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24 August 2020 - NW303

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the report by the Office of the Auditor-General on 25 February 2020 to the Standing Committee on Public Accountsregarding a R1,1 billion loan from the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) to the Madibeng Local Municipality in the North West, what (a) are the details of the due diligence measures that the PIC took when considering the application to grant the loan, (b) was the purpose of the loan, (c) is the interest rate that will be paid on the loan and (d) are the loan repayment (i) dates and (ii) amounts, (2) whether the municipality will be able to meet all interest and capital repayments; (3) what are the details of all conditions attached to the loan; (4) what are the reasons given by the Madibeng Local Municipality for not repaying the loan and interest; (5) what are the details of the (a) court orders obtained by the PIC to force the specified municipality to pay the interest and capital amounts due to the PIC and (b) action taken by the National Treasury to ensure that the interest payments and capital repayment obligations are adhered to by the specified municipality?

Reply:

(1)(a) There are no details available of the due diligence measures that were taken at the time of the transaction. The transaction was concluded on 11 January 1994 by the then Public Investment Commissioners.

(1)(b) The purpose of the loan was to assist Madibeng Local Municipality (Madibeng) with the repayment of a number of short-term loans.

(1)(c) The current matter relates to the remaining three Coupon Certificates (others were settled), and their respective numbers are BR20, BR25 and BR26. The interest rate on BR20 was 13.29%; BR25 was 12.47% and BR26 was 12.47%. The PIC waived the respective interest rates and charged a flat interest rate of 10% in respect of each certificate.

(1)(d) The loan repayment dates and amounts are as follows:

  • BR20 – 30 November 2003 – R37 million
  • BR25 – 30 June 2003 – R83 million
  • BR26 – 30 November 2003 – R87 million

(2) Madibeng will be in a better position to reply to this question, however, they have and continue to make provision for this debt in their financial staments and have not pleaded that they will not be able to repay the PIC. The PIC also made an offer to the Municipality to effect the payment over a period of time, which they declined.

(3) Yield to maturity; final yield on redemption dates; repayment to be effected at par on the redemption date on each certificate.

(4) The reasons are all of a technical nature. Madibeng admitted that they have received the loan amounts and that they owe the money to the PIC. However, they first raised a technical point that they were not authorised to raise the loan and issue the certificates. When they lost on this point, they appealed to the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) where they lost the appeal as well. The matter was remitted to the Court of First Instance for hearing on the merits and the quantum. Madibeng raised another technical point that the debt has prescribed. They lost again and have once more appealed to the SCA . PIC is currently awaiting for a hearing date from the SCA.

(5)(a) The current Court Order, which Madibeng is appealing, is for payment of the sum of R162,639,962,00 plus interest at the reduced rate of 10% per annum. This is after taking into consideration the payments that Madibeng effected after summons was issued.

(5)(b) National Treasury will be in a better position to reply to this question.

24 August 2020 - NW216

Profile picture: Keetse, Mr PP

Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Finance

Did the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) invest in a company constructing student accommodation in Limpopo near the University of Venda; if so, what (a)(i) amount has the PIC invested in the company, (ii) is the name of the company and (iii) process was followed and (b) are the names of the directors of the company?

Reply:

The Public Investment Corporation did not invest in a company to construct student accommodation near the University of Venda. However, the PIC did invest in a company that has projects in Polokwane and near the University of Limpopo.

Rest of the question falls away.

24 August 2020 - NW1184

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What amount of funding did the National Treasury allocate to each province to support their responses to Covid-19?

Reply:

An initial payment to support provinces in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic was made at the end of the 2019/20 financial year (before the full magnitude of the pandemic and its impacts was known). Details of further allocations and reprioritisations for the COVID-19 response in the 2020/21 financial year will be published when the Minister of Finance tables a supplementary adjustment budget on 24 June 2020.

On 25 March 2020, National Treasury approved the release of the amounts shown in Table 1 to provinces from the 2019/20 allocation for the Provincial Disaster Relief Grant. These funds were transferred to provinces by the National Disaster Management Centre to fund the initial costs of purchasing additional personal protective equipment and other medical equipment needed by provincial health departments to respond to the pandemic.

Table 1: Provincial Disaster Relief Grant allocations, 2019/20

R'000

2019/20 allocations

Eastern Cape

44 551

Free State

12 429

Gauteng

115 996

KwaZulu-Natal

138 918

Limpopo

42 449

Mpumalanga

33 993

Northern Cape

6 224

North West

18 540

Western Cape

53 292

Total

466 392

24 August 2020 - NW853

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) number of companies and businesses in each province have made use of and/or benefited from the tax deferral measures announced on 23 April 2020 and (b) was the Rand value of the tax deferrals in each province?

Reply:

a) 8 957 taxpayers requested PAYE Tax Deferments thus far and 4 taxpayers requested deferrals of excise duties.

b) The rand value for the PAYE Tax Deferments is R334m.

Deferral for the payment of excise duties on alcoholic beverages and tobacco products

Excise duties on alcoholic beverages and tobacco products are payable by manufacturers and the liability for excise duty is assessed and collected on a Duty at Source (DAS) basis - i.e. as close as possible to the point of domestic manufacture when goods achieve their excisable character or the point of importation of similar excisable products.

The liability to account for excise duties and the payment thereof therefore rest with the manufacturer with payment periods following the end of the accounting month ranging from 30 to 130 days depending on the product and the period between the time of manufacture and final sale.

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the President declaring a national state of disaster and instituting a nation-wide lockdown with effect from Thursday, 26 March 2020. As a result, the sale of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products was first restricted and has since been prohibited.

In order tominimise cash flow difficulties for the manufacturers of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products, the revised Disaster Management Tax Relief Bill, 2020 proposes that the manufacturers in these industries continue to submit their excise duty accounts on time but that the payments due to SARS be deferred for a period of 90 days without incurring interest or penalties.

Manufacturers will qualify for such deferment provided they have no outstanding excise accounts or payments unless an arrangement has been made for such payments. The proposed deferral, as set out in the proposed amendments to Rule 19A.11 to the Customs and Excise Act No. 91 of 1964, will apply to payments due in the months of May and June and will be for a period of 90 days.

The table below provides the detail of tax deferral measures approved to date in this regard.

Table A: Tax deferral measures relating to the payment of excise duties on alcoholic beverages and tobacco products

Province

Taxpayers Approved

Amounts deferred

Gauteng

1

R546 000 000

KwaZulu Natal

1

R933 000 000

Western Cape

2

R1 073 659 864

24 August 2020 - NW397

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Finance

What remedial processes have been put in place to deal with the consecutive disclaimers in the (a) Bojanala Platinum District Municipality, (b) Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality, (c) Madibeng Local Municipality and (d) Mamusa Local Municipality in the North West?

Reply:

The Honourable Member to note that the National Treasury, in consultation with the Provincial Treasury, had provided support to three of the four municipalities, as required by the Municipal Finance Management Act. Support is provided to those municipalities that commit to implementing the reforms required to address the audit findings. The time required to address all of the institutional, governance, and administrative weaknesses go beyond one financial cycle.

Moreover, the full commitment of both the municipal council and its administration is required to address the negative audit findingsas the primarily responsibility and accountability resides with the municipality.

Therefore, the support included a reviewing and revision of support plans for the financial management grant programme, rendering of technical support through audit specialists, assistance in the development and reviews of audit action plans,capacity building of internal audit units, audit committees and municipal officials to address audit findings. Additional support was provided to review the draft annual financial statements, supporting audit files, correction of previous technical errors, assistance in responding to audit findings, and appropriate responses. The following details relate to the support provided to the municipalities mentioned above.

a) Bojanala Platinum District Municipality

The following support was provided:

  • Reviewed the post audit action plan and annual financial statements (AFS) preparation plan and schedule. 
  • Meetings with Management to discuss AFS preparation plan and adviceon audit preparation.
  • Reviewed interim financial statements.
  • Escalated initiatives for training to address irregular expenditure. 
  • Reviewed prior period error note on draft financial statements and submitted recommendations.
  • Advised training and capacitation of internal audit unit. 

b) Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality

Thefollowing support was provided:

  • Reviewed the post audit action plan and provided feedback to the municipality.
  • Advised the CFO and internal auditor on AFS readiness.
  • Reviewed and provided feedback on AFS preparation. 
  • Followed up on progress made in addressing common audit findings pertaining to roads and water services that had an impact on local municipalities in the district.
  • Supported the municipality at audit steering committee meeting with the Auditor-General  

c) Madibeng Local Municipality

The following support was provided:

  • Reviewed the post audit action plan and provided feedback to the municipality.
  • Attended audit steering committee meeting to render advice. 
  • Advised the municipality on tracking and maintaining records, and copies of documentation required for audit purposes.  

d) Mamusa Local Municipality

The National Treasury could not provide support to this municipality due to institutional instability which was referred to the province for further intervention.

In conclusion, the Honourable Member could request the Legislature to perform additional oversight, especially to all those municipalities that received a disclaimer or an adverse audit opinion, to ascertain progress made and consequence measures taken.

24 August 2020 - NW1118

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he has considered the parole application of a certain person (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what was the outcome of his consideration?

Reply:

Yes, the Minister has considered the offender’ profile for possible placement on parole wherein he approved that the profile of offender Nxumalo be submitted for reconsideration after 31 January 2022.

In the interim the offender will be subjected to the following interventions:

  • The offender to undergo insight orientated psychotherapy to deal with his anti-social personality disorder and loss of his mother;
  • A risk assessment by a non-treating psychologist to be conducted;
  • The offender to be encouraged to improve his vocational skills to assist him with prospects of obtaining employment once he is placed on parole.

END

24 August 2020 - NW536

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What number of critical posts will be filled within the National Treasury in the 2021-22 financial year, (b) which sections are seen as critical and (c) how will it enhance revenue increase to the fiscus?

Reply:

a) At the beginning of the 2020-21 financial year, National Treasury had 103 vacant positions from a staff establishment of 1076. The department is continuously recruiting for critical positions as and when approved by EXCO and replacement of new vacancies. The same process will apply in the 2021-22 financial year.

b) All the divisions within the National Treasury have identified critical posts that need to be filled.

c) National Treasury does not directly collect revenue from any taxes, as this is the responsibility of SARS. National Treasury proposes tax and other policies to generate revenue, as outlined in the annual Budget, and outlined in great detail in the Budget Review and subsequent tax legislation to give effect to the Budget. The actual administration and collection of revenue from taxes is the responsibility of SARS, which also reports to the Minister of Finance.

24 August 2020 - NW1229

Profile picture: Mey, Mr P

Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the names of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:

The National Department of Human Settlements purchased goods and/or services below the amount of R 500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic as indicated below:

Order number

(b)Transaction amount

(c)Service/or product

Deviation

DH-026965

R 8 000.00

Empty Plastic bottles

No

DH-026966

R 25 400.00

Hand Sanitizers

No

DH-026967

R 82 400.00

Cloth Face Masks

No

DH-026968

R 104 550.00

Covid -19 Tests

No

DH-026970

R 174 464.00

Deep cleaning and sanitizing of buildings( 240 JMS; 260 JMS and Struktura)

No.

DH-026980

R 78 000.00

Face Shields

No

DH-026982

R 8 250.00

Foot Operated Hand Sanitizer Stand

No

DH-027009

R 4 800.00

Hand Sanitizers

No

DH-027017

R 41 000.00

Hand Sanitizers

Construction gloves

Face Shields

Cloth Face masks

No

P No. 2420131

R 38 812.50

Hand Sanitizers

Sanitizer Dispensers

No

P No. 2420302

R 77 833.00

Nurses appointed to screen employees and visitors

Yes (only two quotations were received).

P No. 2419856

R 242 213.00

Disinfect the DHS buildings for Covid -19 and fumigation of pests.

No

P No. 2419679

R 31 500.00

Face masks and surgical gloves

No

P No. 2419632

R 1 998.00

Thermometers

No

P No. 2419632

R 2 940.70

Surgical masks 3 ply

No

P No. 2419393

R 1935.00

Disinfecting wipes

No

P No. 2419393

R 1 527.60

Sterile gloves

No

P No. 2419393

R 2 491.95

Hand sanitizers

No

P No. 2419393

R 1 981.20

Hand sanitizers and wipes

No

(2)

(a) Yes, there was a deviation concerning the procurement of nursing services as shown in the table above. 

(b) There were no service providers/agencies registered in the National Treasury Central Supplier Database for the supply of nursing services. The Department of Human Settlements identified three agencies, (i.e. Mab Agency; Mednurse and Medwell). Requests for quotations were sent to the three agencies, but only two (Med nurse and Medwell) responded. A deviation was thus approved for procurement to be done based on two quotations.

(3) Goods and services were purchased from service providers with the lowest acceptable quotes. In instances where the value of goods procured was below R 2000.00, petty cash was used and therefore no requests for quotations were sent out. This practice is in line with the Supply Chain Management prescripts.

(4) My Department is available to brief the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation.

DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) purchased personal protective equipment (PPE). The information relating to expenditure on PPE and other measures to combat the spread of Covid-19 and the suppliers where the PPE were procured from is attached as Annexure A. In addition, the various suppliers used are on the Central Supplier Database.  

(2) No, the DWS did not deviate from the standard Supply Chain Management procedures.  

(3) The reasons for procuring the goods from specific companies was to enable the department to combat the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic through:

  • Provision of PPE to employees
  • Facilitating the screening of employees at the Head office and Regional Offices
  • Disinfection of Office buildings (including Fumigation, Deep Cleaning and Fogging of offices)   

(4) My Department is available to brief the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation.

24 August 2020 - NW635

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will intervene to ensure that the borehole which was constructed in Nyanyukani in the Mopani District Municipality, which does not have electricity due to non-payment of electricity to Eskom, is reconnected; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I have been informed that challenges relating to the borehole in Nyanyukani B have been resolved. This was confirmed after a site visit was undertaken by staff of the Department’s Regional Office in Limpopo on 11 May 2020 to the area.

The borehole in Nyanyukani B was initially connected to the community (household) electricity supply. ESKOM resolved that the borehole should have its connection where a transformer was to be installed. The Mopani District Municipality (DM) found the costs of installing transformers to all boreholes to be unaffordable and the borehole was legalized by Eskom without having a transformer.

In 2019 Eskom disconnected all boreholes in the Mopani District without transformers as they were considered to be illegally connected. The Mopani DM submitted a new electricity application for the borehole in 2019.

Upon consultation with the Mopani DM, the Department of Water and Sanitation was informed that the electricity supply to the borehole in Nyanyukani B had been restored and the borehole was back in operation.

24 August 2020 - NW1290

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)In light of the judgment of the Eastern Cape High Court in the case of Blue Nightingale Trading 397 (Pty) Ltd t/a Siyenza Group v Amathole District Municipality (ECD 1681/15) on the proper interpretation of section 110 of the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA), Act 56 of 2003, read together with Regulation 32 of the MFMA: Supply Chain Management Regulations, what measures has he taken, alone or in collaboration with other Ministers, to ensure that municipalities and organs of State doing business with municipalities, comply with the specified provisions when purporting to procure goods and services under a contract secured by another organ of State; (2) whether he has been informed of any contracts concluded under these provisions afterthe Blue Nightingale judgment, that did not or do not rely on the MFMA section 110 as well as Regulation 32 of the MFMA; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. It is important to highlight that there was no relief sought against the Minister of Finance or that a finding was made against the Minister of Finance or the Regulations as administered by the Minister of Finance. After the Blue Nightingale judgement, two similar judgements were made against KwaDukuza and Mamusa Municipalities. National Treasury assessed the application of Regulation 32 by various municipalities and deemed it necessary to issue a Circular to elaborate on the principles captured in regulation 32. The Circular is available on the National Treasury website as Circular No.96 under MFMA Circulars. The Circular considered the principles in the Blue Nightingale and KwaDukuza judgements.

2. In terms of Circular No. 96, the accounting officer of the participating municipality or municipal entity must utilise the process of reporting as contained in SCM regulation 6, to also include any procurement through SCM regulation 32. The treasuries may request further information in terms of section 74 of the MFMA. The participating accounting officer must also publish the details of the participation contract award on the municipality or municipal entity’s official website in line with section 75 of the MFMA. Therefore, this information is in the public domain, however, there is no specific obligation placed on the municipality or municipal entity to report to the National Treasury or the Minister of Finance with regards to these provisions.

24 August 2020 - NW1346

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What total amount of the announced Covid-19 R 200 billion government-secured loan scheme has thus far been deployed by banks; (2) whether he has found the pace of the lending to be satisfactory; if not, (3) whether any design modifications are being considered to encourage banks to deploy the scheme; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what modifications are being considered?

Reply:

1. The latest information provided to the National Treasury by the Banking Association of South Africa (BASA) is that, as at 25 July 2020, participating South African banks have provided a cumulative R44.85 billionin total financial relief and loan guaranteesto South African businesses and individuals who are financially distressed due to the Covid-19 pandemic and national lockdown. This includes R12,79 billion in loans extended under the Covid-19 Loan Guarantee Scheme. The balance is non-guaranteed financial relief that banks have voluntarily offered to their customers, including R19,18 billionto individuals and R12,88 billion to commercial and small and medium enterprises.

2. The initial update of the Covid-19 Loan Guarantee Scheme appeared to be slow, however it should be seen within the context of the initial relief granted by the banks (debt restructuring, repayment holidays and similar relief) before the credit guarantee scheme took effect.

3. Yes, the modifications have been considered and effected on 27 July 2020. This includes a longer payment holiday (increased to a maximum of 1 year after taking out the loan and repayment over five years) and offering business “restart” loans.The previous turnover cap has been removed and replaced with a maximum amount of R100m per loan. Previously the customer had to be in good standing with their bank on 29 February 2020 and this has been moved to 31 December 2019, which allows for more businesses to access the loan. Sole proprietors are now explicitly included. No security or suretyship was required and this was further clarified to still not be a requirement. Banks may reconsider applications declined under the first phase.The press statement that was issued by National Treasury, the Banking Association of South Africa and the South African Reserve Bank on 26 July 2020 provides more details, and can be accessed on the treasury website at:http://www.treasury.gov.za/comm_media/press/2020/20200726%20Media%20statement%20-%20Updated%20Loan%20Guarantee%20Scheme.pdf

24 August 2020 - NW1336

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

In respect of draft contracts published for comment by municipalities in terms of section 33 of the Municipal Finance Management Act, No 56 of 2003, in the 2018-19 municipal financial year, (a) on which draft contracts identified by the relevant municipality and/or the parties to the contract did the National Treasury give adverse comments and/or ask clarity-seeking questions, (b) what was the essential reason for the adverse comments and/or the clarity-seeking question in each case and (c) which of the specified draft contracts were subsequently concluded by the relevant municipal councils unamended and/or without answers to clarity-seeking questions by the National Treasury?

Reply:

a) Section 33 of the MFMA requires a municipality to amongst others, solicitthe views and recommendations of the National Treasury and the relevant provincial treasury. Treasuries generally reviewmatters of compliance with the MFMA, processes followed, contents of draft contracts, supply chain management, alignment of resources and future obligations, as well as processes of consultation with the public and transparency principles. Draft contracts are reviewed to advise municipalities that contract management are aligned to the provisions in terms of section 116 of the MFMA. No adverse comments were raised on any of the draft contracts received during the 2018/19 financial year.

b) There were no adverse comments on the draft contracts. Comments were more for the municipal officials and council’s consideration prior to approval.

c) We do not maintain records of contracts entered intoafter the conclusion of the comment process.No further processes were followed, since the MFMA requires such contracts to be made public on municipal websites to maintain the accountability and transparency principles.

24 August 2020 - NW1210

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What are the details of the mismanagement case that was mentioned during the presentation made by the Land Bank to the Standing Committee on Appropriations on 20 May 2020; (2) whether the mismanagement case was brought to the attention of the (a) board, (b) chief executive officer, (c) chief financial officer and (d) Standing Committee on Public Accounts (SCOPA); if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) (a) in which financial year did the mismanagement incident take place and (b) what was the financial impact in respect of monetary value, equipment and/or land; (4) were any of the Land Bank officials involved in any manner; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) by what date will Parliament, the Portfolio Committee on Finance and SCOPA receive the final report?

Reply:

We have no recollection of mention being made during the briefing by a representative of the Bank of any instance of mismanagement. What we are able to confirm is that the Chairman of the Board, Mr. Moloto, did say, in response to a suggestion that the Bank’s liquidity challenges may have been attributable to corruption, that the Land Bank prides itself on the governance processes in place and that in the face of any corporate governance lapses, the Board does not hesitate to take disciplinary action and dismiss individuals where necessary. He emphasised that the Land Bank prides itself in maintaining the highest ethical standards.

We would much appreciate it if you could furnish us with specifics as to what may have been said by representatives of the Land Bank which led to this enquiry so that we can accurately respond to the question.

24 August 2020 - NW115

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Finance

What measures does he intend to put in place regarding the mass looting that takes place in the Government’s supply chain processes which results in billions that are lost annually?

Reply:

1. The review of the existing procurement regulatory framework through the Public Procurement Bill is a measure that will be put in place to prevent the mass looting that takes place in the Government’s supply chain management processes. The Draft Public Procurement Bill makes the following provisions:

  • A directive to all Accounting Officers and Accounting Authorities on what measures to put in place within their respective institutions to prevent the abuse of the supply chain management system;
  • A chapter on procurement integrity which outlines code of conduct for officials, bidders and suppliers, including measures for handling any contravention of the code of conduct; and
  • That institutions must ensure that all planned procurement is aligned to the institution’s budget and plan.

2. The National Treasury, furthermore, proposed to the DPSA, the following Key Government Focus Areas (KGFA) and Key Focus Area Activities (KFAA) to be included in the Performance Agreements of Head of Departments:

Key government focus areas: Supply Chain Management System

KGFA

KFAA[1]

Suggested Weight

Target Date

Indicator/Target

Baseline Data

Develop and implement effective and efficient supply chain management system

Elimination of wasteful and fruitless expenditure

20%

Annual

70% elimination of wasteful and fruitless expenditure from baseline 2019 [2]

2018 Baseline

 

Reduction of irregular expenditure

20%

Annual

65% reduction of irregular expenditure from baseline 2019[3]

2018 Baseline

 

Reduction of qualified audits

20%

Annual

Unqualified audit opinion with 25% fewer findings than 2019/20[4]

2018 Baseline

 

Ensure that procurement planning is managed

15%

Annual

The finalisation of tender awards within an average of 100 days

Average number of days to award tenders

 

Ensure that SCM risk management is performed

5%

Annual

Risk response plans for the top 5 SCM risks developed

Risk response mitigation plans

 

Ensure that the department pays all compliant supplier invoices within 30 days of receipt of invoice

20%

Annual

100% of compliant supplier invoices paid within 30 days of receipt of invoice

Average supplier payment days

  1. All KFAAs are compulsory

  2. This indicator should be incremental so that by 2024/2025 the target is 100% elimination

  3. This indicator should be incremental so that by 2024/2025 the target is 75% elimination

  4. This indicator should be incremental so that by 2024/2025 the target is Clean Audit

24 August 2020 - NW281

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Which (a) national and (b) provincial state departments have budget allocations to support local government infrastructure; (2) what is the 2020-21 budget allocation of each specified department?

Reply:

(1) The Public Investment Corporation (PIC), as an operating entity, does not have any budget allocation to support local government infrastructure.

(2) Falls away.

24 August 2020 - NW72

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the position of the Board of Trustees of the Government Employees Pension Fund on the proposals by the Congress of South African Trade Unions, which are alleged to be supported by the Minister of Public Enterprises, to commandeer R254 billion in funds from the Government Employees Pension Fund for the purposes of writing down Eskom’s debt?

Reply:

The GEPF has not received the proposal by the Congress of South African Trade Unionsfor consideration to write down Eskom debt.

24 August 2020 - NW420

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) On what legal basis does the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) administer the Associated Institutions Pension Fund (AIPF) and (b) what measures have been put in place to ensure that the funds of the AIPF are safeguarded and managed transparently in the interests of its members; (2) what are the reasons that the GEPF does not currently have a Board of Trustees in place?

Reply:

1. (a) The Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) does not administer the AIPF. The AIPF is administered by the Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA), a government component in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994, and as provided for in Government Gazette No.33051 of 26 March 2010 which specifically establishes the GPAA for the purposes of the administration of, inter alia, the AIPF.

(b) The Director-General of the National Treasury is responsible for the business of the fund. The funds of the AIPF are invested via the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) in terms of an approved investment mandate.

(2) The GEPF currently has a fully functional Board of Trustees in place and has had such a Board of Trustees in place since 2005 already.

24 August 2020 - NW1155

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The department procured the following goods and services connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

(a)

Name of company

(b)

Amount

Method of procurement

(c)

Service and/or product that each company rendered

Lechoba Medical Technologies

R182 263.50

Three quotations

Hand sanitizers

Masana Hygiene Services

R156 302.26

Three quotations

Hand sanitizers liquid dispensers

 

R121 446.00

Three quotations

Building decontamination

 

R3 801.00

Three quotations

Building decontamination

 

R10 500.00

Three quotations

Building decontamination

Nesoscope Holdings (Pty) Ltd

R54 275.88

  1. Emergency deviation on existing contract

Surface sanitizers

MPM Enviro Enterprise

R293 250.00

Three quotations

N95 masks and latex gloves

Class Three Medical Solution

R12 128.82

Three quotations

Thermometers

Tsuamo Civils (Pty) Ltd.

R9 000.00

Three quotations

Building decontamination

 

R1 900.00

1 quotation amount below R2000.00 SCM threshold

Building decontamination

 

R75 950.00

  1. Emergency deviation memo approved

Building decontamination

 

R80 850.00

Three quotations

Building decontamination

Khulanathi Black Ginger

R135 125.00

Three quotations

Cloth masks reusable

Benixo Utility Services

R98 640.00

Three quotations

Building decontamination

Techcon Systems Pty Ltd

R332 062.50

Three quotations

Rental, supply, installation, replenishing and maintenance of foot operated hand sanitizer dispensers.

TOTAL

R1 567 494.96

   

2. Two emergency deviations were approved.

(a) Immediate sanitization of all surfaces, kitchens, utensils, door handles on regular basis to prevent infections. This was done by the incumbent service provider.

(b)The department experienced positive Covid-19 cases. The building had to be evacuated and there was an urgent need to decontaminate buildings immediately.

(3) The Department’s COVID-19 Committee established the need for the goods and services to manage and contain the spread of infections.Request for quotations were issued to various companies and lowest quotations were accepted in each instance.

(4) N/A

24 August 2020 - NW1337

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) In light of the reply of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services to question 478 on 9 June 2020 regarding the number of prosecutions instituted and convictions secured under section 173 of the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA), No 56 of 2003, (a) what support does the National Treasury currently give the SA Police Service (SAPS) and the National Prosecuting Authority to and prosecute offences under the MFMA and (b) will he, on his own or in co-operation with the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, consider appointing a dedicated team of officials to assist SAPS and the National Prosecuting Authority to obtain evidence in support of prosecutions under the MFMA?

Reply:

a) The National Treasury provides support and training to both NPA and SAPS with regard to interpretation of MFMA, PFMA and related Treasury regulations through the Office of the Accountant-General (OAG). The support and training provided assistthese law enforcement agencies to develop relevant investigation plans and approaches to their cases. The OAG also provides technical expertise on the legislation and related prescripts.

b) The National Treasury already has the Specialised Audit Services unit which works in collaboration with and gives support to the law enforcement agencies on MFMA cases.

24 August 2020 - NW866

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether her department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial and/or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Covid-19 financial and/or other relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds and/or provisions does she or her department rely to allocate Covid-19 financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act and (b) what form of Covid-19 financial or other relief, if any, will be made available to other small businesses?

Reply:

(1) The Department will not offer any form of COVID-19 relief to small businesses, as its Departmental mandate is on Defence of the RSA, and the function does not include funds or resource allocation to businesses.

(2) (a) The Department provides small business the opportunity to supply the Department with goods and services as required. BBBE companies are also assisted in respect of compliance to National Treasury Regulations and other legislative prescripts. (b) No Covid-19 financial and/or other relief will be made available to small businesses in line with the answer provided in paragraph (1) above.

24 August 2020 - NW1310

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with reference to the negative economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on communities at large, the National Treasury is considering measures to assist municipal ratepayers and/or recommending any prescripts for municipalities to this effect; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. National Treasury does not recommend that municipalities provide relief from property rates beyond what is already provided for in existing municipal policies (such as exemptions for indigent households). Municipalities face lower revenues due to a combination of lower demand for services such as electricity and water, and significantly higher non-payment rates for municipal bills. At the same time, they are faced with additional costs in responding to the pandemic. This would not be an appropriate time for municipalities to reduce their property rates.

2. The Supplementary Budget Review tabled on 24 June 2020 discussed the decline in municipal revenue collection and noted that, “The extent to which municipal bills are paid in the months ahead will depend on the duration of restrictions on economic activity, the pace of recovery and the application of revenue collection measures.” No further statements on municipal revenue collections as they relate to the COVID-19 pandemic are planned at this stage.

24 August 2020 - NW1426

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the total cumulative amount of money spent on bailouts for state-owned entities since 27 April 1994; (2) whether he will provide a breakdown of the amount spent annually on bailouts for state-owned entities during each financial year since 27 April 1994; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will provide a breakdown of the total cumulative amount spent on bailouts for Eskom, SA Airways, Denel, the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, PetroSA, the SA Broadcasting Corporation, SA Post Office and Transnet since 27 April 1994; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total cumulative amount of money spent on state-owned entities (SOE)recapitalisations and bailouts from 2000/01 to 2019/20 is R187.4 billion. The information was derived from the ENE databases for the years where the classification was clearly indicated and is thus, at this stage, not available from 27 April 1994.Furthermore, National Treasury followed Standard Chart of Accounts (SCOA)[1] economic classifications in compiling the data and focused on the classification for “payment of financial assets”, this excludes indemnities, guarantees and other contingent support provided to SOEs during this time that may be interpreted as a bailout.

2. The breakdown of amounts spent annually on bailouts andrecapitalisations from 2000/01on SOEsis provided in annexure A. At this stage the information is not available dating back to 27 April 1994.

3. The breakdown of the total cumulative amount spent on bailouts and recapitalisations to Eskom, South African Airways, Denel, South African Broadcasting Corporation, South African Post office and South African Postbank from 2000/01 to 2019/20 is included in Annexure A.At this stage the information is not available dating back to 27 April 1994.

 

 


[1]Standard Chart of Accounts (SCOA) is used by departments and provinces to classify their transactions

 

24 August 2020 - NW1420

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What total amount was allocated to each municipality from the Disaster Management budget; (2) (a) what total amount was spent in each municipality in each department, (b) were there any guidelines on how the budget was meant to be spent and (c) what are the details of each line item expenditure?

Reply:

1. It is not clear what the “Disaster Management budget” being referred to is. In the last quarter of the 2019/20 financial year, a total of R150.2 million was transferred to municipalities from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant (the amount per municipality is shown in Annexure A). In addition to this, an amount of R4 billion was reprioritised for disaster response within other conditional grants already transferred to municipalities in the 2019/20 financial year. This information is also described on page 20 of the Supplementary Budget Review tabled on the 24thJune 2020.

In the 2020/21 financial year, funds are made available to municipalities to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic through an addition of R11 billion to the local government Equitable Share, and an estimated R9 billion is available to be spent on COVID-19 response activities within conditional grants. Details of this are set out in the Division of Revenue Amendment Bill, 2020, tabled on the 24thJune 2020.

(2)(a) The 2019/20 financial year only ended at the end of June 2020. Municipalities have not yet reported on their expenditure for that financial year, and audited financial information will only be available once the Auditor-General has completed their processes in auditing municipal financial statements. For amounts allocated for the current financial year, municipalities should be given an opportunity to spend the funds before they can be expected to report on how much was spent.

(2)(b) Conditions for the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant were gazetted in the Government Gazette No. 42464. The National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) approved that receiving municipalities could spend these funds on particular activities included in the business plans submitted to them by municipalities. In approving the reallocation of funds from conditional grants to be used to respond to the disaster, National Treasury also approved specific conditions for the use of those funds that were prescribed by the Transferring Officer of each grant. Conditions of the use of grant funds in 2020/21 were gazetted in Government Gazette No.43495.

(2)(c) The same constraint in terms of the timing of expenditure information described in response to question (2)(a) applies to this question.

24 August 2020 - NW815

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What steps has she taken against service providers that supply the SA National Defence Force with expired food stuff for its camping soldiers; (2) whether her department will ever do business with such service providers in future; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why?

Reply:

(1) Yes the suppliers involved in the concealed best before date have been identified. The companies are not yet blacklisted as the legal process must first be finalised. However the Department issued the companies involved with a warning letter, and no awards/invitations for the supply of patrol ration packs have been made to these companies since the incident. The suppliers are currently barred from doing business with the Department of Defence (DOD) pending the outcome of the investigation.

(b) The matter is under investigation

24 August 2020 - NW376

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

What amount has he found would the Government save if (a) Ministers, (b) Deputy Ministers, (c) Members of the Executive Council and (d) senior managers in (i) national and (ii) provincial government flew economy class when executing their official duties?

Reply:

The information provided on this response is based on data provided by SAA and BA (two of the airlines that provides Business Class Cabins in the country).

The following assumptions apply:

  1. The values are total Rand value and total number of single trips (legs) for calendar year 2019.
  2. The values include all government institutions that uses the government deal codes as per the National Treasury’s centrally negotiated discount rates (including Parliament).
  3. The data provided was not provided per individual (compliance to POPI Act), hence only total amounts are used.
  4. The values exclude other domestic and international airlines. The data is not readily available.
  5. SAA Economy class Average Price per Ticketwas calculated based on the average price of full Y-class tickets on all the routes. (R6181.00)
  6. The values are exclusive of airport taxes and inclusive of VAT

Observations

If all Business Class tickets for 2019 were to be converted to Full Y Economy class tickets, on the two mentioned airlines only, Government could have saved R12 672 956.

 

COST ANALYSIS FOR FLYING BUSINESS CLASS COMPARED TO ECONOMY CLASS

 

British Airways

South African Airways

 

Total cost (2019)

Total # Legs

Average price per ticket per leg

Total cost (2019)

Total # Legs

Average price per ticket per leg

Business Class

R23 676 021

8967

R2 640

R83 320 961

12873

R6 473

Economy Class (Full Y)

R53 511 915

32509

R1 646

*

*

R6 181

Difference between Business Class and Economy class ticket

 

 

R994

 

 

R292

Estimated saving per Airline

 

 

R8 915 759

 

 

R3 757 196

Total Estimated Saving

R12 672 956

 

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Not provided

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

The pronouncement made by Minister of Finance to cut Business Class travel will yield the desired outcome.

24 August 2020 - NW606

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury monitors the maintenance of asset registers of municipalities; if not what is the position in this regard; if so, what number of municipalities in each province have (a) asset registers that are (i) up to date and (ii) not up to date and (b) no asset registers; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The National Treasury monitors the submission of municipal asset registers together with the annual financial statements, each financial year.

a)  The Honourable Member to note that whilst municipalities are required to record movements of assets on an ongoing basis as part of their recording and accounting process, for acquisition, upgrading or disposal. Theseare generally checked annually, when the Annual Financial Statements are prepared. Since the introduction of Generally Recognised Accounting Practices (GRAP), we have consistently encouraged municipalities to undertake this reconciliation on an in-year basis.

b) All 257 municipalities have asset registers as they are all reporting in terms of the GRAP standards.

2. Each municipality, through the Accounting Officer, is responsible for the management, safeguarding and maintenance of assets, as contained in section 63 of the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA), Act 56 of 2003. To assist municipalities in complying with this provision, the National Treasury has issued frameworks, guidelines, circulars, tools and conducted training on asset management, accounting and reporting thereof. The National Treasury has also rendered additional support to municipalities on asset management. The strength of a municipality’s asset management practices (including the completeness of its asset register) is measured by the quality of the information reported in its annual financial statements, which is also audited by the Auditor-General.

21 August 2020 - NW1681

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What: (a) are the details of the current age analysis of the total debt owed by each municipality to Eskom and (b) amount of the debt is made up of (i) principal debt, (ii) interest and (iii) penalties ineach case?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) The total debt owed by municipalities as at June 2020 is R43.9 billion, of which R30.9 billion is overdue debt. The details of the age analysis of the total debt owed by each municipality to Eskom, as at June 2020 are set out in Annexure A.

b) (i) and (ii) The total debt of R43.9 billion, is made up of the capital amounts of R32.4 billion, interest of R6.7 billion and VAT of R4.8 billion. The makeup of total debt in terms of capital and interest for each municipality, as at June 2020 is set out in Annexure A.

c) (iii) The total Notified Maximum Demand (NMD) exceedance charge for June 2020 is R46.9 million and R104 million for the financial year to date. This is a penalty for NMD exceedance raised in terms of the NMD Rules approved by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) to discourage future exceedances and is included in the capital amount. The NMD exceedance charge, for each municipality as at June 2020 is set out in Annexure B.

21 August 2020 - NW1782

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)With regard to his replies to questions, (a) 1109 on 22 July 2020 and (b) 1039 on 20 July 2020, what (i) was the purpose of each grant stipulated in the annexures and (ii) are the details of the geo-coordinates of the location of each project including longitude and latitude coordinates; (2) (a) what (i) are the reasons that the grants to Denzhe House Regeneration were omitted from the above replies and (ii) is the value of each grant they received irrespective of value and for which financial years and (b) other grants to other entities were omitted from the above replies? NW2173E

Reply:

I have received a reply from the National Lotteries Commission requesting additional time in replying to the first part of the question (1), which I reproduce in full.I have advised the NLC that the shift to lockdown level 2 should enable them to commence immediately with collection of geo-coordinates.

In respect of the second part of the question (2), the NLC provided a reply that reflects the NLC position, and which has not been independently verified. As more information becomes available following the processes that I have initiated, these will in due course be made available:

1. NLC reply: “The NLC submitted a list of organisations that received R 10 Million or greater and top 50 organisations that received highest funding in the past 10 years. The list comprised of the name of the funded organisation, the amount funded, the province where the funded organisation comes from and the year in which the organisation was funded. The NLC list did not include the purpose of each grant and the details of the geo-coordinates of the location of each project including longitude and latitude coordinates.

In order to provide information relating to the purpose of each grant, the NLC will have to go through the individual project files to ascertain the purpose of each project which will take some time as some of the information is in the legacy Grant Management System (GMS) which is no longer used as requested information dates as far back as 10 years ago. The NLC is not in possession of information regarding the geo-coordinates of the location of each project including longitude and latitude coordinates. The NLC will have to travel to all locations of funded projects across the country to get the exact geo-coordinates. With the current nation-wide lockdown regulations, it will be a challenge for the NLC to visit all relevant projects that were funded within the past 10 years. The required geo-coordinates can be provided post the nation-wide lockdown.

In light of the above, the NLC would like to kindly request the extension for the submission of the information regarding the purpose for each grant as requested above to the second week of September 2020. The NLC further request that the submission of geo-coordinates of the location of each project including longitude and latitude coordinates be deferred to post nation-wide lockdown.”

2. NLC reply: “Grants made to Denzhe were not omitted from the supplied list. The list was provided per allocation in line with the set threshold of R10 million or above and top 50 highest funded organisation in the past 10 financial years. Denzhe funding of R17 million is on the list for organisations that were allocated R10 million or above in the past 10 years. The allocations for Denzhe are as follows:

a)  R 17 000 000 - October 2016 (Charities Sector)

b) R 5 000 000 - March 2017 (Sports and Recreation Sector)

c) R 4 666 658. 79 - January 2018 (Charities Sector)

d) R 918 966. 50 - January 2018 (Sports and Recreation Sector)

Grants for other organisations were not omitted. The list was provided per allocation in line with the set threshold of R10 million or above and top 50 highest funded organisation in the past 10 years.”

-END-

21 August 2020 - NW1627

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the total (i) number and (ii) total amount of all disbursements made available to each province by his department in response to Covid-19 pandemic?

Reply:

(a)-(b) (i)-(ii) The department did not transact any disbursements to each province in response to COVID-19 pandemic. However, National Treasury (NT) did transfer the total amount of R466,392,000 to Provinces through the Provincial Disaster Relief Grant for immediate response to COVID-19 from Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs: National Disaster management Centre. The details of the funds are indicated on the attached approval from NT as Annexure A.

The total allocation in response to COVID-19 for the 2020/21 financial year amounts to R3,450,537,000 (Three billion four hundred and fifty million five hundred and thirty-seven rand) scheduled to be disbursed with effect from August 2020 until March 2021 to all Provincial Departments of Health as per attached Annexure B and Annexure C.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1777

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Health

(a) To which location in the Republic was each of the Cuban medical personnel deployed who arrived in the Republic around 27 April 2020 to assist in the fight against Covid-19 and (b) how have the specified medical personnel contributed to the Republic’s fight against Covid-19 in each of the locations?

Reply:

Provinces provided the following update on the Cuban Medical Brigade brigade :

a) Allocation per Province:

Eastern Cape

 

Family Physicians

Biomedical Engineers

Epidemiologists

Biostatisticians

BCM

3

1

1

1

NMBD

3

1

1

1

Chris Hani

1

1

-

-

OR Tambo

1

1

-

-

Free State

 

Family Physicians

Biomedical Engineers

Epidemiologists

Biostatisticians

Botshabelo

2

-

1

-

Mangaung

3

-

-

1

Thabanchu

1

-

-

-

MUCPP

1

-

-

-

  1. Nzula

4

-

-

1

Pelonomi

-

3

-

-

Gauteng

District

Facility

Family Physicians

Clinical Engineer

Johannesburg

Nasrec isolation Centre

5

-

Sedibeng

Sebokeng Hospital

-

1

West Rand

GPG facilities

2

-

Ekurhuleni

Essellen Park

5

-

Tshwane

Pretoria West Hospital

3

-

KwaZulu Natal

 

INSTITUTION

Family Physician

Health Technology

Information Management (Biostatistics)

Epidemiology Technologist

           

Amajuba

Dannhauser CHC

1

-

-

-

EThekwini

St. Mary's Marianhill

2

-

-

-

Harry Gwala

Christ the King Hospital

2

-

-

-

ILembe

Ntunjambili Hospital

2

-

-

-

King Cetshwayo

St. Mary's KwaMagwaza

2

-

-

-

UGu

GJ Crookes Hospital

1

-

-

-

uMgungundlovu

Edendale Hospital

1

-

-

-

UMgungundlovu

Pietermaritzburg

1

-

-

-

Umkhanyakude

Hlabisa Hospital

2

-

-

-

UMzinyathi

Dundee hospital

1

-

-

-

Uthukela

Ladysmith hospital

1

-

-

-

Zululand

Itshelejuba Hospital

2

-

-

-

King Cetshwayo

Ngwelezana hospital

 -

2

-

-

uMgungundlovu

Greys Hospital

-

1

-

-

Wentworth

eThekwini

-

1

-

-

ILembe

Stanger Hospital

-

-

1

-

Uthukela

Ladysmith hospital

-

-

1

-

Amajuba

Madadeni Hospital

-

-

-

1

ILembe

Stanger Hospital

-

-

-

1

Uthukela

Ladysmith hospital

-

-

-

1

Limpopo

DISTRICT

INSTITUTION

Medical Officers

Clinical Engineering

Technologist

Hygienist

Biostatisticians

Capricorn

Rethabile CHC

2

-

-

-

Sekhukhune

Dilokong Hospital

2

-

-

-

Waterberg

FH Odendaal/MDR-TB

2

-

-

-

Mopani

Kgapane Hospital

2

-

-

-

Capricorn

Head Office

-

3

1

1

Mpumalanga

District

Institution

Family Physician

Clinical Engineering

Epidemiology

Ehlanzeni

Rob Ferreira Hospital

-

1

-

GertSibande

Ermelo Hospital Clinical

-

1

-

Nkangala

Witbank Beatty Clinic

-

1

-

Ehlanzeni

Tonga District Hospital

1

-

-

Ehlanzeni

Shongwe District Hospital

1

-

-

Ehlanzeni

Tintswalo District Hospital

1

-

-

Ehlanzeni

Lydenburg District Hospital

1

-

-

Nkangala

Witbank/Impungwe District Hospital

1

-

-

Provincial Office

Provincial Office - CDC

 

-

-

Nkangala

Kwa-Mhlanga District Hospital

1

-

-

GertSibande

Piet Retief District Hospital

1

-

-

GertSibande

Evander District Hospital

1

-

-

Provincial Office

Provincial Office - Integrated Health Planning Unit

-

-

-

Northern Cape

 

MEDICAL OFFICERS

DEPUTY DIRECTOR ADMI

ASS. DIR. ADMIN

JT Gaetsewe

2

-

-

Namakwa

1

-

-

Frances Baard

2

-

-

PixleyKaSeme

1

-

-

ZF Mgcawu

1

-

-

Provincial Office

-

2

2

North West

DISTRICT

INSTITUTION

Family Physician

Health Technology

       

Provincial Office

Mahikeng

-

-

NgakaModiriMolema District

Mahikeng (Lehurutshe/Zee rust Hosp)

2

-

Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati District

Greater Taung Sub-district

1

-

Bojanala District

Rustenburg

2

2

Bojanala District

Madibeng

3

-

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District

Potchefstroom

1

-

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District

Matlosana

1

1

Western Cape

 

MEDICAL OFFICERS

Health Technologists

Epidemiologists

Biostatisticians

CTICC

18

4

-

-

Directorate: Facilities Management

-

-

3

-

Directorate: Information

-

-

-

3

b) The Cuban Medical Brigade’s contribution to the Republic’s fight against Covid-19 in each of the locations includes but not limited to -

  • Their deployment made a significant impact because the institutions are able to address issues of workload pressure because of Covid-19 pandemic.
  • The Cuban Medical Brigade have been resourceful in the Primary Health Care as this is their specialty.
  • Data analysis and information management team were tremendously instrumental in assessing the impact of the intervention.
  • The Epidemiologic predictions of the peak of the pandemic are critical to District readiness.
  • Hygienists and Epidemiologists are playing a key role in the research of the trends the pandemic is following and are providing advice on the projections.
  • The Biomedical Engineers have been critical in the design, installation, adjusting, repairing or provision of technical support for biomedical equipment.
  • The Cuban Medical Brigade are also involved in contact tracing and testing programme of the COVID-19 response.
  • Other Brigades are deployed to Isolation and Quarantine sites
  • They are also assisting with the implementation of the District SOP in the management of confirmed and suspected contacts (PUIs) in the District
  • They are part of ward-based programme and Health Facility decongestion program

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1671

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether a certain company (name furnished) that was launched on 6 June 2018 by his department is still being funded through the Black Industrialists Scheme; if so, what is the (a) funding transfer agreement, (b) contract thereof and (c) total amount of funding awarded to the specified company to date?

Reply:

I am advised by the Department that the company referred to in the question has been approved for a R8 million grant funding for machinery and equipment, commercial vehicles and business development services, under the Black Industrialist Scheme in the 2016/2017 financial year. To date an amount of R4,89 million has been disbursed towards machinery and equipment. The project is still active with the balance of R3,1 million available.

-END-

21 August 2020 - NW1610

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1685 on 18 December 2019, what (a) was the absentee record (ii) in each month in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) processes, procedures and mechanisms are in place to ensure that staff is always present during all required working hours; (2) what (a) is the current number of vacant positions, (b) measures have been put in place to fill the positions, (c) are the timeframes and deadlines for filling each vacancy respectively and (d) functions will be fulfilled by the vacant posts once they are filled?

Reply:

1. (a)-(ii)(iii) The table below reflect the absentee record (ii) in each month in the past three financial years in South Rand Hospital:

Month

Number of planned leave

Number of unplanned leave

Jul-18

64

94

Aug-18

64

120

Sep-18

49

99

Oct-18

70

110

Nov-18

58

161

Dec-18

43

226

Jan-19

30

181

Feb-19

112

43

Mar-19

171

55

Apr-19

124

45

May-19

171

55

Jun-19

120

45

Jul-19

135

39

Aug-19

271

39

Sep-19

313

60

Oct-19

131

44

Nov-19

160

18

Dec-19

99

33

Jan-20

132

59

Feb-20

141

50

Mar-20

159

81

Apr-20

67

20

May-20

135

38

Jun-20

151

48

(b) After the implementation of unplanned leave control measure, all annual leave that are applied for in advance, irrespective of how many leave days is regarded as planned leave.

  • The unplanned leave control measures were effective from the 18th June 2018 and this is what HR is currently doing:
  • HR is categorising all leave forms submitted to the office per directorate
  • This is to allow identification and areas of the high number of unplanned leave per directorate
  • A specific member with high number of unplanned leave will be identified
  • Relevant supervisor will be informed with the request to investigate reason and provide measures to be instituted.
  • HR has already developed a recording book, to record all received unplanned leave per name and department in order to identify the trends

2. (a) Currently there are 20 permanent vacant posts in South Rand Hospital.

(b) All 20 vacant posts have been advertised in May and June 2020.

(c) Shortlisting and interviews were done during the month of May, June & July 2020. The timeframe to fill the posts after posts became vacant is 4 months.

(d) Current staff do overtime to cover the staff shortage until the post is filled.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1708

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)On what date will the preliminary report of the investigation into the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) be tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Trade, Industry and Competition; (2) with reference to his letter to the chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Trade, Industry and Competition dated 15 June 2020, in which he mentioned that his department was investigating four projects related to the NLC yet his response regarding the preliminary report only refers to one project, (a) why is that the case and (b) what are the relevant details thereof? NW2098E

Reply:

In the letter addressed to the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry on 15 June 2020, I advised that I have received various allegations of maladministration at the National Lotteries Commission, particularly relating to irregularities in respect of pro-Active Funding. When these allegations were brought to my attention, I requested an independent investigation on the matters. The ad-hoc release of information flowing from the current process may compromise the investigation and I will accordingly provide the additional information as soon as the processes warrant and permit it. I can confirm that the investigation commissioned is currently considering four projects.

-END-

21 August 2020 - NW1646

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What legal steps has been taken to hold persons accountable, after a proclamation in 2017 by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, resulting in an investigation by the Special Investigating Unit into corruption of water supply tenders at the Alfred Nzo District Municipality found R300 million looted from the specified municipality?

Reply:

1. The table below provides details of the steps taken by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) for each proclamation made by the President in 2017:

Details of the Proclamation

Actions Taken

Civil Litigation

Disciplinary

1. Proclamation R19 of 2017

a) The SIU concluded all investigations and submitted a report to the Honourable President.

b) Criminal matters were referred to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA)

c) Evidence obtained by the SIU resulted in the Hawks arresting eight (8) Municipal officials and one (1) private individual.

The SIU recommended that the Municipality cancel a contract of R2.5 million.

Evidence relating to misconduct against the Acting Municipal Manager, Head of Supply Chain Management and Chief Financial Officer was referred to the Honourable Mayor of Alfred Nzo District Municipality. The said officials resigned and no further action could be taken.

2. Proclamation R36 of 2017

a) The SIU concluded all investigations and submitted a report to the Honourable President.

b) Criminal matters were referred to the NPA

c) Seven (7) cases of Fraud

d) One (1) case in terms of Section 173 of the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA)

e) These matters are currently being investigated by the Hawks in the Eastern Cape.

Evidence relating to an undue benefit by the service provider amounting to R60.7 million was referred for purposes of civil litigation. Combined summonses were issued by the Special Tribunal. Pleadings not yet closed and a court date yet to be determined.

Evidence relating to misconduct against the Acting Municipal Manager was referred to the Honourable Mayor of Alfred Nzo District Municipality. The Acting Municipal Manager resigned and no further action could be taken.

2. The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has taken the following legal steps:

a) Upon receipt of the SIU’s referral of matters relating to the corruption of water supply tenders at the Alfred Nzo District Municipality to the NPA, case dockets were registered, and prosecutors as well as investigating officers were assigned by the NPA and the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) respectively.

b) Case planning was done by the investigating team and prosecutors, whereby two (2) legs of investigations on the matters were undertaken.

c) Police investigations in respect of one (1) of the dockets have been finalised and the charge sheet has been drafted. The case is ready for enrolment and will be placed on the court roll by end August 2020, upon which the accused, who is the service provider to the Municipality, will face charges of fraud.

d) It is anticipated that the investigations, in respect of the other leg, will be finalised in the next two (2) months or so, after which the prosecutor will start to draft the charge sheet so that the case can be placed on the court roll.

21 August 2020 - NW1663

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in responding to the Covid-19 pandemic and making decisions on the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus, he used any statistical data on the number of persons who stay in the (a) rural areas and (b) townships; if not, why not; if so, what statistical data did he use to source statistics on the number of persons living in the rural areas and townships?

Reply:

a) The key statistic that we have been monitoring is the rate of spread of new infections i.e. the 7 day rate of change in COVID-19 cases. While the total number of infections are useful, the key statistic is the number of active cases particularly the rate of change of these active cases and the location of new cases.

b) The spread of the infection in South Africa has not been specific to rural areas or townships. The spread of the infection has been driven largely by movement and interaction by persons that are infected. The infection is droplet spread which would spread much easier in densely populated areas. The areas that have been most severely affected are the large Metros such as City of Cape Town, City of Johannesburg, Buffalo City, Nelson Mandela Bay and eThekwini. The more rural areas have been spared to a large extent from widespread infection due to our restriction on movement during level 5 and level 4. You would note to date that the more rural provinces have had much lower rates of infection – Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Northern Cape and Free State. The infection in the Eastern Cape and Kwa-Zulu is concentrated in the urban centres not rural areas.

c) The infection spread within urban areas has affected both the suburbs and the townships. There viral infection has not spared any community in terms of its transmission.

 

The increase in cases from the 5thto the 18th March was 1088% (5 to 58 cases). On the 25 March 2020 when the 21 day lockdown was announced the rate of change for COVID-19 cases decreased to 526% (58 to 362) then to 24% (362 to 1232) then to 33% (1232 to 1641 cases)-coinciding with the 14 day lockdown extension. The relatively slow rate of increase averaged about 47% until lock down level 4. It then gradually started to increase. This data proved that the lockdown achieved the objective of slowing down the rate of increase of cases, thereby giving health care authorities an opportunity to prepare the health system for the anticipated COVID-19 peaks.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1609

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 1685 on 18 December 2019, what (a) total number of complaints have been received from patients (i) in each month in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b)(i) measures and/or processes are in place to ensure that complaints are addressed and resolved and (ii)(aa) timeframes and (bb) deadlines have been put in place in this regard?

Reply:

a) (i) Total number of complaints for 2018/19 and 2019/20

The National Department of Health (NDoH) has developed a web-based application to assist public health facilities to comply with the National Guideline to Manage Complaints, Compliments and Suggestions in the Public Health Sector. The number of complaints as set out in the tables below are according to the web-based application which came into effect on 1 April 2018. It is important to note that not all health facilities are reporting on the system yet, therefore the number of complaints reflect those health facilities that are reporting complaints on the web-based application.

Month

# Complaints received 2018/19

# Complaints received 2019/20

April

1934

2409

May

2065

2664

June

1720

2129

July

1859

2373

August

1973

2396

September

1875

2116

October

2053

2345

November

1961

1889

December

1219

1330

January

2058

2033

February

2164

2098

March

2118

1740

TOTAL

22999

25522

(ii) Total number of complaints from 1 April to 31 July 2020

 Month

# Complaints received 1 April 2020 to 31 July 2020

April

960

May

1021

June

936

July

736

TOTAL

3653

b) (i) Measures and/or processes are in place to ensure complaints are addressed

The National Health Act (Act 61 of 2003) stipulates in Section 18 that, (i) any person may lay a complaint about the manner in which he or she was treated at a health establishment and have the complaint investigated. To this effect the National Department of Health (NDoH) published the National Guideline to Manage Complaints, Compliments and Suggestions in the Public Health Sector which came into effect on 1 April 2018. Provincial workshops were held in November and December 2017 to train staff on the implementation of the Guideline. According to the Guideline a complaint is defined as the dissatisfaction, displeasure, disapproval or discontent expressed verbally or in writing by any person about the specific health services being rendered and or care being provided within the health sector.

The National Health Act, 2003 was amended in 2013 to make provision for the establishment of the Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC). The objects of the Office are to protect and promote the health and safety of users of health services by:

  • monitoring and enforcing compliance with prescribed norms and standards
  • ensuring effective management of complaints relating to non-compliance with norms and standards through a Health Ombud.

The first Health Ombud, Professor Malegapuru William Makgoba, was appointed on 1 June 2016.

(ii) Time frames and deadline that have been put in place.

According to the National Guideline to Manage Complaints, Compliments and Suggestions in the Public Health Sector, complaints must be resolved within 25 working days.

The National Guideline stipulates that complaints should be lodged at the point of care, i.e. the public health facility where the incident took place. Should the complainant feel that the facility has not addressed his/her concern to their satisfaction, he/she may escalate the complaint in writing to the relevant District Office or the Provincial Health Department. As a last resort when complainants are still aggrieved with the outcome of the District Office or Provincial Health Department’s investigation, they can lodge their complaint with the Health Ombud within the OHSC.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1702

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What was the (a) original quote his department received for the new hospital at Bethal, Mpumalanga and (b) final cost of the new hospital; (2) why was there a discrepancy between the original quote for the hospital and the final cost; (3) to whom did his department award the contract to (a) build and (b) equip the hospital in each case; (4) on what date was the new hospital originally due to be (a) completed and (b) opened; (5) on what date was the new hospital actually opened?

Reply:

1. (a) The estimated costs for Bethal Hospital in Mpumalanga was estimated to be R629,901,000. That consisted of Professional Service Provider fees to the value of R60,901,000 and then Construction costs for phases 01 to 03 to the value of R569,000,000.00.

(b) The estimated final costs of the project is valued at R659,901,000.00

2. The discrepancy between the planned and actuals can be attributed to an approved variation order for procurement of medical equipment and furniture for the amount of R30,000,000.00.

3. The contract was awarded to Clear Choice Builders.

4. (a) The estimated completion of the project was the 30th of October 2020.

(b) Given an actual start date of the 10th of October 2016, Phase 1 and 2 of the project was completed in May 2020.

5. A sectional hand over was achieved for Phase 1 and 2 of the project. The project however is still in Phase 3 and not yet complete.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1706

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to the response by the City of Ekurhuleni during the Covid-19 pandemic, (a) what number of test kits have been procured, (b) from whom were the test kits procured and (c) what was the cost per unit; (2) what (a) is the overall backlog in testing results in each clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) is being done to reduce these backlogs; (3) what (a) is the overall backlog on tracing Covid-19 cases, (b) are the full relevant details of the communities that are yet to be visited and (c) is being done to improve tracing capabilities in the city; (4) what process did his department put in place to ensure that clinics adhere to safety measures put in place for Covid-19 with regard to social distancing, sanitising of hands and the wearing of masks?

Reply:

1. (a) A total of 77 645 test kits were supplied to Ekurhuleni District and this covered all hospitals and clinics.

b) The test kits were procured by the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), and supplied to the District.

c) Cost per test kit including forms, testing and courier services is R399.00.

2. (a) Backlog in all six NHLS testing laboratories as of 28 July 2020 was 891 with registered samples

(b) The two main hospitals that are supporting Ekurhuleni are Tambo Memorial and Charlotte Maxeke. Tambo Memorial is doing the tests for all in-hospital patients while Charlotte Maxeke does all clinic work.

3. (a) The district has a tracing backlog of nearly 23 481 contacts as at 25 July 2020.

(b) The district does not conduct visits to the communities for tracing because they are currently implementing telephonic and COVID-19 Connect tracing initiatives which make use of the telephone and messaging system.

(c) The District is implementing telephonic and COVID-19 Connect for tracking and tracing of contacts. A total of 164 Clinical Officials are currently deployed across the district to strengthen telephonic tracing initiatives.

4. All members of staff in clinics have been trained on COVID-19 safety measures. COVID-19 steering committees have been setup in facilities and they ensure adherence to measures such as social distancing, appropriate use of PPE and frequent hand-washing and sanitization of hands in all the clinics. Senior and Middle Managers undertake unannounced visits to facilities in order to observe and ensure adherence to COVID-19 safety measures.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1802

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Health

On what date will (a) a mother-and-child hospital wing be constructed in line with the request sent to his department by the hospital management of Thelle Mogoerane Hospital in Vosloorus and (b) he ensure that there are enough theatre beds in the specified hospital?

Reply:

(a)-(b) On commissioning of Thelle Mogoerane Hospital, concerns were raised that the maternity and neonatal unit will not be large enough to accommodate the existing services due to the limitations of the building. In response the GDOH-Infrastructure commenced with planning to address these issues raised since the hospital was commissioned and a proposal was made to extend the existing maternity and neonatal wards. Due to challenges with the proposed size of the unit it was clear that it would not be possible to fit the unit on the existing site due to the size of the site and the dolomitic conditions identified in the earmarked areas. The Professional Service Provider team, that was appointed at the time, was requested to look at other sites in close proximity to the hospital. This commenced but the search was not conclusive. The project was thus placed on hold in 2018.

Since then the Neonatal unit was moved to Ward 1 and 14. These changes were made to support neonatal services and was completed in 2019 and early 2020. A new milk room was provided in Ward 14 and completed in early 2020. The conversion of a delivery room into an obstetric theatre commenced in March 2020 and is still in progress.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1664

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of cases of illegal health care practitioners has his department identified in the past year; (2) whether there are plans in place to eradicate the specified trend; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Health has not identified cases of illegal health care practitioners in the past year however, there have been complaints of illegal practice by unregistered persons to the statutory health professional councils which fall under the mandate of Health as follows:

Statutory Health Professional Council

Number of cases reported

Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA)

1,384

South African Nursing Council (SANC)

4 (over the past 5 years)

However, the SANC is currently following-up on a number (3,327) of potential cases which were identified during the implementation of the Bargaining Council Resolution that provides for deduction of money from the nurses’ salaries through Persal for payment of annual registration fees with Council.

Most of the cases referred to above were off the SANC register due to non-payment of annual registration fees and invalid identification numbers.

South African Pharmacy Council (SAPC)

1

South African Dental Technicians Council (SADTC)

82 (due to non-payment of annual fees)

Allied Health Professions Council of South Africa (AHPCSA)

0 (Stats not kept; complaints referred to the South African Police Service)

2. There are various plans and/or strategies employed by the statutory health professional councils to eradicate the specified trend as follows:

a) Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA): In 2015, as part of the strategies of protecting the public, the HPCSA established a law enforcement and compliance Unit, the Inspectorate Office. The functions of the Inspectorate Office are:

(i) to identify and assist in the investigation and prosecution of persons who practice without being registered with the HPCSA;

(ii) to ensure that healthcare practitioners comply with ethical rules, regulations, the Act and sanctions issued by the disciplinary committee (Professional Conduct Committee);

(iii) to create awareness and educate the public about the health risks presented by ‘bogus practitioners’ or unregistered persons; and

(iv) to collaborate with other law enforcement agencies, authorities and regulators in identifying, investigating, arresting and prosecuting ‘bogus practitioners’ or unregistered persons.

Due to financial resource constraints, there are currently 9 inspectors in the Inspectorate Office. However, the number of inspectors employed can be increased to have a larger national footprint. The inspectors are currently deployed as follows: KZN=1; EC=1; WC=1 and the 6 inspectors rotate between GP, Limpopo, FS, NC, and NW according to trends analysis and need.

In addition to the above, the HPCSA through its Inspectorate Office works with other law enforcement agencies and other regulatory bodies which resulted in significant success in dealing with unregistered persons.

b) South African Nursing Council (SANC):  If and when the SANC becomes aware of any person who may be practicing without being registered with the SANC as a nurse (practicing illegally), the SANC investigates and criminal charges are laid against such a person.

c) South African Pharmacy Council (SAPC): The SAPC regularly conducts monitoring inspections of all registered pharmacies and in doing so, eradicates the prevalence of illegal practice.

In addition, the SAPC’s inspector works in partnership with the HAWKS and the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority in the event of Council being aware of any pharmacy being operated with illegal health practitioners.

The legislation pertaining to the access to medicines further makes it very difficult for non-registered persons to gain access to medicines legally.  

d) South African Dental Technicians Council (SADTC): The SADTC manages registration of practitioners in accordance with the enabling legislation and regulations which provides for payment of penalties for practitioners to be restored to the register and to continue practicing.

In addition, Council opens criminal cases against persons found to be practicing illegally. In 2019 Council successfully managed to close two illegal laboratories, one in the Western Cape and Eastern Cape. Both were operated by unqualified and unregistered persons. The two cases were successfully prosecuted, and both got maximum penalties.

e) Allied Health Professions Council of South Africa (AHPCSA): The AHPCSA only has legal jurisdiction over persons registered under that Statutory Health Council. Any person who practices a healthcare legally regulated profession without registration, therefore unlawfully, commits a criminal offence and the matter is reported to the law enforcement authorities.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1810

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Health

What steps has he taken to ensure that the Maluti Clinic in Matatiele is fully capacitated with (a) staff and (b) medical supplies in order to prevent patients from being sent back to their homes every day?

Reply:

There is no Maluti Clinic in Matatiele, but there is Maluti Community Health Centre which provides 24 hour services.

(a) The Department appointed an Operations Manager for Maluti Community Health Centre in September 2019 to provide leadership in the facility. The CHC manager oversees and manages all the operations of the Centre which has already resulted in less complaints being lodged than before. Professional nurses’ vacancies are replaced as and when they are vacated. In 2020, the Department appointed six (6) professional nurses, three (3) of which are Specialised Primary Health Care nurses. This brings the total number of staffing to: One (1) Operational Manager, 26 professional nurses, one (1) doctor, one (1) pharmacist, and two (2) pharmacy assistants. The facility is expecting a dentist to be commencing at the beginning of September 2020. There are 20 Community Health Workers (CHWs) who do general work who are appointed on contract basis under the COVID-19 project.

(b) Medical supplies are monitored daily through stock visibility which is an electronic system monitored by a pharmacist. The status as of 4 August 2020 is that:

ARVs

85%

Vaccines

90%

Tracer Drugs

75%

PPE

75%

All these are efforts that have been made to improve the capacity of Maluti Community Health Centre on both staff and medical supplies in order to prevent patients from being sent back to thier homes every day.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1695

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister ofHealth

What (a) is the full breakdown of child deaths at public hospitals since the State of Disaster was declared by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, and (b) were the reasons for death in each case?

Reply:

a) The number of deaths of children under five years of age in public sector hospitals for the period 1st April to 30th June 2020 is shown in the table below. For comparison the number of deaths for the same period during 2018 and 2019 are also shown in the table. The number of child deaths was lower during the period April to June 2020, than during the corresponding period in each of the preceding two years. It should be noted that the majority of deaths occurred in the neonatal period (from birth to 28 days) with fewer deaths occuring in children aged between one month and five years.

 

Deaths

 

0 – 28 days

1 month – 5 years

Total U5

1st April – 30th June 2020

3,087

855

3,942

1st April – 30th June 2019

2,948

1,321

4,269

1st April – 30th June 2018

2,901

1,407

4,308

The number of under-five deaths which occurred in each public sector hospital from 1st April – 30th June 2020 is shown in Annexure A.

b) The majority of deaths in the newborn period are due to prematurity, infection and birth asphyxia. The leading causes of death in children aged between one month and five years are diarrhoea, pneumonia and septicaemia with HIV infection and malnutrition as important underlying conditions. As deaths due to diarrhoea and pneumonia decline, the proportion of deaths due to congenital disorders and non-natural deaths (as a result of accidents/injuries) is rising. Detailed information on cause of death as recorded on the death certificate is collated by Statistics South Africa, but this information is not immediately available.

Annexure A:

Province

Level

Hospital

Deaths

     

0 – 28 days

1 month – 5 years

Total

U5

Eastern Cape

District

Aliwal North Hospital

1

0

1

   

All Saints Hospital

0

2

2

   

AndriesVosloo Hospital

1

0

1

   

Bambisana Hospital

1

0

1

   

Bedford Hospital

0

1

1

   

Bhisho Hospital

1

0

1

   

Burgersdorp Hospital

1

0

1

   

Butterworth Hospital

5

1

6

   

Canzibe Hospital

3

0

3

   

Cathcart Hospital

1

0

1

   

Cradock Hospital

1

0

1

   

Dordrht Hospital

1

0

1

   

Dr MalizoMpehle Memorial Hospital

3

0

3

   

Empilisweni Hospital

3

3

6

   

Glen Grey Hospital

2

1

3

   

Grey Hospital

0

1

1

   

Holy Cross Hospital

3

2

5

   

Humansdorp Hospital

4

1

5

   

Indwe Hospital

1

1

2

   

Isilimela Hospital

1

1

2

   

Lady Grey Hospital

1

0

1

   

Maclear Hospital

1

2

3

   

Madwaleni Hospital

1

0

1

   

MadzikanekaZulu Memorial Hospital

5

0

5

   

Midland Hospital

0

2

2

   

Mjanyana Hospital

0

1

1

   

Molteno Hospital

0

1

1

   

Mount Ayliff Hospital

7

1

8

   

Nessie Knight Hospital

2

0

2

   

Nompumelelo (Peddie) Hospital

1

0

1

   

Port Alfred Hospital

2

1

3

   

Sipetu Hospital

1

3

4

   

St Barnabas Hospital

3

1

4

   

St Patrick's Hospital

12

4

16

   

Stutterheim Hospital

1

1

2

   

Tafalofefe Hospital

1

1

2

   

Tayler Bequest Hospital (Elundini)

1

1

2

   

Tayler Bequest Hospital (Matatiele)

4

2

6

   

Uitenhage Hospital

7

1

8

   

Victoria Hospital

4

0

4

   

Wilhelm Stahl (Middelburg) Hospital

0

1

1

   

Zitulele Hospital

2

3

5

 

Regional

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

15

2

17

   

Dora Nginza Hospital

26

7

33

   

Frontier Hospital

8

0

8

   

Mthatha General Hospital

15

0

15

   

St Elizabeth's Hospital

12

0

12

 

Provincial Tertiary

Frere Hospital

9

6

15

 

National Central

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

32

19

51

 

TOTAL

206

74

280

Free State

District

Botshabelo Hospital

2

0

2

   

Dr JS Moroka Hospital

1

0

1

   

Elizabeth Ross Hospital

0

1

1

   

FeziNgumbentombi Hospital

5

0

5

   

Katleho Hospital

6

1

7

   

Mohau Hospital

1

1

2

   

Nala Hospital

1

1

2

   

Thusanong Hospital

1

1

2

   

Tokollo Hospital

0

1

1

   

Winburg Hospital

0

0

0

 

Regional

Boitumelo Hospital

9

1

10

   

Bongani Hospital

40

3

43

   

Dihlabeng Hospital

14

2

16

   

MofumahadiManapoMopeli Hospital

14

5

19

 

Provincial Tertiary

Pelonomi Hospital

1

3

4

 

National Centrals

Universitas Hospital

16

4

20

 

TOTAL

111

24

135

Gauteng

District

Bertha Gxowa Hospital

5

2

7

   

BhekiMlangeni District Hospital

5

0

5

   

Carletonville Hospital

3

1

4

   

Dr Yusuf Dadoo Hospital

4

0

4

   

Heidelberg Hospital

4

1

5

   

Jubilee Hospital

15

3

18

   

Kopanong Hospital

4

2

6

   

Odi Hospital

7

2

9

   

Pretoria West Hospital

3

0

3

   

South Rand Hospital

2

0

2

 

Regional

Edenvale Hospital

10

0

10

   

Far East Rand Hospital

13

6

19

   

Leratong Hospital

17

4

21

   

Mamelodi Hospital

35

4

39

   

Pholosong Hospital

11

2

13

   

RahimaMoosa Hospital

33

7

40

   

Sebokeng Hospital

17

1

18

   

Tambo Memorial Hospital

8

6

14

   

ThelleMogoerane Regional Hospital

35

2

37

 

Provincial Tertiary

Kalafong Hospital

22

2

24

   

Tembisa Hospital

52

8

60

 

National Central

Charlotte Maxeke Hospital

41

14

55

   

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

90

11

101

   

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

76

5

81

   

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

18

13

31

 

TOTAL

 

530

96

626

KwaZulu-Natal

District

Appelsbosch Hospital

3

0

3

   

Benedictine Hospital

31

3

34

   

Bethesda Hospital

5

0

5

   

Catherine Booth Hospital

3

0

3

   

Ceza Hospital

1

0

1

   

Charles Johnson Memorial Hospital

2

5

7

   

Christ the King Hospital

3

4

7

   

Church of Scotland Hospital

6

3

9

   

Dundee Hospital

1

0

1

   

East Griqualand and Usher Memorial Hospital

6

0

6

   

Ekhombe Hospital

2

1

3

   

Emmaus Hospital

10

2

12

   

Eshowe Hospital

2

0

2

   

Estcourt Hospital

4

0

4

   

GJ Crooke's Hospital

6

1

7

   

Greytown Hospital

4

1

5

   

Hlabisa Hospital

9

0

9

   

Itshelejuba Hospital

9

1

10

   

KwaMagwaza Hospital

2

0

2

   

Manguzi Hospital

2

0

2

   

Montebello Hospital

0

1

1

   

Mosvold Hospital

4

0

4

   

Mseleni Hospital

4

0

4

   

Murchison Hospital

1

4

5

   

Nkandla Hospital

2

1

3

   

Nkonjeni Hospital

8

2

10

   

Northdale Hospital

8

2

10

   

Osindisweni Hospital

3

1

4

   

Rietvlei Hospital

7

4

11

   

St Andrew's Hospital

10

2

12

   

St Apollinaris Hospital

6

1

7

   

St Mary's Hospital (Mariannhill)

9

0

9

   

Umphumulo Hospital

3

4

7

   

Vryheid Hospital

10

8

18

   

Wentworth Hospital

3

0

3

 

Regional

Addington Hospital

9

2

11

   

Edendale Hospital

23

5

28

   

General Justice GizengaMpanza Hospital

15

7

22

   

King Dinuzulu Hospital

6

0

6

   

Ladysmith Hospital

18

2

20

   

Madadeni Hospital

0

1

1

   

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

30

3

33

   

Newcastle Hospital

24

7

31

   

Port Shepstone Hospital

20

5

25

   

Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

22

5

27

   

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

45

12

57

   

RK Khan Hospital

18

5

23

 

Provincial Tertiary

Grey's Hospital

8

3

11

   

King Edward VIII Hospital

15

6

21

 

National Central

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

6

9

15

 

TOTAL

 

448

123

571

Limpopo

District Hospital

Botlokwa Hospital

2

1

3

   

Dilokong Hospital

8

3

11

   

Donald Fraser Hospital

6

4

10

   

Dr CN Phatudi Hospital

2

0

2

   

Elim Hospital

4

11

15

   

Ellisras Hospital

2

1

3

   

FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital

3

0

3

   

George Masebe Hospital

2

1

3

   

Groblersdal Hospital

9

0

9

   

Helene Franz Hospital

7

3

10

   

Jane Furse Hospital

6

4

10

   

Kgapane Hospital

13

3

16

   

Lebowakgomo Hospital

4

3

7

   

Louis Trichardt Hospital

1

0

1

   

Malamulele Hospital

11

4

15

   

Maphutha L Malatjie Hospital

5

4

9

   

Matlala Hospital

3

0

3

   

Mklenburg Hospital

2

2

4

   

Messina Hospital

2

0

2

   

Nkhensani Hospital

4

2

6

   

Sekororo Hospital

6

0

6

   

Seshego Hospital

10

6

16

   

Siloam Hospital

3

0

3

   

Van Velden Memorial (Tzaneen) Hospital

9

0

9

   

Voortrekker Memorial (Potgietersrus) Hospital

3

2

5

   

Warmbaths Hospital

2

0

2

   

WF Knobel Hospital

3

1

4

   

Witpoort Hospital

1

0

1

   

Zebediela Hospital

1

0

1

 

Regional

Letaba Hospital

20

2

22

   

Mokopane Hospital

18

1

19

   

Philadelphia Hospital

0

4

4

   

St Rita's Hospital

11

0

11

   

Tshilidzini Hospital

18

7

25

 

Provincial Tertiary

Mankweng Hospital

66

9

75

   

Pietersburg Hospital

7

13

20

 

TOTAL

 

274

91

365

Mpumalanga

District Hospital

Barberton Hospital

1

1

2

   

Bernice Samuels Hospital

4

1

5

   

Bethal Hospital

3

1

4

   

Carolina Hospital

1

0

1

   

Elsie Ballot Hospital

1

0

1

   

Embhuleni Hospital

18

0

18

   

Evander Hospital

14

1

15

   

HA Grove Hospital

1

1

2

   

KwaMhlanga Hospital

5

3

8

   

Lydenburg Hospital

4

0

4

   

Matibidi Hospital

5

0

5

   

Matikwana Hospital

7

3

10

   

Middelburg Hospital

2

0

2

   

Mmametlhake Hospital

4

2

6

   

Piet Retief Hospital

7

3

10

   

Sabie Hospital

0

0

0

   

Shongwe Hospital

5

4

9

   

Standerton Hospital

3

0

3

   

Tintswalo Hospital

11

5

16

   

Tonga Hospital

5

3

8

 

Regional

Ermelo Hospital

12

0

12

   

Mapulaneng Hospital

13

3

16

   

Themba Hospital

23

0

23

 

Provincial Tertiary

Rob Ferreira Hospital

11

7

18

   

Witbank Hospital

34

3

37

 

TOTAL

 

194

41

235

North West

District Hospital

Brits Hospital

13

1

14

   

Christiana Hospital

1

0

1

   

Ganyesa Hospital

2

1

3

   

Gelukspan Hospital

7

3

10

   

General de la Rey Hospital

5

0

5

   

Koster Hospital

1

0

1

   

Lehurutshe Hospital

1

2

3

   

Moses Kotane Hospital

2

3

5

   

NicBodenstein Hospital

2

1

3

   

Schweizer-Reneke Hospital

0

1

1

   

Taung Hospital

8

1

9

   

Thusong Hospital

0

2

2

 

Regional

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

6

3

9

   

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

0

7

7

   

Potchefstroom Hospital

0

0

0

 

Provincial Tertiary

Job ShimankanaTabane Hospital

46

5

51

   

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

35

5

40

 

TOTAL

 

129

35

164

Northern Cape

District Hospital

De Aar (Central Karoo) Hospital

1

1

2

   

Hartswater (Connie Vorster) Hospital

1

0

1

   

Kakamas Hospital

2

0

2

   

Kuruman Hospital

6

2

8

   

Postmasburg Hospital

1

1

2

   

Springbok (Dr Van Niekerk) Hospital

1

1

2

   

Tshwaragano Hospital

2

1

3

 

Regional

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital

11

1

12

 

Provincial Tertiary

Robert MangalisoSobukwe Hospital

14

10

24

 

TOTAL

 

39

17

56

Western Cape

District Hospital

Beaufort West Hospital

2

0

2

   

Caledon Hospital

1

1

2

   

Ceres Hospital

1

0

1

   

Citrusdal Hospital

1

0

1

   

Eerste River Hospital

0

1

1

   

Helderberg Hospital

2

0

2

   

Hermanus Hospital

1

0

1

   

Karl Bremer Hospital

5

0

5

   

Mitchells Plain Hospital

4

0

4

   

Oudtshoorn Hospital

2

0

2

   

Prince Albert Hospital

0

1

1

   

RadieKotze Hospital

1

0

1

   

Riversdale Hospital

0

1

1

   

Robertson Hospital

4

1

5

   

Stellenbosch Hospital

1

0

1

   

Vredenburg Hospital

1

0

1

   

Vredendal Hospital

3

0

3

 

Regional

George Hospital

4

1

5

   

Mowbray Maternity Hospital

17

0

17

   

New Somerset Hospital

6

0

6

   

Paarl Hospital

6

2

8

   

Worcester Hospital

16

5

21

 

Provincial Tertiary

Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital

6

11

17

 

National Central

Groote Schuur Hospital

23

1

24

   

Tygerberg Hospital

29

20

49

 

TOTAL

 

136

45

181

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1819

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)On what date will his department ensure that the approximately 51 community healthcare workers who took to the streets at Dukumba in Bhisho demanding permanent contracts on 16 July 2020 are permanently employed by his department, as some have been employed on renewable three month contracts for over 10 years; (2) what number (a) of community healthcare workers does the Republic have, (b) of those community healthcare workers are on contract and (c) is permanently employed by his department?

Reply:

1. There are standing Public Health and Social Development Bargaining Council (PHSDSBC) Resolutions 1 and 2 of 2018/19 and 2019/20 pertaining to standardizing Community Health Worker (CHW) remuneration at R3,500 per month. These Resolutions also highlight the need for processes to guide the employment, placement, remuneration, skills development and other processes related to conditions of employment for CHWs. The extension of Resolution 1 of 2018/19 to 2019/20 will allow the Department to engage all relevant stakeholders to guide the processes on conditions of employment for CHWs. Currently, the recruitment and remuneration for CHWS is enforced through these Resolutions, which do not make allowances for permanent employment, other than renewable of annual contracts. Furthermore, this matter is currently before the Bargaining Council wherein the Department engages with Labour Unions on possible interventions.

2. (a) There are 49,526 CHWs contracted across all Provinces.

(b) There are 49 526 CHWs who are on contract employment.

(c) The Department is not aware of the number of CHWs employed permanently. The Department became aware of the Gauteng Province (GP) intentions to employ CHWs permanently following the announcement by the Health MEC, Dr Masuku, stating that as of 1 July 2020, the Gauteng Department would have finalised the translation of 8,500 CHWs as Level 2 employees and the Department will complete the remaining number by 31 July 2020. There has not been any formal communication to the Director General (DG) for Health in this matter however, the DG has written to GP Head of Department seeking clarity on the matter. For this reason, we cannot confirm the number of CHWs employed permanently by Gauteng Province.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1651

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) total number of (i) vacant posts were available across the Republic for nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers in February 2020 and (ii) the specified vacancies have since been filled and (b) is the number of doctors and nurses that is now needed to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic; (2) whether there is a required number of professionals in the Republic; if not, what measures will he put in place to ensure that there is no shortage of healthcare workers; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The total number of vacant posts that were available across the Republic for nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers in February 2020 was 33 398.

(ii) A total number of 17150 health professionals (i.e. nurses, doctor and other related health care professions) have since been appointed from February to June 2020. This accounts for 34%of the 33 398 vacancies listed above.

(b) The National Department of Health used the Model of Demand based on the projected number of infections per district to determine the Surge Capacity demand during the Covid-19 Pandemic. The Model is applied to the population and Covid-19 caseloads using 85% of Public hospital general beds and 100% of ICU and High Care beds for Covid-19 care. The Model, estimates that the Public Health Sector will require an additional 1 200 Doctors and 18 000 Nurses of various categories.

(2) A total of 7 416 health professionals were already contractedacross the provinces to fill the gap in the HR requirements. A database for workforce candidates containing 942 doctors and 1 261 as well as 144 other categories of staff is accessible to provinces to recruit staff from and some provinces also have databases with potential candidates available. Recruitment is continuing.

Based on the directions issued by the Minister of Health in April, the recruitment process should be shortened by advertising a post and effecting appointments within a period of a week

Budget motivations are submitted to Provincial Treasuries and to NDoH for consideration.

Other sources for healthcare workers include the following:

  • Health Professionals working in the private sector can be appointed on sessional basis
  • 176 health professionals from Cuba is assisting South Africa in the response to COVID-19. The necessary registrations have been completed and they have been deployed across all provinces. They are authorised to work in any province. Since the projected peaks differ between provinces, this cadre could be deployed to areas with the highest need
  • Volunteers: Provinces placed advertisements for volunteers to assist in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Foreign nationals: The Foreign Workforce Management Unit (FWM) of the National Department of Health is facilitating the recruitment and placement of all “Foreign Health Workers” who present themselves for employment and study opportunities in South Africa. Policy guidelines for registration and employment of foreign qualified health professionals in South Africa are in place.
  • Final year students: NDoH engaged with Deans of Health Sciences Faculties and Principals of Nursing Colleges to facilitate deployment of final year students to assist with care of COVID-19 patients e.g. in field hospitals. Postgraduate nursing students returned to workplaces to support the COVID-19 response. Final year nursing students will write examinations by the end of August and will thereafter available for the surge capacity.
  • Interns and Com Serve: There is an existing ICSP database. Health professionals in this category that are not currently employed or due to complete their terms, can be contracted to supplement the surge capacity
  • Retired health professionals: Based on the directions issued by the Minister of Health in April, all retired personnel may be requested to fill in positions on a temporary basis to assist in responding to the pandemic. Retired employees can be deployed to low risk areas to relief staff to attend to COVID-19 patients.

The following additional areas are pursued to expand the resource base:

  • Non-Governmental Organisations and Community based organisations: The directions issued by the Minister of Health in April also makes provision for community service personnel, extended public works programme workers, CBOs and NGOs to fill in positions on a temporary basis to assist in responding to the pandemic. Provinces can engage with these sectors to identify possible capacity. Possible down referral of patients to suitable sectors should be considered as well as increasing the capabilities of homebased caregivers and Community Health workers to strengthen home care.
  • South African Military Health Services (SAMHS): SAMHS can support Provinces in the response to COVID-19 in terms of the role of the South African Defence Force (SANDF) in Disaster Management. Provinces should liaise with SAMHS in the province.

The following measures are implemented to reduce the demand on human resources during the pandemic:

  • Provincial Health Departments are reprioritising health care services. This can include the identification of routine and elective services that can immediately be deferred or moved to other settings or non-affected areas or identification of alternative service providers e.g. from hospitals to PHC settings, private sector or NGOs.
  • Co-ordination with the private sector is done to optimise all the resources available in the province. Discussions at National level resolved to contract the private sector on a global fee inclusive of beds, hospital staff, equipment and consumables where additional capacity is needed, especially for critical care beds. A Service Level Agreement (SLA) template is available.
  • In provinces with metros, metros are engaged to identify services that can be redirected from provincial facilities to municipal clinics and health centres to free up provincial staff for the COVID-19 response. Alternatively, metro staff can be seconded to the field hospitals or other COVID-19 settings.
  • Alternative service delivery mechanisms are to be considered, e.g. allowing pharmacists to extend ordinary prescriptions for people with chronic conditions provided they are controlled on treatment.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1818

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the support team led by Dr SibongileZungu, including Professor Ian Sanne, Theo Lighthelm, Albert Jansen, Dr Dorman Chimhamhiwa and Wendy Ovens that was deployed by Minister ZweliMkhize in the debilitated Eastern Cape Department of Health has submitted any report with recommendations regarding what needs to be done in the specified province; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, (a) what were the recommendations and (b) how far has each recommendation been implemented?

Reply:

The intervention team has submitted a report to the Eastern Cape Department of Health, the Office of the Premier, and the Office of the Minister of Health.

The report submitted covered the analysis and the state of the COVID-19 response in the Eastern Cape for the period, 29th June 2020 until 10th July 2020. The report recommended nine areas of intervention. The recommendation made by the Strategy Team is following the key strategic areas as outlined by the WHO-COVID-19 response guideline as tailored to the provincial needs.

(a) The recommended interventions

1.1 Coordination between Tertiary, Regional and District hospitals is inadequate and should be addressed through the revised command and control structure.

1.2 Given the busy schedule of the SG, it would benefit the Province to have a Project Manager for COVID19 with the necessary authority to fast track actions.

1.3 While the metros have mobilised reasonable infrastructure to meet the surge, the Eastern Cape Department of Health (the Department) needs to give attention to the scaling-up of service delivery requirements such as the adequate provision of oxygen, equipment, human resources, and medicines necessary for the management of the Pandemic.

1.4 Certain hospitals are currently overwhelmed (Doran Nginza in NMB in particular) by the patient demand, and lack of infrastructure, equipment and human resources to meet the clinical care demand which the Department needs to address.

1.5 Labour relations is a matter that requires a dedicated action plan to normalise service delivery.

1.6 Historic arrangements for drainage areas, resource allocation, and referral routing are not addressing the significant surge in patient numbers, particularly in underserved, vulnerable populations.

1.7 Emergency Medical Services and patient transport services require intervention to ensure continued function.

1.8 Within the Province, the oxygen separation plants are located in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro. The distribution of the oxygen is, therefore, a challenge for areas furthest from the Metro.

1.9 Implementation of a comprehensive data system to capture the parameters of the COVID-19 response.

(b) How far each of the recommendations has been implemented

1. Coordination between Tertiary, Regional and District hospitals is inadequate and should be addressed through the revised command and control structure.

The Intervention Team assisted the Department to establish its Command and Control structure which was adjusted from the Department’s strategic documents.

The structure is divided into three layers, Provincial, district and facility specific. Each structure has adopted an incident management approach (WHO-COVID-19 Guidance) with daily command and control meetings covering the following areas:

  • Epidemiology and Surveillance
  • Community engagement for prevention, contact tracing and testing
  • Laboratory support and result reporting
  • Treatment and Care including facility surge capacity
  • Infrastructure and equipment
  • Logistic support - pharmacy, consumables and personal protective equipment
  • Emergency Services
  • Psycho-social support to health workers
  • Port Health

The strategic area of Port Health is not given a daily focus as Port Health is a national competence. The PMU is vigilant around Port Health issues and receives reports relevant to the Province from the National Department of Health.

2. Given the busy schedule of the SG, it would benefit the Province to have a Project Manager for COVID-19 with the necessary authority to fast track actions.

The Premier of the Province Hon. Mr. Oscar Mabuyane announced the establishment of the Project Management Unit for a comprehensive response to COVID-19. The Project Management Unit(PMU) has established the following structure (Fig. 1 below).

Dr Zungu leads the PMU. She works with Dr Monde Tom, a financial management expert with vast experience in both the public and private sector, leads the Business Continuity Workstream and Mr LauwrenceVanZuydam an experienced HR executive seconded from the Office of the Premier.

The project leader is responsible for directing all COVID-19 activities and for fasting track actions. The PMU has been integrated into the overall Eastern Cape Department of Health’s Covid-19 response and supports the HOD as the accounting officer.

The structure of the PMU and the related workstreams is depicted below.

4. Certain hospitals are currently overwhelmed (Doran Nginza in NMB in particular) by the patient demand, and lack of infrastructure, equipment and human resources to meet the clinical care demand which the Department needs to address.

This recommendation is specific to DorahNginza and Livingstone hospitals as there had been persistent negative media reports about the two facilities.

Dora Nginza Hospital

Maternity Services

The Department resolved the congestion of the maternity wards at DorahNginza by strengthening the peripheral clinics to operate their midwife services. They have also addressed the shortage of staff by fast-tracking the recruitment of doctors and nurses.

Upgrade of Dora Nginza Hospital- 100-bed wing

The Department upgraded a dilapidated wing of the hospital to provide a 100-bed wing to support the COVID19 peak. The project was part of the Province’s “Accelerated Construction Program” which meant that a project that would typically take four months, the constructors completed in two months. The Department handed over the site to DorahNginza Hospital on the 6th July 2020.

Oxygen Reticulation

The National Oxygen Team undertook an audit of the whole oxygen reticulation system of the Dora Nginza hospital. It found that the hospital has four Oxygen Manifolds with only one partially functional. Repairs to the system commenced on the 28th July. The local car manufacturing company has committed to the replacement of two manifolds, and the Department has ordered a further one. The full functionality of all the manifolds will ensure a continuous supply of oxygen at the correct pressure and volume.

Livingstone Hospital

Infrastructure

The Department undertook a project to upgrade the basement to provide an additional 68 Beds with Oxygen. The initiative is also part of the “Accelerated Construction Program”.

Leadership

The Department appointed an Acting CEO for the Livingstone hospital on 22nd July. Also, they have advertised the post of Nursing Service Manager and CEO. The processes will be fast-tracked.

Facilities Management

The hospital management set-up a short-term 6-month cleaning contract. The intention is to ensure that the staff at Livingstone hospital are reoriented into a deep cleaning routine and protocols. The washing machine has been repaired, resulting in improvement with the laundry services.

3. While the metros have mobilised reasonable infrastructure to meet the surge, the Eastern Cape Department of Health (the Department) needs to give attention to the scaling-up of service delivery requirements such as the adequate provision of oxygen, equipment, human resources, and medicines necessary for the management of the Pandemic.

6. Historic arrangements for drainage areas, resource allocation, and referral routing are not addressing the significant surge in patient numbers, particularly in underserved, vulnerable populations.

7. Emergency Medical Services and patient transport services require intervention to ensure continued function.

8. Within the Province, the oxygen separation plants are located in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro. The distribution of the oxygen is, therefore, a challenge for areas furthest from the Metro.

We have addressed the recommendations 3, 6, 7, and 8 above through adoption of a service delivery model that rearranges the structure and resource distribution within the Eastern Cape health system to optimise service delivery.

Currently, the major urban areas contain all the critical care capacity, that is Nelson Mandela Bay and Buffalo City metros, Mthatha, and to a limited extent, Queenstown. The outer reaches of the western, central and eastern areas are more than three-hour drive time from existing critical care beds. In collaboration with the Provincial Department of Health, the PMU developed a Hub and Spoke approach to address the shortfalls. The purpose of the Hub and Spoke strategy is then to identify the hospital drainage (referral pathway) to existing and or expanded Critical Care capacity coupled with the estimated distance and travel times to reach a bed safely at the peak of the COVID19 Pandemic. The PMU has also determined the high-risk areas based on at least one of the following factors:

  • Travel times between facilities
  • Travel distance between facilities
  • Quality of the road infrastructure
  • Quality of hospital infrastructure between the referring hospital and the receiving hospitalCritical care bed saturation

The District team are in the process of confirming satellite hubs for the expanded distribution of COVID19 critical care beds to address the potential shortfall. The PMU will support the Province to optimise existing district hospitals based on minimal input but with a maximum return.

The Department of Health supported by the PMU has made the following progress:

Infrastructure: The following infrastructure projects are underway in the Province, to yield a significant increase in the general ward beds (n=2,022) and critical care beds (n=311). The addition of the infrastructure development from the baseline will address the NEC long-term projected peak demand for COVID-19 admission in the districts and Province. The Rev Dr Elizabeth MamisaChabula Hospital facility will receive an additional upgrade of the current Phase I priority three beds to include additional oxygen supply. The intervention will add 312 oxygen beds to meet the demand in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro and surrounding districts.