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04 June 2021 - NW1055

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will provide a full report on each vaccine with regard to ethnicity efficiencies studied; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1213

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether (a) the President, (b) the Deputy President, (c) any of the Cabinet Ministers, (d) any of the Deputy Ministers and/or their (e) spouses, (f) partners and (g) children have been vaccinated against COVID-19; if so, (i) on what dates in each case and (ii) where did the vaccinations take place in each case?

Reply:

Leaders including politicians who are eligible to be vaccinated based on the prevailing eligibility criteria have been encouraged to vaccinate in order to publicise the vaccine roll-out, and to build confidence in the programme amongst vaccine-hesitant citizens.

President Cyril Ramaphosa and Minister of Health, were vaccinated in public on 17th February 2021 at the Khayelitsha District Hospital in the Western Cape at the start of the Sisonke Early Access programme.

However, vaccination status of individuals remains confidential, and the National Department of Health is therefore not in a position to divulge the vaccination status of the other persons identified in the above question.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW416

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What (a) are the arrears amounts owing to her department in respect of the Excelsior Court in Durban, (b) amount is owed to the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in outstanding rates and services and (c) are the time frames for finalisation of payment of any outstanding monies; (2) whether there are any client departments that would benefit from this property; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. I have been informed by the Department that:

(a) It has been confirmed that there are no outstanding amounts.

(b) It has been confirmed that there are no outstanding amounts.

(c) N/A

2. The facility is currently allocated to the South African Police Services (SAPS) for purposes of residential accommodation. The SAPS wishes to hand back the facility to DPWI upon vacation of all their members. The SAPS is currently engaging in this process.

Subsequently, DPWI will allocate the facility to the Department of Defense (DoD) which has a need for residential accommodation for the SANDF. The SANDF Regional Facilities Interface Management (RFIM) office in Durban has verbally expressed their interest in the property and conducted a site visit in early 2020. They thereafter indicated that they will be engaging with their Headquarters to formally express their interest to DPWI and secure funding for renovations to the facility.

04 June 2021 - NW1215

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) are the qualifications of a certain person (name furnished), (b) subject does the person lecture at the University of Pretoria and (c) was the person paid to develop the Analytical Methods for testing in the Forensic Laboratory Services; (2) whether the specified person is recognised as a Forensic Specialist in other laboratories; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the number of court cases in which the person presented evidence as a Forensic Specialist on behalf of the Forensic Laboratory Services?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the University of Pretoria, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the University of Pretoria.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW220

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, with reference to the property owned by her department situated on the corner of Jubilee and Andries Pretorius Streets in Somerset West, which is currently vacant, damaged by fire and vandalised and is now boarded up as a result, her department has assessed the (a) extent of the damage to the building and (b) costs associated with repair and refurbishment; if not, (i) will her department consider alienating the property, (ii) what would the time frames be for such alienation and (iii) will her department consider donating the building to a non-profit organisation and/or non-government organisation for use as a shelter or other public benefit; if so, (aa) what are the costs, (bb) what are the details of the plan for the refurbishment, (cc) what are the associated time frames and (dd) what plans are in place for the building?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) I am informed by the Department that it is in the process of assessing the extent of the damage to the building. On 17 February 2021 the Department initiated the process to undertake an Investment Analysis in order to ascertain the future utilization of the property as well as a Structural Report which will provide a full assessment of the damages.

(b) The cost for the repair and refurbishment of the dwelling will be established once the aforesaid reports have been finalised.

(i) The future of the property will be based on the outcome of the Investment Analysis.

ii) The Investment Analysis will be finalised by the end of June 2021. This will provide an investment solution for the property.

iii) Although the outcome of the Investment Analysis will provide a final way forward, the option of donating the building to a non-profit organisation and/or non-government organisation for use as a shelter or other public benefit could be a possibility.

aa) The costs are not yet known.

bb) The outcome of the Investment Analysis will provide a way forward.

cc) Timeframes can only be provided once a decision on the future of the property has been made.

dd) The future plans of the property will be based on the outcome of the Investment Analysis.

04 June 2021 - NW1243

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What financial strategies has his department adopted to sustain employment and support productivity between now and the end of the year and (b) how does he intend to ensure that companies do not shed employees once the Republic has emerged out of COVID-19?

Reply:

(a) The Department is working on a single source funding model for Productivity SA in line with the provisions of section 12 of the Employment Services, where funding will flow from the appropriation as well as the UIF in terms of section 5 (d) of the UI Amendment Act.

(b) The Department has made provision for (i) the Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) which is the outcome of the Presidential Jobs Summit Framework Agreement to assist companies facing economic distress (financial and operational difficulties) and contemplating retrenching workers. A Joint Adjudication Committee is established, and the CCMA, UIF and Productivity SA collaborate to assist the companies as provided for in the LRA and section 7 of the Employment Services Act.

Further interventions are through Productivity SA whereby the entity implement turn-around strategies and plans to restructure and improve the productivity and operational efficiency of companies facing distress to be sustainable, competitive and create conditions conducive for job retention and creation. Funds have been made available in this regard and for the 2020/21 financial year over R104m was allocated to Productivity SA.

04 June 2021 - NW1092

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, in light of the Department of Labour issuing a notice with regard to the amendments that had to be made to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993, at the Forensic Laboratories at 271 Visagie Street, Pretoria, in October 2018, the amendments have been made; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date did the amendments begin according to the notification; (2) what are the reasons that (a) the amendments have not been completed and (b) it has taken three years to act on the notification which advised that such improvements had to be made in 60 days; (3) on what date will the amendments in terms of the notification be completed?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour issued an improvement and contravention notice to the Forensic Chemistry Laboratory at 271 Visagie Street, Pretoria on 8 October 2018. The laboratory began immediately with the compliance requirement in the improvement notice under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993. Copies of all relevant Acts and Regulations have been made available at the laboratory. Posters are also visible on the walls of the corridors of the laboratory. All DB boards in the laboratory have warning signs attached to them. This was done by the laboratory in October 2018.

2. The risk assessments and medical surveillance program of employees were part of a tender awarded to a service provider in 2019 to cover the National Department of Health and its decentralised units including the Forensic Chemistry Laboratories. The service provider was due to start the risk assessments and medical surveillance of employees in March 2020. Owing to the Covid-19 pandemic response the service provider undertook risk assessments related to Covid-19 only and not general health and safety assessments. In addition, many employees were not at work or undergoing rotational shifts in line with DPSA guidelines and thus the medical surveillance programme was placed on hold. It is envisaged that the risk assessments will be conducted in the third quarter of the 2021/22 financial year. Medical surveillance will be undertaken in the fourth quarter of the 2021/22 financial year after the risk assessments in order to link risk assessments to medical surveillance of individual employees.

Afrox was not able to assist the laboratory with the Certificate of Compliance for gases. The laboratory is following up with Afrox to take responsibility and provide a Certificate of Compliance.

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure was contacted on the 23 October 2018 and to date despite follow up by the laboratory manager on multiple occasions has not responded on the contravention notice covering infrastructure, electrical and mechanical requirements under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993.

3. The laboratory does not have any details or specific dates on when to expect the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to attend to the request. The Director-General will write to the Director-General of Public Works and Infrastructure later this month requesting feedback and intervention.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1123

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(a) With reference to his reply to question 139 on 1 March 2021, who was awarded the tender out of the 19 bidders and (b) will he furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a copy of the (i) inception report, (ii) literature review and stakeholder mapping, (iii) data collection, (iv) desktop research stakeholder engagement and interviews and (v) draft report? [

Reply:

I have submitted the question to the National Lotteries Commission for a reply.

In a letter dated 14 May 2021, NLC Commissioner, Ms T Mampane advised me that “The report is a confidential disclosure to Parliament in terms of Regulation 8 of the Lotteries Act, No. 57 of 1997, as amended. This document is intended for the internal use of NLC only and may not be distributed externally or reproduced for external distribution in any form without express written permission of the NLC and the service provider”.

The Department will be securing advice on the approach of the NLC on the Parliamentary Question.

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW398

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the R22 million blanket saga in KwaZulu-Natal that was exposed by a forensic investigation (details furnished), what (a) charges and/or any other punitive action has been brought against her department’s officials who have been implicated and (b) measures has she put in place to curb corruption within her department at national and provincial level?

Reply:

(a) The reports recommended disciplinary action against all implicated Officials. Out of (12) twelve implicated Officials, 9 (nine) are on suspension with pay. (1) One Official resigned, one passed on.

Out of (9) nine implicated officials (1) one official could not be charged due to lack of evidence.

Eight (8) implicated officials were served with charges and appeared before the Presiding Officer. One case has been finalised, seven cases are under subjudicare.

(b) 1) The Department has and maintains an approved Policy on management of fraud, corruption and theft, which seeks to:

a) Establish the zero-tolerance stance of the Department against fraud, corruption and theft;

2) In addition to this policy, the Department maintains the Whistle-blowing policy which further seeks to:

a) Encourage and enable employees to disclose information relating to suspected or alleged criminal or other irregular conduct within the Department.

b) Provide avenues for employees to disclose information relating to suspected criminal activities and receive feedback on any action taken; and

c) Re-assure staff that they will be protected from reprisals or victimisation for whistle blowing in good faith.

3) The Department also maintains the Fraud Prevention Plan which outlines the three strategies which are:

a) Prevention;

b) Detection; and

c) Investigate.

4) Allegations that needs to be investigated are reported to Provincial Anti-corruption hotline and directly to the Department.

5) The Department constantly conduct anti-fraud and anti- corruption awareness campaigns to its employees and stakeholders such as funded NPOs

6) Where there is manifestation of allegations of fraudulent and corrupt activities within the Department and to funded NPOs, the Department sanction investigations to probe those allegations and fully implement recommendation of investigation.

7) Lastly the Department also conducts fraud risk assessment with the aim of identifying new fraud risk areas.

04 June 2021 - NW1137

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the (a) extent of the commonage land in Gauteng and (b) current usage of the commonage land; (2) whether the commonage land has water rights to allow farming to take place; if not, what steps will her department take to ensure that there are water rights; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there are farming activities taking place on the commonage land; if not, why not; if so, what farming activities are taking place on the pieces of land; (4) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with the relevant information regarding (a) land that has been invaded and (b) the action(s) that were taken regarding the situation; if not, why not; if so, by what date? NW1324E

Reply:

The issues relating to the commonage land and farming activities are managed and administered by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. The Honourable member is advised to direct this question to the said department.

04 June 2021 - NW1054

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What are the relevant details of (a) how the Government’s procurement of COVID-19 vaccines is funded and (b) the detailed breakdown of the funding provided by (i) the Government, (ii) medical aids and (iii) any other person and/or entity?

Reply:

a) Government procurement of vaccines is supported by the allocation of funds from National Treasury to the National Department of Health as earmarked funds.

b) (i) As sole procurer of vaccines from manufacturers, all the vaccines are purchased by the National Department of Health

(ii)-(iii) The vaccines are supplied to vaccination sites in the private and public sector who administer vaccines. Private sector sites buy the vaccine from the NDOH and will claim from medical schemes for the vaccine and administration of vaccines to the insured patients. For uninsured patients, the vaccination sites will claim from the Department

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1173

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she will furnish Mr S Ngcobo with a list indicating (a) the total number of non-governmental organisations (NGO) that (i) are registered in the disability sector and (ii) are funded by her department in each province and (b) the total amount of funding allocated for each specified NGO; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) (i) The total number of non-governmental organisations (NGO) that are registered in the disability sector is 3 765; as below:

Province

Count of NPOs by Province

Eastern Cape

337

Free State

226

Gauteng

975

Kwa-Zulu Natal

605

Limpopo

526

Mpumalanga

375

North West

230

Northern Cape

107

Western Cape

384

Grand Total

  1. 765
  1.  

(ii) the number of NGOs funded by the department in each province as follows:

Province

Number of NPOs funded by the Province

Eastern Cape

86

Free State

97

Gauteng

111

Kwa-Zulu Natal

180

Limpopo

87

Mpumalanga

141

North West

47

Northern Cape

27

Western Cape

154

Grand Total

930

(b) the total amount of funding allocated for each specified NGO, detailed as per attached Annexures:

Annexure A - Eastern Cape

Annexure B - Free State

Annexure C - Gauteng

Annexure D - Kwa Zulu Natal

Annexure E - Limpopo

Annexure F - Mpumalanga

Annexure G - Northern Cape

Annexure H - North West

Annexure I - Western Cape

 

04 June 2021 - NW1228

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has been furnished with any reason that travel restrictions are not necessary to be imposed on persons who have travelled to India, in order to prevent the spread of the specific coronavirus variant, such as the B.1.617, from the specified country; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. There were no reasons furnished to the minister that travel restrictions are not necessary to be imposed on persons who have travelled to India, in order to prevent the spread of the specific coronavirus variant, such as the B.1.617. This is because there are no direct flights from India to South Africa.

The Department of Health has made general recommendations on the additional travel control measures that should be applied to travellers from all “Countries of Concern” and not necessarily from India only, which is part of these countries. The proposed intervention is for travellers who have travelled from or transited through any “Country of Concern” within 14 days of arriving in South Africa to be subjected to antigen testing at the point of entry on arrival.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1230

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, taking into account the slow pace of COVID-19 vaccination, he has revised his vaccination targets for the nation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the new dates by which he intends to have vaccinated enough persons to protect the nation against the spread of the virus?

Reply:

The targets for the vaccine roll-out as follows:

Phase

Time period

Number of vaccinations

1

February – May 2021

1.2 million

2

May – October 2021

16.6 million

3

November 2021 – February 2022

22.6 million

The targets remain as previously announced. The targets are linked to the vaccine supply pipeline, and may need to be revised if vaccine manufacturers do not supply vaccines according to the agreed timelines.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1083

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the reasons that 72 interns with 20 years of laboratory experience were (a) put on a forensic toxicology training programme under a certain person (name furnished) in Pretoria with a certain person (name also furnished) for a year in 2012 and (b) accommodated in a hotel for a year despite many of them coming from Pretoria; (2) (a) what number of days in a week did the interns attend lectures at the hotel and (b) at what time did the lectures take place; (3) what (a) is the name of the hotel where the interns were accommodated and (b) was the total cost of the accommodation for the interns, including meals, refreshments, phones and other relevant details; (4) where were the interns placed after they completed the training presented by the specified person?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the University of Pretoria, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the University of Pretoria.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1084

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) With which sector education and training authority was the training registered that was conducted by a certain person (name furnished) for the Forensic Pathology Services under a certain person (name furnished), with regard to a year-long Forensic Toxicology Training programme of 72 interns in 2012, (b) on what date was it registered, (c) did the specified training have a National Qualifications Framework level qualification and (d) what was the (i) period over which remuneration was paid and (ii) remuneration that was paid to the specified person; (2) what (a) was the number of years during which a certain person served as the mentor of a certain person at the University of Pretoria, (b) other contracts have been entered into by the Forensic Laboratory with the specified person and (c) was the total cost of each contract?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the University of Pretoria, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the University of Pretoria.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1027

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the (a) race and (b) gender demographic of the persons who have been vaccinated as part of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine trial to date?

Reply:

a) Race is not a data element recorded nor collected as part of the vaccination record for vaccinees.

b) Total number of Vaccinations as at 9 May 2021 at 15h30 total 382 568.

  • Number of Male Vaccinees = 93 220 which represents 24.4 % of the total number of Vaccinees
  • Number of Female Vaccinees = 382568 which represents 75.4 % of the total number of Vaccinees

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1245

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether his department has taken any formal steps to secure international co-operation on access to patents and technology for the Republic on the production of COVID-19 vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details, (b) inroads have been made and (c) are the challenges?

Reply:

Yes, the Department has taken formal steps to secure international cooperation on access to patents and technology for the Republic on the production of Covid-19 vaccines. In October 2020 South Africa and India tabled a proposal at the WTO calling for a temporary waiver of intellectual property rights of certain provisions of the TRIPS Agreement. Work has been done with both DIRCO and with the Department of Science and Innovation. President Ramaphosa has engaged with Heads of State to take forward the proposal for the Waiver.

Equitable vaccine rollout across the world is urgent, necessary and in the interest of people across the world. Reportedly about 75% of the vaccines administered were done in just 10 countries and many countries have not yet received a single dose.

On Wednesday, 14 April 2021, on behalf of the SA Government, I addressed the World Trade Organisation (WTO) on the importance of vaccine equity in the face of the most severe health and economic crisis of our generation. The discussion, which included the trade ministers of India, the European Union and United States, as well the heads of the WTO (Dr Okonjo-Iweala) and World Health Organisation (Dr Adhanom) provided a platform for South Africa to lay out its argument for temporary waiver of key areas of the WTO agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS).

We pointed out that the world faces a dramatic supply-constraint. At current levels of vaccine production, it may take the world a number of years to bring the virus under control. The gap in availability of supplies will give time for the virus to spread, and to mutate into more deadly or contagious strains. Vaccine nationalism, the race to purchase vaccines by those who can afford them and vaccine hoarding are not a solution to the global supply-constraint. They are pernicious examples of beggar-thy-neighbour policies.

We made the case for stepping up production on-scale. This means using all available capacity and repurposing capacity where this can be done safely and by adhering to necessary standards.

The constraints to scaling up production include technical challenges, inadequate investment to repurpose existing production facilities and the current intellectual property rights regime.

In this context, we called for a ‘Covid New Deal’ to significantly and rapidly increase supply of vaccines and related medical goods and promote more equitable access to such essential goods.

Until the pandemic is brought under control, support for the Waiver will continue to grow.

Voluntary arrangements as provided for in the WTO’s TRIPS Agreement in many cases are simply contract production on a ‘fill and finish’ basis that do not address backward integration and distribution rights; whilst compulsory licensing procedures are onerous and cumbersome.

Negotiations with suppliers are hampered by information and bargaining asymmetries that can result in inequitable outcomes and untenable conditions attached to their procurement.

TRIPS flexibilities were simply not designed to meet the scale of the challenge we now confront.

Based on this, we proposed that the Covid package or New Deal be pursued on parallel and mutually reinforcing tracks, done pragmatically and covering five areas.

First, to scale-up production, in partnership with pharmaceutical companies, that can cover investment and funding to enhance supply capacity in different and additional parts of the world. This necessitates effective transfer of technology, sharing of know-how, backward integration of the raw materials and distribution rights. It must unlock productive capacity not just fill and finish.

Second, a timebound and targeted TRIPS waiver covering only essential diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics and supplies.

Third, protocols covering transparency of contracts and price stability undertakings.

Fourth, commitment to avoid resort to vaccine nationalism; and

Finally, a TRIPS provision dealing specifically with future pandemics, that provides automatic rights of use and obviates the need for special arrangements and waivers.

Considerable progress has been made to put together a broad coalition of countries in support of the Waiver proposal. Sixty-three WTO Members have co-sponsored the Waiver Proposal and another 50 have indicated their support. There is support across the developing world, and from members of the US Congress, among EU Parliamentarians and from civil society globally. The United States and New Zealand became the first developed countries to support the Waiver. However, not all European countries have as yet supported the proposal for the Waiver put forward by South Africa and India. However, it does seem that all countries are in agreement that the status quo is inadequate and that the WTO will need to find a solution to enable rapid scaling-up of production of vaccines. Discussions are now continuing and South Africa and India together with the other co-sponsors, are engaging more countries to build further support for the proposal for a Waiver.

We have a responsibility imposed by circumstances; and need to build a common approach to act with boldness to save lives.

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1248

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has a strategy in place to ensure self-reliance of the supply of the COVID-19 vaccine in future; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for increased vaccine security and therefore, self-reliance. However, the development of local vaccine manufacturing is a complex process that has high risk associated with it. To ensure the quality and consistency of vaccine manufacturing, hundreds of process steps need to be followed and there are thousands of check points for testing. The transfer of intellectual property rights as well knowledge transfer on vaccine manufacturing should be coupled with massive investment in manufacturing capacity. Currently there is an unprecedented level of support across African governments, African and Global Public Health (GPH) institutions, and the private sector, which is driven by the need for increased vaccine security and self-reliance highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

As part of the African Union we have embarked upon a project to understand the strengths to leverage and challenges that could be faced develop a framework on vaccine manufacturing on the continent including opportunities for collaboration with a range of public and private sector stakeholders. This work is ongoing and is aimed at future pandemic preparedness.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1028

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What role will (a) medical schemes and (b) private hospitals play in the roll-out of COVID-19 vaccinations in the Republic?

Reply:

a) South Africa’s national COVID-19 vaccination strategy is designed along the principles of equitable access, social solidarity and fair pricing. Our main priority as government is to ensure that we have the most rational approach to procuring, distributing and administering the vaccine to all members of the national population, irrespective of whether they have medical scheme cover or not.

Medical schemes, as per the provisions of the Medical Schemes Act and its enabling regulations, are mandated to fund for all their members’ costs associated with the diagnosis, treatment, management and vaccination for COVID-19. These costs are to be paid for in full as per the categorization of COVID-19 as a Prescribed Minimum Benefit. Government has also put into place a mechanism to support medical schemes, and their administrators, in establishing accredited COVID-19 vaccination sites across the country. This is intended to expand the number of sites that medical scheme members and non-members can access in order for them to receive their vaccination as per their registration and scheduling on the Electronic Vaccination Data System (EVDS).

b) Government position is that the effective, fair and sustainable achievement of the targets outlined in the vaccination plan requires a collaborative effort involving a number of partners. Private hospitals, including general practitioner as well as community and corporate pharmacies, are playing a role in the roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccination strategy. The National Department of Health, in liaison with the South African Pharmacy Council, has determined clear criteria that all facilities must comply with (such as having the appropriate cold change facilities and trained personnel to administer the vaccines) in order to receive accreditation as a vaccination site. Therefore, private hospitals would also need to comply with these requirements to be able to participate in the roll-out. Private hospitals and private pharmacies are already participating in the vaccines roll-out program.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1131

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) has been the breakdown of the costs of corruption within his department in the past five financial years, (b) number of tenders have been cancelled as a result of irregularities and/or corruption in each province in the past five years, (c) is the total amount of irregular expenditure in each province in the past five years, (d) is the percentage of tenders that have been put on the e-Tender portal in each province in the past five years, (e) is the percentage of tenders that have been uploaded on e-portal sites in each province and (f) is the (i) national and (ii) provincial percentage of tender processes that are paper based?

Reply:

According to the information provided by the Provincial Health Departments the reply is as follows:

EASTERN CAPE

a) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

PERIOD

CATEGORY

TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES

CASES ABOVE R100,0000

 

FRAUD

CORRUPTION

   

2017/2018

7

11

18

2

2018/2019

7

13

20

2

2019/2020

2

8

10

-

2020/2021

2

3

5

-

TOTAL

18

35

53

4

b) No tenders have been cancelled as a result of irregularities or corruption.

c) The bulk of irregular expenditure as per the table below comprises of extension of contracts above the 15% NT threshold. The 2020/21 figure not yet final.

d) All bids above R500k are advertised on the e-Tender portal other than deviations due to sole source or emergency procurement.

e) All bids above R500k are advertised on the e-Tender portal other than deviations due to sole source or emergency procurement.

f) (ii) The Eastern Cape Department of Health is currently using manual systems which are paper based. The plans to digitise procurement processes have been included on the departmental strategic plan and processes are underway to engage SITA for assistance.

FREE STATE

a) Free State Psychiatric Complex – Fraudulent payment to various transactions to suppliers at FSPC. Double payment were made to various suppliers on same order numbers by means of LOGIS and Sundry Payments (BAS System). Cost involved R7,821,587.62.

b) None, tenders were not cancelled due to irregularities or allegations of corruptions.

c) The total amount registered for Free State Department of Health is: R1,605,678,521.22.

d) 100% all tenders were published on e-Tender portal.

e) 100% tenders were uploaded on e-Tender portal and published on the Provincial Tender Bulleting.

f) (ii) 80% processes are paper based.

GAUTENG

a) 

Year

No of Cases of Corruption

Costs

2020-21

None

R0

2019-20

6

R12 600 944.78

2018-19

1

R2 773 209.60

2017-18

7

R2 875 716.49

2016-17

1

R987 032.00

b) There are two tender that have been cancelled, are as follows;

  • GT/GDH/118/119/120/121/2016) Supply of Physical Security Services
  • (GT/GDH/123/2013)-ICT Infrastructure Refresh – the provision of V-Blocks to Head Office, Zola, New, Natalspruit, Steve Biko and Charlotte Maxeke Hospitals.

Year

Amount

2017

2 050 841 000

2018

1 703 205 000

2019

2 862 156 000

2020

2 318 994 000

2021

3 549 745 000

TOTAL

12 484 941 000

d) 100%- Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin.

e) 100% Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin.

f) (ii) All tenders are advertised through National Tender Bulletin and can be downloaded from respective provincial e-tender portal by prospective bidders.

KWAZULU-NATAL

FY 2016/2017 R 16 918 744,00

FY 2017/2018 R 8 505 932,68

FY 2018/2019 R 118 169 545,62

FY 2019/2020 R 474 767,75

FY 2020/2021 R 110 000,00

b) No tenders have been cancelled in the province in the past 5 years due to irregularities and/or corruption in KZN.

c) 

 

‘000

‘000

‘000

ROOO

ROOO

Period

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Totals

R1,257,484

R1,325,084

R1,464,342

R1,541,732

R1,433,975

d) 100%. All tenders in the province have been advertised on the e-Tender portal.

e) 100%

f) (ii) 100%

LIMPOPO

a) None.

b) None.

c) No irregular expenditure as a result of corruption within the department.

f) 100% of tenders were put on the e-Tender portal in the past five years.

e) 100% of tenders were uploaded on e-Tender portal site of the department.

f) (ii) 100% of tender process are paper based in the department

MPUMALANGA

a) The Department does not have known cases of corruption reported

b) The Department has cancelled contracts for appointed service provider for supply of perishable and non-perishable food due to non-compliance with UIF

c) 

Financial year

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/2020

Amount

1 552 623 000

309 920 000

138 899 000

122 157 000

d) Not applicable – Provincial Treasury competency

e) Not applicable – Provincial Treasury competency

f) (ii) Not applicable

NORTHERN CAPE

a) No cost of corruption incurred in the past five financial years

b) No contract was cancelled as a result of irregularities and/or corruption in the past five years.

c) 

2016/17: R574,183,000

2018/19: R714,939,000

2019/20: R497,829,000

2020/21: R492,748,000 (Preliminary)

Total: R2,692,078,000

d) 

2016/17: No tenders issued

2017/18: 60% (3 out of 5)

2018/19: 0%

2019/20: 0%

2020/21: 0%

e) No tenders were ever uploaded on the e-Portal site.

f) (ii)

2016/17: No tenders issued

2017/18: 40% (2 out of 5)

2018/19: 100%

2019/20: 100%

2020/21: 100%

NORTH WEST

a) No cost of corruption incurred in the past five financial years

b) NWDOH 40/2021, Supply of Physical Security Services

c) 

Year

Amount

2016/2017

721 445 000

2017/2018

809 267 000

2019

1 333 654 000

2020

1 189 467 000

2021

682 000 000

TOTAL

4 735 833 000

d) Irregular expenditure for the past 5 years = R4 728 202 000.

e) 100%- Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin

f) 100%- Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin

g) (ii) All tenders are advertised through National Tender Bulletin and can be downloaded from respective provincial e-tender portal by prospective bidders

WESTERN CAPE

a) None.

b) None based.

c) 

(R’000)

2020/21:               2,452 (unaudited)

2019/20:               6,472

2018/19:             13,260

2017/18:             23,553

2016/17:             11,459

2015/16:               7,284

d) Indeterminable. E-portal is a NT app and has been off-line for a few months. NT unable to provide date as to when it will become available.

e) Indeterminable. E-portal is a NT app and has been off-line for a few months. NT unable to provide date as to when it will become available.

f) (ii) BSC, BEC, BAC processes were paper based up to March 2020. Since March 2020, documents had to be worked on electronically, meetings had to be held electronically and declarations of interest and confidentiality of meetings had to be declared at each virtual meeting.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1030

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) has he found caused the fire at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, (b) were the reasons that the response to the fire was so slow, which led to so much damage to the specified hospital and (c) steps has his department taken since the fire, in order to ensure that services are still provided to persons who depended on the hospital?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the Provincial Department of Health.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1033

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In view of the Western Cape that has implemented an online booking system for disability grant medical assessments, what provisions have been made by her department for persons who do not have access to devices to make online bookings?

Reply:

The online booking system for disability grant medical assessments is being piloted in the Western Cape, but will be rolled out to all provinces for use by all applicants for disability-related grants.

However, this does not replace the face-to-face service which is offered to SASSA clients at local offices. For those persons who do not have access to devices to make online bookings, the option remains for them to report to the SASSA local office. There the staff will use the same system to book their medical assessments. This should speed up the service provided, as bookings can be made for people while they are still in the queue, thus reducing the need for everyone to only be served inside the office.

SASSA still retains a total number of 389 local offices throughout the country. All are staffed with staff who can attend to the citizens.

04 June 2021 - NW1183

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

Whether postponing the elections forms part of the contingency plans that the Government has in place, given the uncertainty about the trajectory of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details of the plans?

Reply:

The preparations for the Local Government Elections are underway to be held on 27 October 2021, as announced by the Honourable President.

The Electoral Commission has indicated that it will be ready to deliver the elections within the constitutionally prescribed timeframes. With regard to the COVID-19 induced climate in which the elections will take place, the required health and safety protocols will be put in place to ensure that the elections are conducted in a manner that does not place any person at risk.

Given the uncertainty of the trajectory of the pandemic, the situation will be continuously monitored and assessed to ensure that the relevant interventions are made. Should circumstances require that the elections be postponed for outside the constitutionally defined period, then the required interventions will be pursued, which will include approaching Parliament and the Constitutional Court.

04 June 2021 - NW1046

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the opening of international borders, what (a) impact analysis has been undertaken, (b) are the results and (c) conclusions were reached in this regard?

Reply:

a) The closure of the borders globally had a negative impact to international travel in every country or tourist destination around the world. According to the latest data from the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), global tourism suffered its worst year on record in 2020, with international arrivals dropping by 74%. Destinations worldwide welcomed 1 billion fewer international arrivals in 2020 than in the previous year, due to an unprecedented fall in demand and widespread travel restrictions.

According Statistics South Africa, in 2020, the volume of tourists decreased by 72.6% from 10.2 million in 2019 to 2.8 million in 2020. The distribution of tourists by region of residence shows that 74.8% of the tourists who arrived in South Africa in 2020 were residents of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries and 1.5% were from ‘other’ African countries. It is therefore, evident the impact of restrictions on international was consistent with global impact of the decline in travel.

b) See (a)

c) The devastating impact of the pandemic is a global phenomenon and no country or tourist destination was spared from this disruption. It therefore stands to reason that countries around the world need to work together to reopen international travel so that the sector can embark on a sustainable road to recovery.

04 June 2021 - NW282

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the current status of government-run night shelters in each province with regard to (a) the total number of shelters, (b) bed space capacity and (c) government funding allocation for the past five financial years?

Reply:

The Free State Province has 5 shelters for gender based violence and 1 safe house (white door). Their bed capacity and funding is detailed below:

NAME OF THE SHELTER

TOWN

BED CAPACITY

FUNDING OVER

5 YEARS

COMMENTS

Goldfields Family Advice Organization

Welkom

16

R 1 927 242

Funded over 4 years

Phelononofa Shelter

Bothaville

28

R 3 183 783

Funded over 4 years

Wepener Shelter(Child Welfare SA)

Wepener

10

R 3 641 978

Funded over 3 years

Child Welfare SA (shelter)

Bethlehem

8

R 1 878 939

Funded over 4 years

Thusanang Advice Centre

QwaQwa

10

R 2 375 363

Funded over 5 years

NAME OF THE SHELTER

TOWN

BED CAPACITY

FUNDING OVER

5 YEARS

COMMENTS

Tumahole Victim Support shelter

Parys

10

R 8 28927

Funded over 3 years and a quarter due to non-compliance they could not be funded for the remaining 3 quarters

 

WHITE DOOR

NAME OF THE SHELTER

TOWN

BED CAPACITY

FUNDING OVER

5 YEARS

COMMENTS

Reaphela Safe House

Bloemfontein

10

R1  336 404

Provides safety for 72 hours yet there cases when victims stays longer

Total

6

81

R 14343 709

 

Western Cape

(a) The Western Cape Department of Social Development has zero government-run night shelters

(b) Western Cape Social Development subsidize 2031 bed spaces to 32 NPO Homeless shelters.

(c) 20/21 – R26, 156 million

19/20 – R20, 205 million

18/19 – R19, 397 million

17/18 – R18, 621 million

16/17 – R17, 876 million

Northern Cape

a) There are no Government-run night Shelters in the Northern Cape Province.

The focus is on locating families of persons on the street and focussing on family re-unification programs.

Children on the street are assisted as prescribed in the Children’s Act 37 of 2005, Chapter 9

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

Gauteng

The Gauteng Department of Social Development does not have Government run ‘Night Shelters’.  However, the Department provides NPO funding and monitors Shelters for Homeless and Shelters for Women that operates 24 hours and is not specifically a ‘Night Shelter’.

Limpopo

(a) There are two shelters one run by government and one privately run

b) Huis Maroela in Phalaborwa with a bed capacity of 10 and Khuseleka One Stop Centre in

Polokwane with a bed capacity of 40.

c)

Funding allocation in the past 5 years

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

R 4 800 000

R 7 746 000

R3 718 000

R4 947 000

R4 467 000

Huis Maroela

R 317 500

R 317 500

R317 500

R317 500

R317 500

North West

  1. There are two (2) shelters in the province of which one (1) is state run and the other is NPO run.

(b) Bed space capacity

State-run = 40

NPO-run = 30

(c) Government funding allocation for the past five financial years?

  • State – run = The state-run was taken over from NPO management in 2019 and received R1 900 000 for operational cost and R 5.7m. Prior to 2019 the facility was run by an NPO for
  • NPO-run = For the past five years, the NPO received a funding of, R900 000 for 2016/17, R870 000 for 2017/18, R1 000 000 for 2018/19 and R 1 200 000 for 2019/20 R1 300 000 for 2020/21 for rendering the Victim Support Services.
  • Funded NPO-run crisis centres

2016/17 : 10 130 000 (24 centres)

2017/18 : 10 869 000 (22 centres)

2018/19 : 12 488 955 (22 centres)

2019/20 : 18 094 000 (20)

2020/21: 18 656 000 (20)

Eastern Cape

a) The total number of shelters,

Currently there are 4 shelters for homeless people that are still operational in the province which are located in Buffalo City Metro, Sarah Baartman and Nelson Mandela Metro. This number has dropped from a total of 42 shelters across the province during the Level 5 Covid 19 Lockdown.

b) Bed space capacity

The total bed capacity of the current shelters is 171.

c) Government funding allocation for the past five financial years?

There was no government funding during the past 5 years as all shelters for homeless people were established during the Covid 19 Lockdown which came into effect during the 2020/21 financial year. Shelters were established to accommodate homeless people and assist them to comply with the Lockdown Regulations.

04 June 2021 - NW1145

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 466 on 19 March 2021, he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed breakdown of the R31 356 005, 33 expenditure relating to a certain company (name furnished) in (a) 2015, (b) 2016 and (c) 2017; if not, why not; if so, by what date? [

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

NO.

FINANCIAL YEAR

DESCRIPTION

COSTS (R)

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

 

2016/17

Educating the public by explaining the process, requirements and qualifications relating to the application for grants in terms section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Call for Applications

R446 092.65

External

 

2016/17

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations : Brand Positioning

R250 000.00

External

 

2016/17

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations :Regulatory Mandate

R1,901 904.00

External

 

2016/17

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Grant Funding Mandate

R45,291.06

External

TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 2016/17

R2,643,287.71

NO.

FINANCIAL YEAR

DESCRIPTION

COSTS (R)

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Supply Chain Management

R179 533.82

External

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Grant Funding Mandate

R10 147 553.06

External

 

2015/16

Educating the public by explaining the process, requirements and qualifications relating to the application for grants in terms section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Call for Applications

R6,469,486.94

External

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act – Operations :Regulatory Mandate

R1 460 009.36

External

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act – Stakeholder Relations, Marketing and Communication

433 105.38

External

TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 2015/16

R18 689 688.56

NO.

FINANCIAL YEAR

DESCRIPTION

COSTS (R)

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: National Lotteries Commission: Operational Changes

R2,368,544.70

External

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Grant Funding Mandate

R5 849 966,38

External

 

2014/15

Educating the public by explaining the process, requirements and qualifications relating to the application for grants in terms section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Call for Applications

R1,567,772.57

External

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Supply Chain Management

R3,820.96

External

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act Operations :Regulatory Mandate

R232,924.45

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 2014/15

R10 023 029,06

04 June 2021 - NW1056

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What are the relevant details of the specific impact of COVID-19 vaccines approved for vaccination in the Republic, on persons, including with regard to (a) the different age groups and (b) persons with comorbidities, with reference to how effective and/or for how long the vaccines will provide protection against re-infection?

Reply:

Only a marginal reduction in efficacy has been noted the elderly (>60-65 years) in the trials conducted to date. With regards to comorbidities, current trials have shown no difference in efficacy compared to persons without comorbidities. Theoretically they may be less effective in persons with decreased immune system, however the limited trials to date have not shown this.  

There is currently no data on how long the vaccines will provide protection against re-infection.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1240

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of a media briefing by the Chairperson of the Road Accident Fund (RAF), Ms Thembelihle Msibi, a few weeks ago when commenting on the RAF’s financial affairs (details furnished) and given that the RAF has begun a turnaround strategy whose implementation began on 1 April 2020, he is in any position to detail the list of service providers found to have been connected to the cases, including the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council for mismanagement of their trust accounts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

Of the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council (LPC) for mismanagement of their trust accounts, only 42 firms (listed below) have as yet not repaid the duplicate payments they received from Road Accident Fund (RAF).

As part of its recovery procedures the RAF withheld further payment to law firms identified as having received duplicate payments. However, a full bench of the North Guateng High Court, Pretoria, delivered judgment on 9 April 2021, in the matter of Road Accident Fund v Legal Practice Council and Others (58145/2020) [2021] ZAGPPHC 173, ordering the suspending of certain categories of writs of execution and warrants of attachment against the RAF, and in its judgment states that it does not believe that the RAF should withhold payments from successful claimants because of a dispute between the RAF and the law firms acting for the claimants. The court indicated that the RAF must instead approach the court on a case-by-case basis.

Consequently, the RAF has brought an Application in the North Guateng High Court, Pretoria, citing the 42 legal firms; the LPC; the Sheriff, Pretoria Central; the Sheriff, Pretoria East; the Sheriff, Centurion East the Sheriff, Johannesburg Central; the Sheriff, Johannesburg North; and, ABSA Bank Ltd. The details of the 42 law firms cited in the Application are as follows:

 

1. Phefadu AP Attorneys with its business address at Suite 407-408, Savelkouls Building, Cnr Paul Kruger & Pretorius Street.

2. CN Phukubje Attorneys with its business address at 83 Albertina Sisulu Street Corner Von Brandis Street Bradlows Building, Works @ Market 4th Floor Offices 405-407.

3. Feke-Myeko Attorneys with its business address at 380 Bosman Street Pretoria.

4. Frans Rabie Attorneys with its business address at 110A Themba Shozi Street, Balfour, Mpumalanga, 2410.

5. Gura Tlaletsi & Partners with its business address at 38 Carrington Street Mafikeng Industrial Mafikeng, North West.

6. KG Mashigo Attorneys with its business address at 58 Marshall Street Marshall Street Marshalltown Johannesburg.

7. Lekopane Khumalo Attorneys with its business address at Office 1, Grongo’s Centre, 40 Mouton Street, Hendrina, Mpumalanga.

8. Letheba Makgato & Associates with its business address at 81 Ampthill Avenue, Suite 2, @nd Floor, Central House Building, Benoni.

9. Mahlangu SV with its business address at 507 Spuy Street, Sunnyside, Pretoria, Gauteng.

10. Makhurupetzi Attorneys with its business address at Suite 106 and 107, First Floor, Olivetti House, Cnr Pretorius and Sophie De Bruyne Streets.

11. Makokga Sebei Inc with its business address at Tudor Chambers Office No 0240 229 Helen Joseph Street Pretoria.

12. Malange Attorneys with its business address at 28 Helen Joseph Street, Suite 107 Church Square Building, Pretoria.

13. Malose Matsaung Attorneys with its business address at 238 Paul Kruger Street, Standard Bank Chambers, Pretoria Central, Pretoria.

14. Maluleka Tlhasi Inc with its business address at 754 Stanza Bopape Street, Eastcliff, Pretoria.

15. Mammile A M Attorneys with its business address at Mammile Law Chambers, 130 Highveld Road, Kempton Park.

16. Matodzi Neluheni Attorneys with its business address at 70 Sutherland Street, Newcastle Central, Newcastle.

17. Mphahlele MR Attorneys with its business address at 17B Biccard Street, Polokwane Central, Polokwane, 0699.

18. Mpho Mashiloane Attorneys with its business address at 38 Marloth Street, Mbombela,1201/ Tarentaal Shopping Center, corner Ou Kaapschenhoop & N4 Nelspruit Office No TA 03

19. Muleya Attorneys with its business address at G06, 1064 Arcadia Street, Hatfield, Pretoria 0083.

20. Musa Baloyi Attorneys with its business address at Mageza Road, Giyani-E, Giyani 0826.

21. Mzamo Attorneys with its business address at Suite 2, 3rd Floor, West Wing Suites, 132 Fox Street, Johannesburg.

22. N.T Ntshele Attorneys with its business address at Suite 325, Bank Towers, 190 Thabo Sehume Street, Pretoria, 001.

23. Ndambakuwa Attorneys with its business address at 200 Pretorius Street, Pretoria Central, Pretoria.

24. Ndlovu Attorneys with its business address at 15A Park Street, Kempton Park Central, Kempton Park, 1620.

25. Nomvula Meyiwa Incorporated / Meyiwa Inc with its business address at 525 Mendelson Street, Cnr Garsfontein & Isie-Smuts Street, Constantia Park, Glenstantia, Pretoria.

26. Nxumalo and Radebe Inc with its business address at Stand Number 265 Elukwatini Crossing, Elukwatini-A, Elukwatini.

27. PM Mositsa Inc with its business address at Lapa Building,380 Bosman Street, Pretoria. 28. PP Milazi Attorneys with its business address at 212 Rahima Moosa Street, Johannesburg 2001.

29. Raleswinga Attorneys with its business address at 523 Stanza Bopape Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, 0007.

30. Ramaselela MC Attorneys with its business address at 100 Pretorius Street, Suite 106 Olivetti House, Pretoria.

31. S Twala Attorneys with its business address at 2nd floor, Mathomo House, 132 Fox Street, Cnr Kruis Street.

32. Shabangu & Beauchamp (Pretoria) with its business address at Shop 15, Bothongo Plaza West, Francis Baard Street, Pretoria Central, Pretoria,0001.

33. Simpsons Attorneys Incorporated with its business address at 77 Troon Road, Greenside, Randburg.

34. T A Matshanda Trust with its business address at Suite 1309 - 1310, 13th Floor, His Majesty Building Cnr Commissioner & Joubert Street, Johannesburg.

35. T Khumalo Attorneys with its business address at Office 6, 17th Floor, Marble Towers, 201 Rahima Moosa Street, Johannesburg.

36. Taute Bouwer & Cilliers Incorporated with its business address at 827 25th Avenue, Rietfontein, Pretoria.

37. TC Rampatla Incorporated with its business address at Absa Building, Suite 208, 250 Pretorius Street, Pretoria Central.

38. K Malao Attorneys with its business address at 3710 Amberfield Valley Capensis Avenue Rooihuiskraal North Ext 24 Centurion.

39. Mouton & Williams Attorneys with its business address at 263,297 Ontdekkers Road, Carenvale, Roodeport,1724.

40. Modibedi Sebele Phethoe Attorneys with its business address at 44 Rooihuiskraal Road, The Reeds Centurion.

41. HC Madike Attorneys with its business address at 13 Jan Kemp Street Pongola Kwazulu Natal and at 235 Helen Joseph Street Suite 303, 3rd Floor Burlington House, Pretoria.

42. Erasmus ELS Inc t/a Erasmus Scheepers with its business address at 172 Bronkhorst Street Nieuw Muckleneuk Pretoria.

The names of the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council (LPC) for mismanagement of their trust accounts, are as follows:

  1. ABRAM PHUTIANE PHEFADU
  2. BALOYI ATTORNEYS
  3. CHUEU ATTORNEYS INC
  4. CN PHUKUBJE ATTORNEYS
  5. ERASMUS ELS INC T/A ERASMUS SCHEEPE
  6. ERWEE ATTORNEYS (MUSINA)
  7. FEKE-MYEKO ATTORNEYS
  8. FRANS RABIE ATTORNEYS
  9. GUMBO & CO
  10. GUR TLALETSI & PARTNERS
  11. HANLIE BRUWER ATTORNEYS
  12. HLUNGWANI TG ATTORNEYS
  13. JACOBS AND MAKWAKWA ATTORNEYS
  14. JD SKHOSANA ATTORNEYS
  15. K MALAO INC
  16. KG MASHIGO ATTORNEYS
  17. KHOROMMBI MABULI INCORPORATION
  18. KOMANE ATTORNEY
  19. LEKOPANE KHUMALO ATTORNEYS
  20. LETHABO MOKOENA ATTORNEYS
  21. LETHEBA MAKGATO & ASSOCIATES
  22. LM MAILA INCORPORATED
  23. M RAMOGOTSWA INC ATTORNEYS
  24. MA MOTHAPO ATTORNEYS
  25. MA MPHOLOANE INC
  26. MADIKE HC ATTORNEYS
  27. MAHLANGU SV
  28. MAHOLOBELA INC ATTORNEYS
  29. MAJA MATSIMELA ATTORNEYS
  30. MAKAU PHEFADU & PARTNERS
  31. MAKHURUPETZI ATTORNEYS
  32. MAKOKGA SEBEI INC
  33. MALAN M ATTORNEYS
  34. MALANGE ATTORNEYS
  35. MALATJI ATTORNEYS
  36. MALATJI MOLOSH & POOE
  37. MALOSE MATSAUNG ATTORNEYS
  38. MALULEKA TLHASI INC
  39. MAMMILE A M ATTORNEYS
  40. MAMOKGALAKE CHUENE ATTORNEYS
  41. MANTON J J S
  42. MASHAPA
  43. MASHEGO P PROKEREURS INC
  44. MASWENENG ATTORNEYS
  45. MATHEKGA ATTORNEYS
  46. MATODZI NELUHENI
  47. MBOWENI MALULEKE INCORPORATED ATTOR
  48. MG MALI ATTORNEYS
  49. MJ MOSIKARI
  50. MMELA MTSWENI
  51. MODIBEDI SEBELE PHETOE ATTORNEYS
  52. MOGAU SETSHOANE
  53. MOHULATSI ATTORNEYS INC
  54. MOKGATLE LESOLE ATTORNEYS
  55. MOKHABUKHI ATTORNEYS
  56. MOLEPO INCORPORATED ATTORNEYS(PTY)
  57. MOLOSI
  58. MOUTON & WILLIAMS ATTORNEYS
  59. MP MNGOMEZULU INCORPORATED
  60. MPHAHLELE MR ATTORNEYS
  61. MPHO MASHILOANE
  62. MT MAKWELA ATTORNEYS
  63. MTSHWENI INC ATTORNEYS
  64. MTSWENI INC ATTORNEYS
  65. MULEYA ATTORNEYS
  66. MUNRO FLOWERS & VERMAAK
  67. MUSA BALOYI ATTORNEYS
  68. MZAMO ATTORNEYS
  69. N.T NTSHELE ATTORNEYS
  70. NDALA ATTORNEYS
  71. NDAMBAKUWA
  72. NDHLOVU BORNVENTURE ATTORNEYS
  73. NDLOVU ATTORNEYS
  74. NDOBELA AND LAMOLA ATTORNEYS
  75. NOMVULA MEYIWA INCORPORATED
  76. NTLOEDIBE ATTORNEYS
  77. NTSHANGASE SS ATTORNEYS
  78. NXUMALO AND RADEBE INC
  79. PJ FAURIE ATTORNEYS
  80. PM MOSITSA INC
  81. PN HLATSWAYO ATTORNEYS
  82. PP MILAZI ATTORNEYS
  83. RALESWINGA ATT
  84. RAMASELELA MC ATTORNEYS
  85. RATSHIVHOMBELA ATTORNEYS
  86. RENE FOUCHE INCORPORATED
  87. ROME ANTHONY IAN
  88. S TWALA ATTORNEYS
  89. SANCHEZ SKOSANA INCORPORATED
  90. SELAMOLELA INC
  91. SELOLO TLOU INCORPORATED
  92. SHABANGU & BEAUCHAMP (PRETORIA)
  93. SIMPSONS ATTORNEYS INCORPORATED
  94. SPRUYT INC
  95. T A MATSHANDA TRUST
  96. T KHUMALO ATTORNEYS
  97. TAUTE BOUWER & CILLIERS INC
  98. TC RAMPATLA INCORPORATED
  99. THINDISA ATTORNEYS
  100. TL KEKANA ATTORNEYS
  101. VAN VELDEN DUFFEY
  102. VAN WYK ATTORNEYS (MARSHALLTOWN)

04 June 2021 - NW1204

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Health

What is the total number of babies who were born to undocumented foreign nationals and/or illegal migrants in government health facilities in each year in the past five years?

Reply:

The Department of Health strives to take reasonable legislative and other measures to achieve the progressive realisation of the right to have access to health care services including reproductive health care in terms of its Constitutional obligations. Section 27 (1) (a) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa states that everyone has the right to have access to health care services, including reproductive health care. Section 27 (3) further states that no one may be refused emergency medical treatment.

The statistics on the total number of babies who were born to undocumented foreign nationals and/or illegal migrants in government health facilities in each year in the past five years is not available as our health facilities do not keep statistics on foreign nationals.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1110

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to Eskom suspending stage two load shedding between 10:00 and 14:00, in order for the nation to mourn the passing of the King on 18 March during the memorial service of King Goodwill Zwelithini, (a) How did Eskom arrive at the decision to suspend load shedding for the memorial service, (b) What criteria were used to arrive at the decision, (c) By whose instruction was the suspension agreed to and (d) What total amount did Eskom spend on diesel fuel to provide uninterrupted electricity supply during the period?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

On 17 March 2021, Government requested Eskom to suspend load shedding for the duration of King Goodwill Zwelithini’s memorial service on 18 March 2021 from 10:00 to 14:00. The System Operator evaluated the request and concluded that this was technically possible without putting the power system at risk and would not result in a higher stage of load shedding either before or after the memorial service.

The following was taken onto account:

  • The stage of load shedding before and after the memorial service would not be increased from Stage 2 load shedding that was being implemented at the time.
  • The load shedding that was being implemented was necessary to ration the remaining fuel at the pumped storage and OCGT power stations, as these resources were running low on diesel and water in the top reservoirs.  The suspension of load shedding would require additional generators at these power stations to be dispatched utilising some additional fuel.
  • The duration of the suspension of load shedding was only four hours.
  • Load curtailment of industrial customers would not be suspended.
  • The suspension of load shedding would take place during the late morning and early afternoon when there was a reduction in demand.
  • The event was considered to be in the national interest and is allowed by NRS048-9, the standard that governs load shedding in South Africa.
  • A number of generating units were expected to return to service that afternoon and early evening.

In order to supply the additional demand due to the suspension of load shedding, the System Operator dispatched four additional OCGTs from 09:42 until 14:10.  These OCGTs supplied 2 404 MWh (approximately R8.5 million) during this period with a maximum output reaching 610 MW.  Furthermore, pumped storage generation was dispatched and supplied an estimated additional 2 240 MWh with a maximum additional capacity of 626 MW dispatched.  Between 12:00 and 14:00, four coal-fired generators returned to service adding 1 935 MW of capacity to the system, although it takes many hours to ramp these generators to their maximum capacity.

Eskom has the technical capacity and expertise to evaluate each situation and make a sound, technical decision.

I trust that the Honourable Member is not opposed to efforts such as these being made, when appropriate and technically possible?

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi Pravin Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

04 June 2021 - NW1182

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Following the recent fire that broke out at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital which saw operations being halted, what is the extent of the (a) damage and (b) disruption caused in the services provided to patients at the hospital; (2) were there any lives lost as a direct result of the fire; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the Provincial Department of Health.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1256

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What strategies, financially and otherwise, is the Government implementing to ensure that companies retain workers as the country prepares to emerge from COVID-19, given the interruption brought by the COVID-19 pandemic in the employment and labour sector?

Reply:

With the outbreak of the COVID-19, There is now a sense of URGENCY to accelerate implementation of the Employment Services Act, No. 4 of 2014; the UI Amendment Act, No. 10 of 2016, specifically section 5 (d) which provides for the financing of the retention of contributors in employment and the re-entry of contributors into the labour market; the Presidential Jobs Summit Framework Agreement, 2018 with a focus on: (i) protecting jobs, (ii) informal sector support, and (iii) inclusive growth interventions. The COVID-19 pandemic coupled with the advancement in technology presents us as a country with an opportunity to place productivity at the centre of the country’s long-term competitiveness and economic activity and recovery.

The pandemic, which has devastating effects on our socio-economic systems and the labour market is also creating an important opportunity for leadership in government to create an enabling environment and partner with leaders in business and labour to take decisive and urgent action to turn things around.

Over the next ten (10) years (2021 to 2030), Productivity SA strategic objectives and plans will be focused on vigorously unlocking South Africa’s productivity and potential for sustained competitiveness and economic growth as part of our interventions to implement the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, particularly priority areas 2: Industrialisation and Growing the productive economy; and priority area 5: Macro-economic interventions and enablers for economic growth. During this period, our Enterprise Development and Support Programmes will be focused on supporting an Integrated Enterprise Development and Support Ecosystem (government-wide programme in collaboration and partnership with social partners) to create a coherent platform to enhance access and coordination of SMME support to preserve existing job and create productive and decent employment.

The Department has allocated over R104m to Productivity SA whereby the entity implements turn-around strategies and plans to restructure and improve the productivity and operational efficiency of companies facing distress to be sustainable, competitive and create conditions conducive for job retention and creation. Funds have been made available in this regard and for the 2020/21 financial year over R104m was allocated to Productivity SA. Part of the interventions include establishing Workplace /Future forums (committee comprising on management and workers), training and capacitating their members on productivity improvement solutions.

Productivity SA also have a productivity and Competitiveness Improvement Programme which is designed to improve the competitiveness and sustainability of enterprises, targeting small enterprises and cooperatives in the productive sectors of the economy in line with the Sector Master Plans. Overall, 2796 companies were supported through the programme in the 2020/21 financial year, which included emerging entrepreneurs and cooperatives.

There are also targeted interventions through the Workplace Challenge Programme (WPC), with 109 companies mostly in the Special Economic Zones and Industrial Parks assisted and 3 industrial clusters were established in the Forestry, Footwear and Leather, and the Creative sector.

04 June 2021 - NW1029

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the peer-reviewed study published in the medical journal The Lancet, where trial results showed that the Russian developed COVID-19 vaccine, Sputnik V, has shown an efficacy of 91% and is deemed safe, what are the reasons that he cannot speed-up the procurement of the Sputnik V-vaccine for South African citizens?

Reply:

The Gamaleya Institute is still undergoing investigations into the effectiveness of the Sputnik V in the presence of the 501Y.V2 (B.1.351, or Beta) variant, which is the main circulating strain of COVID-19 in South Africa. The published results do not represent the effectiveness of this vaccine against this variant. Also, concern was raised with regards to the second booster dose which uses the Ad5 vector, where previous work in the Phamibili study showed that using this vector may increase the acquisition of HIV, particularly in males. 

The Ministerial Advisory Committee on COVID-19 Vaccines has been engaging with the Gameleya Institute to investigate these matters further.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW333

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) Whether, with reference to Excelsior Court in Durban, the building has been returned to her department from the SA Police Service (SAPS); if not, on what date is the building set to revert to her department; if so, on what date was the building returned to her department; (2) whether there are any SAPS officials who are still legally and/or illegally residing in the building; if so, what, (a) number of persons are currently residing in the building in each case and (b) measures are being taken to remove these residents; (3) whether her department has commenced with an assessment of the state of the building; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) measures are being taken to protect persons from the dangers associated with the poor state of the building, including falling bricks and broken doors, (b) are the time frames for addressing the issues around the specified building, (c) are all the relevant details for each issue to be resolved and (d) plans does her department have for the (i) alienation of the property and/or (ii) refurbishment of the property?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. I have been informed by the Department that Excelsior Court has not been handed back to DPWI from the South African Police Services. The SAPS has reported that a court process is underway to evict the illegal occupants. The Department is still waiting for SAPS to finalise their eviction process.

2. (a) The Department does not have records of occupants of the building and is unable to provide accurate number thereof.

(b) SAPS Legal Services is in the process of evicting the illegal occupants through the Court Process.

3. The Department has not commenced with the assessment of the building due to illegal occupation.

(a) Several attempts were made to conduct routine maintenance on the property, but unfortunately property/items are repeatedly being vandalised and damaged by the occupants. DPWI is unable to take full responsibility in safe-guarding the property and it has no control over management due to continuous intimidation by the occupants. The SAPS was requested to prohibit persons from walking in the danger zone.

(b) The Department is unable to accurately respond on the time frame due to the court process on eviction of illegal occupants pursued by the SAPS.

(c) Upon finalisation of eviction process, the Department shall embark on an exercise to determine the highest and best use of the facility.

(d) (i) The Department does not have plans to alienate the property.

(ii) The Department shall conduct a full condition assessment of the facility once the eviction process is concluded by SAPS.

04 June 2021 - NW1097

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to his replies to questions 196, 197 and 198 on 5 March 2021, he has now received the information from the National Lottery Commission; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

I have been furnished information of the 3 replies. Below are the supplementary replies received by the Commissioner of the NLC, Ms Mampane:

PQ 196 - Reply from the National Lotteries Commission:

“1 (a) The NLC can fully account for the R13 332 300 that was granted to the beneficiary. With reference to Parliamentary Question 2803, the NLC responded to the direct questions posed by honourable member wherein he enquired specifically around the accountability for funding for workshops and infrastructure.

  • The NLC responded that the amount that was utilised for workshops was R801 000 accounted for as detailed in PQ 2803.
  • In terms of infrastructure, it was confirmed that no infrastructure was funded under this project number.

With respect to PQ 196, the NLC responds as follows:

  • The remaining amount of R12 531 300 was for project activities related to the Cape Minstrels Carnival.
  • The NLC funded the following project activities amongst others Sound and Stage, Transportation, Apparel, Security, Catering and Administration.

(b) The NLC received a progress report from the beneficiary and it was found to be satisfactory and all requirements pertaining to the grant that was made to the organisation have been fulfilled and the project was subsequently closed. The funds were accounted for inline with what was reported in paragraph 1(a) above, therefore no missing funds identified.

(c) There was no funding for infrastructure.

2 (a) Reporting requirements for beneficiaries are contained in the signed Grant Agreement. The NLC received and reviewed the interim and final progress report in line with the signed Grant Agreement. The amounts were spent as indicated in paragraph 1(a) above.

(b) The NLC does not audit the finances of beneficiaries however conduct reviews as stipulated in the Grant Agreement in relation to the funded project. The NLC reviewed all interim reports and final report that were submitted by the beneficiary on the following dates:

  • 13 January 2013
  • 29 April 2013
  • 4 June 2013
  • 24 June 2013
  • 8 August 2013

(c) The NLC found that all reporting requirements pertaining to the NLC grant were fulfilled. This is supported by the letter from NLC to the beneficiary.”

PQ 197 – Reply from the National Lotteries Commission:

“(1)(a) With reference to answer provided to Parliamentary Question 2802, the NLC indicated that an amount of R 5 000 000 was allocated for the building of Carnival Heritage Museum out of a grant of R 27 320 758, 64. The R 22 320 758 was accounted for as the allocation included amongst others the following: Minstrel Carnival Planning; Minstrel Carnival Rehearsal; Minstrel Carnival; and Minstrel Carnival New Year.

(b)(i) R1 700 000.00

(ii) R1 700 000.00

(c) The Cape Town Minstrel Carnival Association.

(2) a) The spending for the project was for the following main line items: Minstrel Carnival Planning; Minstrel Carnival Rehearsal; Minstrel Carnival; and Minstrel Carnival New Year. The total spending was R 27 320 758, 64.

(b) Information on the current rental being paid is not available as the project currently closed and a closeout report was issued.”

PQ 198 – Reply from the National Lotteries Commission:

“(1)(a) The National Lotteries Commission does not audit the financial statements of the funded organisation. It conducts monitoring and evaluations on funded projects and assess the progress reports submitted to ascertain whether the project yielded the envisaged return on that investment. Three (3) reports were submitted by the organisation in question on the following dates:

  • 5 May 2014;
  • 25 June 2014; and
  • 24 August 2015

In terms of the report submitted, a total amount of about R 8 290 000.00 was spent on the magazine. The amount includes amongst others the procurement of transport equipment, marketing costs, printer costs, cost of operational equipment, design and publishing, distribution and logistics.

(1)(b) The report submitted does not provide the number of publication and only quantifies the costs associated with the publishing of magazines

(1)(c) The report submitted does not provide the number of copies printed and only quantifies the costs associated with printing of the magazine

(2) a) The report submitted did not have the copies of each magazine and project. After receipt of a satisfactory progress report, the project was subsequently closed.

(2)(b) The National Lotteries Commission does not audit the financial statements of the funded organisation. It conducts monitoring and evaluations on funded projects and assess the progress reports submitted to ascertain whether the project yielded the envisaged return on that investment. In terms of the report submitted, indicated that a total of about R 5 460 000.00 was spent in conducting the socioeconomic cohesion symposium. The amount is inclusive of all operational costs and personnel costs for the project.”

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1001

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the Early Childhood Development-Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF) applications received in each of the provinces before 26 February 2021 deadline, (a) on what date will applicants receive the relief package and (b) what (i) total number of applications have been received, (ii) is the ECD registration status of applicants, (iii) is the number of applications that fall within poor wards according to the Statistics SA Multidimensional Poverty Index and (iv) is the total number of (aa) ECD employees who will benefit, (bb) children who attend the ECDs and (cc) ECDs who have committed to re-opening within 60 days of receipt of the ECD-ESRF?

Reply:

a) The applicants receive the relief package as and when they pass the verification process. Currently eight thousand and eighty-seven (8 083) ECD services with thirty-three thousand five hundred and twenty three thousand and seventy nine (23 079) employees have been paid.

b) (i) A total of 28,283 applications were received.

Eastern Cape

3778

Free state

1493

Gauteng

6023

KwaZulu-Natal

5415

Limpopo

4250

Mpumalanga

1928

North West

1478

Northern Cape

749

Western Cape

3169

 

(ii) The applicants received are either fully/conditionally registered or unregistered.

(iii) 39% of applications falls within poor wards according to the Statistics SA Multidimensional Poverty Index. The breakdown according to provinces:

Province

% Applications in Poor Wards

% Wards that are poverty declared

Eastern Cape

67%

72%

Free State

4%

8%

Gauteng

12%

10%

KwaZulu-Natal

55%

74%

Limpopo

84%

82%

Mpumalanga

37%

17%

North West

53%

43%

Northern Cape

22%

12%

Western Cape

0%

0%

(iv) (aa) A total of 108 833 ECD employees is targeted to benefit, however after the verification based on the applications received 116 578.

(bb) There are over 450 000 children who attend the ECD programmes since reopening of ECD services in July 2020. It is not immediately possible

to have the accurate numbers.

(cc) Every applicant committed to re-open within 60 days after receipt of funding as it was one of the requirements.

04 June 2021 - NW1089

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her department’s presentation on its Third Quarter performance to the Portfolio Committee on Social Development on 17 March 2021, what (a) are the root causes for the 14% performance decline in the Third Quarter compared to the Second Quarter and (b) corrective measures have been implemented to address the 14% decline?

Reply:

National Assembly Written Reply: 1089 of 2021

a) The following are performance areas which contributed to the decline in performance during the third quarter. There has been significant progress made in meeting some of the targets that could not be met at the end of the third quarter:

  • Entity Oversight: At the time of reporting, The Entity Governance and Oversight Framework could not be presented at governance structures as anticipated. DSD Management decided that the framework be finalized using internal expertise. As a result, DSD has since finalized the Framework and it was approved before end of March 2021. The implementation of the Framework will continue in the new financial year.
  • Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E): The Analysis of existing M&E tools within Social Sector Programmes was not achieved at the time of reporting. More substantial work has since been concluded including the draft “as-is report” on all existing M&E tools in the Sector as well as a draft M&E Framework with indicators for 5 priority programmes within DSD.
  • Human Capital Management: The Sector Human Resources Plan was to be presented in the relevant Departmental management structures. The Plan did not serve on time as planned because critical inputs were being incorporated and the targets were also to be presented in the 4th quarter. To date, the Sector Human Resource Plan (SHRP) has been finalised and has been approved by Departmental Management Committee and a forum of all Heads of Social Development on 9 March 2021.
  • Social Assistance: The target of Monthly transfers of funds to SASSA was not achieved, since the DSD does not “transfer’ the funds, but the funds are provided in monthly allocations to SASSA to pay social grants. The Auditor-General has advised that the use of the word “transfer” is inaccurate, which means the target will never be achieved. The DSD has revised the indicator in its 2021/22 APP to address the ambiguity.
  • Social Security: The Regulations to the Social Assistance Amendment Act were not approved for public comment until early January 2021. The Regulations were subsequently published for public comments with the closing date of 24 February 2021. The Regulations were revised and completed based on public comments. The Regulations will be finalised during the first quarter of 2021/22 financial year.
  • Early Childhood Development (ECD): The target to employ 36 111 compliance monitors to monitor the norms and standards and COVID-19 compliance in DSD managed and supported facilities was not achieved. This was due to funds being allocated towards the ECD Stimulus Relief Fund instead of appointment of compliance monitors. However, many ECDs will be supported through the allocated R496 million for the ECD Presidential Employment Stimulus Relief Fund, which seeks to provide employment protection for an additional 80 000 employees in the ECD sector.
  • Families: The Framework for review of the White Paper on Families was not completed due to misalignment between the third quarter APP target and the set process to achieve the annual target. To date, consultations have been completed and the review of the White Paper has been completed.
  • Professional Social Services: The Draft Social Service Practitioners Bill could not be submitted to the Office of Chief State Law Advisor (OCSLA) for precertification due to lack of capacity to support the drafting process at the National office. Provincial departments have assisted with the redrafting of the Bill and the Bill has been submitted to the office of Chief State Law Advisor for Pre-Certification.
  • Population and Development: The annual target of Research report on Youth perception survey on Socio-economic, health, & gender on Impact of COVID19 was not achieved. The appointment of a Research Institution to conduct this study required approval from National Treasury, which was only granted in October 2020. Other procurement and contract management processes had to follow after receipt of National Treasury approval. The remaining time was not sufficient to complete the final study reports as planned. The timelines of the study have been adjusted to ensure that the study is completed in the new financial year.

b) The Department held intensive Programme Performance Review meetings in February 2021 to interrogate the root causes of decline in performance. During these Review Meetings, Management committed to implement various corrective actions to ensure improvement in performance for all areas where targets were not achieved in the third quarter. Preliminary analysis of the year-end performance of the Department shows improvement in achievement of set targets as compared to the third quarter. This improved performance may be attributed to the intensive Branch Performance Review Sessions and corrective actions which were implemented during the last quarter of the financial year.

04 June 2021 - NW1042

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the total number of vehicle testing stations in the Republic, (b) number of the specified vehicle testing stations are privately owned and (c) is the (i) race and (ii) gender demographic of all owners of privately-owned vehicle testing stations?

Reply:

a) The combined total number (both public and private) of vehicle testing stations in the Republic is 540 (five hundred and forty)

b) The number of the specified vehicle testing stations are privately owned is 380 (three hundred and eighty)

c) (i) Race

The National Road Traffic Act, 93 of 1996 and Regulations does not define race as a criteria for application for a private vehicle testing station and the information available to the Department only relates to the nationality of persons.

The Following information was received manually from the provinces:

 

Province

African

Coloured

Asian

White

Eastern Cape

14

6

36

28

Free State

5

0

1

7

Gauteng

19

0

57

59

KwaZulu-Natal

3

1

36

18

Limpopo

18

0

3

11

Mpumalanga

6

0

6

13

North West

6

1

2

9

Northern Cape

0

0

1

5

Western Cape

0

27

0

24

(ii) Gender demography of all privately owned VTSs

The National Road Traffic Act, 93 of 1996 and Regulations does not define Gender as a criteria for application for a private vehicle testing station. However, as part of the registration of a business on the National Traffic Information System (NaTIS) the nature of the organisation and the proxy must be identified.

The gender dispensation for the proxies of privately-owned vehicle testing stations are as follows:

Province

Female

Male

Eastern Cape

13

59

Free State

2

17

Gauteng

37

149

KwaZulu-Natal

14

75

Limpopo

9

42

Mpumalanga

13

31

North West

8

12

Northern Cape

4

4

Western Cape

12

102

 

 

04 June 2021 - NW1152

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with regard to the Republic’s COVID-19 vaccine procurement that has lagged behind compared to most other emerging countries, his department has made an effort to leverage the Republic’s bilateral cooperation agreements with vaccine producing countries to procure more vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The two major vaccine manufacturing countries are China and Russia. Vaccines require regulatory approval from SAHPRA. Countries cannot be the applicant and have to work through commercial entities to obtain approval. We have been in discussion with a number of companies having obtained marketing approval from the Gamaleya Institute of Russia for the Sputnik vaccine and with Numolux for the Sinovac vaccine. When all regulatory mattera have been attended to, the negotiations will progress further.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1021

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Social Development

To date, what (a) total number of persons have benefited from the R350 social relief grant, (b) impact has she found that the specified grant had on the lives of those to whom it was paid and (c) has she found would the social and livelihood implications of stopping the grant be on those who have been recipients of the grant?

Reply:

a) To date a total of 9 998 879 applications have been received for the relief grant. The numbers approved per month varied as validation of every application was done monthly. The number approved per month for the duration of this grant is indicated below:

May 4 424 449

June 5 061 088

July 5 570 962

August 5 963 465

September 6 037 809

October 6 135 121

November 6 088 879

December 5 930 154

January 5 934 216

February 5 924 709

March 5 780 422

April 5 917 068

b) The department has conducted a Rapid Assessment of the Covid-19 R350 grant and has also reviewed other independent studies conducted on relief measures. All studies confirm that the relief measures have made significant impact on the livelihoods of not only those receiving the grant, but also those in a household of a grant recipient. From our rapid assessment study we found that around 88% of recipients of the COVID SRD grant pooled the grant with their other household incomes to take care of the needs of everyone in the household; thereby confirming that the reach of the grant to reduce poverty, thus goes far beyond just the recipient. It is estimated that between the CSG Caregivers allowance and the COVID SRD grant of R350, approximately 36 million individuals benefited from these both directly and indirectly.

Our utilisation surveys also confirms that the grant was mainly used for the purchase of food. This triangulates well with other research indicating that hunger declined during the period May to October 2020 when the relief package was at its maximum level and then increased from November onwards when part of the relief package, and notably the care givers allowance, was withdrawn. It is expected that with the withdrawal of the last portion of the relief package, whilst in 3rd wave of the pandemic, more households and individuals will become vulnerable to hunger.

The research findings by The National Income Dynamics Study - Corona Virus Mobile Survey, 2020 (NIDS CRAM) confirms that the special COVID-19 grant has brought millions of previously unreached individuals into the system, and application for and receipt of the grant has been relatively pro-poor. This is further confirmed by the department’s rapid assessment study:

  • Over 6 million new applicants accessed this grant, the majority being youth.
  • Most found the application process relatively easy to navigate.
  • Of those who received the grant, the majority are in low-income households.
  • 30% of those who were retrenched between February and April report no household-level grant protection at all; and hence the new COVID SRD grant was able to provide them with some form income support.

In terms of poverty and inequality, microsimulation work done by Southern Africa – Towards Inclusive Economic development (SATIED), a collaboration between National Treasury, UNIWIDER, SARS, TIPS and others; found that poverty measured at the Food Poverty line would have increased from 20.6% of the population living below the food poverty line to 32.1% if there were no COVID social relief interventions. However with these interventions, not only were we able to prevent further deepening of food poverty, but also decrease this from 20.6% to 18.8%. Similar results were found at the lower and upper bound poverty lines.

Similarly with inequality, as measured by the Gini coefficient, without the relief measures, inequality would have increased from 0.64 to 0.67, however with the relief measures our Gini coefficient has declined to 0.61.

The policy brief on the distributional impact of COVID-19 and the state emergency packages in South Africa by SA-TIED provide recommendations that is important to note that comprehensive social security helps protect people from economic shocks by operating as an automatic stabiliser that is built into the tax-benefit system and that there is an urgent need to establish social assistance for poor people of working age, as a permanent rather than temporary feature of the system

c) The evidence provided by the various research, and analysis, confirms the assumption that ending relief programmes will reduce household demand as well as increase hunger and social alienation. These factors will add to social and political stress, which in turn will slow down the economic recovery over the coming year or two at least.

 

04 June 2021 - NW1026

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What total number of recently graduated medical doctors (i) have been placed as medical interns as at 1 April 2021 and (ii) are still sitting at home, waiting to be placed and (b) what (i) has he found caused the delays in placing the recently graduated medical doctors and (ii) steps are being taken by his department to resolve the situation?

Reply:

a) According to records on the Internship and Community Service Placement (ISCP) online System, 257 medical students were confirmed to have met the requirements to be allocated for medical internship as at end of April 2021 (i.e. 138 NMFC students who passed the Cuban National Exam; 26 passed the HPCSA Medical Board Exam; and 93 completed their blocks in local universities which made them eligible for medical internship posts, (i) 0 has been allocated on medical interns on 1 April 2021, as there are only two allocation cycle for medical internship, which are 1 January and 1 July of each year and (ii) 257 are still waiting for allocation and will be allocated during June to take up positions on 1 July 2021 and (b) (i) there was no delay as the applicants were not yet eligible for medical internship at the time (ii) the ICSP online System will opened applications from 14 May 2021. Only after the application process is closed, the actual application numbers will be confirmed as more students are becoming eligible (i.e. completing blocks).

b) Due to increased number of qualifying applicants for medical internship posts the Public health sector remains challenged by budget cuts to fund additional internship posts and to accredit excessive number of medical internship posts in health facilities as it requires additional resources (appointment of additional specialists and senior medical doctors).

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1249

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Given the reality brought to us by the COVID-19 pandemic about the importance of investing in scientific research capacity for pharmaceutical production, what strategies has the Government adopted to boost local research capacity in pharmaceuticals; (2) whether the Government intends to intervene in the pharmaceutical sector to ensure self-reliance in pharmaceuticals; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details of the strategy and (b) is the projected timeline?

Reply:

1. The SAMRC has a variety of grant programs (both internal and through strategic partnerships) that are supporting drug discovery research and development in key health priority areas. These projects are leading to novel drug targets and candidate molecules and include plant-based medicines as well as biologicals such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies.

The Technology Innovation Agency, with funding from the Department of Science and Innovation has established an API Cluster aimed at increasing the capacity of the country to develop the processes and manufacturing capability for the manufacture of active pharmaceutical ingredients. This cluster links innovators at the universities and science councils with industry, including development partners and pilot production facilities. This provides a mechanism to advance new drugs in development by local innovators towards testing and approval. One of the objectives is to synthesise molecules that may have efficacy against Covid to ensure continuity of supply. We are in discussions with international partners round this.

Government, through the Department of Science and Innovation, is a shareholder in The Biovac Institute, which has embarked on an ambitious journey to bring manufacture of vaccine APIs to the country. Biovac has been pursuing a backward integration strategy and has undertaken technology transfers with major pharmaceutical companies to establish the capacity for formulation, fill and finish of vaccines. It is raising funding to expand this capacity and to add a production suite for antigens/immunogens/biologicals. The same applies for Afrigen Biologics. Biovac and Afrigen are, further, developing its own vaccine candidates. Government has also been supporting the CSIR’s efforts to establish GMP manufacture of biologicals using plant production systems. The team are actively working on a concerted strategy to leverage off South Africa’s scientific investments to see if these can translate into products.

There are a number of pockets of excellence in drug discovery and vaccine development research in South Africa, situated predominantly at the universities and science councils. A key bottleneck, however, is the pilot scale manufacture of these under GMP conditions for clinical trials and later commercial manufacture at scale. This is where further investment is required to ensure that the full pharmaceutical and vaccine development value chain is in place in the country.

2. On 2 October 2020, India and South Africa proposed the TRIPS Waiver”, a proposal to suspend intellectual property protections for products and technologies needed for the fight against COVID-19, including vaccines, for the duration of the pandemic. This would involve a temporary suspension of certain rules set out in the Trips agreement, the intellectual property treaty of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The waiver proposal by India and South Africa presents an important opportunity for all governments to unite and stand up for public health, global solidarity, and equitable access through a concrete step at the international level that can provide an automatic and expedited solution to address IP and technology challenges collectively.   The TRIPS Waiver proposal is now gaining support from major drug manufacturing countries.

The Department of Science and Innovation, and Trade, Industry and Competition are developing strategies for the local production of pharmaceuticals, especially the production of the active pharmaceutical ingredients.

Inter-Ministerial Committee on Covid-19 vaccines has a DPME lead Technical Working Group tasked with mobilizing local capacity to deliver the dosages required and building a long-term capability step by step using current capacity from upstream to downstream to prepare for the next pandemic. They are starting by looking at the vaccines already developed and approved and those in the pipeline to determine what they can do locally in ensuring dosages by using a fill/finish strategy and then move to how to build capabilities to enable future pandemic response.

The following are key milestones that have been achieved to date:

  1. Several partnerships established with current and under development Covid-19 vaccines developers (Biological E partnership; ImmunityBio; Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology of Cuba; Greenlight BioScience for technology transfer of mRNA technology; Kentucky Bio-Products; and J&J – already manufacturing locally through Aspen)
  2. South Africa have the following competitive advantages which can be used to build permanent State Infrastructure to enable future pandemic response

      a) South Africa has experienced principal investigators who are employees of universities and Science Councils which is an advantage.

       b) Bioanalytical laboratories e.g. North-West University/DSI – Preclinical Drug Development Platform facility has been developed for this purpose

       c) Ethics related expertise including individuals for the data safety and management board

       d) Existing capabilities locally: CAPRISA, SAMRC, AURUM, DESMOND TUTU, WITS HEALTH, AHRI, and others on the clinical research side

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1185

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

In light of the announcement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, of 27 October 2021 as the date for the local government elections, what are the details of the measures that she intends to put in place to balance COVID-19 restrictions with the opening of political spaces for campaigning?

Reply:

We are carefully monitoring developments with regards to the COVID-19 pandemic. Government has gazetted a number of regulations to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Adjusted levels 1 and 2 of the regulations have opened more space for political activity. While these Regulations are in place, preparations made for the recent by-elections and the upcoming local government elections by stakeholders such as the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), political parties, government, communities etc, must be done in accordance with the provisions set out in the Regulations.

Working closely with the IEC, we have put processes in place in response to challenges that come with a global pandemic. The IEC has recently appointed Justcie Dikgang Moseneke to lead the inquiry into ensuring free and fair local government elections during Covid-19. The salient features of the terms of enquiry for the inquiry are to:

  • Enquire into, make findings and report on, and make recommendations concerning the likelihood that the Electoral Commission would be able to ensure that the forthcoming 2021 general local government elections will be free and fair, in view of –
  1. challenges posed by the COVID 19 pandemic; and
  2. measures promulgated by the government to curb the continued spread of the pandemic; and
  • Indicate additional measures that the Electoral Commission may be required to implement in order to realise free and fair elections within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The IEC is also considering the introduction of an on-line platform to enable the registration of eligible voters.

The regulations may change going forward, depending on the Covid-19 situation, and advice from the Minister of Health and the National Coronavirus Command Council.

04 June 2021 - NW978

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)    What is the time frame for the establishment of each district hub that is being established in terms of the District Development Model; (2) Whether each and/or any one of the hubs have the ability to provide shared services to local or district municipalities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the expected capability of each or any of the hubs to render shared services with regard to (a) financial management, (b) project management, (c) engineering services, (d) town and regional planning and (e) enterprise resource management systems; (3) (a) what are the estimated capital expenses related to the establishment of each of the hubs and (b) where will the money be sourced?

Reply:

  1. District Hubs have been established in the Waterberg and OR Tambo Districts and in eThekwini Metro. In the Financial Year for 2021/22, the Department plans to establish District Hubs in the 21 District Municipalities who are water services authorities. The remaining 28 District Hubs will be established during the 2022/23 Financial Year, provided funding is made available.
  2. It is not the responsibility of District and Metropolitan Municipalities nor Provincial CoGTAs to set up Hubs. It is a national CoGTA function to ensure that the DDM is effectively implemented with a government-wide focus. Existing institutional arrangements and practices in different provinces will inform the setting up of Hubs and their operations. The Hubs are not municipal structures falling under municipal administration. They may be physically located at district or metropolitan level but not within the municipality. They are accountable to national CoGTA but have to be inclusive and collaborative thus steered by intergovernmental district/metropolitan level steering committees having participation of respective municipalities, provincial CoGTAs and key national and/or provincial departments. The Hubs are aimed primarily at facilitating intergovernmental joint planning and as needed and in a differentiated way will support Local Government capacity building and coordinate capacity building programmes. Shared Services functions will not be performed by the Hubs as these need to be done through direct agreements between respective municipalities. The Hubs may support these processes as may be appropriate or necessary.A DDM Hub is conceived as a functional network of support and a facilitation system for Intergovernmental Planning in relation to a specific district or metropolitan space or a combination of district spaces or metropolitan spaces.
  3. The District Hub itself does not necessarily physically constitute the full range of people and resources required to be effective but enables a platform for networking, linking and connecting with various resources and processes located at various levels of government and outside of government. A minimum resource requirement would be a DDM Hub Manager as a senior, strategic person that can build the necessary networks and partnerships around successful facilitation of the One Plan. (b) The money will be allocated through the MTEF. CoGTA continues to mobilise support and capacity building opportunities through partnerships with private sector partners.

04 June 2021 - NW1184

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What has she found to be the ramifications of her publication of a notice in the Government Gazette extending the national state of disaster to 15 May 2021 on preparations for the local government elections

Reply:

The extension of the national state of disaster to 15 May 2021 by implication also extends the Regulations (GN R 480 as published in Government Gazette 43258 as amended) made in terms of Section 27(2) of the Disaster Managent Act, 2002.

The regulations are designed to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and whilst these regulations are in force, preparations made for the local government elections by stakeholders such as the Independent Electoral Commission, political parties, government, communities etc, must be done in accordance with the provisions set out in the regulations.

04 June 2021 - NW1079

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total (a) amount paid by the SA Social Security Agency to recipients who did not qualify for all types of grants in 2020 and (b) value of double dipping where recipients are being paid for more than one grant, essentially taking advantage of the system?

Reply:

a) Normal practice is that SASSA does not pay people who do not qualify for the different type of grants. SASSA only pays recipients who are deemed to have met the qualification criteria for the different types of grants. However, SASSA may under exceptional circumstances end up paying people who do not qualify, where there is misrepresentation from the grant applicant.

During 2020 SASSA detected possible fraud involving the following:

(i) 1 768 SAPO employees who were receiving social grants. The grants were suspended saving SASSA approximately R1.5 million per month.

(ii) 4 726 grant beneficiaries who transacted outside South Africa during the lockdown period when the international borders were closed. The grants were suspended saving SASSA approximately R7 million per month.

(iii) 105 active Correctional Services inmates who were receiving social grants. These grants were cancelled saving SASSA approximately R196 000 per month.

b) The Social Pensions System is configured in such a way that double dipping between different social grants can be detected and prevented. Thus there have been no incidents of double dipping that have been detected within the social grants system administered within SASSA.

The Auditor General of South Africa has identified incidents of double dipping involving the applicants of the special COVID 19 SRD grant who also applied for other COVID 19 relief measures administered by other government entities. While AGSA identified a total of 80 117 cases in the first 3 months of this grant, on confirming information, 25 088 people were identified with a value of R8 780 800 as having received the R350 grant to which they were not entitled. Debts are being raised for these citizens. It should also be noted that, as soon as the anomalies were identified by AGSA, payment of the special relief grant to these clients was stopped, thus limiting the loss to the state.

National Assembly Written Reply: 1079 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

04 June 2021 - NW1118

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) On what date was the last SA Social Security Agency system update to accommodate all grants to be automated, (b) what types of grants need to be captured manually and (c) what is the total number of applications that need to be recaptured manually?

Reply:

(a) SASSA Online Grants application system has been progressively implemented as of 14 September 2020. The system is used by applicants for the older persons grant, child support grant and foster child grant. The system is continuously updated based on feedback that is received from members of the public and system users.

(b) All applications for all social grant types are captured directly on the SOCPEN system during in person applications. However, the online application system does not currently interface directly with SOCPEN and applications submitted online have to be captured manually on the SOCPEN system. The integration between the Socpen system and the online application system is development which is being attended to. The future vision is to ensure that the information provided through the online system is automatically updated to Socpen as it is submitted, for staff only to quality assure the information provided.

(c) A total of 23 732 online grant applications were received since September, of which 21 401 have been captured and processed on Socpen system. The balance are in process.

National Assembly Written Reply: 1118 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

04 June 2021 - NW633

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of early childhood development (ECD) centres are equipped to handle disabled children in the Republic and (b) measures has she taken to ensure that the needs of disabled children are provided for in ECD centres?

Reply:

PROVINCE

(a) total number of early childhood development (ECD) centres are equipped to handle disabled children in the Republic

(b)Measures taken to ensure that the needs of disabled children are provided for in ECD centres

EC

The Eastern Cape has 34 Special Day Care Centres for Children living with Disabilities.

The 34 Special Day Care Centres for Children living with Disability has been funded for 2021/22 financial year.

FS

There are 10 ECD centres equiped to handle children with disabilities.

All these centres are equiped with ramps, rails and disablitiy accesable toilet facilities.

A 5% of the subsidy is utilised to procure stimulation material that includes children with disablities.

In ECD centres where children with disablities are admitted, the Department in partnership with the Department of Education and Health provides appropriate care and support using the strategy on scerening, idenfication and Support (SIAS) to assess in order to curb the unnecasessary placement in day care centres thereby promoting mainstreaming.

The ECD classrooms are made approriate and play equipment adapted to accomodate children with Disabilities.

GP

There are 73 ECD centres that are currently accomodating children with disabilities.

The province has partnered with a Sector on Persons with Disabilities to capacitate ECD Practitioners on the identification, learning and stimulation of children with special needs to promote inclusion.The indicator is on the Province APP to ensure inclusion of children with disabilities in the sector.

KZN

All the funded ECD centers in KwaZulu Natal are equipped to handle disabled children.

The educators in ECD Centers were trained to handle children with disabilities. The Province did revamps in the ECD Centers for easy access by children with disabilities.

LP

There are hundred and two (102) centres

There are on-going capacity building sessions on management of children with disabilities offered by a multi-disciplinary team (Primary Health Care Practitioners, Occupational, speech and hearing therapists) from the Department of Health. A 5% of the subsidy is utilised to procure stimulation material.

NC

The centres are not fully equipped to render ECD services to all children with disabilities. The Northern-Cape Province had seven (7) ECD Facilities registered as centres providing ECD services to children with disabilities, but two (2) of the seven (7) centres closed and two (2) decided to mainstream due to poor attendance of children younger than seven (7) years.

parents and practitioners are supported and capacitated through programmes rendered by Uhambo, an NGO appointed by the Department of Health and Occupational Therapists stationed at clinics and some appointed by DBE to stimulate the children at the centres and at home.

NW

The Provincial Social

Development has

equipped 150 ECD

centres through

training of ECD

Practitioners on

Inclusive Education

for children with

special needs during

2019/20

financial year

The Department is continuously

Conducting workshops on the

minimum Norms and Standards that provides guidance on the accessibility of Partial Care and ECD Centres to children with disabilities.

A total number of 400 parents and caregivers were trained on parenting programme to enable them to provide Early Childhood Development services for children with special needs.

Training was also conducted in partnership with the Department of Health on the Nutrition Guideline for ECD practitioners from 134 ECD Centres.

WC

5 Registered facilities accommodates children with disabilities.

The focus on children with disabilities is an imperative. To this end, the Department is piloting the registration of partial care facilities/day care centres for children with disabilities to give effect to the legislative mandate prescribed by Chapter 5 of the Children’s Act, 38 of 2005.  One registration was concluded already.

In addition, the department funds two social service organisations to provide capacity to ECD practitioners to encourage inclusion of children with special needs using the inclusive education and persona dolls approaches.

National Assembly Written Reply: 633 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

03 June 2021 - NW1493

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)Whether her department and/or the State Security Agency has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether her department and/or the State Security Agency took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

Reply to this Parliamentary Question has been logged with the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) in Parliament