which the specified 60% of non-South Africans came who were giving birth at the hospital?

Reply:

a) I had visited Steve Biko Academic Hospital while Minister of Health, with the then Minister of Finance Mr Pravin Gordhan on 11 September 2012.

b) We did not ask for such details because it was not necessary to do so.

END

16 May 2022 - NW479

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

Whether his Government is committed to an evidence-based policymaking approach as envisioned by the National Policy Development Framework; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

At the beginning of the Sixth Administration, on the occasion of the Budget Vote of the Presidency 2019/20, I said that public policy that must be evidence-based and effectively coordinated.

The Presidency established a Public Sector Policy Development and Research Network in March 2020 as a platform to capacitate policy practitioners on the use of evidence in policy making. This network is represented by policy practitioners, researchers and legal services from national and provincial government, and municipalities will be included in the near future

The Presidency, through the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME), has an Evidence Mapping System that assists departments with mapping research work and evidence from a wide range of credible sources.

The National School of Government offers training to officials on evidence-based policy making and the National Policy Development Framework.

Finally, the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System assists in ensuring that early drafting of policies, Bills and Regulations are supported by relevant evidence.

16 May 2022 - NW1015

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What are the costs of court orders that her department has entered into to assist the Government to drive down costs with private service providers? (2) what are the details of the (a) agreements reached by her department with private property owners in negotiating the costs to do business with the State and (b) plans that her department has in place to address the rising costs to lease buildings over the medium term?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. I have been informed by the Department that there are no costs of court orders that the Department of Public Works & Infrastructure has entered into to assist the Government to drive down costs with private service providers. However, the Department has incurred legal costs for a briefing of Senior and Junior Counsel to assist in bringing an urgent court application for spoliation against one landlord who illegally locked-out some client departments from leased premises and the costs thereof are still to be received from the Office of the State Attorney.

2. 

(a) The Department has undertaken a lease renegotiation drive for lease renewals with various landlords whose leases have expired or are about to expire; where user departments are still in occupation of such buildings. In this process, the Department relies on the following principles:

  • All renewed lease agreements are aligned to the Rhode Report – which is an independent instrument that does market research to determine fair rentals for various areas around the country.
  • Escalation is capped at 6% to manage the increase in rental rates annually.
  • Negotiation of longer-term leases to increase our bargaining power to negotiate the lower rentals.
  • Improved maintenance and tenant installations for such buildings where longer-term lease agreements have been successfully negotiated.

(b) In the medium term, the Department is implementing various strategies in order to reduce over-reliance on private leases and reduce the cost of leasing.

    • The Lease-to-own Strategy – Involves signing longer-term leases (more than the usual 9years, 11 months) that allow developers to build these facilities to specification and the facilities reverting back to the state at the end of the lease period. This is aimed at smaller properties such as police stations and some courts.
    • The Precinct Development Strategy - The DPWI is making strides to plan and integrate accommodation requirements within government precincts, targeting both urban and rural areas. Because of population growth mainly in metros, there is a deliberate infrastructure planning interventions in the metro areas. In this regard, most of the Government Head Offices are situated in Tshwane, which is a hybrid of state-owned and leased accommodation. In terms of state-owned 14, National Government Departments occupy 750 000m2 of accommodation.

The establishment of the Government Estate Development Framework will facilitate the development of a further 900 000m2 of state-owned development across the following Precincts in Tshwane: Northern Gateway, Civic Precinct, Caledonian Precinct, Government Boulevard, and Ceremonial Boulevard

Within the Northern Gateway precinct, Salvokop is a mixed-use precinct gazetted as Strategic Infrastructure Project. Salvokop is a state-owned mixed-use precinct located within the inner city of Tshwane. The development will focus on phase 1 to develop 360 000 m2 of Head Office Complex for four (4) National Government Departments. This flagship project is jointly executed by DPWI, the National Treasury, and the City of Tshwane.

    • The Refurbish, Operate, and Transfer Strategy (ROT) - The ROT is an offtake of the already well-established infrastructure financing scheme called Build, Operate, and Transfer (BOT). Only the target for DPWI is already existing buildings that require funding to refurbish. BOT is a scheme or private finance initiative (PFI) or alternative procurement method in which a government contractually grants to a private sector entity a concession requiring the entity to obtain financing for the design, build, and operation of a public facility or infrastructure for a fixed period of time, during which the private entity can recover its costs of construction, plus profit, by charging fees or tools for its use and at the end of the concession period, transfer ownership and operation of the facility back to the government.

 

16 May 2022 - NW1332

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his undertaking on 29 May 2019 to sign performance agreements with each Minister and Deputy Minister, and his reiteration during his State of the Nation Address on 14 February 2020 that the performance agreements would still be signed, (a) on what date did (i) he and (ii) each relevant Minister and Deputy Minister sign the respective performance agreements and (b) what are the reasons that it took so long after his initial undertaking in May 2019 to sign the performance agreements; (2) (a) on what date(s) was the performance of each Minister and Deputy Minister evaluated against the targets set in the performance agreements, (b) what are the details of the outcomes of each evaluation and (c) what action has he taken against any Minister or Deputy Minister who was found to have failed to meet a performance target; (3) whether he has found that the implementation of the performance agreements has strengthened the capacity of the State and increased accountability, as was his aim in February 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) details of the evidence he has relied on in this regard? NW1596E

Reply:

The President has signed performance agreements with Ministers and Deputy Ministers to assist in the fulfilment of Section 91(2) of the Constitution, which states: “The President appoints the Deputy President and Ministers, assigns their powers and functions, and may dismiss them.”

The performance agreements provide clear guidance to Ministers and Deputy Ministers on their responsibilities and performance indicators. This enables the President to more effectively evaluate the fulfilment of these responsibilities, and, together with the Deputy President and respective Ministers and Deputy Ministers, identify measures to address areas of concern.

While these performance agreements and the process of assessment are matters between the President and the respective Ministers and Deputy Ministers, copies of these agreements have been made public. They are available on the Government website at: www.gov.za/ministers-performance-agreement

16 May 2022 - NW1378

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Social Development

What steps has she taken in order to initiate the upgrade of the 25-year old computer system of the SA Social Security Agency, which crashes on a frequent basis?

Reply:

It is important to note that, despite downtime being registered against the system, the Social Pensions System (SocPen) has always been able to pay SASSA beneficiaries each month without fail.

The system had downtime related challenges which have been resolved since 15 March 2022. The system was continuously monitored since then and has been stable with no downtime being required. However, periodically downtime was caused by external factors such as load shedding or network related matters, which are dealt with on an individual, per occurrence basis. It usually also just affects a certain location and not the whole system.

A firm decision was taken to replace the system with a modern, progressive and technologically advanced system, which can be fully integrated with current SASSA systems and technologies.

In this regard SASSA is busy developing a roadmap to replace the old mainframe legacy system. The system replacement is amongst others, based on industry comparative studies that will guide and benchmark what other government and agencies are using for government social security benefits distribution and disbursement. By the end of the second quarter, the roadmap will be finalised.

16 May 2022 - NW1533

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of social workers that her department dispatched to the flood-stricken KwaZulu-Natal area to provide psychosocial services to affected families?

Reply:

The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Social Development has deployed three hundred and eighty-two (382) social workers to provide psychosocial support services to individuals and families in the flood-stricken areas.

16 May 2022 - NW1466

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) process was followed to appoint members of the (i) Technical Committee for Payments of Social Grants and (ii) SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) Governance whose names were given upfront by the former Minister of Social Development, Ms S Shabangu, (b) was the role of each member and (c) total amount was each member paid; (2) whether there are any reports coming out of the Technical Committee for Payments of Social Grants and SASSA Governance; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms B S Masango with a copy and/or copies of the reports?

Reply:

a) (i) The Technical Committee for SASSA was appointed by the previous Minister of Social Development to assist SASSA in implementing the Constitutional Court judgment of 23rd March 2018 and to advise on business model review of SASSA.

Various Constitutional Court judgments in the course of 2017 made it clear that there were challenges with the existing contract with service providers for cash payment, without which SASSA would not be able to execute its mandate and the extra capacity for a period of time was required.

The Technical Committee was appointed from May 2018 until October 2018.

Hon Minister Susan Shabangu appointed the Technical Committee for Payments of Social Grants in accordance with Regulation 20 of Treasury Regulations published in terms of Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 (PFMA). Also, see the attached Affidavit to the Constitutional Court filed by the then Minister of Social Development.

a)(ii) The following names were given as part of the committee:

1.

Ms. Dipuo

Peters

Former Minister of Transport and former Premier of the Northern Cape Provincial Government

2.

Adv Vusi

Madonsela

Former Director-General of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development and former Director-General of the Department of Social Development (Withdrew from the committee due to other commitments

3.

Ms Manoko

Nchwe

Former Deputy National Commissioner: South African Police Service

4.

Ms.Totsie

Memela

Non-Executive Chairman of Memela Pratt and Associates

5.

Mr.Selwyn Jehoma

Former Deputy Director-General of the Department of Social Development

6.

Ms Zodwa Manase

A Chartered Accountant to help with numbers

7.

Mr Sipho . Shezi

Former Special Adviser to the Minister of Social Development

(b) The roles of the Technical Committee for Payments of Social Grants is outlined in the attached Terms of Reference (See Attached Annexure B)

(c) The total amount paid to the Technical Committee for Payments of Social Grants was R2, 534 831,05 Please see below breakdown of payment per committee member:

Name of Committee Member

Total Amount Paid

Ms.Dipuo Peters

R468,503.05

Ms Manoko Nchwe

R449,040.00

Ms.Totsie Memela

R235,592.00

Mr.Selwyn Jehoma

R383,466.00

Ms.Zodwa Manase

R348,580.00

Mr.Sipho Shezi

R649,650.00

2. Yes, the Technical Committee for Payments of Social Grants submitted monthly reports (See attached Annexure C)

 

16 May 2022 - NW1657

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether all staff members at the office of the Chief Executive Officer of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) and her office security are vetted; if not, why not, in each case; if so, on what date and at what level were they vetted; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms B S Masango with the security clearance reports in this regard; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) whether vetting by the State Security Agency was undertaken for the company and/or by companies doing Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) at SASSA; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date was the vetting conducted and (b) what was the outcome for each member and/or director of each of the companies; (4) whether the specified companies have experience in doing BPR; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) at which organ of State have they separately or together done the BPR and (b) on what date; (5) whether any of the companies doing BPR was appointed at SASSA and her department for any other services prior to the BPR; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date, (b) what process was followed, (c) for what services and (d) what total amount was each company paid?

Reply:

1. All staff members in the office of the Chief Executive Officer and her office are in the process of being vetted at the level of Top Secret by the State Security Agency. Forms submitted between the period 2020/02/12 and 2022/05/04

CEO submitted in 2021/11/10- Top Secret

Senior Manager: Office of the CEO- submitted in 12/02/2020- Top Secret

General Manager: Office of the CEO submitted 04/05/2022- Top Secret

Manager: Intergovernmental & Stakeholder Liaison - submitted 04/05/2022- Top Secret

Chief Coordinator: Office of the CEO: her completed form in the year 2016 and has since been awaiting the results. She now has to complete a new form since 5 years has lapsed.

2. A request for the vetting status for the members mentioned above was submitted to the State Security Agency on Friday, 06 May 2022.

3. Vetting by the State Security Agency (SSA) was conducted for the company, 4 Chakras Consulting CC which is doing Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) at SASSA on (a) 21 December 2021 and received report back in January 2022.

(b) The following Directors/members of 4 Chakras Consulting CC were vetted:

Dr. M Kuppen, Ms SA Meadows and Mr I Hassim. No negative information of national security relevance was received on behalf of the above members.

(4) 4 Chakras Consulting CC comes with lot of experience in conducting BPR. See attached annexures for (a) and (b) replies.

(5) Yes, 4 Chakras Consulting CC was appointed for other services in SASSA prior to BPR.

(a) 26 August 2019 and 21 February 2021

(b) These two services were acquired through a quotation process.

(c) For Strategic planning facilitation and skills audit services

(c) For Strategic planning facilitation, the company was paid R499 150 and R498 400 for skills audit.

16 May 2022 - NW1428

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether the abuse and misuse of the child support grant renders the mother unfit to have the child under her care; if not, why not; if so, on what legislative provisions does her department rely in this regard?

Reply:

The management of social grants, including the child support grant is done in terms of the Social Assistance Act, 2004. Section 19 of the Social Assistance Act empowers SASSA to appoint a person to investigate suspected abuse of a social grant. If the abuse is confirmed on objective grounds, SASSA may suspend payment of that grant, or appoint another person to receive the grant in respect of the beneficiary or child.

The determination as to the fitness of the care giver to care for the child is being dealt with in terms of section 150 of the Children’s Act, Act 38 of 2005. The investigation needs to be conducted by a social worker which will assist to compile a report that will guide the court to make a decision in terms of the caregiver’s fitness to care for the child.

16 May 2022 - NW1333

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his repeated claims that the National Coronavirus Command Council is guided by the science when it takes decisions, on what (a) grounds did the Council ignore the advisory issued by the Ministerial Advisory Committee (i) on 21 July 2021 that all primary schools in the Republic should open at full capacity, as it found that the harms of rotational schooling would outweigh the benefits, until around 7 February 2022, (ii) on 8 February 2022 that the (aa) Government should remove the requirements for cross border travellers to undergo SARS-CoV-2 tests and (bb) requirement to wear masks outdoors be scrapped, until around 22 March 2022, given that both would have brought significant relief to the tourism industry and (iii) on 16 February 2022 that the restrictions placed on outdoor and indoor gatherings be lifted, including the 50% capacity and minimum physical distancing regulations, which would have brought significant relief to the events and entertainment industries, especially nightclubs and (b) scientific grounds are nightclubs still not allowed to operate?

Reply:

The role of the COVID-19 Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAC) is to advise the Minister of Health with regards to managing cases of COVID-19 in the health system, interventions to control the spread of the disease, communication strategies, the research agenda and the economic impact on the health system.

The MAC develops advisories on specific issues in response to requests from the Minister for guidance on a particular issue or in response to new knowledge and developments as the pandemic evolves.

Following submission of an advisory to the Minister of Health, the Minister directs the response to the advisory which may include:

  • activation, processing and implementation through internal departmental processes;
  • engagement with other internal and external stakeholders;
  • tabling at the National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) or Cabinet for deliberation and decision making.

In reaching decisions, the NCCC relies on contributions from numerous sectors and other stakeholders. While decisions are guided by scientific advice and evidence, additional social, economic, legal and behavioural considerations are also taken into account.

16 May 2022 - NW1620

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) is able to determine the province where a SASSA application is made and where the SASSA grant is drawn; if not, (a) how does SASSA measure demand versus allocation of (a) offices, (b) staffing and (c) other resource capacity; if so, what is the breakdown of beneficiaries in each province?

Reply:

SASSA is able to determine the province where the application for a social grant is made, if such an application was done in person at a SASSA office. For online applications done through the internet, SASSA is unable to determine the location from which the application was done. However, the address provided by the applicant confirms the province in which the applicant resides.

In addition to knowing where an application emanates, SASSA is able to determine where the grant money was withdrawn for beneficiaries who receive their money through the SASSA/SAPO card. This information is provided by the South African Post Office to SASSA. However, where the grant is deposited into a personal bank account, SASSA is unable to determine where the grant is withdrawn.

a) The principles for establishment of offices was derived from the SASSA Service Delivery Model (SDM) which was introduced in 2010. In terms of the SDM SASSA committed to the establishment of service offices within a 40km radius. Where there is insufficient infrastructure available in the 40km radius and/or the beneficiary numbers do not justify a physical building, a mobile office unit and field workers would be deployed. In the process of attempting to establish these service offices, SASSA does take reasonable consideration of available resources (staffing, finance and other tools of trade) to help achieve the progressive realisation of this objective.

b) In order to establish any additional service point, funded posts must exist on the organisational structure. Where mobile services are provided, the staff are taken from the local offices to provide the service on specific days.

c) Existing offices are allocated resources on the basis of the following critical elements :

    • Number of beneficiaries serviced by the affected office.
    • Number of communities the office services which may require extensive travelling
    • Financial resources available at the time.

d) Breakdown of beneficiaries in each province

 

Total number of BENEFICIARIES in Payment by region and Grant Type as at 202203

Region

Care Dependency Grant

Child Support Grant

Combination (foster child and care dependency)

Disability Grant

Foster Child Grant

Grant-In-Aid

Old Age Grant

War Veterans Grant

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

21419

1079071

1578

172623

47387

36422

595873

6

1721073

Free State

8293

418796

518

75276

15573

11673

214703

 

672672

Gauteng

20441

1179473

638

115924

26651

11366

700253

7

1951636

KwaZulu- Natal

36983

1642112

1331

215294

38724

81766

741335

4

2476262

Limpopo

16170

1064528

546

95731

26332

56198

494929

 

1589530

Mpumalanga

11122

655480

343

76135

14772

23877

270796

 

957640

North West

9123

498010

411

61456

16755

17676

280052

1

807904

Northern Cape

5121

181501

479

47226

6463

21162

93362

1

301871

Western Cape

15259

636676

942

145133

19633

23631

383301

6

1125222

Grand Total

143931

7355641

6786

1004798

212290

283771

3774604

25

11603801

16 May 2022 - NW861

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

The expenditure information as required will be separated as follows:

(a) Catering

Year

Total

(i)

Minister

(ii)

Deputy Minister

(iii)

Officials of NDSD

2019/20

10 795 884

53 581

87 013

10 655 290

2020/21

144 900

2 497

59 635

82 768

2021/22

3 286 527

3 156

21 799

3 261 572

 TOTAL

14 227 311

59 234

168 447

13 999 630

(b) Entertainment

Year

Total

(i)

Minister

(ii)

Deputy Minister

(iii)

Officials of NDSD

2019/20

154 900

55 019

15 170

84 711

2020/21

85 782

18 073

5 430

62 279

2021/22

76 727

11 594

14 945

50 188

 TOTAL

317 409

84 686

35 545

197 178

(c) Accommodation

Year

Total

(i)

Minister

(ii)

Deputy Minister

(iii)

Officials of NDSD

2019/20

28 212 901

616 029

1 716 252

25 880 620

2020/21

7 364 301

381 849

1 849 220

5 133 232

2021/22

18 731 457

1 039 023

2 529 654

15 162 780

 TOTAL

54 308 659

2 036 901

6 095 126

46 176 632

16 May 2022 - NW1359

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the current total number of persons who are beneficiaries of the Government’s social welfare grants and (b) is the (i) age, (ii) gender and/or (iii) race of each specified person?

Reply:

a) The total number of beneficiaries (that is people who actually received the social grants) as at March 2022 is 12 787 866.

The number of children benefitting from the grants is 13 610 113.

(i) and (ii) The age and gender split for the 12 787 866 social grant beneficiaries is indicated in the table below:

(iii) SASSA does not collect information along racial lines.

16 May 2022 - NW1452

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the fact that once a child turns 18, they no longer qualify for a child support grant and a foster care grant, unless they are still enrolled in schooling, what total number of children (a) who previously received the grants have exited the system due to reaching the age limit in the period 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2021 in each province and (b) are expected to exit the child support grant and the foster care system in 2022 in each province?

Reply:

a) The tables below provide the detail of foster child and child support grants which were lapsed as the child turned 18 years of age for the calendar years from 2017 to 2021. It should be noted that the child support grants lapse at the end of the month in which the child turns 18, while the foster child grant lapses at the end of the year in which the child turns 18 years. The number of foster child grants has excluded the numbers of foster children who returned to the system, as they are still in an educational institution.

b) The table below indicates the projected number of both child support grants and foster child grants which will lapse in 2022.

16 May 2022 - NW1427

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, in light of the fact that baby savers and safe anonymous abandonment of babies are illegal in the Republic, she intends having haven laws promulgated in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) how does the absence of laws regarding havens affect the children’s right to life?

Reply:

(1) The current legislative regime does not provide for the matter in question. There is no legal provision for baby savers The Department’s policy position does not support this option because are sufficient measures in place to mitigate abandoned of children. Temporary safe care is one of such measures in place that is regulated in terms of the Children’s Act (Act No. 38 of 2005).

Furthermore, as already indicated, child abandonment is a criminal offence as it puts the lives of children in danger if such children are not safely left with relatives or even given up for adoption. The spirit of the Children’s Act is to care and protect the child whilst upholding the child’s best interests. Abandonment of children already has long term negative impact on the child whether abandoned safely or not. Therefore, abandonment of children as in all categories of abuse, neglect and exploitation of children remains a criminal offence.

(2) The absence of laws regarding havens does not affect the children’s right to life whatsoever. Right to life should come naturally and in a legal way and not be forced by breaking existing laws to have it fulfilled. In fact, the systems and processes referred to in paragraph 1, such as offering a child for adoption are more protective of the right to life than havens do.

16 May 2022 - NW1738

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What assistance is the Department of Home Affairs giving to undocumented orphans in the North West province especially in (a) Maquassi Hills and (b) the Moses Kotane Local Municipality?

Reply:

Please note that PQ 1738 has been misdirected and should be transferred to the Department of Home Affairs instead, as it does not fall within our mandate.

16 May 2022 - NW1608

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the finding of the Office of the Auditor-General that at least 5 812 public servants fraudulently applied for and received the R350 Social Relief of Distress Grant, what (a) informed the decision to investigate only 242 of the implicated public servants, (b) is the current status of the specified investigations and (c) date will the investigations be concluded; (2) Whether her department is providing updates to Department of Public Service and Administration on the progress of the investigations and their outcomes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1934E

Reply:

1 (a) A multi stakeholder forum comprising of the South African Police Service (SAPS), National Prosecution Authority (NPA), Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) and the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) Discipline Management Unit is meeting under the auspices of the Fusion Centre with the intention of investigating the 5812 cases involving public servants who benefited from Covid -19 Social Relief of Distress grant. A directive was issued at Fusion Centre that a sample of 242 civil servants be dealt with in order to learn from it through identification of challenges and their resolution.

1(b) The investigation of the 242 sample found the following:

  • Investigation revealed that 44 civil servants qualified to receive SRD grant as they were employed on sessional basis resulting in 198 civil servants to be taken for disciplinary and criminal action.
  • Of the 198 civil servants, DPSA advised that 44 were no longer in the employ of government resulting in 154 disciplinary files being handed over to DPSA for the coordination and monitoring of the disciplinary hearings with Departments at Provincial and National level.
  • Internal investigations involving 198 civil servants were concluded and opening of individual cases is in progress. The processes of opening of 198 cases is scheduled to be concluded by the 10th May 2022.
  • For the purposes of loss recovery from government employees who refuse to sign acknowledgement of debt forms, Section 300 of the Criminal Procedure Act, will be invoked.

1(c) regarding the 5812 civil servants - SASSA intends to finalise the following two processes on or before the 31st September 2022:

  • Handing over files to DPSA for the purpose of disciplinary hearing coordination with affected National and Provincial Departments, and
  • Opening criminal cases within various Provinces.

(2) There is an ongoing working partnership between SASSA and DPSA which has culminated in:

  • the identification of the 242 civil servants, 44 civil servants qualified as they were sessional employees, resulting to 198 civil servants being under investigation.
  • of the 198 civil servants it was further established that 44 civil servant were no longer in the employ of government resulting in 154 civil servants disciplinary files being handed over to DPSA for the coordination and monitoring of the disciplinary hearing processes with Departments at Provincial and National level.

On 21st April 2022 SASSA was invited by the DPSA to attend an event wherein 154 files were handed over to National and Provincial Departments for the commencement of the disciplinary hearing processes.

16 May 2022 - NW1039

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the President of the Republic

What factors (a) did he take into account in his decision to appoint Justice Raymond Zondo as the new Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court and (b) led him to ignore the recommendation of the Judicial Service Commission to appoint the Judge President of the Supreme Court of Appeal, Justice Mandisa Maya?

Reply:

The Constitution sets out the role of the Chief Justice. Section 165(6) indicates that the Chief Justice is the head of the judiciary and exercises responsibility over the establishment and monitoring of norms and standards for the exercise of the judicial functions of all courts. He or she also heads the Constitutional Court, our apex court.

Section 174(1) of the Constitution requires that persons appointed as judicial officers be fit and proper persons, and that those appointed to the Constitutional Court must also be South African citizens. Section 174(2) further requires that the judiciary must reflect broadly the racial and gender composition of South Africa and that this must be considered when judicial officers are appointed.

These are among the factors that were relevant to my choice of who should be the next Chief Justice.

In addition, I considered the great value in ensuring continuity and certainty in the leadership of the judiciary, and the important role the judiciary plays in ensuring trust and faith in state institutions.

I had the benefit of the inputs of all political parties represented in Parliament, and the contents and outcomes of the interviews conducted by the Judicial Service Commission, who were consulted as required by the Constitution. The Constitution does not give primacy to any of those entities and persons that I am enjoined to consult.

I exercised my Constitutionally granted discretion, taking into account all factors, in coming to the determination that Justice Raymond Zondo is the best person to be our next Chief Justice.

16 May 2022 - NW1603

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of illegal foreign children who are currently in South African schools in terms of section 39 and 42 of the Immigration Act, Act 13 of 2002?

Reply:

Please note that PQ 1603 has been misdirected and should be transferred to the Department of Basic Education instead, as it does not fall within our mandate.

16 May 2022 - NW1601

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the fact that a person may only be 18 years old before they can relinquish their parental right, therefore enabling such a person’s child to be adopted, what assistance is there then for teen mothers who don't want their babies and/or are unable to care for them?

Reply:

Teen mothers who do not want their babies and / or are unable to care for them are assisted by providing them with the necessary support services and intensive counselling, where information on all the options available are explored with them, including taking care for their babies as a priority, with availability of resources such as social grants and family support system to assist them. Other options to consider is kinship care, foster care and adoption. Option counselling is provided to these teen mothers, to assist them to make an informed decision on what will be in their best interest and more particularly the best interest of their babies.

If adoption is opted for, adoption counselling is provided to the teen mothers. The Children’s Act 38 of 2005 in section 233 indicates that a child may be adopted only if consent for adoption has been given by each parent of the child and counselling must be provided before consent to the adoption is granted. Therefore, counselling assists teen mothers to understand what adoption is, its legal implications

including the right of the biological father of the child to consent for the adoption of the child. If adoption is finally being considered, teen mothers are well prepared about the process of signing of consent for adoption of their babies at the Children’s Court, where they are informed about the implications thereof and the 60 days period if they wish to withdraw their consent for adoption.

The Children’s Act in section 233 further provides that if the parent is a child, that parent has to be assisted by his or her guardian. Hence, teen mothers’ parents or guardians must be involved if possible in the counselling and when consent to the adoption is signed at Court. This allows the parents or guardians to support their children to ensure that they are making informed choices and understand the consequences of signing consent to the adoption of their babies. This ensures that teen mothers have the support system that would go beyond giving their babies up for adoption.

Support services are further provided to teen mothers after signing of consent to assist them to deal and cope with the reality of giving up their children for adoption and are referred to appropriate resources or other professionals to assist them, where necessary.

16 May 2022 - NW1454

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, based on the Statistics South Africa mid-year population estimates that provinces such as Gauteng and Western Cape have the highest provincial in-migration numbers, while provinces such as Eastern Cape, Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal have the highest provincial out-migration numbers (details furnished), the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) intends to (a) establish more SASSA offices and (b) increase staff capacity within the Western Cape in order to keep up with increased demand; if not, why not; if so, what the relevant details; (2) whether SASSA intends to reinstate the regular usage of community halls and civic centres within the Western Cape to service its clients; if not, why not; if so, what other interventions have SASSA actioned to address challenges brought about by increased provincial migration with regard to the improved service delivery for existing clients as well as access for new clients?

Reply:

1(a) In the Western Cape, SASSA is busy with a process to establish 4 additional offices. Procurement Instructions have been issued to the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) for the establishment of these offices, which are two (2) in Khayelitsha and two (2) in Gugulethu. These areas have been prioritised as a result of the high number of applicants in these areas. To date NDPW has signed one (1) lease for an office in Khayelitsha. The lessor will be constructing a new building for SASSA. The other 3 sites received non-responsive bids and NDPW will have to go out on tender for these areas specifically once again.

(b) The staff establishment will be reconsidered, once the outcome of the Business Process Re-Engineering exercise (BPR), which is underway is concluded. The exercise was to consider the current organisational structure and review staff capacity in order to ensure that SASSA can deliver on its mandate. However, it should be borne in mind that government is on a drive to contain the structure and not to grow it. This has been one of the considerations in the decision to automate many of the processes for grant applications and reviews. The automation should reduce the need for people to report in person at SASSA offices, but to ensure that the face to face channel is available for those who do not have access to the internet for online processes, or otherwise require the interaction with a staff member.

2. The Region is in the process of securing funding for opening of 102 sites linked to community halls and civic centres. The procurement process will be initiated once the funding has been sourced.

13 May 2022 - NW1470

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a)(i) On what date was a full inspection in respect of the structural integrity of the bulk water supply pipeline between Welbedacht Dam and the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality done and (ii) what were the findings and (b) what are the details of a proactive maintenance plan in respect of the pipeline in order to prevent and/or limit pipe bursts and emergency repairs?

Reply:

a)  (i) The full Hydraulic assessment of the Pipeline from Welbedacht to Bloemfontein was conducted in February 2011 and a further assessment was conducted in October 2019 at one trajectory (Dehoek to Uitkyk) after a pipe failure occurred on that part of the pipeline.

(ii) The findings on the 2011 report indicated that:

  • there were infrastructure components that required refurbishment,
  • There were leaks on the pipeline which had to be addressed via the Bloem Water’s winter preventative maintenance shutdowns.

b) Since the inspections were conducted, Bloem Water has done the following as part of a proactive maintenance plan:

  • Established a Pipeline Reaction Team in 2015
  • Reworked its Preventative Maintenance Strategy
  • Established its inhouse pipeline manufacturing workshop which assists with pipeline components and quick turnaround time of maintenance work on the main pipeline

These measures have assisted Bloem Water to reduce real water losses on its strategic infrastructure to less than 13% for the past 8 financial years. Furthermore, three years has passed since the last pipe burst on this 48-year-old pipeline.

In addition, Bloem Water is currently implementing the construction project of a mitigating parallel line which is 33.7km long as phase 1. This pipeline will be in operation by July 2022 and will further preserve the status of reliable uninterrupted bulk water supply to the Mangaung Metro Municipality. The new pipeline will replace the problematic portion of the mainline which frequently experience pipe bursts. Phase 2 of the remaining 72km is currently under planning. This pipeline will replace the old line from Welbedacht Dam to Bloemfontein, once completed.

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13 May 2022 - NW894

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his Office (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

There were no incidents of sexual harassment and/or sexual assault cases reported in the past three financial years, and the status quo remains since 1 April 2021 to date in my office.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW1469

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What total number of (a)(i) water engineers and (ii) structural engineers is provided for on the organogram of Bloem Water and (b) the specified positions for water and structural engineers were vacant on 28 February 2022?

Reply:

(a) (i) The organogram makes provision for 73 water engineers and (ii) 34 structural engineers.

(b) Vacancies as of 28 February 2022

  • Process controllers: 13
  • Electrical Artisan: 1
  • Mechanical Artisan: 1

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13 May 2022 - NW1614

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to her department’s press release of 25 February 2022, (a) what is meant by the term species fees and (b) who receives the species fees (2) what is the breakdown of the income generated from species fees totaling approximately R1,1 billion, broken down by (a) species and (b) recipients of such fees?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

13 May 2022 - NW1457

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the South Rand Hospital in (a) each of the past three financial years and (b) the current financial year, what was the (i) allocated budget and expenditure, (ii) average expenditure in each month for water, electricity, security and security services, food and catering services, maintenance and upgrades, cleaning services, medication, consumables and disposables and (iii)(aa) maximum bed capacity and (bb) average bed occupancy in each month; (2) what is the (a) staff complement currently in each department of the hospital and (b) total number of posts that are unfilled currently in each department?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is consulting with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health to source the relevant details in this regard. The Gauteng Provincial Department has been requested to provide the Ministry with the required information to enable the Minister to provide the response to the Honourable Member’s question. The response will be submitted as soon as information has been obtained from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health.

END.

13 May 2022 - NW866

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister in The Presidency

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her Office since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Description

Deputy Minister

Office of the Deputy Minister

Total

a. Catering

0

58,292.60

58,292.60

b. Entertainment

0

0

0

c. Accomodation

250, 570.48

1,078,702.87

1,329,273.35

 TOTAL

250,570.48

1,136,995.47

1,387,565.95

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW1615

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment:

with reference to her department’s press release of 25 February 2022, (a) how was the figure of 418 000 per persons employed by the biodiversity economy in 2019 arrived at and (b) what (i) is the breakdown of the figure in terms of the relevant economic categories and (ii) number of the persons were employed directly in the hunting sector?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

13 May 2022 - NW1616

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of police vehicles are (a) allocated to the SA Police Service station situated in Lwandle in the Helderberg in Cape Town, currently operational and (c0 awaiting service and/or repairs (2) whether the police station has the optimum number of vehicles; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

13 May 2022 - NW1458

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) On what date was the tender for the beautification and maintenance of the gardens surrounding the Booysens Magistrates Court issued, (b) on what date did the tender close, (c) what total number of bidders responded to the tender, (d) which bidder won the tender, (e) what is the duration of the tender, (f) what is the value of the tender, (g) what are the payment conditions for the tender, (h) on what date did the successful bidder officially commence with work, (i) what are the terms, conditions and minimum standards for this tender and (j) how are the terms, conditions and minimum standards monitored for compliance?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I have been informed by the Department that the tender in question was not processed by the DPWI and as such, the department is not in a position to respond to the specific questions asked. The tender was processed by the Department of Justice.

13 May 2022 - NW1720

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of employees in the logistics industry are registered with the (a) Unemployment Insurance Fund and (b) Compensation Fund?

Reply:

\a) In terms of the categories in the UIF Database, there is no specific category for logistics industry. The Logistics industry appear under various sectors within the Database and the exact number cannot be identified which might result in inaccurate information, hence the number of employees under logistic cannot be provided.

b) The Compensation Fund registers employers and not employees; and respectively receives claims for employees as registered and submitted by their employers. With regards to the respective industry; there are 61 103 employers registered with the Compensation Fund within the sub-class category for the logistics industry.

13 May 2022 - NW1537

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment:

What system is in place, by which reports of the SA Weather Service which monitors possible severe weather conditions, are relayed to her department and taken to Cabinet to inform it to be on high alrt and act accordingly?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

13 May 2022 - NW1407

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

How will the wastewater challenge be funded which, according to the 2022 Green Drop Report, requires an amount of R8 billion in order to clean up the stinking sewage and wastewater crisis in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation uses the Green Drop Report as a performance baseline for the municipal wastewater fraternity to inform appropriate regulatory intervention with the objective to facilitate improvement. This is included in the Department’s Water Services Improvement Programme which includes sustainable intervention with the objective of ensuring a turnaround in the perfromance of the Municipal Water Services Sector.

The Green Drop Performance trends will be used to determine repetitive poor performance, to inform a more drastic approach to ensure a turn-around. This could include facilitating long-term intervention by either a capacitated water board or any other suitable mode of sanitation services support.

The results of the Green Drop Report dictates that wastewater services be a primary focus area of the government in targetted areas. Therefore, national government will ensure that grant funding allocated to the water sector is allocated with the objective of restoring the functionality of exisiting wastewater infrastructure according to the findings of this report.

The determination of the “Very Rough Order of Estimates” (VROOM), which informed the amount referenced in your question, was done to give an estimation of the capital requirement for the functionality restoration drive. This will be effected with the support of National Treasury.

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13 May 2022 - NW1643

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, the appointment of Mr. Alec Moemi as the new Acting Director-General of her department is on a fixed-term contract; if not, what position will the specified person assume when the acting position is no longer available; if so, (a) what is the term for acting, (b) was the specified position advertised and/or was the person headhunted from the person’s previous position, (c) what processes were followed to appoint the person and (d) what are the reasons that the appointment of an Acting Director-General was not made internally; (2) Whether the specified person is (a) being paid the same salary as Adv. Vukela while the latter is suspended and (b) appointed with the intention for the person to take up the position of Director General, should the latter be found guilty in his disciplinary proceedings and dismissed as a result; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? W1970E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) No, Dr. A. Moemi is appointed as an Acting Director-General for a period of six (6) months in accordance with Section 32 (2) (a) and (b) (ii) of the Public Service Act 30 of 2007 as amended read with Regulation 63 sub regulation (2) and (3) of the Public Service Regulations 2016. In the event that his appointment as the Acting Director-General is not extended beyond the six months, then Dr Moemi will assume his position as the Head of the Property Management Trading Entity,

(a) The term for acting is six (6) months, renewable.

(b) The position was not advertised, however

(c) Dr Moemi is appointed on contract additional to the establishment for a period of 12 months in accordance with Regulation 57 sub regulation (2) to (6) of the Public Service Regulations 2016.

(d) Dr Moemi is an employee of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, appointed on contract additional to the establishment, hence he was considered for appointment as Acting Director-General.

(2)

(a) The difference between the salary of Dr Moemi and Adv. Vukela is R155 217.00.

(b) No, Dr. Moemi is appointed in the Department as Head of the PMTE and requested to act due to his extensive experience as a Director-General. It is further due to a need to strengthen the GRC Branch with the return of DDG Imtiaz Fazel to his original post. Lastly, it will be premature to plan on the possible outcome of the disciplinary proceeding of Adv. Vukela because that process is handled by an independent chairperson and the outcome cannot be predetermined.

13 May 2022 - NW1556

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that the much talked about academic hospital has not yet been built in Limpopo despite many promises in the past two years that construction would have started by this time?

Reply:

The size and complexity of a project like Limpopo Central Hospital (LCH) requires a consolidated and concerted effort between various role players to eliminate risk and to keep the project on track, so that it can ultimately benefit the community and students it serves. Due to the impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic, the envisaged consultative processes for the LCH could not be undertaken between the relevant stakeholders due to the lockdown, lack of access to engagements with design consultants and the various Departmental Stakeholders. The consultative processes were thus delayed in finalising Stage Gate 3.

The project is however, currently in Stage 4: Design Documentation. The National Department of Health (NDoH) requested a Gateway Review process in line with the Framework for Infrastructure Delivery and Procurement Management (FIDPM) in December 2021 for this stage gate deliverables. The reviewal of Stage 4.1 was not a mandatory process but done to reduce the risk associated with the project during construction and eliminate any unforeseen costs. The objective of the review process was to ensure that the project delivers value for money, that any design related issues are appropriately addressed and that the overall project structure and governance is sound to take the project through construction. The Gateway review process have been concluded and the project is expected to go out on tender on approval of the Stage Gate 4 deliverables. The construction process is set to start in Q3 of this financial year.

END.

13 May 2022 - NW1468

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

On which dates during the past 24 months did the National Efficiency Enhancement Committees and each of the Provincial Efficiency Enhancement Committees meet?

Reply:

DRAFT REPLY

The National Efficiency Enhancement Committee (NEEC) and the Provincial Efficiency Enhancement Committees (PEEC) are judicial governance stakeholder forums which are chaired by the Chief Justice and the Judges President of the Divisions of the High Court respectively. The request for information as contained in the question by the Honourable member has been referred to the Chief Justice for consideration.

13 May 2022 - NW1349

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) is the full list of financial institutions that have issued (i) long-term loans, such as bonds and (ii) short-term loans, such as Treasury bills to the Government and (b) are the (i) names of (aa) the market participants and (bb) their clients, (ii) interest rates, (iii) term(s) of each loan and (iv) total amounts borrowed in each case?

Reply:

Treasury Bills (t-bills) are held by every commercial bank in the country that holds a banking license since they form part of the High-Quality Liquid Assets (HQLA) which are required by the Prudential Authority. These assets allow banks to meet their short-term liquidity requirements and can be used as collateral for central bank operations, as well as benchmarking for pricing financial assets. The same banks may hold both t-bills and bonds on behalf of clients in their stockbroking or wealth management units in both discretionary, non-discretionary and segregated income portfolios. For the latter reason, it would be near impossible for the National Treasury (NT) to determine what rate investors bought the bonds at and who the clients are.

Long term loans are bought by the nine primary dealers in the primary market on behalf of insurers, asset managers and hedge funds on a weekly basis. Furthermore, these bonds are then traded in the secondary market where they are bought and sold by different entities. The nine primary dealers are:

  1. ABSA
  2. HSBC
  3. NEDBANK
  4. CITIBANK
  5. STANDARD BANK
  6. INVESTEC BANK
  7. DEUTSCHE BANK
  8. RMB
  9. JP MORGAN

To qualify as a primary dealer, applying banks are required to comply with capital adequacy requirements per the banks act as well as additional NT requirements. These banks would buy these bonds at different rates on a weekly basis and distribute these bonds for a turn in the secondary markets both on exchange and over the counter which also impacts the rates at which the bonds trade. The interest rates and amounts at which the bonds are auctioned in the primary market are available on the NT website on a weekly basis however, the amount that each bank buys in the auction is not public information since this information is sensitive for the ongoing auction process. There are no terms associated with each bond purchase except the obligation to pay the interest rate and principal when it is due on NT’s part.

The ultimate holders of the bonds can categorized as follows:

1. Monetary Institutions

        (a) Banks

        (b) SARB

2. Insurers

(a) Long Term Insurers

(b) Short Term Insurers

3. Pension Funds

(a) PIC

(b) Private self-administered pension funds

(c) Official Pension Funds

4. Other Financial Institutions

(a) Unit Trusts

(b) Participation Mortgage bond schemes

(c) Financial Public enterprises

The details of the ultimate holders are not recorded by the NT since the NT’s purview is the primary market. It is in the secondary market where these bonds bought and sold by various institutions. The JSE, Strate and the institutions themselves would be best placed to provide details in terms of the quantity of bonds they hold since they transact both on and off-exchange. Market data systems like Bloomberg, Reuters would also provide details for the reported market.

It is worth remembering is that these institutions would themselves be holding these bonds on behalf of individual investors or policy holders who cannot be legally disclosed as per FICA and POPIA act. The holdings change regularly owing to the needs of each category of holder. For example, insurers would buy long term debt to meet long term obligations however they may need to liquidate short- and medium-term bond holdings if claims rose suddenly. Pensions funds would rebalance their portfolios regularly based on the investment mandate of their portfolios and whether or not they are managing an external portfolio. For this reason and many others, it is impractical for NT to quantify how much each institutional holder owns at a point in time or what interest rate they are receiving since they would hold bonds along the yield curve.

Institutions also frequently engage in interest rate swaps to manage their risk which would transfer those rates to other entities. Retail bonds are held by individual investors whose names cannot be disclosed. Retail bond interest rates are available on the retail bonds website along with the terms and conditions of each retail bond.


The National Treasury publishes monthly detailed information on outstanding bonds, redemption dates, redemption amounts, and coupon rates can be found on the National Treasury's investor website. The same details can be found in the SARB’s quartely bulletin.

http://investor.treasury.gov.za/pages/default.aspx

Table 7.5 of the 2022 Budget Review reflects the international financing institution borrowings. The table provides information on the institution, disbursement date, interest rate, terms (years), grace period (years), and amount (billion). From the table, the borrowing has only been long-term in nature, with no short-term loans being entered into.

13 May 2022 - NW1715

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he has taken any steps with regard to the issue of the Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE) in Port Elizabeth and East London, that are in dire financial constraints due to lack of support from his department and the other spheres of government; if not, why not; if so, (a)(i) on what date and (ii) how will his department intervene as people with disabilities are the target group of the SEEs and (b) how does his department intend to (i) sustain the SEEs and (ii) increase employment opportunities for persons with disabilities?

Reply:

Both Gqeberha and East London factories are part of Supported Employment Enterprise’s network of 13 factories located across 8 of the 9 provinces of the country. All these factories receive a proportional share of the budget from the annual transfer of R160 from National Treasury via the Department of Employment and Labour Program 3, Public Employment Services and is also expected to generate revenue through manufacturing and sale of goods and services within its portfolio of textile, wood and steel.

1(a)(i) The steps taken to improve the financial positions of these entities include the following:

  • During the financial year 2021/22, we embarked on a rigorous campaign within government to persuade Treasury to reconsider current procurement regulations that require the entity to compete for government contracts just like most businesses in the open labour market that have the flexibility to source other cheaper international inputs, whilst SEE entities are restricted to follow normal supply chain regulations and processes. We look forward to the introduction of the New Preferential Procurement regulations that are going to protect SEE and other similar organisations, Youth, Women, SMMEs and other Vulnerable Groups suppliers.
  • We have applied to the National Treasury to grant exemptions in procurement of bulk materials and conclusion of supply of materials for three year contracts and these were granted to protect them from fluctuating raw material prices.
  • We have submitted budget bids to Treasury to increase the SEE allocation to fund the maintenance of its decaying infrastructure without success and we hope that with the improvement in the country’s economic conditions, the Treasury will assist us to renovate these factories.

(ii) We have taken a conscious decision to encourage all our Labour centres and entities that form part of the Department of Employment and Labour to procure their furniture and textile needs from SEEs

  • We have approached Treasury over the years to grant approval for veriment of under expenditure to SEE to bail them out in improving staff and factory worker’s salaries and other conditions of employment, their Information Technology and Communication systems and financial management.
  • We have seconded staff where vacancies arose in key strategic positions to maintain their operations

(b)(i) As part of our strategy to sustain SEEs,

- we have encouraged staff to diversify production and produce goods that are directed at members of the public as a new market.

- The Director General approved the New SEE marketing strategy that include targeted approaches to Provincial, District and local municipalities.

- We have proposed SEE governance and administration changes in the current Employment Services Amendment Bill that is undergoing public consultation process.

(ii) It is our view that if all the above measures are supported and successfully implemented, they will assist us to increase the intake of more people with disabilities from 1350 to over 4000 as these factories have the necessary capacity to accommodate additional numbers. We will also reconsider our expansion plans to open another factory in Mpumalanga and our footprint elsewhere where there is an uptake of their goods and services.

We will also use the provisions of the Employment Equity to persuade companies to recruit some of the SEE employees into formal establishment as part of their integration into the formal economy and to generally improve their standard of living.

Since SEE operates under the auspices of the Department of Employment and Labour, the Department is leading the efforts to encourage other Departments to use government’s purchasing power to execute employment equity, which stipulates that at least 2% of the total workforce must be from the designated group of persons with disabilities, as for SEE this kind of support becomes indispensable as the entity employs 100% persons with disabilities in all their factory operations.

13 May 2022 - NW1577

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment:

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation Since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

13 May 2022 - NW1516

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Given that post-use technology product are currently reported as being the fastest accumulation of waste products in the world, what are the full, relevant details of current intervention in place to recycle electronic waste, as well as interventions currently being discussed, to thereby also created a circular economy; (2) whether her department has collaborated with any other department to promote and/or facilitate e-waste recycling; if not, why not, if so what are the full, relevant details of her department’s collaboration with other department

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

13 May 2022 - NW1471

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, in light of the Architectural Profession Act, Act 44 of 2000, which provides for the establishment of a juristic person to be known as the South African Council for the Architectural Profession (SACAP), in terms of which the Council consists of members appointed by the Minister and taking into account the principles of transparency and accountability (details furnished), she will furnish Mrs M B Hicklin with the (a) list of the SACAP Board members as they currently stand and (b) breakdown in their capacities as detailed by the prescripts of the specified Act; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) and (b) I have been informed that the list and breakdown of the capacities of the Council members of the SACAP is as follows:

  1. Mr Charles Ntsindiso Nduku (Professional Architect): President of the Council, member of the Transformation Committee and Recognition of Prior Learning Committee.
  2. Ms Letsabisa Shongwe (Professional Architect): Vice President of the Council; Chairperson of the Professional Fees Committee; Chairperson of Stakeholder Relations Committee and Vice Chairperson of the Transformation Committee.
  3. Ms Mandisa Pepeta Daki (Professional Architectural Technologist): Council member, Chairperson of the Investigating Committee and Transformation Committee and Vice Chairperson of the Stakeholder Relations Committee and member of the Continuing Professional Development Committee.
  4. Mr Vusi Phailane (Professional Architect & State Representative): Council member, Chairperson of the Identification Committee and member of the Investigating Committee and Recognition of Prior Learning Committee.
  5. Mr Kevin Bingham (Professional Architect), Council member, Chairperson of the Education Committee and Recognition of Prior Learning Committee.
  6. Mr Mohammed Allie Mohidien (Professional Architectural Draughtperson), Council member, Chairperson of Registration Committee and member of the Identification of Work Committee and Recognition of Prior Learning Committee.
  7. Mr Lufuno Motsherane (Public representative), Council member, Chairperson of the REMCO, member of the Audit & Risk Committee and Investigating Committee.
  8. Dr Sitsabo Dlamini (Professional Senior Architectural Technologist): Council member and Chairperson of the Continuing Professional Development Committee and member of the Recognition of Prior Learning Committee.
  9. Mr Nick Nichols (Public Representative): Council member, member of the REMCO and Audit & Risk Committee.

13 May 2022 - NW1719

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to his reply to question 1066 on 1 April 2022, what (a) number of the 166 vacant positions of labour inspectors has been vacant for more than 4 months and (b) are the reasons that the positions have been vacant?

Reply:

a) 76 posts of the 166 posts have been vacant for more than 4 months.

b) The afore said 76 vacancies above 4 months are due to the following reasons:

(a) Grievances: candidates participating have the right to invoke grievance procedures for investigation if they are not satisfied with any element in the process of the recruitment, selection and appointment.

(b) Withdrawal of shortlisted candidate: this often leads to a prolonged time of recruitment and affects the DEL’s ability to complete the recruitment process on time.

(c) Re-advertisement: this would be done in instances where the interview process failed to obtain suitable candidate. In addition, there could have been failure to obtain suitable candidates during the shortlisting phase

(d) Inadequate HR capacity: IES depends on HRM to support the Branch with regards to Selection and Recruitment processes.

13 May 2022 - NW1538

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment:

Which programmes have been put in place by her department to ensure that the general public moves away from single-use plastic?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply