Questions and Replies

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25 June 2021 - NW1168

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, in light of the one-year anniversary of the implementation of the different levels of lockdown in the Republic, the Government has ever conducted and/or outsourced a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of every lockdown level in order to determine whether the costs of the various lockdown levels outweighed the benefits or not, where such costs and benefits are defined in terms of years of life lost and gained, respectively; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details of the analysis?

Reply:

No, the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) did not conduct a cost-benefit analysis relating to these aspects as the underlying economic and medical considerations that will inform such an analysis fall within the purview and expertise of the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition, the National Treasury and the Department of Health. As such, these deaprtments are best placed to respond to the question.

 

25 June 2021 - NW679

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether (a) her Office and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

  • None of the two Entities (Brand SA and MDDA) use private security.

Thank you.

25 June 2021 - NW1142

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the total number of water tankers that operated in Ward 3, uMzinyathi, in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in each year since 2010?

Reply:

1142 AND 1143

Financial year

Description

Project No.

YTD Actuals (at 30 April 2021)

Total per FY in

Rm

2020/21

MZINYATHI

X7533

-

 

 

ETAFULENI TOWNSHIP

X5653D

0.185

 

 

 

 

 

0.185

2019/20

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

2.706

 

 

MZINYATHI,EMAQADINI RETICULATION

X7533

8.774

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 16 Water tankers

 

32.120

 

 

 

 

 

43.600

2018/19

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

9.997

 

 

Etafuleni Township

X5653

0.111

 

 

Intathakusa elevated tower & outlet pipeline

X5028A

3.746

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 15 Water tankers

 

27.375

 

 

 

 

 

41.229

2017/18

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

0.011

 

 

Mzinyathi infill project

X6540

0.001

 

 

Intuthuko infills

X4506A

-

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 12 Water tankers

 

19.710 

 

 

 

   

19.722

2016/17

 

 

 

 

 

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

0.066

 

 

Etafuleni Township

X5653B

0.737

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 10 Water tankers

 

14.600

 

 

 

 

 

15.403

2015/16

 

 

 

 

 

INTHUTHUKO WATER INFILLS

 

0.003

 

 

Intathakusa Project

 

-

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 10 Water tankers

 

12.775 

 

 

 

 

 

12.778

2014/15

Ekukhanyeni/Mzinyathi

X3675

0.011

 

 

Intuthuko Water

X4506

0.180

 

 

Mzinyathi Baseline Survey

X5720

0.570

 

 

 

 

 

0.761

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

It is to be noted that parliamentary question require information since 2010, however information submitted by the Ethekwini Metro is for period since 2011/12 financial year. According to the Metro, information before 2011/12 is not readily available and therefore will require more time to be extracted and submitted

25 June 2021 - NW885

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

(a) What is the breakdown of paid-for interviews on community radio stations by her Office and/or the Government Communication and Information System, for the period commencing 1 January 2020 to 1 March 2021 in the Western Cape, (b) which community radio stations were paid by government for interviews, (c) on what date was each interview done, (d) what was the total Rand value for each interview at each of the radio stations and (e) which individual(s) appeared on each of the interviews?

Reply:

 

Number of paid for Radio interviews

Date of the Radio programme

Name of the Community Radio

Name of the Messenger and Theme

Cost

 

4 Interviews

16 Live reads

29 September 2020

30 September 2020

1 October 2020

6 October 2020

14-30 September 2020

WRFM –Witzenberg Radio

Mr P Titus

Mr Maynier

-Tourism Month

Mr P Titus

– Domestic Violence

Mr P Titus

– Gender Base Violence

R 15000.00

 

3 Interviews

16 live reads

29 September 2020

30 September 2020

30 September 2020

Heartbeat FM

Heritage Day – Jethro Grootboom RCC

Mr D Saur

Mr J Grootboom

R 15000.00

 

3 Interviews

16 Live reads

14 September 2020

18 September 2020

27 September 2020

Eden FM

Office of the Consumer Protector - Public Service Month

Tourism Month - Mr J Grootboom

Thusong Manager form Waboomskraal Thusong Centre

R 15000.00

 

4 Live reads

20 Live reads

22 September 2020

30 September 2020

12 October 2020

15 October 2020

Radio Helderberg

Radio Helderberg

Mr L Labantu

Legal Officer Commission for Gender Equality

Mr Z Badroodien

Mr L Macakati

MrsS Britz

R 15000.00

 

5 Interviews

24 Live reads

2 October 2020

4 October 2020

6 October 2020

7 October 2020

9/10/2020

Whale Coast FM

Dr N Louw

Mayor of the Overberg

Sgt Jooste

L Van Staden Badisa

Brig D Heilbron

Dr R van Renburg Surgeon

Dr M Grobbelaar

R 24000.00

 

5 Interviews

24 Live Reads

2 October 2020

9 October 2020

16 October 2020

23 October 2020

30 October 2020

Radio Namakwaland

Social Development

Matzikama Municipality

Disaster Management

Disaster Management and Office of the Mayor - COVID-19

Cederberg Municipality – COVID-19

R 24000.00

 

4 Live reads

24 Live reads

11 & 20 September 2020

12& 17 October 2020

Heartbeat FM

Mr J Grootboom - COVID-19

Mr Pat SAPS - GBV

R 24000.00

 

5 Interviews

24 Live reads

30 September 2020

7 October 2020

14 October 2020

21 October 2020

28 October 2020

RWC - Radio West Coast

Disaster Management – COVID-19

Social Development–GBV

Saldanha Bay Municipality – COVID-19

Disaster Management – COVID-19

Berg Rivier Municipality – COVID-19

R 24000.00

 

24 Live reads

3 Interviews

18 September 2020

22 September 2020

29 September 2020

Radio Gamkaland

S Phiffers – COVID-19

Srg Louw SAPS – GBV

H Jacobs – COVID-19

R 24000.00

 

3 Interviews

24 live reads

14 September 2020

9 September 2020

22 September 2020

Eden FM

L Mcakathi CGE – GBV

J Grootboom– Covid 19

Social Auxiliary Worker – GBV

R 24000.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

12 February 2021

25 February 2021

Whale Coast FM

E Maloy - Post Sona

E Maloy and Dep Mayor Overstrand – Post Sona

R 9426.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

23 February 2021

25 February 2021

Radio Helderberg

M Mnqosela – Post Sona

K Sayed

Cllr Mfecane – Post Sona

R 7000.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

24 February 2021

25 February 2021

Heartbeat FM

T Wolmarans

J Grootboom – Post Sona

R 7500.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live Reads

17 February 2021

18 February 2021

Radio KC

P Titus -Post Sona

P Titus – Post Sona

R 10494.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

24 February 2021

25 February 2021

Radio Overberg

E Maloy & P Titus –Post Sona

R 8720.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

22 February 2021

24 February 2021

WRFM – Witzenberg FM

P Titus –Post Sona

P Titus – Post Sona

R 8400.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

23 February 2021

27 February 2021

Radio 786

Nkodlo –Post Sona

C Dagmore – Post Sona

R 9600.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Reads

18 February 2021

12 February 2021

Eden FM

L van Rhenen – Post Sona

Dr N Benjamin -Sona

R 8800.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

22 February 2021

24 February 2021

Radio Namakwaland

E Mckay - Post Sona

E Mckay - Post Sona

R 5040.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

24 February 2021

Paarl FM

P Titus – Post Sona

R 8720.00

TOTAL

59 radio interviews implemented with 292 Live reads where implemented

R 287 700.00

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW1267

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the total (a) number of water tankers that operated in the Inanda area since 2010 and (b) amount spent on (i) water tankers and (ii) bulk infrastructure in the specified area in each specified year?

Reply:

1267

Financial year

Description

Project No.

YTD Actuals (at 30 April 2021)

Total per FY in Rm

2020-21

INANDA NEWTOWN C SEWER RETICUL

Y8136D

                   0.818

 

 

INANDA B-SINAMUVA DRIVE SEWER

Y8783D

                   0.228

 

 

 

 

                   1.046

      1.046

2019-20

Umbhayi Housing Development

X8224

                   0.152

 

 

INANDA NEWTON C SEWER RETICULATION

Y8136B

                   5.630

 

 

INANDA NEWTOWN C SEWER RETICUL

Y8136C

                          -  

 

 

INANDA NEWTOWN C SEWER RETICUL

Y8136C

                          -  

 

 

 

 

                   5.782

      5.782

2018-19

INANDA NEWTON C SEWER RETICULATION

Y8136B

                   0.186

 

 

Inanda B Sinamuva drive sewer

Y8783

                   0.268

 

 

 

 

                   0.454

      0.454

2017-18

Inanda Newtown 'C' Sewer Reticulation

Y8136B

                   0.138

 

 

 

 

                   0.138

      0.138

2016-17

 

 

                          -  

 

 

 

 

 

0

2015-16

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

0

2014-15

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

0

2013-14

Inanda Glebe Sewer Reticulation

Y6459

                   0.079

 

 

 

 

                   0.079

      0.079

2012-13

Etafuleni phrase1 and 2 collector

Y6523

                   2.871

 

 

 

 

                   2.871

      2.871

 

 

 

 

 

Grand total

 

 

 

10.3698

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

It is to be noted that parliamentary question require information since 2010, however information submitted by the Ethekwini Metro is for period since 2012/13 financial year. According to the Metro, information before 2012/13 is not readily available and therefore will require more time to be extracted and submitted.

25 June 2021 - NW590

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether she has been informed of a high-level operation in which powerful politicians are using state organs in an attempt to harm Independent Media and its major shareholder, Sekunjalo Investment Holdings, thereby posing a threat to media freedom (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what is her department’s position on the matter? NW646E.

Reply:

The GCIS is not aware of any operation to harm the Independent Media Group and its major shareholder Sekunjalo Investment Holdings. The department is obliged in terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa to treat all media fairly.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW1075

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

With reference to the performance agreements concluded with Directors-General (DGs) and/or Heads of Department (HoDs), what (a) measures will be put in place to ensure that DGs and/or HoDs submit their performance agreements within the stipulated time frame, (b) action will be taken against DGs and/or HoDs who fail to submit their performance agreements within the stipulated time frame and (c) action, consequence management or otherwise, will be taken against DGs and/or HoDs who perform poorly in terms of their performance agreements?

Reply:

a) The Director – Generals and /or Heads of Departments are most Senior officials in Government and are expected to be exemplary by submitting on time. However, Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation sends reminders of the submission deadlines. In addition, the conclusion of Performance Agreements of Director-Generals and Heads of Departments are part of Performance Agreements of Ministers.

b) Section 7.2 of the Directive on Performance Management for Heads of Department state that the DG/HoD will forfeit their performance incentives (bonus and pay progression) if they do not comply with the submission date of their performance agreements. As stated above Ministers will also be assessed on this.

c) The Senior Management Service policy for the management of poor performance is also applicable to the HoDs. Annexure I to the PMDS for HoDs outlines the process to be followed in cases of poor performance. The process entails that if it is the first occurance then the reasons for non-performance will be explored and a performance improvement plan should be developed and implemented. If the non-performance is not the first time then the process of warnings and disciplinary hearings must be instituted which could result in sanctions, extension of notice period, demotion, transfer or dismissal.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW499

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the reasons that her department entered into a non-disclosure agreement with GovChat to support the implementation of the Early Childhood Development Employment Stimulus Relief Fund?

Reply:

The department signed an MOU with GovChat to support the implementation of the Early Childhood Development Employment Stimulus Relief Fund.

25 June 2021 - NW1149

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What steps will municipalities take to protect poor and indigent households following the 16% Eskom tariff increase; (2) whether electricity tariff subsidies will be extended to households which lost income due to job losses caused by the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department provides support and guidance to all municipalities with regards to the provision of FBE to indigent households, through the regular monitoring of monthly FBE executive summary reports reflecting transactions for that particular month, quarterly reports reflecting a list of municipalities that are in arrears on their FBE accounts and quarterly reports reflecting details of access/collection of FBE tokens per municipality. This assists with identifying municipalities that are constantly in arrears especially in light of the annual rate increment and enable the necessary interventions to be effected. It further assists with the identification of indigent households not collecting their FBE thus not benefiting from the provision of FBE and enable the necessary interventions to be effected.

The Department works closely with Eskom (where Eskom is the licensed service provider), Provincial COGTAs and Municipalities; with the objective being to ensure that municipalities provides FBE to all qualifying indigent households receive FBE guided by the FBE Funding Agreement.

2. No, there is no specific electricity tariff subsidy to the households that lost their jobs due to Covid-19 Pandemic. However, any household that requires subsidy for basic services is required to register at the municipality for free basic services subject to them meeting the criteria utilized for eligibility to receive the subsidy.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

The government’s intention is to provide support to municipalities by facilitating the provision of free basic services, namely: free basic water, free basic electricity, free basic sewerage and sanitation, and free basic solid waste management services to all qualifying households/consumers. The Electricity Basic Services Support Tariff (EBSST) policy introduced by the Department of Energy prescribes that 50kWh per provided to indigent households connected to the national grid on a monthly basis. The provision of FBE is funded through the Local Government Equitable Share (LGES) which augments municipal own revenues, to assist municipalities in providing free basic services to indigent housholds.

The Department of Cooperative Governance’s (DCoG) monitoring of the provision of FBE in Eskom supply areas is based on the FBE Funding Agreement between Eskom and the respective municipalities. Eskom is a licensed service provider to provide FBE to 213 municipalities across the country. It is critical to note that the absence of signed Funding Agreements or SLAs makes it difficult for the DCoG to intervene when there are disputes, such as delays by municipalities in paying for services rendered by Eskom as well as the identification of indigent households not collecting their FBE tokens. This has a negative impact on the provision of FBE.

The current three-year contract cycle commenced on 1July 2018 and will end on 30 June 2021. The Department and Eskom are busy engaging on processes to facilitate the renewal fo the current multi-year Funding Agreement that is due to commence from 1 July 2021 and end 30 June 2024.

The increase in municipal debt and its effects has been reiterated by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and has been declared as an enormous challenge that has resulted in the disconnection of electricity of some indigent households. Poor communities are the ones who are affected the most by these disconnections and are deprived of their basic needs as reflected in the National Development Plan. Municipalities with escalating outstanding are constantly encouraged by the Department, to settle their FBE debt on time to avoid disputes and disconnections. It must be emphasized that municipalities, need to equally pay Eskom for the services rendered on their behalf for the provision of FBE to indigent households within their municipal jurisdiction.

25 June 2021 - NW434

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has completed the Producer/Farmer Register for small-scale and subsistence farmers; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the specified register be made available?

Reply:

Yes.

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has completed the Producer/Farmer Register. The report will be made available by end of July 2021.

25 June 2021 - NW940

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, in view of the performance agreements that the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, signed and concluded with the various Ministers, a framework has been developed to manage the performance of the Ministers; if not, why not; if so, was the framework approved by Cabinet; (2) how often will the President review and assess the performance of the various Ministers; (3) whether her Office will upload the performance reviews and assessments on its website, in an effort to promote accountability and transparency on the part of the Executive; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) how will the Deputy Ministers be reviewed and assessed and (b) will the President conclude performance agreements with the Deputy Ministers as well?

Reply:

(1) Yes, a framework was developed.

(2) The President will perform reviews annually considering performance score cards developed by DPME. DPME will also submit Mid-Year reports concerning progress in the implementation of the Annual Performance Plans (APP’s) of Departments. This will serve as early warning systems to identify areas that are lagging behind against the targets set in the APP.

(3) The Mid-Year performance reviews on the APP’s are published on the website after approval by Cabinet.

(4)(a) The performance agreements signed by the Ministers have included the delegated functions to Deputy Ministers.

Thank You.

 

25 June 2021 - NW1148

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a)Whether, with reference to the Ratings Afrika’s Municipal Sustainability Index which has constantly ranked the City of Cape Town as the most financially sustainable metro in the Republic, in the interests of cooperative governance, her department has ever considered replicating the Cape Town model to assist struggling metros across the Republic to improve their financial sustainability, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department does not currently rely on of the many external institutions or agencies to assess and compare the financial health and performance of municipalities. Municipalities also use different financial ratios and norms to assess their own performance and set benchmarks for improvement to be measured over time.

The department shares best practices from other municipalities and uses these benchmarking initiatives to improve efficiency and effectiveness of municipal services like the water services delivery, strengthening performance measurement monitoring and measurement, in order to build resilient and climate-smart communities and improve the quality of people’s lives.

25 June 2021 - NW1278

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, with respect to the moratorium placed on filling vacancies pending the reconfiguration of Brand SA, SA Tourism and Invest South Africa, the moratorium was placed on all three entities or only on Brand SA; if the moratorium was placed only on Brand SA, what were the reasons; (2) whether there are plans in place to lift the moratorium in order to allow for the filling of critical posts at an executive level in the specified entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. I can only be able to respond on the Brand SA which is under my authority. The temporary moratorium was put in place, whilst the work assigned towards establishing an effective and streamlined entity out of the three mentioned entities. The mentioned entities will drive an international marketing programme of the country.

2. Whether there are plans in place to lift the moratorium in order to allow for the filling of critical posts at an executive level in the specified entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  • In December 2020 my predecessor lifted the moratorium on critical posts, to be filled on a contract basis whilst this work continues.
  • I have also met with the Board of the Brand SA to discuss their Annual Performance Plan (APP) for 2021/22. These discussions are continuing with the Director General of the GCIS to guide me on the posts that might need to be filled urgently whilst the work of rationalizing these entities continue.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW1143

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) is the total amount that has been spent on (i) water tankers and (ii) bulk water infrastructure in Ward 3, uMzinyathi, in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in each financial year since 2010?

Reply:

1143

Financial year

Description

Project No.

YTD Actuals (at 30 April 2021)

Total per FY in

Rm

2020/21

MZINYATHI

X7533

-

 

 

ETAFULENI TOWNSHIP

X5653D

0.185

 

 

 

 

 

0.185

2019/20

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

2.706

 

 

MZINYATHI,EMAQADINI RETICULATION

X7533

8.774

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 16 Water tankers

 

32.120

 

 

 

 

 

43.600

2018/19

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

9.997

 

 

Etafuleni Township

X5653

0.111

 

 

Intathakusa elevated tower & outlet pipeline

X5028A

3.746

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 15 Water tankers

 

27.375

 

 

 

 

 

41.229

2017/18

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

0.011

 

 

Mzinyathi infill project

X6540

0.001

 

 

Intuthuko infills

X4506A

-

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 12 Water tankers

 

19.710 

 

 

 

   

19.722

2016/17

 

 

 

 

 

Intathakusa ET & Outlet pipeline

X5028B

0.066

 

 

Etafuleni Township

X5653B

0.737

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 10 Water tankers

 

14.600

 

 

 

 

 

15.403

2015/16

 

 

 

 

 

INTHUTHUKO WATER INFILLS

 

0.003

 

 

Intathakusa Project

 

-

 

 

 Umzinyathi - 10 Water tankers

 

12.775 

 

 

 

 

 

12.778

2014/15

Ekukhanyeni/Mzinyathi

X3675

0.011

 

 

Intuthuko Water

X4506

0.180

 

 

Mzinyathi Baseline Survey

X5720

0.570

 

 

 

 

 

0.761

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

It is to be noted that parliamentary question require information since 2010, however information submitted by the Ethekwini Metro is for period since 2011/12 financial year. According to the Metro, information before 2011/12 is not readily available and therefore will require more time to be extracted and submitted

25 June 2021 - NW1129

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What steps has her department taken to assist the Joe Gqabi District Municipality to avert the water crisis that is currently affecting the municipality?

Reply:

My department requested the Eastern Cape Provincial department to provide a detailed report in relation the water challenges raised by the honourable member. The reply will be updated with this information as it becomes available.

25 June 2021 - NW1091

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What number of the 70 social service practitioners capacitated on psychosocial support are stationed in the Northern Cape; (2) what total number of active shelters for women are in the Northern Cape according to the policy on sheltering services?

Reply:

(1) Sixteen (16) Gender Based Violence Social Workers received training on psycho-social support.

The first training session was on Trauma Management and it was held on the 17-21 February 2020 and the second session was on Trauma Debriefing held on the 21-28 February 2020.

(2) The Northern Cape has six (6) functional Shelters in the Province.

NAME OF THE SHELTER DISTRICT AND TOWN

1. Ethembeni Centre, Pixley Ka Seme, De Aar

2. Colesberg Shelter, Pixley Ka Seme, Colesberg

3. Bopanang Centre, Z. M. Mgcawu, Upington

4. Prinsess Poffadder Safe House, Z. F. Mgcawu, Keimoes

5. Kimberley Shelter, Frances Baard, Kimberley

6. Bankhara Bodulong White Door, John Taolo Gaetsiwe, Kuruman

25 June 2021 - NW1285

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the (a) extent of the commonage land in the Eastern Cape and (b) current usage of the commonage land; (2) whether the commonage land has water rights to allow farming to take place; if not, what steps will her department take to ensure that there are water rights; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there are farming activities taking place on the commonage land; if not, why not; if so, what farming activities are taking place on the pieces of land; (4) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with the relevant information regarding (a) land that has been invaded and (b) the action(s) that were taken regarding the situation; if not, why not; if so, by what date? NW1324E

Reply:

To redirect the question to: Department of Agriculture, Land and Rural Development

Matters relating to the commonage land and farming activities are managed and administered by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. The Honourable member is advised to re-direct the aforementioned department.

25 June 2021 - NW1318

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the presentation of the Auditor-General to the Portfolio Committee on Social Development, (a) with what amount did the debtors balance increase due to the R350 Social Relief of Distress grant overpayments and (b) what number of ineligible beneficiaries received food parcels and vouchers due to poor policies and procedures; 2. (a) what are the reasons behind the slow progress in finalising cases under investigation in the SA Social Security Agency and (b) what is the impact of the slow progress of finalising cases on consequence management; (3) what are the reasons that not all contracts were listed in the procurement plan of the National Development Agency? NW1513E

Reply:

1(a) The total amount paid to beneficiaries who were not eligible for the Special COVID-19 SRD Grant is R11 175 950.

(b) All people who received food parcels from SASSA met the broad qualifying criteria as set in the Social Assistance Act, which, under Regulation 9(2) stipulates that a person may qualify for social relief of distress “if refusal of the application may cause undue hardship…”

While some of the citizens who received a food parcel may have also been in receipt of a social grant (largely one of the child grants), this is also permitted in terms of Regulation 16A which allows for the provision of social relief of distress to a child already benefitting from a social grant, “where the prevailing economic circumstances warrants the provision of social relief of distress.”

In addition, Regulation 9(5) to the Social Assistance Act provides for the provision of social relief of distress to citizens who are affected by a declared or undeclared disaster. The COVID pandemic has been the largest declared disaster faced by this country and the number of citizens requiring assistance increased significantly during this period.

The assistance provided by SASSA was provided in accordance with the requirements of the Social Assistance Act and Regulations. However, SASSA was not the only instance providing assistance in the form of food parcels.

(2) (a) what are the reasons behind the slow progress in finalising cases under investigation in the SA Social Security Agency

The total number of exceptions that were identified by the Auditor General of South Africa (AGSA) is 67670. Most of these exceptions were mainly as a result of SASSA not having access to the databases that the AGSA had. SASSA immediately stopped payments to all the cases flagged by the AGSA.

The number of exceptions identified by the AGSA are as follows:

Table: Exceptions identified by the AGSA and action taken by SASSA

Category

Number of exceptions

SASSA action

PERSAL/ PERSOL

15711

SASSA has SASSA has commenced the process of recovering money from public servants who received the Covid 19 SRD grant. In addition SASSA has referred the implicated public servants to the relevant departments for disciplinary action.

The Fusion Centre is working with the Department of Public Service and Administration to ensure that all implicated public servants are pursued.

UIF

15069

People who benefitted from the Covid SRD grant and UIF were referred to the Fusion Centre for further investigation.

UIF-TERS

2119

People who benefitted from the Covid SRD grant and UIF were referred to the Fusion Centre for further investigation.

Social Pension

15062

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose from timing differences in the validation databases that were used by SASSA and AGSA.

NSFAS

10358

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose from timing differences in the validation databases that were used by SASSA and AGSA.

Internships

6562

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the internships databases.

Department of Agriculture vouchers

1281

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the Department of Agriculture database on recipients of their vouchers.

Spaza support

372

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the Spaza support database.

Inmates

332

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose from timing differences in the validation databases that were used by SASSA and AGSA.

GEPF

312

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the GEPF database.

PLAS farmers

289

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose from timing differences in the validation databases that were used by SASSA and AGSA.

Artists

111

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the Department of Arts database.

IDC Debt Relief

65

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the IDC database.

Sport applicants

27

SASSA has stopped payments to these cases, which mainly arose because SASSA did not have access to the Department of Arts database.

TOTAL

67670

 

SASSA has referred the suspected fraudulent cases to the Fusion Centre (which consists of the Financial Intelligence Centre, Special Investigating Unit, State Security Agency, National Prosecuting Authority, South African Police Service) for further investigation. The Fusion Centre is still busy with the investigations.

(b) what is the impact of the slow progress of finalising cases on consequence management;

It should be noted that the Covid SRD grant applications were processed electronically by matching information from various databases and systems. There is thus no consequence management that needs to be pursued on officials. However SASSA has commenced the process of recovering money paid to the implicated government employees. SASSA has in addition referred the implicated government employees to their departments for disciplinary action.

(3) With reference to the 2020-21 procurement plan, 14 (fourteen) contracts of the 19 contracts planned as per the 5th (fifth) amendment of the procurement plan were awarded by financial year end. The two contracts referred to by the Auditor-General, as not being included on the 2020-21 procurement plan, were for the Western Cape Provincial office space, and the Mpumalanga - Hazyview District office space. These contracts were extended briefly during the 2020-21 financial year, to accommodate the removal of furniture and equipment, and were then terminated, in accordance with a decision taken by management, early in the financial year, to rationalise the costs for leased premises. These contracts were however listed in the 2019-20 procurement plan, a tender for office space was issued in that financial year, and adjudicated in April 2020. It was subsequently cancelled to align with management’s decision to terminate the lease contracts for Western Cape and Mpumalanga –Hazyview, and these contracts were therefore not included in the 2020-21 procurement plan.

25 June 2021 - NW1090

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her department’s presentation on its Third Quarter performance to the Portfolio Committee on Social Development on 17 March 2021, and specifically that it only spent approximately 29% of its budget allocation to provinces and municipalities to date, what amount does her department owe municipalities for services?

Reply:

The National Department of Social Development does not owe money to municipalities as the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure manages the account for services on behalf of government departments.

24 June 2021 - NW1611

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In light of the fact that his department extended the contract of VFS Global to administer the issuing of visas in December 2018 until December 2020 and then further extended the contract, and given that the extensions were on the basis that the development of internal capacity will be expedited, what is the status (a) on the establishment of the Central Adjudication Hub and (b) of the model and the associated bid process?

Reply:

The Service Level Agreement with the VFS global company to provide visa front desk services has been extended until 31 December 2022. (a) The eVisa pilot process has been concluded and rollout is envisaged to commence in the second quarter of this financial year 2021/22 for short-term visitor’s visa applications. The eVisa adjudication hub has been identified and the staff for the eVisa adjudication hub are currently in their final stages of training. (b) the Public-Private Partnership process is underway. The Department consulted with the National Treasury and the Department was advised to recruit a Transactional Advisor and Project Manager to lead the process and ensure that activities and timelines are adhered to. The Department is currently busy with the Supply Chain processes for the appointment of the Transactional Advisor and Project Manager.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1347

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)In light of the fact that under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993, regulations were promulgated in 2010, and a second set of regulations were drafted for public comment in 2020 to regulate diving, (a) what total number of commercial diving schools are currently registered nationally, (b) where are the schools situated and (c) how often is the Chief Inspector required to visit a diving school in order to ensure that it remains in compliance with the regulations for a registered diving school; (2) whether any diving schools have had their registration revoked for non-compliance since the publication of the first regulations in 2010; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which schools, (b) on what date were they revoked and (c) have they been re-registered; (3) whether any schools have reported serious incidents that occurred during the training of divers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details, including action that was taken by the school and the Chief Inspector; (4) whether any diving schools are under investigation for non-compliance; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details, including the names of the schools, the non-compliant areas, and what is being done to address the non-compliance?

Reply:

Question1:

The first set of diving regulations were promulgated in 2001 and these were followed by the diving regulations which were promulgated in 2010. Currently, the draft commercial diving regulations are undergoing processes following the incorporation of public comments.

(a) & (b) Registered diving schools

Name of the Diving School

Approval level

Location

Professional Diving Centre

Classes 4 to 1

Durban

BS Divers

Classes 4 to 2

Hermanus (WC)

Sea Dog

Classes 4 to 2

Saldanha (WC)

Jack’s Dive Chest

Classes 4 to 2

Strand (WC)

University of Cape Town

Classes 6 to 4

Cape Town

Nelson Mandela Metro University

Classes 6 to 4

Cape Town

South Africa Police Services Academy

Class 4

Pretoria

South African Association for Marine Biological Research

Class 4

Durban

c) There is no prescribed frequency for the Diving Inspectors to conduct inspections at the approved diving schools. Pro-active inspections are planned as part of the normal Inspection Plan.

Some of the inspections are triggered by the Diving Notifications received from schools when they conduct practical training as such training is deemed diving work.

Question 2

There are no Diving Schools that had their registration revoked. When Diving Inspectors conduct inspections and if they find non-compliances at the schools, they issue notices (legal instruments) in terms of section 30 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act. There are 3 types of notices that could be issued (individually or jointly) when there is non-compliance, namely;

a) Prohibition notice – when there is an act or process that threatens the health and safety of any person. The employer must immediately stop the operation or the process. The inspector may revoke the prohibition in writing if the threatening situation has been corrected to the satisfaction of the inspector.

b) Contravention notice – when there is a contravention of any regulation.

c) Improvement notice – when an inspector requires an improvement on certain activities or tasks that the employer has already implemented in the workplace.

The employer may appeal a notice and will be given 60 days should he/she wishes to appeal the content of the notice issued.

If the employer fails to comply with the notices issued, a prosecution will be recommended to the NPA. Where a Diving School was issued with a notice, the school did comply with the notice(s) issued.

Question 3

There were two fatalities in training since the promulgation of the Diving Regulations in 2010.

a) The first fatality happened at BS Divers on 06 April 2015. The preliminary investigation was conducted on the 08 April 2015 and section 31 investigation was conducted on the 7 May 2015. The investigation revealed that the divers were learners at the school, but the activity that they were undertaking was outside the scope of the school curriculum. The divers used free flow diving method as they were moving the jackstays underwater and one of the diver’s rope became entangled to his weight belt, causing him to drown. Diving without the use of diving apparatus, is outside the scope of the Diving Regulations.

Even though the divers were conducting this activity outside the scope of training of the school, the school still had the responsibility in terms of section 9(1) of the OHS Act to ensure that all learners are safe because the learners were within their premises and therefore, the school had a responsibility towards these divers in training. Contravention notices were issued for the school to improve their risk assessment for free-diving and to update their sea bed search method and to introduce measures to prevent the shot line from becoming entangled. The school complied with the notices issued.

b) The second fatality happened at Jack’s Dive Chest on 22 January 2020. The learners were at the Blue Rock Quarry performing a practical diving exercise on the emergency procedures and the recovery of an unconscious diver. Two divers were paired together to perform the exercise. The deceased diver swam from the wet bell to the worksite and was supposed to pretend to be unconscious so that the other diver can go and rescue him. When the deceased failed to respond to all the communication signals sent to him, the diver who remained in the wet bell, was instructed by the supervisor to go and rescue the deceased. The deceased was found unconscious and the other diver swam while holding him on the surface. The deceased was declared dead on the scene by the paramedics.

The preliminary investigation was conducted on 23 January 2020. During the investigation, a contravention and a prohibition notice were served to the employer. The section 31 investigation was conducted on 16 September and 09 November 2020. The delay was caused by the lock down for COVID-19. Once the investigation was finalized, a report was prepared and the matter was referred to the National Prosecution Authority on the 26 February 2021.

Question 4

Currently, there is no school that is under investigation for non-compliance. Inspectors do conduct inspections at the diving schools regularly to enforce compliance in terms of the Act and the regulations.

24 June 2021 - NW1740

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total amount does it cost his department to keep prisoners incarcerated in each month and (b) items cost his department the most in terms of the daily running of prisons and correctional centres, apart from paying staff?

Reply:

a) The average per capita costs per month incurred by the Department during the 2020/21 financial year (unaudited figures) are as follows:

The average per capita costs projected to be spent by the Department for the 2021/22 financial year to keep inmates incarcerated monthly including and excluding CoE are as follows:

The following should be noted on the calculations of the average monthly per capita expenditure of inmates:

  • For both financial years the total number of offenders in the two Public Private Partnerships (PPP) correctional centres are 5 952. The PPP expenditure is excluded on calculations and the average monthly per capita of offenders in PPP correctional centres is indicated separately. It should be noted that the PPP Index Fee includes Compensation of Employees appointed in the two PPP correctional centres.
  • The expenditure incurred under Programme 5: Community Corrections are excluded as the whole programme deals with Parolees, Probationers, and Awaiting Trial Persons who are not incarcerated.
  • The average monthly per capita expenditure is also shown excluding Programme 1: Administration and Sub Programme Facilities under Programme 2: Incarceration. Programme 1: Administration deals with the administration and management of the whole department including PPP correctional centres and Community Corrections population. Sub Programme Facilities deals with maintenance, upgrade, and construction of correctional centres, municipal services and accommodation for state-owned buildings.
  • The most accurate average monthly per capita total cost incurred in 2020/21 financial year would be R10 890.52 including CoE and R2 946.91 excluding CoE.

b) The items from the operational budget that cost the Department most (using the threshold of R200 million per annum) apart from Compensation of Employees are as follows:

  • Property Payments item is for the payment of electricity, water and sanitation services to the various municipalities and the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) where relevant;
  • Agency and Support/outsourced Services item is used for the payments to the two PPP correctional centres;
  • Operating Leases item is for expenditure incurred for the accommodation charges for state buildings paid to the DPWI and the private leases for various offices;
  • Inventory: Food and Food Supplies is for the expenditure of food for inmates;
  • Fleet Services is for the payment of all running costs of government vehicles including repairs and maintenance;
  • Consumable Supplies item is for cleaning material, stationery and printing supplies, building material and supplies and IT consumables;
  • Inventory Farming Supplies is for the animal feed, farming and gardening supplements, fertilisers, and seedlings.

Expenditure Items above R200 million for 2021/22 Financial Year Projected Expenditure are as follows:

END

24 June 2021 - NW1450

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Given the continued closure of determination and retention of citizenship services in his department, (a) what number of applications for the (i) determination and (ii) retention of citizenship were (aa) received and (bb) processed in the period 1 January 2021 to 12 May 2021, (b) what mechanism is available for citizens to satisfy legally prescribed requirements to retain citizenship before assuming the citizenship of a second country, given that there is no set date for the end of lockdown to curb the COVID-19 pandemic, (c) what are the reasons that it is not possible to receive and process the specified applications via a designated email address as an emergency measure and (d) given that visas are being extended under lockdown regulations essentially waiving overstays for the affected persons until the document renewal is possible, why is the loss of citizenship not suspended until such time as the retention of citizenship service is reopened and affected parties have been afforded a reasonable time period to apply?

Reply:

(a)(i) 117 determination applications

(ii) 407 retention applications

(aa) 68 determination applications processed

(bb) 76 retention applications processed

(b) While awaiting review of the Regulations, clients are advised not to assume citizenship of another country.

(c) Original documents are critical for authentication purposes.

(d) The proposal will be considered in the review process.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1630

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What total number of Zimbabwean (a) refugees and (b) asylum seekers fleeing their country for political reasons were issued with documentation to be in the Republic legally in (i) 2019 and (ii) 2020; (2) (a) what total number of such applications were rejected and (b) for what reasons were they rejected?

Reply:

1.

Year

Asylum Seeker

Refugee

Total

2019

1746

52

1798

2020

210

4

214

Total

1956

56

2012

 

2. (a) A total of 1561 have received a first instance rejection.

(b) The application form mostly states political grounds and atmosphere between ruling party and opposition parties. However, through interrogation and adjudication they concede on economic grounds, which do not exist under the 1951 UN Convention and the 1998 Refugee Act.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1627

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department is considering implementing programmes to equip recent graduates with support to enter the COVID-19 job market, considering the changing prospects of new job seekers who graduated during the pandemic; if not, why not; if so, how has his department intervened in the fight against increasing youth unemployment at a time when some companies are shutting down?

Reply:

Yes, we are implementing programmes to equip recent graduates, other youth and people who have lost employment to re-enter the labour market under the current Covid-19 environment. The Department through its various entities, the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF), the Compensation for Occupational and Injuries and Diseases Fund (Coida), Public Employment Services (PES), Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), as well as Productivity (SA), all have programmes that are assisting these affected groups to enter the labour market.

Through the more than 126 labour centres the Department, daily provides assistance to work seekers to access the labour market. Work seekers, can register on the Employment Services System of South Africa (ESSA), and get access to many job and training opportunities that are posted by prospective employers.

The Department helps them to compile CV’s and also provides employment advise and were necessary even counselling from trained psychologists employed by the Department. They provide valuable life skills advise, psychometric assessments and career interest assessments.

During the period ending 31 March 2021, the Department registered 938,505 work seekers, provided counselling to 246,454 work seekers and was able to place 37,193 work seekers into employment or training opportunities. This is in addition to the 169,717 job opportunities, created through the stimulus packages that was made available by the Treasury to various government Departments.

24 June 2021 - NW826

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)What number of members of the State Security Agency (SSA) are categorised as senior management service members (SMS); (2) whether the SMS members within the SSA submitted their financial disclosure forms to the Department of Public Service and Administration, as required by Regulations 18 and 19 of the Public Service Regulations of 2016, for the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20 financial years; if not, what are the reasons that SMS members did not submit their financial disclosure forms despite it being a mandatory requirement to do so in terms of the relevant provisions of the Public Service Regulations; if so, what number of SMS members submitted their financial disclosure forms in each of the specified financial years; (3) whether he plans to take disciplinary action against the implicated SMS members; if not, why not; if so, what is the nature of the disciplinary action that he intends to take against the implicated SMS members?

Reply:

Reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Parliament Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

 

24 June 2021 - NW1427

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether his department has embarked on a learnership programme for the 2021-22 financial year; if not, will his department hold the learnership programme in abeyance until all existing trainees have been absorbed; if so, (a) what number of learners are enrolled and (b) what steps will be taken to ensure that these learners are absorbed into his department when they qualify, (2) whether the unsuccessful candidates who are not going to be absorbed will be advised personally; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the unsuccessful candidates will be removed from the persal system so that they can pursue alternative employment; if not, why not; if so, by what date will they be removed?

Reply:

(1) No, the Department of Correctional Services has not yet embarked on the 2021/22 Learnership Programme. The enrolment will be determined by the human resource needs and the availability of funds. The absorption of learners who have completed their learnership is not a determining factor for the enrolment of the next group of learners on the programme. The aim of the programme is to provide training and skills development opportunities to the youth preparing them for the labour market.

(1)(a) None

(1)(b) Not applicable

(2) No, the learnership programme is a 12 month development programme and not an employment contract, in the case of group 1 of 2019/20 the contract was extended as the programme was suspended for two months during the lockdown levels 5 and 4. The programme came to an end on 31 December 2020.

(3) Yes, their contract appointment on the PERSAL system is created in such a way that, when the contract end date is reached, the learner is automatically removed from the PERSAL system enabling them to pursue alternative employment.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1625

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, given the current levels of illegal immigration into the Republic, the Government have an estimate of the total number of undocumented immigrants who are in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the total breakdown by nationality; (2) whether his department has any plans in the medium term to enforce immigration legislation by deporting illegal immigrants; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The government does not have a precise number of the number of undocumented immigrants in Republic due to the clandestine nature of the act of being here illegally. A number of persons entered without being recorded on any system and live here as unrecorded. It is only when they are detected or their presence is noted that we are able to have figures. The number of undocumented migrants that were deported in 2019/20 was 29376 with the nationality breakdown as follows:

Mozambique

13834

Pakistan

32

Burundi

15

Bolivia

6

Zimbabwe

5790

Zambia

31

Ethiopia

13

Algeria

3

Malawi

4277

China

29

Botswana

11

Cape Verde

3

Lesotho

3963

India

29

Cameroon

11

Senegal

3

Tanzania

517

Bangladesh

26

Thailand

11

Bulgaria

2

Eswatini

314

Ghana

25

Brazil

10

Guyana

2

Nigeria

176

Angola

22

Congo-Brazzaville

10

Iraq

2

DRC

87

Kenya

21

Somalia

8

Sri Lanka

2

Uganda

50

Namibia

19

Egypt

7

UK

2

Spain

1

Saudi Arabia

1

Saint Vincent

1

Peru

1

Venezuela

2

Cuba

1

Gabon

1

Morocco

1

Cote d’Voire

1

Ecuador

1

Israel

1

Palestine

1

and in 2020/21 deportations dropped with the onset of the Covid pandemic and stood at 14859 the breakdown as follows:

Lesotho

5769

Kenya

5

Zimbabwe

3226

UK

4

Mozambique

2714

Botswana

3

Malawi

2019

China

3

Eswatini

622

Thailand

3

Tanzania

236

Cameroon

2

Nigeria

59

Guinea

2

DRC

51

Paraguay

2

Namibia

24

Philippines

2

Angola

23

Argentina

1

Burundi

19

Bolivia

1

Brazil

13

Bulgaria

1

Uganda

9

Germany

1

Zambia

8

Guyana

1

   

Pakistan

1

   

Seychelles

1

   

Sierra Leone

1

   

USA

1

2. The department is mandated by legislation to enforce immigration act and deport illegal immigrants. This activity continues unabated as reflected in response to question 1 above.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1696

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the National Economic Development and Labour Council has commissioned any external service providers regarding the review of its statutes and protocols by the Governance Task Team; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the name of the entity that was commissioned, (b) at what cost and (c) what recommendations were made?

Reply:

The Governance Task Team at Nedlac agreed to conduct a study on how Nedlac can become fit for purpose. The study did not specifically focus on reviewing the statutes and protocols of Nedlac.

a) The Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection (MISTRA) in partnership with the International Labour Organisation (ILO)

b) The cost of the study is R1 206 510. The study has been funded by the ILO and Yellowwoods Foundation

c) A number of recommendations have been made by the service providers which are yet to be considered by the governance structures of Nedlac. Once the recommendations are confirmed, they will be reported on to Parliament.

24 June 2021 - NW1610

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the concessionaire funding model for the One Stop Border Posts operating on a user pay principle, what regulation mechanism will be put in place to regulate the concessionaire tariffs to ensure that a private concessionaire cannot charge whatever they want?

Reply:

The annual tariff escalation will be done strictly on the basis of what was negotiated and agreed to between the DHA and the private concessionaire. The agreed principle will then be provided for in the concession agreement as the sole basis of escalating the tariffs.  

For example, the concession agreement may stipulate that the annual tariff escalation will be linked to inflation, as calculated by StatsSA. Once this is agreed to, it becomes the only way that the concessionaire can escalate the tariffs.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1217

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

How does he intend to improve his department’s services to the persons in Matatiele in the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The Department agrees that there are service challenges with the Municipality of Matatiele. This has informed a recent intervention wherein a senior management team led by the Director General undertook a visit to Mataiele on 2 June 2021 and engaged with municipal officials in finding a solution. The parties have agreed to a set of interventions addressing immediate, short and long term requirements to assist the district in its economic upliftment and transformation. The immediate constraint of DHA not having access to a suitable premise to conduct its business was addressed, and agreement with the municipality has been reached for the lease of a municipal building which will be refurbished to the standards of the department. It is envisaged that a full service live capture Medium Office affording the people of Matatiele and its surrounds with a modernised system to accept and process Smart ID Card applications should be operational by January 2022. For the interim the department is considering deployment of one of its Mobile Trucks for a week at a time to address the immediate demand for services.

The long-term solution entails the building of a fit for purpose DHA office in Matatiele and to this end a building has been identified by both the Municipality and DHA for the relocation of the offices.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1508

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether her department has taken any steps to ensure that the cybersecurity of the Republic is not compromised in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic during which there had been a worldwide rise in cybercrimes and ransom attacks; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The SSA through its National Communications provides the following as measures and steps to ensure that Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Security or cyber security in organs of state is maintained.

Provision of ICT Security Solutions and services to organs of state for protecting and securing electronic systems:

Rendering periodic and on-demand Information Assurance services and continuous monitoring services to clients and identified Critical Information Infrastructure:

    • Conducting technical Vulnerability and Risk assessments to identify and report on common critical vulnerabilities affecting Organs of state.
    • Continuous monitoring of ICT Security network infrastructures and systems of Organs of state in order to provide proactive alerts and warnings that help to protect the systems before harm.
    • Provision of Incident response to compromised systems of organs of state to mitigate risks and deploy measures to avoid recurrence of ICT security and Cyber-attacks and incidents.
    • Provision of cyber security awareness.

SSA National Communications is also busy with the review of the Cyber Security Strategy to improve the security and resilience of national infrastructures and services. The strategy establishes a range of national objectives and priorities that should be achieved in a specific timeframe.

The review/finalisation of the Cybercrimes and Cybersecurity Bill:

  • to define offences and impose penalties that have a bearing on cybercrime
  • to criminalise the distribution of data messages that are harmful
  • to provide for interim protection order
  • to further regulate jurisdiction in respect of cybercrimes
  • to further regulate the powers to investigate cybercrimes
  • to further regulate aspects relating to mutual assistance in respect of the investigation of cybercrime
  • to provide for the establishment of a 24/7 Point of Contact
  • to further provide for the proof of certain facts by affidavit
  • to impose obligations on electronic communications service providers and financial institutions to assist in the investigation of cybercrimes
  • to report cybercrimes
  • to provide for the establishment of structures to promote cybersecurity and capacity building
  • to regulate the identification and declaration of critical information infrastructures and measures to protect critical information infrastructures
  • to provide that the Executive may enter into agreements with foreign States to promote cybersecurity
  • to delete and amend provisions of certain laws
  • to provide for matters connected therewith.

24 June 2021 - NW1698

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With regard to the extension of the Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme benefit of the Unemployment Insurance Fund for the periods (a) 15 October 2020 to 31 December 2020 and (b) 1 January 2021 to 15 March 2021, what number of (i) applications were received from enterprises in the (aa) tourism, (bb) liquor, (cc) hospitality, (dd) conferencing-events sectors and (ee) any other business in related value chains, (ii) applications were rejected on the grounds of incorrect Standard Industry Classification Codes and (iii) the rejected applications were overturned on appeal?

Reply:

a) 15 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

 

Application received

Applications were rejected on the grounds of incorrect Standard Industry Classification Codes

Rejected applications were overturned on appeal?

Tourism

No data showing this category

No data showing this category

9

Liquor

12655

440

14

Hospitality

16332

686

290

Conferencing-events sectors

28987

No data showing this category

50

Any other business in related value chains,

No data showing this category

11549

5

b)

1 January 2021 to 15 March 2021

 

Application received

Applications were rejected on the grounds of incorrect Standard Industry Classification Codes

Rejected applications were overturned on appeal?

Tourism

No data showing this category

No data showing this category

6

Liquor

6222

62

9

Hospitality

10701

124

239

Conferencing-events sectors

No data showing this category

No data showing this category

39

Any other business in related value chains

16923

1420

7

24 June 2021 - NW1501

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether, given the proliferation of e-hailing services, their extension into food deliveries, and in light of the developments on the regulation of these services in other jurisdictions, the Government intends to regulate e-hailing services to give the drivers legal protection as employees with benefits; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the specifics and estimated timelines; (2) whether, in light of the increasing youth unemployment rate which currently stands at more than 50%, the Government has any plans to reserve the employment of drivers for e-hailing services for South Africans; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the Government has put any safeguards in place to protect drivers in the e-hailing services from exploitation by owners of vehicles; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. NEDLAC social partners are currently dealing with matters that are affecting e-hailing services workers the labour market will be informed as soon as this process is complete.

The Labour Relations Act of 1995 and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act of 1997 deal with the presumption of who is an employee. According to the two legislations, a person is presumed to be an employee if they are able to establish that one of seven listed factors in section 200A of the LRA and section 83A of the BCEA is present in their relationship with a person for whom they work or to whom they render services.

The presumption comes into operation if the applicant establishes that one of the following seven factors is present:

  • the manner in which the person works is subject to the control or direction of another person;
  • the person's hours of work are subject to the control or direction of another person;
  • in the case of a person who works for an organisation, the person forms part of that organisation;
  • the person has worked for that other person for an average of at least 40 hours per month over the last three months;
  • the person is economically dependent on the other person for whom he or she works or renders services; and
  • the person is provided with the tools of trade or work equipment by the other person; 'the person only works for or renders services to one person.

The presumption applies regardless of the form of the contract entered into. The issue of the applicant's employment status cannot be determined merely by reference to either the applicant's obligations as stipulated in the contract or a 'label' attached to the relationship in a contract. Therefore, a statement in a contract that the applicant is not an employee or is an independent contractor is not a conclusive proof of the status of the applicant.

Any person believing that is an employee based on one of the presumption of who is an employee and feels that his employment rights were violated is free to approach the CCMA for help.

2. The Department, has been working closely with the International Labour Organisation in the commissioning and development of a National Labour Migration Policy. One of the recommendations emerging from a range of proposals, is the concept of introducing complete prohibitions or quarters on the number of foreign nationals that can be employed in any sector and this may include e-hailing transport. This will be in line with Section 36 of our Constitution to justify fair discrimination against foreign nationals as part of our efforts to address local high unemployment levels and to uphold existing minimum labour standards. I will release the Draft Policy and the proposed amendments for public discussion and consultation with the social partners as soon as internal government processes are completed.

3. Honourable Mr Ngcobo, as I have alluded to the fact that NEDLAC social partners are already dealing with the matter of e-hailing service workers, let us allow NEDLAC time to deal with the issues and at the right time, the labour market will be kept abreast on the developments.

24 June 2021 - NW1631

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department is considering to introduce a remote working visa that enables travellers to work remotely in the Republic, a condition currently not accommodated by existing visa legislation in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Visas are administered in terms of the Immigration Act, 2002 (Act 13 of 2002) as amended read in conjunction with the Regulations promulgated under the Act. The Department is not in the process of amending the Immigration legislation to authorise the issuance of Remote working visas that would enable travellers to work remotely in the Republic

END

24 June 2021 - NW1304

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) total number of children were (i) registered and (ii) received birth certificates in the Republic in each year in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2021, (b) is the breakdown for each province in each year in the specified period?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) The department maintains and reports its performance per financial year. The total number of children that were registered within 30 days of birth and issued with birth certificates for the period of 2011/2012 to 2020/2021 financial years is 7 133 885. However, the total number of all births i.e. inclusive of late registration of birth (births registered for persons 31 days and above) is 10 862 086.

b) Provincial breakdown of children that were registered within 30 days of birth and issued with birth certificates for the period of 2011/2012 to 2020/2021 financial years

PROVINCE

2011/2012

2012/2013

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

2020/2021

Grand total

EASTERN CAPE

70123

68633

81634

88334

83959

86206

89695

95925

97704

78340

840553

FREE STATE

37712

38290

43749

42990

41902

42342

43706

45856

45432

40666

422645

GAUTENG

142502

146856

160228

164002

163236

173736

177687

188921

191363

170075

1678606

KWAZULU-NATAL

98170

101423

106049

119233

119961

128358

132174

141553

156588

136490

1239999

LIMPOPO

58134

67399

79658

88351

92514

100987

106295

113217

120636

118007

945198

MPUMALANGA

29703

38973

44839

53659

55712

60338

63700

66842

69534

69866

553166

NORTH WEST

32515

35598

38129

45404

21136

50104

52613

53841

54443

48139

431922

NORTHERN CAPE

15582

17484

20010

21578

45179

21146

21348

22494

21906

19736

226463

WESTERN CAPE

66964

73190

76383

80976

79887

81973

84817

88049

87647

69768

789654

HEAD OFFICE

5357

26

3

0

279

14

0

0

0

0

5679

TOTAL

556762

587872

650682

704527

703765

745204

772035

816698

845253

751087

7133885

END

24 June 2021 - NW1525

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With regard to the Inter-Ministerial Committee co-chaired by him and the Minister of Home Affairs established in 2020, what measures have been put in place to effectively deal with issues of migration and labour since the inception of the specified committee?

Reply:

Since the establishment of the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Migration and Labour we have put a number of measures that include the following:

  • Establishment of a Technical Committee of Directors General that supports member Ministers on migration cross cutting measures that may be short, medium and long term that must be implemented to address various identified challenges.
  • Developed a detailed discussion document that identified various Constitutional and existing Legislation and Regulations, Southern African Development Community and African Union instruments and protocols, Global Migration Treaties and Conventions, Courts judgements in relation to migration cases that we must always be mindful off and Legal opinions.
  • We continue to implement short term measures that include, improvements in border management, joint enforcement and inspections on the roads and employment premises.
  • We have established a National and Provincial Trucking, Logistics and Road Freight Forums that brought all stakeholders within the sector together to address the torching and looting of trucks, presence of foreign drivers and collective bargaining within the sector.
  • The Action Plans developed, details measures that each Department is initiating in the areas of Statistics and projection of foreign nationals in the country, criminal and security measures, justice, human rights, social development, trade and bilateral agreements, agriculture etc.
  • The Medium and long term measures include policy harmonization and development where there are gaps. The Department of Employment and Labour has developed a Draft National Labour Migration Policy and Draft proposed Employment Services Amendment Bill aligned to the policy that I will release as soon as I have completed internal government processes. The Department of Home Affairs is also reviewing the Immigration Act in its entirety.
  • We have also established Committees that are assisting us to address other urgent matters relating to migration such as processing of Applications for Waivers of the current Immigration Act provisions, Work Visa applications by foreign nationals or corporates.
  • We have made Submissions to brief Cabinet on the activities of the IMC.

24 June 2021 - NW1348

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether (aa) certain person (details furnished) and (bb) certain person (details furnished) who were sentenced to 25 years plus 15 years for murder and robbery with aggravating circumstances in Kroonstad in 2003 were recently paroled; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date, (b) what factors were taken into account when deciding to release them on parole and (c) what are the conditions on which they were released; (2) whether either of them has subsequently appeared in court in connection with committing an offence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date, (b) at which location, (c) what offence(s) are they charged with and (d) have they been granted

Reply:

(1)(aa) Yes, the mentioned offender was placed on parole.

(1)(aa)(a) He was placed on parole on 1 November.2019 to 24 April 2040.

(1)(aa)(b) He was placed on parole after completion of 1/3 of his sentence. The offender benefited from the Phaahla judgment since he was sentenced after 1 October 2004 for offences committed in June 2003. This meant that he qualified to be considered for parole after serving a 1/3 instead of ½ of his sentence as this was the parole policy applicable at the time of commission of the offences. He was considered for placement after attending relevant programmes. The placement on parole was subject to placement conditions until expiry of his sentence. The CSPB further considered amongst others the following factors:

  • the completion of the legislatively required minimum detention period;
  • proof of a monitorable and appropriate support system;
  • positive report on conduct and behaviour (including relevant interventions and programmes where applicable);
  • proof that rehabilitation/ development took place;
  • risk posed to the community/ victim; and
    • acceptance of the conditions for placement by the offender.

(1)(aa)(c) The Offender was inter alia subjected to the following parole conditions in line with section 52 of Correctional Services Act, 1998 (Act 111of 1998):

  • house detention;
  • does community service;
  • seeks employment;
  • where possible takes up and remains in employment;
  • restricted to one magisterial district;
  • lives at a fixed address;
  • refrains from using alcohol or illegal drugs;
  • refrains from committing a criminal offence;
  • is subject to monitoring;

(1)(bb) Yes, the mentioned offender was placed on parole.

(1)(bb)(a) He was placed on parole on 20 September.2019 to 24 April.2040.

(1)(bb)(b) He was placed on parole by the CSPB after completion of 1/3 of his sentence. The offender benefited from the Phaahla judgment since he was sentenced after 1 October 2004 for offences committed in June 2003. This meant that he qualified for consideration after serving a 1/3 instead of ½ of his sentence as this was the parole policy applicable at the time of commission of the offences. He was considered by the CSPB after attending relevant programmes and was placed on parole subject to placement conditions which he had to comply with until expiry of his sentence. The CSPB further considered the following factors, among others:

  • the completion of the legislatively required minimum detention period;
  • proof of a monitorable and appropriate support system;
  • positive report on conduct and behaviour (including relevant interventions and programmes where applicable);
  • proof that rehabilitation/ development took place;
  • risk posed to the community/ victim; and
  • acceptance of the conditions for placement.

(1)(bb)(c) The offender was among others subjected to the following parole conditions in line with section 52 of Correctional Services Act, 1998 (Act 111of 1998):

  • house detention;
  • does community service;
  • seeks employment;
  • where possible takes up and remains in employment;
  • is restricted to one magisterial district;
  • lives at a fixed address;
  • refrains from using alcohol or illegal drugs;
  • refrains from committing a criminal offence;
  • is subject to monitoring;

(2) Yes,

(2)(a) The offender mentioned in part (aa) appeared in court on 12 May 2021.

(2)(b) He appeared at the Frankfort District Court.

(2)(c) He is alleged to have committed robbery with aggravating circumstances.

(2)(d) Bail has not been fixed.

 

END.

24 June 2021 - NW1388

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What safety measures has he put in place to guarantee the safety of citizens at the Local Government Election polls in October this year?

Reply:

The question was referred to the Electoral Commission which has responded as follows:

The Electoral Commission in consultation with the National Party Liaison Committee (NPLC) has agreed on a voting station COVID protocol which, inter alia, provides the following measures:

a) The mandatory wearing of masks within the perimeter of the voting stations

b) Enforcement of social distancing on queues at the voting stations

c) Mandatory sanitizing of hands at entrance and exit of voting station

d) Encouraging voters to bring own pens to the voting stations even though pens will be provided and sanitised.

e) Where the size of the voting station is small, allowing a single party agent per party

f) Providing Personal Protection Equipment for voting officials at all voting stations and during home visit special votes.

Additional measures are currently being discussed within the auspices of the NPLC. Once a common view emerges and budget permitting these measures will be presented to the Commission for consideration and possible approval.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1429

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What plans does his department have for the Graaff-Reinet office in the Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality to provide services that are not currently reaching all the residents in order to (a) issue (i) identity cards and (ii) birth certificates and (b) provide other additional services to the towns of (i) Aberdeen, (ii) Steytlerville, (iii) Jansensville, (iv) Klipplaat, (v) Rietbron and (vi) Willowmore; (2) how often is it envisaged that his department will visit the specified towns in the period leading to the local government elections in October 2021; (3) whether his department intends to draft a programme for servicing the towns; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will the programme be in place; (4) whether his department will advertise its programme for servicing the towns timeously; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a)(i)(b)(i),(ii)(iii)(iv)(v)(vi)

The above-mentioned far flung areas are visited on a monthly basis by the Office to provide Services-on-wheels. There is a Monthly Program in place. More, recently, Jansenville and Klipplaat were visited by the Mobile Solution Unit on 17 and 18 May 2021, respectively, to provide services to the community and the learners.

2. The above-mentioned areas will be visited on a monthly basis to provide services leading to the local government elections in October 2021.

3. There is a Monthly Program in place, and it is communicated to the Local Municipal leader / active members in the Home Affairs / Municipal Stakeholder Forum that are assisting the communities, and Community Development Workers (CDWs) when the Department visits the areas

4. The programmes and visits are communicated, timeously, to all role players.

END

24 June 2021 - NW1343

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What was the (a) closing balance of contingent liabilities against his department, (b) total rand amount of legal fees paid by his department and (c) total rand amount of cost orders against his department for the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

a) The unaudited closing balance for contingent liabilities as at 31 March 2021 for the Department of Home Affairs is R1 930 321 440.36 (compared to R2 189, 283 as at 31 March 2020). Please note the 2020/21 figure is unaudited and subject to change, which change may not be that significant.

b) The total amount of legal fees paid by the Department of Home Affairs during the 2020/21 financial year is R38, 512 million (compared to R75, 162 million as at 31 March 2020). Please note the 2020/21 figure is unaudited and subject to change.

c) As indicated above, the Department paid R38, 512 million in legal fees, however, this amount includes fees for both matters that the Department succeeded (costs of Department’s Counsels to represent the Department) as well as unsuccessful matters.

It must be noted that the State Attorney pays legal fees on behalf of the Department and the Department in turn reimburses the State Attorneys. Invoices received from the State Attorney’s office are received in bulk and the State Attorneys do separate costs for successful and unsuccessful matters when sending invoices.

END

23 June 2021 - NW1699

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) is the total number of communities and/or beneficiaries who received land development support grants since 1 January 2014 and (b) are the (i) full details of the and amounts received by each community and/or beneficiary since 2014 and (ii) names of the persons who are responsible for the monitoring and evaluation of the specified funds?

Reply:

a) Since 1 January 2014 till 31 March 2021 the land development support grants were received by a total of 1664 beneficiaries across three different programs as reflect in attached Annexures A: Recapitalisation and Development Programme (RADP) projects; B: 1House Hold 1 Hectare (1HH1H) projects and C: Land Development Support projects.

b) (i) Please refer Annexures A, B and C.

(ii) The monitoring of the specified funds for the implementation of projects is done at different levels. The first level is at operational, which is at the Province through our Provincial Shared Service Centres (PSSCs), and lastly at programme level in national office.

When it comes to evaluation, the responsibility in the Department lies with the Monitoring and Evaluation Unit, which is independent from the implementing unit. However, this function is not only limited to this unit, it also happens through Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) and Public Service Commission (PSC), in some instances done by non-government organisations and institutions of higher learning.

23 June 2021 - NW1655

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) total number of veterinarians in the Northern Cape and (b)(i) current vacancy rate and (ii) date by which the specified province intends to fill the vacant positions; (2) what is the total number of veterinarians per livestock unit; (3) whether her department has implemented the compulsory service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what were the (a) prevailing animal diseases during the past financial year and (b) interventions to treat them?

Reply:

1. (a) Veterinary services in the Northern Cape is a directorate headed by the Senior Manager (Director) who is a veterinarian and who reports directly to the Executive Manager (Chief Director) in the department. There are 7 state veterinary offices spread throughout the province and each state veterinary office have service centres in their areas that the Animal Health Technicians operate from. The number of veterinarians in the province is 9 and this number includes the Chief Director, Director and 2 Deputy Directors.

POSITION

STATION

FILLED

VACANT

Chief Director: Agricultural Technical Support Services

Kimberley

1

0

Director: Veterinary Services

Kimberley

1

0

Deputy Director: Animal Health

Kimberley

0

1

Deputy Director: Veterinary Public Health & Export Control

Kimberley

1

0

Deputy Directory: Veterinary Laboratory & Epidemiology

Kimberley

1

0

State Veterinarian: Veterinary Laboratory

Kimberley

1

0

State Veterinarian: Export Control

De Aar

0

1

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

Kimberley

1

0

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

De Aar

1

0

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

Calvinia

1

0

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

Springbok

0

1

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

Upington

0

1

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

Kuruman

1

0

State Veterinarian: Animal Health

Mothibistad

0

1

Total

 

9

5

(b)(i) current vacancy rate is about 36%

(ii) There is a moratorium currently in place on the filing of vacant posts due to the financial constraints put on the departmental budget by the Covid

19 pandemic.

2. The FAO recommends a ratio of 1 veterinarian per 100 000 livestock units, and using this norm would result in the province requiring 16 State Veterinarians to carry out disease control, laboratory diagnostics and veterinary public health, which are the minimal requirements for a basic service.

3. The Compulsory Community Service (CCS) programme was finally rolled out in the Northern Cape province in 2016 with the number of CCS veterinarians increasing steadily from 4 to the current number of 7. This year, the CCS veterinarians only started on 1 March 2021 due to the disruption of the academic year caused by Covid 19 pandemic. The MEC, Mase Manopole welcomed the seven (7) newly qualified Veterinarians to the Department under the Compulsory Community Service (CCS) program. The areas that benefits from this programme include Kuruman (2), Kimberley (2), Prieska (1), Veterinary Laboratory (1) and Upington (1). These 7 placements significantly increased access to Veterinary Services in the province, increasing the number of field Animal Health Veterinarians from 4 to 10. The livestock farmers in the rural communities have welcomed the move by government to introduce the CCS programme to speed up rural animal health care.

4. No major disease of economic importance was recorded in the last 4 years. The Northern Cape Province received above normal rainfall that favoured the breeding of mosquitoes which are responsible for the transmission of Rift Valley Fever disease (RVF), African Horse Sickness, Lumpy Skin Disease, Bluetongue etc. The MEC for Agriculture, Environmental Affairs, Rural Development and Land Reform, Ms Mase Manopole was on an awareness drive, forewarning all farmers to vaccinate their cattle, sheep and goats against RVF before the peak of mosquitoes around March and April. The MEC also advised farmers to get vaccines from the cooperatives in the province and encouraged them not to eat dead animals and should always wear protective clothing when handling aborted foetuses.

Rabies remains prevalent in wildlife and to support this phenomenon, the provinces recorded a number of rabies cases with only one human case. Fortunately, the victim was successfully enrolled on a full course of post exposure rabies prophylaxis. 5153 pets were vaccinated during the World Rabies awareness period in the province.

Sheep scab has been reported in areas where farming with sheep is dominant. Sheep scab is traditionally most prevalent during the second and third quarter of the year and 2020 was no exception. All the confirmations were done by the Kimberley Veterinary laboratory, which is the only government laboratory that is accredited to do sheep scab testing. All the outbreaks were handled as per the protocol.

23 June 2021 - NW1654

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) total number of veterinarians in the Western Cape and (b)(i) current vacancy rate and (ii) date by which the specified province intends to fill the vacant positions; (2) what is the total number of veterinarians per livestock unit; (3) whether her department has implemented the compulsory service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what were the (a) prevailing animal diseases during the past financial year and (b) interventions to treat them?

Reply:

1. (a) Veterinary services in the Western Cape is a directorate headed by the Senior Manager (Director) who is a veterinarian and who reports directly to the Executive Manager (Chief Director) in the department. There are 23 (18 State veterinarians and 5 Managers (Veterinarians).

(b)(i) There are only four unfilled positions out of the twenty two positions for veterinarians. Please note that this response excluded the director position which would have made the positions for veterinarians 23. The vacancy rate is therefore 18.8%.

(ii) The Western Cape Province is considering filling the vacant positions by December 2021. The filling of these positions will be guided by government prescripts related to resource constraints.

2. The FAO recommends a ratio of 1 veterinarian per 100 000 livestock units, and using this norm would result in the province requiring 15 State Veterinarians to carry out disease control, laboratory diagnostics and veterinary public health, which are the minimal requirements for a basic service. Considering the historical figures of veterinary livestock units in the Western Cape, the available veterinarians per veterinary livestock units is below norm that is 12.

3. The Compulsory Community Service (CCS) programme for veterinarians is being implemented. A total of 17 CCS veterinarians have been allocated to the Western Cape Province and are deployed in the various districts.

4. (a) The following diseases were prevalent in the Western Cape during the past financial year:

  • Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza;
  • African Swine Fever ;
  • African Horse Sickness and
  • other day to day animal diseases.

(b) Whenever an animal disease outbreak occurs, relevant disease contingency plans are activated. Highly Pathogenic Avian influenza and African swine fever causes high mortalities in poultry and pigs respectively and are a serious threat to food security. Awareness campaigns are being conducted and improved surveillance for the diseases is implemented. African horse sickness is a disease of horses and other equines. It is a disease that is very trade sensitive and its occurrence leads to export restrictions.

23 June 2021 - NW1607

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With regard to the refurbishment of the parliamentary villages which was mooted and begun with many of the brick houses being assessed first, a process which resulted in the rebuilding of a number of brick houses currently underway, and in light of the fact that many of the prefabricated houses have asbestos roofs which pose significant health concerns to residents, (a) on what date is it envisaged the refurbishments will (i) be concluded on the brick houses which were started before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and (ii) start on the prefabricated houses in the parliamentary villages and (b) what plans are in place to fast-track the finalisation of the refurbishment programme in all three parliamentary villages?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) I have been informed by the Department that:

(i) The project does not entail rebuilding but maintenance of the brick houses. The, site handover was done in September 2020 and is scheduled to be completed as follows:

  • Acacia Park - 7 February 2022
  • Laboria Park - 7 November 2022
  • Pelican Park - 7 September 2023

(ii) The demolition of the prefabricated houses and building of new units project will commence with the appointment of the contractor in October 2021, firstly the designs will be done and thereafter construction.

(b) The project will be completed within the agreed timelines.

23 June 2021 - NW1640

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) How far along is the disciplinary process of officials of her department who were involved in the Beitbridge debacle and (b) what consequences have such departmental officials suffered?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) I have been informed by the Department that the hearing was held on 08 March 2021 wherein parties agreed on the hearing dates of the 21-24 April 2021, and 04-06 May 2021 respectively. A pre-hearing meeting was held on 30th March 2021 between the employer’s party and the employees’ parties.

The hearing for Members of the Bid Adjudication Committee was scheduled for 21 – 24 April 2021 and the hearing proceeded with DPWI leading a witness for three consecutive days on procurement processes. The matter was postponed to 14, 15, 17 & 18 June 2021 for further testimony and cross examination of the witnesses.

The hearing of the Senior Officials was scheduled for 04 – 06 May 2021, however, the hearing was postponed on the first sitting due to the failure one of the official’s legal representative to attend the hearing. The said legal representative indicated that he is launching a court application to review the report and to stop the disciplinary enquiry. However, the Department argued that the matter should proceed and that the legal representative should be advised to attend the hearing on the next day, 05 May 2021, since there is no court order interdicting the disciplinary process and that DPWI has not been cited as a party to the aforementioned intended court application. The hearing was postponed to 05 May 2021 and proceeded accordingly. During the hearing one of the official’s legal representative served the chairperson and the department with the Court application to review the investigation report and also to stop the disciplinary enquiry. As a result thereof the chairperson of the hearing ruled that the disciplinary action is postponed indefinitely pending the finalization of the court application, because the Department will not suffer any prejudice if postponement is granted until finalization of the Court application and that the DPWI may proceed with the disciplinary action if the application is not granted. The Chairperson further ruled that the Court application for the review has a bearing on the current disciplinary action since the directive and the report giving rise to the process is the subject matter of the review and therefore the argument by DPWI that there is no Court Order prohibiting the continuation of disciplinary enquiry is without valid merits

b) In view of the aforesaid statement, no official has suffered any consequences. This is dependent on the outcome of the concluded disciplinary process which has been put on halt pending the outcome of the court application.

23 June 2021 - NW1759

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What specific actions has she and/or her department taken to provide support to farmers whose crops were damaged by the heavy rains between 1 November 2020 and 28 February 2021?

Reply:

Since the fall of the heavy rains and the cyclone Eloise, provinces reprioritised their equitable share and conditional grants in order to address the damages incurred by farmers. Mpumalanga made available an amount of R8 270 000.00, Free State R1 200 000.00 and Northern Cape R1 500 000.00. North West catered for the affected farmers in the 2021/22 Fetsa Tlala programme to be assisted with seeds. The intervention is provided through provision of seeds, crop seedlings and soil rehabilitation to support the affected farmers. Continuous monitoring is done while early warning information and advisories are being disseminated on a daily basis.

23 June 2021 - NW1735

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What is the status of transformation in Government universities as reflected in the percentage of black (a) academics as a whole, (b) female academics vis-à-vis white female academics in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects and (c) female academics vis-à-vis male academics in STEM subjects; (2) what (a) is the Government strategy to enhance transformation through inclusion of black female academics STEM subjects as reflected in the above percentages and (b) are the anticipated timelines?

Reply:

(1)     According to HEMIS data (2019), overall there are still more male than female staff occupying instruction and research posts in the sector. African women are significantly under represented. The table below illustrates the breakdown of the numbers according to race and gender:

Table 1: Headcount of instruction and research staff in 2019:

Population Group

Instruction and Research

 

Female

Male

Total

  African

3 416

4 807

8 223

  Coloured

792

655

1 447

  Indian/Asian

888

731

1 619

  White

4 397

3 807

8 204

  Unknown

94

314

408

Total

9 587

10 314

19 901

 

The HEMIS data does not provide a breakdown according to field of specialisation. 

(2)     To address this, the Department is implementing the Staffing South Africa’s Universities’ Framework (SSAUF) as part of the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP). The UCDP is an implementation programme that is intended to enable an integrated approach to capacity development across three focal areas: student development, staff development and programme/curriculum development. For the purposes of the UCDP, staff development activities are activities that enable the development of university academic and professional staff in a range of roles, including teaching, researching, leading, managing and administering.

The SSUAF comprises sub-programmes that are designed to intervene at important transition points along the academic staffing career trajectory. There are five programmes focused on the recruitment of black (African) female academics, and these are the Nurturing Emerging Scholars Programme (NESP), the New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP), the University Staff Doctoral Programme (USDP), the Future Professors Programme (FPP) and the Higher Education Leadership and Management Programme (HELMP).

The NESP aims to recruit honours graduates who demonstrate academic ability, who express an early interest in the possibility of an academic career and who might be lost to the system if structured, attractive prospects and opportunities for recruitment into academic positions do not exist. NESP Master's graduates then become a resource pool from which new academics can be recruited. The NESP is implemented in phases by the Department with Phase 1 having started with implementation in 2020 with 97 candidates supported through the programme. Five of these candidates were given an opportunity to study for Master's degrees in France and three of them are women. The rest will be confirmed this year. Each phase of the NESP will be a 3-year programme for all selected participants, comprising two stages. Stage 1 will comprise of a 2-year scholarship programme and Stage 2 is a compulsory 1-year internship programme at the recruiting university. The NESP was implemented for the first time in 2020.   

The nGAP involves the recruitment of highly capable scholars as new academics to be appointed in permanent posts at universities, against carefully designed and balanced equity considerations and in light of the disciplinary areas of greatest need. To date, seven phases (Phase 1 - 7) of the nGAP are being implemented, and posts have been awarded and continue to be filled by the universities. Phase 7 commenced in April 2021, and the recruitment and contracting for these posts must be concluded in March 2022. 

Out of a total of 542 nGAP lecturers in the system currently, 252 (46%) are appointed in STEM positions. Out of the 252, 140 (55.5%) are women and 112 (44.5%) are men.

The USDP, which supports existing permanent academics to obtain doctoral degrees, also follows suit with the majority (56 out of a total of 101) of participants in the programme being women.

The FPP, which supports lecturers and senior lectures who demonstrate academic leadership potential to transition to the professoriate, started implementation in 2019/20 with the majority of participants being women.

The HELMP seeks to build leadership and management capacity in the university system and has a special programme that focuses on the development of women as leaders in higher education.

All these programmes emphasise that of the selected candidates, 90% must be black South Africans and at least 55% of the beneficiaries must be women. The sustainability of these programmes is secured as these programmes form part of the annual performance targets of the Department and are allocated funds in the Ministerial Statement for University Funding each year.

These programmes are as per the need for each university with some of them demonstrating a need in the STEM subjects. However, due to a limited pool of qualifying female prospective candidates, recruitment of this group of the population is often difficult, a matter that the Department is trying to attend to.

23 June 2021 - NW1700

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department is making use of consultants and/or service providers to do work on its behalf; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the (i) name and (ii) business of each consulting firm and/or service provider and (b) are the details of the budget (i) allocated and (ii) spent since 1 January 2019?

Reply:

Yes.

(a)(i),(ii) Please refer to the table below.

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Business of each consulting firm

Spent since 01 January 2019 to 31 May 2021

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Research And Advisory Services

R83,575,461

DATA WORLD

Research And Advisory Services

R33,245,315

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Implementation Of Kaonafatso Ya Dikgomo Scheme

R25,000,000

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Survey On Available Turfs In Provinces

R24,201,000

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Project Management

R16,967,000

J Maynard Pty Ltd

Project Management

R16,558,295

FEM PLAN

Project Management, Planning, Feasibilty And Detail Design And Cost Estimation

R16,087,482

THE DECIDUOUS FRUIT PRODUCERS' TRUST

Research And Advisory Services

R15,203,000

THE DECIDUOUS FRUIT PRODUCERS' TRUST

Research And Advisory Services

R14,410,000

UNDP Representative SA

Research

R13,174,000

NATIONAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Valuations Advisory Services

R11,618,400

SPATIAL INTELLIGENCE

Research And Advisory Services

R10,993,976

NATIONAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Implementation Of Research And Technology Fund Projects

R10,968,600

SIZEYA CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Project Management

R10,370,729

ESRI SA

Advisory Consulting Services

R9,853,684

ENTSIKA CONSULTING SERVICES

Project Management

R8,751,903

UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN

Project Management

R8,553,606

BOIKGANTSHO CONSULTING AND EVENTS

Financial Management

R8,252,250

SEMH AGRICULTURE, ENVIRONMENT, CONSULTING AND TRAI

Research And Advisory Services

R6,137,000

BOIKGANTSHO CONSULTING AND EVENTS

Training

R5,950,875

Moses Kotane -NW

Research

R5,608,118

Forestry South Africa

For South African Sirex Control Programme

R5,560,000

SMEC SA

Project Management

R5,533,882

ESRI SA

Advisory Consulting Services

R4,926,842

THUSO ENVIRO AND AGRIC DEVELOPMENT

Research And Advisory Services

R4,721,500

FEM PLAN

Project Management

R4,535,132

FEVERTREE CONSULTING

Project Management

R4,118,387

Urban Econ Development Economist

Research

R3,723,163

GABHISA PLANNING INVESTMENTS

Research And Advisory Services

R3,335,804

CADRE PLAN

Research And Advisory Services

R3,266,797

ENTERPRISES UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA

Research

R3,042,775

ERNST AND YOUNG ADVISORY SERVICES

Business And Advisory Services

R3,016,817

ILIFA AFRICA ENGINEERS

Project Management

R2,923,144

FEM PLAN

Research And Advisory Services

R2,830,040

DATA WORLD

Valuations Advisory Services

R2,787,600

MDAVANZI FOODS

Project Management

R2,693,221

DATA WORLD

Advisory Consulting Services

R2,619,355

MASWANA JV

Research And Advisory Services

R2,564,389

ORI PROFESSIONALS

Advisory Consulting Services

R2,552,241

UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA

Research And Advisory Services

R2,490,325

MVD KALAHARI

Research And Advisory Services

R2,414,713

NEMORANGO CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Project Management

R2,158,148

FEVERTREECONSULTING

Project Management

R2,153,574

BVI CONSULTING ENGINEERS KWAZULU-NATAL

Research And Advisory Services

R2,136,025

ARUP (USE D1649)

Research And Advisory Services

R2,118,292

CASNAN CIVILS

Project Management

R2,084,746

URBAN-ECON DEVELOPMENT ECONOMISTS

Research And Advisory Services

R2,082,273

UMBUSO TRAINING SERVICES

Research And Advisory Services

R2,013,650

WATER RESEARCH COMMISSION

Support Water Research Commission Projects In Water Management

R2,000,000

ELEMENT CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Research And Advisory Services

R1,925,064

THE SUPREME TRAINING ACADEMY

Research And Advisory Services

R1,880,500

ISIBUKO DEVELOPMENT PLANNERS

Advisory Consulting Services

R1,865,875

GFK CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Research And Advisory Services

R1,707,535

ENTERPRISES UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA

Research And Advisory Services

R1,674,842

ICT WORKS

Business And Advisory Services

R1,637,140

METROPLAN TOWN PLANNERS AND URBAN DESIGNERS

Research And Advisory Services

R1,610,000

TOKSEO

Research And Advisory Services

R1,560,629

Enterprise University Of Pretoria

Research

R1,552,270

KENA CONSULT

Research And Advisory Services

R1,550,000

AKANYA DEVELOPMENT SOLUTION

Valuations Advisory Services

R1,545,600

SETPLAN SETTLEMENT PLANNING SERV

Research And Advisory Services

R1,434,510

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Research And Advisory Services

R1,416,029

EVN AFRICA CONSULTING SERVICES

Research And Advisory Services

R1,368,149

TOWNSCAPE PLANNING SOLUTIONS

Research And Advisory Services

R1,321,925

PLANNING PARTNERS

Research And Advisory Services

R1,262,580

URBAN-ECON DEVELOPMENT ECONOMISTS

Project Management

R1,240,132

ISIBUKO DEVELOPMENT PLANNERS

Research And Advisory Services

R1,185,535

TSITELLO

Project Management

R1,183,474

FEMPLAN (PTY) LTD

Project Management

R1,111,337

EVN AFRICA CONSULTING SERVICES

Project Management

R1,044,552

Koma OO

Financial Management

R1,024,335

ZARON BUSINESS SOLUTIONS

Research And Advisory Services

R958,260

POAD CONSULTING

Project Management

R937,252

PHUNGA CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Research And Advisory Services

R921,590

M AND M EXECUTIVE CONSULTING SERVICES

Research And Advisory Services

R890,790

ISIKHUNGO SETHU ENVIRONMENTAL SER

Advisory Consulting Services

R860,310

FEM PLAN

Advisory Consulting Services

R850,865

MAYECON CONSULTING

Research And Advisory Services

R780,840

ELECTIONS FACILITATORS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

Election Facilitators

R760,605

RAIN CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Financial Management

R755,741

TPS DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

Research And Advisory Services

R750,000

MACHAKA NC

Project Management

R714,604

DR JOHN LANGALIBALELE DUBE INSTITUTE

Research And Advisory Services

R660,000

ICT WORKS

Advisory Consulting Services

R654,856

Stellenbsoch University

Project Management

R623,213

MOILWA AND SONS RESOURCES

Project Management

R602,590

MASWANA INVESTMENT HOLDINGS

Advisory Consulting Services

R593,400

PLAN ASSOCIATES DEVELOPMENT PLANNERS

Research And Advisory Services

R586,475

URBAN DYNAMICS (FREE STATE)

Research And Advisory Services

R574,706

Rukuni M

Research

R537,385

MANEKWANE BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

Research And Advisory Services

R522,199

Chirwa P

Financial Management

R512,672

DELTA BUILT ENVIRONMENT CONS

Research And Advisory Services

R502,755

SK Development Research & Training

Research

R498,300

NOLINDELA TRADING ENTERPRISE

Project Management

R493,800

DIGES GROUP

Project Management

R479,218

MAXIM PLANNING SOLUTIONS

Research And Advisory Services

R475,000

MVD KALAHARI STADS-EN STREEKBEPLANNERS EN AANVERWA

Advisory Consulting Services

R446,637

GABHISA PLANNING INVESTMENTS

Research

R442,952

PLAN ASSOCIATES TOWN & REGIONAL

Advisory Consulting Services

R434,599

COASTAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Enviromental Advisory Services

R433,076

MASWANA JV

Advisory Consulting Services

R432,354

PROJECTS ET AL HOLDINGS

Research And Advisory Services

R422,270

JG AFRIKA

Research And Advisory Services

R420,809

ALMENTA 203

Research And Advisory Services

R415,000

LADUMA TAPP

Advisory Consulting Services

R415,000

G-SQUARED SHEQ SOLUTIONS

Research And Advisory Services

R402,662

TOWNSCAPE PLANNING SOLUTIONS

Advisory Consulting Services

R400,775

Exclaim Innovations

Research

R393,913

EVN AFRICA CONSULTING SERVICE

Research And Advisory Services

R389,233

ENGINEERING ACES

Project Management

R385,006

Klein Inc

Research

R384,000

CUBIC TRADING

Research And Advisory Services

R374,063

PEGASYS STRATEGY AND DEVELOPMENT

Project Management

R365,096

IMPERATRIX

Research And Advisory Services

R350,000

KGOKAGANO TRADING

Research And Advisory Services

R346,481

DIKGABO CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Research And Advisory Services

R340,000

WEKNOW CONSULTANTS

Project Management

R329,902

UMBUSO TRAINING SERVICES

Project Management

R326,363

JST MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Research And Advisory Services

R320,850

PHAKAMA TRADING ENTERPRISES

Research And Advisory Services

R318,874

DUMAKUDE PROJECTS

Research And Advisory Services

R311,703

AGNOWIZ

Research And Advisory Services

R302,945

AES CONSULTING

Project Management

R272,252

SOUTH AFRICAN ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES

Research And Advisory Services

R271,264

ZARON BUSINESS SOLUTIONS

Advisory Consulting Services

R265,000

FORT HARE TRADING SOLUTIONS

Research And Advisory Services

R259,767

INFRA CONSULT ENGINEERING

Project Management

R257,566

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Determining Infestation Of The Oriental Fruit Fly In Litchi, Mango And Guava

R245,000

ROYAL HASKONING DHV

Research And Advisory Services

R243,099

ASIKA CONSULTING

Research And Advisory Services

R240,030

ELECTIONS FACILITATORS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

Election Facilitators

R234,979

ISIKHUNGO SETHU ENVIRONMENTAL SER

Research And Advisory Services

R234,630

MARIA MAGDALENA STEYN

Valuations Advisory Services

R234,198

MACHAKA NC

Research

R225,217

MVD KALAHARI

Advisory Consulting Services

R224,963

JOINTSHELF 1183

Research And Advisory Services

R222,600

PHAPHAMA RESOURCES

Research And Advisory Services

R222,340

MASWANA INVESTMENT HOLDINGS

Advisory Consulting Services

R220,800

UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA

Project Management

R216,224

KHANYAICDD

Research And Advisory Services

R215,767

MAHLAGA INDUSTRIAL STRATEGISTS

Research And Advisory Services

R215,680

Mahlanga Industrial Strategist

Research

R215,680

Hydrid Innovation Solution

Organisational

R210,359

WORLEYPARSONS RSA

Project Management

R208,474

DITSAMAI INVESTMENTS AND PROJECTS

Research And Advisory Services

R208,150

LINDON CONSULTING CORPORATION

Project Management

R193,260

NKWALI HOLDINGS

Research And Advisory Services

R193,010

PLANTAGO LANCEOLATA

Environmental Consulting Services

R189,917

Mkhize Attorneys

Research

R187,671

FEVERTREECONSULTING

Project Management

R183,811

P W A RHEEDER PROFESSIONELE LANDMETERS

Land Surveyors

R178,676

AUTUMN RIDGE TRADING 29

Research And Advisory Services

R178,250

PHUHLISANI

Research And Advisory Services

R172,110

UNIVERSITY OF VENDA

Research And Advisory Services

R167,423

K 2M TECHNOLOGIES

Advisory Consulting Services

R164,450

WACO AFRICA PTY LTD

Project Management

R158,999

IDI TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS

Research And Advisory Services

R150,527

MVD KALAHARI STADS-EN STREEKBEPLANNERS EN AANVERWA

Research And Advisory Services

R148,879

SET SECONDMENTS

Research And Advisory Services

R130,479

SA QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY

Qualification Verification

R127,470

Khumalo MHO

Risk And Complaince Co

R124,760

Chirwa

Financial Management

R121,183

P W A RHEEDER PROFESSIONELE LANDMETERS

Valuations Advisory Services

R116,495

CADRE

Research And Advisory Services

R111,127

ACUTE CONSULTING

Project Management

R104,340

BVI CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Research And Advisory Services

R102,941

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Research And Advisory Services

R100,000

BLUE UNICORN

Research And Advisory Services

R99,670

UBUQOTHO INTEGRITY INSTITUTE

Research And Advisory Services

R98,866

K O R CONSULTING

Consulting And Advisory Services

R96,000

A AND SONS PROPERTY GROUP

Valuations Advisory Services

R95,450

UPTURN CONSULTING

Research And Advisory Services

R94,500

KBS BUSINESS CONSULTANTS

Project Management

R91,000

URBAN DYNAMICS

Business And Advisory Services

R89,332

URBAN DYNAMICS

Advisory Consulting Services

R89,332

COASTAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Advisory Consulting Services

R89,112

PLAN ASSOCIATES DEVELOPMENT PLANNERS

Advisory Consulting Services

R87,500

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT PLANNING CONSULTANTS

Research And Advisory Services

R84,565

MARBLESHARP 57

Valuations Advisory Services

R80,499

MB MABUZA LAND SURVEYORS

Monitoring And Evaluation

R77,611

Deeds Trading Account

Project Management

R75,958

K 2M TECHNOLOGIES

Advisory Consulting Services

R74,750

Raymond Mhlaba

Project Management

R74,733

Buthelezi BG

Risk And Complaince Co

R72,900

PLANTAGO LANCEOLATA

Consulting And Advisory Services

R71,219

LSB GROUP TRUST

Valuations Advisory Services

R70,992

Mavivate Attorney Incorporated

Project Management

R70,388

ZITHOLELE CONSULTING

Project Management

R70,161

BIGEN AFRICA SERVICES

Project Management

R61,122

SPECTRUM VALUATIONS AND ASSET SOLUTIONS

Valuations Advisory Services

R60,013

OMNIVAL VALUATIONS

Valuations Advisory Services

R58,150

TSHANI CONSULTING

Advisory Consulting Services

R55,128

SINFRA INVESTMENTS 344

Valuations Advisory Services

R52,697

WORLEYPARSONS RSA

Advisory Consulting Services

R52,283

KUFUMA DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

Monitoring And Evaluation

R50,520

Moeeng TG

Risk And Complaince Co

R48,600

Reatswela Travel & Tours

Risk And Complaince Co

R48,600

Pro Active Public Service College

Project Management

R47,800

LAND REFORM INSTITUTION OF SOUTH AFRICA

Research And Advisory Services

R46,050

Mhlongo AN

Committees Membership

R46,016

WORK DYNAMICS

Research And Advisory Services

R46,000

DDP VALUERS

Monitoring And Evaluation

R45,564

Randall TL

Committees Membership

R42,752

KIMOPAX

Project Management

R42,520

Tasokodibane MJ

Rcc Chairperson

R39,364

AFRICOST JBFE PROJECT MANAGERS

Research And Advisory Services

R39,336

URBAN DYNAMICS

Research And Advisory Services

R38,859

Randall TL

Plant Production

R38,207

MANAGED INTEGRITY EVALUATION

Background Screening And Vetting

R37,512

NATIONAL PRIVATE SPECIFICATIONS

Research

R35,098

Randall TL

Risk And Complaince Co

R33,297

Managed Integrated Evaluation PTY LTD

Conduct Criminal Checks And Id Verifications

R31,212

CHELETE KE MOLLO

Research And Advisory Services

R25,800

KANYISA PROPERTY AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Valuations Advisory Services

R25,300

April H

Risk And Complaince Co

R24,300

MBB CONSULTING SERVICES

Research And Advisory Services

R23,666

SINFRA INVESTMENTS 345

Monitoring And Evaluation

R21,912

KANYISA PROPERTY AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Monitoring And Evaluation

R21,620

SPECTRUM VALUATIONS & ASSET SOL

Monitoring And Evaluation

R21,620

Thupane MJJ

Risk And Complaince Co

R19,440

SPECTRUM VALUATIONS & ASSET SOL

Valuations Advisory Services

R16,330

ZWAHULI VALUERS

Valuations Advisory Services

R16,180

DDP VALUATION AND ADVISORY SERVICES

Valuations Advisory Services

R16,174

INTELLIFRA HOLDINGS

Monitoring And Evaluation

R15,750

MOOKODI VALUERS

Valuations Advisory Services

R14,950

MILLS FITCHET AFRICA

Valuations Advisory Services

R14,835

MOHOHLO ATTORNEYS

Research And Advisory Services

R14,296

KHOTHULE

DLR Committee Membership

R13,686

WSP ENVIROMENTAL

Project Management

R13,398

ZWAHULI VALUERS

Valuations Advisory Services

R13,200

ONSITE INSIGHT CONFERENCING SOLUTIONS

Conferencing Solutions

R12,914

RAMOHOLI

DLR Committee Membership

R11,262

Randall TL

Member Of Risk And Compliance Co

R10,404

JACK AMOUR

DLR Committee Membership

R9,920

Makofane LJ

DAMC Committee Membership

R9,920

Maisela SJ

DAMC Committee Membership

R9,870

Sefoloshe PJ

DAMC Committee Membership

R9,870

RAMOHOLI

DLR Committee Membership

R9,385

Lodi NB

DAMC Committee Membership

R7,990

CAMPA M

Research And Advisory Services

R7,521

I.M KORDOM

DLR Committee Membership

R7,508

I.N THOBEDI

DLR Committee Membership

R7,508

L.S MARCH

DLR Committee Membership

R7,508

KWARENGE LANGUAGE SOLUTIONS

Translations And Transcriptions

R7,200

Monakedi AL

DAMC Committee Membership

R6,580

Jansen Van Rensburg K

Board And/Or Committees Membership

R6,318

EMAH SELEPE

Household Profiling

R6,300

EVODIA MAFATLE

Household Profiling

R6,300

KAGISO MARUMO

Household Profiling

R6,300

KOPA NEO

Household Profiling

R6,300

MIYA ALENA

Household Profiling

R6,300

MM NHLAPO

Household Profiling

R6,300

MOKOENA PALESA

Household Profiling

R6,300

MSIBI NHLAKANI

Household Profiling

R6,300

N NKOSINKULU

Household Profiling

R6,300

PAT SELEPE

Household Profiling

R6,300

SHEZI N

Household Profiling

R6,300

SIBEKO JONNY

Household Profiling

R6,300

SIBEKO SESI

Household Profiling

R6,300

TM MOLOI

Household Profiling

R6,300

TWALA MD

Household Profiling

R6,300

DHLAMINI SA

Household Profiling

R6,300

EM SELEPE

Household Profiling

R6,300

KUBHEKA SC

Household Profiling

R6,300

MAKHUBO NP

Household Profiling

R6,300

MALINGA PP

Household Profiling

R6,300

MOKOENA MOSIWA

Household Profiling

R6,300

MOKOENA NT

Household Profiling

R6,300

MOLOI BELINA

Household Profiling

R6,300

MORAJANE PINKI

Household Profiling

R6,300

MORAJANE TJ

Household Profiling

R6,300

MPHUTHI NL

Household Profiling

R6,300

NDABA PRECIOUS

Household Profiling

R6,300

NKABINDE SIFISO

Household Profiling

R6,300

PL MGABHI

Household Profiling

R6,300

POPPIE MKHONZA

Household Profiling

R6,300

RADEBE NE

Household Profiling

R6,300

RADEBE NG

Household Profiling

R6,300

SELEPE LEHLOHO

Household Profiling

R6,300

SELEPE THABO

Household Profiling

R6,300

SHEZI NP

Household Profiling

R6,300

SV SHEZI

Household Profiling

R6,300

TD MOKOENA

Household Profiling

R6,300

TJ MOSIKILI

Household Profiling

R6,300

TM KHUMALO

Household Profiling

R6,300

TSHABALALA DUDU

Household Profiling

R6,300

SIBEKO NP

Household Profiling

R5,950

Nyelisani PR

DAMC Committee Membership

R5,875

MOUTLOATSI SETLOGELO

DLR Committee Membership

R5,631

RADEBE J

Household Profiling

R5,600

Dokolwana Z

Research And Advisory Services

R4,900

DR SELEPE

Household Profiling

R4,900

MPIKA N

Household Profiling

R4,900

Myoywane MF

Household Profiling

R4,900

Ndesi BE

Household Profiling

R4,900

Ntabankulu X

Household Profiling

R4,900

Ranuga N

Household Profiling

R4,900

Sanguqu N

Household Profiling

R4,900

Sinxutu NE

Household Profiling

R4,900

Tshotyana NF

Household Profiling

R4,900

Vunda N

Household Profiling

R4,900

Ralepelle ME

DAMC Committee Membership

R4,720

PLAN ASSOCIATES TOWN & REGIONAL

Research And Advisory Services

R4,575

SR SELEPE

Household Profiling

R4,550

YABELA CONSTRUCTION AND TRADING

Research And Advisory Services

R4,408

Mokgomole MR

DAMC Committee Membership

R4,280

Ahrens GHF

DAMC Committee Membership

R4,220

MONARENG AM

Household Profiling

R4,200

XP KUBHEKA

Household Profiling

R4,200

Xaba SDM

DAMC Committee Membership

R3,510

Mabundadza FV

DAMC Committee Membership

R3,055

Mtsweni ZP

DAMC Committee Membership

R2,820

South African Qualifications Authority

Verifying Of Qualification

R2,635

Mulaudzi NE

DAMC Committee Membership

R2,145

Mabunda AP

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,950

Mpye J

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,886

Motaung G

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,714

SELEOANE

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,560

Chakache CD

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Chisale -Elniemua MM

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Deelie JJ

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Kgampe MS

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Khumalo JEK

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Khunou LM

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Kokota BS

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Matsoga JM

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Mosia MP

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Robela MA

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Sekobane MM

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Thebe AH

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Tshabalala SM

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,558

Nukeri

DAMC Committee Membership

R1,170

BEEF

DAMC Committee Membership

R944

BEEF WILLIE

DAMC Committee Membership

R944

HOSEA GAETSEWE

DAMC Committee Membership

R856

GAETSEWE

DAMC Committee Membership

R856

GAONGALELWE MOROKA

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

MASESE MOILWA

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

MODISE PHOLOANYANE

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

POO

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

BELEM THOMAS

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

CHANTELE BRUYN

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

DE BRYUN

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

KEFUWE POO

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

KODISANG

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

LENTORO

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

MABE

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

MALEHO KODISANG

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

MOFOTI

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

NKOE

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

PHOLOANYANE

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

PORTIA NK0E

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

RAYMOND JANSEN

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

TAUNYANE

DAMC Committee Membership

R780

ENTERPRISES UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA

Econometric And Economic Modelling Services, Partnering And Capacity Buildings

R746

Nghatsane LO

DAMC Committee Membership

R585

TEBOHO MACHAKELA

DAMC Committee Membership

R472

MABOTE BODULO

DAMC Committee Membership

R428

LAURETTE PHOOKO

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

LEBAKENG MOLEBELED

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

MATSHEDISO MORAKE

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

MITA MOLEMA

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

MMASENYA LEKAUTA

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

MOJALEFA KOTOPE

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

THEMBEKA HLEKO

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

TSOKOLO TELEKOA

DAMC Committee Membership

R390

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Research And Advisory Services

R358

Grand Total

 

R513,812,873

(b)(i),(ii) Please refer to the table below.

Consultants Items

(i) Budget

(ii) Expenditure

Variance

Board and Committees

R13,681,855

R13,681,855

-

Financial Management Consulting

R2,413,931

R2,413,931

-

Organisational Development

R5,519,172

R5,519,172

-

Project Management

R140,755,529

R140,755,529

-

Qualification Verification

R175,786

R175,698

R88

Research and Development

R345,323,164

R332,891,510

R12,431,654

Translations and Transcriptions

R16,396

R16,396

-

Valuation Services

R18,358,782

R18,358,782

-

Grand Total

R526,244,616

R513,812,873

R12,431,742

 

23 June 2021 - NW1684

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What outreach programmes were put in place by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority for young people to encourage their interest in tourism and related sectors (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2021, (b) what targets have been set in this regard, (c) what were the actual results obtained in each case, (d) what are the details of the (i) dates, (ii) venues, (iii) attendances and (iv) outcomes of each programme and (e) how is each programme monitored, evaluated and assessed in each case?

Reply:

(a)  During the past three financial years, CATHSSETA has partnered with the Department of Tourism to host the National Tourism Careers Expo to encourage learners in careers related to the tourism and hospitality sectors. Furthermore, the SETA partnered with the Department of Higher Education and Training, and other SETAs to host the annual Heritage Expo focusing on the Culture, Arts and Heritage subsector. This expo has been taking place since 2019. The 2021 expo was held on 7 May 2021 in Limpopo and 8 June 2021 in Cape Town. Over and above the aforesaid programmes, the SETA disburses discretionary grants to its stakeholders to fund bursaries, learnerships, skills programmes, artisans and work-integrated learning programmes.

(b) The SETA signs service level agreements with clear targets with the Department of Higher Education and Training on an annual basis to support occupationally directed programmes such as vocational qualifications. The targets for the following learning programmes have been agreed upon for the 2021/22 financial year with the SETA:

-   Bursaries for 263 learners;

-   Learnerships for 158 learners;

-   Skills programmes for 210 learners;

-   Work-integrated learning for 473 learners;

-   Artisanships for 261 learners; and

-   Internships for 173 learners.

All these interventions are aimed at addressing the occupational shortages identified in the Sector Skills Plan.

(c) The following achievements can be noted:

-   Number of workers completed Adult Education and Training               30

-   Number of university graduate placements completed                        54

-   Number of TVET graduate placements completed                               330

-   Number of graduate internships completed                                          183

-   Number of learners Completed skills programmes                               2 993

-   Number of learners completed learnerships                                         966

-   Number of learners who completed bursaries                                      127

(d) (i)   Programmes are delivered within a specific financial year that would have been agreed upon with the stakeholders or in line with the duration of the learning programmes.

      (ii)  Learners are placed in different establishments operating within the nine provinces' subsector for training and workplace exposure.

      (iii)   CATHSSETA programmes are attended by both employed and unemployed learners. CATHSSETA also supports labour unions, NGOs, Cooperatives, SMMEs and disabled people. 

      (iv)  Increasing access to high quality, relevant education, training and skills development opportunities.

(e) CATHSSETA conducts induction and project monitoring and evaluation visits at least once during the lifespan of a project. The SETA uses monthly project reports and meetings as tools to monitor project progress. The SETA is currently conducting a tracking study to trace where the learners that were trained previously by the SETA are to check the impact of training provided to them