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22 March 2024 - NW171

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she has ever met with Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, leader of Sudanese Rapid Support Forces, at any time since 1 January 2023; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full details of any military support that the Republic is providing in the Republic of Sudan?

Reply:

Find reply here

 

 

22 March 2024 - NW266

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, considering that during his reply to the debate on the State of the Nation Address, the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, indicated that unspent funds by municipalities is something that should not be tolerated, and noting that the financial year-end of departments and municipalities do not coincide, he has found that there is a level of fiscal dumping by national departments onto local governments which gives them only three months to spend their money; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether he will consider motivating the financial year-end of all spheres of government to be the same; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. National Treasury (NT) during the many forums, intergovernmental forums and consultation processes always caution organs of state against fiscal dumping. Fiscal dumping is perceived when sector departments (transferring officers), that administrate and monitor municipal performance, transfer huge amounts of money during the last month of the national financial year (March). However, it should be noted that in terms of the division of nationally raised revenue that appropriates money through the Division of Revenue Act (DoRA), NT is of the view that the national departments are unable to ‘dump’ funding to municipalities because all transfers to municipalities are made in terms of the approved payment schedule and follow a project plan.

Municipalities also implement in-year budget adjustments changes in the last month of the national financial year, between January and March annually which is another process that may also appear to imply fiscal dumping of the funds to the local government sphere.

Additionally, NT conducts another process in terms of section 18 of the DoRA which is a mid-year process of assessing progress of municipalities in terms of their DoRA allocated funds. This process is undertaken during the middle of the municipal financial year, 31 December annually. The implication of this process is that should funds against slow moving municipalities be stopped in terms of section 18 of DoRA and be reallocated to fast moving municipalities in terms of section 19 of DoRA, the recipient municipalities would receive additional funding during the last month (March) of the national financial year, allowing a municipality three months to spend the additional amounts.

2. NT is not considering motivating the financial year-end of all spheres of government to be at the same time.

The national / provincial budget process involves managing the following simultaneously: the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), the medium-term fiscal framework, the division of revenue process, and the budget processes of national government and the nine provincial governments.

The separation of national / provincial financial years from the local government financial years allows for a proper sequencing of the national / provincial and the local government processes. The MTSF, the fiscal framework, the division of revenue and the national and provincial conditional transfers to local government are all in place and certain by mid-February which is when municipalities begin compiling their budgets. This means that municipalities can compile their budgets with accurate awareness of what resources they will be receiving from the equitable share and in the form of national and provincial conditional transfers.

From the municipal perspective, the alignment of the municipal financial year with the national and provincial financial year will:

a) place enormous pressure on municipalities already strained financial management capacity.

b) impact negatively on the quality of municipal budgets, as they will not have access to the final equitable share and conditional transfer numbers until right at the end of the process.

c) undermine the community consultation and participation processes around municipal budgets, as they would have to happen during the same period while the national and provincial budgets are being compiled and changed; and

d) undermine the scope for effective coordination of national, provincial and local government planning, as the municipalities would be required to develop and revise their integrated development plans, at the same time the national and provincial departments are still doing their own planning.

The net result would be to condense coordination of national, provincial and local government planning which would inevitably result in gaps and weaker spending outcomes, particularly in relation to conditional grants and will generally impact negatively on the move towards improved planning and execution.

A further key factor to consider is the ability of the Office of the Auditor-General to audit all national departments and their entities, all provincial departments and their entities, municipalities and their entities, within two months after the end of the financial year. The current staggering of financial years means the work is spread over a four-month period and there are sufficient auditors to meet the requirements.

20 March 2024 - NW401

Profile picture: Mthethwa, Mr E

Mthethwa, Mr E to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture.”

What was the total budget spent on the compensation of members of the Ministerial Advisory Team (MAT) appointed by the department?

Reply:

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture's total budget spent on the compensation of members of the Ministerial Advisory Team (MAT) appointed by the department.

(i). The total budget is R638 369,76 (six hundred and thirty-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-nine rand and seventy-six cents only) as follows:

(ii). The amount of R592 183,19 (Five hundred and ninety-two thousand one hundred and eighty-three rand and nineteen cents only) for the remuneration of all members

(iii). The amount of R46 186.57 (forty-six thousand one hundred and eighty-six rands fifty-seven cents only) for travelling to attend meetings

Thank you

20 March 2024 - NW540

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) are the reasons that (i) the staff at the Swellendam Hospital have not been paid their much-needed salaries and (ii) the specified staff have to wait until the next financial year in order to be remunerated and (b) urgent steps of intervention have been taken to resolve the problem?

Reply:

(a) (i), (ii) and (b)

The official report form Western Cape Department of Health and Wellness is that they do not have any records, nor reports of staff from Swellendam hospital not receiving their remuneration. Also, contractors of Swellendam hospital have also reported that they are not aware of any of such claims emanating from themselves nor their employees. However, it will be appreciated if the honourable member could provide any further specific details regarding any person who has not been paid as it is pointed out in the question.

END.

20 March 2024 - NW610

Profile picture: Le Goff, Mr T

Le Goff, Mr T to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE:

With reference to his reply to question 95 on 22 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by his department for (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

The details of the vehicles bought for the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019 are as detailed below: - Deputy Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture are as follows.

Vehicle

Minister

Deputy Minister

(a) Make

No vehicles purchased.

BMW

(b) Model

N/a

520d

(c ) Year

N/a

2020

(d ) Purchase date

N/a

15/01/2020

(e ) Purchase price

N/a

R 649 000.00

 

THANK YOU

20 March 2024 - NW596

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With reference to her reply to question 85 on 24 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

20 March 2024 - NW622

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What proactive measures has he put in place to safeguard against undue influence of the tobacco industry on research focusing on the impact of tobacco products on health?

Reply:

The World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) Guidelines for implementation of Article 5.3 recommends that Parties monitor the activities of the tobacco industry. The Convention Secretariat assisted countries with the establishment of tobacco industry observatories in some interested Parties. One of the Observatories is based in South Africa specifically to monitor tobacco industry interference. These observatories inform policy makers and governments on Tobacco industry activities. The South Africa based observatory is called Africa Centre for Tobacco Industry Monitoring and Policy Research (ATIM).

The Department works closely with ATIM- one of their functions is to interrogate research by the industry and they have been able to identify studies and scientist that are funded by the tobacco industry. The Department has access to ATIM findings which have demonstrated how industry has manipulatedsuppressed or used data incorrectly to suit the needs of the tobacco industry.

The Department also is also influenced by research and analysis conducted by the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC), who analyse studies conducted by the Tobacco industry, further citations from other reputable research organisations that are pro-tobacco control and pro-protection of public health are available for use.

The current and proposed laws on tobacco control warrant that the tobacco industry discloses the research conducted by a manufacturer or by a person conducting research paid for in whole or in part by a manufacturer.

END.

20 March 2024 - NW486

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the full details of the urgent steps of intervention his department has taken together with the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality and uMngeni-uThukela Water to provide adequate water and sanitation to the residents of KwaXimba?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) and the uMgeni-uThukela Water Board are assisting the eThekwini Municipality to ensure the provision of adequate water to the KwaXimba area. The uMgeni-uThukela Water Board is implementing a project to install a package plant and associated infrastructure to augment the supply to the area.

As a short term intervention, the uMngeni-uThukela Water Board will make use of an existing 2Ml/d package plant to supply water to the KwaXimba area. This work is anticipated to be completed by the 17th of May 2024. The process of obtaining the environmental authorisation and power supply for the new package plant is underway. The eThekwini Municipality is currently completing the design and procurement process for a 5Ml/d package plant which is a long term solution to ensure water supply for the area of KwaXimba. Completion of this project is envisaged by end of June 2024.

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20 March 2024 - NW229

Profile picture: Mkhwebane, Adv BJ

Mkhwebane, Adv BJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What steps is he taking to ensure that those granted unaffordable bail are transferred to remand detention until their cases are finalised by the courts, in light of the Judicial Inspectorate for Correctional Services’ (JICS) report to Parliament in October 2023, which indicated that unaffordable bail is one of the main contributors to overcrowding in prisons in which almost 5000 inmates are unable to pay bail set at R1000?

Reply:

The two strategies (categorised as direct measures in the overcrowding reduction strategy) which are driven by the Department of Correctional Services are:

  • Bail review which entails submitting of applications to court in line with section 63A and 63(1) of the Criminal Procedure Act.
  • Referral of applications to court for consideration of the length of detention of Remand Detainees (49G of the Correctional Services Act) at 21 months initially and annually if the RD continues with detention after submitting the initial and subsequent applications. Since there is no parallel section in the Criminal Procedure Act for handling the 49G applications, the bail review sections and subsections (section 60) are utilised when considering the 49G applications. The section refers to a multitude of interest of justice factors which have to be considered in each case when considering releasing the Remand Detainees, however the Department of Correctional Services as a detention institution is not informed of the factors.

The following table provides a breakdown of bail amounts of R1000 and below of RDs detained in South African correctional facilities. Contrary to the mentioned report, nationally, a total of two thousand eight hundred and twenty (2 820) remand detainees were detained with bail below R1000 as at quarter 3 of 2023/23 (31 December 2023).

Region

R500 and below

>R500 to R1000

EC

244

274

FSNC

238

149

GP

280

374

KZN

172

170

LMN

134

211

WC

271

303

Total

1339

1481

Grand total

2820

It should be noted that Department records the number of remand detainees incarcerated with an option of bail however, that the Department does not have information that plainly confirms that the remand detainees granted bail are still in detention due to inability to pay bail.

The Department will continue to refer remand detainees who qualify to court in terms of the Section 63 of the Criminal Procedure Act (Act 51 of 1977). Some of the RDs who are detained with an option of bail do not qualify for bail review in terms of the Bail Protocol due to the nature of crimes they are detained for.

END

20 March 2024 - NW583

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1) With reference to the widespread concern regarding alleged collaboration between poaching syndicates and staff at wildlife parks in the Republic, what is the total number of staff members currently employed by the SA National Parks (SANParks) who are currently subject to (a) internal disciplinary action and (b) criminal charges relating to any involvement with poaching of animals and plants; (2) what (a) total number of internal disciplinary proceedings relating to involvement in poaching have been completed since 1 January 2019 and the lalest specified date for Which information is available, (b) were the results of the internal disciplinary proceedings and (c) successful criminal prosecutions were obtained relating to involvement in poaching that have been of SANParks staff between 2019 to date?

Reply:

Find reply here

20 March 2024 - NW623

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What specific steps has his department taken to regulate the (a) sales and (b) marketing of unhealthy foods and/or products that make a significant contribution to death, especially in the context of inadequate regulation in the countries of the global south?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

The Minister of Health, through the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act (FCD), 1972 (Act. 54 of 1972) regulates foodstuffs with the aim of promoting food safety and to prohibit the misleading advertising of foods. The regulations relating to foodstuffs are aligned to the global best practice of the joint World Health Organisation and Food and Agricultural Organisations’ Codex Alimentarius.

The Department of Health is committed to the improvement of the health and nutrition of South Africans through regulating the labelling of foodstuffs sold in South Africa. This would allow South Africans to make healthy food choices without being misled through inaccurately labelled and advertised foodstuffs thereby assisting consumers to make good nutritional choices and adopt a healthy lifestyle.

In terms of the legislation “it is an offence’ to sell foodstuff that does not bear a label indicating the kinds or grades of ingredients and their proportions or amounts present in a mixed, blended or compounded foodstuff.

The Minister of Health has published the following regulations to help reduce premature death from noncommunicable diseases which is Goal 3.4 of the Sustainable Development Goals:

1. Regulations relating to Trans-Fats in foodstuffs (No.R.127 of 2011), prohibit the sale, manufacture and importation of oils and fats, including continuous phase emulsions, either alone or as part of processed foods. An increased intake of trans fat (>1% of total energy intake) is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHDs) mortality and relevant events. South Africa is one of the global leaders in protecting the heart health of its citizens through the regulation of Trans Fats.

2. Regulations relating to the reduction of sodium in certain foodstuffs and related matters (No.R.214 of 2013) to help in reducing salt (sodium chloride) intake to less than 5g per day. Excessive salt intake is associated with high blood pressure (hypertension) which is a major risk factor for CVDs. Scientific evidence suggests that reducing sodium intake significantly reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults particularly its contribution towards coronary artery disease and stroke. South Africa is the first country in the world to legislate salt levels to help reduce the amount of salt in processed foods.

3. Regulations relating to foodstuffs for infants and young children (No.R.991 of 2012) aims to protect and promote optimal infant and young child feeding practices and to encourage the safe and appropriate use of commercially processed foods through regulating the labelling, advertising, sale and promotion, and the provision of information and education relating to infant and young child feeding and nutrition.

4. Regulations governing general hygiene requirements for food premises, the transport of food and related matters (No.R.638 of 2018) ensures that all food products are safe for consumption by the public. The regulations apply to all food establishments, including restaurants and hotels, and cover a range of topics including hygiene, food handling, transportation, storage and food preparation. All food establishments that comply with these regulations are issued with the Certificate of Acceptability.

The Minister has also published draft regulations to improve food labelling requirements so that consumers are clear about the contents of food. (No.R.146/2010). These regulations include the following :

(i) a model to classify healthy foods

(ii) specifying criteria for health claims, and,

(iii) a mandatory Front of Pack Label in the form of a easily understood logos, to assist consumers in identifying foods that exceed the threshold of certain “negative” nutrients (added sugar, sodium, and saturated fats) that contribute to the rising obesity and non-communicable disease and death burden in South Africa.

These regulations are implemented at local government level where health inspectors would do inspections to check compliance with regulatory requirements outlined above.

The purpose of regulating the sale and marketing of foods is to inform the consumer of the risk associated to the consumption of particular foods. Evidence from several countries suggests that consumers make healthy food choices when provided with information about the food they consume.

END.

20 March 2024 - NW606

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to his reply to question 187 on 1 March 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration has purchased one (1) official vehicle for the Minister and two (2) official vehicles for the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019. Details of the vehicles as purchased are as follows:

(i) Minister (Seat of office - Pretoria)

  1. Make: BMW
  2. Model: X3 sDrive20i
  3. Year of Manufacture: 2023
  4. Date of Purchase: 19 January 2024
  5. Purchase Price: R772 808.00

(ii) Deputy Minister (Seat of office – Pretoria)

  1. Make: BMW
  2. Model: 520D
  3. Year of Manufacture: 2022
  4. Date of Purchase: 9 June 2022
  5. Purchase Price: R748 624.04

(iii) Deputy Minister (Seat of office – Cape Town)

  1. Make: Audi
  2. Model: Q5 45 TFSI
  3. Year of Manufacture: 2023
  4. Date of Purchase: 31 May 2023
  5. Purchase Price: R790 000.00

End

20 March 2024 - NW427

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What is the (a) status of the criminal charges brough against a senior official of Boxing South Africa for alleged involvement in the credit card saga and (b) CAS number of the specifies criminal charges?

Reply:

The information at my disposal, which was verified with Boxing South Africa is that there was no criminal case opened against a senior official of Boxing South Africa. The said official tendered a resignation before the commencement of a disciplinary hearing against him.

THANK YOU

20 March 2024 - NW444

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

(1). Whether his department has developed plans to facilitate the building and refurbishment and / or rehabilitation of sport, arts and culture infrastructure, arts centres, sports facilities, and libraries throughout the Republic, if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details. (2). What are the (a) financial implications of the specified projects and (b) projected completion date.

Reply:

Arts, Culture, and Arts Centres

(1). DSAC has developed the User Asset Management Plan, (UAMP) to facilitate the building, and refurbishment, and/or rehabilitation of Arts, and Culture infrastructure, and art centres. The UAMP is developed on a three (3) year cycle, which is updated annually. It comprises mainly the inputs and projects from the Arts, Culture, and Art Centres.

(2)(a). The financial Implications of the specified projects in the UAMP are outlined in the attached document. It must be noted that the UAMP is subject to the annual National Treasury Virement Process and Budget cuts and the figures shown in the attached document for the current 2023/24 financial are as per the approved virement process.

(b). The Projected Completion Dates which were submitted by the Implementing Agents, i.e. Public Entities, Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, Development Bank of South Africa, Provinces, and Service Providers, are outlined in the attached document.

Libraries

(1). DSAC in corporation with the Provincial Departments of Sport, Arts and Culture have developed plans to facilitate the building, refurbishment, and/or rehabilitation of libraries.  The plans are developed and approved by the Provincial Departments. The plans outline the project scope, cost, and timeframe. The details of the projects are outlined on the attached document below.

(2). The financial Implications of the specified projects are outlined in the attached document.

Sports Facilities

(1). The provision (Construction, refurbishment, and rehabilitation) including the maintenance of Sport and recreation facilities is the constitutional responsibility of Local Government through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) and the Metropolitan Municipalities through the Urban Settlement Development Grant (USDG). However annually since 2016, DSAC allocates municipalities, which are custodians of sport facilities, funding from ring-fenced MIG for upgrading, refurbishment and construction of sport facilities in line with requests submitted.

It is important to emphasise that maintenance and refurbishment of sport facilities, as per the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, is a mandate of these municipalities, and the funds DSAC recommends for allocation are municipal grants aligned to this mandate. Additional to this allocation, municipalities are required to use 5% of their baseline MIG allocations they receive from COGTA for, inter alia, refurbishment of sport facilities. To ensure this happens, DSAC is in a process to engage with COGTA to enforce use of 5% for sport facilities, especially for refurbishment purpose.

2(a). The List of 52 projects/municipalities that are recommended for the next financial year is attached, with details regarding the district, name of Local Municipality allocated, project name, scope of work and total amount allocated. It should be noted that all the 52 projects are already gazetted and letters from DSAC confirming funding has been sent. Currently DSAC assisting municipalities fast track the registration process through COGTA.

(b). The projects will only begin with implementation June 2024 which is the new financial year of the municipality. Municipalities are encouraged to complete the project the same year of allocation, we expect that the projects be completed July 2025, we do however acknowledge that due to delays either in registration or appointment of professional service providers and contractors or any other challenge the municipalities might experience during implementation some might be finalise September/October 2025.

Thank you

20 March 2024 - NW581

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

a) Whether, with reference to reports from the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism regarding the re-exportation of white rhinos back to the Republic from Namibia in order to circumvent regulations for the export of rhinos to non-range states, she has been informer of any incidents of live white rhinos impoi1ed from the Republic being re-exported from Namibia; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; b) what (a) is the total number of live white rhinos that were exported trom the Republic to Namibia in each of the past five years and (b) are the current regulations controlling the import of live white rhinos from Namibia?

Reply:

 

Find reply here

20 March 2024 - NW508

Profile picture: Xaba-Ntshaba, Ms PP

Xaba-Ntshaba, Ms PP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What strategies and programmes has she found are required to create work opportunities for the unemployed to contribute to improved service provision through public employment programmes as they can serve as a source of increased capacity for local government to improve the provision of basic services?

Reply:

The Strategies required to create work opportunities for the unemployed to contribute to improved service provision include the following:

  1. Maximising labour-intensive construction (LIC) where feasible without compromising the quality of the services.
  2. Maximising use of labour for maintenance of infrastructure.
  3. Ensuring that skills development and training is provided to those employed for provision of services.

The Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) was introduced by Government to create work opportunities across all its four sectors, namely Infrastructure, Non-State, Environment and Culture, and Social sectors. One of the prescripts of the EPWP is to use labour-intensive methods that ensure that significant numbers of participants are employed in the Programme to do the work. Some examples include opting to employ labour for excavating trenches for pipework instead of using machines, opting for paved roads that maximise labour force as well as litter picking.

The use of labour for planned and routine maintenance of infrastructure includes cleaning stormwater drainage systems, cutting grass or patching of potholes.

It is imperative that skills development and training is part of the public employment programmes mentioned above to ensure that labour is capacitated to perform the tasks for quality products, and as part of the exit strategies wherein the beneficiaries can be employed in future utilising the skills learnt.

The Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) is currently supporting municipalities to implement their infrastructure projects labour intensively. This involves ensuring that suitable projects are selected for maximising LIC, LIC design methods incorporated in project documentation, monitoring is done during construction and the work opportunities created are recorded on the EPWP system administered by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI).

End.

20 March 2024 - NW553

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps has he/his department taken to address concerns raised by the freedom park branch of National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union in their December 2023 letter to the Portfolio Committee on Sport, Arts and Culture, specifically regarding the alleged controversial transaction involving (i) some members of council and (ii) Freedom Park management, (b) what do the specified transaction entail and (c) how are the concerns addressed?

Reply:

(a). The matter was referred to the Freedom Park Council which in turn commissioned an internal investigation to establish the veracity of the claims. The report presented showed that the allegations made were not factual.

  1. There are no transactions of whatever nature that any Council member was involved in.
  2. There are no transactions of whatever nature that the management was involved in.

(b). A council member, Mr Mpho Tsedu did engage in television production management with the organisation while he was a private citizen and not a member of the Council. The productions were done in regular manner and were beneficial to the organisation. Mr. Tsedu has never entered into any transactions since he became member of Council.

(c). Any concern receives attention and internal investigations are conducted.

THANK YOU

20 March 2024 - NW513

Profile picture: Ntuli, Ms M M

Ntuli, Ms M M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What is the progress regarding the implementation of the e-government strategy and (b) on what date is it envisaged that services such as the Z83 form and other administrative processes will be digitised and/or automated?

Reply:

a) What is the progress regarding the implementation of the e-government strategy?

The implementation of the National e-Government Strategy prioritises the implementation of e-Services as the first milestone towards digitalisation of government.

E-SERVICES

The following are some of the flagship e-services implemented by government.

National e-Services Portal developed by DCDT and SITA 

The National e-Governmental Portal initiative reinforces SITA’s e-Government Programme Imperatives, including transversal services, streamlining legacy systems, open digital platform, and cloud capabilities. The National e-Governmental Portal has various features and services available for consumption by different sectors of our society. The following is a list of the services in the portal (www.eservices.gov.za):

  1. Private Employment Agency Registration,
  2. International Cross Boarder Labour Migration (ICBLM) Certificate,
  3. e-Participatory Governance & Land Use Management System (ePGLUM),
  4. Permit Platform (eastern Cape DEDEAT, Free State DESTEA, DFFE-CIPS),
  5. Licensing Platform (KZN EDTEA),
  6. Free State School of Nursing- Student Management System,
  7. e-Learning Platform, e-Rehabilitation Platform,
  8. e-Complaints Platform,
  9. Funza Lushaka: Front-end/Funza Lushaka: Back-End,
  10. e-Matric: e-Registration,
  11. e-Re-Issue, and e-Re-Mark/Re-Check,
  12. DHET: Exams e-Query,
  13. Grants Management System,
  14. South African Council for Educators (SACE),
  15. Agro-Processing Service (Phase 1),
  16. Electronic Document Delivery System,
  17. e-Prison (pre prod), 
  18. Annual Performance Plan

Electronic Document Delivery (EDD)

The EDD has transformed the way government distributes payslips to the employees with payslips being sent directly to their respective email address and accessible through desktop and mobile devices.

EDD provides preparation, formatting, composition, and timely secure delivery of electronic documents (such as Invoices, Payslips, Certificates, Permits, etc) via multiple delivery platforms e.g. Email, FAX, SMS to specific recipients as per the business requirements.

CIPC e-Services

The CIPC eServices portal is an online platform provided by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) in South Africa. It allows individuals and businesses to access numerous services related to company registration, intellectual property, and other legal matters.

eHome Affairs

The Department of Home Affairs developed a portal enabling citizens to apply for identity related services. E-Home Affairs allows the following: Submit ID and Passport applications online, make online payments for applications, and make bookings where allowed.

Other online services portals

Some integrated provincial websites offer eservices: Gauteng Online portal; Western Cape Portal, KZN online; and Eastern Cape online. Other provinces publish their services on the launch pads of their respective websites.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Some of the large-scale interventions in support of government’s digitalisation programme by individual departments and clusters of departments:

Home Affairs:

DHA developed the National Population Register (NPR), the Home Affairs Identification System (HANIS), the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS), and the Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS), together with the Live Capture System that supports the digitalisation of the service at the front-office.

Department of Health:

NDoH digitalisation is enabled through a range of databases, systems and applications, including the Health Patient Registration System (link to HANIS), the District Health Information System (DHIS), the National Health Information Repository and Data-warehouse (NHIRD), the Centralised Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) system, the Stock Visibility System (SVS), MomConnect, and the Electronic Vaccination Data System (EVDS). In addition, South Africa launched a COVID-19 Tracing Database in April 2020 to trace people who had met someone with COVID-19.

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

The Integrated Justice System (IJS) in South Africa is a comprehensive initiative to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system. The IJS aims to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the criminal justice system by increasing the probability of successful investigation, prosecution, punishment for priority crimes and rehabilitation of offenders. Further issues receiving specific attention include overcrowding in prisons and awaiting-trial prisoner problems, as well as bail, sentencing and plea-bargaining.

National Open Government Platform Initiatives

South Africa is the member of the Open Government Partnership and one of the requirements is that member states should make government data accessible to citizen to promote transparency and ensure good governance.

The following are some of the initiatives that government implemented to achieve this:

Open Data South Africa

Open Data South Africa encourages using government data for social impact under the stewardship of the DPSA, and working with OpenUp, the CPSI, The Innovation Hub, Geekculcha, Open Cities Lab and the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC).

Municipal Money:

Municipal Money a web portal making available extensive municipal financial information in an easily accessible format, aims to promote transparency as part of the NT’s budget participation reform process.

Vulekamali:

Vulekamali is an Online Budget Data Portal (https://vulekamali.gov.za/).

The City of Cape Town and the eThekwini Municipality (https://edge.durban/) have launched open data initiatives to foster transparency through information sharing.

South African Cities Data Almanac:

A city-centric data portal providing evidence, analysis, and insight.

Policy, Norms And Standards

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration published digital government enabling directives including:

Use of Cloud Technologies: 

The Determination and Directive on the use of cloud technologies provides clear guidance on adopting and using cloud computing services in the Public Service. It was issued on the 2nd of February 2022. The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) provides ongoing implementation support for all Departments. 

Cybersecurity 

The Directive on Information Security Management in the Public Service provides direction for the Public Service regarding establishing departmental Information Security governance, practices, and procedures to protect information and technology assets. The directive was issued on the 21st of June 2022. The DPSA is providing ongoing implementation support to all the Departments. 

Digital Government Risk Management  

The Determination and Directive on ICT Service Continuity provides clear guidance to Departments for developing and implementing ICT service continuity plans supporting the department’s business continuity objectives. This Directive was issued on the 1st of December 2022. The DPSA is providing ongoing implementation support to all the Departments. 

Determination and Directive on Corporate Governance of ICT Policy Framework

The Determination and Directive on Corporate Governance of ICT Policy Framework provides norms and standards to implement the revised public service Corporate Governance of ICT policy Framework. This was issued on the 11th of November 2022. The DPSA is providing ongoing implementation support to all the Departments. 

Determination and Directive on Knowledge and Data Management 

This Directive provides direction on institutionalizing and standardizing the implementation of Knowledge Management (KM) to attain at a minimum level 2 (Initiation Phase) of maturity supported by Phase 1 foundational Data Management (DM) practice areas in the public Service. The Directive is approved by the minister for the DPSA. 

b) On what date is it envisaged that services such as the Z83 form and other administrative processes will be digitised and/or automated?

The automation of the Z83 form and its associated business processes fall within the scope of the IFMS project and therefore no significant progress can be recorded. Nevertheless, some provinces and government departments have forged ahead to automate recruitment and other administrative processes.

e-Recruitment technologies automate one of the administrative business processes of the Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS). The delays of IFMS impedes the ability for government to implement an e-Recruitment for the whole public service. The National Treasury issued an instruction note no. 5 of 2017 / 2018 which prohibits departments to acquire any Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) type ICT solution that might result in the duplication of the functionality of the IFMS.

This instruction note has a negative impact on the digitalisation and modernisation of government administration business processes primarily those of Financial Management, Supply Chain Management and Human Resource Management.

However, the Kwa-Zulu Natal, Gauteng, Eastern Cape and Western Cape provinces have forged ahead and implemented e-recruitment, after obtaining exemption to the instruction note by the National Treasury. The Presidency and SITA and National Treasury have e-services portals that provide e-Recruitment. In addition, several departments also have e-recruitment implemented in their respective departments.

The Department of Labour developed the Employment Services of South Africa system (ESSA), a platform where citizens access job opportunities and organisations publish their jobs. This is an alternative electronic platform through which citizens can access job information outside the public service.

Discussions are underway between the DPSA and National Treasury to enable some human resource digitalisation initiatives to proceed while the IFMS project deals with its Governance and SCM issues.

End

20 March 2024 - NW549

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) type of performance and/or incentive bonuses, excluding the 13th salary cheque exist in the Public Service and (b) amount was spent on the specified performance and/or incentive bonuses since 8 May 2019; (2) on what grounds were performance bonuses paid out to employees of government departments that recorded adverse audit outcomes and/or did not achieve their key performance indicators?

Reply:

  1. (a) & (b)

The performance management and development system (PMDS) is underpinned by the notion of improving organisational performance and accountability. The PMDS is designed to ensure that the goals/objectives contained in a department’s Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plan are cascaded into the performance agreements of employees.

Based on the prescripts, the following amounts were spent on performance and/or incentive bonuses from the 2019/20 to 2023/24 financial years:

Amount spent on performance bonuses / cash bonuses

Financial Year

National Departments

Provincial Departments

2019/20

R36 318 724

R154 463 238

2020/21

R240 721 980

R819 214 333

2021/22

R321 125 930

R649 738 458

2022/23

R92 879 151

R427 102 143

2023/24

R71 121 130

R179 822 396

Data Source: PERSAL (8 March 2024)

2. Each employee is assessed based on the key performance areas as per the signed performance agreement between himself/ herself with the immediate supervisor against the set targets. The performance assessments of Heads of Department and members of the SMS take into consideration the Auditor-General’s findings and opinions and the department’s performance against the planned targets included in its Annual Performance Plan. Employees are rewarded based on the outcomes of their moderated performance assessment, on whether they have performance above the expected level (highly effective) or not and in compliance with Regulation 72 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 (Performance agreements and assessments) and the directives issued by the Minister for the Public Service and Administration.

End

20 March 2024 - NW550

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of Public Service employees are currently on suspension in each (i) national and (ii) provincial government department, (b) is the average period that each employee has been on suspension and (c) is the breakdown of the total cost to the State for each (aa) financial year and (bb) month that the employees have been on suspension?

Reply:

The number of Public Service employees currently on suspension, as directed in the question above, is reflected in the following two tables as captured on PERSAL:

i) National departments

Name of Department (i)

a) Number of employees on suspensions

b) Period

c) Cost to the State

aa) Financial Year

bb) Month/s/Period

Agriculture, Land reform and Rural Development

No Report

       

Basic Education

Nil

       

Civilian Secretariat for Police

Nil

       

Communications and Digital Technologies

Nil

       

Cooperative Governance

Nil

       

Correctional Services

84

27 months

R318 368.41

2021/22

27 months

   

27 months

R202 323.61

2021/22

27 months

   

6 months

R48 403.42

2023/24

6 months

   

8 months

R46 842.31

2023/24

8 months

   

7 months

R128 529.90

2023/24

7 months

   

9 months

R51 439.54

2023/24

9 months

   

12 months

R46 842.31

2023/24

12 months

   

14 months

R136 336.35

2022/23

14 months

   

9 months

R106 809.57

2023/24

9 months

   

3 months

R45 687.48

2023/24

3 months

   

4 months

R69 962.79

2023/24

4 months

   

5 months

R69 959.80

2023/24

5 months

   

4 months

R90 544.00

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R62 773.61

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R200 333.56

2023/24

4 months

   

3 months

R69 959.80

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R57 771.28

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R48 803.42

2023/24

3 months

   

7 months

R46 842.31

2023/24

7 months

   

7 months

R48 803.42

2023/24

7 months

   

6 months

R22 384.70

2023/24

6 months

   

10 months

R64 191.65

2023/24

10 months

   

14 months

R61 400.32

2022/23

14 months

   

15 months

R71 800.29

2022/23

15 months

   

3 months

R51 553.62

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R69 959.80

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R47 490.03

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R51 553.62

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R69 959.80

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R50 156.46

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R89 799.05

2023/24

3 months

   

5 months

R56 771.28

2023/24

5 months

   

7 months

R48 803.42

2023/24

7 months

   

5 months

R69 959.80

2023/24

5 months

   

5 months

R106 801.57

2023/24

5 months

   

1 month

R23 517.86

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R12 542.86

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R10 050.27

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R10 763.08

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R29 789.29

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R0.00

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R0.00

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R49 919.18

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R16 017.36

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R0.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R0.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R0.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R0.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R0.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R13 610.95

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R35 819.61

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R47 759.47

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R66 673.97

2023/24

1 month

   

3 months

R104 462.10

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R47 294.63

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R25 085.72

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R18 814.29

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R18 814.29

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R13 224.04

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R18 814.29

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R73 022.79

2023/24

2 months

   

3 months

R86 856.13

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R74 010.21

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R72 036.60

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R38 055.48

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R36 385.68

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R30 844.66

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R11 357.46

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R16 034.28

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R18 513.66

2023/24

1 month

   

3 months

R36 911.74

2023/24

3 months

 

 

1 month

R8 623.22

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R0.00

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R38 233.39

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R42 481.70

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R37 584.90

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R33 077.90

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R14 810.93

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R9 241.48

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R11 023.40

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R13 114.57

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R15 258.51

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R2 351.79

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R65 669.28

2023/24

2 months

   

5 months

R48 803.42

2023/24

5 months

Defence

Nil

       

Employment and Labour

1

5 months

R37 524.23

2023/24

5 Months

Forestry, Fisheries and the Environmental Affairs

Nil

       

Government Communication and Information System

Nil

       

Government Pensions Administration Agency

2

1 month

R0 (Not indicated)

2023/24

1 month

Government Printing Works

9

10 months

R259 875.02

2023/24

10 months

   

12 months

R620 905.49

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R119 600.25

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R153 362.50

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R134 135.75

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R102 828. 25

2023/24

12 months

   

5 months

R308 386.50

2023/24

5 months

   

9 months

R86 949.50

2023/24

9 months

   

9 months

R86 949.50

2023/24

9 months

Health

1

4 months

R107 256.00

2023/24

4 months

Home Affairs

7

34 months

R1 173 726.10

2020/21

34 months

   

17 months

R387 098.74

2022/23

17 months

   

15 months

R224 840.85

2022/23

15 months

   

15 months

R330 563.95

2022/23

15 months

   

10 months

R241 997.27

2023/24

10 months

   

7 months

R363 710.73

2023/24

7 months

   

10 months

R318 572.01

2023/24

10 months

Department of Higher Education and Training

11

15 months

R578 067.24

2022/23

15 months

   

13 months

R989 638.14

2022/23

13 months

   

9 months

R228 174.55

2023/24

9 months

   

5 months

R54 218.12

2023/24

5 months

   

3 months

R71 569.89

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R71 709.11

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R38 571.04

2023/24

1 month

   

3 months

R38 462.78

2023/24

3 months

   

4 months

R71 936.75

2023/24

4 months

   

2 months

R46 953.07

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R22 688.44

2023/34

2 months

Military Veterans

3

11 months

R2 173 562.17

2023/24

11 months

   

5 months

R624 120.31

2023/24

5 months

   

5 months

R588 819.86

2023/24

5 months

Department of Justice

9

26 months

No costs indicated

2021/22

26 months

   

36 months

No costs indicated

2020/21

36 months

   

9 months

R31 572.07

2023/24

9 months

   

8 months

R102 389.61

2023/24

8 months

   

8 months

R102 389.61

2023/24

8 months

   

8 months

R102 389.61

2023/24

8 months

   

9 months

R97 920.21

2023/24

9 months

   

7 months

R370 958.12

2023/24

7 months

   

6 months

R26 267.49

2023/24

6 months

Mineral Resources

Nil

       

National School of Government

Nil

       

National Prosecuting Authority

16

32 months

R2 355 182.89

2022/23

32 months

   

17 months

R107 023.00

2022/23

17 months

   

17 months

R717 853.00

2022/23

17 months

   

1 months 15 days

R144 401.40

2023/24

1 months 15 days

   

13 months

R264 509.00

2022/23

13 months

   

12 months

R547 577.00

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R619 031.00

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R519 874.00

2023/24

12 months

   

11 months

R441 971.00

2023/24

11 months

   

10 months

R976 611.00

2023/24

10 months

   

7 months

R368 927.00

2023/24

7 months

   

13 months

R662 913.00

2022/23

13 months

   

9 months

R265 241.00

2023/24

9 months

   

4 months

R296 106.00

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R174 666.00

2023/24

4 months

   

7 months

R442 834.00

2023/24

7 months

National treasury

Nil

       

Office of the Chief Justice

3

3 months

R41 039.00

2023/24

3 months

   

1 month

R29 549.34

2023/24

1 month

   

08 days

R295.43

2023/24

08 days

Planning Monitoring and Evaluation

1

23 days

R84 778.00

2023/24

23 days

Public Enterprise

Nil

       

Public Service and Administration

Nil

       

Public Service Commission

1

26 days

R1 365 411.00

2023/24

26 days

Public works and Infrastructure

Nil

       

Science and Innovation

1

34 months

R2 055 430.00

2022/23

34 months

Small Business Development

Nil

       

Social Development

Nil

       

South African Police Service

26

2 months

R38 236.58

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month, 10 days

R47 611.05

2023/24

1 month, 10 days

   

1 month

R20 137.25

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R19 580.35

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R21 004.23

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R9 790.17

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R98 164.27

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R50 988.54

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R78 671.01

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R60 121.71

2023/24

2 months

   

3 months

R68 031.19

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R41 857.44

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R46 018.78

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R31 727.32

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R31 727.32

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R31 727.32

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R31 727.32

2023/24

2 months

   

18 days

R14 510.64

2023/24

18 days

   

2 months

R71 770.95

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R40 109.34

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R32 344.39

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R52 590.81

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R52 590.81

2023/24

2 months

   

5 months

R101 573.53

2023/24

5 months

   

3 months

R101 008.82

2023/24

3 months

Sports Arts and Culture

Nil

       

Statistics South Africa

Nil

       

Tourism

Nil

       

Trade, Industry, and Competition

Nil

       

Traditional Affairs

Nil

       

Transport

Nil

       

Water and Sanitation

Nil

       

Women, Youth, and Persons with Disabilities

Nil

       

The Presidency

Nil

       

TOTAL

158

 

R21 816 586,30

   

ii) Provincial departments

Name of department (ii)

a) Number of employees on suspensions

b) Duration

c)Cost to the state

aa) Financial Year

bb) Month/s/Period

1. Eastern Cape

         

Public Works and infrastructure

3

10 months

R848 947.52

2023/24

10 months

   

4 months

R67 705.15

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R194 344.75

2023/24

4 months

Office of the Premier

3

7 months

R495 705.33

2023/24

7 months

   

4 months

R298 600.00

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R124 908.00

2023/24

4 months

Education

11

3 months

R101 325.00

2023/24

3 months

   

6 months

R282 120.00

2023/24

6 months

   

2 months

R92 576.26

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R69 672.00

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R86 072.35

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R76 887.19

2023/24

2 months

   

3 months

R137 286.46

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R83 290.26

2023/24

2 months

   

3 months

R85 897.89

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R70 952.26

2023/24

2 months

   

8 months

R167 867.10

2023/24

8 months

Health

6

6 months

R2 370 369.00

2023/24

6 months

   

2 months

 

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

 

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

 

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

 

2023/24

2 months

   

3 months

 

2023/24

3 months

2. Free State

         

Department of Economic, Small Business Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs (DESTEA)

Nil

       

Office of the Premier

1

10 months

R1 154 477.00

   

Social Development

5

3 months

R86 403.16

2023/24

3 months

   

1 month

R55 191.44

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R76 021.69

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R57 842.18

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R221 684.42

2023/24

1 month

Human Settlement

4

40 months

R4 212 176.70

2021/22

40 months

   

17 months

R1 236 290.18

2021/22

17 months

   

17 months

R1 229 050.72

2021/22

17 months

   

39 Days

R37 479.45

2021/22

39 Days

Sport Arts and Recreation

Nil

       

Provicncial Treasury

2

2 months

R283 793.00

2023/24

2 months

   

3 months

R189 511.00

2023/24

3 months

Public Works and Infrastructure

2

15 months

R150 858.87

2021/22

15 months

   

19 months

R1 754 317.02

2021/22

19 months

Community Safety

5

9 months

R1 161 524.13

2023/24

9 months

   

7 months

R861 792.24

2023/24

7 months

   

5 months

R534 010.32

2023/24

5 months

   

4 months

R99 197.04

2023/24

4 months

   

3 months

R85 652.51

2023/24

3 months

Health

8

1 month

R9 683.86

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R9 683.86

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R9 552.18

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R8 459.61

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R13 848.02

2023/24

1 month

   

7 months

R120 382.19

2023/24

7 months

   

5 months

R56 800.20

2023/24

5 months

   

2 months

R97 576.27

2023/24

2 months

Agriculture

2

32 months

R2 877158.06

2021/22

32 months

   

4 months

R378 662.79

2023/24

4 months

Education

5

3 months

R104 994.39

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R106 428.39

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R79 662. 00

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R79 662. 00

2023/24

3 months

   

4 months

R131 344.00

2023/24

4 months

3. Gauteng

         

Office of the Premier

Nil

       

Roads and transport

2

7 months

R628 902.39

2023/24

7 months

   

10 months

R749 327.21

2023/24

10 months

e-Government

Nil

       

Rural Development and Agriculture

Nil

       

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

Nil

       

Education

28

13 months

R310 697.52

2021/22

13 months

   

9 months

R648 715.53

2023/24

9 months

   

8 months

R85 600.64

2023/24

8 months

   

8 months

R197 234.44

2023/24

8 months

   

5 months

R65 820.48

2023/24

5 months

   

6 months

R337 986.58

2023/24

6 months

   

6 months

R251 043.26

2023/24

6 months

   

2 months

R75 357.42

2023/24

2 months

   

14 months

R545 128.10

2021/22

14 months

   

8 months

R500 926.36

2023/24

8 months

   

8 months

R652 064.12

2023/24

8 months

   

7 months

R381 510.18

2023/24

7 months

   

6 months

R111 064.78

2023/24

6 months

   

6 months

R205 801.93

2023/24

6 months

   

5 months

R190 399.27

2023/24

5 months

   

3 months

R92 066.11

2023/24

3 months

   

4 months

R183 829.59

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R42 115.24

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R100 945.03

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R127 142.36

2023/24

4 months

   

3 months

R93 298.78

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R31 367.37

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R82 520.51

2023/24

3 months

   

2 months

R80 394.88

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R30 712.99

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R44 652.48

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R30 314.12

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R29 508.83

2023/24

2 months

Community Safety

Nil

       

Economic Development

2

44 months

R3 241 348.34

2020/21

44 months

   

31 months

R1 067 198.73

2020/21

31 months

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Nil

       

Social Development

3

14 months

R199 070.26

2021/22

14 months

   

4 months

R62 937.80

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R62 937.80

2023/24

4 months

Human Settlement

1

49 months

R4 752 585.63

2019/20

49 months

Infrastructure Development

7

20 months

R415 895.25

2021/22

20 months

   

20 months

R408 974.25

2021/22

20 months

   

20 months

R270 357.00

2021/22

20 months

   

20 months

R295 147.50

2021/22

20 months

   

20 months

R408 974.25

2021/22

20 months

   

4 months

R36 759.00

2022/23

4 months

   

4 months

R36 759.00

2022/23

4 months

Provincial Treasury

Nil

       

4. Mpumalanga

         

Office of the Premier

Nil

       

Community Safety and Liaison

8

4 months

R59 004.27

2023/24

4 months

   

4 months

R48 557.38

2023/24

4 months

   

1 month

R24 443.88

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R24 443.83

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R49 053.50

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R49 053.50

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R20 972.75

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R47 888.88

2023/24

1 month

Education

8

6 months

R175 513.95

2023/24

6 months

   

6 months

R141 703.74

2023/24

6 months

   

8 months

R492 566.72

2023/24

8 months

   

1 month

R36 178.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R30 606.88

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R103 378.90

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R51 224.74

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R36 514.38

2023/24

2 months

Public Works, Roads and Transport

1

39 months

R719 097.21

2020/21

39 months

5. Limpopo

         

Limpopo Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism (LEDET)

Nil

       

Social Development

Nil

       

Transport and Community Safety

1

2 months

Not indicated

   

Agriculture

1

2 months

Not indicated

   

Health

2

2 months

R157 210.98

2023/24

2 months

   

4 months

R381 537.00

2023/24

4 months

Education

Nil

       

Office of the Premier

Nil

       

Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs (COGHSTA)

Nil

       

Treasury

Nil

       

Public Works, Roads, and Infrastructure

Nil

       

6. KwaZulu-Natal

 

COGTA

1

30 months

R3 620 897.79

2020/21

30 months

Health

11

1 month

R90 107.25

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R73 417.50

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R49 931.25

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R46 006.50

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R43 337.25

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R70 328.25

2023/24

1 month

   

7 months

R349 985.00

2023/24

7 months

   

2 months

R34 682.00

2023/24

2 months

   

9 months

R405 726.50

2023/24

9 months

   

29 months

R4 355 424.00

2020/21

29 months

   

14 months

R1 711 762.00

2021/22

14 months

Social development

1

15 months

R449 400.00

2021/22

15 months

Education

43

51 months

R93 6347.25

2019/20

51 months

   

27 months

R84 5430.75

2021/22

27 months

   

27 months

R1348 708.86

2021/22

27 months

   

26 months

R91 3191.5

2021/22

26 months

   

21 Months

R 522 805,50

2021/22

21 Months

   

23 Months

R411 861

2021/22

23 Months

   

19 Months

R55 4918.75

2021/22

19 Months

   

15 months

R526841.25

2021/22

15 months

   

15 months

R649 286.25

2021/22

15 months

   

14 months

R224 917

2021/22

14 months

   

14 months

R676 382

2021/22

14 months

   

12 Months

R297 156

2023/24

12 Months

   

12 Months

R324 996

2023/24

12 Months

   

12 months

R300 114

2023/24

12 months

   

12 months

R295 680

2023/24

12 months

   

9 Months

R243 747

2023/24

9 Months

   

8 Months

R254 168

2023/24

8 Months

   

11 Months

R283 448

2023/24

11 Months

   

9 Months

R305 517,33

2023/24

9 Months

   

9 months

R275 202

2023/24

9 months

   

9 Months

R739 481,58

2023/24

9 Months

   

7 Months

R44 521,75

2023/24

7 Months

   

7 Months

R131 668,67

2023/24

7 Months

   

7 Months

R229 852

2023/24

7 Months

   

7 Months

R235 366,25

2023/24

7 Months

   

6 Months

R242 389,56

2023/24

6 Months

   

5 Months

R238 477,5

2023/24

5 Months

   

6 months

R138 873

2023/24

6 months

   

6 Months

R159 324

2023/24

6 Months

   

6 months

R206 486,22

2023/24

6 months

   

22 months

R1064 497,5

2021/22

22 months

   

16 months

R532 896

2021/22

16 months

   

8 months

R396 534

2023/24

8 months

   

5 Months

R199 768,75

2023/24

5 Months

   

13 Months

R449 806,5

2021/22

13 Months

   

7 months

R397 451,25

2023/24

7 months

   

4 months

R117 315

2023/24

4 months

   

4 Months

R156 027

2023/24

4 Months

   

4 Months

R236 072

2023/24

4 Months

   

4 Months

R217 470

2023/24

4 Months

   

3 months

R54 940,5

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R139 021,5

2023/24

3 months

   

1 month

R28 372,50

2023/24

1 month

7. Northern Cape

 

Agriculture Environmental Affairs, Rural Development and Land Reform (DAERDLR)

1

42 months

R1 438 290.08

2019/20

42 months

Education

10

25 months

R848 961.57

2021/22

25 months

   

11 months

R315 046.00

2023/24

11 months

   

8 months

R215 458.00

2023/24

8 months

   

4 months

R73 191.00

2023/24

4 months

   

5 months

R184 148.25

2023/24

5 months

   

4 months

R168 743.75

2023/24

4 months

   

5 months

R168 624.00

2023/24

5 months

   

7 months

R191 277.75

2023/24

7 months

   

4 months

R100 399.15

2023/24

4 months

   

3 months

R79 662.00

2023/24

3 months

   

1 month

R70 872.50

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R109 254.00

2023/24

1 month

Health

8

1 month

R29 950.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R19 751.00

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R141 260.68

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R14 797.38

2023/24

1 month

   

2 months

R168 906.00

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R78 223.73

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R86 127.26

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R157 215.20

2023/24

2 months

8. North-West

         

Agriculture

Nil

       

Community Safety and Transport Management

6

10 months

R259 263.18

2023/24

10 months

   

9 months

R175 525.92

2023/24

9 months

   

2 months

R49 005.70

2023/24

2 months

   

2 months

R28 932.00

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R26 718.61

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R26 712.71

2023/24

1 month

Economic, Environmental Conservation and Tourism

1

23 months

R625 531.65

2021/22

23 months

Education

NIL

       

Health

12

30 months

R500 313.69

2021/22

30 months

   

20 months

R38 056.88

2021/22

20 months

   

14 months

R395 461.62

2021/22

14 months

   

27 months

R821 651.13

2021/22

27 months

   

27 months

R28 009.00

2021/22

27 months

   

27 months

R35 258.38

2021/22

27 months

   

24 months

R39 485.38

2021/22

24 months

   

7 months

R72 445.38

2023/24

7 months

   

7 months

R110 516.65

2023/24

7 months

   

2 months

R134 809.94

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R12 369.80

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R25 565.88

2023/24

1 month

Human Settlement

1

6 months

R486 141.01

2023/24

6 months

Office of the Premier

1

12 months

R1 122 763.51

2023/24

12 months

Public Works and Roads

1

20 months

R1 673 466.20

2021/22

20 months

Social Developments

2

24 months

R360 744.82

2021/22

24 months

   

14 months

Not indicated

2021/22

14 months

9. Western Cape

         

Police Oversight and Community Safety

1

6 months

R114 956.80

2023/24

6 months

Local Government

Nil

       

Infrastructure

Nil

       

Health and Wellness

7

2 months

R105 112.77

2023/24

2 months

   

1 month

R18 409.61

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R20 698.51

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R7237.59

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R36 170.58

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R19 734.11

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R23 295.63

2023/24

1 month

Social Development

6

4 months

R64 368.20

2023/24

4 months

   

5 months

R66 732.76

2023/24

5 months

   

2 months

R30 122.42

2023/24

2 months

   

4 months

R75 396.13

2023/24

4 months

   

1 month

R12 809.29

2023/24

1 month

   

1 month

R11 271.85

2023/24

1 month

Education

4

72 months

R75 544.65

2019/20

72 months

   

4 months

R65 603.83

2023/24

4 months

   

3 months

R37 262.29

2023/24

3 months

   

3 months

R108 929.81

2023/24

3 months

TOTAL

237

 

R107 726 606,86

   

OVERALL

395

 

R129 543 193,16

   

End

20 March 2024 - NW552

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with (a) copy of the forensic investigation report into matters at freedom park that was conducted by SNG Grant Thornton and (b) the fraud case number including an update on the investigation initiated in 2019; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; and (2) whether the report will be made publicly available; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (3) What actions have been taken against the (a) Chief Financial Officer and (b) Financial Manager who are being accused of negligence in the forensic report. (4) whether the employee responsible for the improper procurement of fried chicken has been disciplined as the auditor recommended; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a). Copy is attached for your attention.

 

(b). Case number 421/1/2018. I am not able to provide update as the case was opened by Freedom Park.

(2). The Freedom Park Council commissioned the report, and it is their prerogative to make if they wish to make the report publicly available.

(3)(a). The Chief Financial Officer resigned prior to the finalization of the report, and the report did not issue recommendations against him as he was no longer an employee of Freedom Park (b) The Finance Manager:

A disciplinary enquiry was initiated as per the recommendations. The process could however not be concluded as the employee resigned before the matter was finalised.

(4). The said employee, the SCM official underwent a process of disciplinary hearing and was found not guilty.

Thank you

20 March 2024 - NW349

Profile picture: Le Goff, Mr T

Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the full details of all (a) sponsorship, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and//or any other purposes to (I) him, (ii) his department and (iii) officials of his department by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available?

Reply:

During the specified period between 01 January 2021 and to the current date in 2024, the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has not received sponsorships, donations, or any transfers for lawfare and for any other purposes from Qatari Iranian and/or Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident.

Thank you

20 March 2024 - NW600

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 89 on 20 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) Year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

1. The Department of Human Settlements purchased the following vehicles, since 8 May 2019:

(a) AUDI.

(b) Q5 40 TDI.

(c) 2022.

(d) (i) Minister, none.

(ii) the Deputy Minister, 27 July 2022 and

(e) Purchase price for:

(i) Minister, none.

(ii) the Deputy Minister, R 795 280.97.

20 March 2024 - NW390

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Given that he has recently warned municipalities against the over-reliance on water tankers and boreholes as a means of water provision to communities and considering that many rural communities throughout the Republic lack the infrastructure needed for the supply of piped water, what plans has his department put in place to capacitate municipalities with phasing out the use of water tankers for a more sustained method, such as piped water?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) provides support to municipalities through conditional grants; the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). The purpose of the grants is to support municipalities to develop their water and sanitation infrastructure and to address backlogs of infrastructure, thus improving access to water services.

The Department has allocated about R44 billion over the MTEF period for water and sanitation projects to various municipalities in all the province. This includes R7 billion allocated to Water Boards for the implementation of strategic projects. This caters for 107 RBIG projects under implementation in the 2023/24 financial year for which R14 billion has been allocated to 259 municipalities. 6.7 million households are envisaged to benefit from this investment. A further R15.6 billion and R14.3 billion is planned for the 24/25 and 25/26 financial years respectively.

The Department is also investing in robust planning activities for water and sanitation projects. This is to ensure that the most viable and sustainable options are identified to address the needs. Planning is based on life cycle costing and environmental, practicality, security and climate change considerations. There are 107 water and sanitation projects currently subjected to rigorous departmental planning. In line with this, the Department is also in the process to develop Provincial Bulk Master Plans that will identify Water Resource shortages in critical areas and the development of pipeline of projects to ensure the availability of resources to all affected areas.

Groundwater is an essential as part of the water resource mix and country’s natural resources that must be used to effectively supply a reliable resource to communities in South Africa. The Department has developed a Standard Operating Procedure for Groundwater Resource Development for Community Water Supply Projects which are in the process of being rolled out to all Provinces to ensure that groundwater is appropriately developed as a source.

---00O00---

20 March 2024 - NW85

Profile picture: Moore, Mr S J

Moore, Mr S J to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the fact that the 2022/23 Budgetary Review and Recommendation Report of the Portfolio Committee on Water and Sanitation indicates that 71% of Regional Bulk Infrastructure projects are delayed, and that, consequently, costs have increased by R9,4 billion, he will furnish Mr S J Moore with the details of (a) which projects are delayed, (b) the duration of delays for each project and (c)(i) the original costs of each project and (ii) by how much costs of each project have increased; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation notes the submission that there are 71% Regional Bulk Infrastructure projects that are delayed which have resulted in cost escalations of R9, 4 billion. These figures are from the Auditor General (AG) findings report, which states the following:

  • 71% of the total RBIG projects are delayed in terms of completion
  • Over the years, as the projects were delayed the initial budget continues to be revised. To date there is an increase of budget by R9,4 billion
  • The spending on these projects is also not always aligned to the initial plan. Variations in scope can be due to poor planning by municipalities.
  • If the root causes for poor project management is not corrected, there is a risk that other projects may be similarly delayed

 

The Department acknowledges that, per findings by the Auditor General in a report to the Portfolio Committee on the 2022/23 Annual Report, there have been delays on a number of projects over a period of time due to numerous reasons including:

  • Appointment of beneficiary municipalities with history of poor financial controls and lacking adequate capacity
  • Poor performance of implementing agents – inadequate contract management – no actions taken for poor performance
  • Poor performance of contractors not identified in a timely manner.
  • Contractors abandon site due to cash flow challenges or non-payment by municipalities
  • Delays in the procurement process both to appoint contractors and also on procuring some of the materials
  • Access restrictions by community leaders and protests by the community as they also want to be part or benefit from the project
  • Poor project management both by the implementing agent and the department
  • Poor oversight and monitoring by the department
  • There are also instances where the projects are multi-year projects which are broken down into different phases which are funded over a number of years.

In terms of the Department’s report to the Portfolio Committee on its 2022/23 Annual Report, the DWS reported an achievement of 5 out of 13 RBIG funded projects in the year under review and further indicated that there were delays for the following projects:

Project name

District municipality

Project start date

Initial completion date

Revised completion date

Original project cost

Revised project cost

Mpumalanga

           

Driekoppies phase 1A

Ehlanzeni DM

03 September 2018

18 September 2020

The project is undergoing a litigation process a revised completion date will be known once the courts have decided on the matter

R96 743 094

Cost not revised

Empuluzi/Methula RBWS phase 3B

Gert Sibande DM

22 May 2020

28 March 2023

30 April 2024

78 698 005

Cost not revised**

Empuluzi/Methula phase 5, 6 & 7

Gert Sibande DM

04/03/2021

14/12/2023

30 April 2024

194 472 739

Cost not revised***

Kwa Zulu Natal

           

Driefontein BWS

Chris Hani DM

Jan 2011

Dec 2021

Not yet determined

R397 742 111

Not yet determined

Eastern Cape

Cluster 9 BWS

Chris Hani DM

Sept 2010

Nov 2022

Feb 2024

R254 695 667

R485 700 000

Cluster 4 BWS

Chris Hani DM

Apr 2022

May 2023

Mar 2024

R427 099 000

R849 474 094

Cluster 6 BWS

Chris Hani DM

Jun 2010

May 2023

Jan 2025

R323 952 670

R474 323 951

Limpopo

           

Nebo BWS

Sekhukhune DM

Jan 2009

Jul 2016

Aug 2024

R1 379 080

R700 000

Free State

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply Phase 2

Fezile Dabi DM

Jul-2020

Dec-22

Jun- 25

R129 027 000

R249 2961 47

Based on the project list provided above, the projects collectively do not add up to 9.4 billion as some are funded over multiple years and others have no revised costs. Even where there are cost escalations, it is not anticipated that it will amount to R9.4 billion.

  • The Driefontein Bulk Water Supply Project - The project RBIG commitment ceiling has been reached. There is no allocation for the current financial year. The project is about 99% complete and the contractor moved off-site due to the municipality’s failure to pay its invoices. The Minister is intervening on this project, it is currently under planning to finalise for finding alternative water source to ensure long term sustainable water supply. Currently being the users are supplied water via Ladysmith WTW and boreholes.
  • Nebo Bulk Water supply Project – the delays are due to the contractor having been stopped from working by the construction mafias. Meetings were held with these Construction Mafias and an MoU signed as attached to allow Contractor to proceed with the work. 
  • Chris Hani District Municipality Cluster 4 - Phase 4 and 5: where the delays are due to poor contractor performance delayed the completion of these projects.
  • Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply Phase 3 of 3, where the delays are as a result of community strikes, relating to 30% sub-contracting. The project has lost many days that have affected the completion time. The contractor was also experiencing challenges of cash flows including non-payment by the municipality.
  • Empuluzi phases 3B, 5, 6: Delays by the contractor to finalise the works was affected by flooding.

There was a fatality caused by flooding which led to the Department of Labour closing the site for investigations. Currently the site is opened, the contractor working and project to be completed by June 2024

DWS is actively implementing the recommendations made by the Auditor General in its 2022/23 Budgetary Review Report for improving RBIG Project Management. For instance, in relation to the Auditor General’s recommendation that the project management unit must be adequately capacitated with the right skills to drive the performance targets that have been set for RBIG colleagues, the DWS introduced a new structure in 2022 to address such capacity and skills inadequacies and inefficiencies. The DWS has reconfigured the structure strategically, which has resulted in a dedicated Branch for Water and Sanitation Services Management to provide support to municipalities on activities such as, project planning, project management, monitoring. The branch is capacitated by professional engineers who are now supporting municipalities.

---00O00---

20 March 2024 - NW559

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

In light of 3 tons of fish killed in February 2022 in eMalahleni, Mpumalanga, where 23 species of fish were killed, but fortunately could be found somewhere else and bred to introduce to the river through the rehabilitation process at the breeding facility in Loskop dam area where the Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency have taken responsibility for it, (a) what species of fish are currently being bred to ensure the re-introduction of these 23 species into the river, (b) what progress has been made regarding the cleaning and rehabilitation of the rivers, (c) how long will the rehabilitation take until completion and (d) whether there is any other species being bred that will assist with the rehabilitation process?

Reply:

Find reply here

20 March 2024 - NW560

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Whether, with regard to fears of endangered and close to extinct animals, there are breeding facilities for the (a) southern ground hornbill, (b) pangolins and (c) black-footed cat; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how many facilities in each case per province; (2) Which endangered species have breeding facilities in each province to ensure that they do not become extinct?

Reply:

Find reply here

20 March 2024 - NW516

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to her reply to question 3220 on 20 November 2023, and given that we are witnessing increased disaster patterns due to global warming and other acts of nature, what steps will her department take to increase the (a) human resources capacity and (b) financial support to municipalities in those provinces that do not currently have the capacity to render urban search and rescue services?

Reply:

a) Human resources capacity:

Since the 2023/2024 Financial Year, the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) Fire Services Directorate have been performing annual capacity assessments within Provinces, in particular where little or no capacity exists, to determine the level of support required.

The purpose of the capacity assessments is in an effort to develop a sustained urban search and rescue capability across the country. The assessments assist the NDMC Fire Services to ascertain the necessary human resource capacity and skills and infrastructure required within a particular Province to reduce the level of risk of structural collapses, and water related risks to the community.

b) Financial support to municipalities:

The NDMC is responsible for the establishment as well as development of a Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) capacity through governmental and regulatory frameworks.

Therefore, in the 2024/2025 Financial Year, the NDMC have made budgetary provision for training and development programmes within the assessed Provinces, in order to strengthen USAR capabilities within each province, district, and local municipality in an effort to ensure that they are equipped, and ready to respond to urban search and rescue incidents at various capacities.

End.

20 March 2024 - NW430

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Mr A Matumba (EFF) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”.

Whether other programmes that were launched together with the Silapa Wellness Intervention Programme ceased to exist; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the reasons for their discontinuation?

Reply:

The Department is not aware of any other projects that were launched together with Silapha Wellness Intervention programme, however, the Department had two other projects that were implemented in conjunction with Silapha, namely Golekane & Baqhawafazi.

The Golekane campaign is a call to action for men to end GBVF. The program also focuses on the mentorship of the boy child. To date the program has implemented projects such as the Walk Fit for Purpose and the Golekane men’s conference. The Golekane campaign has also worked with NGOs such as Frida Hartley, Love Life and POWA.

Baqhawafazi is a campaign that raises awareness against gender-based violence and femicide through the use of mediums such as Film, theatre and spoken word. The campaign has also implemented projects such as the Survivors guild in both Gauteng and Mpumalanga.

Over and above that the Department has also supported the Nqoba iGBVF program which aims at enhancing and strengthening Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) interventions within the identified GBVF Hotspots in South Africa.

The programme focuses on establishing collective structures, strengthening social cohesion through trauma-informed training and capacitating Community-Based Organisations working within the GBVF sphere within the identified hotspots.

 

Thank you

20 March 2024 - NW288

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the Community Works Programme (CWP) is aimed at providing a job safety net for unemployed people of working age, what is the total amount (a) of the allocated CWP budget that has been lost to (i) corruption, (ii) undeserving beneficiaries and (iii) theft and (b) that has been recovered and paid back to the State in the past 10 financial years in each case?

Reply:

a) (i)There is no amount of CWP budget that has been lost to corruption. The Department did not discover any fraudulent activities nor our assurance providers discovered and reported any fraudulent activities

(ii) The amount paid to undeserving benefiaries is R1,3 million.

(iii) There is no amount of CWP budget that has been lost to theft as the Department and its assurance providers did not discover or report any theft.

(b) The amount that has been recovered is R1,2 million and this relates to underseving beneficiaries. The balance of R100 000.00 is still to be recovered through arbitration and mediation with two implementing agents respectively.

 

End.

20 March 2024 - NW624

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the concerning revelations surrounding corporate funding of health research in academic institutions, what collaborative mechanisms does his department have in place with the Department of Higher Education, Science and Innovation to ensure that there is transparency and integrity in health research funding in the Republic’s institutions of higher learning?

Reply:

The National Department of Health (NDoH) collaborates with the Department of Higher Education, Science and Innovation through the National Health Research Committee (NHRC). NHRC is an NDoH Ministerial Advisory statutory body established in terms of National Health Act of 2003. It responsible for determining the nature, scope, as well as the co-ordination of health research. NHRC is made up of researchers and representative of various academic institutions.

It is a prerequisite that all health research proposals and protocols are reviewed and approved by the health research ethics committee which is registered with the National Health Ethics Council (NHREC) to ensure transparency and integrity of health research. The NHREC is mandated by the Health Act of 2003 to develop guidelines for institutional research ethics committees (IRECs), register and audit IRECs, advise the department of health on all research ethics matters, and adjudicate complains about health research ethics committees.

END.

20 March 2024 - NW561

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Ms SJ GRAHAM: TO ASK THE MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

(1). What is the total number of applications received from the Eastern Cape Geographical Names Committee since the start of the standardisation of the place names process, (2). Whether all the applications were approved, if not, (a) what total number was not approved, (b) what were the reasons for their rejection, and (c) which applications were not approved, (3). How many applications were successfully objected to (a) prior to gazetting, (b) post gazetting, and (c) on what grounds would an objection be successful?

Reply:

1. The total number of applications received and gazetted from the Eastern Cape Geographical Names Committee (PGNC) since the start of geographical names process in the Republic of South Africa is 312.

2. Not all the applications were approved.

(a) The total number of applications not approved is 2.

(b) The reasons for their rejection were that the one name was a duplication of an already existing suburb name and the other name required consultation with all stakeholders in the town.

(c) Applications not approved were the city name changes of East London to KuGompo (applied for in 2020) and initially the changing of the name of Grahamstown to Makhanda. Subsequent to that consultation, the name change was returned to the Minister, approved, and gazetted in the government gazette of 29 June 2018.

3. (a). No name application was successfully objected to prior gazetting.

(b). No name application was successfully objected to post gazetting.

(c). A name application would be successfully objected to, if the application process was not followed, i.e. if the name application did not follow the South African Geographical Names Council Act, (Act No 118 of 1998), the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act (PAJA) 2000 (Act No 3 of 2000) (when it comes to consultation) and the Council’s Standard Operating Procedure (SOP).

Thank you

20 March 2024 - NW477

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether he will furnish Mr M K Montwedi with a list of all projects that were done and completed by his internal project management unit in the past five years; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the project(s) were completed in time and within the allocated budget; if not, (a) what caused the delay and (b) how will he deal with the situation in future; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1.  The Infrastructure Management Branch within the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) completed the following projects in the past five years:

  • Olifants River Water Resources Development Project – Phase 2A: De Hoop Dam in Limpopo
  • Mdloti River Development project: Raising of Hazelmere Dam in Kwa-Zulu Natal

2. The construction of the Olifants River Water Resources Development Project – Phase 2A: De Hoop Dam was completed in time with expenditure of 101% at completion. The 1% over expenditure is due to cost escalations.

The raising of Hazelmere Dam Project experienced delays and cost overruns. The project was not completed in the initial planned time and within the original budget. Project was completed in March 2023.

a) Various challenges resulted in delays in the project implementation, but the major delays are attributed to issues arising from contractual matters, contractual disputes and delays due to technical aspects. This led to the termination of the contract between the DWS and the contractor which was eventually resolved but impacted the project implementation timelines, however, construction works did recommence and was completed.

b) To address the challenges encountered during project implementation, alternative project capacitation is being explored with the Department as well as the implementation of a new procurement policy which aims to enhance the DWS's capability to select service providers with the requisite capacity and skills to successfully execute projects within stipulated timelines and budgets.

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20 March 2024 - NW597

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 86 on 22 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by his department for (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

Since 1 June 2019 the department only bought one vehicle for the current Minister: Dr. MJ Phaahla, MP, when he was the Deputy Minister as per the table below:

Members of Executive Authority

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Year of Manufacture

(d) Cost

(e) Purchase date

i) Minister: Dr MJ Phaahla, MP

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

ii) Former Minister:

Dr ZL Mkhize, MP

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

iii) Deputy Minister: Dr S Dhlomo,MP

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

No Procurement was made

iv) Former Deputy Minister: Dr MJ Phaahla

Audi

Q5

2020

R 756,489.83

10/5/2020

END.

20 March 2024 - NW615

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to his reply to question 101 on 24 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price of all the official vehicles purchased for (i) him and (ii) each Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

The Department purchased the following vehicles for the Ministers and Deputy Ministers since 8 May 2019:

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Year of Manufacture

(d) Date of Purchase

(e) Purchase Price

(d) Official

BMW

X3

2021

11 October 2021

R799,563.97

Deputy Minister Magadzi (PTA)

Audi

Q5

2022

06 October 2022

R786,706.94

Minister Mchunu (CPT)

Audi

A6

2022

19 November 2022

R741,656.22

Deputy Minister Mahlobo (CPT)

 

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20 March 2024 - NW582

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

​ (1) Whether, with reference to her recent announcement that 499 rhinos were poached in the Republic in 2023, amountin9 to an increase of 51 from the previous year, the SA National Parks (SANParks) is working with provincial paits to help roll out polygraph testing for staff members in provincial parks to help reduce poaching instances in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What (a) total number of polygraph tests were carried out on SANParks staff and (b) is the job description of each person who was tested; (3) Whether any of the polygraph tests carried out on SANParks staff assisted in identifying persons who were involved in poaching; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Find reply here

20 March 2024 - NW515

Profile picture: Smalle, Mr JF

Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department will intervene to capacitate the administration of the 66 municipalities that have been identified as dysfunctional due to maladministration and the inability to hold errant officials accountable; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, we are already intervening and capacitating municipalities so that they respond better in fulfilling their constitutional mandate, that of providing basic services. The DCoG, Provinces and Salga have done a lot of training and capacity building for oversight structures in municipalities, not just in dysfunctional municipalities.

Consistent with the provisions of Section 154 of the Constitution, the Department has established a Results Management Office (RMO) with the aim of capacitating municipalities. National Cogta, Provincial Cogta Departments and National and Provincial Treasuries have deployed various experts to deal with challenges related to governance, financial matters, local economic development, service delivery and infrastructure including water, roads and electricity.

Moreover, the following legislative and regulatory frameworks have been introduced to support and strengthen the capacity of all municipalities, including the 66 dysfunctional municipalities to deal the breaches of Code of Conduct for Municipal Staff Members:

a) Schedule 2 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Amendment Act, 2000 as amended.

b) Local Government: Disciplinary Regulations for Senior Managers, 2011.

c) Disciplinary Proceedure Collective Agreement.

In addition to the above, the Department has established a database of staff members who have been dismissed and resigned prior to finalisation of disciplinary proceedings which is monitored on continuous basis.

End.

20 March 2024 - NW478

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the full details of urgent steps that have been taken by his department to provide adequate water and sanitation services to residents of Pomfred in Kagisano Molopo in the North West?

Reply:

In the 2017/2018 financial year, the Department Water and Sanitation (DWS) allocated R 4,9 million through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the implementation of the Rural Water Supply Project in Pomfret.

The scope of works for project included the:

  • Equipping of four boreholes (displacement pumps electrical works and new pipework)
  • Construction of new four borehole pumphouse concrete bases, construction of new four precast concrete borehole pumphouses,
  • Refurbishment and replacement of existing borehole fences, replacement and installation of two new transformers at Grootgat booster pumpstation. All these four electrical boreholes are currently not functional due to mechanical and electrical components stolen and vandalised.

The Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality has reported that, it is currently supplying water in Pomfret through water tankers as an interim measure to supplement water needs for the community of Pomfret. The municipality has already appointed a Professional Service Provider (PSP) to conduct technical assessment to refurbish the Grootgat borehole which will include the replacement of the stolen steel pipeline with the uPVC material. It is envisaged that the assessment will be completed before the end of March 2024 and the refurbishment work will thereafter be expedited to restore the water supply in Pomfret.

In the medium to long term, Pomfret will also benefit from the Regional Bulk Water Scheme Programme to be implemented in the Kagisano Molopo Municipal area (Cluster 7 Pomfret). The scope of this project incorporates:

  • Upgrading of the existing water reticulation for Pomfret, Bray and Tosca,
  • Testing of existing boreholes for water yield and quality,
  • Groundwater source investigation, siting, water testing,
  • Drilling of approximately 6 boreholes within Pomfret, Bray and Tosca to supplement the shortfall of water demand
  • Provision of Eskom power supply to boreholes
  • Construction of new rising mains and a new booster pump station in Pomfret
  • Upgrading the existing Booster pump station in Bray
  • Construction of an additional elevated tank for Tosca and a pump station, rising main from the proposed boreholes to the booster pump stations.

This Cluster 7 Bulk Water Scheme is still at the inception stage and it is envisaged that the Implementation Readiness Study (IRS) will be finalised before the end of the financial year 2024/2025 financial year.

With respect to Sanitation, the Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati DM allocated R50m for the 2022/23 Financial year under the Rural Sanitation Programme for the Kagisano Molopo LM. The Promfret village was allocated 280 Double Ventilated Improved Pit-latrine (DVIP) Units, constructed between March and June 2023. A further 60 households are to be prioritised in 2024/25 financial year for the Rural Sanitation Programme.

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20 March 2024 - NW443

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

(a). What specific initiatives and/or programmes are being considered by his department to empower legends in sport and the arts and (b) how will such initiatives be implemented?

Reply:

(a). With reference to the Sport Sector, the Department noted and realised the absence of programmes catering for life after active careers of our sports heroes/heroines, as well as the need for more hands in the effective implementation of current and future initiatives in sport, and decided to develop a programme that would match the skills and experience of these sports heroes/heroines with the existing gaps within the initiatives that we wishes to introduce and/or enhance in the sport sector.

In the Cultural and Creative Sector, the Department established the Living Legends Legacy Fraternity Programme. This program is funded and created a Trust (Living Legends Legacy Fraternity Trust), with a board of trustees entrusted with ensuring that Legends come up with life skills transfer projects, to avoid industry pitfalls.

The Masterclasses are done to empower the next generations of artists and creatives, and in the process the Legends get remunerated in order for them to sustain their livelihood.

(b). The Sport Ambassador Programme is being implemented through the Active Nation Chief Directorate of the Department, wherein the sport legends are required to deliver coaching, mentoring and life-skills as well their self-initiated programmes within the school sport programme and in communities.

The Sport Ambassadors have further served as role models addressing the Youth at the Department’s annual Youth Camps, coaching, and providing life-skills at the National School Sport Championships

The Programme has also provided opportunities for other facets of the sport sector where legends of the Sport media sector have been involved in mobilisation of communities as South Africa hosts major Sporting events, like the Netball World Cup, and facilitating discussions during strategic gatherings of the Sporting sector, like the School Sport Indaba.

The Sports Ambassador Programme is also catered for in Provincial Activities and budget for this is catered for in the Conditional Grant.

Sector organisations in the Creativity Industry are enlisted to assist the Legends in various categories to conceptualise projects to be supported by the Department as our Legends are of an advanced age and need to be assisted by individuals that have insight about the Sector.

Thank you

19 March 2024 - NW347

Profile picture: Khakhau, Ms KL

Khakhau, Ms KL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the full details of all (a) sponsorships, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purposes to (i) her, (ii) her department and (iii) officials of her department by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available?

Reply:

(a) (b) (c) (i) (ii) (iii) (aa) (bb) (cc) None

19 March 2024 - NW307

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What total amount of office hours were lost due to (i) load shedding, (ii) office closures, (iii) water outages, (iv) system downtime and (v) no online verification scanners at health facilities in quarter 3 of the 2023-24 financial year and (b) what was the total percentage of uptime of his department’s civic services system hosted by State Information Technology Agency?

Reply:

(a) The total amount of office hours lost in all Provincial Offices across the country due to load shedding, office closures, water outages, system downtime and no online verification scanners at health facilities in quarter 3 of the 2023-24 financial year is as follows:

(i) 6 106 hours (load shedding);

(ii) 34 hours (office closures);

(iii) 682 hours (water outages);

(iv) 8 645 hours (system downtime);

(v) 780 hours (no online verification scanners at health facilities).

(b) The DHA/SITA SLA covering all offices reflects as follows:

Month

Reachability (Network)

Availability (power)

October 2023

92.71%

95.07%

November 2023

88.75%

90.95%

December 2023

92.34%

94.17%

END.

19 March 2024 - NW338

Profile picture: Engelbrecht, Mr J

Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What are the full details of all (a) sponsorships, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purposes to (i) him, (ii) his department and (iii) officials of his department by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available?

Reply:

No sponsorships, donations, or financial transfers have been provided for lawfare and or any other purposes to me, the Department, or any official in the Department by any Qatari, Iranian, or Russian organ of state/organisation since 1 January 2021 to date. The Department and I would not know whether any sponsorship, donation, or financial transfer for lawfare and or any other purpose was made by any Qatari, Iranian, or Russian organ of state /organisation to any resident from 1 January 2021 to date.

END.

19 March 2024 - NW539

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number of appeals regarding the Social Relief of Distress Grant (a) has her department received in the past two years and (b) still need to be finalised?

Reply:

a) As the Honourable Member is aware, social grants appeals are handled by the Independent Tribunal for Social Assistance Appeals. For the period in question, the Tribunal received a total of 23 939 400 appeals for the SRD Grant.

b) The above number is inclusive of 15 343 533 appeals received for the period 1 April 2022 – 31 March 2023 and 8 595 867 appeals received during the period 1 April 2023 – 31 December 2023. To date, the Tribunal has adjudicated and finalised a total of 23 298 222 SRD Grant appeals.

19 March 2024 - NW599

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 88 on 28 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by his department for (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

(i) Minister

(a) Isuzu MUX, (b) 3.0 DDI MU-X LSE A/T (c) 2023, (d) 15 November 2023 (e) R800 000.00 inclusive of VAT

(ii) Deputy Minister

(a) BMW (b) 520d (c) 2019 (d) 19 December 2019 (e) R668 000.00 inclusive of VAT

END.

19 March 2024 - NW568

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the late registration of birth certificate applications in the 2022-23 financial year, what total number of applications were (a) lodged, (b) finalised and (c) of these applications, what number required DNA testing to prove parentage and (d) what was the average processing time of the applications?

Reply:

(a)(i) Applications lodged for Late Registration of Birth (LRB) for the category - 31 days to 15 years = 77 179

(a)(ii) Applications lodged for LRB applications for the category 15 years and above = 10 097

(b)(i) Applications finalised for the category - 31 days to 15 years = 70 651

(b)(ii) Applications finalised for LRB applications for the category 15 years and above = 6 714

c) Percentage of DNA Testing = Data in respect of DNA testing is not captured on the department’s Track & Trace system. Each birth registration would need to be extracted and analysed to determine if DNA testing was conducted.

d) Published turnaround time for LRB is 180 days. The average processing time of LRB is 3 months to 6 months. Processing times differ for each application, either due to investigations or verification of information obtained during the interview.

END.

19 March 2024 - NW564

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Ms T A Khanyile (DA) to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) Whether he will furnish Ms T A Khanyile with the relevant detailed financial accounts of the revenue accrued from short-term visa applications processed in conjunction with VFS Global for the fiscal years (a) 2019-20, (b) 2020-21, (c) 2021-22, (d) 2022-23, and (e) since 1 April 2023; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of each specified period; (2) what are the relevant details of the financial arrangements and revenue-sharing model between his department and VFS Global regarding these transactions?

Reply:

1.The information is tabulated hereunder: -

(1)

Financial year

Revenue collected by VFS for visa applications

(a)

2019-20

R44 393 680.00

(b)

2020-21

R19 932 830.00

(c)

2021-22

R31 969 065.00

(d)

2022-23

R33 754 185.00

(e)

2023-24 (as at 31 January 2024, unaudited)

R32 126 493.75

2. The visa facilitation services contract between VFS Global and Home Affairs is based on the user-pay model and not on a revenue-sharing model. VFS collects the prescribed visa and permit fee on behalf of Home Affairs and pays it over to the Department. This constitutes the revenue collected in the table above. VFS Global adds a service charge, also called a service fee, on each transaction. It is a fee collected to pay for services that relate to a product or service that is being purchased. In other words, a service charge is an additional charge for the service provided with the submission of a visa or permit application, product, or other auxiliary service. The service fee is approved by the Department. VFS Global does not get any share of the visa or permit fees (revenue) that are due to the Department.

END.

19 March 2024 - NW459

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What was the (a) average number of persons detained (b) total budget spent and (c) total number of detainees released, because they had not been deported in time at the Lindela Repatriation Centre for the 2022-23 financial year?

Reply:

  1. The average number of persons detained is 9595.
  2. The total budget spent: R35 443 197-41 in 2022/23 financial year.
  3. The total number of detainees released, because they had not been deported in time at the Lindela Repatriation Centre for the 2022-23 financial year is 53 .

END.

19 March 2024 - NW608

Profile picture: Khakhau, Ms KL

Khakhau, Ms KL to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 94 on 28 March 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(d)(e)(i)(ii) I refer the Honourable Member to my previous reply question (Question 94). Neither myself nor the Deputy Minister have purchased any new vehicles since the reply to Question 94.

19 March 2024 - NW308

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the project to employ 10 000 graduates to digitise Home Affairs records, for every functional and operating office, (a) what are the respective locations of the offices where digitalisation will occur and (b) how many (i) graduates are currently employed in terms of the project and (ii) records have been digitised as at 31 August 2023?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) will be utilising five buildings to digitise the 340 million records.

(b)(i) As per my reply in Parliamentary Question 2220, the recruitment of the 10,000 youth graduates is being rolled out in three phases. The advert for the first 1st 2000 cohort of unemployed graduates was published in the 2022/23 financial year, leading to the initial employment of 1405 graduates. This number has been decreasing due to youth finding better opportunities elsewhere. As of 31 January 2024, a total of 1142 youth were still in the employ of the Department and have been posted at various locations, in all provinces. The advert for the 2nd cohort closed on 03 March 2023 and yielded 2951 qualifying candidates out of the 439k applications received. In December 2023, the Department issued 2550 appointment letters to qualifying applicants. This brings the total number of young graduates employed for the digitisation project close to 3,700. The 3rd and last cohort of youth will be recruited in the 2024/25 financial year.

(b)(ii) As of 29 February 2024, the Department had digitised 31 419 990 images which translates to 714 016 records. Records consist of paper records and microfilms.

END.

19 March 2024 - NW387

Profile picture: Loate, Mr T

Loate, Mr T to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, in view of the fact that the National Treasury did not have the money to assist his department to obtain more money in order to employ more staff to have a contingency of at least 60% to operate optimally in sorting out visa applications, his department employed innovative and speedy measures to fasttrack the applications for 35 000 visas of persons who had legitimate spouses in the Republic and wanted to come and live in the country and seek employment here as well; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the reasons that legitimate foreign spouses of South African citizens cannot have their visa applications speedily processed?

Reply:

1. The Department has developed a Backlog Eradication Plan and the Plan was presented to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs. The Plan includes amongst other additional capacity to complement the current Immigration Services’ team. An additional 117 officials coming from Head Office and Provinces have been put together to deal with the Backlog Eradication Plan.

The Department through Operation Vulindlela has sought the support of the private sector to speed up verification of documents as verifications contribute to delays in the processing of visas.

2. To establish the legitimacy of any spousal relationship for a visa application, the adjudication process requires that such relationships should be verified for authenticity. This includes the notarial agreements that are submitted in support of such applications. In most cases the contact number of the purported South African spouse is not provided, making it difficult to confirm with certainty that the South African citizen is indeed party to the relationship.

END.