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02 October 2019 - NW812

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What progress did her department make with regard to the vocational and technical education during the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (iv) 2017-18 and (v) 2018-19 financial years and (b) will she furnish Ms B M van Minnen with a list of schools that will be affected by the programme in each province?

Reply:

a) (i) (ii) The implementation of the Technical Vocational Stream commenced in January 2015. 1 660 teachers and Subject Advisors were trained on Technical Subjects Specialisations, 203 in Technical Sciences, and 228 in Technical Mathematics in preparation for the implementation at Grade 10 in 2016.

(iii) In 2016,1 647 Grade 11 Teachers and subject advisors for Technical specialisation subjects.345 trained in Technical Mathematics and Technical Sciences in preparation for implementation at Grade 11 in 2017.

(iv) (v) In 2017,1229 Grade 12 Teachers and subject advisors for Technical subjects specialisations,195 in Technical Mathematics and 206 in Technical Sciences were trained in preparation for implementation at Grade 12 in 2018.

(b) See attached document

02 October 2019 - NW853

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How does the new social workers programme which is tailor-made for social workers who are to work in schools and who have been assigned by her department to universities, differ from the current social workers curriculum provided at universities and (b) what is preventing her department from appointing the current 3 000 unemployed social worker graduates to various schools?

Reply:

a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) participates in the National Committee for School Social Work Education and Practice (NACOSSWEP) which brings together universities, Government Departments and the Council for Social Services Professions (SACSSP) to declare school social work as a specialisation recognised by the SACSSP. In 2019, the Board of Social Work at the SACSSP approved the regulations for specialisation in school social work which is yet to be gazetted by the Minister of Social Development. It is anticipated that social workers will begin to specialise in school social work from 2020 or 2021.

b) The Department continues to optimise services through referrals and close collaboration with the Department of Social Development as the employer of social workers. The DBE currently has no budget to employ social workers.

 

QUESTION 853

Compiler:

DR F KUMALO

CHIEF DIRECTOR: CARE AND SUPPORT IN SCHOOLS

DATE:

DR G WHITTLE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: SOCIAL MOBILISATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/ NOT APPROVED/ AMENDED

DR MR MHAULE

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/ NOT APPROVED/ AMENDED

MS MA MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER OF BASIC EDUCATION

DATE:

01 October 2019 - NW903

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of the (a) persons using the land within the basin of the Qedusizi flood attenuation dam situated outside Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal, including the (i) full names, (ii) area in hectares rented and/or leased by each person and (iii) duration of the period of use, rent and/or lease and the lease or rental charges charged to each person, and (b) parameters applied in allocating land to each person; (2) what are the relevant details of the plans to convert the specified dam into a dual flood attenuation and storage dam; (3) who or which government department is responsible for ensuring that no environmental damage is caused by the persons using the land in the dam basin; (4) what are the relevant details of limitations placed on the persons renting or leasing the land in the dam basin, including the (a) number of livestock permitted to be run on the land, (b) maintenance of fencing and other fixtures and (c) requirements to (i) inoculate livestock, (ii) burn firebreaks and (iii) be members of the Fire Protection Association?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Honourable Member is referred to Annexure A for the relevant details of persons using the land within the basin of Qedusizi flood attenuation dam situated in Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal. However, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the names of each person using the land within the Qedusizi flood attenuation dam. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) The Department of Water and Sanitation has held various meetings and round table discussions with all interested parties. Most of the state land within the dam boundary line was allocated to the commercial farmers whose lease agreements were due to expire. Due to emerging farmers requesting the Department to allow access to the state land for grazing purposes the land was re-allocated. Land was then divided so that all parties who applied could be accommodated. The allocation of land was negotiated with all the lessees before it was submitted for approval to the Acting Director-General.

The parameters applied in allocating land to each person are in accordance with the valuation report received and have been applied as follows:-

  • R100/ha/annum is for those around the dam (high risk area), and
  • R110/ha/annum for those away from the dam (low risk).

(2) The Department of Water and Sanitation has no plans currently to convert the Qedusizi Dam from a flood attenuation dam to a storage dam.

(3) In terms of section 1(i)(x) of the National Water Act, 1998(Act 36 of 1998), the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation is the owner of the land on which a Government Waterworks is situated. Therefore, the Department of Water and Sanitation is responsible as the land owner to ensure that there is no environmental damage caused by the lessees. The Department also does monitoring of the government waterworks and management thereof. The leases can be terminated if the lessees do not comply with the conditions set out in the lease agreements.

(4) Because the dam is a flood control dam and poses a danger to animals and humans, the following special conditions were included into the lease agreements.

(a) The number of livestock permitted on the land is done in consultation with the Department of Agriculture to determine the carrying capacity of the land.

(b) According to the conditions of the lease agreements, fences must be erected and maintained by the lessees.

(c) (i) It is a condition of the signed lease agreements that animals must be inoculated and marked/tagged.

(ii) Another condition of the lease agreements that the lessees must adhere to the National Veld and Forest Act, 1998(Act 101 of 1998) as well as all other applicable legislation.

(iii) The lease agreement also states that lessees must form part of a Fire Protection Association, if one exists in the area.

ANNEXURE A

Hectares

Lease Period and rental charges (Amount due per year with a 10% escalation (Rental is market related)

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

198.1610ha

2 years from August 2019

R19 816.10

361.5355ha

2 years from August 2019

R39 768.90

291.5226ha

2 years from August 2019

R32 067.47

261.5359ha

2 years from August 2019

R28 768.94

138.3792ha

2 years from August 2019

R15 221.70

103.0000ha

2 years from August 2019

R11 330-00

Hectares

Lease Period and rental charges (Amount due per year with a 10% escalation (Rental is market related)

402.1545ha

2 years from August 2019

R44 236.99

177.1824ha

2 years from August 2019

R19 490.04

351.7589ha

2 years from August 2019

R36 928.89

46.2043ha

2 years from August 2019

R5 082.47

1167.7224ha

2 years from August 2019

R94 170.46

918.7344ha

2 years from August 2019

R101 060.76

121.5646ha

2 years from August 2019

R23 301-01

120.6878ha

2 years from August 2019

R13 275.91

01 October 2019 - NW570

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is her department’s plan to alleviate the problem of nongovernmental organisations that are closing due to non-payment of subsidies by her department?NW1567

Reply:

The Department of Social Development is primarily responsible for registration of all Non Profit Organizations in terms of NPO Act. The NPOs are registered to operate within a diverse range of sectors and are classified according to type of activities they are engaged in. Within the social development sector, entities need to comply with funding requirements in order to receive funding. The organizations that qualify for funding and are rendering services in line with the mandate of the Department are thus funded accordingly.

However, the sector experiences the ever present reality that funding is constrained. In order to address some of the challenges, the department reviewed its funding policy with the aim to guide the country’s response to the funding of NPOs; to facilitate transformation for the equitable distribution of services and resources; and to ensure effective and efficient service provision to the poor and vulnerable sectors of society.

It is hoped that in the long term, the policy will unlock provincial and national funds for more equitable funding of social services in all provinces. The policy further guides the department in terms of putting in place clear, predictable procedures that are transparent and fair, and above all to ensure that funding allocations are made on time.

01 October 2019 - NW814

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of (a) her department’s proposed amendments to the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from and Unlawful Occupation of Land Act, Act 19 of 1998, and (b) how the proposed amendments will assist municipalities (i) in safeguarding land under their custodianship from illegal occupation and (ii) to immediately repossess land lost to illegal occupation?

Reply:

(a) The proposed amendments to the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from Unlawful Occupation of Land Act, Act 19 of 1998 seek to make provision for the exemption of certain persons from the application of the Act;

  • to prohibit certain acts in respect of unlawful occupation of land and to create offences relating to such acts and to extend the scope of prohibition thereof.
  • to make a uniform procedural requirement to all 3 spheres of government in eviction matters and also extends the period of notice of proceedings, from 14 days to 2 months;
  • the proposed amendment Bill provides for the inclusion of additional circumstances that the courts will have to consider in making orders in eviction matters.

(b)(i)&(ii) The proposed amendment Bill will provide municipalities with the basis on which they may institute urgent legal proceedings for urgent evictions.

The Bill also imposes preemptory mediation process on a municipality prior to instituting any legal processes to evict persons.

The Honourable Member will have an opportunity to comment on the proposed amendments once the Bill has been published for public comments and again when it is before Parliament for processing.

 

01 October 2019 - NW569

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the recent statistics on the high level of drug abuse in society, what (a) is her department’s plans to deploy social workers to drug-ridden areas, (b) deviation programmes has her department put in place to combat substance abuse by the youth and (c) monitoring and evaluation tool is used by her department to assess the impact of the deviation programmes on substance abuse nationally?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Social Development (DSD) is currently rolling out Siyalulama Outreach Programme in provinces. The programme aims at providing people living in substance abuse hot spot areas with services. DSD implements this programme in partnership with other Government Departments and Community Based Organisations based on their availability and the issue being addressed. Professionals being employed in this programme includes Social Service Professionals, medical practitioners, law enforcement officials, educators, researchers, etc.

(b) DSD is also offering the following programmes to youth:

• Ke Moja Education and Awareness Programme which targets young people and children in and out of school. The programme seeks to create awareness and educate young people and children about the effects of drugs and other related substances. It provides them with skills to deal with substance abuse related challenges. The programme also informs youth about available government services and how to access them.

• The Institutions of Higher Learning Education and Awareness Programme targets students at institutions of higher learning particularly first year students. The aim of the programme is to create awareness and educate students about the effects of drugs and alcohol and also link them to services around their new social environment.

The Festive Season Education and Awareness Programme targets adults, youth, Children, women and other vulnerable groups. The purpose of the programme is to encourage children and youth in particular to have a drug and alcohol free festive season. This programme also seeks to protect children against neglect and accidents such as drowning during this period. The programme encourages parents to be more vigilant and protect their hard earned valuables and money during this time of the year.

(c) DSD together with the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation evaluated the implementation of the National Drug Master Plan (NDMP) 2013-2017. The report was presented to Cabinet during March 2019. The study aimed at assessing the extent to which the NDMP has been implemented. The report was used during the review of the new NDMP. DSD together with the Medical Research Council are currently developing an electronic Service Quality Measurement (SQM). The paper based system has been developed and piloted. SQM will help the department to continuously measure the quality of treatment services in the Country. DSD also work with the South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drugs (SACENDU) to produce statistical report on people who receive treatment services on a six monthly basis. DSD also contributes and receive a presentation on the Annual World Drug Report from the Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. These reports helps to determine the trend of drug trafficking and use both locally and international.

01 October 2019 - NW572

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What does her department intend doing to show caregivers that they are officially acknowledged?

Reply:

1. The Department of Social Development acknowledges the role of Community Caregivers (CCGs) in the provision of comprehensive and quality social service within the home and community. The Department is developing a Policy Framework for Community Caregivers that aims to provide guidance towards the management of Community Caregivers as valued contributors to the broader delivery of comprehensive social development services.

The Policy Framework will provide a guidance for the recruitment and management of Community Caregivers; create an enabling environment by promoting fairness, transparency and recognition of Community Caregivers; clarify their roles, rights and responsibilities; and, strengthen partnerships between government, civil society and communities

2. The Department funds Non Profit Organisations (NPOs) that employ Community Caregivers to render services through the Home and Community Based Care programme (HCBC), which is one of the programmes participating in the Social Sector Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). The programme focuses on creating work opportunities for Community Caregivers by ensuring that they receive monthly stipends, and receive accredited training that improves their skills and chances of getting permanent or productive jobs. Their stipends are based on the EPWP Ministerial Determination, which is reviewed on an annual basis.

3. The Department has developed the following three Skills Development Programmes for Community Caregivers:-

(i) Psychosocial Wellbeing Skills Development Programme which focuses on their psychosocial wellbeing.

(ii) Child Protection Skills Development Programme, to increase their understanding of child protection issues.

(iii) Supportive Supervision Skills Development Programme.

4. The Department, in collaboration with Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA) and Quality Council for Trade and Occupations (QCTO) is developing a part qualification for Community Caregivers, i.e. developing a qualification on NQF level 2, with modules taken from NQF level 5, to accommodate those without qualifications. This initiative will chart a career path for CCGs as a cadre of the social service workforce through the formalisation of their training in order to improve the quality of services they provide in communities. Achieving formal recognition and career pathing for CCGs as a cadre of the service workforce will put them in good stead to access better opportunities in the job market.

01 October 2019 - NW666

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether she has been informed of the current crisis affecting the Republic’s relations with the United States of America (USA) at the level of its Adoption Central Authorities, Congress and bilateral treaty partners, caused by a purported policy change by the Department of Home Affairs that prohibits adopted children leaving the Republic post-adoption; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) No, the Department of Social Development is not aware of the crisis extending to any other countries. (3) (a) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with The Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption that the Republic has acceded as all intercountry adoptions adheres to the principles of the Hague Convention. (b) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with the bilateral work agreements that the SA Central Authority has concluded with the central authorities of several other countries. (c) Yes, the department’s policy position is aligned to the bilateral work agreements that child protection organisations in the Republic have entered into with international counterparts, with the endorsement of both governments; hence approval is made for the accredited child protection organisations to enter into working agreements with accredited foreign adoption agencies. (4) No, the Minister has not been informed that the effect of this so-called policy change physically separates families as this matter is still under discussion with her department’s central authority and the Department of Home Affairs.

Reply:

1. The Minister has not been informed about any crisis the Honourable member is referring to. However the Central Authority is always in contact and engaging in joint meetings with the Department of Home Affairs to address any adoption related matter at the level of the adoption central authority.

2. No, the Department of Social Development is not aware of the crisis extending to any other countries.

3. (a) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with The Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption that the Republic has acceded as all intercountry adoptions adheres to the principles of the Hague Convention.

(b) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with the bilateral work agreements that the SA Central Authority has concluded with the central authorities of several other countries.

(c) Yes, the department’s policy position is aligned to the bilateral work agreements that child protection organisations in the Republic have entered into with international counterparts, with the endorsement of both governments; hence approval is made for the accredited child protection organisations to enter into working agreements with accredited foreign adoption agencies.

4. No, the Minister has not been informed that the effect of this so-called policy change physically separates families as this matter is still under discussion with her department’s central authority and the Department of Home Affairs.

01 October 2019 - NW75

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number (a) of social workers were trained by her department in each of the past five years and (b) of those social workers were employed by her department?

Reply:

a) Total number of social workers trained by the department in each of the past five years is 21 932 as indicated in the table below.

Scholarship beneficiaries

Financial Year

Total

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

 

Trained

5 199

5 674

4 702

4 331

2 026

21 932

b) Total number employed by provincial departments of social development is 2 187 as indicated in the table below.

Scholarship beneficiaries

Financial Year

Total

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

 

Employed

509

279

393

712

294

2 187

01 October 2019 - NW766

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that the Government recently unveiled De Hoop Dam in the Sekhukhune area whereas neighbouring communities (details furnished) living near the dam still have no access to water, by what date will the specified communities have access to piped, running tap water?

Reply:

The villages in questions fall within the Nebo Plateau Bulk Water Supply project that is still under construction. The project is funded through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and implemented by the Sekhukhune District Municipality. The project is implemented in phases and currently the connection pipeline from De Hoop Dam and the water treatment works at Ga-Malekana are completed and partially commissioned to supply villages of Ga-Masha and Ga-Maphopha. The supply at Ga Maphopha is however constrained due to reservoir capacity that is currently being addressed by the District Municipality through MIG funding. The project progress is at 82% and the anticipated completion date is 30 September 2019.

The overall project progress is at 83% and construction is in progress for Makgeru to Schoornoord pipeline which will supply water to Makgane, Tshehlwaneng and Schoornoord. The project has been delayed by non-delivery of ductile pipes by the local service provider appointed by Sekhukhune District Municipality. The municipality is in the process of terminating the contract of the supplier in a bid to appoint a new supplier. Due to these delays, the project is now anticipated to be completed by the end of February 2020.

The villages of Ga-Marishana and Ga-Masemola are covered through a pipeline extending from Jane Furse to Lobethel. The project was put on hold due to poor performance by the contractor and the engineer appointed by the District Municipality. The Municipality has since terminated the contracts of both the engineer and contractor following failures to complete the project within the agreed timeframe. An assessment will be done on the constructed pipeline to determine the remaining scope and budgetary needs to complete the pipeline.

The village, Ga-Mampuru will benefit through a planned branch off the main pipeline from Ga-Malekana Water Treatment Works (WTW). The technical report was completed for bulk pipelines and the reservoir. However construction will only commence following the upgrading of the Water Treatment Works due to limited capacity of the water works. Currently the community is benefiting from the Boschkloof WTW which abstracts raw water from the Steelpoort River downstream of De Hoop dam. This community has access to tap water.

The full functionality of the Nebo Plateau Bulk Water Supply scheme will depend on the upgrading of the Malekana Water Treatment Works from the current 12Ml/d to 24Ml/d to provide for current and future needs. Proper planning and reconciliation of water demand and supply is required to ensure that instituted projects address the current and future needs of all the 40 villages in the Nebo plateau. The planning process is at an early stage and was delayed due to financial constraints.

01 October 2019 - NW805

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department has put any mechanisms in place to monitor that the norms and standards set out in the Regulations Regarding Older Persons, 2010, are adhered to; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) has she found that the norms and standards have been adhered to; (2) whether her department collects data on older persons to ensure that the Republic can benchmark itself against international data collected by the World Health Organisation, United Nations and other international organisations; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) when was the last set of data collated and (c) where can the data be accessed; (3) whether her department monitors the training of persons who care for older persons; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details, including the details of the training a person needs to complete to become a caregiver and (b) details of the institutions that offer the training; (4) whether her department monitors the facilities where caregivers work in the Republic; (5) what number of caregivers currently work in the Republic? NW1920E

Reply:

Yes, mechanisms have been put in place to monitor that the norms and standards set out in the Regulations are adhered to.

(1)(a) Regulation 11 (4) mandates that the Director-General, a Social Worker or a person designated by the Head of the Department (as per the delegations) must ensure that a registered residential facility is monitored and evaluated at least once annually as provided for in Section 22 of the Older Persons Act, 2006 (Older Persons Act No. 13 of 2006). The annual professional visit is aimed at ensuring continuous compliance with part 2 of the national norms and standards.

There are three levels of monitoring, viz.

District, Province and National levels.

In terms of Section 32 of the Older Persons Act No. 13 (2006), on Delegation of Powers, the Director-General has delegated the responsibility of monitoring as outlined in Section 15 and 22 of the Older Persons Act, to the Heads of Social Development (HODs) in Provinces.

The National Office of the Department, at varied times, randomly selects a few facilities to monitor compliance with the Older Persons Act, 2006, which is inclusive of unannounced visits.

(1)(b) It has been found that most of the residential facilities partially comply with the norms and standards. The findings are as follows:

(i) STRUCTURAL PRESCRIPTS

Most of the structures partially comply with the national norms and standards as they were built before the promulgation of the Older Persons Act, No 13 of 2006.

(ii) PROGRAMMES

Most of the facilities are compliant. However, there are gaps, especially in previously disadvantaged communities.

(2)(a) Data is collected annually or when there is a need in terms of the Older Persons Act, 2006. The Department also makes use of the data collected by Statistics South Africa and other research institutions such as the HSRC etc.

(2)(b) Data was collected in 2016/17 on the state of the services delivered to older persons in terms of the Older Persons Act, No 13 of 2006 since its implementation. The project was undertaken by the Department of Social Development in partnership with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation. The research was titled “The Implementation Evaluation of the Older Persons Act, 13 of 2006” and is part of the National Evaluation Plan (NEP). This endeavour has enabled the collation of data relating to the implementation of the Act and thus elevated some critical issues on, i.e. the number of Older Persons accessing both Community Based Care and Support Services (CBCSS) and Residential Care Services, financial and human resource allocations, programmes for Older Persons implemented such as the protection of older persons, the Active Ageing Programme, Educational Programmes, Economic Programmes, Inter-generational Programmes etc.

Additionally, meetings were held with Statistics SA this year, (2019), with a view to update the existing data nationally.

(2)(c) The information is available in the Department of Social Development and at Statistics South Africa (Stats SA).

(3)(a) The Department has developed an Accredited Training Manual for Standardisation of the Caregiver Training Programme. To this effect, the Department annually conducts training of caregivers in partnership with the appointed accredited service provider.

After the training has been conducted, the department provides mentoring of the trained caregivers in order to support the caregivers to ensure that they put theory into practice and also the completion of their practical Portfolios of Evidence.

(3)(b) Currently there is only one service provider (NICDAM) accredited by the Health and Welfare SITA.

(4) Yes. Monitoring is conducted to facilities rendering services to Older Persons, to assess compliance with regard to the national norms and standards.

(5) The Department does not have the total number of caregivers currently working in the Republic as they work in various sectors.

01 October 2019 - NW571

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What total number of (a) enquiries have been recorded regarding offenders in the Child Protection Register in the past three years and (b) offenders are in the Child Protection Register; (2) whether she will furnish Mrs B S Masango with the provincial statistics of offenders as recorded in the Child Protection Register?

Reply:

1. (a) In the past three years (i.e. 2016/2017; 2017/2018 and 2018/2019) the total number of recorded enquiries on the Child Protection Register is 348 522;

1. (b) There is currently 1 475 recorded number of persons found unsuitable to work with children in the Child Protection Register;

2. Yes, I will gladly furnish the Honourable Masango with the provincial statistics of persons found unsuitable to work with children as recorded in the Child Protection Register.

 

30 September 2019 - NW679

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with reference to the dire financial position of the SA National Defence Force (details furnished), she has commissioned a new defence review based on the realistic defence requirements as determined by section 200 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) on what date will this new information be submitted to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans?

Reply:

1. No I have not commissioned a new Defence Review.

2. We have concluded that the Defence Review 2015 is, and remains, the National Policy on Defence and it should not be withdrawn. The bulk of the Defence Review 2015 remains valid and appropriate even though it was predicated on a steady-stream of improving defence allocation.3. 

3. Furthermore, we have concluded that I, as the Executive Authority responsible for Defence, must engage strongly with Cabinet and Parliament on the ever-declining defence allocation.

(a) This must include discussion, debate and resolution on the “Level of Ambition” that South Africa wants, including the shape and size of the Defence Force.

(b) The emerging security risks, contingencies and priorities that we require the Defence Force to be prepared for.

(c) The concomitant defence capabilities that we must fund and support.

30 September 2019 - NW614

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

(a) R 57 549 018,59 total for (aaa) 2017/18 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R12 072 641.88

(bb) Security services R36 778 192.43

(cc) Gardening services R 301 669.55

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning services R 5 875 417,37

(bb) Security Services R 2 409 742,36

(cc) Gardening Services R 111 355,00

a) R 73 632 992,87 total for (bbb) 2018/19 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R14 351 278.43

(bb) Security services R46 012 132.71

(cc) Gardening services R 456 801.36

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning Services R 6 604 433,82

(bb) Security Services R 6 208 346,55

(cc) Gardening Services R nil

(b) Please see attached spread sheets for 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years with details of payments to each service provider and;

(c) Total amount per service provider.

30 September 2019 - NW588

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the total number of South Africans who are currently employed at each call centre in the Republic?

Reply:

We know that the call Centre (business process outsourcing) industry employs 54000 people. However, the department does not have a breakdown of how many of the 54000 are South Africans.

30 September 2019 - NW27

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) What are the terms of reference of the SA Revenue Service’s tax inquiry into Bosasa and persons associated with Bosasa and (b) by what date is the inquiry expected to be completed; (2) whether the inquiry will investigate the R500 000 donation made by Bosasa to the CR17 African National Congress presidential campaign of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, in line with the provision of section 69(2)(d) of the Tax Administration Act, Act 28 of 2011, the specified R500 000 donation was declared for (a) income and/or (b) donations tax; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The questions relate to taxpayer information provided by a taxpayer and taxpayer information obtained by SARS in respect of a taxpayer. SARS is prohibited from disclosing such taxpayer information in terms of section 68 (1)(b) of the Tax Administration Act, Act 28 of 2011

SARS GOVERNANCE IN RESPECT OF OUR CASE SELECTION

The legislative provisions governing tax inquiries is contained in Chapter 5 of the Tax Administration Act, No. 28 of 2011 (“TAA”). A tax inquiry is a formal process with witnesses subpoenaed and evidence being led under oath or solemn declaration, but it remains an information gathering mechanism.

We think it would be helpful to share members of parliament what process we follow when a matter comes to our attention.

SARS has an independent case selection methodology to protect the governance of how matters are followed up to ensure that there is a verifiable trail that informs how cases are selected.

When a matter comes to SARS’ attention, it is reviewed and evaluated to ensure the validity or merit of the case. Once we have applied our minds and possible grounds are established the case is then further investigated and should additional information be required, there are a number of instruments at SARS disposal that can be utilised to collect relevant information such as:

  • a request for relevant material;
  • production of relevant material in person during an interview at a SARS office;
  • inspection,
  • audit or criminal investigation;
  • tax inquiry before a presiding officer;
  • and search and seizure.

Based on the facts of the case the most appropriate investigative approach will be selected within the legal framework of legislation administered by the Commissioner for SARS.

The legislative provisions governing tax inquiries is contained in Chapter 5 of the Tax Administration Act, No. 28 of 2011 (“TAA”). A tax inquiry is a formal process with witnesses subpoenaed and evidence being led under oath or solemn declaration, but it remains an information gathering mechanism.

Before an inquiry into the tax affairs of a person may be held, SARS must apply through an ex parte application to a judge of the High Court for an order designating a person to act as a presiding officer, the order, will also be specific to the ambit of the inquiry. According to section 56 of the TAA, the tax inquiry is private and confidential. The secrecy provisions of the TAA apply to all the persons present at questioning, including the persons being questioned.

Information disclosed during an inquiry constitutes taxpayer information and is subject to the confidentiality provisions of the TAA, which regulate the disclosure of taxpayer information. The information obtained during the inquiry will be used by SARS to conduct investigations into the taxpayer’s affairs, to establish, whether the taxpayers complied with their obligation in terms of the relevant tax acts administered by the Commissioner for SARS.

Due to the confidentiality provisions contained in the TAA, SARS, is accordingly not in a position to provide any specific information pertaining to the ambit of the inquiry outside of the specified provisions.

30 September 2019 - NW799

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) total amount of each unclaimed (i) pension, (ii) funeral and (iii) investment benefit that is held by each (aa) private institution that is responsible for managing the assets and (b)(i) name of each specified institution and (ii) total amount owed in each case?

Reply:

a) The total number of unclaimed (i) Pension and (ii) Funeral benefit

Details

Rand Amount

Cases

Funeral Benefit

R1 197 422.62

138

Total unclaimed Benefit (July 2019)

R664 186 398.71

17 558

(iii) The GPAA do not deal with investment of funds.

30 September 2019 - NW456

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the employment equity profile of the Western Cape (a) provincial departments and (b) municipal councils?

Reply:

a) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape provincial departments as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

b) Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE profile (2018)

1.1 Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

376

1053

304

7369

163

603

157

1811

260

49

12145

 

3,1%

8,7%

2,5%

60,7%

1,3%

5,0%

1,3%

14,9%

2,1%

0,4%

100,0%

Senior Management

1383

3185

821

10525

763

2232

528

5402

499

191

25529

 

5,4%

12,5%

3,2%

41,2%

3,0%

8,7%

2,1%

21,2%

2,0%

0,7%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

7503

12301

2262

20588

7045

12178

1967

17647

1694

674

83859

 

8,9%

14,7%

2,7%

24,6%

8,4%

14,5%

2,3%

21,0%

2,0%

0,8%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

40246

47550

3583

25291

37418

46330

4083

31329

3901

1762

241493

 

16,7%

19,7%

1,5%

10,5%

15,5%

19,2%

1,7%

13,0%

1,6%

0,7%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

111512

76404

2659

9772

147124

90216

3830

17667

6374

2368

467926

 

23,8%

16,3%

0,6%

2,1%

31,4%

19,3%

0,8%

3,8%

1,4%

0,5%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

87594

48332

558

1854

85155

46576

503

1076

5182

2146

278976

 

31,4%

17,3%

0,2%

0,7%

30,5%

16,7%

0,2%

0,4%

1,9%

0,8%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

248614

188825

10187

75399

277668

198135

11068

74932

17910

7190

1109928

 

22,4%

17,0%

0,9%

6,8%

25,0%

17,9%

1,0%

6,8%

1,6%

0,6%

100,0%

Temporary employees

31628

17085

347

2693

33034

22001

407

3368

4321

2613

117497

 

26,9%

14,5%

0,3%

2,3%

28,1%

18,7%

0,3%

2,9%

3,7%

2,2%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

280242

205910

10534

78092

310702

220136

11475

78300

22231

9803

1227425

Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE Profile for Persons with Disabilities Only (2018)

1.2 Please report the total number of employees with disabilities only in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

23

8

84

1

22

3

22

2

0

171

 

3,5%

13,5%

4,7%

49,1%

0,6%

12,9%

1,8%

12,9%

1,2%

0,0%

100,0%

Senior Management

11

54

12

140

2

38

8

60

2

1

328

 

3,4%

16,5%

3,7%

42,7%

0,6%

11,6%

2,4%

18,3%

0,6%

0,3%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

43

150

27

262

35

111

21

187

11

3

850

 

5,1%

17,6%

3,2%

30,8%

4,1%

13,1%

2,5%

22,0%

1,3%

0,4%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

256

583

47

403

220

434

46

387

12

3

2391

 

10,7%

24,4%

2,0%

16,9%

9,2%

18,2%

1,9%

16,2%

0,5%

0,1%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

755

843

40

261

875

837

47

268

10

5

3941

 

19,2%

21,4%

1,0%

6,6%

22,2%

21,2%

1,2%

6,8%

0,3%

0,1%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

812

546

20

87

862

420

7

64

7

6

2831

 

28,7%

19,3%

0,7%

3,1%

30,4%

14,8%

0,2%

2,3%

0,2%

0,2%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

1883

2199

154

1237

1995

1862

132

988

44

18

10512

 

17,9%

20,9%

1,5%

11,8%

19,0%

17,7%

1,3%

9,4%

0,4%

0,2%

100,0%

Temporary employees

203

97

6

17

231

89

5

10

1

0

659

 

30,8%

14,7%

0,9%

2,6%

35,1%

13,5%

0,8%

1,5%

0,2%

0,0%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

2086

2296

160

1254

2226

1951

137

998

45

18

11171

c) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape municipal councils as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

                       

Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

21

0

9

5

8

0

4

0

0

53

 

11.3%

39.6%

0.0%

17.0%

9.4%

15.1%

0.0%

7.5%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

13

50

6

57

7

12

4

15

0

1

165

 

7.9%

30.3%

3.6%

34.5%

4.2%

7.3%

2.4%

9.1%

0.0%

0.6%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

198

694

41

607

160

350

26

277

19

6

2378

 

8.3%

29.2%

1.7%

25.5%

6.7%

14.7%

1.1%

11.6%

0.8%

0.3%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

1164

3274

44

868

1252

1826

28

504

34

9

9003

 

12.9%

36.4%

0.5%

9.6%

13.9%

20.3%

0.3%

5.6%

0.4%

0.1%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

2067

4302

31

344

1583

2634

39

443

7

4

11454

 

18.0%

37.6%

0.3%

3.0%

13.8%

23.0%

0.3%

3.9%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

2570

3687

11

75

1173

1177

3

15

8

0

8719

 

29.5%

42.3%

0.1%

0.9%

13.5%

13.5%

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

6018

12028

133

1960

4180

6007

100

1258

68

20

31772

 

18.9%

37.9%

0.4%

6.2%

13.2%

18.9%

0.3%

4.0%

0.2%

0.1%

100.0%

Temporary employees

303

327

0

25

202

248

1

31

0

0

1137

 

26.6%

28.8%

0.0%

2.2%

17.8%

21.8%

0.1%

2.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

6321

12355

133

1985

4382

6255

101

1289

68

20

32909

Western Cape Municipal councils’ EE Profile for Person with Disabilities Only (2018)

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

 

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

5

 

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

20.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

2

24

1

24

3

6

0

5

0

0

65

 

3.1%

36.9%

1.5%

36.9%

4.6%

9.2%

0.0%

7.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

15

71

3

37

12

49

1

31

3

0

222

 

6.8%

32.0%

1.4%

16.7%

5.4%

22.1%

0.5%

14.0%

1.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

30

75

0

18

19

61

2

31

0

0

236

 

12.7%

31.8%

0.0%

7.6%

8.1%

25.8%

0.8%

13.1%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

31

93

0

3

12

24

0

3

0

0

166

 

18.7%

56.0%

0.0%

1.8%

7.2%

14.5%

0.0%

1.8%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

78

265

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

695

 

11.2%

38.1%

0.6%

12.1%

6.6%

20.3%

0.4%

10.2%

0.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Temporary employees

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

 

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

78

268

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

698

26 September 2019 - NW533

Profile picture: Diale, Mrs B

Diale, Mrs B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Regarding the Sanitation Appropriate for Education (SAFE) Initiative projects to provide safe and adequate sanitation to schools, (a) what number of projects are in the (i) planning and design and (ii) construction phase in each province as at 30 June 2019, (b) for each project, what (i) is the name of the school where the project is taking place and (ii) the number of toilets to be (aa) demolished and (bb) provided, (iii) type of toilet will be provided, (iv) are the projected costs of each project and (v) what portion of the total cost will be paid from Government funds?

Reply:

a)

(i) 880 Projects are currently under planning and design phase

(ii) 127 Projects are currently under construction.

Province

No. of Projects

Planning

Construction

EC

262

262

0

FS

148

80

68

KZN

402

372

30

LP

162

162

0

MP

33

4

29

Total

1007

880

127

b) 

(i) Refer to Annexure A, column B

(ii) 

(aa) All the inappropriate sanitation will be demolished.

(bb) The number of toilets seats to be provided is determined by the learner enrolment as the ratio is prescribed in the Norms and Standards.

(iii) Where there is reliable source of water supply, flushing ablutions will be constructed and if the water supply is not reliable dry sanitation systems will be constructed.

(iv) Refer to Annexure A, column K

(v) All the 1007 projects will be funded through government funding, either the SAFE Allocation which is managed at the National Department of Basic Education (DBE) or the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) that is managed by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). Refer to Annexure A, column L

26 September 2019 - NW850

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the information and communications technology material and gadgets provided to schools, her department has costed the price of the (a) laptops, (b) iPad/tablets and (c) smart boards that all public schools will require; if not, why not; if so, what total amount will it cost her department, (2) is (a) there any evidence of improvement in the performance of learners who have received the above gadgets as compared to schools who do not have these gadgets and (b) her department finding value for money in providing the above gadgets; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details? NW1970E

Reply:

1. (a), (b) and (c)

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) and Provincial Education Departments (PDEs) are using State Information and Communication Technology (SITA) and National Treasury transversal contracts to procure and rollout ICT devices to schools.

The DBE in collaboration with Department of Trade and Industry, National Treasury, State Information & Technology Agency are working together to develop an education specific contract. The department will use this education specific contract to leverage on the economies of scale. Furthermore, the DTI is conducting a study to determine the local capacity in the country to manufacture and assembly ICT devices. Based on the study the government will be able to determine the cost of providing ICT equipment to schools.

2. (a) The department has not conducted a comparative research study to determine whether there has been an improvement in the performance of learners who have received the above gadgets as compared to schools who do not have these gadgets.

(b) The primary value of providing ICTs in education is to transform teaching and learning to:

  • Enhance learning experiences of learners;
  • Improve efficiency in delivering educational services; and
  • Leverage on ICTs to mitigate educational challenges.

However, drawing lessons from local experiences, the Khanya Project in the Western Cape was implemented to promote learning and maximize educator capacity by integrating the use of appropriate, available and affordable technology (computer technology) into the curriculum delivery process. In addition, the GDE ICT and e-Education Strategy is aimed at ensuring that schools in Gauteng are well resourced with ICT facilities to:

  • Promote e-learning with the aim of introducing devices and smart software into the classroom using technology;
  • Enhance teaching quality;
  • Accessing materials to engage learners; and
  • Train teachers and school administrators.

In conclusion, it should be noted that in order to bring 21st century skills to learners, the department is implementing the use of ICTs and eLearning programs to enhance the education environments that are best suitable for teaching and learning.

 

26 September 2019 - NW809

Profile picture: Diale, Mrs B

Diale, Mrs B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has used any training programmes of the National School of Government during the period 1 January 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details, including the costs incurred in each case?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education sent officials to the National School of Government (NSG) on a regular basis, to attend skills development and training courses. The five tables below indicate the number of officials who attended skills development and training programmes offered by National School of Government (NSG) from 2014/15; 2015/16; 2016/17; 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years.

The information presented includes the name of courses, number of officials according to race, gender, disability and the total cost per financial year.

Financial year 2014/15

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per Official

Total cost per course

Advanced Management Development Programme

10

9

         

1

20

R 6 498.000

R129 960.00

Foundation Management Development Programme

5

15

           

20

R4 250.00

R85 000.00

Emerging Management Development Programme

6

11

     

2

1

 

20

R6 890.00

R137 800.00

Breaking Barriers into public service

 

2

           

2

No cost

No cost

Assessor Training

1

3

           

4

R 4 215.00

R16 860.00

CIP Train the Trainer

 

2

           

2

No cost

No cost

Compulsory Induction

11

15

     

1

   

27

R4 025.00

R108 675.00

TOTALS

33

57

     

3

1

1

95

 

R 478 295.00

Financial year 2015/16

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per Official

Total cost per course

Public Service Trainers Forum

 

3

           

3

R3 275.000

R9 825.00

Financial year 2016/17

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per official

Total cost per course

Advanced Management Development Programme

8

9

1

       

2

20

R8 400.00

R168 000.00

Compulsory Induction Programme

16

20

           

36

R1 892.00

R68 112.00

E-Learning on BID Committee (PFMA)

10

5

2

1

   

2

 

20

R2060.00

R41 200.00

Job Evaluation Follow up

 

2

           

2

R3 680.00

R7 360.00

Supply Chain Management

2

5

 

1

       

8

R4 925.00

R39 400.00

TOTALS

36

41

3

2

   

2

2

86

 

R 324 072.00

Financial year 2017/18

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per official

Total cost per course

Compulsory Induction Programme

3

13

       

1

1

18

R2 159.00

R38 862.00

Mentoring for Public Service

1

4

       

0

1

6

No cost

No cost

Mentoring for Public Service

2

15

(1-disable official)

   

1

1

 

1

20

R4 100.00

R82 000.00

Emerging Management Programme Development

4

15

   

1

     

20

R8 400.00

R168 000.00

TOTAL

10

47

   

2

1

1

3

64

 

R 288 862.00

Financial year 2018/19

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per official

Total cost per course

BID Committee (PFMA)

11

7

2

1

1

   

1

23

R4 782.60

R110 000.00

Compulsory Induction Programme (On-line)

7

3

           

10

R946.00

R9 460.00

Job Evaluation

5

1

       

1

1

8

R4 650.00

R37 200.00

Supply Chain Management

4

6

           

10

R6 750.00

R67 500.00

TOTAL

27

17

2

1

1

 

1

2

51

 

R224 160.00

Conclusion

The total amount spent by the Department of Basic Education for Skills Development and Training programmes attended by officials facilitated by the National School of Government from 1 March 2014 to 31 March 2019 (i.e the past five years) is R1 328 214.00.

26 September 2019 - NW532

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether she will furnish Ms D van der Walt with a list of schools in each province which have been provided with safe and adequate sanitation by the national Sanitation Appropriate for Education Initiative as at 30 June 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) for each specified school in each province, what is (a) the name of the school, (b) the number of toilets that were (i) demolished and/or (ii) provided, (c) the type of toilet provided (details furnished), (d) the cost of the project at the school and (e) the portion of the total cost was paid for from government (non-donor) funds?

Reply:

1.  To date 188 Schools have been provided with adequate sanitation.

Province

No. of Projects

Donor

EIG & ASIDI

EC

11

4

7

FS

29

 

29

KZN

93

2

91

LP

35

3

32

MP

20

9

11

TOTAL

188

18

170

2.

(a) Refer to Annexure A, column B

b) (i) All the inappropriate sanitation was demolished.

(ii) The number of toilets seats provided is to be confirmed by the Provincial Education Department (PEDs).

c) The type of toilets provided is to be confirmed by the PEDs.

d) & (e) The financial implications are to be confirmed by the PEDS.

26 September 2019 - NW951

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department will begin the acquisition process for urgently needed aircraft replacement for the (a) essential maritime patrol and reconnaissance capabilities at 35 Squadron, (b) essential cargo, logistical and personnel C130 carriers at 28 Squadron in support of the various operations and (c) essential helicopter capabilities, particularly of the Oryx and Rooivalk; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the steps she intends to take to provide the specified critically essential services?

Reply:

(a – c) No. The acquisition of main equipment to replace the aging fleet in the South African Air Force is inextricably linked to the budget allocation. There is currently no funding on the SCAMP to initiate the process for the acquisition process or to procure the replacement of the ageing fleet.

26 September 2019 - NW967

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether she appointed a certain person (name furnished) to a position within her department; if so, (a) were proper processes followed in the appointment, (b) what total number of other applications were received for the position, (c) what is the specified person’s job title, (d) does the specified person have the requisite skills and competencies for the position and (e) what is the nature of the relationship between her and the specified person?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

a) Yes, proper processes were followed in accordance with the Public Service Regulation of 2016.

b) No applications were received for the position as the appointment of the specified person was done without advertising as provided for in Regulation 66, sub-regulation (2) of the Public Service Regulations 2016. However, the specified person was subjected to an interview process to determine suitability to the position,

c) Assistant Appointment Secretary.

d) Yes, in that the specified person has 14 years of Secretary, Receptionist and Administrative experience and she was appointed with the relaxation of qualifications, in accordance with Regulation 39 of the Public Service Regulations 2016. Regulation 39 provides that an Executive Authority shall establish a job description and job title that indicate, with appropriate emphasis on service delivery, the main objectives, activities and functions of the post or posts in question and the inherent requirements of the job. The delegation to approve lies with the Director-General. Relaxation of inherent requirements (qualifications) is a standard practice in the public service.

e) Recruitment of personnel is based on merit and the experience that they bring into the job. It is not a requirement for HR recruitment to establish whether candidates are related to any of those already in employment.

The said person is related to the Minister. She has since resigned from her position stating ethical reasons.

25 September 2019 - NW693

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

What (a) number of recommendations did the Public Service Commission make since 1 January 2018 in line with its mandate of promoting measures that would ensure effective and efficient performance within the Public Service and promoting values and principles of public administration as set out in the Constitution, throughout the Public Service, (b) number of the specified recommendations have been implemented and (c) was the outcome of the implementation of each of the specified recommendations?

Reply:

a) Number of recommendations issued: 153

b) Number implemented (including partially implemented and to be implemented): 43

c) Outcome: See notes in the last two columns in the detailed table at Annexure A below.

Summary Table

Research Reports

Number of recommendations issued

30

 

To be implemented

1

 

Implemented

1

 

Partly implemented

18

 

Not implemented

10

Public Administration Investigations

Number of recommendations issued

77

 

No feedback received

32

 

To be implemented

9

 

Subject to court judgement

31

 

Implemented

5

Grievances

Number of recommendations issued

46

 

No feedback received

35

 

To be implemented

 
 

Implemented

9

 

Partly implemented

 
 

Not implemented

2

Annexure A: DETAILS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS

Title of Report

Department

Key Recommendations

Outcome of implementation of the recommendations

Comments

Service Delivery Inspection at 1 Military Hospital (Thaba-Tshwane)

Department of Defence (DoD) and Military Veterans

1. The DoD supported by the PSC and the Office of the Military Ombudsman to engage with the City of Tshwane to explore the possibility of allocating an electricity transformer/grid to the hospital.

Not implemented

The PSC forwarded the report to the Minister on 29 May 2018 and requested an engagement regarding the findings. Further correspondence through email dating back to 6 July 2018 were directed to the Chief of Staff of the Ministry to no avail.

As an alternative, the PSC held a meeting with the Secretary for Defence on 28 March 2019 and agreed that the Department will provide the PSC with an action plan within 60 days. To date, no feedback has been received.

The Chairperson of the PSC has sent letters to the Minister and the Secretary for Defence to schedule an engagement with the Chairperson to address this matter.

A meeting between the Director-General of the PSC and the Secretary for Defence has been scheduled for 17 September 2019.

   

2. The DoD should conduct an assessment of the security and safety needs of the hospital in line with the Minimum Physical Security Standards and the Minimum Information Security Standards. The security features should also be aligned to those accorded to National Key Points.

   
   

3. The DoD supported by the PSC and the Office of the Military Ombudsman should engage National Treasury on the management of transversal contracts and its implications for the 1 Military hospital with regards to the courier service provider to ensure the latter adheres to the service level agreement (SLA).

   
   

4. The DoD and South African National Defence Force (SANDF) should consider granting both Human Resources and Financial Delegations to the hospital management for efficient operations.

   
   

5. The Department of Military Veterans should re-assign an official to the hospital to facilitate the interface between the hospital and new ex-combatants.

   
   

6. The DoD and SANDF to review and redesign the organisational structure and service delivery model to ensure that it responds to the mandate of the hospital

   
   

7. The DoD and SANDF should attend to the Human Resources Management and Development issues affecting the hospital, including performance management (PMDS), occupation specific dispensation (OSD), remunerated work outside of the public service (RWOPS) and overtime payment.

   
   

8. The Department of Public Works (DPW) should provide the PSC and Office of the Military Ombudsman with a report on the delay in finalisation of the RAMP. In this regard, the PSC will request a meeting with the DoD, Public Works and National Treasury.

   

Factsheet on the implementation of the performance management and development system (PMDS):

case study at the Department of Agriculture: Western Cape

Western Cape Department of Agriculture

1. Ensure that Performance Agreement (PA), reviews, and assessment documents are initialled and signed. The signing of the PAs is important for authenticity and validity as these documents form the legal basis for performance contracting.

Implementation of all recommendations is in progress

During February 2019, the PSC engaged the HoD of Agriculture on the findings and recommendations. The HoD accepted all the recommendations.

   

2. Ensure on-going feedback and coaching in conducting of reviews. The PERMIS (computerised) system can restrict the personal interaction between supervisor and employee as information is signed-off on the system, so supervisors should make a concerted effort to sufficiently interact with their supervisees during the review process.

   
   

3. Ensure that the performance of employees is evaluated fairly and consistently evaluated across the Department. Lower level employees who do not have computers indicated that their performance assessment documents are loaded on the system by their supervisor. They are not always sure if the right information is captured. This may create a problem when individual ratings agreed upon between the employee and her/his supervisor is not correctly captured.

   
   

4. Ensure that there is a common understanding of the standards required as well as the unit of measurement that should be linked to posts where similar outputs are required. Farmworkers usually work in groups and the assessments do not allow for a group/team award. A training session should be held with these employees to create a shared vision of the standards required for their post.

   
   

5. Ensure that development needs are completed. Most of the employees did not complete the Personal Development Plan. Where employees lack knowledge and skills relevant to their work it is important that gaps are identified and training needs captured, and training programmes be implemented

   
   

6. Employees should feel empowered to influence the content relating to targets, quality of delivery, and resource allocation, as examples. A first step could be that employees are encouraged to formulate the performance statements and descriptions themselves. This is perhaps not universally applied for good reason. However, it does engender greater ownership of the agreement.

   

Non-Payment of Suppliers within the prescribed 30 days by National Departments

  • Rural Development and Land Reform
  • Social Development
  • Public Works
  • Water and Sanitation
  • Police
  • Cooperative Governance

1. Put systems and internal controls in place to adhere to the PFMA regulations to pay invoices within 30 days of receipt.

Partly implemented

Overall, the departmental performance has fluctuated from quarter to quarter.

Some departments continued to demonstrate a pattern of poor performance in the 30-day payment of invoices.

The PSC held engagements with the HODs of the mentioned departments.

Follow-up letters indicating dissatisfaction with the recurring bahaviour of defaulting on payments were further issued during the week of 13 and 14 June 2019.

   

2. Apply consequences management where officials were found to have neglected their duties of ensuring that invoices are paid on time.

   

Evaluation of the department against the nine principles in section 195 of the Constitution

Social Development, Gauteng

1. The Head of Department need to put measures in place to ensure that disciplinary hearings are held within 60 days as prescribed in Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 1 of 2003.

Implemented

For the 2017/18 financial year the Department reported zero in terms of disciplinary hearings which were held after 60 days, meaning that the measures have been put in place to improve the management of labour relations. The issue of labour relations has been prioritised in the province since most departments are battling with it, particularly resolution of the cases in time.

 
   

2. The Head of Department need to produce and publish citizens’ annual reports on the departmental website annually.

Not implemented

There was no improvement, during the 2017/18 financial year because the Department still had no annual citizens’ report published and posted on its departmental website.

 
   

3. The Head of Department needs to make sure that all the strategic objectives have set targets.

To be implemented

This area can only be confirmed after scrutinizing the department’s Annual Report for the 2018/19 financial year. The Annual report will only be available late in September 2019.

 
   

4. The Head of Department need to take actions against the supervisors who are not concluding performance agreements with their supervisees as required.

Not implemented

There are officials who are still not concluding their performance agreements (and the number of officials who are not concluding their performance agreements increased compared to the previous financial year).

 

The PSC will continue to monitor the Department on this matter and ensure that there is improvement in this matter. The PSC will have an engagement with the new MEC as part of its strategy of raising problematic areas that the PSC has observed.

Public Administration Investigations

Investigation into a complaint

Rural Development and Land Reform

9 recommendations on acting appointments and acting allowances

No feedback received

The period for implementation of recommendations lapsed on 3 June 2018. Reminder e-mails were forwarded to the Ministry on 10 August 2018, 9 November 2018 and 4 February 2019.

Investigation into a complaint

Independent Police Investigation Directorate

5 recommendations regarding disciplinary procedures, precautionary suspension, irregular appointment and failure to pay invoices within 30 days

No feedback received

The period for implementation of recommendations lapsed on 8 March 2018. Reminder e-mails were forwarded to the Ministry on 19 April 2018, 3 May 2018, 12 June 2018, 10 August 2018, 9 November 2018 and 4 February 2019.

Investigation into a complaint

Water and Sanitation

5 recommendations on failure to adhere to a bargaining council resolution, appointment/ secondment of staff and job evaluation

Implemented

The former Minister sent the PSC a letter dated 6 April 2018 in which the PSC’s recommendations were accepted. The PSC’s investigating officer has testified in the disciplinary proceedings instituted by the Department

 

Investigation into a complaint

Public Service and Administration

4 recommendations on the filling of posts in the private office of the Minister

No feedback received

The final report was on 13 February 2019 forwarded to, amongst others, the Minister for further action.

Investigation into a complaint

Public Enterprises

1 recommendation on recovery of money that was irregularly paid

No feedback received

The report was approved and forwarded to the Minister on 15 November 2018 for comment within 30 days of receipt of the report.

Investigation into a complaint

Justice and Constitutional Development

2 recommendations on irregular appointments

No feedback received

The report was approved in March 2017. The Department had to provide feedback on the implementation of recommendations within 60 days of receipt of the report. Follow-ups were made with the Department. The latest follow-up being on 08 July 2019.

Investigation into a complaint

Public Works

31 recommendations regarding 12 instances of irregular appointments of members of the senior management service

Subject to court judgement

The DPW has approached the courts to set aside the irregular appointments.

Investigation into a complaint

Science and Technology

3 recommendations on non-adherence to Supply Chain Management regulations and Treasury Practice Notes

Implemented

 

Investigation into a complaint

Trade and Industry

5 recommendations on irregular expenditure on tuition fees and awarding of study bursaries

2 implemented

3 to be implemented

 

Investigation into a complaint

Sport and Recreation SA

11 recommendations with regard to delays in the filling of posts, creation of posts, competency assessment and deployment matters – transfers, secondments and assignments.

No feedback received

The final report together with the letter addressed to the Minister was handed to the Chief of Staff (CoS) in the Ministry on 5 November 2018. Feedback on implementation of the recommendations had to be provided to the PSC within 60 days, which period lapsed on 5 January 2019. Reminder e mails were forwarded to the CoS in the Ministry on 24 January 2019 and 16 April 2019. On 4 February 2019 the CoS indicated in an e mail that the content of the e mail dated 24 January 2019 was “shared with the Minister and the department who will respond to you in due course”. To date no feedback on the implementation of the recommendations has been received.

Investigation into a complaint

Center for Public Service Innovation

1 recommendation on the approval of sponsorship agreements

To be implemented

The Report was delivered on 02 August 2019. The 30 days to respond to the PSC has not yet lapsed.

Grievances

Several investigations of the grievances of employees in the public service

Several departments

Recommendations were made to address the grievances of the effected employees.

Implemented

7

Implementation of recommendations contributes towards compliance with policy, builds sound relations between the employer and employees, and contributes towards employee productivity.

In the case of the two recommendations that were not implemented, the EAs disagreed with the PSC’s recommendations and provided reasons for the disagreement. Aggrieved employees have the right to declare disputes should the disagree with the outcome of the process. In many instances the PSC’s findings are confirmed by dispute resolution bodies and the employees are then given awards which are enforceable.

     

Partially implemented

2

 
     

Awaiting feedback from department

35

 
     

Not implemented

2

 
     

Total issued

46

 

25 September 2019 - NW495

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

What is the average remuneration package of public service employees appointed at (a) senior management and (b) middle management levels in the (i) national and (ii) provincial governments?

Reply:

1. Appointees appointed to the Middle Management Service (MMS) (salary levels 11 and 12) and Senior Management Service (SMS) (salary levels 13 to 16) are remunerated by means of Total Cost-to-Employer (TCE) packages, which include the following macro benefits:

1.1 Employer contribution to the Government Employees Pension Fund.

1.2 Employer contribution to a registered medical aid scheme.

1.3 13th cheque.

1.4 Housing benefit.

2. The annual average (mean) TCE packages of MMS and SMS members, per salary level, per national and provincial department, as at 1 July 2019, are as follows:

 

Cadre

Salary level

Government Sphere

Annual average TCE package

1

MMS

11

National

R779 802

     

Provincial

R779 435

   

12

National

R922 750

     

Provincial

R947 802

2

SMS

13

National

R1 078 267

     

Provincial

R1 076 222

   

14

National

R1 285 722

     

Provincial

R1 269 755

   

15

National

R1 557 121

     

Provincial

R1 533 755

   

16

National

R1 974 067

     

Provincial

R1 984 885

Source: PERSAL (Julu 2019 data)

25 September 2019 - NW797

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

Department of Home Affairs

1. (aa) For financial year 2016/17 – R 1,449,947.84

(bb) Financial year 2017/18 – R 6,833,958.28

(cc) Financial year 2018/19 – R 3,380,574.43

(2) (a) The department total expenditure incurred R 3,095,535.24

(i) Financial year (2016/17)

YFM – R 50,997.33

Financial year (2017/18)

Power FM – R86,564.00

YFM – R 507,542.82

TisoBlackstar - R 37,121.00

Financial year (2018/19)

TisoBackstar R557,706.99

(ii) Financial year (2016/17)

None

Financial year (2017/18)

Airport screens – R 255,018.00

Stadium advertising – R 570,000.00

Financial year (2018/19)

Airport screens – R 449,650.00

Digital Screens in major routes across the country – R 172,500.00

Stadium advertising – R 494,999.10

(c) None.

Government Printing Works

(1) (a) (ii) (aa) none

(a) (ii) (bb) none

(a) (ii) (cc) none

(2) (b) (i) none

(b) (ii) none

(c) (aa) none

(c) (bb) none

(c) (cc) none

Electoral Commission

(1)(a) The amount spent in each of the financial years is as follows:

   

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

   

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

   

36 531 210.99

75 840 626.44

45 418 600.53

         

(2)(b)(i)

 

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

 

BANZOGENIX

-

-

2 400.00

 

EASTERN CAPE COMMUNITY RADIO FORUM

71 941.89

138 161.04

4 500.00

 

GIJIMA PRINTERS

-

-

20 374.50

 

IZETHEMBISO ZENKOSI TRADING ENTERPRISE

-

-

1 995.00

 

MADIBA PROMOTIONS

-

-

21 355.50

 

MMABATHO FM 107.7 MHZ

-

1 998.00

3 996.00

 

SIPHUMELELE LIYA TRADING

-

2 240.00

1 944.00

 

SIX FINGAZ MEDIA

-

-

8 974 970.03

 

TUBATSE PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY RADIO

-

-

4 200.00

 

ALMEBYTE T/A DARKSTAR

579 315.38

10 748 872.67

-

 

EMERGING SEARCH CONSULTANTS

-

45 000.00

-

 

KARMA COMMUNITY PROJECTS

-

27 360.00

-

 

LEKOA MULTI-MEDIA COMMUNICATION DE

-

24 000.00

-

 

MANTUNTU TRADING ENTERPRISE

-

2 976.00

-

 

MAPUTALAND COMMUNITY RADIO

-

6 000.00

-

 

PHELI FM

-

10 000.00

-

 

RADIO 786

8 000.00

-

-

 

THAMZO TRADING

-

5 180.00

-

 

WATERBERG WELFARE SOCIETY

-

4 810.80

-

 

ZEBEDIELA COMMUNITY RADIO

-

7 990.00

-

 

RADIO KC

8 000.00

-

-

 

SIBABALWE PROMOTIONS AND EVENTS

112 450.00

-

-

 

THE MEDIA SHOP

34 138 762.96

-

-

 

THE PHONEBOOK COMPANY

5 210.53

-

-

 

TOTAL ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE

34 923 680.76

11 024 588.51

9 035 735.03

   

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

(2)(b)(ii)

 

2 311 077.91

10 062 873.02

6 463 353.48

(2)(c)

 

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

 

ALMEBYTE T/A DARKSTAR

 

2 397 835.04

 

 

SIX FINGAZ MEDIA

 

 

59 202.00

 

THE MEDIA SHOP

2 311 078.00

 

 

   

2 311 078.00

2 397 835.04

59 202.00

 

END

25 September 2019 - NW474

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

1. What reasons did a certain official (name and details furnished) give for resigning; 2. Whether she has found that there was no undue political interference in the specified person’s decision to resign; if not; (a) will the alleged undue political interference be investigated and (b) what action will be taken against persons found to have been involved in the alleged exercising of the undue political interference in the specified person’s decision to resign? NW1466E

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

  1. The erstwhile Post Office GCEO, Mr Mark Barnes, mainly cited the ultimate separation of the shareholding, control and management of Postbank and SAPO as his main reason for his resignation. He reasoned that the decision goes against the agreed strategy for SAPO business model founded on a diversified revenue strategy.
  2. The resignation letter does not indicate that undue political interference was the reason for the resignation. (a) and (b) are therefore not applicable.

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

25 September 2019 - NW735

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. No.

(1)(a), (b) and (c) Not applicable

(2) No

(2)(a), (b) and (d) Not applicable

 

Ms Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams

Minister

25 September 2019 - NW915

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether the Broadband Infraco (BBI) has been the subject of any investigation by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) in the period of 1 June 2014 to 30 June 2019; if so, what was the (a) subject and nature of each specified investigation and (b) outcome of each such investigation? 2. Whether the specified investigations have been completed in each case; if not, what is the current status of each of the incomplete investigations; if so what was the outcome of the investigation in each case? NW2069E

Reply:

I have been advised by the BBI as follows:

BBI was not the subject of an investigation by the SIU.

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

25 September 2019 - NW803

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he will take any steps to re-allocate his department’s personnel from offices that require less support to offices that require more support, in order to fight long queues and capacitate offices requiring more assistance; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department is in the process of re-allocating personnel to critical front line service delivery areas, relevant to Civic services. To this extent, front line service delivery areas are envisaged to be capacitated by an additional 349 personnel (on a permanent and temporarily basis, subject to the availability of funds), by 31 March 2020.

Within the Immigration services environment too, the Department is looking at the possibility of deploying additional personnel to identified Missions abroad, within the current financial year.

 

END

23 September 2019 - NW767

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) Why have there been delays in the building and allocation of housing for military veterans and (b) are there any plans to speed up the process?

Reply:

(a)&(b) Indeed Honourable Member, the Military Veterans Programme has not been performing as expected and we are extremely concerned about the slow pace of delivery to our military veterans. On 3 May 2017, we convened a National Military Veterans Dialogue to exchange views and dialogue around finding solutions to challenges encountered in the provision of housing for military veterans. It has become evident to me that we have not moved far enough with delivery on this programme.

I will place the matter on top of the agenda of our MINMEC and it will remain a standing item until we make satisfactory progress on this matter.

Some of the reasons provided to me for delays in the delivery of houses for military veterans include:

(i) The finalisation and authentication of the beneficiary list by my Department and the Department of Military Veterans (DMV) has presented challenges for us. The completion of this process prior to the commencement of a military veterans’ housing project is very vital for planning. Where we proceeded to build and complete a project while the approved list had not been finalised, houses have been invaded by military veterans who did not qualify for these houses.

(ii0 Provincial structures of the South African Military Veterans Association in most cases dispute the beneficiary lists submitted by the National Department of Military Veterans.

23 September 2019 - NW649

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

Whether the SA Police Service investigated the allegations delivered to them by the SA Revenue Service pertaining to Project Snowman and Project Broken Arrow in 2010 and in 2014; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the outcomes in each case? NW1657E

Reply:

The South African Police Service (SAPS), including the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), is not aware of Project Snowman or Project Broken Arrow, purportedly having been delivered by the South African Revenue Service (SARS), in 2010 and in 2014, respectively.


Reply to question 649 recommended/

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-16

Reply to question 649 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 22/09/2019

23 September 2019 - NW424

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) How does his department intend to leverage the resources of the (i) Unemployment Insurance Fund and (ii) Compensation Fund to invest in job-creating initiatives in the current financial year and (b) what portion of the resources will be used for the purposes of job creation?

Reply:

Unemployment Insurance Fund

  1. Project Development Partnership(PDP)

The Department of Employment and Labour through PIC and the UIF launched the Project Development Partnership (PDP) Fund on the 14 December 2018. The Fund is aimed at supporting and creating jobs through creating and funding early-stage businesses. An allocation of R2bn is directed towards the PDP Fund, and this allocation is funded by the UIF. The PDP Fund is specifically directed at performing the following roles:

  • Offering funding to create and grow small businesses, therefore creating new companies.
  • The PDP Fund would fund companies in sectors such as Agribusiness and Bio- science, Mining and beneficiation, Manufacturing and ICT, social infrastructure, Water and related services, financial services, and Youth innovation.
  • President Ramaphosa highlighted the importance of South Africa’s participation in the 4th Industrial Revolution and emphasized the need to move with greater focus and urgency to develop the skills, human capital, institutions and strategies that are required to seize the advantages of this technological change. The PDP Fund echoes the sentiments of our President and will focus on investing in projects which are solving SA socio-economic challenges through investment projects which are aligned to 4th Industrial Revolution.
  • The PDP Fund is expected to create and support over 10 000 jobs (direct and indirect), particularly ensuring Future of Work opportunities are utilized

The PDP fund allocation of R2bn will be split into two investment streams. A portion will be invested by PIC directly into early-stage businesses and projects. The other portion of the R2bn allocation will be allocated to black-owned fund managers with an intention to transform the asset management industry in South Africa.

Progress since the launch:

  • 194 applications were received for funding from the PDP fund, 85% have been screened. 73 were received from the public application process
  • Request for proposals (RFP) were completed and processed for the appointment of the fund managers, and 5 managers have been shortlisted.
  • All 5 fund managers are Black-owned and have excellent pipeline that includes projects that offer key unlocks for the South African economy and align well with employment creation targets

Project Bokamoso, the agricultural high-value land development flagship project, is progressing well and is in the Due-Diligence stage of the investment process. Other direct large-scale projects in pipeline includes:

    • Project Energise – beneficiation/ rural electrification / local manufacturing
    • Project Hope – High-tech satellite manufacture / agriculture / water
    • 2 Education / Healthcare project under consideration
    • 2 Primary agricultural development projects e.g. Macadamia Co-op (Eastern Cape and Limpopo)
    • 2 manufacturing projects under consideration – both targeted in SEZs for export market
    • Bonds4Jobs – youth skills development and employment placing
    • Mining and rehabilitation – high-tech/ low-cost minerals extraction

2. High Social Impact Portfolio(HSIP)

The aim of the Fund is a first step to put into effect the newly signed Unemployment Insurance Act as Amended 2017 Section 5(d) which states that: “Financing of the retention of contributors in employment and the re-entry of contributors into the labour market and any other scheme aimed at the vulnerable workers”. The purpose of the HSIP was born out of the above mentioned section and is just but one of the intervention the Department of Employment and Labour has embarked on to pro-actively intervene in the market where it’s possible to do so.

Purpose: The HSIP aims to fund interventions in entities in order to ensure job preservation and creation. It will target transactions where the current risk of significant direct job losses is high.

Social Impact Criteria and Expectations: Minimum social return of X% of the investment amount based on the value to the UIF of the primary social impacts. The primary social impacts that will be measured are related to the expected jobs saved at the target entity or that can be proven downstream:

  • Saving of claim payments;
  • Retention of UIF contributions;
  • Impact on the Fiscus (e.g. PAYE)

Investment Criteria: The investments should contribute to the preservation and creation of sustainable job opportunities in particular for women, youth and other designated persons.

Progress to Date

  • HSIP was only launched in February 2019
  • The Department through UIF set aside R3 billion for the portfolio
  • R1.2 billion was invested in Edcon acquiring a stake of 19% and in the process saving about 140 000 direct and indirect jobs. This investment also avoided stores; farms; and other stores downstream from closing.
  • Overtime staff ownership will be worked into the formula of investment

3. Training Layoff Scheme and now Temporary Employee/Employer Relief Scheme(TERS)

The Department of Employment and Labour has swiftly implemented the job summit resolution on reviewing the Training Layoff Scheme process to ensure speedy intervention for the companies in distress. The intention of the review was in line with the newly reviewed UIF Act which emphasise the need to fund the retention of contributors in employment.

In the line with the Job Summit resolution the following has been implemented:

  • The numerous decision making platforms have been reduced to one committee centralised at the CCMA which enables speedy decision making.
  • As a result of the centralisation of the committee the following successes has been registered:
  1. The committee has met 22 times since October 2018
  2. 30 companies considered
  3. 27 companies recommended and approved
  4. Those 3 companies that have not been recommended have been advised to address compliance issues
  5. A total of 2 929 jobs preserved
  6. Just over R52 millions spent to date to preserve the jobs

Compensation Fund

1. Rehabilitation and Return to Work

The Compensation Fund introduced a Rehabilitation and Orthotics unit in 2018 with the aim of implementing a Rehabilitation and Return to Work programme for the injured workers. Injured workers who are assessed to be permanently disabled would usually leave the labour market thus contributing to the unemployment rate. The Rehabilitation unit introduced at the Compensation fund focuses on three forms of rehabilitation, the traditional clinical rehabilitation we have always provided injured workers with and the newly introduced social and vocational rehabilitation.

Vocational Rehabilitation is aimed at assisting the injured workers with reskilling for reintegration back into the labour market. Through the Vocational Rehabilitation Programme, the Compensation Fund seeks to remove barriers to accessing or returning to employment or other useful occupation by providing developmental opportunities to maximise performance, employability or participation in the country’s economy.ositiveegan in 2017on coperates ls that ensure employability t and also focus on development in rural areas pertainign le with The Programmes objectives are

  • To support tertiary students who require financial assistance and are pursuing a tertiary degree
  • To encourage the participation of previously employed persons who suffered occupational injuries or diseases resulting in a disability by providing training and development initiatives to enable them to be reintegrated back to work or become self-sustainable;
  • To build a talent pipeline of a pool of capable candidates who are readily available for the labour market;
  • To leverage on opportunity creation initiatives to assist unemployed workers who suffered occupational injuries resulting in a disability and Persons with Disabilities to achieve economic self-sufficiency; and Vocational Rehabilitation comprises of various sub programmes. In order to enable a successful Return to work programme for injured workers that now have a disability, the Fund has a Vocational Rehabilitation Bursary Scheme aimed at assisting the injured beneficiaries to acquire skill(s) that will enable them to be returned to work post the injury. Injured workers are among the most vulnerable in society and tend to be mostly blue collared workers with no matric or tertiary qualifications.

As a pilot, we are currently funding upper limb amputees enrolled for electrician and welding course, tertiary degrees and on entrepreneurship programmes.

In addition to promoting the employability of persons living with disability as a result of occupational injuries, the Compensation Fund currently runs a tertiary bursary programme which began in 2017 that is aligned to some of the scarce skills identified in South Africa. The bursary programme is an intensive programme which entails an online support programme and on site mentoring coaches at universities which monitor not only the academic performance of the student but also addresses social issues considering that some of our students are from rural areas in South Africa.

As at the beginning of 2019, this programme has 327 students pursuing a tertiary degree at various universities in the following fields:

  • Nursing
  • Medical Orthotics and Prosthetics
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Information Communications Technology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Accounting Science
  • Actuarial Science and Financial Mathematics
  • Medicine and Surgery

The Rehabilitation and Return to work programme will require participation of both the public and private sectors to be successful. As part of the Social Rehabilitation programmes we will be embarking on initiatives that are aimed at promoting social entrepreneurship for those who have been reskilled and successfully rehabilitated. We will outline the details of these programmes in the near future.

2. Socially Responsible Investments

The Compensation Fund has set aside 10% of its investment portfolio for investment in unlisted investments with job creation potential. These investments are made across various sectors of the economy.

23 September 2019 - NW423

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What are the details of the partnerships forged by his department with (a) employers and (b) training institutions to train the youth for digital jobs which are expected to be created in the wake of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

Reply:

a) The Department of Employment and Labour under the Employment Services Act provides free recruitment and placement services to employers and work seekers alike.

220,851 work seekers were registered by Department of Employment and Labour centres during Quarter 1 of 2019, against an annual target of 700,000.

Through various partnerships with employer organizations a total of 52,894 employment opportunities were registered by Department of Employment and Labour centres during Quarter 1 of 2019, against an annual target of 90,000.

The department also profiles and assess competencies of registered work seekers to shorten employer recruitment and selection process. During Q1 a total of 70,086 work seekers were provided with employment counselling by against an annual target of 210,000.

The counselling services are an important step in identification of work seekers for referral for selection and placement by various employers or for further training in various training institutions. 18,126 registered employment opportunities were filled during Quarter 1 of 2019 against an annual target of 45,000.

b) The Department of Employment and Labour through the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) has partnered with about 32 State Owned training providers and institutions to implement training of UIF beneficiaries. The intention is to pilot the project with training of over 160 000 learners over a period of three years. The training will vary from Skills Programme to Learnership to Artisan. The projected budget for the intervention is estimated at R7.9 billion over the period of three years.

Through this intervention 6000 artisans will be trained at the cost estimation of over R800 million. Learnership will take about 67 000 learners at an estimated cost of R3.7 billion. There are 400 of the claimants who have skills and need to be assisted with certification through Recognition of Prior Learning(RPL), at a cost of R15 million. A further 81 000 of the learners will be taken through the skills Programme at a cost of about R2.5 billion to enable them access to training and possible job placement. The final leg is the introduction of enabling entrepreneurship through enterprise development and training. Just over 1 400 will be trained in this area with the intention of absorbing trainees from other Programmes and linking to the market.

As at quarter 1; 20 000 people are in training with over 75% being young people and more 50% of the total being women.

The intervention is expected to grow over time to an extent that as and when a claimant visits the Department of Employment and Labour to claim for unemployment an opportunity will be ready for the claimants to link up the benefit payment with training thereby reduce cost on paying stipend.

23 September 2019 - NW739

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote Debate, if so, (a) where was each event held (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest. 2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events, if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts. [NW1784E]

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour did not host an event or function related to 2019 Budget Vote Debate.

a) Falls away

b) Falls away

c) Falls away

2. There was no event hosted and therefore there were no gifts exchanged

a) Falls away

b) Falls away

23 September 2019 - NW692

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What number of disputes were referred to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration since 1 January 2019 and (b) on what statutory provision was each dispute based? [

Reply:

The question is replied to by means of a Spreadsheet with three pages attached.

Page one deals with the number of disputes referred breaking them down to CCMA centres.

Page two deals with the statutory provision the disputes are based on.

Page three breaks down issues and provides figures.

Please note that information furnished here has been so from 1st January to 30 January 2019

 

23 September 2019 - NW846

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) What number of cameras are at the Sebenza Police Station and (b) where is each camera situated; (2) (a) when last was each camera inspected, (b) what was the working condition of each camera and (c) on what date was each faulty camera repaired; (3) (a) when last did the specified police station report any camera that was out of order, (b) when were the reported cameras repaired and (c) for how long has each camera been out of order?

Reply:

(1 )(a) There are no cameras installed at the Sebenza Police Station.
(1)(b) Not applicable.
(2)(a)(b)(c) Not applicable.

(3)(a)(b)(c) Not applicable.

 

Reply to question 846 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-16

Reply to question 846 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 22/09/2019

23 September 2019 - NW697

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of vehicles does the Edenvale Police Station have currently; (2) what number of the specified vehicles have had the mandatory four inspections per week during the first six months of 2019?

Reply:

(1) The Edenvale Police Station, currently has a total of 34 vehicles.

(2) All the vehicles that are available at the station, are inspected weekly, except for those that are booked in at the garage for repairs or other reasons.

Reply to question 697 recommended
 

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-16

Reply to question 697 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 22/09/2019

23 September 2019 - NW69

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

1. What number of persons in each province is employed in the South African retail sector?

Reply:

PERSONS EMPLOYED IN THE TRADE SECTOR IN SOUTH AFRICA

PROVINCE

TOTAL_ACTIVE_EMPLOYEES (AS ON 23-JUN-2019)

GAUTENG

2 029 714

WESTERN CAPE

1 212 098

KWAZULU NATAL

695 013

MPUMALANGA

293 531

EASTERN CAPE

258 762

FREE STATE

107 266

NORTH WEST

69 609

LIMPOPO

67 714

NORTHERN CAPE

48 163

GRAND TOTAL

4 781 870

Source: UIF Operations system

According to the operations system of the UIF more than 4.7 million people are employed in the trade sector in South Africa. The provinces of Gauteng, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal has 82% of the employees with Gauteng alone contributing 42% of the total employees. The Northern Cape has the least number of employees at just over 48 000.

23 September 2019 - NW845

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Police:

(1) (a) What number of cameras are at the Primrose Police Station and (b) where is each camera situated; (2) (a) when last was each camera inspected, (b) what was the working condition of each camera and (c) on what date was each faulty camera repaired; (3) (a) when last did the specified police station report any camera that was out of order, (b) when were the reported cameras repaired and (c) for how long has each camera been out of order?

Reply:

(1 )(a) There are 23 cameras installed at the Primrose Police Station.

(1)(b) The cameras are installed in the corridors, the holding cells, the outside of the Police Station, the perimeters and the parking areas.

(2)(a) The last inspection was done, in August 2019.

(2)(b) A total of 21 cameras are in working condition and two cameras are out of order.

(2)(c) A quotation, to have the cameras repaired, was requested from the supplier. The quotation is still outstanding.


(3)(a) In August 2019, during the inspection, two cameras were reported to be out of order.

(3)(b) The cameras have not been repaired yet.

3 )( c) The two cameras have been out of order, for two months

Reply to question 845 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-16

Reply to question 845 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 22/09/2019

23 September 2019 - NW699

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of police officers at the Edenvale Police Station have failed their firearm competency test as at the latest specified date for which the information is available; (2) what number of police officers at the specified police station currently have a firearm competency certificate that has (a) expired and (b) not yet expired as it is still within the prescribed one year?

Reply:

(1) A total of 10 police officers at the Edenvale Police Station have failed their firearm competency test.

(2)(a) A total of 15 police officers at the Edenvale Police Station currently have a firearm competency certificate that has expired.

(2)(b) A total of eight police officers at the Edenvale Police Station currently have a firearm competency certificate that has not yet expired.

Reply to question 699 recommended


GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-16

 

Reply to question 699 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 22/09/2019

20 September 2019 - NW824

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) is the official purpose for the introduction of the Tourism Amendment Bill by her department, (b) number of registered tourism travel agencies exist in (i) the Republic and (ii) each province as at 1 September 2019 and (c) legislation governs and regulates the operation of tourism travel agencies in the Republic; (2) whether any unregistered tourism travel agencies have been reported to her department since 2014; if so, what (a) number of unregistered travel agencies and (b) steps did her department take to deal with each complaint?

Reply:

(1)(a) what is the official purpose for the introduction of the Tourism Amendment Bill?

To amend the Tourism Act, 2014, so as to provide for certain definitions; to provide for the determination of thresholds for short-term home sharing; to provide for the renaming of the South African Tourism Board as South African Tourism; to provide for additional competence requirements of tourists guides; to provide for the regulation of safety in relation to tourist guiding and the improvement of the tourist guiding experience; and to provide for matters connected herewith.

(b) Number of registered travel agencies that exist in

(i) Republic & (ii) Each Province

The Department does not register or keep records relating to tourism travel agencies either in the Republic or in Provinces.

(c) What legislation governs and regulate the operation of tourism travel agencies

Tourism Act, 2014, does provide for matters relating to tourism travel agencies. Section 28(1) of the Tourism Act, 2014, states that the Minister may develop a National Grading System for tourism with a view to maintaining or enhancing the standards and quality of tourism services (which includes tourism travel agencies), facilities and products. Again, tourists can, in terms of section 45(2)(b) of the Tourism Act, 2014 refer any complaint in respect of tourism services (which will include tourism services offered by travel agencies to the Tourism Complaints Officer for referral to relevant authorities for resolution.

2. Whether any unregistered travel agencies have been reported since 2014 ,If so

(a)What number of unregistered agencies?

The Department does not keep registration details of travel agencies.

(b) steps taken to deal with each complaint

Six complaints were received from tourists against travel agents. Each complaint was referred to the travel agent responsible for an amicable resolution. In cases where a complaint remained unresolved, the department referred it to a relevant regulator for further processing and resolution.

20 September 2019 - NW861

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) total number of residential properties are under her department’s custodianship in the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality, (b) total number of the specified properties are (i) vacant, (ii) occupied and (iii) earmarked for disposal and (c) are the details of the time frames for the disposal of the properties that are earmarked for disposal? NW1981E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

A0 The total number of residential properties under her department’s custodianship in the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality is 61.

b) (i) None.

(ii) Please refer to Annexure A on the Compact Disc for National Department of Public Works and

Infrastructure’s residential properties located in the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality.

(iii) None.

c) N/A.

ANNEXURE A: Utilised Properties in the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality

MUNICIPALITY

FACILITY GROUPING NAME

USER DEPARTMENT

STREET NAME

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

AGRICULTURE

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

R63 TOWARDS GRAAFF REINET

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

AGRICULTURE

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

R63 TOWARDS GRAAFF REINET

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

AGRICULTURE

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

R63 TOWARDS GRAAFF REINET

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

AGRICULTURE

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

R63 TOWARDS GRAAF FREINET

IKWEZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

KLIPPLAAT

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

BEAUFORT WEST RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

BEAUFORT WEST RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

13 OLIVIER DIPPENAAR

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

WATER AFFAIRS

OFF N9

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

WATER AFFAIRS

OFF N9

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

CNR GRAVE/NEW

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

WATER AFFAIRS

OFF N9

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

8 VAN DER STEL STREET

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

FERRAIRA STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PORTER

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

VICTORIA STREET

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

HOUSE

PUBLIC WORKS

R63 TURN LEFT INTO ADENDORP

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

COLLEGE

SA POLICE SERVICES

COLLEGE RD

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

FLAT

PUBLIC WORKS

R63 TOWARDS GRAAFF REINET

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

VICTORIA STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

VOORTREKKER

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

COLLEGE

SA POLICE SERVICES

COLLEGE RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

KINGWILL DR

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

2K

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

WATER AFFAIRS

OFF N9

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

13 OLIVIER DIPPENAAR

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

10 KINGWILL DR

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

V D STEL STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

6 KINGWILL DR

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

17 OLIVIER DIPPENAAR

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

AALWYNSTREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

3 MUNNIK STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

AALWYNSTREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

CNR GRAVE/NEW

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

6 AALWYN STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

1 AALWYN STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

144 CRADOCK

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

10 WES STRAAT

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

GLOBE

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

V D STEL STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

MUNNIK

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

GRAVE/NEW

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

PRISON

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

SAREL CILLIERS STR

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

COLLEGE

SA POLICE SERVICES

COLLEGE RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

PRISON

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

SAREL CILLIERS STR

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

WATER AFFAIRS

OFF N9

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

OP DIE OEWER

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

 

PUBLIC WORKS

CAMDEBOO VALLEY CONSERVANCY

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

COLLEGE

SA POLICE SERVICES

COLLEGE RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

AALWYNSTREET

IKWEZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

BOOMST

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

AALWYNSTREET

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

HOUSE

PUBLIC WORKS

R63 TURN LEFT INTO ADENDORP

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

HOUSE

COOP GOV & TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

BANTOM AGRICALTURAL COOPERATION

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

HOUSE

PUBLIC WORKS

R63 TURN LEFT INTO ADENDORP

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

SAPS RIETBRON

SA POLICE SERVICES

LOOP STREET

IKWEZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

BRIDGESTR

CAMDEBOO MUNICIPALITY

HOUSE

WATER AFFAIRS

DIXON STREET

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

COLLEGE

SA POLICE SERVICES

COLLEGE RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

COLLEGE

SA POLICE SERVICES

COLLEGE RD

CAMDEBOO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

RESIDENTIAL ACCOMODATION

SA POLICE SERVICES

VAN RIEBEECKSTREET

20 September 2019 - NW833

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he has been informed of the various reports stating that the National Treasury is seeking an initial budget allocation cut to his department of 5% for the 2020-21 financial year, followed by a 6% and 7% cut for the following two financial years; if so, (2) whether the financial cuts will affect the provision of essential services to South Africans by his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the financial cuts will result in (a) any jobs losses and/or (ii) the closure of any Home Affairs offices in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the requirement to present compulsory budget baseline reduction scenarios is set out in the MTEF Technical Guidelines 2020 issued by National Treasury in June 2019. In addition, the CFO presented the compulsory budget baseline reduction scenarios at the Departmental priority setting workshop held on 13 and 14 August 2019.

2. It is logical that when there are budget cuts, it will impact on the capacity to certain services.

(3)(a-b) Budget cuts will have a negative impact on the filling of some posts, but we are not envisioning closure of any Home Affairs office.

 

END

20 September 2019 - NW857

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Public Works to question 1757 on 3 September 2018, what amount is currently outstanding in unpaid rental fees for properties under her department’s custodianship that are leased in each province; (2) Whether her department finalised the acquisition and disposal framework in collaboration with the National Treasury; if not, by what date will the framework be finalised; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) which top 10 persons and/or entities renting property from her department regularly fail to pay rental fees on time; (4) what amount has her department incurred in legal fees for collecting debt from outstanding rental fees from persons and entities renting property from her department (a) in the (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)

 

REGION

AMOUNT

1. 

Bloemfontein

R838 059.70

2. 

Cape Town

R11 787 343.30

3.

Durban

R1 312 592.64

 

4.

Johannesburg

R9 094 541. 71

5.

Kimberly

R6 402 742.59

6.

Mmabatho

R3 950 754.93

7.

Mthatha

R420 743.45

8.

Nelspruit

R279 513.42

9.

Polokwane

R3 696 099.58

10.

Port Elizabeth

R1 531 900.62

11.

Pretoria

R37 531 674.41

TOTAL

 

R76 854 966.40

(2) Acquisition and disposal framework was developed according to Section 217 of the Constitution. National Treasury has appointed new officials in the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer and consequently there will have to be further engagements before finalization. The Department’s Real Estate Management branch regularly convenes engagements with provinces to discuss various matters in the leasing and letting environment. The next meeting will take place in September and will be hosted by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Infrastructure Development.

(3)

 

INSTITUTION

AMOUNT

 

Telkom SA

R8 077 478.62

 

Lucky Star

R411 626.38

 

Eastgate Airport

R116 147.20

 

Houtbay Boat Yard

R369 221.18

 

Fisha Wellness

R107 616.10

 

Troyan Foods

R484 455.01

 

Abagold

R75 109.84

 

Afrima Import Export (PTY) Ltd

R354 488.00

 

Sea Freeze fishereries (PTY) Ltd

R499 082.13

 

Inter Travel Shops (PTY) Ltd

R1 712 109.00

 

TOTAL

R4 129 854.90

 

(4)

2017/18

2018/19

April 2019

R25 600.00

0

R22 500.00

TOTAL = R48 100.00

   

20 September 2019 - NW924

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What amount has the African Renaissance Fund (ARF) loaned to Cuba to date, (b) on what terms, including interest and duration, was the loan made, (c) what amount of the loan (i) has been repaid and (ii) is still outstanding in terms of ( aa) money still to be loaned to Cuba and (bb) monies still repaid by Cuba and (d) does the ARF allow for loan initiatives to be made to countries outside the African continent?

Reply:

a) The loan amount was R 63 628 818.

b) The interest was charged at 3% daily compounded monthly, the repayment duration and term was 1 year. following the expiry of the availability period for tranch A in four equal quarterly payments.

c) A loan has been repaid in full with interest R 64 994 855.03

  1. R 64 994 855.03
  2. Nothing is outstanding

(aa) A concurrence has been issued for a total amount of R140 million

(bb) Nothing, as the loan has been repaid with interest

(d) Yes.

20 September 2019 - NW856

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to her department’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Public Works and Infrastructure on 21 August 2019, what are the details of the (a) total amount budgeted for the establishment of the Public Works Academy and (b)(i) remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) qualification required and (iv) job description of each employee to be appointed in the academy; (2) whether the academy will partner with any academic institutions other than the University of the Witwatersrand to offer training programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the details of how the training will be utilised to capacitate the Property Management and Trading Entity to fulfil its mandate?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. Since the presentation by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) on the establishment of the Public Works Academy to the Portfolio Committee on Public Works and Infrastructure on the 21st August 2019, there was another session within the Department wherein officials made a presentation to the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure. After the officials had made a presentation to the Minister about the Academy, and having taken into consideration the financial implications to establish such an Academy, and also in light of the cost-cutting measures that are being applied in the DPWI and in the Public Service as a whole, it was found as prudent to discontinue with the plan. However, the Skills Development (Technical Capacity Building) Programme, which the DPWI is busy with, will not be negatively impacted upon as there will be more focus and dedicated energy towards its roll-out. The DPWI has a dedicated Professional Services Branch to drive this work.

(a) and (b) (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) Fall away.

2. The State Technical Capacity Building Programme will partner with other Public Sector Academies, including the National School of Government and Higher Education Institutions for immediate access to Learning Programmes (contact and online) to enhance the Programme outcomes. Below link, please find a diagram depicting other partnerships to be entered into.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW856State.pdf

Acronyms:

 

ECSA: Engineering Council of South Africa

SACAP: South African Council of Architectural Profession

SACLAP: South African Council of Landscape Architectural Profession

SACPCMP: South African Council for Project Construction Management Profession

SACQSP: South African Council of the Quantity Surveying Profession

SACPVP: South African Council for the Property Valuation Profession

SACPLAN: South African Council for Planners

SAGC: South African Geotechnical Council

IREM: Institute for Real Estate Management

SAFMA: South African Facilities Management Association

QCTO: Quality Council for Trade Occupations

NSG: National School of Government

FSTDI: Free State Training and Development Institute

MSTA: Maths, Science, and Technology Academy

SAPOA: South African Property Owners Association

GBSA: Green Building South Africa

VAs: Voluntary Associations

TVETs: Technical Vocational Education and Training (Colleges)

3. Capacitation of the Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE) is of paramount importance to the Capacity Building Programme, and will implement its Asset Management programmes, guided by ISO standards on Asset Management. These standards clearly articulate the role of employees in the Asset Management value chain and the competencies they need to possess. To further bolster the State’s capacity in Infrastructure Delivery (supported by the Young Professionals and Candidacy Programmes aligned to the Built Environment Professional Councils, Maintenance (Facilities Management supported by Artisans and Apprentices) and Management (Asset Management ISO Standards), the aim of the Programme will be to address lack of competencies throughout the value chain of Infrastructure. Below is a summary of targeted employees and Asset Management training intervention areas.

Training Group

Training Areas of focus

Executive Senior Management

Legislative Drivers, Meaning of Asset Management (AM) planning, expectation outcomes from AM planning, Organisation’s AM strength and weaknesses, How does the organisation compare nationally & Internationally

   

Asset Managers, Asset Planners, Capital Works Delivery

Legislative Drivers, Key AM concepts, Asset management activities throughout the asset lifecycle: Level of service/ performance management, Demand forecasting and management, Operations and maintenance planning, Land rehabilitation planning

Note: Organisation’s AM practices and how they compare with other, case studies of good practice AM, Workshop/discussion – how could we be doing AM better

   

Upskilling Group (those that have already attended a lot of formal AM training)

Refresher on AM concepts and practices, Examples of good practice, organisation’s AM strengths and weaknesses, Comparison of national and international organisations

Note: Workshop/discussion – critical AM issues in the organisation and how do we address these

   

Operations team (Technical & Non- Technical )

Legislative Drivers, Key AM concepts, Asset management activities throughout the asset lifecycle, How operations fits in with the overall AM picture, Examples/case studies of good practice AM,

Note Workshop/discussion – how could we be doing operational AM better

   

Customer Services (e.g. Call Centre, Service Desks)

Legislative Drivers, Key AM concepts, Asset management activities throughout the asset lifecycle, how the customer/call centre role fits with the overall AM picture

   

Information Systems/Data Entry Staff

Legislative Drivers, Key AM concepts, What data and functionality is required to support good AM

20 September 2019 - NW811

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the highlights from the Lekgotla of her department held from 21-23 January 2019, what are the detailed outcomes of (a) a competence-based curriculum to enhance entrepreneurship, (b) the assessment implications for the Fourth Industrial Revolution and (c) the provision of learning and teaching support material?

Reply:

a) The outcomes of a competence-based curriculum to enhance entrepreneurship include problem-solving, creative thinking, critical thinking and collaboration all of which are inculcated through the Project Based Learning approach.

b) Assessment in subjects focusing on the 4IR, such as Digital Skills (including coding and robotics) to be project-based (include Practical Assessment Tasks) where learners demonstrate their skills and competencies and which will also foster ‘soft’ skills required for functioning in a changing world.

c) The Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSM) will be developed following the finalisation of the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for these subjects.

20 September 2019 - NW854

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the incorporation of Early Childhood Development (ECD) into her department, any costing was done in terms of the (a) number of teachers who will be required and (b) qualification(s) they will need; if not, why not; if so, has the qualification programme already been developed and provided at various universities; (2) whether the title of practitioner will change to educator; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the salaries of the ECD teachers and/or practitioners will be raised to the level of educators instead of receiving stipends; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The funding available currently is for Grade R only. This will be revised in the new financial year to accommodate for the new functions that have been transferred to the DBE.

(b) REQV 13 is the minimum qualification as determined in the Employment of Educators ‘Act and the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM). The Minister of Higher Education and Training gazetted the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Programmes Leading to Qualifications in Higher Education for Early Childhood Development Educators in 2017. This Policy puts in place a set of qualifications for ECD practitioners who are delivering or assisting in delivering ECD programmes.

2. To be employed as an educator, one has to have an REQV 13 as a minimum qualification as determined in the Employment of Educators ‘Act and the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM). This translates to Matric plus three years of formal training for a teaching degree. In relation to compulsory Grade R, qualified Grade R practitioners will be appointed as educators in terms of the Employment of Educators Act and will be subject to the conditions of service as they apply to all other school-based educators. In relation to ages 0-4 years, the Department is still gathering information about these practitioners, including identifying a need for a full audit on the qualifications and skills set of the practitioners. The audit will inform the decisions that need to be taken in relation to career options for practitioners. This will also clarify what job titles should exist in ECD centres, the qualification framework required and the salary scales as well as the conditions of service that will exist for Early Childhood Practitioners.

3. Salary scales of educators are determined in terms of the requirements of the Employment of Educators’ Act and the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM). It will therefore not be automatic that the salaries of ECD practitioners will be equal to educators, if they do not meet the minimum requirements for appointment as educators. However, any qualified Grade R practitioners will be subject to the conditions of service applicable to other school-based educators.