Questions and Replies

04 July 2018 - NW44

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the Public Investment Corporation is working on an exit strategy in respect of its investment in the Independent Newspapers of South Africa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In line with the terms and conditions of the transaction, the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) is working on an exit strategy in respect of its investment in Independent News and Media, South Africa (INMSA). However, due to the sensitive nature of the information, the details of this strategy cannot be publicly disclosed.

04 July 2018 - NW169

Profile picture: Gardee, Mr GA

Gardee, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) (a) What is the total number of research that the National Treasury has commissioned between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016, (b) what was the purpose of each research, (c) what is the name of each contractor who was awarded the research contract and (d) what is the total amount of each research contract; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) consultants, (ii) contractors and (iii) commissioned researchers that are currently appointed by the National Treasury, (b) for what purpose have they been appointed in each case and (c) what is the total amount of each contract?

Reply:

I refer the Honorable Member to the response submitted to Parliament on the 24 May 2018, to a very similar question posed by Honorable Shivambu, to Question Number:168 [NW175E] first published on the same date as your question on 8 February 2018.

It should be noted that your question is very wide and assumes that there is a simple way to classify research. The nature of National Treasury’s work is generally research-driven, and ranges from technical support, desk-top research, policy research and formal academic research. Some research is general in nature or, as determined by research institutions, and funding, may be up-front and specific or in the form of a subsidy towards a project, or specifically commissioned if and when the need arises. It is, therefore, not possible to provide a simple attachment of all research commissioned by the National Treasury given that some of the research is conducted internally (as part of the routine work) and other forms of research are conducted externally (by universities or research institutions or consultants commissioned to do so).

Some research leads to a specific output (e.g. research on climate-change or employment tax incentive) and some research may be on-going, involving many months of engagement between the department and specific researchers, where a specific output may take many years (e.g. research on growth or employment-generation) before any final output. Whilst most research is ultimately published as a paper, either directly by National Treasury (e.g. of the employment tax incentive) or by the research institutions themselves (e.g. researchers funded by ERSA), some research projects may take a long time to complete or publish.

The upfront allocations to research institutions like ERSA and UN Wider are published in Budget documents like the Budget Review and Estimates of Expenditure, and actual spending figures are noted in the Annual Report of the National Treasury.

 

04 July 2018 - NW835

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the status of the investigation into the matter referred to the National Treasury and that was received and stamped by the National treasury Parliamentary Services (details furnished) on 25 October 2017?

Reply:

The Member is advised to refer the matter to the Municipality Council for consideration and response.

04 July 2018 - NW533

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What total amount has the Public Investment Corporation lent to state-owned enterprises over the past 20 years and (b) what are the relevant details of (i) each loan that was granted, (ii) the amount of each loan, (iii) the name of the company to whom the loan was granted, (iv) the purpose of each loan and (v)(aa) the manner in which and (bb) the date by which each loan was paid back or will be paid back?

Reply:

As the question refers to amounts “lent” to state-owned enterprises, the reply to the question will deal only with Private Placements and not normal Bond transactions. The reply to the question is contained in Annexure A to this response.

                 

Annexure A to PQ533

PRIVATE PLACEMENTS

               
         

PIC

   

MANNER

 

COMPANY

BOND CODE

DATE GRANTED

AMOUNT

COUPON

CLIENT

PURPOSE

MATURITY DATE

REPAID

COMMENTS

DBSA

DV13

25/08/2008

R1,8Bln

10,06%

GEPF

Infra structure spending

25/08/2013

Bullet

Repaid

SAA

SAAL01

15/03/2008

R800m

11,77%

GEPF

Working Capital

15/09/2015

Bullet

Repaid prior to maturity date, on 15/05/2009

Transnet

T018

06/07/2004

R6Bln

10,75%

GEPF

Capped losses Oil price import hedges

15/07/2018

Bullet

Repaid prior to maturity date, by converting to normal listed bonds

ESKOM

ECN20

14/09/2015

R5Bln

9,65%

GEPF

Working Capital

14/03/2020

Bullet

Still in place, coupons repaid as agreed

ESKOM

ECN22

14/09/2015

R5Bln

9,75%

GEPF

Working Capital

14/03/2022

Bullet

Still in place, coupons repaid as agreed

ESKOM

ECN24

14/09/2015

R5Bln

9,95%

GEPF

Working Capital

14/03/2024

Bullet

Still in place, coupons repaid as agreed

ESKOM

ECN32(CPI Link)

14/09/2015

R5Bln

2,95%

GEPF

Working Capital

14/03/2032

Bullet

Still in place, coupons repaid as agreed

 

                 

03 July 2018 - NW2092

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

On what date will the Waste Management Bureau complete the process of filling the key corporate governance positions, (b) what is the composition of the Board of the Waste Management Bureau and (c) to whom does the Chief Executive Officer account currently?

Reply:

(a) The process to fill the key positions in the Waste Management Bureau is underway and this is in line with Section 34D of the National Environmental Management Waste Act. The department is anticipating to conclude the process once the listing of the Bureau is effected.

Section 34D of the Act states that “the objects of the Bureau are to –

(e) progressively build capacity within the Bureau to provide specialist support for the development and implementation of municipal waste management plans and capacity building programmes.”

(b) The Bureau does not have the Board due to the delays with the listing process.

(c) Currently the Bureau does not have the Chief Executive Officer.

Section 34A states that;

“in the event of absence of a functional Bureau or a Chief Executive Officer, the powers and duties of the Bureau revert to the Director-General of the Department contemplated in section 34G(1), who, in such a case, must exercise those powers and perform those duties until the Bureau is functional or a Chief Executive Officer is appointed. Therefore, the Director-General is currently performing these duties.”

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03 July 2018 - NW1975

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)What is the official mandate of the Waste Bureau; (2) are there any plans in place to have the Waste Bureau continuing to manage the operations of the waste tyre industry after the 2018-19 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, has the bureau submitted a proposal to her?

Reply:

(1). The mandate of the Waste Management Bureau is outlined in the National Environmental Management Waste Amendment Act, Act 26 of 2014 (NEMWAA). Part 7A, Section 34A of NEMWAA refers to the establishment of the Waste Management Bureau.

Section 34D relates to the objects of the Waste Management Bureau as listed below.

“34D. The objects of the Bureau are to—

(a) function as a specialist implementing agent within the Department in respect of matters delegated to the Bureau in terms of this Act;

(b) promote and facilitate minimisation, re-use, recycling and recovery of waste;

(c) manage the disbursement of incentives and funds derived from waste management charges contemplated in sections 13B and 34D for the minimisation, reuse, recycling, recovery, transport, storage, treatment and disposal of waste and the implementation of industry waste management plans;

(d) monitor implementation of industry waste management plans and the impact of incentives and disincentives;

(e) progressively build capacity within the Bureau to provide specialist support for the development and implementation of municipal waste management plans and capacity building programmes; and

(f) support and advise on the development of waste management plans, tools, instruments, processes, systems, norms, standards and municipal waste management plans and capacity building programmes.”

Section 34E relates to the functions of the Waste Management Bureau and is listed below.

“34E. (1) The Bureau must—

(a) implement the disbursement of incentives and funds derived from waste management charges contemplated in sections 13B and 34D;

(b) identify and promote best practices in the minimisation, re-use, recycling or recovery of waste;

(c) progressively build capacity of the Bureau to support municipalities in the development and implementation of integrated waste management plans and capacity building programmes;

(d) support and advise on the development of industry waste management plans, integrated waste management plans and other tools, instruments, processes and systems, including specialist support for the development of norms or standards for the minimisation, re-use, recycling or recovery of waste and the building of municipal waste management capacity;

(e) monitor the implementation of industry waste management plans;

(f) monitor and evaluate the impact of incentives and disincentives; and

(g) perform any other task or function that the Minister may assign or delegate to the Bureau in relation to the implementation of this Act.

(2) The Bureau may—

(a) invest any of its money, after having complied with section 34F(2); and

(b) charge fees for services rendered, other than services rendered in terms of section 13A or to the Minister or the Department.”

(2) The Bureau will manage operations of the tyre industry until there is a new industry waste tyre management plan approved by the Minister. The Bureau will also be monitoring implementation of various other industry plans that the Minister will be approving in due course. The Minister has already called for three industry plans to be implemented in the short to medium term once approved. There will be many other plans that the Minister may approve in future and the Bureau will monitor implementation of all these plans.

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03 July 2018 - NW290

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How many schools have been built by each provincial education department since 1 January 2009, (b) what is the name of each school, (c) where is each school located, (d) when did construction commence, (e) when was each school handed over to the education department and (f) how much did each school cost?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is responsible for the replacement of unsafe schools built wholly of mud and unsafe materials through the ASIDI program. In addition it assists the Provinces in the areas of water, sanitation and electricity provision. This information can be provided forthwith. Provinces receive an infrastructure grant and their equitable share in terms of the Division of Revenue. The physical planning, audit of needs and costing resides with Provinces and it suggested that the information is obtained from the Provinces.

03 July 2018 - NW805

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With regard to the debt owed to Eskom by the (a) Modimolle, (b) Mookgophong and (c) Thabazimbi Local Municipalities in Limpopo, (i) what amount was owed by each specified municipality at the end of each of the past five financial years and (ii) who was the (aa) municipal manager and (bb) chief financial officer in each case; (2) whether any actions were taken to pay the outstanding debts; if not, why was no action taken; if so, what actions were taken;(3) whether any debts owed by the municipalities to Eskom were written off in the specified financial years; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) (i) Table 1 presents the total amount owed by Modimolle, Mookgophong and Thabazimbi Local Municipalities in Limpopo at the end of the past four financial years as well as January 2018 as follows:

Table 1: Total amounts owed:

   

Financial year

NAME of Municipality

As at Jan_2018 (Rm)

Mar_2017 (Rm)

Mar_2016 (Rm)

Mar_2015 (Rm)

Mar_2014 (Rm)

MODIMOLLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

133 677 479

89 691 778

30 052 581

6 216 489

5 479 296

MOOKGOPHONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

123 185 380

98 353 558

64 435 450

38 801 446

19 079 933

THABAZIMBI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

222 470 986

208 018 852

149 351 611

109 226 136

63 239 219

Grand Total

479 333 845

396 064 189

243 839 643

154 244 071

87 798 449

1. (ii) (aa)(bb)

 

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

 

MM

MM

MM

MM

MM

Thabazimbi

Ntsoane M.E

Ntsoane M.E (Suspended)

Ntsoane M.E (Suspended)

Vacant

T.J. Ramagaga

Mookgophong

Magwala N.P

Vacant

Sebola O.P

Sebola O.P

Amalgamation

Modimolle

Vacant

Bambo N.S

Bambo N.S

Sebola O.P

Sebola O.P

 

CFO

CFO

CFO

CFO

CFO

Thabazimbi

Malema L.C

Malema L.C (Suspended)

vacant

vacant

Mhlanga S.N

Mookgophong

Eksteen D

Eksteen D

Eksteen D

Eksteen D

Amalgamation

Modimolle

Mathabatha

Mathabatha

Vacant

EKsteen D

vacant

2. Yes, Eskom was involved in the following actions:

  • Various payment arrangements were signed by these municipalities over time, but they were not fully honoured.
  • Eskom, with the intervention of national and provincial government (Treasury and CoGTA) have engaged municipalities in order to agree on realistic payment plans.
  • Promotion of Administration Justice Act (PAJA) was initiated against the three municipalities in question at different time periods.
  • Thabazimbi Municipality entered into several payment arrangements and none were honoured (April 2015, March 2017). Electricity supply was interrupted during October 2017 and November 2017. The municipality has subsequently signed a new payment arrangement with Eskom in December 2017 and it is being honoured monthly.

The municipality is busy with a project of installing smart metering in its residential areas although it is getting resistance from some customers. Upon finalisation of the project, the

smart metering initiative should assist the municipality with its revenue collection efforts.

  • Modimolle and Mookgophong Municipalities signed payment arrangements with Eskom in November 2016 and they were not honoured. Thereafter, they signed new payment arrangements in March 2017 and these were also not honoured. PAJA was initiated in November 2017 and the process was suspended after the municipalities entered into new payment arrangements that were signed in November 2017.

They have subsequently failed to honour their agreements and the electricity bulk supplies to the two municipalities are scheduled to be interrupted from 31 March 2018 as published.

3. Eskom has not written off any municipal debt in any of the abovementioned financial periods.

 

03 July 2018 - NW2090

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

How do the current levels of the Waste Management Bureau’s (WMB) offtake compare to the Recycling and Economic Development Initiative of South Africa, (b) what recycling rates were achieved in 2018 under the management of the WMB, (c) what is currently being done with regard to the off-the-road (OTR) tyres collections backlog and (d) what volume of OTRs have been recycled?

Reply:

(a) The table below shows the comparison between the Waste Bureau and Redisa in term of waste tyres processed on an annualised basis. It shows that if exports are excluded, then the Waste Bureau performs better than Redisa.

 

Oct17-Mar18 Annualised

Dec16-Jul17 Annualised

 

Recycled (Tons)

Category

Waste Bureau

Redisa

Re-use

3 277

78

Crumbing

7 945

4 482

Pyrolysis

3 616

6 357

TDF

21 772

14 426

Sub-Total (excl Exports)

36 610

25 343

Exports

0

12 473

Total incl Exports

36 610

37 816

Estimated waste tyres arising

170 226

Recycling as % waste tyres arising (excl exports)

21,5%

14,9%

Recycling as % waste tyres arising (incl exports)

22,5%

22,2%

(b) As shown in (a) above, the recycling rate as % of waste tyres arising is 21.5%. The recycling rate is 22% for both the Waste Bureau and Redisa if exports are included.

(c) The stockpiles created by Redisa as well as waste tyres collected from collection points are sorted and pre-processed at depots prior to being delivered to processors and/or secondary industries. The Waste Bureau is gradually increasing its OTR pre-processing capability by incrementally procuring pre-processing equipment as well exploring markets for the pre-processed OTR material. These efforts will then enable the Bureau to address the post levy stockpiles. Stockpiles which do not fall within the category above (Historical waste tyre stockpiles), are dealt with in terms of Regulations 7, 8 and 9 of the Waste Tyre Regulations of 2017. Owners of Historical waste tyre stockpiles are expected to register with the Minister as well as submit abatement plans to the Minister for approval.

(d) 874 tons of OTR were recycled during the period from Oct 2017 to March 2018.

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03 July 2018 - NW2124

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 289 on 23 March 2018, has she received the outstanding information?

Reply:

No, the Minister has not received the outstanding information. The Honourable Member is requested to kindly submit the request directly to the provinces because this detail of information is not collected in the Department.

03 July 2018 - NW2119

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Why are the annual reports of the National School Nutrition Programme for the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years not available on her department’s website and (b) will she furnish Ms E R Wilson with copies of the specified annual reports?

Reply:

a) (i)(ii)(iii) No annual reports were developed and published on the website because the Department had resolved to scale down on high cost of design and layout for publications. The data of all annual reports published in previous years derives from the consistent annual reports submitted to the National Council of Provinces, National Treasury and Portfolio Committee for Education.

b) There are no copies of annual publications.

03 July 2018 - NW2125

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 292 on 23 March 2018, has she received the outstanding information?

Reply:

The response in NA 2512 has reference.

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) does not collect or collate this information. The Honourable Member is requested to direct the question to the relevant provinces as such data is in their possession.

03 July 2018 - NW810

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any municipality’s health inspectorate department is understaffed; if so, (a) which municipality is affected and (b) what is the (i) actual and (ii) budgeted staff complement in each case; (2) whether any of the affected municipalities conducted any inspections on (a) food processing facilities, (b) food handling facilities and/or (c) restaurants, fast food take aways and other similar establishments falling within its boundary (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The information requested by the honorable member is not readily available in the department. However, the Department has engaged the 9 Provincial Departments responsible for local government to obtain the relevant information from all municipalities in the country. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

03 July 2018 - NW1930

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)What (a) is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment that were reported to the human resources offices of entities reporting to her in (i) 2016 and (ii) 2017 and (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

Department of Environmental Affairs

1) (a) (i) Nil

(ii) Four (4).

(b)

Two (2) Incidencies reported

  • against the same manager, of sexual assault and/or harassment.
 

One (1) incident reported

  • against a manager making sexual advances.
 

One (1) incident reported

  • against an official, of touching of shoulders when walking by/past the complainants work station.

(2) Yes.

 

Two (2) Incidencies reported

  • Basis established.
 

One (1) incident reported

  • Basis established.
 

One (1) incident reported

  • Mediation to caution the implicated officials to refrain from touching the complainant.

iSimangaliso

(1) (a) (i) Nil

(ii) Nil

(b) Not applicable

(2) Not applicable

South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI)

1) (a) (i) Nil

(ii) One (1).

(b)

One (1) Incident reported

  • A male staff member allegedly touched a female intern in an inappropriate manner.

(2) Yes.

 

One (1) Incident reported

  • An investigation was conducted and the offender (a male staff member) resigned immediately, before the institution of the disciplinary process.

South African National Parks (SANParks)

(1) (a) (i) Nil

(ii) Nil

(b) Not applicable

(2) Not applicable

South African Weather Service (SAWS)

(1) (a) (i) Nil

(ii) Nil

(b) Not applicable

(2) Not applicable

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03 July 2018 - NW2100

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What toilet facilities were available at the Luna Primary School at the time of Lumka Mkhethwa’s death in March 2018, (b) were any temporary toilets supplied by the Eastern Cape provincial education department after the learner’s death and (c) what is the current status of sanitation at the school?

Reply:

a) The school has 5 blocks of face brick Ventilated Improved Pit (VIP) latrines as well as 2 blocks of plaster brick Pit Latrines.

b) Yes.

c) Construction of toilets to replace the 2 blocks of pit latrines is underway as well as a donation by MTN for renovations to existing structures.

03 July 2018 - NW1403

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What are the details of the backlog of schools to be built in the country, (b) what number of schools must be built, (c) in which municipalities must each school be built and (d) what is the total cost to build (i) all the schools and (ii) each specified school?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is responsible for the replacement of unsafe schools built wholly of mud and unsafe materials through the ASIDI program. In addition it assists the Provinces in the areas of water, sanitation and electricity provision. This information can be provided forthwith. Provinces receive an infrastructure grant and their equitable share in terms of the Division of Revenue. The physical planning, audit of needs and costing resides with Provinces and it suggested that the information is obtained from the Provinces.

03 July 2018 - NW2029

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What are the details of the (a) number of accidents that vehicles owned by his department were involved;(i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) cost for repairs in each case and (c)(i) number of and (ii) reasons for vehicles being written off in each case; (2) whether all vehicles owned by his department have tracking devices installed?

Reply:

2015/16 = 0

2016/17 = 0

2017/18 = 0

(i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) cost for repairs in each case and

2015/16 = 0

2016/17 = 0

2017/18 = 0

Since 01 April 2018 = No repairs

(c) (i) number of and (ii) reasons for vehicles being written off in each case;

No vehicles were written off since 2015/16 financial year to date.

(2) whether all vehicles owned by his department have tracking devices installed?

Not all the vehicles owned by the department are installed with trackers. Five vehicles are installed with trackers and two are in the process of being installed.

NW2189E

 

 

03 July 2018 - NW1977

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) How sustainable are the remuneration changes to the participants of the Waste Bureau network into the future, (b) what plans has the Waste Management Bureau put in place to deal with the off-the-road waste tyre backlog and collections and (c) will she provide Mr T Z Hadebe with a full and detailed list of all legal tyre depots in the country?

Reply:

(a) The sustainability of the remuneration to participants is dependent on budget allocation.

(b) Redisa did not adequately address the recycling of waste tyres. The stockpiles created by Redisa as well as waste tyres collected from collection points are sorted and pre-processed at depots prior to being delivered to processors and/or secondary industries. The Waste Bureau is gradually increasing its OTR pre-processing capability by incrementally procuring pre-processing equipment as well as exploring markets for the pre-processed OTR material. These efforts will then enable the Bureau to address the post levy stockpiles. Stockpiles which do not fall within the category above (Historical waste tyre stockpiles), are dealt with in terms of Regulations 7, 8 and 9 of the Waste Tyre Regulations of 2017. Owners of Historical waste tyre stockpiles are expected to register with the Minister as well as submit abatement plans to the Minister for approval.

(c) The Bureau has lease agreements in place with the depots in the attached list.

---ooOoo---

03 July 2018 - NW2088

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What are the reasons that the Waste Management Bureau is issuing tenders for new properties where current owners are not more than 51% compliant as opposed to setting out a roadmap for them to become black empowered?

Reply:

The Waste Bureau has to issue new tenders for storage and preprocessing facilities because most of the contracts with current owners are expiring on 30 September 2018 and cannot be extended further due to the fact that National Treasury only permitted the contracts to be for a maximum period of
12 months, which 12-month period now expires on 30 September 2018.

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03 July 2018 - NW1632

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 3529 on 15 December 2017, his department has since received the outstanding information?

Reply:

Yes, the below response is based on the outstanding information submitted to the Department of Cooperative Governance by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the Gauteng Province (“the Province”).

The following status prevails in respect of the number of persons that worked in each of the various political offices in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Council:

(a) Mayor

Date

Number of Persons that Worked in the Office

As at 1 August 2016

54

As at 1 August 2017

63

(b) Speaker

Date

Number of Persons that Worked in the Office

As at 1 August 2016

8

As at 1 August 2017

8

(c) Chief Whip

Date

Number of Persons that Worked in the Office

As at 1 August 2016

20

As at 1 August 2017

35

(d) Mayoral Committee Members

There were ten (10) mayoral committee members as at 1 August 2016 and as at 1 August 2017.

Date

Number of Persons that Worked in the Office

As at 1 August 2016

10 Political Advisors

 

10 Personal Assistants

 

10 Administrative Assistants

As at 1 August 2017

10 Political Advisors

 

10 Personal Assistants

 

10 Administrative Assistants

(e) Chairperson of a Committee

There were fifteen (15) chairpersons of committees as at 1 August 2016, and seventeen (17) chairpersons of committees as at 1 August 2017.

Date

Number of Persons that Worked in the Office

As at 1 August 2016

6 Researchers

 

15 Administrative Assistants

 

6 Committee Administrators

As at 1 August 2017

6 Researchers

 

17 Administrative Assistants

 

6 Committee Administrators

In summary, the total number of staff members as at 1 August 2016 was 139, and as at 1 August 2017 it was 165.

1. The below background is based on a report submitted by the City of Ekurhuleni to the Province.

Parliamentary question relates to the previous reply to question 3529 on 3 November 2017

2. The Municipal Human Resource Systems unit in the Department of Cooperative Governance has developed draft regulations on the Local Government: Municipal Staff Regulations.

As per Chapter 2, Item 5(b)(2) of the above-mentioned draft, the following posts may be provided on the approved staff establishment in the offices of the political office bearers, subject to the category, size and affordability of municipality, including approval by council of the municipality:

Executive Mayor / Mayor

Deputy Executive Mayor/ Deputy Mayor

Speaker

Chief Whip / Whip

Councillor Support

       

Member of Executive Council/ Mayoral Committee/Chairperson of a subcouncil

Party Offices

  • Chief of Staff
  • Executive Secretary
  • Community Liaison Officer
  • Senior/ Registry Clerk
  • Driver
  • Head of the Office of Deputy Mayor
  • Executive Secretary
  • Driver
  • Head of the Office of the Speaker
  • Public Participation and Outreach Coordinator
  • Public Officer: Petitions and Hearings Ward Coordinator
  • Coordinator: Community Development Workers
  • Senior / Administrative Officer
  • Executive Secretary
  • Driver
  • Support Officer
  • Secretary
  • Manager: Councillor Support
  • Executive Support Officer per POB
  • Secretary per POB
  • Manager: Councillor Support
  • Executive Support Officer per POB
  • Researcher per POB
  • Secretary per POB

Possible Shared Resources:

1. Researcher and Speech Writer

2. Committee Support (Administration)

03 July 2018 - NW1974

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What portion of the off-the-road (OTR) waste tyre budget is allocated to the Mogalakwena project and (b) what is the full budgeted cost, including (i) site establishment, (ii) collection, (iii) equipment, (iv) downsizing operations and (v) transport, up- to off-take of OTR waste management, per kilogram?

Reply:

(a) There is no total budget allocated to Mogalakwena project. The service provider is contracted to preprocess post levy tyres at an agreed rate per kilogram.

(b) (i) Refer to a

(ii) Refer to a

(iii) Refer to a

(iv) Refer to a

(v) Refer to a

---ooOoo---

03 July 2018 - NW1973

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) Has (i) her Department or (ii) the Waste Bureau issued any authorisations to add post-tyre levy on off-the-road (OTR) waste tyres to stockpiles, (b) how does her Department and the Waste Bureau ensure that stockpile owners comply with the registered waste tyre stockpiles abatement plans, particularly in terms of time-frames for abatement and adequacy of their abatement budgets, (c) what is the status of stockpile owners’ compliance with the abatement plans nationwide, (d) how is her Department currently dealing with non-compliant stockpile owners, (e) how is the Waste Bureau monitoring compliance with the Waste Tyre Regulations of OTR stockpiles, and (f) what are her Department and the Waste Bureau’s current options to enable collections and recycling of the OTRs nationwide?

Reply:

a) (i) No, the stockpiles must be dealt with by the stockpile owners who must fund the management of their stockpile.

(ii) No, the Waste Bureau has not issued any such authorisation.

b) The stockpile owners, on approval of their stockpile abatement plans, are issued with an approval letter, with conditions. These conditions include time-frames for the implementation of the abatement plan. The letter requires the submission of annual reports to enable the Department and the Waste Management Bureau to track progress.

c) 3 stockpile abatement plans were submitted and approved by the Minister. Only 1 plan has submitted the annual report. Letters of non-compliance have been issued to the remaining 2 approved abatement plan owners requesting submission of the report by July 2018.

d) Letter requesting annual reports have been sent to the owners for submission by July 2018.

e) DEA is engaging with historical stockpile owners (stockpiles before November 2012) with regard to their responsibility on submission of receipt of the annual reports as per their approved abatement plans. Site visits are part of the standard operating procedures for compliance monitoring to verify the information contained in the annual reports, and consequent compliance against the Waste Tyre Regulations is determined accordingly.

f) The stockpiles created by REDISA as well as waste tyres collected from collection points are sorted and pre-processed at depots prior to being delivered to processors and/or secondary industries. The Waste Bureau is gradually increasing its OTR pre-processing capability by incrementally procuring preprocessing equipment, as well exploring markets for the pre-processed OTR material. These efforts will then enable the Bureau to address the post levy stockpiles. Stockpiles which do not fall within the category above (Historical waste tyre stockpiles) are dealt with in terms of Regulations 7, 8 and 9 of the Waste Tyre Regulations of 2017. Owners of Historical waste tyre stockpiles are expected to register with the Minister, as well as submit abatement plans to the Minister for approval.

---ooOoo---

03 July 2018 - NW2101

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the current dropout rate of learners in each province between (i) Grade 1 and Grade 8, and (ii) Grade 1 and Grade 12, (b) how does her department measure the dropout rate, (c) what are the main reasons for learners dropping out that have been identified by her department and (d) what actions is her department taking to reduce the number of learners who drop out of school?

Reply:

A) Drop-out rate in each province; and

B) The method of calculation in the Department of Basic Education

Currently, the best source of data available for estimating drop-out rates is STATS SA’s General Household Survey (GHS). The most recent data is from 2016. The table below shows the drop-out rates and survival rates for 2 different age cohorts, those born during 1987-1989 (and surveyed between 2011-2013) and those born during 1990-1992 (and surveyed between 2014-2016). These two cohorts provide a justifiable comparison across time, because the individuals would have been the same age when surveyed (between 22 and 26 years old). The specific cohorts were chosen, because individuals aged 22 – 26 years old would have been old enough to have completed school at the time when the GHS data was collected, and we will therefore be able to gauge what percentage of them finished their schooling at which grades. The survival rates in the table show the percentage of individuals who reached each grade. The rate was then converted to show the number of individuals, out of a 1000 individuals who reached each grade. It was then also possible to calculate the percentage of all individuals reaching particular grades who then drop out before attaining the next grade.

Note that the data of several years have been combined for this analysis in order to ensure that there are sufficient sample sizes in each of the cells. It is also important to note that whilst this method provides the most reliable estimates of drop-out rates by grade, it does not reflect the drop-out that happened in a particular year – the data may have been collected from 22-26 year-olds between 2014-2016, but those youths may have dropped out of school in an earlier year.

Interpretation focusing on 2014-2016:

An estimated 0.7% of 22-26 year-olds in 2014-2016 reported to have not even completed Grade 1, whereas 51.5% of this cohort attained Grade 12. It was also calculated that 26% of those with Grade 11 (NB: not of all youths) dropped-out before attaining Grade 12. Similarly, the drop-out rates for grade 7, 8 and 9 were 3.1%, 4.6% and 9.5% respectively.

Drop-out rates for each grade are also reported by province using the same methodology in the tables below, for both the 2011-2013 combined period and the 2014-2016 combined period. It is worth noting that in general the survival rates improved in the more recent period.

Survival rates and drop-out rates, associated with each grade

 

2011-2013

2014-2016

 

Survival Rate

Survival per 1000

Percentage dropping out with this Grade attained

Survival Rate

Survival per 1000

Percentage dropping out with this Grade attained

Total cohort

100%

 

 

100%

 

 

No schooling

 

1000

0.7%

 

1000

0.7%

Grade 1

99.3%

993

0.4%

99.3%

993

0.1%

Grade 2

98.9%

989

0.5%

99.1%

991

0.2%

Grade 3

98.4%

984

0.4%

98.9%

989

0.5%

Grade 4

98.0%

980

0.7%

98.4%

984

0.5%

Grade 5

97.3%

973

1.0%

97.9%

979

0.8%

Grade 6

96.3%

963

1.5%

97.1%

971

1.5%

Grade 7

94.9%

949

3.1%

95.7%

957

3.1%

Grade 8

92.0%

920

5.2%

92.7%

927

4.6%

Grade 9

87.2%

872

9.0%

88.5%

885

9.5%

Grade 10

79.4%

794

17.1%

80.0%

800

15.5%

Grade 11

65.8%

658

26.0%

67.6%

676

23.8%

Grade 12

48.6%

486

 

51.5%

515

 

Data Source: General Household Survey, DBE own calculation

Drop-out rates, associated with each grade by province 2014-2016

Grade

No schooling

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Western Cape

1.0%

0.1%

0.2%

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

0.8%

3.1%

4.7%

9.9%

16.9%

22.3%

Eastern Cape

0.9%

0.2%

0.4%

1.3%

1.1%

1.9%

3.0%

5.0%

6.9%

13.7%

23.8%

35.0%

Northern Cape

1.8%

0.4%

0.0%

0.4%

0.5%

1.1%

2.3%

4.0%

8.8%

14.0%

19.3%

23.0%

Free State

0.9%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.4%

0.8%

1.8%

3.4%

5.2%

12.5%

17.1%

21.5%

KwaZulu-Natal

0.7%

0.3%

0.4%

0.5%

0.6%

0.8%

0.8%

2.5%

4.1%

7.8%

13.3%

25.3%

North West

1.4%

0.2%

0.5%

0.3%

0.7%

0.9%

2.1%

2.5%

6.3%

14.5%

20.2%

22.6%

Gauteng

0.4%

0.0%

0.2%

0.2%

0.3%

0.2%

0.8%

2.0%

2.6%

5.0%

10.4%

17.6%

Mpumalanga

0.5%

0.0%

0.0%

0.3%

0.5%

1.5%

1.6%

3.7%

2.9%

8.1%

16.6%

28.7%

Limpopo

0.6%

0.1%

0.2%

0.7%

0.6%

0.8%

2.5%

4.3%

7.3%

15.6%

19.3%

28.4%

Data Source: General Household Survey, DBE own calculation

Note: data for 2014-2016 pooled together to overcome small sample errors

Interpretation: This means that 28.4% of 22-26 year-olds in Limpopo who completed Grade 11 dropped-out before attaining Grade 12.

Drop-out rates, associated with each grade by province 2011-2013

Grade

No schooling

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Western Cape

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

0.1%

0.2%

0.5%

0.8%

2.7%

5.5%

11.1%

21.1%

23.1%

Eastern Cape

0.7%

0.4%

0.8%

1.3%

1.2%

2.3%

3.6%

5.2%

10.0%

13.3%

23.5%

40.6%

Northern Cape

1.5%

0.1%

0.1%

0.6%

1.9%

0.8%

1.4%

4.6%

10.3%

14.1%

20.7%

19.4%

Free State

0.3%

0.4%

0.2%

0.2%

1.0%

0.4%

1.9%

2.8%

4.9%

12.7%

19.1%

20.3%

KwaZulu-Natal

0.5%

0.6%

0.6%

0.7%

0.8%

0.9%

1.1%

2.4%

4.0%

7.5%

15.2%

23.2%

North West

1.8%

0.7%

0.4%

0.5%

0.8%

1.9%

2.3%

5.4%

6.1%

10.1%

19.2%

27.3%

Gauteng

0.6%

0.3%

0.4%

0.1%

0.4%

0.4%

0.8%

1.7%

2.8%

4.8%

12.0%

22.2%

Mpumalanga

1.2%

0.1%

0.6%

0.2%

0.9%

1.2%

1.4%

2.9%

6.5%

8.9%

16.3%

29.4%

Limpopo

1.1%

0.5%

0.4%

0.4%

0.4%

1.3%

1.3%

4.3%

5.2%

12.6%

22.5%

33.4%

Data Source: General Household Survey, DBE own calculation

Note: data for 2011-2013 pooled together to overcome small sample errors

Reasons for not attending an educational institution

For children who are not attending school, the GHS asks: “What is the main reason why [this child] is not attending any educational institution?” Responses to this question must be interpreted in the light of research showing that the main predictor of dropping out is poor quality early education. The self-reported reasons for not attending school may act as a trigger for dropping out, but those same factors may not trigger drop out for children who are progressing well in terms of learning levels, especially if they are in a good quality school. Furthermore, it should be noted that this question was only asked of learners who stated that they are not currently attending any educational institution, and the severity of each reason should be interpreted as such. The figure below shows the number and percentage of children aged 7 to 15 years old who reported not attending any education institution. In 2016, 1.1% (roughly 104 000 learners) of all 7 to 15 year olds were reported to not be attending any education institution.

The table below shows that disability is the main reported reason on why children aged 7 to 15 years old are not attending any educational institution. The 28% statistic should be interpreted as 28% of the children not attending any educational institution (which is 1.1% of all 7 to 15 year olds) responded that disability was the main reason. However, as reported in the 2016 GHS: Focus on Schooling report, around 90% of learners with disabilities are currently attending an educational institution. Encouragingly, no respondents in this age group stated that marriage or lack of transport are reasons for not attending any education institution. For the 15% of 16 to 18 year olds not attending educational institutions, the main reasons were because of a lack of money for fees and that they completed their education or are satisfied with their level of education.

7 to 15 year old children who are out of school, 2002 – 2016

Reasons for non-attendance of educational institutions among, 2016

Reason

% of the roughly 104,000 learners aged 7 to 15 who are not in school

% of the roughly 466,000 learners aged 16 to 18 who are not in school

No money for fees

6.8%

21.4%

Other

15.9%

14.8%

Has completed education/satisfied with my level of education/do not want to study

5.9%

13%

Education is useless or not interesting

6.5%

8.3%

Failed exams

2.8%

7.7%

Family commitment (e.g. child minding)

2.5%

7.4%

He or she is working at home or business/job

1%

7.3%

Unable to perform at school

6.3%

6.5%

Pregnancy

2.2%

3.3%

Not accepted for enrolment

8.6%

3%

Disability

28%

2.2%

Illness

7.1%

2%

Too old/young

3.7%

1.2%

Do not have time/too busy

1.1%

0.7%

Got married

0%

0.5%

Violence at school

1.2%

0.4%

Difficulties to get to school (transport)

0%

0.4%

School/education institution is too far

0.4%

0.1%

Total

100%

100%

Data Source: General Household Survey, DBE own calculation

C) Main reasons for learner dropping out as identified by the Department of Basic Education

Main reasons for learner drop-out include:

  • The socio-economic situation of communities such as poverty and unemployment
  • Inaccessibility of services such as health services
  • Teenage pregnancy
  • High prevalence of gender based violence and other related developmental problems (most notably HIV infections and reproductive health).
  • Institutional barriers (lack of gender budgeting, gender‐biased curriculum and pedagogy, and lack of integration in service delivery);
  • Socio‐cultural barriers (poor parenting, cultural factors such as initiation schools, virginity testing & ukuthwala)
  • Gendered burden of care in families and communities where girl children are expected to take care of sickly parents and younger siblings.

D) Interventions and actions taken in an attempt to reduce dropout rates in schools

  • Learners who drop out of school are categorised as vulnerable learners and are targeted for support through the Care and Support for Teaching and Learning (CSTL) Programme. Schools ensure that vulnerable learners receive the various pro-poor programmes implemented in schools such as fee exemption, scholar transport, school meals through the National School Nutrition Programme, and school health services through the Integrated School Health Programme.
    • The National School Nutrition Programme provides a meal to more than 9m learners every school day to address issues of hunger and food insecurity that might prevent learners from coming to and staying in school.
    • The Integrated School Health Programme provides health services to more than 1m learners per year, to ensure that learners are not prevented from coming to or staying in school due to health reasons.
    • Considering the shortage of psychosocial professionals in education, the Department of Basic Education together with Provinces are increasingly orientating educators on various psychosocial skills to enable them to support vulnerable learners, especially around trauma support to ensure that learners are not prevented from coming to or staying in school due to emotional distress.
  • In addition, relevant Departments such as the Departments of Social Development, Health, Home Affairs, SASSA, non-governmental organisations and the private sector are coordinated through the CSTL framework to render the necessary support to vulnerable learners, either through integrated service delivery days coordinated by the Department of Basic Education or individual referral of learners for services by schools.
  • Advocacy programmes to empower learners at risk so that they do not feel unsupported and resort to dropping out. These advocacy programmes include:
    • Speak Out Against Abuse
    • Prevent Violence and Bullying in Schools
    • GEMBEM/ Youth Leadership programme

03 July 2018 - NW2089

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether her department has any plans in place to ensure that the Waste Management Bureau depot at Klerksoord is compliant as it is missing a fence and has no water for fire safety which renders it noncompliant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The fence at Klerksoord Depot was erected in March 2018. The depot landlord has arranged to be in compliance with fire safety requirements by end of June 2018. The process of erecting a borehole following a lack of response to an application for water connection from City of Tshwane is underway.

---ooOoo---

03 July 2018 - NW1651

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of cases relating to the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, Act 12 of 2004, as amended, have been referred to the (i) SA Police Service (SAPS) and (ii) Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) by (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her for further investigation since the Act was assented to and (b) what number of the specified cases have (i) been investigated by SAPS and DPCI, (ii) been followed up by the respective accounting officers and (iii) resulted in a conviction in each specified financial year since 2004?

Reply:

(a) (i) Since the Department of Higher Education and Training became operational on 1 April 2010, six cases were referred to the South African Police Services for further investigation comprising two from the Department and four by public entities based on the information submitted to date.

(ii) The Department referred no matters to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations, while the public entities referred four cases for investigation.

(b) (i) Both the Departmental and three of the eight public entity cases have since been investigated by the South African Police Services and Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations.

(ii) In respect of the Department, one of the two cases has been followed up by the Accounting Officer, while the second matter is currently under investigation. The public entity cases are still under investigation.

(ii) None of the investigations has resulted in convictions to date.

03 July 2018 - NW1976

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What are the time frames for the appointment of industry managers to take over contracts entered into by the Waste Bureau?

Reply:

The process associated with the time-frames for possible take-over of contracts will depend on my decision as the Minister, relating to the submitted plan/s, once the current process is complete.

The approval and/or rejection of Industry Waste Management Plans is regulated by section 32(1) of National Environment Management: Waste Act (Act no 59 of 2008) as amended. The Department is currently consolidating the comments received and as the Minister I will consider the four (4) tyre Industry Waste Management Plans received in terms of section 28(1) terms of section 28(2) or 29(2), and may:

a) approve the plan in writing, with any amendments or conditions, and give directions for the implementation of the plan;

b) require additional information to be furnished and a revised plan to be submitted within timeframes specified by the Minister for approval;

c) require amendments to be made to the plan within timeframes specified by the Minister; or

d) reject the plan with reasons if it does not comply with the requirements of a notice in terms of section 28(1).

The final decision will be issued and communicated in terms of section 32(6), which requires that such notice be given in the Government Gazette.

---ooOoo---

03 July 2018 - NW1743

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Minister of Higher Education and Training’s reply to question 1125 on 24 May 2018, (a) what number of subjects did learners enrol for in respect of the (i) Senior Certificate and (ii) National Senior Certificate examination cycles in each of the past three academic years at each community education and training college and (b) of the specified subjects, what number of (i) subjects were eventually written and (ii) students achieved marks (aa) equal to 40% and above and (bb) between 30% and 40% in each case?

Reply:

The information below relates to adult learners that wrote the Senior Certificate and National Senior Certificate examination at Adult Education and Training Centres.

(a) (i) Senior Certificate

 

2015

2016

2017

Number of subjects

33

33

35

(a) (ii) National Senior Certificate

 

2015

2016

2017

Number of subjects

41

44

43

(b) (i) Senior Certificate

Subject

2015 Wrote

2016 Wrote

2017 Wrote

ACCOUNTING

821

653

2 893

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

231

203

1 218

AFRIKAANS HOME LANGUAGE

28

35

242

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

632

637

2 480

BUSINESS STUDIES

2 083

1 839

8 799

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

27

25

34

ECONOMICS

1 305

1 087

6 142

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2 966

2 613

11 941

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

302

284

1 954

GEOGRAPHY

1 475

1 246

6 351

HISTORY

860

797

4 005

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

3

4

0

ISINDEBELE FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

1

ISINDEBELE HOME LANGUAGE

1

0

15

ISIXHOSA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

4

10

8

ISIXHOSA HOME LANGUAGE

134

179

563

ISIZULU FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

42

42

233

ISIZULU HOME LANGUAGE

815

621

2 086

LIFE SCIENCES

2 327

2 215

9 762

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

1 411

1 663

9 194

MATHEMATICS

1 411

1 169

4 720

PHYSICAL SCIENCES

892

712

3 184

RELIGION STUDIES

399

419

3 363

SEPEDI FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

1

7

18

SEPEDI HOME LANGUAGE

159

135

988

SESOTHO FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

4

15

SESOTHO HOME LANGUAGE

131

103

599

SETSWANA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2

8

32

SETSWANA HOME LANGUAGE

80

53

818

SISWATI FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2

0

2

SISWATI HOME LANGUAGE

5

5

51

TSHIVENDA FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

3

TSHIVENDA HOME LANGUAGE

20

9

147

XITSONGA FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

6

XITSONGA HOME LANGUAGE

35

17

258

(b) (i) National Senior Certificate

Subject

2015 Wrote

2016 Wrote

2017 Wrote

Accounting

2 418

2 908

2 895

Afrikaans First Additional Language

373

482

511

Afrikaans Home Language

7

8

19

Afrikaans Second Additional Language

8

4

7

Agricultural Management Practices

1

0

0

Agricultural Sciences

592

755

1 098

Agricultural Technology

1

0

1

Business Studies

2 693

3 460

4 028

Civil Technology

3

9

4

Computer Applications Technology

55

68

51

Consumer Studies

21

37

35

Design

0

   

Dramatic Arts

 

3

0

Economics

2 997

3 670

4 242

Electrical Technology

9

5

13

Engineering Graphics and Design

34

50

43

English First Additional Language

3 238

4 060

3 957

English Home Language

1 062

1 520

1 715

English Second Additional Language

0

0

 

French Second Additional Language

 

1

17

Geography

3 100

4 159

5 232

History

843

1 167

1 274

Hospitality Studies

 

2

2

Information Technology

4

4

1

IsiXhosa First Additional Language

 

0

1

IsiXhosa Home Language

8

6

26

IsiZulu First Additional Language

10

19

22

IsiZulu Home Language

48

53

64

Life Orientation

31

55

75

Life Sciences

5 489

6 966

9 034

Mathematical Literacy

3 475

5 508

6 785

Mathematics

7 305

9 022

10 674

Mechanical Technology

11

23

19

Music

   

0

Physical Sciences

6 212

7 553

8 770

Religion Studies

1

2

4

Sepedi First Additional Language

 

2

 

Sepedi Home Language

42

24

34

Sesotho First Additional Language

0

   

Sesotho Home Language

10

12

23

Setswana First Additional Language

0

0

1

Setswana Home Language

20

24

10

SiSwati First Additional Language

 

1

 

SiSwati Home Language

0

 

1

Tourism

168

234

300

Tshivenda First Additional Language

0

   

Tshivenda Home Language

0

2

0

Visual Arts

 

0

2

Xitsonga Home Language

26

21

11

(b) (ii) (aa) Senior Certificate

Subject

2015 Achieved 40 - 100 %

2016 Achieved 40 - 100 %

2017 Achieved 40 - 100 %

ACCOUNTING

15

9

92

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

58

39

316

AFRIKAANS HOME LANGUAGE

4

13

62

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

9

22

137

BUSINESS STUDIES

69

70

342

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

1

1

1

ECONOMICS

39

29

455

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

417

312

3887

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

137

65

503

GEOGRAPHY

66

57

460

HISTORY

97

117

442

ISINDEBELE FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

 

0

1

ISINDEBELE HOME LANGUAGE

0

 

12

ISIXHOSA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2

8

4

ISIXHOSA HOME LANGUAGE

118

147

488

ISIZULU FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

40

35

191

ISIZULU HOME LANGUAGE

252

280

795

LIFE SCIENCES

62

60

438

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

66

101

920

MATHEMATICS

17

16

239

PHYSICAL SCIENCES

7

11

162

RELIGION STUDIES

135

172

1270

SEPEDI FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

0

7

SEPEDI HOME LANGUAGE

38

41

497

SESOTHO FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

4

9

SESOTHO HOME LANGUAGE

95

79

465

SETSWANA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

6

26

SETSWANA HOME LANGUAGE

35

28

387

SISWATI FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2

 

2

SISWATI HOME LANGUAGE

5

2

41

TSHIVENDA FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

 

0

2

TSHIVENDA HOME LANGUAGE

10

4

97

XITSONGA FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

3

XITSONGA HOME LANGUAGE

14

10

98

(b) (ii) (aa) National Senior Certificate

Subject

2015 Achieved 40 - 100 %

2016 Achieved 40 - 100 %

2017 Achieved 40 - 100 %

Accounting

318

414

302

Afrikaans First Additional Language

51

57

58

Afrikaans Home Language

5

6

3

Afrikaans Second Additional Language

4

1

0

Agricultural Management Practices

0

0

0

Agricultural Sciences

73

113

110

Agricultural Technology

0

0

0

Business Studies

459

624

381

Civil Technology

2

4

1

Computer Applications Technology

19

16

16

Consumer Studies

9

16

11

Dramatic Arts

 

2

0

Economics

449

431

448

Electrical Technology

1

1

5

Engineering Graphics and Design

5

11

8

English First Additional Language

2 487

3 001

2 736

English Home Language

686

999

1 063

French Second Additional Language

 

1

12

Geography

627

723

815

History

239

306

230

Hospitality Studies

 

1

1

Information Technology

1

2

0

IsiXhosa First Additional Language

 

0

1

IsiXhosa Home Language

6

6

26

IsiZulu First Additional Language

10

17

21

IsiZulu Home Language

43

37

50

Life Orientation

24

41

68

Life Sciences

1 330

1 468

2 115

Mathematical Literacy

871

1 283

1 048

Mathematics

1 178

1 496

1 614

Mechanical Technology

4

1

4

Physical Sciences

945

1 312

1 202

Religion Studies

0

2

1

Sepedi First Additional Language

 

1

 

Sepedi Home Language

36

17

26

Sesotho First Additional Language

0

   

Sesotho Home Language

10

11

19

Setswana First Additional Language

0

0

1

Setswana Home Language

15

22

6

SiSwati First Additional Language

 

1

 

SiSwati Home Language

0

 

1

Tourism

79

155

190

Tshivenda Home Language

0

2

0

Xitsonga Home Language

18

20

7

(b) (ii) (bb) Senior Certificate

Subject

2015 Achieved 30 - 39.9 %

2016 Achieved 30 - 39.9 %

2017 Achieved 30 - 39.9 %

ACCOUNTING

20

16

128

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

24

38

157

AFRIKAANS HOME LANGUAGE

3

5

96

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

33

49

293

BUSINESS STUDIES

129

115

722

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

1

3

0

ECONOMICS

60

72

735

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

996

761

4 325

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

81

90

755

GEOGRAPHY

123

117

791

HISTORY

85

147

791

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

0

0

0

ISINDEBELE FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

0

ISINDEBELE HOME LANGUAGE

0

0

3

ISIXHOSA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2

0

1

ISIXHOSA HOME LANGUAGE

15

23

61

ISIZULU FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

2

16

ISIZULU HOME LANGUAGE

327

192

809

LIFE SCIENCES

91

101

839

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

149

127

1 551

MATHEMATICS

25

25

309

PHYSICAL SCIENCES

15

24

254

RELIGION STUDIES

81

85

848

SEPEDI FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

4

6

SEPEDI HOME LANGUAGE

67

54

323

SESOTHO FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

0

1

SESOTHO HOME LANGUAGE

25

18

82

SETSWANA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

2

2

6

SETSWANA HOME LANGUAGE

33

24

321

SISWATI FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

0

0

0

SISWATI HOME LANGUAGE

0

1

7

TSHIVENDA FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

0

TSHIVENDA HOME LANGUAGE

8

5

33

XITSONGA FIRST ADD. LANGUAGE

0

0

0

XITSONGA HOME LANGUAGE

9

1

108

(b) (ii) (bb)National Senior Certificate

Subject

2015 Achieved 30 - 39.9 %

2016 Achieved 30 - 39.9 %

2017 Achieved 30 - 39.9 %

Accounting

435

674

489

Afrikaans First Additional Language

87

134

148

Afrikaans Home Language

2

2

12

Afrikaans Second Additional Language

4

3

6

Agricultural Management Practices

1

0

0

Agricultural Sciences

175

262

274

Agricultural Technology

0

0

0

Business Studies

750

929

775

Civil Technology

0

2

2

Computer Applications Technology

15

21

10

Consumer Studies

6

13

14

Dramatic Arts

0

1

0

Economics

696

864

1 039

Electrical Technology

5

2

4

Engineering Graphics and Design

13

12

12

English First Additional Language

675

927

1 035

English Home Language

359

485

608

French Second Additional Language

0

0

4

Geography

936

1 254

1 460

History

249

413

335

Hospitality Studies

0

1

0

Information Technology

1

1

0

IsiXhosa Home Language

1

0

0

IsiZulu First Additional Language

0

2

1

IsiZulu Home Language

4

12

10

Life Orientation

3

12

7

Life Sciences

1 724

2 036

2 329

Mathematical Literacy

1 062

1 555

1 838

Mathematics

1 304

1 715

1 836

Mechanical Technology

4

5

8

Music

0

0

0

Physical Sciences

1 208

1 613

1 675

Religion Studies

1

0

2

Sepedi Home Language

6

7

7

Sesotho Home Language

0

0

3

Setswana Home Language

5

2

3

Tourism

69

58

82

Xitsonga Home Language

6

1

4

03 July 2018 - NW2069

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether any policy has been put in place to ensure that (a) members of the Ministerial Task Team and/or (b) any other person who contributed to the decision to make history a compulsory subject for high learners will be precluded from benefiting financially in any way from the production of textbooks and any other relevant teaching material for the subject; if not, in each case, why not; id so what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) There is no policy that has been put in place to preclude members of the History Ministerial Task Team who contributed to the decision to make history a compulsory subject for high school learners from benefiting financially in any way from the production of textbooks and any other relevant teaching material for the subject.

There is no decision that has been taken by the Minister of Basic Education or any other person regarding the teaching of compulsory History in Grades 10-12. The MTT only recommended that there is a possibility of teaching compulsory History in the FET band provided that there is proper planning by DBE as well as considering issues such as the financial implications, teacher provisioning and training. The DBE is planning to make wider public consultations regarding the recommendations by the MTT before such a decision can be taken.

However there is a policy outlining the Terms of Reference for any publisher to submit material for evaluation and catalogue of core textbooks in the Department of Basic Education. The DBE requests publishers to submit material for evaluation purposes and these materials have to cover the entire curriculum for the whole year, as outlined in the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) of a specific subject.

DBE publishes an Invitation and Terms of Reference (TOR) which outlines the process for submissions. This TOR also informs tenderers of subjects and grades for which submissions are invited and dates as well as other important issues that publishers must comply with, in order for their submissions to be considered.

The DBE is responsible for the development of the national catalogue which is forwarded to provinces, districts and schools. The provinces are responsible for procurement and delivery of books to schools.

Notices regarding submissions of LTSM are advertised on the DBE website www.ltsm.doe.gov.za.

The reason why the MTT members are not precluded, it is because the DBE does not enter into agreement with individual authors but with publishers for the submission of material to be included in the National Catalogue for Grades 10 – 12 core textbooks. Although the DBE approves material to be on the catalogue it does not guarantee their purchase.

Furthermore, submission by a publisher does not guarantee that the material will be successful to be included on the DBE catalogue. The material goes through a rigorous process by a panel of teachers, subject advisers and members of Higher Education Institutions from various provinces. They are selected on the basis of their subject knowledge, expertise and experience in the specific subject. Hence the screening process is regarded as transparent, reliable and credible because it is guided by the five pillars from the National treasury: value for money, open and effective competition, ethics and fair dealings, accountability and reporting, and equity.

b) There is no policy that has been put in place to ensure that any other person who contributed to the decision to make history a compulsory subject for high school learners precluded from benefiting financially in any way from the production of textbooks and any other relevant teaching material for the subject.

The same reasons provided in answer (a) apply in this case as well.

03 July 2018 - NW1703

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What total amount of land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her in each province is (i) vacant and (ii) unused or has no purpose and (b) what is the (i) location and (ii) size of each specified plot of land; (2) (a) how much of the land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her has been leased out for private use and (b) what is the (i) Rand value of each lease and (ii)(aa) location and (bb) size of each piece of land?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department does not own land; however, it leases two privately owned buildings via the Department of Public Works (123 and 178 Francis Baard Street) and occupies a State-owned building in Olifantsfontein, i.e. the Indlela Trade Test Centre. The Mining Qualifications Authority, South African Qualifications Authority and National Student Financial Aid Scheme reported that they owned land, and the details are provided in the table below.

2. 

Entity

1 (a) Total amount of land owned by the entity in each province

(i) Vacant

(ii) Unused or has no purpose

(b)(i) Location?

(ii) Size of each specified plot of land?

2 (a) Land owned by the entity been leased out for private use

(b)(i) Rand value of each lease

(ii) (aa) Location of each piece of land

(bb) Size of each piece of land

Mining Qualifications Authority

R3 525

Gauteng Province

Not vacant

Used for MQA offices

Erf 917, 7 Anerley Road, Parktown, Johannesburg

3 525 m2

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

South African Qualifications Authority

R515 455

Gauteng province

Not vacant

Used for SAQA head office

1067 Arcadia Street, Hatfield, Pretoria, Erf 637

2 933 m2

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

R770 000

Western Cape

Not vacant

Used as offices of the organisation

(Erf #, 66447,66458,66459,66460 and 66461 Wynberg, Cape Town)

2 712 m2

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

03 July 2018 - NW2123

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 887 on 3 May 2018, what are the names of the (a) 14 schools in the Eastern Cape, (b) 12 schools in the Free State, (c) 33 schools in KwaZulu-Natal, (d) 22 schools in Limpopo, (e) 34 schools in Mpumalanga, (f) 21 schools in the Northern Cape, (g) nine schools in the North West and (h) 32 schools in the Western Cape that appear on the list of hotspot schools?

Reply:

 

a) EASTERN-CAPE

  1. Dudumeni H.School
  2. Emdikisweni Junior Secondary School
  3. Bizana village High School
  4. Mtebele Secondary School
  5. Butterworth High School
  6. Gwelane Secondary school
  7. Mazibuko Secondary school
  8. A.M.Zantsi Secondary School
  9. Khwaza Secondary Secondary
  10. J.A. Calata Senior Secondary school
  11. Matthew Goniwe Secondary School
  12. Skenjane Secondary School
  13. Ngangolwandle Secondary School
  14. Dinizulu High school

b) FREE STATE

  1. Lephoi Primary School
  2. Reikaeletse Secondary School
  3. Inoseng Primary School
  4. Ipeleng Primary School
  5. Trompsburg Primary School
  6. Madikgetla Primary School
  7. Trompsburg Secondary School
  8. Lere La Thuto Secondary School
  9. Jim Fouche Secondary School
  10. Petunia Secondary School
  11. Rosenhof Secondary School
  12. Vulamasango Secondary School

c) KWAZULU-NATAL

  1. Ikhandlela High School
  2. Qantaye Secondary School
  3. Phawulethu Secondary School
  4. Dlamvuzo High School
  5. Siyabonga Secondary School
  6. Mphemba High School
  7. Vulamuva High School
  8. Nomyaca High School
  9. Ntongande Secondary School
  10. Nqumizwe Secondary School
  11. Hlamvana High School
  12. Mdlamfe High School
  13. Emthungweni Secondary School
  14. Mnyakanya High School
  15. Sizwesonke Secondary School
  16. Matheku Secondary School
  17. Bhamu High School
  18. Yanguye Secondary School
  19. Zinqobela High School
  20. Richards Bay Secondary School
  21. Dlozilesizwe High School
  22. John Ross College School
  23. Mphepose Secondary School
  24. Dover Secondary School
  25. Mthonga High School
  26. Amazondi High School
  27. Malabela High School
  28. Siphosabadletshe High School
  29. Mtubatuba High School
  30. Kufezile Secondary School
  31. Vezobala Junior Secondary School
  32. Shengeza High School
  33. Thulasibone High School

d) LIMPOPO

  1. Kutama Secondary School
  2. Luvhivhini Secondary School
  3. Denga Tshivhase High School
  4. Nwanati High School
  5. Ripanabeta High School
  6. Silemale Secondary School
  7. Mountainview Secondary School
  8. Kgakala Secondary School
  9. Tubake Secondary School
  10. Mosepedi Secondary School
  11. Mathomomanayo Secondary School
  12. Tshikuwi Primary School
  13. Thagaetala High School
  14. Phasoane Secondary School
  15. Jawe Jawe Secondary School
  16. Sekgopetjana Secondary School
  17. Solomon Marabo Secondary School
  18. Goerge Mbulaheni High School
  19. Denga Tshivhase High School
  20. Hoerskool louis Trichardt
  21. Jim Chabani High School
  22. Ditlalemeso Secondary School

e) MPUMALANGA

  1. EJ Singwane Secondary school
  2. Gedlembane Secondary school
  3. Hillaria Mthethwa Secondary school
  4. Duma Primary School
  5. Tikhontele Secondary school
  6. Masitakhe Secondary school
  7. Sitfokotile Secondary school
  8. Funindlela Primary School
  9. Letsakuthula Primary School
  10. Sehlulile Primary school
  11. Jerusalem Secondary school
  12. Khanyisani Secondary school
  13. Lungisani Primary school
  14. Mshadza Secondary school
  15. Phola Secondary school
  16. Sakhile Primary School
  17. Khumbula Secondary school
  18. Victory park Primary School
  19. Jacob Mdluli Secondary school
  20. Mntungwa Secondary school
  21. Phatfwa Secondary school
  22. Hlanganani Secondary school
  23. Mbuyani Secondary school
  24. EbuhleniPrimary School
  25. Mhlume Secondary school
  26. Sbhulo High school
  27. Siligane Secondary school
  28. Ngodini Secondary school
  29. Emtfonjeni Primary School
  30. Fundinjobe Secondary school
  31. Zikodze Secondary school
  32. Khutsalani Secondary school
  33. Vulindlela Secondary school
  34. Phakani Primary School

f) NORTHERN CAPE

  1. Alexander Bay High
  2. Calvinia High School
  3. Hantam High School
  4. Fraserburg High School
  5. Malherbe Human Intermediate
  6. Garies High School
  7. J.J Lambert Primary
  8. Kharkams Combined
  9. Concordia High School
  10. Nababeep High School
  11. Okiep High School
  12. Okiep Primary School
  13. Boesmanland high School
  14. Francois Visser Primary
  15. Port Nolloth High School
  16. Port Nolloth Primary School
  17. Dr Isak Van Niekerk Primary
  18. Matjieskloof Primary School
  19. Namaqualand High School
  20. S.A Van Wyk High School
  21. Ferdinand Brecher Primary School

g) NORTH WEST

  1. Mokgosi Primary School
  2. Moeti Primary School
  3. Kameel Primary School
  4. Uitspan Intermediate School
  5. Monthusi Primary School
  6. Kwalakitso Primary School
  7. Kitlanang Middle School
  8. Itsholetseng Middle School
  9. Modisekanono Middle School

h) WESTERN CAPE

  1. Breerivier High School
  2. Cloetesville High School
  3. De Kruine Secondary School
  4. Desmond Tutu High School
  5. Esselenpark High School
  6. Aurial College
  7. Bastiaanse Secondary School
  8. Beaufort-West Secondary School
  9. Bridgton Secondary School
  10. Concordia High School
  11. Arcadia High School
  12. Blomvlei Primary School
  13. Bonteheuwel High School
  14. Boundary Primary School
  15. Crystal High School
  16. Hexvallei Secondary School
  17. Langeberg Secondary School
  18. Orleansvale Primary School
  19. Paarl School of Skills
  20. Paulus Joibert Secondary
  21. Waveren High School
  22. Weltevrede High School
  23. Fezile Secondary School
  24. Ladismith Secondary School
  25. Gerrit Du Plessis Secondary School
  26. Hillcrest Secondary School
  27. Imizamo Yethu Secondary School
  28. Indwe Secondary School
  29. Downeville Primary School
  30. Edendale Primary School
  31. Heideveld High School
  32. ID Mlkize High School

02 July 2018 - NW2155

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether any government employees (a) have shares in and/or (b) own companies whose bids were approved in any of the bidding windows of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programmes?

Reply:

Government employees declare their financial interests in companies annually as required by the Public Service Regulations.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2151

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Energy

(a) What is the cost of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programmes to the economy and (b) how was this determined?

Reply:

A) The impact of the REIPPPP on the South African economy is not about costs, but rather about benefits. The highly competitive procurement conditions of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme (REIPPPP), combined with excellent domestic natural resource potential, policy support and technological progress has resulted in rapid cost reductions and competitiveness of renewable energy technologies.

The South African government established the REIPPPP in 2010 as an urgent intervention to support the transition to a low-carbon economy, enhance and diversify South Africa’s electrical power generation capacity and accelerate private-sector participation in the energy industry through a competitive bidding process. The programme design, implementation and operational requirements further makes significant contributions to broader national economic development objectives, such as job creation, social upliftment, enterprise development, increasing economic ownership opportunities for black people, foreign direct investment, technological progress, climate change mitigation, alleviating pressure on the fiscus and lower electricity costs.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe,MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2149

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether any studies regarding (a) costs and (b) feasibility were conducted before signing any of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme (REIPPP) deals; if not, (i) why not and (ii) on what grounds and basis were the REIPPPs pursued; if so, (aa) was each study published, (bb) who conducted each study, (cc) was a tender issued to conduct each study, (dd) what was the cost of conducting each study, (ee) what is the title of each study and (ff) where are the copies of the studies available?

Reply:

Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP) projects are procured and contracted pursuant to Ministerial Determinations issued by the Minister of Energy, in consultation with the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) in terms of Section 34 of the Electricity Regulation Act, No 4 of 2006. Considerations include issues of carbon emission reduction commitments, new technology uncertainties such as costs, operability and lead time to build, water usage, localisation and job creation as well as regional development and integration and security of supply.

Each Independent Power Producer (IPP) participating in the tender process is responsible to undertaking a feasibility of its own project before bid submission to ensure the bankability of the project. At bid submission the IPPs have to comply with various qualification criteria which can only be complied with if they did undertake feasibility studies.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2142

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Energy

With reference to his statement on 1 June 2018 in which he stated that the two coal Independent Power Producers (IPPs) would give rise to at least 5 000 jobs during construction (details furnished), (a) where did he obtain this figure and (b) can he verify it, as the figures provided by the coal IPPs are different?

Reply:

In terms of the Request for Proposals (RFP) for coal IPPs, the preferred bidders bid the following in terms of job creation:

 

Project 1

Project 2

Total

Jobs during Construction (person years)*

7 943

2 377

10 320

Jobs during Operations (person years)

10 678

4 626

15 304

Total jobs in person years

18 621

7 003

25 624

*(Person years: 1 job = 12 person-months and 1 person-month = 160 working hours)

The quantification of job creation is calculated in terms of the above formula stipulated in the RFP. If one were to assume the Construction period to be 4 years with the Operations period being 30 years, the total direct jobs during Construction would be equivalent to having approximately 2 580 people working for 4 years during Construction and approximately 510 people working for 30 years during Operations. However, since jobs are provided in job years as per the RFP, the figures are likely to be understated given workers who are employed for less than one year, especially during the construction phase.

Furthermore, these job numbers directly associated with the coal IPP plants do not include the indirect jobs created as a result of the new mine which one of the Projects will be dependent on as well as the jobs created in relation to the discard coal supply which the other Project will be utilising. The job numbers further exclude indirect job creation in respect of factors such as manufacturing and limestone supply.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2164

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Energy

Did certain persons (names furnished) declare that they were directors in certain companies (details furnished), all of which had their bids accepted as part of the most recently signed Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme agreements; if so, on what basis was this approved?

Reply:

Projects are not evaluated on the directorship of participating companies but rather on the shareholding of each project company to ensure that the bid criteria in respect of South African Entity and Black ownership participation are met. Thus the persons (names furnished) were not required to declare directorship.

All bidders are bound by rules against collusion which may result in disqualification. The commonality in directorship in the specified project companies refer to a group of companies with the same shareholding structure. Thus, collusion with another bidding group or developer is not relevant. The individual bids by the named project companies competed with multiple other bids in respect of the unique offering of each underlying project, in terms of a combination of factors that inform their pricing, for example location, size of plant and technology.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

.

02 July 2018 - NW2143

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether he is aware of the development fee to be paid by Independent Power Producers (IPPs) to the National Treasury and to his department in order to set up the Project Development Fund for Baseload Coal Energy (details furnished); if so, what is the (a) total amount in Rand of the development fee and (b) breakdown of all costs that (i) have been incurred and (ii) will be incurred by his department for the procurement of energy from IPPs?

Reply:

(A) The development fee of the Baseload Coal Independent Power Producers Procurement Programme has been set in the Request for Proposals (RFP) (December 2015) at 1.75% of the Total Project Value. The development fee is utilised as a cost recovery mechanism for costs incurred in the design, development, procurement and implementation over a 30-year contract term. The exact Rand value of the Development Fee can only be calculated once all the preferred bidders have reached Financial Close.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2154

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Energy

Were there any conflicts of interest identified in any of the bids for all of the bidding windows of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme; if so, (a) on what bids and (b) what was the conflict of interest in each case?

Reply:

All bidders, evaluation teams, review teams as well as governance audit specialists are required to complete extensive declarations of conflicts of interest. Bidders are also required to declare that no collusion took place in the preparation of their bids and if found to have taken place the bids will be disqualified.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2152

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Energy

How much less electricity will Eskom be required to produce because of the approval of the bids of Independent Power Producers by his department?

Reply:

Eskom is not required to produce less electricity as a consequence of Independent Power Producers. Eskom’s policy on the decommissioning of its fleet is informed by an optimal balance of cost efficiencies, reduced capacity and carbon emission considerations. Eskom’s planned decommissioning of the Arnot, Camden, Grootvlei, Hendrina, Komati coal-fired power stations was already projected in the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) 2010 which indicated that the decommissioned capacity would be replaced by approximately 8 800MW new Coal Generation capacity through Kusile and Medupi. The Wind and Solar Photovoltaic technologies introduced through the renewable energy programme do not displace coal-fired power stations as these technologies do not provide base load capacity.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2150

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Energy

What are the (a) Government and (b) relevant entities projected to spend both directly and indirectly on the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programmes; (2) has he found that the Government and the entities can afford the cost; if so, what are the details of how this was determined?

Reply:

There is no direct or indirect spend by Government or relevant entities exclusively attributable to the Electricity Regulation Act, 2006, Section 34 sanctioned Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme (REIPPPP). Regulation 10 of the New Generation Regulations enable Eskom, as the single buyer, to recover all costs in respect of the Section 34 Ministerial Determinations and includes payments for the purchase of electricity from Independent Power Producers (IPP) in terms of a power purchase agreement. Eskom only pays for actual electricity evacuated into the grid at a predetermined fixed price that can only escalate by CPI annually.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2168

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Energy

Did certain persons (names furnished) declare that they were directors in certain companies (details furnished), all of which had their bids accepted as part of the most recently signed Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme agreements; if so, on what basis was this approved?

Reply:

Projects are not evaluated on the directorship of participating companies but rather on the shareholding of each project company to ensure that the bid criteria in respect of South African Entity and Black ownership participation are met. Thus the persons (names furnished) were not required to declare directorship.

All bidders are bound by rules against collusion which may result in disqualification. The commonality in directorship in the specified project companies refer to a group of companies with the same shareholding structure. Thus, collusion with another bidding group or developer is not relevant. The individual bids by the named project companies competed with multiple other bids in respect of the unique offering of each underlying project, in terms of a combination of factors that inform their pricing, for example location, size of plant and technology.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

.

\

02 July 2018 - NW2167

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Energy

Did certain persons (names furnished) declare that they were directors in certain companies (details furnished), all of which had their bids accepted as part of the most recently signed Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme agreements; if so, on what basis was this approved?

Reply:

Projects are not evaluated on the directorship of participating companies but rather on the shareholding of each project company to ensure that the bid criteria in respect of South African Entity and Black ownership participation are met. Thus the persons (names furnished) were not required to declare directorship.

All bidders are bound by rules against collusion which may result in disqualification. The commonality in directorship in the specified project companies refer to a group of companies with the same shareholding structure. Thus, collusion with another bidding group or developer is not relevant. The individual bids by the named project companies competed with multiple other bids in respect of the unique offering of each underlying project, in terms of a combination of factors that inform their pricing, for example location, size of plant and technology.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

.

02 July 2018 - NW2169

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Energy

What steps have been taken to prevent collusion with respect to the formula used to determine the price score for compliant bids in the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producers Programme; (2) whether any collusion with respect to awarding bids has been found; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

To prevent collusion, bidders declare that in submitting a Bid Response that each of its members, its Lenders, the Contractors and all other participants in any Bid Response certifies that there has not been communication with a competitor or potential competitor that would amount to collusive bidding.

If the Department becomes aware of or is of the opinion that any of the collusive activities have been undertaken by any Bidder or any of its Members, Lenders, Contractors or Advisors, the Department shall be entitled to disqualify such Bidder, its Members, Lenders, Contractors or their Advisors and to bar any or all of them from participating further in the Renewable Energy Power Producers Procurement Programme. No collusion has been found.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2156

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether he has found that any of his relatives or relatives of any other Minister (a) have shares in and/or (b) own companies whose bids were approved in any of the bidding windows of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programmes?

Reply:

I have not found out if my relatives have shares in these companies. Ministers declare their financial interest annually through the appropriate platforms.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2165

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Energy

Did certain persons (names furnished) declare that they were directors in certain companies (details furnished), all of which had their bids accepted as part of the most recently signed Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme agreements; if so, on what basis was this approved?

Reply:

Projects are not evaluated on the directorship of participating companies but rather on the shareholding of each project company to ensure that the bid criteria in respect of South African Entity and Black ownership participation are met. Thus the persons (names furnished) were not required to declare directorship.

All bidders are bound by rules against collusion which may result in disqualification. The commonality in directorship in the specified project companies refer to a group of companies with the same shareholding structure. Thus, collusion with another bidding group or developer is not relevant. The individual bids by the named project companies competed with multiple other bids in respect of the unique offering of each underlying project, in terms of a combination of factors that inform their pricing, for example location, size of plant and technology.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

.

02 July 2018 - NW2185

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the current status of a certain person (name and details furnished) in his department, who was found guilty of rape, bribery and defeating the ends of justice?

Reply:

The official is on suspension. He was suspended on 08 June 2018, the disciplinary hearing is scheduled for 28-29 June 2018.

02 July 2018 - NW2159

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether any relatives of Ministers (a) have shares in and/or (b) own companies that are Independent Power Producers?

Reply:

I am not privy to the required information.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2160

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Energy

With reference to his reply to question 1363 on 23 May 2018, what percentage of shares in Main Street (RF) (Pty) Ltd, Ramizone (RF) (Pty) Ltd, Amstilinx (RF) (Pty) Ltd, Amstilite (RF) (Pty) Ltd are owned by BTSA Netherlands Cooperatie U.A, Ramizest and Friedshelf 1294 respectively?

Reply:

The shareholding of BTSA Netherlands Cooperatie U.A, Ramizest and Friedshelf 1294 are the same across all four projects. Refer to table below for detail per shareholder.

 

Company

Shareholders

Shareholding

Main Street (RF) (Pty) Ltd

BTSA

60%

 

Ramizest (on behalf of the Letsatsi Trust)

37.5%

 

Friedshelf 1294 (on behalf of the relevant Local Community Trust)

2.5%

Ramizone (RF) (Pty) Ltd

BTSA

60%

 

Ramizest (on behalf of the Letsatsi Trust)

37.5%

 

Friedshelf 1294 (on behalf of the relevant Local Community Trust)

2.5%

Amstilinx (RF) (Pty) Ltd

BTSA

60%

 

Ramizest (on behalf of the Letsatsi Trust)

37.5%

 

Friedshelf 1294 (on behalf of the relevant Local Community Trust)

2.5%

Amstilite (RF) (Pty) Ltd

BTSA

60%

 

Ramizest (on behalf of the Letsatsi Trust)

37.5%

 

Friedshelf 1294 (on behalf of the relevant Local Community Trust)

2.5%

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2158

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether any relatives of Ministers (a) have shares in and/or (b) own companies that provided financing for the companies that won bids, in any bidding windows of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programmes?

Reply:

I am not privy to the required information.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date

02 July 2018 - NW2157

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether any government employees (a) have shares in and/or (b) own companies that provided financing for the companies that won bids in any bidding windows of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programmes?

Reply:

Government employees declare their financial interest in companies annually as required by the Public Service Regulations.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

02 July 2018 - NW2166

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Energy

Did certain persons (names furnished) declare that they were directors in certain companies (details furnished), all of which had their bids accepted as part of the most recently signed Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme agreements; if so, on what basis was this approved?

Reply:

Projects are not evaluated on the directorship of participating companies but rather on the shareholding of each project company to ensure that the bid criteria in respect of South African Entity and Black ownership participation are met. Thus the persons (names furnished) were not required to declare directorship.

All bidders are bound by rules against collusion which may result in disqualification. The commonality in directorship in the specified project companies refer to a group of companies with the same shareholding structure. Thus, collusion with another bidding group or developer is not relevant. The individual bids by the named project companies competed with multiple other bids in respect of the unique offering of each underlying project, in terms of a combination of factors that inform their pricing, for example location, size of plant and technology.

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister of Energy

Date:

.