Questions and Replies

04 October 2018 - NW2730

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the total number of non-profit organisations that are funded by her department, particularly for people with disability and autism and (b) amount was allocated to each organisation in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

a) The total number of non-profit organizations funded by the National Department of Social Development (NDSD) during the 2017-18 financial year are twenty-two (22) in number , and four (4) non - organisations are funded to deal with people with disabilities whilst only one (1) non - organisation is funded for autism.

b) The amounts allocated to each organization for 2017-18 financial year, particularly for services to people with disabilities and Autism are as follows:

No.

Name of organisation

2017/2018

1.

Autism South Africa (ASA)

R1 723 000

2.

Albinism Society of SA

(ASSA)

R 740 000

3.

South African Federation for Mental Health (SAFMH)

R1 000 000

4. 

DeafBlind South Africa (DBSA)

R 700 000

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

04 October 2018 - NW2618

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) What is the total number of (a) municipal managers in the country and (b)(i) women municipal managers and (ii) in which municipality is each employed?Please find here:

Reply:

Please find here: Reply

04 October 2018 - NW2498

Profile picture: Dube, Mr J J

Dube, Mr J J to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

To what extent has he found that the time spent by the Mayor of the City of Cape Town in court affected municipal service delivery, particularly to areas in dire need of services (details furnished

Reply:

We are always guided by the Constitution and the Legislative framework in dealing with matters of investigations and allowing judiciary processes to run their course. It is necessary during this period that the municipal service delivery responsibilities are not impacted upon and the administration continues to effectively deliver on their responsibilities. The implementation of service delivery programmes rests with the administration led by the Municipal Manager, which has the responsibility and obligation to continue their work regardless of the impasse experienced at political leadership level.

Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2579

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to him and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

The information was provided by National CoGTA and MISA Human Resources
 

1 (a) (i) Total number of Deputy Directors-General

3

ii) Total number of Chief Directors that are employed in (aa) an acting capacity

None

bb) Total number of Chief Directors employed in a permanent capacity

30

(b) What is the total number of women in each case

(i) Deputy Directors-Genera

None

(ii) Chief Directors

14


Please find here: 2. Entities

04 October 2018 - NW2666

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1780 on 18 June 2018, and in view of the fact that the Sebenza Police Station has four sectors, he has found that the optimal number of police officers for visible policing should actually be 64, in correlation with four members per shift per sector for four shifts; if not, how can the specified police station be expected to fulfil its requirement of two sector vehicles patrolling each sector at all times;(2) given the inevitability of police officers taking leave, including but not limited to family responsibility leave, sick leave, study leave and annual leave, what number of additional visible police officers should the police station have in order to ensure that two vehicles per sector are patrolling at all times? (2) given the inevitability of police officers taking leave, including but not limited to family responsibility leave, sick leave, study leave and annual leave, what number of additional visible police officers should the police station have in order to ensure that two vehicles per sector are patrolling at all times?

Reply:

( 1) The Sebenza Police Station is currently unable to fulfil the requirement of two vehicles, per sector, due to a shortage of resources.

(2) The Sebenza Police Station consists of four sectors, with two members, per sector, per shift and one vehicle. In order to fulfil the requirement of two vehicles, per sector, to patrol at all times, the following additional resources are needed:

Additional Requirements

Personnel

12

Vehicles

6



Original signed MAJOR GENERAL

f/PROVINCIAL COMMISSIONER: GAUTENG

NL NAPO

Date: 11 September 2018


Please find here: Reply to question 2666 recommended

04 October 2018 - NW2255

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) Which municipalities are affected by the intention of the Eastern Cape Provincial Government to establish interventions on instruction of his department, (b) on what legal provision will each intended intervention rely on, (c) what will be the timeline and (d) what are the expected outcomes of each intervention; (2) whether all interventions under section 139 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, have been exhausted; if not, why has the national and/or provincial executive not acted in terms of the specified constitutional obligation? NW2429E

Reply:

1.(a)  I am not aware of any municipalities affected by the Eastern Cape Provincial Government’s intention to establish interventions in that province, and neither I nor my Department have instructed the provincial government to invoke interventions in the province. I can only become aware of such municipalities, if any, once the provincial government has initiated the interventions and then submitted to me the requisite notices, because interventions are a prerogative of the provincial government. However, I have recently referred to the province a demand from the Legal Resources Centre for an intervention at Makana Local Municipality and a request from Hon. Terri Stander, MP, for an intervention at Enoch Mgijima Local Municipality, for the provincial government’s consideration. I was subsequently notified by the MEC for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs that the Provincial Government has intervened at Enoch Mgijima Local Municipality in terms of sections 139(1)(b) and 139(5) of the Constitution.

For reasons already stated above, I am also not aware as to: (b) on what legal provision will each intended intervention rely on, (c) what will be the timeline and (d) what are the expected outcomes of each intervention.

2. Regarding the second question, I am unable to discern what response or details Hon. Mileham wanted to elicit from me because his question is not easy for me to understand. Assuming that he wants to know whether all interventions in terms of section 139 of the Constitution have ever been implemented in the Eastern Cape, then the answer is “No”, not all interventions in terms of this section have ever been implemented in the Eastern Cape. According to records at my Department’s disposal, the provincial government has in the majority of cases invoked interventions in terms of section 139(1)(b) of the Constitution at its municipalities. I have observed that, sometimes, these interventions have been invoked simultaneously with section 139(5) of the Constitution, as is the case at Enoch Mgijima Local Municipality. However, the provincial government has never invoked an intervention in terms of section 139(4) of the Constitution.

I am also unable to provide a direct answer to the second part of this question, as to why the national and/or provincial executive have not acted in terms of the specified constitutional obligation. This is due to the fact that the constitutional obligation Hon. Mileham is referring to has not been specified in the question.

Ends

04 October 2018 - NW2238

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the debt owed to Mopani District Municipality, Limpopo, by (a) Ba-Phalaborwa, (b) Giyani, (c) Greater Letaba, (d) Maruleng and (e) Greater Tzaneen Local Municipalities, (i) what are the amounts owed as at the latest specified date for which information is available, (ii) for what period has the debt been outstanding, (iii) what is the reason for the non-payment, (iv) what steps have been taken to collect the debt by the District Municipality and (v) will his office intervene; if so, (aa) when and (bb) how?

Reply:

Please find here: Reply

04 October 2018 - NW2735

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Has her department at any point engaged the Moonlight Foundation for Autism; if so, (2) whether any undertakings were agreed to and/or promises made at the specified engagements; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The department of social development funds non-profit organisations in line with the policy on financial management act (PFMA). Annually the department through advertisements, calls for non-profit organisations to submit applications in form of a business proposal for funding. MOOFA submitted an application for funding for the 2016/17 financial year. As an emerging organisation, the department funded them to the amount of R800 000 for the 2016/17 financial year in line with their business proposal.

2. In accordance with the Policy on financial award, the department requests for periodical progress reports, financial statements, supporting documentations and proof of evidence. Site visits are also conducted periodically to assess progress and achievements in line with the business proposal. The monitoring and evaluation was conducted as done with all funded organisations. Subsequently MOOFA applied for the 2017/18 financial year. However due to non-compliance (Outstanding documents were not furnished VIZ: expenditure and financial statements). They were not considered for funding for the 2017/18 financial year. MOOFA was advised that due to non-compliance, the application for the 2017/18 financial year was unsuccessful. The department was awaiting outstanding documents to reconcile their reports from MOOFA.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

04 October 2018 - NW2668

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1788 on 18 June 2018, and in view of the fact that the Tembisa South Police Station has three sectors, he has found that the optimal number of police officers for visible policing should actually be 48, in correlation with four members per shift per sector for four shifts; if not, how can the specified police station be expected to fulfil its requirement of two sector vehicles patrolling each sector at all times; (2) given the inevitability of police officers taking leave, including but not limited to family responsibility leave, sick leave, study leave and annual leave, what number of additional visible police officers should the police station have in order to ensure that two vehicles per sector are patrolling at all times?

Reply:

(1) The Tembisa South Police Station is currently unable to fulfil the requirement of two vehicles, per sector, due to a shortage of resources.

(2) The Tembisa South Police Station consists of five sectors, with two members, per sector, per shift and one vehicle. In order to fulfil the requirement of two vehicles, per sector, to patrol at all times, the following additional resources are needed:

Additional Requirements

Personnel

56

Vehicles

2

Original signed MAJOR GENERAL

f/PROVINCIAL COMMISSIONER: GAUTENG

NLNAPO

Date: 11 September 2018

Please find here: Reply to question 2668 recommended

04 October 2018 - NW2613

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1) Whether he has been informed of any allegations of abuse of power and sexual harassment levelled against a certain person (details furnished); if so, (a) has he instituted an investigation into the allegations and (b) what steps has he taken to remedy the situation; 2) what measures exist within the entity to support members of staff who have experienced abuse, violence and sexual harassment?

Reply:

1. SALGA has not informed me of any allegations of the abuse of power and sexual harassment, levelled against its Chief Financial Officer.

(a) I was not informed of any allegations of the abuse of power and sexual harassment. Therefore, I have not instituted any investigations into these allegations.

(b) Not applicable.

2. According to the reply received from SALGA, the organization is also not aware of such allegations. The organization has no record of any complaint levelled against the Chief Financial Officer in terms of the organization’s Grievance Policy and Process. Nor has there ever been a complaint lodged via the anonymous channel that the organization has put in place terms of its Employee Health and Wellness Policy, that is managed through an external Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider namely, CAREWAYS.

The organization has a set of policies approved by the SALGA’s National Executive Committee that includes the following, amongst others:
• Code of ethics and business conduct – the policy objective is to ensure that everyone involved with SALGA, conducts business with the highest standards of ethics, integrity, desired business conduct and professional behavior and ensures that the integrity of both SALGA and its employees is not compromised.

• Harassment policy – the policy outlines SALGA’s stance on harassment, particularly sexual harassment, which constitutes discrimination and ensures a common understanding throughout SALGA, with regard to a misconduct of this nature and sets out the procedures to be adhered to in order to ensure that incidents of harassment are reported and are dealt with seriously, expeditiously and confidentially.

• Grievance Policy and Process – the policy has an objective of affording any employee or group of employees with a grievance as an opportunity to resolve such grievances internally in a reasonable and fair manner.
• Discipline and dismissal policy – the policy provides a code of conduct as a guideline for an unacceptable behavior, which stipulates provisions to regulate the management of misconduct and provides for dismissal of employees for reasons of misconduct.
• In addition to organizational policies, the organization periodically convenes the Women’s and Men’s Dialogue forums for SALGA staff to amongst others, increase women’s engagement in peacebuilding and improve attitudes and perceptions towards coexistence, trust building and appreciation of diversity and social cohesion.

Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2480

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance Traditional Affairs

a) What is the extent of land that is owned by each municipality, (b) what is the (i) location and (ii) size of the land and (c) how much of the specified land is (i) vacant and (ii) leased; (2) a) to whom is the specified land leased and (b) for what amount in each case; (3) has private investment taken place on the land; if so, what is the (a)(i) nature and (ii) value of the investment, (b) length of the investment and (c) company that is investing?NW2739E

Reply:

The Minister for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA) will not be in a position to respond to the question posed by the Honourable Member. Section 24 of Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA) gives the responsibility for land management use to municipalities. SPLUMA is administered by the Minister for Rural Development and Land Reform (DRDLR), who would be in a better position to provide a response to questions of this nature.  

04 October 2018 - NW2195

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) In light of her department’s alleged intention that 139 farms have been identified for land expropriation without compensation test cases, (a) where is each of the listed farms located, (b) how many hectares are each farm and (c) whether each farm is currently in (i) private, (ii) state or (iii) trust ownership; (2) for what purposes must every farm be expropriated; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. As I have already stated publically in response to these allegations, there is no list of arms earmarked for “land expropriation without compensation”. We will however continue to implement land reform in terms of existing laws including the Expropriation Act 63 of 1975 and the Property Valuations Act 17 of 2014 as well as existing provisions in section 42E of the Restitution of Land Rights Act 22 of 1994, together with any other applicable legislation approved by this Parliament that makes provision for expropriation. The matter on policy and related amendments to effect expropriation without compensation remains work in progress of this Parliament.

a),(b),(c)(i),(ii),(iii) Falls away.

(2) Falls away

(3) Falls away

04 October 2018 - NW2497

Profile picture: Dube, Mr J J

Dube, Mr J J to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

“What (a) is the total number of councillors who have been found to be doing business with the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality in the 2017-18 financial year and (b) action has been taken against each councillor?”

Reply:

a) The municipal council has not received any notification of a Councillor from the Auditor-General that any councilor is a party to, or beneficiary under a contract for the provision of goods or services. The municipal council has not received any notification that a councillor’s spouse, partner, business associate or close family member acquired or stands to acquire any direct benefit from a contract concluded with the municipality.

b) Not applicable

In terms of Schedule 1: Code of Conduct for Councillors, of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, item 5 on Disclosure of interest

1. A councillor must –

(a) disclose to the municipal council, or to any committee of which that councillor is a member, any direct or indirect personal or private business interest that that councillor, or any spouse, partner or business associate of that councillor may have in any matter before the council or the committee; and

b) withdraw from the proceedings of the council or committee when that matter is considered by the council or committee, unless the council or committee decides that the councillor's direct or indirect interest in the matter is trivial or irrelevant.

2. A councillor who, or whose spouse, partner, business associate or close family member, acquired or stands to acquire any direct benefit from a contract concluded with the municipality, must disclose full particulars of the benefit of which the councillor is aware at the first meeting of the municipal council at which it is possible for the councillor to make the disclosure

3. This section does not apply to an interest or benefit which a councillor, or a spouse, partner, business associate or close family member, has or acquires in common with other residents of the municipality.

Ends

04 October 2018 - NW2256

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any of the 15 municipalities that invested with the VBS Mutual Bank received (a) presentations and/or (b) instructions from any official of a certain political organisation (name furnished) at national or provincial level to do so; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what is the name of the person who made the presentation and/or issued the instruction, (ii) on which statutory grounds was the presentation and/or instruction made and (iii) on what date did each presentation and/or instruction take place?

Reply:

The Municipal Investment Regulation 12 state that the responsibility and risk arising from any investment transaction vests in the relevant municipality or municipal entity.

All the municipalities invested with VBS Mutual Bank confirmed that they did not receive any presentation from an official of political organisation at Provincial and/ National level to invest the funds.

(b) All the municipalities invested with VBS Mutual Bank confirmed that they did not receive any instruction from an official of political organisation at Provincial and/ National level to invest the funds.

Municipalities reflected that they used quotations from financial institutions to invest the funds in accordance with their municipal investment policies.

Given the response that no presentations made and/ instruction issued, the questions relating to (i), (ii) and (iii) are not applicable.

Section 13(1) of the Municipal Financial Management Act (MFMA) states that the Minister of Finance, acting with the concurrence of the Cabinet member responsible for local government, may prescribe a framework within which municipalities must (a) Conduct their cash management and investments and

(b) Invest monies not immediately required, (2) a municipality must establish an appropriate and effective cash management and investment policy in accordance with any framework that may be prescribed in terms of subsection (1).

Regulation 6 of the Municipal Investment Regulations state that a municipality or municipal entity may invest funds only in any of the following investment types:

a) Securities issued by the national government

(b) Listed corporate bonds with an investment grade rating from a nationally or intentionally recognized credit rating agency

(c) Deposits with banks registered in terms of the Banks Act 1990 (Act No 94 of 1990)

(d) Deposits with the Public Investment Commissioners as contemplated by the Public Investment Commissioners Act 1984(Act No.45 of 1984)

(e) Deposits with the Corporation for Public Deposits as contemplated by the Corporation for Public Deposits Act 1984(Act No. 46 of 1984)

(f) Banker’s acceptance certificates or negotiable certificates of deposits of banks registered in terms of the Banks Act 1990

(g) Guaranteed endowment policies with the intention of establishing a sinking fund

(h) Repurchase agreements with banks registered in terms of the Banks Act 1990, Municipal bonds issued by a municipality and

(j) Any other investment type as the minister may identify by regulation in terms of section 168 of the Act, in consultation with the Financial Service Board.


The investment with Mutual Bank is not permitted in terms of the Municipal Investment Regulations. The 15 municipalities invested funds contrary to the Municipal Financial Management Act and Municipal Investment Regulations.

Municipalities are prohibited to take instructions from external parties and/ official from a political organization to influence government processes, as it is deemed interference with the administration processes. Municipalities use government legislations, regulations and municipal policies to procure goods and services.



Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2630

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he intends to launch an independent investigation into the bus rapid transit of the City of Ekurhuleni; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No.

The Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs has not received any substantiated allegations involving the bus rapid transit of the City of Ekurhuleni that would require the Minister to act.

Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2704

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(a) Who are the top five companies or individuals with the highest allocation of fishing rights in the country and (b) what is the fishing rights allocation in each case?

Reply:

a) The top five companies or individuals with the highest allocation of fishing rights in the country are:

Ranking

Company

Number of Commercial Fishing Rights held

1

Premier Fishing SA (Pty) Ltd

9

2

Eyethu Fishing (Pty) Ltd

7

3

Dyer Eiland Visserye (Edms) Bpk

Impala Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Irvin & Johnson Limited

Letap cc

Viking Fishing Co (Deep Sea) (Pty) Ltd

6

4

BMC Visserye Bk

Combined Fishing Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

Ferro Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Fisherman Fresh cc

Hacky Fishing (Pty) Ltd

JC Fishing cc

Offshore Fishing Company (Pty) Ltd

5

5

Atlantis Seafood Products (Pty) Ltd

Balobi Fishing Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

Balobi Processors (Pty) Ltd

Bayana Bayana Fishing cc

Biz Afrika 131 (Pty) Ltd

Cape Fish Processors cc

Cyrel Burrel Fishing cc

DMA Fishing Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

Humansdorp Community Factory Workers (Pty) Ltd

Komicx Products (Pty) Ltd

Laaggety Visserye Bk

LM Fisheries (Pty) Ltd

Mayibuye Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Noordkaap Visserman Onderneming Bpk

Ocean Ukhozi Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Ocean View & Masiphumelele Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Quayside Fish Suppliers Cape (Pty) Ltd

Risar Fishing cc

Sceptre Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Sevlac Investments No 51 cc

Striker Fishing Ent. (Pty) Ltd

Ukloba Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Ukuloba Kulungile Investments (Pty) Ltd

Ulwandle Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Unathi-Wena Fishing cc

Viking Inshore Fishing (Pty) Ltd

Visko Seeprodukte (Pty) Ltd

4

(b) The fishing rights allocation in each case were:    

Company name

Number of rights

Sector

TAC/TAE

Premier Fishing SA (Pty) Ltd

9

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

628.921 tons

   

Hake longline

43.949 tons

   

Horse mackerel

448.8 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-15721.7 tons Sardine-4396.96 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-307.79 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-1595.6 tons

   

South coast rock lobster

134625 kilograms

   

Squid

74 crew

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

64307 tons

EYETHU FISHING (PTY) LTD

7

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

3719.462 tons

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-19.248 tons Hake-285.038 tons

   

Hake longline

52.253 tons

   

Horse mackerel

1433.1 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-3894.25 tons Sardine-1262.19 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-88.35 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-395.11 tons

Dyer Eiland Visserye (Edms) Bpk

6

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

130.284 tons

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-13.11 tons Hake-163.862 tons

   

Horse mackerel

469.2 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-175.91 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-12.31 tons

Impala Fishing (Pty) Ltd

6

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

533.96 tons

   

Hake longline

102.745 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-3498.64 tons Sardine-534.07 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-37.38 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-355.06 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

IRVIN & JOHNSON

6

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

34503.575 tons

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-32.502 tons Hake-1509.417 tons

   

Horse mackerel

1101.6 tons

   

Patagonian toothfish

77.05 tons

   

Squid

16 crew

LETAP CC

6

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.642 tons Hake-163.862 tons

   

Horse mackerel

484.5 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-223.78 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-15.66 tons

   

Squid

44 crew

Viking Fishing Co (Deep Sea) (Pty) Ltd

6

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

2261.225 tons

   

Hake longline

48.059 tons

   

Horse mackerel

1058.25 tons

   

KZN prawn trawl

1 right

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

BMC VISSERYE BK

5

Demersal Shark

1 vessel

   

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.936 tons Hake-173.94 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Squid

15 crew

Combined Fishing Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

5

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

666.888 tons

   

Hake longline

70.134 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-1166.99 tons Sardine-411.4 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-28.8 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-117.99 tons

FERRO FISHING (PTY) LTD

5

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

45.829 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

2582 tons

Fisherman Fresh Cc

5

Demersal Shark

1 vessel

   

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.642 tons Hake-122.897 tons

   

Horse mackerel

494.7 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-223.078 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-15.66 tons

HACKY FISHING (PTY) LTD

5

Demersal Shark

1 vessel

   

Hake longline

93.269 tons

   

KZN prawn trawl

1 right

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Tuna pole

3 vessels

JC Fishing CC

5

Horse mackerel

252.45 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-222.02 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-15.54 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

2582 tons

Offshore Fishing Company (Pty) Ltd

5

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

2032.19 tons

   

Horse mackerel

484.5 tons

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-2192.78 tons Sardine-366.53 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-25.66 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-222.99 tons

   

Squid

18.5 crew

Atlantis Seafood Products (Pty) Ltd

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-8.64 tons Hake-245.793 tons

   

Horse mackerel

765 tons

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

1990 tons

BALOBI FISHING ENTERPRISES (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake handline

37 crew

   

Hake longline

77.409 tons

   

Squid

97 crew

BALOBI PROCESSORS (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake handline

48 crew

   

Hake longline

78.637 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-313.51 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-21.95 tons

Bayana Bayana Fishing CC

 

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-145.68 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-10.2 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

BIZ AFRIKA 131 (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

43.949 tons

   

Squid

16 crew

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

Cape Fish Processors Cc

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.642 tons Hake-163.862 tons

   

Hake longline

59.029 tons

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-2965.32 tons Sardine-868.85 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-60.82 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-300.93 tons

Cyrel Burrel Fishing CC

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.642 tons Hake-163.862 tons

   

Hake longline

75.639 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

DMA FISHING ENTERPRISES (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

2026.107 tons

   

Hake longline

333.753 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-1013.36 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-70.94 tons

HUMANSDORP COMMUNITY FACTORY WORKERS (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

66.161 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-266.6 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-18.66 tons

   

Squid

16 crew

Komicx Products (Pty) Ltd

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-743.56 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-52.05 tons

   

Squid

16 crew

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

Laaggety Visserye Bk

4

Hake longline

36.167 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-223.78 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-15.66 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

2582 tons

LM FISHERIES (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake handline

25 crew

   

Hake longline

100.83 tons

   

Squid

25 crew

Mayibuye Fishing (Pty) Ltd

4

Hake deep sea trawl

1915.759 tons

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.642 tons Hake-90.698 tons

   

Horse mackerel

96.9 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-223.78 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-15.66 tons

NOORDKAAP VISSERMAN ONDERNEMING BPK

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

1306.45 tons

   

Hake longline

127.745 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

OCEAN UKHOZI FISHING (PTY) LTD

4

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-9.642 tons Hake-163.862 tons

   

Hake longline

104.259 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

3436 tons

OCEAN VIEW & MASIPHUMELELE FISHING (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

67.837 tons

   

Squid

27 crew

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

QUAYSIDE FISH SUPPLIERS CAPE (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

522.637 tons

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-1307.03 tons Sardine-457.44 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-32.02 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-133.15 tons

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

3624 tons

RISAR FISHING CC

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

96.244 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-853.4 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-59.74 tons

   

South coast rock lobster

11408 kilograms

Sceptre Fishing (Pty) Ltd

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

75.168 tons

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-336.09 tons Sardine-679.75 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-47.58 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-34.64 tons

   

Squid

54 crew

Sevlac Investments No 51 CC

 

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Horse mackerel

504.9 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

Striker Fishing Ent. (Pty) Ltd

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

43.949 tons

   

Squid

41 crew

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

UKLOBA FISHING (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

219.811 tons

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-4434.56 tons Sardine-624.39 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-43.71 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-450.32 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

UKULOBA KULUNGILE INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD

4

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-8.64 tons Hake-245.793 tons

   

Horse mackerel

765 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

   

West coast rock lobster (offshore)

1990 tons

ULWANDLE FISHING (PTY) LTD

4

Hake longline

326.471 tons

   

Horse mackerel

499.8 tons

   

Small pelagics

Anchovy-2333.98 tons Sardine-582.73 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-40.79 tons Sardine by-catch - Anchovy-237.07 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

UNATHI-WENA FISHING CC

4

Demersal Shark

1 vessel

   

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake longline

68.03 tons

   

Large pelagics

1 vessel

VIKING INSHORE FISHING (PTY) LTD

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake inshore trawl

Sole-95.946 tons Hake-787.931 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-250.28 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-17.52 tons

   

Tuna pole

1 vessel

Visko Seeprodukte (Pty) Ltd

4

Fish processing establishment

1 right

   

Hake deep sea trawl

398.941 tons

   

Small pelagics

Sardine-222.12 tons Sardine by catch (juv)-with DIRECTED Sardine-15.55 tons

   

Squid

86 crew

04 October 2018 - NW2586

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Energy

(1) (a} What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii} chief directors that are employed in (aa} an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b} what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a} what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii} directors of each entity reporting to him and (b} what is the total number of women in each case? NW2876E

Reply:

(1} (a) (i) Four (4) Deputy Directors-General.

(ii} (aa} Five (5) Chief Directors in acting capacity.

(bb} Eighteen (18} Chief Directors in permanent capacity


(b) Deputy Director-General - One (1) Women;

Chief Directors in acting capacity- one (1) Women; and

Chief Directors in permanent capacity-Seven (7) Women.

(2) (a} (i} (ii} Chief Executive Officers and Directors do not report to the Minister they report to the Board.

(b) Not applicable

04 October 2018 - NW2495

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Did any metropolitan municipality in the past five years outsource a function which was previously insourced; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was outsourced, (b) on what date, (c) to whom and (d) what was the total monetary value of the contract? NW2742E

Reply:

I request the Honourable Member, Mr L G Mokoena (EFF), to kindly direct the question to National Treasury, as they are the relevant department to respond to the question.

Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2667

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1779 on 18 June 2018, and in view of the fact that the Tembisa Police Station has seven sectors, he has found that the optimal number of police officers for visible policing should actually be 112, in correlation with four members per shift per sector for four shifts; if not, how can the specified police station be expected to fulfil its requirement of two sector vehicles patrolling each sector at all times;(2) given the inevitability of police officers taking leave, including but not limited to family responsibility leave, sick leave, study leave and annual leave, what number of additional visible police officers should the police station have in order to ensure that two vehicles per sector are patrolling at all times? (2) given the inevitability of police officers taking leave, including but not limited to family responsibility leave, sick leave, study leave and annual leave, what number of additional visible police officers should the police station have in order to ensure that two vehicles per sector are patrolling at all times?

Reply:

(1) The Tembisa Police Station is currently unable to fulfil the requirement of two vehicles, per sector, due to a shortage of resources.

(2) The Tembisa Police Station consists of seven sectors, with two members, per sector, per shift and one vehicle. In order to fulfil the requirement of two vehicles, per sector, to patrol at all times, the following additional resources are needed:

Additional Requirements

Personnel

28

Vehicles

14

Original signed MAJOR GENERAL

f/PROVINCIAL COMMISSIONER: GAUTENG

NL NAPO

Date: 11 September 2018


Please find here: Reply to question 2667 recommended

04 October 2018 - NW2732

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the names of the persons who serve in her department’s Review Committee for Non-profit Organisations?

Reply:

N/A

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

04 October 2018 - NW2632

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department is taking any steps against former Acting Chief Executive Officer of the SA Social Security Agency, Ms Pearl Bhengu, following the recent findings of the Constitutional Court; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has not and does not intend taking any steps against former Acting Chief Executive Officer of the South African Social Security Agency, Ms Pearl Bhengu.

The Department cannot establish, from the findings of the Constitutional Court, any element upon which the Department can take any step against the former Acting Chief Executive Officer, Ms Pearl Bhengu.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

04 October 2018 - NW1719

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(a) What total amount of land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her in each province is (i) vacant and (ii) unused or has no purpose and (b) what is the (i) location and (ii) size of each specified plot of land; (2) (a) how much of the land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her has been leased out for private use and (b) what is the (i) Rand value of each lease and (ii)(aa) location and (bb) size of each piece of land

Reply:

No

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

INGONYAMA TRUST BOARD

  1. (a) (i)

Approximately 27 801 hectares, which is primarily mountainous land and land with indigenous forests.

No land is vacant and unused or has no purpose as the land held by the Ingonyama Trust is used communally for residential, ploughing and grazing by the local traditional council communities.

(ii)

0 hectares

 

(b) (i)

Columns 1,2,3 and 4 of Annexure A titled “Vacant Land”

Falls away.

(ii)

Last column of Annexure A.

Falls away.

  1. (a)

Approximately 2 309 078 Hectares.

Approximately 61 671 hectares

(b) (i)

Last 2 columns of Annexure B titled “Leased Land”

Annexure C

(b) (ii) (aa)

Columns 1,2,3 and 4 of Annexure B

Annexure D

(bb)

Last column of Annexure B

Annexure D

04 October 2018 - NW2471

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) Since July 2016, what is the total number of persons who were appointed at senior management level at Kouga and Nelson Mandela Municipalities (b) what is the position in which each person was appointed, (c) what is the name of each person, (d) on what date was each person appointed, (e) what is the qualification of each person who has been appointed and (f) what is the name of each member of the interviewing panel?Please find here: Reply

Reply:

Please find here: Reply

04 October 2018 - NW2702

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to (a) his reply to question 1681 on 26 June 2018 and (b) the reply by the Minister of Energy to question 2351 on 29 August 2018, what is the (i) name and (ii) location of each ward in the country that does not have access to electricity as at 1 June 2018?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has engaged various municipalities and stakeholders in an attempt to collate the requested information and through this process we have learned that the requested information is only collated through the Stats SA Census. The last Census took place in 2011

Should the Honourable Member have an interest in viewing the requested information at municipal level, the information can be obtained on the following website: www.wazimap.co.za .

Ends

04 October 2018 - NW2642

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) With regard to contracts awarded to a certain company (name furnished) by the Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality in the (a)(i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17 and (iv) 2017-18 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018, (aa) what is the total rand value of each contract, (bb) what are the exact details of each contract and (cc) what is the name of each director of each company awarded a contract; (2) whether each specified company has been awarded contracts by any other municipalities in Limpopo since 2016; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2930E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has sent a letter to Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality to provide the relevant information. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2203

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) What is the Government’s position regarding the upgrading of security of tenure of persons who occupy land under the Ingonyama Trust; (2) whether the Government intends to provide such persons with legal titles to the land that they occupy; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2371E

Reply:

  1. The Government’s position is that all the people residing on communal land, including on land controlled by the KwaZulu-Natal Ingonyama Trust, should have secure tenure and should not be subjected to their tenure rights being taken away without their consent.
  2. The Government intends to initiate legislation that will provide for a variety of tenure forms that may be selected by people in communal areas in accordance with their preferences.

04 October 2018 - NW2609

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) are the names of municipalities that have land invasion units and (b) number of (i) evictions did each unit engage in and (ii) persons were (aa) evicted, (bb) arrested, (cc) injured and (dd) killed on each specified occasion in each of the past three financial years? NW2902E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has engaged the Provincial Departments responsible for Local Government to obtain the relevant information. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Ends.

04 October 2018 - NW2488

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Since July 2016, what is the total number of persons who were appointed at senior management level at Langeberg, Matzikama, Mossel Bay, Oudtshoorn, Overstrand, Cederberg, Hessequa, Knysna, Cape Winelands, Eden, Overberg, West Coast, Beaufort West, Bergrivier, Bitou, Breede Valley, Cape Agulhas, City of Cape Town, Theewaterskloof, Overstrand, Stellenbosch, Swartland, Swellendam, Saldanha Bay, Prince Albert and Witzenberg municipalities, (b) what is the position in which each person was appointed, (c) what is the name of each person, (d) on what date was each person appointed, (e) what is the qualification of each person who has been appointed and (f) what is the name of each member of the interviewing panel?

Reply:

A Parliamentary question was received regarding the details number of persons who were appointed at senior management level at municipalities since July 2016.

Section 54A and 56 of the Systems Act prescribe that –

  1. if the post of municipal manager or a manager directly accountable to the municipal manager becomes vacant, the municipal council must advertise the post in a print-media circulating nationally and select from the pool of candidates a suitable person who complies with the prescribed requirements for appointment to the post;
  2. b) a person appointed as a municipal manager or manager directly accountable to the municipal manager must at least have the skills, expertise, competencies and qualifications as prescribed;
  3. a municipal council must appoint a municipal manager;
  4. (d) a municipal council after consultation with the municipal manager, must appoint a manager directly accountable to the municipal manager;
  5. a decision to appoint a municipal manager or manager directly accountable to the municipal manager is null and void if the person appointed does not meet the prescribed skills, expertise, competencies and qualifications;
  6. the municipal council must within 14 days of appointment inform the MEC responsible for local government of the appointment process and outcome;
  7. the MEC for local government must within 14 days of receipt of the information referred to above and after satisfying himself/ herself that the appointment complies with the prescribed requirements and that the appointment was made in accordance with the Systems Act, submit a copy thereof to the Minister within 14 days of receipt;
  8. the municipal council must re-advertise the post if there is no suitable candidate who complies with the prescribed requirements; and
  9. the municipal council may, in special circumstances and on good cause shown, apply in writing to the Minister to waive the skills, expertise, competencies and qualifications as prescribed if it is unable to attract suitable candidates.

The Local Government: Regulations on Appointment and Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers (“the Regulations”) prescribe that a municipal council must appoint a selection panel of at least three and not more than five persons to make recommendations for the appointment of candidates to vacant senior manager posts.

(a) In the case of the appointment of a municipal manager, the selection panel must consist of at least the following persons:

(i) The mayor, who will be the chairperson, or his or her delegate

(ii) A councillor designated by the municipal council and

(iii) At least one other person, who is not a councillor or a staff member of the municipality, and who has expertise or experience in the area of the advertised post.

(b) In the case of the appointment of a manager directly accountable to a municipal manager, the selection panel must consist of at least the following persons:
(i) The municipal manager, who will be the chairperson

(ii) A member of the mayoral committee or councillor who is the portfolio head of the relevant portfolio and

(iii) At least one other person, who is not a councillor or a staff member of the municipality, and who has expertise or experience in the area of the advertised post.

Ends

04 October 2018 - NW2539

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to two cases, CAS 259/10/2015 and 261/10/2015, registered at the Worcester Police Station, (a) what are the reasons that the two cases are delayed and not sent to the State prosecutor at the Worcester Magistrate Court, (b) why was the Western Cape Police Ombudsman not able to conclude on the cases subsequent to them being referred to him and (c) what is the usual time frame for such cases to be concluded and referred to the prosecuting authorities;(2) whether he has found that the delay is intentional; if not, why has there been a time delay of three years; if so, (a) what steps will his department take to speed up the investigations and (b) what consequences will the officials who are not dealing with the cases promptly suffer? (2) whether he has found that the delay is intentional; if not, why has there been a time delay of three years; if so, (a) what steps will his department take to speed up the investigations and (b) what consequences will the officials who are not dealing with the cases promptly suffer?

Reply:

(1)(a) The two case dockets, Worcester, CAS 259/10/2015 and 261/10/2015, were submitted to the Senior Public Prosecutor (SPP), on several occasions and returned with guidance on further investigations to be conducted. The last date that the case dockets were returned, was on 5 September 2018 and the Investigating Officer is busy dealing with the instructions, which were issued by the SPP.

(1)(b) The Ombudsman on Policing, in the Western Cape, reports to the Provincial Government and not to the South African Police Service (SAPS). The SAPS can, therefore, not respond to this part of the question.

(1 )(c) The complexity of these cases differ from one to the other and therefore, a standard acceptable time frame cannot be determined.

(2) It has been found that the delay was not intentional. The case was no//e prosequi (refused to prosecute) and was only re-opened by the SAPS, after the complainant approached the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA),to seek clarity.

(2)(a) Not applicable.

(2)(b) Not applicable.

Original signed LIEUTENANT GENERAL

DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: DETECTIVE SERVICE

TC MOSIKILI

Date: 6 September 2018

Reply to question 2539 recommended/not recommended

Original signed LIEUTENANT GENERAL

DEPUTY NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: CRIME DETECTION

LJ TSUMANE

Date: 6 September 2018

Reply to question 2539 recommended4

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITHOLE (SOEG)
DATE: 2018-09-26


Reply to question 2539 approved


MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date: 01/10/2018

04 October 2018 - NW2445

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

  • The Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries does not own land but administers it on behalf of the Department of Public Works. The land is leased to prospective producers as per prescripts defined and agreed to.
  • With regards to ownership of land by entities reporting to the Minister, only the Agricultural Research Council owns land but there are no external investors on the current land under its administration.

04 October 2018 - NW2612

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What is the total number of graduates who were trained as social workers at the expense of the Government and (b) of the specified number of graduates, what is the total number of social workers who are still unemployed?

Reply:

a) The total number of social work graduates trained through the scholarship programme is 10 760.

b) Total number of graduates who are still unemployed is 4 192.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

03 October 2018 - NW2655

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in August 2018, he discussed with President Joseph Kabila the (a) alleged maltreatment of Mr Moise Katumbi, (b) deployment of the armed forces to Kasumbalesa and Kinshasa, where violence was used to oppress peaceful supporters of the specified person, (c) use of controversial electronic voting machines despite domestic and international opposition, (d) credibility of voters’ rolls with particular reference to allegations of significant numbers of duplicates and (e) continued detention of political prisoners; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the discussions in each case?

Reply:

a) During the discussions, I was briefed by my host about the matter of Mr Katumbi during which the government of the DRC explained their national legal requirements that prevented Mr Katumbi from registering in the national elections.

b No. The deployment of the army or troops in any country is the sovereign right of the government of the day.

c) - (d) During the discussions, I was briefed about the DRC’s preparedness to hold the upcoming elections.

I wish to refer the Honourable Member to the attached Joint Statement that was issued by the Presidency on 10 August 2018 on my Working Visit to the DRC. As part of statement, it was stated that:

“The two Heads of State noted that the political and security situation is calm throughout the national territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and took note of the significant progress made in the ongoing electoral process in the country, with regard to the commitments made in accordance with the electoral calendar published on 5 November 2017 by the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI) and providing for the organization of presidential, legislative and provincial elections at the end this year.

“The two Heads of State noted, among other things, the continued financing of the electoral process by the Congolese Government, which has just completed the stage of submitting candidatures for the presidential, legislative and provincial elections, in compliance with the constitutional rules and national laws of the Democratic Republic of Congo”.

(e) The matter of the detention of any individual was not discussed during the meeting.

03 October 2018 - NW2561

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

With regard to his speech that he delivered during the Armed Forces Day celebrations in Kimberley on 21 February 2018 (details furnished), has he found that the (a) former President, Mr J G Zuma, intended to remain in power by force and (b) army considered intervening in the politics and democratic processes of the country; if not, what is the position in this regard in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The speech that the President delivered in Kimberley as the Commander-in-Chief of the South African National Defence Force on the occasion of Armed Forces Day, on 21 February 2018, does not make reference to any of the assertions made in the question of the Honourable Member.

The section of the speech quoted by the Honourable Member reflects the primary mandate of the SANDF, as prescribed in the Defence Act No. 42 of 2002, Section 2(b), which states: “The primary object of the Defence Force is to defend and protect the Republic, its people and its territorial integrity”.

The President’s speech on Armed Forces Day 2018 is attached for information.

03 October 2018 - NW2253

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) Whether she will furnish Mr K P Robertson with copies of the rental agreements signed between certain companies (names furnished) relating to the Mala Mala land claim; (2) whether she will furnish Mr K P Robertson with copies of the financial statements indicating the (a) revenue received by the specified community investment company from the specified management company and (b) payments made to beneficiaries in the N’wandlamharhi community property association (CPA); (3) which members of the specified CPA are (a) receiving and (b) not receiving any payments?

Reply:

1. No. The current lease agreement between (names furnished) is a private document which involve third parties and therefore the Minister is not in a position to furnish such documents without the consent of the parties.

2. (a),(b) No. (name furnished) is a private company and does not report to the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform.

3. (a) Please refer to Annexure A.

(b) The Department does not have a list of members who are not receiving payment.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2333

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2510E

Reply:

1. (a)(i) The Department is currently facing 48 (those with more than one applicant counted as one) disputes.

(a)(ii) No disputes are currently being faced by the Ingonyama Trust Board (ITB) and the Office of the Valuer-General, both entities under the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(b) These vary but include the following:

  • Non-renewal of fixed-term contracts
  • Performance assessments and related bonuses
  • Non OSD translations
  • Non-payment of leave days not taken
  • Non- upgrading to higher salary levels
  • Placement on pre-cautionary suspension
  • Outcomes of Disciplinary Enquiries

(c) Nature of dispute. This includes:

  • Unfair dismissals in terms of section 186(1) of LRA
  • Unfair labour practice relating to promotion in terms of section 186(2)(a) of the LRA
  • Interpretation of collective agreements
  • Unfair labour practice relating to benefits in terms of section 186(2)(a) of the LRA
  • Unfair labour practice relating to unfair suspension of an employee or disciplinary action short of dismissal in terms of section 186(2)(b)

(d)(i) see information relating to dates of disputes reported Annexure A.

(d)(ii) see information relating to dates of disputes resolved Annexure B.

(2) (a)( i) The Department dismissed 51 employees during the past 5 years

(a)(ii) Reasons for dismissal

8 employees dismissed for absenteeism.

1 employee dismissed for assault.

6 employees dismissed for fraud / forged signature / fraudulent medical certificate and overtime claim.

1 employee dismissed for damage to state vehicle

7 employees dismissed for abscondment

1 employee dismissed for falsification of performance assessment

1 employee dismissed for having two employment contacts

1 employee dismissed for insubordination

1 employee dismissed for irregular appointment of service provider

6 employees dismissed for irregularities in Land Reform projects

1 employee dismissed for misrepresentation of beneficiary information

3 employees dismissed for misrepresentation of disciplinary record from previous employment.

1 employee dismissed for misrepresentation of information related to service provider

1 employee dismissed for misrepresentation of criminal record on appointment

2 employees dismissed for misuse of GG vehicle / use for private purpose

3 employees dismissed for negligence and misrepresentation of information in handling Land Reform projects

1 employee dismissed for negligence with regard to payment and verification of restitution claimants

2 employees dismissed for soliciting bribe from a land reform beneficiary

1 employee dismissed for unauthorized use of GG vehicle

1 employee dismissed for unauthorized use of hired vehicle

1 employee dismissed for financial misconduct regarding e-cadastre project

1 employee dismissed for unauthorized use of Ministry letterhead.

(b)(i) no employee was paid a severance package in the past 5 years

(b)(ii) no monetary value as there were no severance packages.

03 October 2018 - NW2409

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

Since the inception of the Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) programme, what (a) number of beneficiaries have participated in the programme, (b) extent of land in terms of the (i) number of farms and (ii) total hectares has been purchased and/or leased by or for beneficiaries through the LRAD programme in each (aa) year and (bb) province and (c) extent of this land has been transferred to the ownership of beneficiaries? NW2657E

Reply:

a) 72 000 beneficiaries participated in the programme.

b) (i) 2 400 farms.

(ii) 1 167 000 hectares.

(aa),(bb) Please refer to Annexure A.

c) 1 167 000 hectares were transferred; land acquired through the Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) programme is not leased.

03 October 2018 - NW2653

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Purdon, Mr RK to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) With reference to the reply to question 3275 on 13 November 2017, (a) what is the current status of the outstanding land claims lodged for the (i) Tamboekiesvlei Farm 858, Portions 1 to 16 and (ii) Tamboekiesvlei Farm 859, Portions 1 to 3, in the Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape and (b) what is the status of Section 42D which was due to be submitted in the last quarter of the 2017-18 financial year; (2) whether her department will assist with the (a) removal and (b) relocation of illegal occupants; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the expected timeframe for claimants to receive their title deeds; (4) whether her department will assist the claimants with regard to restoration

Reply:

1. (a),(i),(ii),(b) The office is currently waiting for the recommendations of the valuation from the Office of the Valuer General. The community will receive financial compensation. The State Land Unit will upgrade their tenancy rights to ownership.

2. (a),(b) The people occupying the claimed land will not be removed or relocated; the claimants have agreed to continue residing with them.

3. The Department is unable to set timeframes for transfer of title deeds, as the claim is not yet settled due to the outstanding valuation report from the Office of the Valuer General.

4. Yes. The Department will upgrade the claimant community´s tenure rights on the claimed land.

03 October 2018 - NW2713

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

With reference to her reply to question 2341 on 30 August 2018, what is the size of the land for each outstanding land claim?

Reply:

The size of the land is only determined when claims are processed and researched, as some of the claims could be found to be invalid. Part of the process requires that inspections in loco be conducted. It is only after such inspections that the correct size of the claimed land will be determined.

03 October 2018 - NW2639

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the US$ 100 billion in new investment he intends to generate over the next five years includes investment by (a) public corporations and (b) general government; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) - (b) The investment drive to mobilise $100 billion over five years targets both the private sector (which includes public and unlisted companies) and general government, including state owned enterprises. The investment drive seeks to encourage investors to invest in the economy through greenfield and brownfield projects. While the emphasis is on fixed investment, government is not prescriptive on the investments.

03 October 2018 - NW2325

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2502E

Reply:

DAFF RESPONSE

(1)   (a) WHAT NUMBER OF LABOUR DISPUTES ARE CURRENTLY BEING FACED BY (i) HIS DEPARTMENT AND (ii) THE ENTITIES REPORTING TO HIM, (b) WHAT IS THE CAUSE OF EACH DISPUTE, (c) WHAT IS THE NATURE OF EACH DISPUTE AND (d) ON WHAT DATE WAS EACH DISPUTE (i) REPORTED AND (ii) RESOLVED;

Q(1)(a)(i): Number of current disputes face by the department

Q(1)(a)(ii): Number of current disputes face by entities of the department

Q(1)(b): cause of each dispute

Q(1)(c): nature of dispute

Q(1)(d)(i):

Date of dispute referral

Q(1)(d)(ii):

Date of dispute resolved

Twenty (20)

NA

Employee not shortlisted for a post she applied for.

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

03 November 2017

Awaiting arbitration award from General Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (GPSSBC).

   

Precautionary suspension

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

8 September 2016

Arbitration adjourned to 4 & 5 September 2018.

   

Job Evaluation results

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

29 January 2018

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Resignation due to allegedly intolerable work environment

Unfair dismissal (constructive dismissal)

17 October 2016

Awaiting arbitration award from GPSSBC.

   

Job grading

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

17 February 2018

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Pay progression

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

7 July 2017

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Dismissal

Unfair dismissal (s186(1)

10 August 2017

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC after matter was postponed.

   

Dismissal

Unfair dismissal (s186(1)

22 November 2017

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Job Evaluation (JE) results

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

15 December 2017

Awaiting arbitration award from GPSSBC.

   

Implementation of Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD)

Interpretation and application of collective agreement

21 July 2017

Awaiting arbitration award.

   

Disciplinary sanction: suspension without pay

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

13 November 2017

Arbitration adjourned to 11 & 12 September 2018.

   

Precautionary suspension

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

18 January 2017

Arbitration adjourned to 5, 6 & 7 September 2018.

   

Leave payout

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

12 February 2018

Matter withdrawn on 21 August 2018.

   

Discrimination during salary upgrades

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

12 May 2017

Awaiting ruling on jurisdiction.

   

Suspension

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

5 November 2017

Part-heard matter. Commissioner has given the date of 17 September 2018 as the date for finalisation of the matter.

   

Dismissal

Unfair Dismissal

6 February 2018

Settlement agreement entered into with the applicants. Awaiting Ministerial approval. Minister has approved the submission. Human Resources unit to facilitate the JE process.

   

Conditions of employment

Unfair Labour Practice (conditions of employment)

09May 2018

Settlement agreement entered into with NEHAWU. The post is to be job evaluated.

   

Victimization

Unfair Labour Practice (occupational detriment).

09 July 2018

Awaiting arbitration date

   

Non-payment of pay progression

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

17 June 2018

Awaiting award to be issued by the Arbitrator.

   

Payment of subsidized vehicle.

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

03 November 2017

Arbitration scheduled for 3 October 2018.

(2) (a)(i) WHAT NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN DISMISSED BY HIS DEPARTMENT IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS AND (ii) FOR WHAT REASON WAS EACH EMPLOYEE DISMISSED AND (b)(i) WHAT NUMBER OF THE SPECIFIED EMPLOYEES WERE PAID SEVERANCE PACKAGES AND (ii) WHAT WAS THE MONETARY VALUE OF EACH SEVERANCE PACKAGE? 

Q2(a)(i): Number of dismissed employees in the past five years

Q2(a)(ii): reason for dismissal for each employee

Q2(b)(i): employees paid severance packages

Q2(b)(ii): monetary value of each severance package

Twenty two (22)

Employee 1: Fraud

None (0)

R0.00

 

Employee 2: Fraud

   
 

Employee 3: Absenteeism and misuse of state vehicle

   
 

Employee 4: Gross insubordination

   
 

Employee 5: Fraud

   
 

Employee 6: Fraud

   
 

Employee 7: Assault

   
 

Employee 8: Abscondments

   
 

Employee 9: Assault

   
 

Employee 10: Absenteeism

   
 

Employee 11: Absenteeism

   
 

Employee 12: Abscondment

   
 

Employee 13: Fraud

   
 

Employee 14: Rhino poaching

   
 

Employee 15: Fraud

   
 

Employee 16: Timber theft

   
 

Employee 17: Fraud

   
 

Employee 18: Abscondment

   
 

Employee 19: Rhino poaching

   
 

Employee 20: threatening to kill supervisor and gross insubordination

   
 

Employee 21: Absenteeism

   
 

Employee 22: Fraud

   

ARC RESPONSE

1.There are only two disputes in this category that are in superior courts of law in the ARC.

a) One is in the Labour Court regarding the calculation of interest in the past dispute. The other is in the High Court as a claim for consequential damages for dismissal.

b) The cause of the labour court dispute was the result of a finding by the CCMA that the failure to renew a fixed term contract amounted to a dismissal.

2. a. (i) 36 employees were dismissed and reasons are attached to the annexure to this document.

    (ii)Reasons are attached as annexure to this document.

b. (i) The ARC has not offered any employee severance package during this period.

    (ii)The question is not applicable.

NAMC RESPONSE

1. None

2. (a)(1) 4 Employees

(ii) Misconduct

(b) (i) None

(ii) None

SAVC RESPONSE

1 (a) The SAVC does not have any current labour disputes.

2 (a) (i) The SAVC had one (1) dismissal in the past (5) years; and

(ii) The employee was dismissed for Gross Misconduct due to gross continued abuse of organisation resources / property.

(b) (i) One (1) employee was paid a separation package subsequent to a settlement agreement during a disciplinary hearing; and

(ii) The monetary value of the voluntary separation package was R107 484.00 equivalent to three month’s salary.

OBP RESPONSE

No

Cause of the dispute

Nature of dispute

Date reported

Date resolved

Outcome

1

The employee was dismissed after an internal disciplinary hearing for being AWOL.

Employee alleged unfair dismissal and lodged a dispute at the CCMA.

April 2017

On going

CCMA ruled in favour of OBP.

The employee has referred the matter to the Labour Court

2

The employee was suspended for gross violation of OBP manufacturing practices.

Employee lodged 2 cases of unfair suspension with CCMA

February 2017

December 2017

The CCMA ruled in favour of OBP on both occasions

3

The employee was dismissed for gross violation of OBP manufacturing practices.

Employee lodges a case with the CCMA for access to information

August 2017

28 February 2018

The CCMA ruled in favour of OBP

4

The employee was dismissed for gross violation of OBP manufacturing practices.

Unfair dismissal lodged at CCMA

August 2017

On going

The matter is set down for 30 August 2018

5

Employee was dismissed for gross insubordination

Unfair dismissal

June 2017

December 2017

Matter settled

6

Employee was dismissed for not following quality procedures.

Unfair dismissal

February 2018

June 2018

Matter settled

7

Employee alleges unfair labour practice for equal pay for equal pay

Unfair labour dispute

February 2018

On-going

Matter set down for 26 July 2018 and will continue on 10 and 11 September 2018

8

Wage Bargaining

The Unions rejected the last offer from OBP and lodged an MMI with CCMA

July 2018

Ongoing

The matter is set down for 24 August 2018

9

Unfair dismissal

The employee refer the matter to the labour court

2015

On-going

The matter is set down for March 2019

PPECB RESPONSE

(1)  (a) The PPECB currently has one dispute that has been reffered to the CCMA.Details are depicted below:

No.

(b)

Cause of Dispute

(c)

Nature of Dispute

(d)(i)

Date Reported

Date

CCMA

Outcome

Remarks

1

Contract Employee has an expectation of permanent employment.

Section 198 of Labour Relations Act

25-May-18

12-Jun-18

Referred to arbitration.

Pending until 12 Sep-18

(2)  (a)(i) The table below depicts dismissals that occurred at the PPECB over a period of 5 years. 

             (i)

Employee Nr

Dismissal Date

(ii)

Reason for Dismissal

(b)

Severance Package

1

05/08/2013

Misrepresentation

R-nil

2

09/05/2014

Misrepresentation

R-nil

3

04/05/2015

Misrepresentation

R-nil

4

21/05/2015

Misrepresentation

R-nil

5

23/08/2016

Misrepresentation

R-nil

6

25/05/2017

Absconded and Dishonest

R-nil

7

09/06/2017

Misrepresentation

R-nil

8

31/08/2017

Inappropriate use of company property

R-nil

9

12/03/2018

Material breach of contract

R-nil

It is worth noting that majority of the cases relates to misrepresentation meaning that people were dismissed for fraudulent claims relating to timesheets.

03 October 2018 - NW2638

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to each Special Envoy on Investment appointed by him, (a) what number of investors has each special envoy engaged with, (b) what is the name of each investor engaged with, (c)(i) on what date and (ii) where was each specified investor engaged with, (d) what total value of investment (i) was secured and/or (ii) was pledged by each specified investor and (e) what was the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of such costs of the engagements with investors?

Reply:

(a) - (b) The envoys were appointed to create an additional channel through which business can alert government of possible investment opportunities as well as impediments they experience in pursuing those opportunities. The envoys combined have had more than 150 engagements. These include meetings with individual companies, business chambers, business groupings and embassies.

(c) (i) The meetings referred to above have been held since the envoys were appointed, up to date.

(ii) Meetings were held in various locations including Johannesburg, Cape Town, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, China, Canada, Ireland, London and Poland.

(d) (i) (ii) Envoys are volunteers who are deployed to convey messages about the investment climate and to generate goodwill with investors. They are not tasked with deal-making, but with opening doors. It is up to the government to pursue the investment opportunities where appropriate, or to resolve the issues that may be blocking private sector investment.

(e) (i) (ii) To date, the total cost is at R369,644.14, which includes:

- Ticket fares: R225,397.90

- Hotel Accommodation: R57,798.69

- Delegation fee: R86,447.55

 

03 October 2018 - NW2610

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he has ever received a letter from the leaders of Abahlali baseMjondolo in his capacity as Deputy President and/or President or; if so, on what exact date did he receive the letter; (2) whether he responded to the letter; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did he respond and (b) what was the name of the addressee? NW2904E

Reply:

(1) Yes, the letter from the leaders of Abahlali baseMjondolo was received by the President, in his capacity as President, on 6 June 2018.

(2) The letter was responded to on 11 July 2018, addressed to the President of Abahlali baseMjondolo, Mr S. Zikode.

03 October 2018 - NW2633

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Carter, Ms D to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) Whether, with reference to the Government’s intention to expropriate portions of Akkerland game farm, in particular those portions known as Lukin and Salaita in the Makhado area of Limpopo, the Government can provide any assurance that the motive for the intended expropriation is for land reform purposes and not an alleged attempt to exploit its coal reserves; if not, what is the Government’s position in this regard; if so, what assurances can the Government provide in this regard; (2) who are the intended beneficiaries of the specified expropriation? NW2921E

Reply:

1. The farms Lukin 643 MS and Salaita 188 MT are amongst the farms that were claimed by Mr. Nthambeleni Hendrick Musekwa, on behalf of the Musekwa Community, before 31 December 1998. This claim was gazetted in 2006, long before it was known that there are coal deposits on the land under claim, and before the Government declared the area a Special Economic Zone. The intention of the Department to expropriate the farms Lukin 643 MS and Salaita 188 MT is for land restoration purposes.

2. Musekwa community.

03 October 2018 - NW2628

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he intends to give evidence before the Judicial Commission of Enquiry into State Capture (the commission); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he responded to the letter; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did he respond and (b) what was the name of the addressee? NW2904E

Reply:

(1) - (2) The Commission of Inquiry into State Capture is empowered to decide who should give evidence before it. If the Commission asks me to appear before it, I will gladly oblige.

Any person, including members of Cabinet and senior government employees, who may have information that would assist the Commission in its work, is encouraged to make that information available to the Commission and, if necessary, to give evidence.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2654

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the President of the Republic

What are the details of the (a) stakeholders he engaged with during his visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in August 2018, (b) basis on which the specified stakeholders were chosen to engage with and (c) implications of the decision to engage with the specified stakeholders on the perception of South Africa as a neutral and unbiased mediator; (2) whether he met with any members of opposition political parties during the visit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) why did he praise President Kabila during his visit to the DRC, in view of President Kabila’s seemingly poor record of conducting free and fair elections and (b) does he hold the same positive views of President Kabila in light of subsequent developments and President Kabila’s perceived lack of commitment to free and fair elections, particularly after President Kabila rejected his special envoy? NW2943E

Reply:

1. (a) I visited the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to meet with President Kabila. On my departure from the DRC, a courtesy call by the ruling party’s Presidential candidate, Mr Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary, took place at the airport.

(b) The purpose of the visit to the DRC was to meet with President Kabila. Mr Shadary requested the courtesy call.

(c) None.

2. No other candidate requested to meet with me. If they had, I would certainly have been willing to meet them.

3. (a) I commended President Joseph Kabila for honouring the Congolese Constitution by not seeking a third term. This position is consistent with the Statement that was issued following the 38th Southern African Development Community (SADC) Summit of Heads of State and Government held in mid-August 2018 in Windhoek, Namibia, which also commended President Kabila and the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo for upholding the Constitution.

(b) I maintain the same position on President Kabila’s decision not to seek a third term. Contrary to media reports former President Mbeki has not been appointed as a Special Envoy to the DRC, but has agreed to my request, given his vast experience, to assist the government with various issues in the Great Lakes region as a whole.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2560

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to involve Parliament in the process of appointing a new National Director of Public Prosecutions to ensure that the process is transparent and open; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Section 179(1)(a) of the Constitution provides that the National Director of Public Prosecutions is appointed by the President, as head of the national executive. It is an executive appointment, constitutionally distinguished from those institutions whose members’ appointment involves Parliament.

03 October 2018 - NW2626

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Filtane, Mr ML to ask the President of the Republic

In light of the fact that earlier this year the Eastern Cape Department of Public Works started the process for the disposal of residential properties across the province through sale using market-related values (details furnished), and with reference to his reply to oral question number 13 on 22 August 2018, he intends to discourage and stop the sale of land and residential properties currently owned by the Eastern Cape Department of Public Works; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The disposal of non-core residential state land in urban areas is required when such properties do not contribute to the line function needs of government. The disposal of land is guided by national legislation, the State Land Disposal Act No. 48 of 1961, as well as provincial legislation – the Eastern Cape Land Disposal Act No. 7 of 2000.

Further, in April 2009, the Government Immovable Asset Management Act No. 19 of 2007 was promulgated to regulate uniformity in the management of state assets through its life-cycle, including a surrender plan for assets that do not meet the service delivery objectives of the State.

The properties that are advertised under SCMU5-18/19-PM002 are all vacant or dilapidated residential sites. The systematic release, through the prescribed legislative frameworks, of the State’s immovable assets that are surplus to the needs of Government and that are lying dormant in the urban areas, will promote residential development in municipal areas, as well as provide our people with security of tenure through the attainment of title deeds and also stimulate socio-economic development. The one way of addressing the latter is through the upgrading of dilapidated structures in the urban centres, and by so doing increase the revenue stream of municipalities and generally upgrade the facade of towns.

The Eastern Cape Province, through the said disposal process, aims at addressing the imbalances of the past, which contributed to the skewed land ownership patterns, with the focus on ownership transfer to the designated groups, such as black people, women, youth, military veterans and the disabled. First time home owners will be targeted as preferred bidders.

The province has committed that any site beneficially occupied or identified for strategic economic development will not be disposed.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2388

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) Whether she or her department is planning to identify certain properties and farms, for a test case concerning expropriation in terms of section 25 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, or is already doing so; if so, (a) how many properties and farms, (b) where is each of the specified properties and farms situated and (c) how many hectares each specified property and farm comprises; (2) whether each such property and farm is owned by a private person, the State or a trust; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) for what purpose is each of the properties and farms being expropriated; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. No.

(a),(b),(c) Falls away.

2. Falls away.

3. Falls away.

4. No.

02 October 2018 - NW2792

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Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to his reply to question 1539 on 4 June 2018 and in view of the fact that the Elsburg Police Station has three sectors, which should have two vehicles patrolling in each sector at all times, by what date will the station receive additional sector vehicles in order to ensure it meets the prescribed standards;(2) are there any additional sector vehicles needed for (a) sector managers and (b) any other police personnel; if so, (i) what number and (ii) by what date will the station receive additional vehicles? (2) are there any additional sector vehicles needed for (a) sector managers and (b) any other police personnel; if so, (i) what number and (ii) by what date will the station receive additional vehicles? NW3085E

Reply:

(1) The Elsburg Police Station will receive three additional sector vehicles, by 2018-11-30.

(2) The station requires the following additional vehicles:

(2)(a)(i) Three vehicles are required for sector managers.

(2)(a)(ii) No additional vehicles will be allocated in this financial year.

(2)(b )(i) Three vehicles are required for other police personnel.

(2)(b )(ii) One vehicle will be received, by 2018-12-14.

 

Reply to question 2792 recommended


GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SREVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date:2018-09-26

Reply to question 2792 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date: 01/10/2018
 

02 October 2018 - NW2801

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the total number of schools for the (a) hearing impaired, (b) visually impaired and (c) learners with profound and severe intellectual disabilities that have been built in each province in the past five financial years; (2) (a) what is the total number of learners with disabilities that were on waiting lists in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) of these learners, what number was accommodated in schools in the specified years?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) (c) No schools have been built in the past five financial years.

(2) (a) The total number of learners with disabilities that were on waiting lists in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years is depicted in the table below:

Province

(i) 2016-2017

(ii) 2017-2018

EC

2 106

0

FS

257

548

GT

14 081

852

KZN

1 363

770

LP

53

0

MP

445

393

NC

300

687

NW

16

72

WC

Use a centralised waiting system (CEMIS) 0

Use a centralised waiting system (CEMIS) 0

Total

18 621

3 322

Source: Provincial Quarterly Stats

(b) Learners on the waiting list are awaiting alternative placement in other schools, and are supported in their current schools until they are placed.