Questions and Replies

14 November 2018 - NW3123

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

Whether, since she served in Cabinet, she (a) (i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of her department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) No

(b) No. However, I have been invited and did attend a Diwali celebration at the Gupta residence.

14 November 2018 - NW3002

Profile picture: Makeleni, Ms P

Makeleni, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education

1) With reference to her reply to question 2801 on 2 October 2018, in which schools in each province have the learners with (a) hearing impairments, (b) visual impairments and (c) learners with profound to severe intellectual disabilities who are on waiting lists been accommodated; (2) What steps are taken in each province to ensure that the specified learners are receiving the education they are entitled to according to their respective disabilities? (3) are the schools in each province who accommodate these learners provided with the relevant resources like (a) SA Sign Language (i) teachers and (ii) assistant teachers, (b) braille teachers, (c) braillers and (d) large print books?

Reply:

(1) (a),(b),(c) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

(2) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

(3) (a)(i), (ii),(b),(c) and (d) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

14 November 2018 - NW2860

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

1. (a) Which countries were visited by a team of her department’s officials and educator union representatives in 2018 as part of the seven-country tour, (b) on what date was each country visited and (c) why was that particular country chosen as having experience relevant to the South African context; 2. (a) what are the names of the officials and educator union representatives who visited the specified countries, (b) why was each specified official and unionist chosen to undertake the visit and (c)(i) what was the cost of each official and unionist’s flights and accommodation and (ii) from which departmental budget was the cost of the visit to the country paid; 3. was each official and unionist required to provide a report on their findings; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings for each country visited?

Reply:

  1. RESPONSE

 

1 (a). The bench mark study tour was initiated and funded by the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) to assist the research work currently underway in the ELRC. Four(4) countries were visited, namely Finland, Singapore, Canada and Brazil.

(b). The engagements with the countries various departments took place from 26 February 2018 to 9 March 2018. The dates were as follows:

  • Finland : 26 February 2018 – 27 February 2018.
  • Singapore : 28 February 2018 – 2 March 2018.
  • Canada : 5 March 2018 – 6 March 2018.
  • Brazil : 8 March 2018 – 9 March 2018.

(c). At an Education Indaba in 2017 that was organised by the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC), three streams of work were identified to be undertaken to address challenges relating to education provisioning and related matters. One of these pertinent matters is post provisioning, which has become one of the difficult issues in the different provincial education departments in South Africa.

In addressing the issues raised by the Post Provisioning Commission at the Education Indaba, the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) commissioned desktop research to assess how international countries have approached post provisioning challenges, managed compensation of teachers and adopted effective distribution models within their education system. Based on the research, the four (4) countries that were identified that could best assist South Africa with its challenges and provide possible solutions.

During the visits three (3) focus areas were concentrated on primarily because of the South African context. The areas were:

  • Annual and long-term human resource (HR) planning (teachers and other personnel) at state, provincial, and school levels;
  • Budget allocation and funding structures from Grade R/ Kindergarten to Matriculation levels taking into account factors such as poverty, special education needs, and specialist subjects; and
  • Norms and standards for HR provisioning in small and/or rural schools.

2. (a). The names of the departmental officials were the following:

  • Mr T Kojana: Eastern Cape Department of Education;
  • Adv T Malakoane: Free State Department of Education;
  • Ms N Mutheiwana: Limpopo Department of Education;
  • Ms L Moyane: Mpumalanga Department of Education;
  • Mr E Mosuwe: Gauteng Department of Education;
  • Ms S Semaswe: North West Department of Education;
  • Mr T van Staden: Northern Cape Department of Education;
  • Mr M Cronje: Western Cape Department of Education;
  • Mr S Faker: Department of Basic Education; and
  • Mr M Mfela: Department of Basic Education.

The names of the union officials were the following:

  • Mr B Manuel: Teacher Union Executive Director: CTU ATU;
  • Mr M Maluleke: Teacher Union SADTU; and
  • Mr M Galorale: Teacher Union: SADTU.

The teacher unions identified the officials that were to attend on their behalf and they were invited separately from the DBE officials. The information on how the union officials were identified therefore needed to be obtained from the unions.

(b). The departmental officials were chosen because of their expertise and responsibility in either post provisioning, human resource management, early childhood development and finance. Unions were required to identify their own representatives.

(c) (i). The entire benchmark study tour was orgainised by the ELRC based on the resolutions taken at the Education Indaba 2017. The ELRC funded the entire study tour. There were no financial implications for the Department.

The Department is not in a position to provide the cost for each delegate on the benchmark tour.

(c) (ii). See (c) (i) above.

3. A detailed report with findings and recommendations were drafted by the ELRC with inputs provided by the delegates. A copy of the report may be requested from the ELRC.

14 November 2018 - NW2859

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What are the relevant details of the Early Grade Reading Norms and Standards that are meant to be implemented by provincial education departments and (b) what progress has each province made in meeting the specified norms and standards?

Reply:

 

Response:

(a) The relevant details of the Early Grade Reading Norms and Standards which are meant to be implemented by provincial education departments are explained in the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) from Grades R – 3. These include the text types that learners should engage with in a 2 weekly cycle and the time allocation per grade for each term of the year. They also contain the components of reading such as decoding, sounding letters of the alphabet, letter recognition to reading words and reading fluency which is clearly described in the Annual Teaching Plan (Section 3) of the CAPS. Additional guidelines were developed in February 2018 and mediated through the Foundation Phase Subject Committees and workshops at national, provincial, district and teacher training, as well as through Professional Learning Communities.

(b) Progress by province in meeting the specified norms and standards as per the CAPS are reported on quarterly through the National Strategy for Learner Attainment (NSLA). In addition, the Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) Programme is being implemented to assist teachers to evaluate learners reading progress. Base-line, mid-line and end-line assessments are conducted to evaluate learners. Currently, 1670 schools are using EGRA to support the implementation of the CAPS.

The Primary School Reading Improvement Programme (PSRIP) was launched in October 2016. As a result, 11 712 Foundation Phase teachers and 263 subject advisors have trained on reading content and pedagogy in preparation for delivering the reading component of the CAPS. The table below details the progress as at 30 September 2018 on the above programmes in provinces.

Province

Progress

Eastern Cape

  • 334 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1677 Foundation Phase teachers and 58 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.
  • Jolly Phonics programme is currently being piloted in 48 schools in Grade 1 to support the implementation of the norms and standards.

Free State

  • 100 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1108 Foundation Phase teachers and 25 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Gauteng

  • 112 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1098 Foundation Phase teachers and 38 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

KwaZulu-Natal

  • 324 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 2350 Foundation Phase teachers and 24 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.
  • The Jika Imfundo programme is used to teach teachers on how to use reading strategies effectively in the classroom.

Limpopo

  • 333 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1597 Foundation Phase teachers and 28 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Mpumalanga

  • 125 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1247 Foundation Phase teachers and 22 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

North West

  • 117 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 668 Foundation Phase teachers and 19 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Northern Cape

  • 115 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 933 Foundation Phase teachers and 22 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Western Cape

  • 110 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1034 Foundation Phase teachers and 27 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

14 November 2018 - NW2999

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her department’s presentation on the progress of the implementation of the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for SA Sign Language (SASL), Grades R-12, presented to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 12 September 2018, (a) why was the development of the SASL CAPS only done following a court case in 2009 between Springate and Others v the Minister of Basic Education and Others and (b) why did her department wait for legal proceedings to introduce CAPS for SASL, which is a deaf person’s constitutional right; (2) in view of 2018 being the first year that deaf learners will be examined in SASL as a Home Language subject, has she found that (a) the deaf learners are well prepared to be examined and (b) her department and the education system are sufficiently prepared to examine deaf learners in SASL; (3) what is (a) the number of suppliers of SASL learning and teaching support materials on her department’s database and (b) the experience of the specified suppliers in the field of SASL?

Reply:

Response

(1)(a) The development of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for South African Sign Language (SASL) prior to the 2009 court case of Springate and others versus the Minister of Basic Education and others was impeded and limited by challenges faced by government which had not yet been finalised. This is in reference to the fact that SASL is not yet the Official Language of government which essentially means it may not be provided at Home Language level in Basic Education, which is what it is for Deaf learners. However, it must be noted that the South African Schools Act 84 of 1996 already recognised Sign Language for use as language of learning and teaching (LoLT) for Deaf learners. Following the court case, the Minister instituted a process of developing SASL CAPS which is already being implemented even though the Department of Arts and Culture and the Pan South African Language Board have not yet concluded the process of making SASL one of the official languages of government.

(b) In addition to the response in (1)(a) above, it must be noted that there is nothing in legislation that prevents right holders from claiming their right from those who have a hold on it. This claim was inadvertently directed to government largely than it was directed to Basic Education given the response in (1)(a) above.

(2)(a) In preparation for the first Grade 12 NSC examinations and in an effort to prepare candidates for the exit examination, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has set and released SASL HL exemplar question papers for Grade 10 and Grade 11 in 2017. In 2018, the DBE has set the preparatory examination question papers for SASL HL in Grade 12, so that learners have full exposure to an examination that is equivalent to the final examination.

(b)The DBE appointed a panel of experts to set and internally moderate question papers for the Grade 12 NSC examinations. These question papers were externally moderated and approved by Umalusi. In preparation for the implementation and administration of examinations in SASL HL, the DBE established a task team to ensure that all schools, teachers and learners are fully prepared for the November examination. This task team developed Guidelines for the Implementation and Conduct of Examinations in South African Sign Language Home Language and this document was issued to schools prior to the preparatory examination. The DBE and PEDs also conducted an audit of all centres where SASL HL examinations are to be conducted. In cases where there were deficiencies, these were addressed. In addition, the DBE took a decision to mark the preparatory examination papers nationally in Pretoria. Teachers from schools that offer SASL HL in Grade 12 were appointed as markers. The DBE appointed a national team for the moderation of School-Based Assessment in SASL HL. All portfolios of candidates that offer SASL HL were moderated and feedback was given to schools.

On the basis of the above initiatives, the DBE is confident that we are adequately prepared to examine Deaf learners in SASL.

(3) (a) There are six (6) suppliers of South African Sign Language (SASL) learning and teaching support material in the DBE database.

(b) The DBE puts a call for submission of SASL materials to all suppliers. The following are the only suppliers that have responded: Sign Language Education and Development (SLED), National Institute for the Deaf (NID) and University of Stellenbosch. These are the only institutions that have developed and submitted SASL materials over the years.

14 November 2018 - NW2407

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM:

(a) What is the total amount in rental income that her department received from the leasing of farms (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) what is the (i) name and (ii) location, including global positioning system co-ordinates, of each farm, (c) under which land reform programmes of her department is each farm leased, (d) why has full ownership of each farm not been transferred to the beneficiaries to date and (e) by what date does her department intend to transfer the ownership of each farm? NW2655E

Reply:

(a)(i),(ii) Please refer to the table below.

 

Province

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

Since April 2018

EASTERN CAPE

631 993.99

1 039 008.04

711 718.52

202 887

FREE STATE

1 465 123.52

1 687 180.76

1 943 739.27

327 429

GAUTENG

351 422.51

593 502.09

499 167.72

430 00

KWAZULU-NATAL

430 625.41

1 716 154.11

1 197 198.69

156 789

LIMPOPO

599 266.68

660 528.17

1 402735.35

49 360

MPUMALANGA

1 726 532.65

10 195 210.48

13 794 929.66

1 195 428

NORTH WEST

941 738.29

2 840210.6

241 0344.04

870 755

NORTHERN CAPE

554 800.29

735 896.8

424 769.47

146 007

WESTERN CAPE

596 700.64

842 972.14

879 06.92

963 29

Total

7 298 203.98

20 310 663.19

22 472 509.64

3 087 984

(b)(i),(ii) ,(c) Please refer to Annexure A.

(d) With regard to properties not transferred under the Restitution Programme, there are conflicts amongst claimants that impact on their ability to take ownership. With regard to other programmes, properties have not been transferred since the current government policy provides for leasing of state land with an option to purchase. The transfer must therefore be preceded by a lease and the exercise of an option.

(e) Properties under the Restitution Programme will be transferred to the claimants as soon as the instability and disputes are resolved amongst claimants. The balance of the properties will be transferred after the relevant farmers exercise their option to purchase.

14 November 2018 - NW369

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

a) What is the total amount that was (i) budgeted for and (ii) spent on her private office (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2017 and (b) what was the (i) remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office in each of the specified

Reply:

The Ministerial Handbook provides guidelines on the appointment of the staff in the Private Office.  It equally provides the recommended salary levels of each post. The salary levels are adjusted on an annual basis as prescribed in the Public Service Regulations.

 

The Office of the Minister has a staff complement as defined in the Ministerial Handbook.  In line with the Protection of Personal Information Act (PoPi) and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, I am unable to provide the members with such confidential information in the manner it is requested.

 

I however draw the honourable members to the Department’s Annual Report wherein the organogram of the Department provides the information required.  Should it be insufficient, the Department will make the personal files of the officials available for further scrutiny by the Auditor General as prescribed by the Act.

14 November 2018 - NW3461

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of State Security

1. (a) On what date did her department last conduct an audit of artwork owned by Government which is under her department’s curatorship and (b) what are the details of each artwork under the curatorship of her department according to the Generally Recognised Accounting Practice 103; 2. Whether any artworks under her department’s curatorship have gone missing (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The department does not apply GRAP 103 in recognising any of its assets, and therefore is not required to apply the standard to any of its artwork.  Furthermore, SSA does not have heritage assets as defined and recognised by GRAP 103.  GRAP 17 is however used to recognise assets.

 

2. Artwork is included in the SSA assets register.  Verification of artwork occurs with the normal verification of other assets’ classes and have been audited as part of the statutory audit by the Office of the Auditor General.

 

14 November 2018 - NW2937

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM:

Whether, she has officially or unofficially met with any member of the Gupta family at any time between 1 January 2009 to date; if so (a) what was the nature of the specified meeting and (b) where was it held?

Reply:

I have been invited and did attend a Diwali celebration at the Gupta residence.

 

13 November 2018 - NW3036

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) will be the capacity of each faculty at each institution of higher learning in 2019 and (b) number of first year students will each specified institution of higher learning be able to accept in 2019?

Reply:

(a) Universities have a variety of ways in which they name their faculties, and therefore, the programmes offered by faculties across institutions vary considerably. The enrolment plan for each university is not developed per faculty, but rather for the institution as a whole. It is therefore not possible to indicate the capacity of each faculty at each institution. However, it is possible to provide the planned overall enrolments per field of study at each university.

Table 1 below shows the approved enrolment planning targets for each university by major fields of study in Science, Engineering and Technology; Business and Commerce; Education and Other Humanities, for 2019.

(b) The approved number of first-time entering students across all fields of study that each university will be able to accept in the 2019 academic year, is indicated in table 2 below.

13 November 2018 - NW3378

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether the so-called spy tapes were produced by the SA Revenue Service’s High-Risk Investigation Unit which was handed to Mr Michael Hulley for the former President, Mr JG Zuma’s defence; if not, who produced the tapes; if so, who handed the tapes to Mr Hulley?

Reply:

The EFF is advised to request the South African Revenue Service to indicate whether it produced the so-called spy-tapes.

Furthermore, the requested information is of such a nature that it would form part of the broader operational strategy of the State Security Agency and therefore as a matter of policy the SSA does not disclose such information.  It should however be observed that the SSA is held accountable on such matters by the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

12 November 2018 - NW3284

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

(a) No tender awarded to listed companies the Department of Mineral Resources and or entities reporting to me.  (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) (iii) (iv) : Falls away

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

12 November 2018 - NW3080

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

What (a) is the number of notices issued in terms of (i) section 54 and (ii) section 55 of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Act, Act 28 of 2002, in the 2017-18 financial year and (b) are the reasons for each section 54 and section 55 notice issued to (i) companies and (ii) other mining and prospecting companies?

Reply:

(a) Provisions of section 54 and 55 of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Act, Act 28 of 2002 does not necessitate issuing of any notices.

(b) Please see (a) above

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

12 November 2018 - NW2950

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1)Whether media personnel was given access to the meeting held in Xolobeni in the Eastern Cape on 23 September 2018; if not, (a) why not and (b) under whose instructions; (2) were any lawyers excluded from the meeting; if so, (a) which lawyers and (b) on what basis?

Reply:

  1. Media was invited by the Department, the District and Local municipalities.
  2. No lawyers were excluded.

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

12 November 2018 - NW3157

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether the Department of Military Veterans received an application from a certain person (name and details furnished) to manage the burial benefits of military veterans; if so, what is the current status of the specified person’s application?

Reply:

REPLY

1. It is advised that NO application form for 640117 5868 086 Mr Tube has been received by the Department of Military Veterans.  It is further advised that NO application has been registered on the DMV Burial Support Database.

12 November 2018 - NW3118

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, since she served in Cabinet, she (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of her Office’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) No, I have never been influenced, nor have I influenced an employee to take administrative action on behalf of the person(s) specified.

(b) (i) I attended official meetings with Mr. Ajay Gupta present when I was Minister of Foreign affairs and he was a board member at Brand South Africa.
(ii) I was also invited and accepted an invitation to attend Diwali celebrations at the Gupta family home.

   

Approved

Not

Approved

Approved

as amended

   

Comment:

Dr NC Dlamini-Zuma

Minister in the Presidency: Planning Monitoring and Evaluation

   

Date:

   

12 November 2018 - NW3239

Profile picture: Ngwenya, Ms G

Ngwenya, Ms G to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

What (a) amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

(a) None (i) (ii) (aa) (bb), (b), (c) (d) falls away

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

12 November 2018 - NW3253

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

 

Response:

the dti and it’s Entities did not borrow any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2018.

“Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

12 November 2018 - NW3292

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

Response from the Department

No contracts and/or tenders were awarded by the dti to the companies listed in your Annexure A.

Response from the Entities

Entity

(b)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)(aa)

(b)(ii) (bb)

(iii)

(iv)

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

The CIPC had contracts or tenders with Vox Telecommunications

4MB Uncapped ADSL Bandwidth for Data, Voice & Internet Services

R75 618.00

01/04/2015: over a period of 18 months

The Accounting Authority Ms. Astrid Ludin

Yes, The procurement followed the required legislative prescripts applicable.

Companies Tribunal (CT)

The CT had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

The ECIC had no contracts or tender between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

The NCC had a contract or tenders with Vox Telecommunications

Security equipment and installation

R44 319.78

25/03/2015

(Once off)

The Accounting Authority of the National Consumer Commission

Yes, it was in line with the National with all National Treasury and Departmental Procurement guidelines

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

The NCT had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

No

t applicable

Not

applicable

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

NCR had a contract or tender with Vox Telecommunications

E-mail archiving services

R767 517.74

01/07/2015-30/06/2018

(3 Years)

The adjudication committee approved the award of the tender and the Accounting Officer approved the contract

Yes, it was included in the procurement plan, advertised for 21 days in the tender bulletin, evaluated by the Bid Evaluation Committee; recommended for approval by the Committee and approved by the Accounting Authority

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The NEF had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

National Gambling Board (NGB)

The NGB had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

The NLC had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

The NMISA had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

The NRCS had no contracts or tenders between 2009 – 2018 with the listed companies

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

Not

applicable

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

SABS had a contract or tender with Vox Telecommunications

Procured cell phone call, MS gateway and Rightfax services

R3 477 260.66

2009-2015

(6 Years)

The CEO, GM Procurement, Procurement manager or the respective business owners.

To the best of our knowledge, the tenders/contracts were done in line with National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines.

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

SANAS had a contract or tender with Vox Telecommunication

Microsoft Licences

R587 308.55

2018/19 Financial year

(One Year)

Outcome from open tender process approved by CEO( tenders between R500K TO R1m approved bt CEO)

Yes, in terms of SANAS SCM policy as alinged to National Treasury guidelines

“Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

09 November 2018 - NW2646

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

What are the details of (a) the criteria used by the Valuer-General when evaluating properties earmarked for expropriation, (b) scenarios available on all properties valued and (c) how the price for properties that are earmarked for expropriation are determined?

Reply:

(a) All valuations for land reform are carried out in terms of Section 12 of the Property Valuations Act, 2014 (Act No. 17 of 2014). The criteria for determining the value is as follows:

“value” for purposes of section 12 (1)(a), means the value of property identified for purposes of land reform, which must reflect an equitable balance between the public interest and the interest of those affected by the acquisition, having regard to all the relevant circumstances, including the-

  • current use of the property;
  • history of the acquisition and the use of the property;
  • market value of the property;
  • extent of direct state investment and subsidy in the acquisition and beneficial capital improvement of the property; and
  • purpose of the acquisition.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) The values of properties earmarked for land reform are determined using the criteria as outlined in part (a) above.

09 November 2018 - NW2828

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Will the National Financial Student Aid Scheme (NSFAS) be (a) scrapping or (b) amending the so-called student-centred model adopted in 2018; if so, what are the features of the future system to disburse payments to students; (2) what does it mean that there has only been a 46% utilisation of the funds made available by the NSFAS by technical and vocational education and training colleges as at 30 August 2018?

Reply:

  1. (a) No decision has been made on the scrapping of the student-centred model.

(b) Part of the Terms of Reference for the Administrator is to work with the Department of Higher Education and Training to review the business processes of the entity and make long-term recommendations on the future models, structures, systems and business processes necessary for an effective National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).

2. The budget allocation for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college students was calculated on an expected proportion of eligible students linked to the enrolment plan. The number of students that have taken up the opportunity has been lower than expected for the TVET college sector. A major factor has been a large number of students who have not signed their bursary contracts. To mitigate this, NSFAS has sought approval from the Auditor-General to pay TVET colleges on proof of registration rather than on the basis of a signed contract.

09 November 2018 - NW2947

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1)Who (a) arranged the meeting held in Xolobeni in the Eastern Cape on 23 September 2018, (b) was invited to the meeting and (c) sent the invitations for the specified meeting; (2) whether, besides invitations, there was any other form of communication to inform people of the meeting; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3259E

Reply:

  1. (a) The meeting was arranged by the Department of Mineral Resources, National and Regional Offices, District Municipality, Local Municipality as well as the relevant security agencies.

(b) The following stakeholders were invited to the meeting – Kindly see the attached register

(c) Invitations to the political principals were sent by the Minister’s Office; Media was invited by the Department’s Chief Directorate: Communication and Knowledge Management; the community representatives were invited by the Local Mayor’s office.

(2) Yes beside the formal invitations, ward Councillors informed communities that they serve.

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

09 November 2018 - NW2592

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM:

(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) (aa) 1 DDG acting in the post of Director General.

(bb) 6 DDGs employed in permanent capacity

(a) (ii) (aa) 7 Chief Directors acting at DDG level.

 

 

(a) (ii) (bb) 74 Chief Directors employed in permanent capacity including the 7 acting at DDG level.

(b) 1 woman at DDG level acting at DG level.

2 women are permanent DDGs including the Acting DG

3 women at CD level acting at DDG level

30 women are permanent CDs including 3 acting at DDG level.

2. (a) (i) 3 Heads of entities report to the Minister i.e. Commission on Restitution of Land Rights, Office of the Valuer-General and Ingonyama Trust.

 

(ii) 4 Directors ITB

6 Directors OVG

23 Directors Commission

(b) 2 (Chief Land Claims Commissioner and the Acting CEO of the ITB).

09 November 2018 - NW2878

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Energy

(1) Whether the new Power China International Energy Project Power Plant in Limpopo will contribute to the national grid; if not, what will the specified power plant be supplying energy to; if so, which areas; (2) Are there any specific companies which the power plant will be supplying energy to; if so, what (a) is the name of each company, (b) is the name of each director of each company (c) is the registration number of each company and (d) amount has been invested by each company; and (3) Has he found that the power plant is in compliance with the Electricity Regulations Act, Act 4 of 2006, and the Integrated Resource Plan?

Reply:

The Department received the question, reviewed its contents against its mandate and has determined that the most appropriate respondent should be the Department of Trade and Industry and the Limpopo Provincial Government.

09 November 2018 - NW2894

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of students are beneficiaries of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme at each institution of higher learning in each province from 1 January 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following information as at 18 September 2018 in relation to the number of students that are beneficiaries at each institution of higher learning:

Number of beneficiaries per University:

No.

Institutions (Universities)

New student

Returning student

   

Students funded

Students funded

1

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

5008

7264

2

Central University of Technology

3566

6338

3

Durban University of Technology

7136

13016

4

Mangosuthu University of Technology

2705

4431

5

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

5235

6414

6

North-West University

7431

8238

7

Rhodes University

1040

881

8

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

1242

1489

9

Sol Plaatje University

289

307

10

Tshwane University of Technology

13270

21686

11

University of Cape Town

1507

2187

12

University of Fort HARE

2483

5940

13

University of Free State

7098

6972

14

University of Johannesburg

8042

13742

15

University of KwaZulu-Natal

9389

11470

16

University of Limpopo

5183

10074

17

University of Mpumalanga

1055

689

18

University of Pretoria

3886

3811

19

University of South Africa

31370

15773

20

University of Stellenbosch

1240

1147

21

University of The Western Cape

3197

4566

22

University of the Witwatersrand

3216

4035

23

University of Venda

3641

7902

24

University of Zululand

5270

9065

25

Vaal University of Technology

4259

5864

26

Walter Sisulu University

7659

11968

Number of beneficiaries per Technical and Vocational Education and Training College:

No.

Institutions
(TVET Colleges)

New students

Returning students

   

Students funded

Students funded

 

Boland

2269

1359

 

Buffalo City

1446

1388

 

Capricorn

3390

4039

 

Central Johannesburg

2481

1264

 

Coastal KZN

3254

3167

 

College of Cape Town

2640

1689

 

East Cape Midlands

1989

1578

 

Ehlanzeni

3869

750

 

Ekurhuleni East

4538

1322

 

Ekurhuleni West

5336

3727

 

Elangeni

3311

2116

 

Esayidi

1303

2299

 

False Bay

1659

1716

 

Flavius Mareka

2094

806

 

Gert Sibande

3737

2671

 

Goldfields

991

410

 

Ikhala

1603

1190

 

Ingwe

1736

2075

 

King Hintsa

1220

816

 

King Sabata Dalindyebo

2406

2605

 

Lephalale

880

725

 

Letaba

2562

1200

 

Lovedale

1447

1206

 

Majuba

7198

3173

 

Maluti

3032

2208

 

Mnambithi

1684

1406

 

Mopani

2361

1520

 

Motheo

5077

1336

 

Mthashana

1835

1133

 

Nkangala

3084

1915

 

Northern Cape Rural

1920

376

 

Northern Cape Urban

1667

671

 

Northlink

5416

2569

 

Orbit

2923

1426

 

Port Elizabeth

1800

1894

 

Sedibeng

5833

3303

 

Sekhukhune

2165

934

 

South Cape

1826

775

 

South West Gauteng

6346

2294

 

Taletso

744

210

 

Thekwini

2580

1608

 

Tshwane North

4581

2602

 

Tshwane

2669

1061

 

Umfolozi

2446

2233

 

Umgungundlovu

1845

1342

 

Vhembe

8242

3469

 

Vuselela

1915

557

 

Waterberg

1784

983

 

West Coast

3010

659

 

Western (Gauteng)

6333

1263

09 November 2018 - NW3281

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

(a)The department did not award any contracts and /or tenders to the any of the companies listed in the question above, from 1 January 2009 to 2018, (i) Not applicable, (aa) Not applicable, (bb) Not applicable, (iii) Not applicable and (iv) Not applicable

(b)

Central Energy Fund

NAME OF SUPPLIER

SERVICES RENDERED

VALUE & LENGTH OF CONTRACT

APPROVED BY

COMPLIANCE WITH POLICY AND NT GUIDELINES

Vox Telecommunications

Rightfax Software upgrade, Maintenance & Support

R 940 600

48 months

PetroSA Group Supply Chain Management Committee

Yes

NB: PetroSA has no contract with DCD Group (2006/037611/07). PetroSA entered into a contract with DCD Marine (Pty) Ltd, registration no 1947/027805/07 for the provision of support to assist with systems integration testing of subsea structures and fabrication works for the Reel Drive System onto the deck of DSV Da Vinci for PetroSA’s Project Ikhwezi. The Supplier, DCD Marine (Pty) Ltd, was paid R 7 064 076.71 between August 2013 and May 2014. DCD Marine (Pty) Ltd is a subsidiary of DCD Group (Pty) Ltd.

Strategic Fuel Fund

NAME OF SUPPLIER

SERVICES RENDERED

VALUE & LENGTH OF CONTRACT

APPROVED BY

COMPLIANCE WITH POLICY AND NT GUIDELINES

Vox Telecommunications

Telephone Systems

R 609, 395.24

36 months and left 15 months.

Supply Chain Management Process.

Yes

The CEF Group and its subsidiaries did not at any point in time have any dealing with the rest of the below entities:

  • DCG Group
  • Afrit Propco
  • Elgin Dock
  • Simiglo
  • Interpair Services
  • Cancerian Investments
  • Phuma Finance
  • Elgin, Brown and Harper
  • Diesel and Turbo Services

National Energy Regulator of South Africa

(b) None of the furnished companies were awarded any contracts and/or tenders, (b)(i) N/A, (ii) (aa) N/A,

(bb) N/A, (iii) N/A and (iv) N/A

South African Nuclear Energy Corporation

(b) Afrit van der Wettering, (i) Service of a trailer and repairs to a trailer, respectively, (ii)(aa) R6690 (excl VAT) placed on 3/10/2016 and R7131 (excl VAT) placed on 3/10/2016, (iii) Mr. Thabo Tshelane for Nuclear Liabilities Management department, (iv) The work was done within 30 days. No official contract was entered into and no tender process was required as this was below the tender threshold per NECSA’s procurement procedure, (b) Vox Telecommunications, (i) Internet services for information management, (ii)(aa) R30 140.00 and (iii) Mr. Leon Russell, Manager Information Services, (iv) The above orders and contract were in line with NECSA’s procurement as well as all National Treasury guidelines.

National Nuclear Regulator

(b) None of the furnished companies were awarded any contracts and/or tenders, (b)(i) N/A, (ii)(aa) N/A,

(bb) N/A, (iii) N/A and (iv) N/A

National Radioactive Waste Disposal Institute

(b) None of the furnished companies were awarded any contracts and/or tenders, (b)(i) N/A, (ii)(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A, (iii) N/A, and (iv) N/A

South African National Energy Development Institute

(b) None of the furnished companies were awarded any contracts and/or tenders, (b)(i) N/A, (ii)(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A, (iii) N/A and (iv) N/A

08 November 2018 - NW3045

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What plans did he put in place to remedy the (a) financial, (b) administrative and (c) governance difficulties currently being experienced by the Road Accident Fund?

Reply:

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) has put the following plans in place to remedy the (a) financial,

In the longer term the design of the system of road accident compensation must change to address the fact that the existing system is unaffordable, with income not matching expenditure. To this end the RABS Bill, which is currently before the Portfolio Committee on Transport, will address the future financial viability of road accident compensation by ensuring a balance between funding and benefits. In the interim, the RAF has implemented a Cash Management Strategy to ensure that available funding is distributed in an equitable and fair manner. This has since evolved to cash management in the ordinary course of business, which is reviewed in response to the business environment. The RAF ensures that it communicates with service providers to ensure they are kept abreast of developments where necessary. The RAF seeks to ensure that any funds that are not committed due to general savings or delays in procurement, are allocated to the settlement of claims, where possible. The RAF has engaged with stakeholders such as National Treasury and the Department of Transport to ensure awareness, to present status updates and to seek solutions. In addition, the RAF has sought to implement measures to minimize the interruption caused by attachments of the RAF’s bank accounts.

(b) administrative and

The existing system of road accident compensation is administratively complex. Fault has to be proven and benefits are not defined, which results in delays in establishing liability and the quantification of claims, often resulting in disputes and protracted litigation, in which the intermediaries have a direct and substantial financial interest. The RABS Bill addresses the shortcomings by, inter alia, providing for defined benefits, on a no-fault basis, paid directly to beneficiaries, in a structured manner, ensuring wider cover, especially to the poor. The RABS Bill further seeks to reduce the administrative complexity inherent in the current system which will see less involvement by intermediaries and more money reaching the intended beneficiaries of the system.

In the interim, the RAF addresses improved administration through, inter alia, the RAF’s Annual Performance Plan for the 2018 - 2019 financial year, which addresses the RAF’s administrative challenges by, amongst others, providing for: initiatives aligned to efficient processing of claims; initiatives aligned to providing accessible services: initiatives aligned to effective financial management; initiatives aligned to optimising ICT functionality; initiatives aligned to improving people management; initiatives aligned to RAF transformation; and initiatives aligned to an assured control environment.

(c) governance difficulties currently being experienced by the Road Accident Fund

The previous Board was dissolved by the Minister of Transport and an Interim Board was appointed to address governance challenges. The process to appoint a permanent Board has commenced. The process to appoint a CEO re-commenced two months ago.

08 November 2018 - NW2852

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

Whether her department has received the report of the inquiry into land rights at Gwatyu in the Eastern Cape from the service provider yet; if not, by what date is the report expected; if so, (a) who is the service provider, (b) why was the specified service provider selected, (c) what are the terms of reference for the service provider’s mandate relating to the report and (d) what costs were incurred in employing the specified service provider?

Reply:

No, the report is expected by 30 November 2018.

(a) Sonamzi Mkata Attorneys.

(b) It was their turn in the rotational system that is used by the Land Rights Management Facility in sourcing service providers that are already on their panel.

(c) The terms of reference are as follows:

  • Provide a legal opinion on the tension between the Tshatshu Traditional Council, Gwatyu Emerging Farmers Union and the Gwatyu CPA;
  • Make recommendations on whether one communal property association or multiple communal property associations should be established for Gwatyu Farms;
  • Identify all occupiers and categorize them according to their tenure status e.g. former leases, former farm dwellers, invaders etc.;
  • Identify and describe disputes between land rights holders;
  • Provide recommendations regarding the resolution of disputes;
  • Search for all leases and identify invaders and verify their relationships with former lessees or farm occupiers;
  • Provide a comprehensive list of their assets including their livestock (proof to be provided e.g. branding certificate etc.);
  • Establish the number of occupiers that are keeping livestock of their relatives who are not staying on the farms;
  • Determine the number of sites illegally demarcated / subdivisions and, if purchased, indicate the amount paid; and
  • Check the number of civil servants who are in occupation of Gwatyu Farms and make recommendations in line with the State Land Lease and Disposal Policy Framework.

(d) About R402 121.00.

08 November 2018 - NW3043

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he can give an indication regarding the number of claims that have become prescribed in the hands of the Road Accident Fund since 1 January 2000 for each month of each year according to (a) percentage and (b) absolute numbers from the year 2000 up to and including the latest statistics for 2018; (2) what are the overall reasons for the prescription of the claims in each month; (3) given the prescriptions that take place, what does he intend to do in order to stop this malpractice, especially against the background of the establishment of the Road Accident Benefit Scheme (RABS) Bill according to which the fund/scheme will act as an adjudicator of benefits and a benefit manager?

Reply:

  1. Statistics on direct claims lodged prior to December 2012 are not available, as stand-alone direct claims units were only established throughout the Road Accident Fund (RAF) during the 2012 -2013 financial year. From December 2012, statistics on direct claims were were reported on separately from other claims. The following information regarding the number of claims that have become prescribed in the hands of the RAF (claims lodged and, or, prosecuted personally by a claimant who elected not to use the services of an attorney or elected to terminate the services of their attorney) since 1 December 2012 for each month of each year according to (a) percentage and (b) absolute numbers (total) from the year 2012 up to and including the latest statistics for 2018;

Financial Year

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

January

February

March

Total

2012/13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

2

3

7

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14%

14%

29%

43%

100%

2013/14

6

3

1

3

9

10

2,066

8

2

1

664

121

2,894

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

0.1%

0.3%

0.3%

71%

0.3%

0.1%

0%

23%

4%

100%

2014/15

1

14

4

2

1,716

3,974

178

-

-

36

201

112

6,238

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

28%

64%

3%

0.0%

0.0%

1%

3%

2%

100%

2015/16

4

2

3

13

7

6

38

39

7

32

14

3

168

% of total% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

2%

1%

2%

8%

4%

4%

23%

23%

4%

19%

8%

2%

100%

2016/17

7

60

21

16

77

5

18

5

6

3

1

6

225

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

3%

27%

9%

7%

34%

2%

8%

2%

3%

1%

0.4%

3%

100%

2017/18

3

3

22

272

8

12

4

7

4

3

5

1

344

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

1%

1%

6%

79%

2%

3%

1%

2%

1%

1%

1%

0%

100%

2018/19*

3

3

44

53

10

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

162

% of the total of claims prescribed during the period

2%

2%

27%

33%

6%

30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

100%

2) the overall reasons, amongst others, for the prescription of the claims in each month, are claims that prescribed in the following circumstances: while awaiting the judgment in the case of Mvumvu and Others v The Minister of Transport and the RAF (Case CCT 67/10); awaiting the completion of medico-legal reports by medical experts; delays in obtaining confirmation of appointments for assessments for medico-legal reports; delays in obtaining completed medical reports from hospitals; awaiting necessary information from claimants or service providers; files not sent to Regions by consultants prior to prescription of the claim; administrative issues such as incorrect registration, miscommunication between the regions; where direct claimants have subsequently elected to instruct an attorney and summons is not issued before prescription and where claimants failed to provide correct contact information, or contact information subsequently changed and the claimant failed to inform the RAF;

3) The RAF has implemented a Direct Claims Policy with effect from 15 February 2016. The purpose of the Direct Claims Management Policy, amongst others, is to regulate the internal management of Direct Claims to ensure that the rights of Unrepresented Claimants are protected; to ensure that the risks to the RAF are managed; and finally, to manage conflicts of interest that may arise. The Direct Claims Policy provides for consequence management in the event of non-compliance.

08 November 2018 - NW2453

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

(a)(i) Please refer to Annexure A.

(a)(ii) Please refer to Annexure B.

(b)(i),(ii),(iii) Please refer to Annexure B.

08 November 2018 - NW2928

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by (aa) his department and (bb) each entity reporting to him (aaa) in the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018 and (ii) is the name of each company or contractor and (b) what amount is each employee paid?

Reply:

Department

Financial period

Number of employees outsourced from private companies and/or contractors

Name of Company

Amount employee was paid

2015/2016

2

(i) Affirmative Portfolios

(ii) Akasia Personnel Consultants

(i) R112 532.80

(ii) R1 095 863.44

2016/2017

1

Akasia Personnel Consultants

R977 300.01

2017/2018

1

Akasia Personnel Consultants

R833 395.47

1 April 2018 to date

0

none

none

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

The question requesting information about those employees that are paid by ACSA but were insourced from private companies by ACSA, has reference.

Airports Company South Africa confirms that there are no employees on the payroll of the company

that we have insourced from external private companies. This means there are no employees on our

payroll who were outsourced to Airports Company South Africa by private companies.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS)

(aa) N/A

(bb) ATNS doesn’t have any employees that have been outsourced from private companies.

ATNS has 29 employees currently employed on a Fixed Term Contract

(aaa) 2017/2018 financial year: 15

2016/2017 financial year: 21

2015/2016 financial year: 10

(bbb) 2018/2019 YTD: 35

(ii) N/A

(b)

Employee Number

     

Position Description

Cost to Company (A)

1

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

2

     

Regional Director: Africa

R 2 044 720,00

3

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

4

     

ATCO2: KN

R 772 357,00

5

     

ATCO3: EL

R 918 493,00

6

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

7

     

Administrator: L & D

R 245 067,00

8

     

Specialist: Operational System

R 1 176 329,90

9

     

Project Manager: Business Mark

R 760 000,00

10

     

ATCO3: CT

R 918 493,00

11

     

Billing Contracts Administrator

R 398 329,91

12

     

Billing Contracts Administrator

R 377 122,78

13

     

Administrator: Foreign Billing

R 377 122,78

14

     

Accounts Payable Administrator

R 350 042,47

15

     

Chief Executive Officer

R 4 261 269,00

16

     

Manager: Finance

R 969 680,00

17

     

Assistant: Company Secretary

R 780 000,00

18

     

Consultant: HR (Bruma & ATA)

R 1 195 955,00

19

     

Executive: Human Capital

R 2 073 000,00

20

     

Security Guard

R 143 253,03

21

     

Secretary: Departmental IT

R 293 582,00

22

     

Accountant: Fixed Assets & Pro

R 620 595,00

23

     

ATCO3: CT

R 918 493,00

24

     

ATCO1: PM

R 515 662,00

25

     

ATCO1: LE

R 497 476,00

26

     

ATCO3: PE

R 918 493,00

27

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

28

     

ATCO3: JS

R 831 994,00

 

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) A total of 18 employees using 9 different companies have been outsourced from private companies (bb) by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (aaa) over the past three years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018. (ii) The names of each of the companies used and (b) the related amounts are listed below:

List of Outsourced Employees

Cross Border Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a) The (i) (bb) Cross-Border Road Transport Agency did not have employees that were outsourced from private companies and/or contractors in the past three financial years.

(bbb) In September 2018, two (2) employees were supplied by (ii) Nyalu Communication to provide cleaning services. The company quoted an amount of R13,000 for the service to be rendered by the two cleaners per month for a period of three (3) months. (ii) Not applicable.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

The (a)(i)(bb) Road Accident Fund (RAF) outsourced[1] a total of (aaa) 68 employees in the past three financial years, and (bbb) 8 employees since 1 April 2018, and (ii) the name of each private company or contractor is:

  1. AC Consulting
  2. Affirmative Portfolios
  3. Astute Advisory
  4. Core Focus
  5. Dalitso
  6. Deloitte
  7. DNS
  8. EOH
  9. Human Communications
  10. Impela Alliance
  11. Investong Group
  12. KPMG
  13. Morvest Human Capital Management
  14. Moshitoa
  15. Nexus Forensics
  16. Ntirho Human Capital
  17. Phaki Personnel
  18. Price Waterhouse Coopers
  19. Resolve
  20. Teleresources
  21. Toro Human Capital

(b) the amount that each employee is, or was, paid is not known to the RAF in those instances where the salary payment to the employee is, or was, made by the private company or contractor, and, in those instances where the RAF made, or makes, the salary payment to the employee the RAF is prevented from divulging this information which constitutes personal information of the employee in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, No. 2 of 2000.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

  1. One (1)

(aa) One (1)

(bb) One (1)

(aaa) None

(bbb) One (1)

(ii) Thapelo Kharametsane Attorneys R42 000

Road Traffic Management Corporation Agency (RTMC)

See table below for response

Cleaning Services

       

Answer to aaa)

Financial

Period

Answer a)

Total Nr. of employees

Answer to a)(ii)

Name of Contractor

Answer to b)

Average

Annual Cost per Employee

Location

Comment

2015/16

9

Samagaba Cleaning Services

R46 902,80

Head Office

Contract Ended 31 August 2017

           

2016/17

9

Samagaba Cleaning Services

R54 355,57

Head Office

Contract Ended 31 August 2017

           

2017/18

8

JR 209 (Blue Star Trading)

R35 591,24

Head Office

Contract start date is 01 September 2017 and was ended 31 May 2018.

All cleaning personnel were absorbed.

2017/18

10

Global Cleaning services

R83 234,84

Natis Offices

Contract Commenced 06 April 2017 and was ended 31 March 2018.

All cleaning employees were absorbed.

           

2018/19

8

JR 209

R35 591,24

Head Office

Contract start date is 01 September 2017 and was ended 31 May 2018.

All cleaning personnel were absorbed.

Security Services

Answer to aaa)

Financial

Period

Answer a)

Total Nr. of employees

Answer to a)(ii)

Name of Contractor

Answer to b)

Average

Annual Cost per Employee

Location

Comment

2015/16

8

Vimba Security

R135 554,02

Head Office

Contract ended 31 March 2017

           

2016/17

8

Vimba Security

R135 554,02

Head Office

Contract ended 31 March 2017

           

2017/18

8

Royal Security

R155 967, 83

Head Office

Contract ended 31 July 2017

2017/18

8

JR 209

R150 945,32

Head Office

Contract still in place

2017/18

16

Mafoko Security

R185 674,62

Natis Office

Contract still in place

2017/18

20

Eldna Security

R99 749,10

Boekenhout Traffic College

Contract still in place

           

2018/19

8

JR 209

R150 945,32

Head Office

Contract still in place

2018/19

16

Mafoko Security

R185 674,62

Natis Office

Contract still in place

2018/19

20

Eldna Security

R99 749,10

Boekenhout Traffic College

Contract still in place

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

RESPONSE TO PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NUMBER: 2928

Question

Response

What is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors

31

By his department

Not applicable

Each entity reporting to him?

SAMSA

In the past three financial years?

2016 - 27, 2017 - 1 and 2018 - 3

Since 1 April 2018

 2

What is the name of each company or contractor?

  • Legadima Personnel
  • Sanda HR Solutions
  • Intrinsic
  • Isiwe Chartered Accountants
  • FD Centre
  • Manpower
  • Only the Best
  • Talent Guru
  • The Prestige Cleaning Services
  • Mamchira Projects
  • Business System Services
  • Lunobo Cleaning Construction
  • Advance Cleaning

What amount is each employee paid?

  • Legadima Personnel - 411,776.09
  • Sanda HR Solutions - 358,316.75
  • Intrinsic - 158,609.74
  • Isiwe Chartered Accountants - 249,600.00
  • FD Centre - 1,194,214.11
  • Manpower - 257,964.90
  • Only the Best - 157,865.36
  • Talent Guru - 515,605.50
  • The Prestige Cleaning Services - 553,001.24
  • Mamchira Projects - 59,865.35
  • Business System Services - 63,880.20
  • Lunobo Cleaning Construction - 85,959.89
  • Advance Cleaning - 77,463.44

Railway Safety Regulator

(bb) The Railway Safety Regulator does not make use of any outsourced employees.

(aaa) (bbb)(ii)(b) Falls away

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa

  1. (i) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) does not make use of outsourced employees. PRASA would, through Supply Chain Management processes, sources service to be provided such as security services, where labour is part of the overall cost. These service providers have the employees assigned to PRASA in their books and on their payroll.

(aaa) 2015/16 2,963

2016/17 2,977

2017/18 2,361

(bbb) 2018/19 2,980

PRASA furthermore supports SMME’s and Co-operatives where communities are empowered through station cleaning and horticulture services. For the current year 593 job opportunities have been created. A list of these co-operatives is also provided.

(ii) Security Companies

 

Company

 

Sinqobile Equestrian

Futuris Guarding Systems

Hlanganani Protection Services

Changing Tides Security

Vusa Isizwe Security Services

Vimtsire Protection Services

Royal Security

Enlightened Security

Afri-Guard

R1

Supreme Operations

Comwezi

Chippa

Sechaba

Chuma

Illiso

Ilanga Security

Ibhubesi Security

Enlightened

Royal Security

Ilanga

Enlightened

Comwezi

Vusa-Isiswe

Scheme Security

WorldWatch

Advanced Detachment

Co-Operatives for Station Cleaning and Horticulture

Mantswe Akgakala Le Motewana

Nithandane Makhosikazi

Bokamoso Cleaning Primary Cooperative

The Tabernace Porimary Cooperative

Uzwano Cooperative Limited

Pro Knit Primary Cooperative

Masego Trading Cooperative

Phakamani Mzontsundu Primary Cooperative

Mphempe Ya lapisa Cooperative

Eich Women in Public Transport Cooperative

Mantswe Akgakala Le Motewana

Masego Trading Cooperative

Ikakgeng Cooperative

Phambili bomama

Masiyasiya

Parents Power

Orange Farm Cultural Cooperative

Uthando Cooperative

Bakubung Cooperative

Kgalaletstang Cooperative

Hamisi Cooperative

Lethokuhle Cooperative

Likhothwayo

Hamisi Cooperative

Nan Primary Cooperative

Eich Women in Public Transport Cooperative

Neo Entle Cooperative

Mocheko Cooperative

Mashudu Cooperative

Sediba-Sa Lefa Multi-Purpose Co-operative

Pfaranani Primary Co-operative

Susavusiwana Co-operative

Bright Mind Co-operative

Predianet Construction and Projects Co-operative

Tirisano Multi-Purpose Co-operative

Dedicated Collegues Co-op

Hardworkers co-op

Cabangusebenze co-op

Anny main primary co-op

Izinkwezeli co -operative ltd

Rainbow primary co-op

Blossen co-operative ltd

Umshanelo wakwazulu co-op

Snade co-op ltd

Majiya multipurpose co-op

Abamtoti womens co-op

C-nesipho primary co-op

Cikizisa construction @farming co-op

Wayforward primary co-op

Ezasenanda trading co-op

Isizanathi primary co-op

Silindokuhle co-op

KwaMashu progress

Inkotha yedube co-op

Sibambene co-op

Asibonge farming co-op

Abasadi primary co-op

Sanelisiwe co-op

Czwesonke farming co-op

Mlonyeni primary co-op

Elohim primary co-op

Ntandokuhle trading

Abaphikeleli co-op

Mzansi wethu co-op

Kathuthuyasi primary co-op

Khaya thingo co-op

Beauty Petros primary co-op

Grace co-op

Nozibele nonkulomo livestock

Barack co-op

BNNZ primary co-op

Sihamba phambili primary co-op

Amangwazi co-op

Iintokozoeh cleaning co-op

Thondolubanzi primary co-op

Khehlengane primary co-op

Sandile co-op

Abundance co-op

Magaye trading Enterprise

Nkeshezane Trading Enterprise

Manthuli Transport PTY Ltd

Lion Primary Co-op

Yolitha Productions Co-op

Unako Primary Co-operative Limited

Lithemba Projects Co-operative

Lukhanyo Primary Co-operative

Khanyisa Services Primary

  1. The contracts with suppliers require that they pay legislated rates for the industry and in case of security the PSIRA rates.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (i) (bb) The Ports Regulator of South Africa did not outsource from any private companies

or contractors in the past three financial years.

(aaa) (bbb)(ii)(b) Falls away

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

Financial Year (aaa)(bbb)

Total Amount paid by SANRAL (a)(i)

Total Number of Employees (i)

Name of outsourcing company(ii)

Name of each Employee (b)

Amount paid to each employee (b)

 

2015/16

R624 808.74

36

1.G Lison Personnel

Employee 1

R893.76

 

 

 

 


2.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 2

R351.12

 

 

 

 

3.Kelly

Employee 3

R8 474.76

 

 

 

 

4.MPC

Employee 4

R5 894.36

 

 

 

 

5.Ikamva

Employee 5

R2 616.62

 

 

 

 

6.Affirmative portfolios

Employee 6

R134 488.71

 

 

 

 

7.Adcorp Workforce

Employee 7

R408.18

 

 

 

 

8.Azola Human Capital

Employee 8

R478.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 9

R913.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 10

R284.49

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 11

R194.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 12

R155.50

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 13

R291.56

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R194.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R395.81

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R240.31

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 17

R816.36

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 18

R602.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 19

R252.68

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 20

R2 163.70

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 21

R8 790.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 22

R12 004.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 23

R14 593.50

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 24

R2 433.97

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 25

R539.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 26

R191.83

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 27

R946.10

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 28

R540.63

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 29

R71 224.98

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 30

R660.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 31

R6 489.45

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 32

R9 234.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 33

R5 171.04

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 34

R2 052.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 35

R640.47

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 36

R329 184.63

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016/17

R1 206 712.67

70

1.Afrizan Tes

Employee 1

R906.30

 

 

 

 

2.G Lison Personnel

Employee 2

R2 797.01

 

 

 

 

3.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 3

R14 180.44

 

 

 

 

4.Pakanyo Trading

Employee 4

R1 436.40

 

 

 

 

5.Tasiso Consulting

Employee 5

R2 049.75

 

 

 

 

6.Kelly

Employee 6

R2 335.60

 

 

 

 

7.MPC

Employee 7

R346.13

 

 

 

 

8.Ikamva

Employee 8

R3 155.42

 

 

 

 

9.Affirmative portfolios

Employee 9

R159 318.46

 

 

 

 

9.Adcorp Workforce

Employee 10

R1 457.78

 

 

 

 

10.Azola Human Capital

Employee 11

R4 351.85

 

 

 

 

11.Dante personnel

Employee 12

R8 600.93

 

 

 

 

12.Morvest Human Capital Management

Employee 13

R4 646.51

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R330.43

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R137 822.58

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R4 817.93

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 17

R325.13

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 18

R193.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 19

R602.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 20

R5 646.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 21

R816.35

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 22

R41 511.48

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 23

R2 896.12

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 24

R26 527.59

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 25

R158 624.99

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 26

R325.13

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 27

R1 091.07

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 28

R116.62

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 29

R349.87

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 30

R4 753.75

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 31

R9 781.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 32

R28 343.25

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 33

R444.60

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 34

R437.76

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 35

R611.33

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 36

R296.51

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 37

R296.51

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 38

R1 423.29

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 39

R524.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 40

R6 862.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 41

R1 918.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 42

R179.85

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 43

R755.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 44

R2 170.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 45

R878.53

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 46

R1 025.84

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 47

R120 983.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 48

R15 985.85

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 49

R5 423.21

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 50

R14 741.27

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 51

R93 476.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 52

R45 262.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 53

R5 833.63

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 54

R8 947.39

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 55

R1 094.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 56

R2 187.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 57

R2 736.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 58

R12 852.43

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 59

R8 421.41

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 60

R7 978.18

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 61

R8 421.41

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 62

R9 307.87

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 63

R8 421.41

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 64

R4 432.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 65

R3 989.09

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 66

R3 989.09

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 67

R4 432.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 68

R4 432.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 69

R510.06

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 70

R164 572.55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017/18

R1 403 483.71

53

1.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 1

R1 178.76

 

 

 

 

2.Phanda Personnel

Employee 2

R1 157.10

 

 

 

 

3.Ricoware

Employee 3

R410.40

 

 

 

 

4.Tasiso Consulting

Employee 4

R23 942.40

 

 

 

 

5.Kelly

Employee 5

R312.25

 

 

 

 

6.MPC

Employee 6

R1 405.11

 

 

 

 

7.Ikamva

Employee 7

R6 574.56

 

 

 

 

8.Adcorp Workforce

Employee 8

R1 484.28

 

 

 

 

9.Dante personnel

Employee 9

R1 987.88

 

 

 

 

10.ETS Professionals

Employee 10

R38 255.20

 

 

 

 

11.Morvest Human Capital Management

Employee 11

R38 875.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 12

R568.98

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 13

R410 569.08

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R98 952.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R6 574.56

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R6 574.56

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 17

R44 104.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 18

R1 313.28

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 19

R17 896.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 20

R12 044.75

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 21

R276.19

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 22

R103 745.53

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 23

R1 893.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 24

R1 657.13

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 25

R463.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 26

R631.29

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 27

R1 893.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 28

R37 344.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 29

R21 378.69

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 30

R26 926.17

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 31

R496.24

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 32

R82 753.12

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 33

R959.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 34

R5 602.66

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 35

R477.22

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 36

R7 888.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 37

R12 483.30

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 38

R6 710.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 39

R4 651.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 40

R1 574.42

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 41

R2 907.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 42

R43 436.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 43

R45 209.66

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 44

R6 205.25

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 45

R6 205.25

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 46

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 47

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 48

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 49

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 50

R6 669.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 51

R51 300.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 52

R195 856.77

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 53

R9 933.32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018/19

R105 923.90

16

1.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 1

R5 423.00

 

 

 

 

2.Phanda Personnel

Employee 2

R833.75

 

 

 

 

3.Kelly

Employee 3

R37 918.40

 

 

 

 

4.Khulisa connection

Employee 4

R5 301.00

 

 

 

 

5.MPC

Employee 5

R5 888.00

 

 

 

 

6.Izilamani group

Employee 6

R3 312.00

 

 

 

 

7.Warrior Talent Holdings

Employee 7

R4 554.00

 

 

 

 

8.Adcorp workforce

Employee 8

R21 576.30

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 9

R310.50

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 10

R1 231.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 11

R3 817.54

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 12

R1 527.02

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 13

R10 337.94

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R2 646.83

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R554.24

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R692.18

 

Total

R3 340 929.02

175

   

R3 340 929.02

 
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

08 November 2018 - NW3132

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since he served in Cabinet, he (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of his department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i)I was never influenced by any person and/or (ii) nor influenced any of the department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and (cc) acknowledges to have met the close associates of the Gupta family during the SABC/TNA morning breakfast shows where I was a guest on the shows.

08 November 2018 - NW3245

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM:

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) R0.

(ii) R0.

 

(aa),(bb),(b),(c),(d) Falls away.

08 November 2018 - NW3082

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) Whether any aircraft owned or chartered by the SA Air Force (SAAF) has landed on the island of St Helena in the period 1 January 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (a) on what date, (b) what type of aircraft was it and (c) what were the reasons for the landing(s); (2) did the aircraft(s) carry any military equipment for which National Conventional Arms Control Committee permits are required; if so, (a) what are the details of the cargo transported under the permits and (b) on what date will this be reported to the Joint Standing Committee on Defence; (3) will she make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. (1) (a) The aircraft landed at St Helena on 14 August 2018.

(b) C130B Hercules.

(c) Refuelling stops.

(2). No military equipment was transported on this flight.

(3). No

08 November 2018 - NW3095

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the awarding of a contract by his department to a certain company VNA consulting engineers in KwaZulu-Natal in 2017, what (a) are the terms of reference of the contract, (b) goods and services (i) will be delivered and (ii) have been delivered to date, (c) is the duration of the contract, (d) is the value of the contract in Rand and (e) are the details of the supply chain and/or tender processes followed in awarding the contract?

Reply:

The Department of Transport has no access to the contractual issues and Supply Chain Management Process of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Transport. The Honourable Member may re- direct the Question the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Transport in Kwa-Zulu Natal, Honourable Mxolisi Kaunda.

Therefore Question (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) fall away.

08 November 2018 - NW3250

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of State Security

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

 

The State Security Agency has never borrowed any amount of money from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in the past three years and since 1 April 2018.

08 November 2018 - NW3041

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he can give an indication of the expected and actually realized income regarding the Gauteng e-toll system for each month from 31 December 2013 to date; (2) what type of road user made payments through corporate and individual road users for each month during the same period respectively; (3) what number of e-tags that are recorded have been activated and deactivated for each month during the same period; 4) what is the total (a) amount of legal costs spent on issuing summonses to road users thus far and (b) outstanding debt to the e-toll system for each month of the specified period; (5) whether any consideration is given to reissue summonses; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount has been budgeted for this, (b) what number of persons or institutions will be sued in this regard and (c) on what date will this take place?

Reply:

  1. Please see Table 1 below for the expected (forecast) versus realized (actual) income.
  2. Payments are made by an account holder who assumes responsibility to pay the account for the registered vehicles, which can be an individual, a corporate, or a combination. The person/entity that sets up the account does not complete a “field” to indicate if it is a corporate or individual user. As a result, the SANRAL toll system does not record whether a vehicle is registered (or owned) by an individual or a corporate user and the information requested cannot be directly extracted from the toll system. Should more details be required the Member of Parliament is welcome to visit SANRAL Head Office in Pretoria.
  3. Table 2 below provides, for each month, the number of tags that have been activated and deactivated from December 2013 to date. The table does not reflect the tags registered prior to the December 2013 date, such as the tags that were already in use on the Bakwena route. Tags are deactivated for various reasons, which include the following:
  • Movement of tag to a new vehicle
  • Movement of vehicles and tags between accounts, e.g. Public Entity and Key accounts
  • Deregistrations, etc

Table 1: GFIP expected (forecast) versus realized (actual) income

Table 2: e-Tag Activations versus Deactivations

Year

Month

Tags Activated

Tags Deactivated

2013

December

348382

22667

 

 

 

 

2014

January

165030

23480

 

February

112086

18424

 

March

87814

18731

 

April

70082

17578

 

May

62602

18419

 

June

65643

19330

 

July

51642

19357

 

August

40810

18739

 

September

34834

22980

 

October

31604

17940

 

November

25614

17144

 

December

18833

12155

 

 

 

 

2015

January

24856

17406

 

February

22443

15280

 

March

21656

16827

 

April

18924

15425

 

May

22663

17850

 

June

29217

17329

 

July

36139

19312

 

August

30274

21768

 

September

30685

19336

 

October

32080

18070

 

November

24631

15287

 

December

18624

12945

 

 

 

 

2016

January

29676

16615

 

February

30536

16897

 

March

31193

20179

 

April

29310

19458

 

May

34520

21343

 

June

28130

19711

 

July

32300

16475

 

August

27270

16852

 

September

28881

20350

 

October

30733

16361

 

November

26566

59163

 

December

21566

84980

 

 

 

 

2017

January

30497

17699

 

February

29186

16936

 

March

28355

28654

 

April

19699

17387

 

May

24736

18799

 

June

24399

16537

 

July

29388

17478

 

August

29138

17409

 

September

26645

16760

 

October

31358

17295

 

November

29733

15409

 

December

21410

12567

 

 

 

 

2018

January

29016

19675

 

February

28005

16357

 

March

21786

18216

 

April

21571

16997

 

May

22334

20042

 

June

24091

14923

 

July

29719

16678

 

August

26140

16107

 

September

27454

15749

 

October

31005

16733

4. (a)The Contractor (ETC) incurred R4,6m on legal fees up to August 2018.

(b) The Accounting Policy of SANRAL, which is in line with IFRS, determines that the impairment assessment is done on an annual basis. As such the trade receivables balance is calculated, audited and published annually. Table 3 below reflects the audited trade receivables for the requested financial years:

Financial Year

Toll debtors (R’million)

2018

10 840.4

2017

8 798.4

2016

6 620.1

2015

4 935.3

2014

951.3

   
   

Table 3

5. SANRAL’s toll operator is not re-issuing summonses. The summonses that have already been issued will be amended to include new debt (if required) but will not require re-issuing. Therefore, we respond as follows:

a) Not applicable as the re-issuing summonses is not required.

b) Not applicable refer to a).

c) Not applicable refer to a).

08 November 2018 - NW3027

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) With regard to the repatriation of the remains of South Africans killed in the collapse of the church in Lagos, Nigeria, run by Pastor T B Joshua, in September 2014, (a) which company was awarded the tender in this regard, (b) what were the objectives and targets of the tender, (c) what was the value of the tender, (d) who awarded the tender, (e) what process was followed in the procurement of services and (f) what were the outcomes of the tender; (2) has he found that there were any irregularities with regard to the tender process and/or outcomes of the tender; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Imvubu Aviation Services Pty (Ltd)

(b) The initial specifications by the Department of Transport (DOT) was for two Antonov 124 cargo planes and one passenger aircraft plane. However, only one Antonov 124 was commissioned and paid. The Antonov’s were identified to transport mortuary trucks, other light support vehicles, equipment including tents, luggage etc. and 10xPAX to Lagos, and to additionally to this original cargo, include the remains identified for repatriation on the return to South Africa.

The passenger aircraft was identified to transport a maximum of 100 passengers.

(c) The total amount paid was R16 448 200.00 for one Antonov 124 cargo plane

(d) Mr Mawethu Vilana, acting Director-General, Department of Transport, in his capacity as Accounting Officer approved the award.

(e) Approval to deviate from inviting tenders was granted by the Accounting Officer in terms of Section 16A6.4 of the Treasury Regulations.

Following an Inter-Ministerial Committee and a Health Cluster Technical Team meeting, specifications were drafted as determined by the SA Military Health Services (SAMHS) and the Department of Health (SG/D MH OPS/R/311/2/15 dated 2 October 2014).

Numerous aviation service providers were approached and six quotations for each of the initial requirements were received (2 x Antonov and 1 x Passenger Aircraft). Three companies were disqualified due to non-tax compliance, incorrect specifications etc.

The qualifying bids were:

a) 2 x Antonov 124

Service Provider

BEE Score

Cost per Item

Total Cost

Rank

HCR Ilanga Aviation Solutions

8

1 755 600 USD

(R 19 438 900)

3 511 200 USD

(R 38 877 800)

3

SRS Aviation

8

1 601 607 USD

(R17 938 000)

3 203 214 USD

(R 35 876 000)

2

Imvubu Aviation Services

8

1 485 500 USD

(R16 448 200)

2 971 000 USD

(R 32 896 400)

1

b) 1 x Passenger Aircraft

Service Provider

BEE Score

Total Cost

Rank

HCR Ilanga Aviation Solutions

8

268 923 USD

(R2 977 650)

3

SRS Aviation

8

131 650 USD

(R1 457 700)

1

Imvubu Aviation Services

8

215 883 USD

(R2 390 360)

2

*USD/ZAR exchange rate used on 18 October 2014 during evaluation calculated at R 11.0725.

The approved requirement was reduced to one Antonov 124 and an official order to that effect was issued on 5 November 2014 for R 16 448 200.00.

(f) The initial specifications by DOT was for two Antonov 124 cargo planes and one passenger aircraft plane. However, due to numerous factors, including cost, only one Antonov 124 was approved and paid by the DOT.

The Antonov 124 was tasked to transport eight vehicles and specialized equipment to Lagos to assist in the repatriation of the remains of South Africans and to return with said remains, vehicles and equipment.

Amongst the eight vehicles transported were four Forensic Pathology Trucks from the Department of Health that are specifically designed to handle bodies in disaster situations.

Nigerian authorities officially handed over positively identified mortal remains of seventy-four South Africans to Minister Radebe at the Sam Ethnan Air Force Base, Ikeja, Lagos State, Nigeria on Saturday 15 November 2014.

The Antonov 124 departed from Nigeria on the evening of Saturday 15 November 2014 and arrived home in South Africa on the morning of Sunday 16 November 2014. A formal reception ceremony was hosted on Sunday 16 November 2014 at the Air Force Base Waterkloof to receive the remains of the South Africans who had perished.

(2) No irregularities were found.

07 November 2018 - NW2933

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What (i) is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her (aaa) in the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018 and (ii) is the name of each company or contractor and (b) what amount is each employee paid?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The tables below provide the details of the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by the Department and its entities with the name of each company or contractor and contract value.

Department of Higher Education and Training

Financial Year

Number of Employees

Type of Services

Company Name

Contract value in Rand

1 April 2015 –
31 March 2016

0

National Skills Authority (NSA) fund manager

SAB & T Chartered Accountants t/a Nexia SAB&T

R 5 886 155.88

 

0

Business process mapping

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd

R 3 494 850.00

 

0

Internal and Forensic Audit (Department of Higher Education and Training)

A2A Kopano Inc

Average hourly rate, VAT inclusive

Audit fees:

Year 1: R 606.15

Year 2: R 642.52

Year 3: R 681.07

Forensic Audit fees:

Year 1: R 710.22

Year 2: R 752.83

Year 3: R 798.00

 

0

Internal and Forensic Audit (NSF)

A2A Kopano Inc

Average hourly rate, VAT inclusive

Audit fees:

Year 1: R 625.17

Year 2: R 662.68

Year 3: R 702.44

Forensic Audit fees:

Year 1: R 710.22

Year 2: R 752.83

Year 3: R 798.00

 

0

Monitoring and evaluation framework for the teaching and learning development sector support programme

Uweso Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 495 869.22

 

0

Forensic Service

Nexus Forensic Services

R 541.00/hour

 

0

Roll-out of skills planning system

Core Focus

R 2 639 199.18

 

0

Subject matter expert for mathematics

SAIDE

R 156 417.60

1 April 2016 –

31 March 2017

0

Career development services

Amoriway (Pty) Ltd

R 1 450 000.00

 

0

Fund manager for the Human Resource Development Council (HRDC)

Duja Consulting

R 1 985 973.38

 

0

Bid assistance for infrastructure procurement

Deloitte & Touché

R 3 787 404.08

 

0

Transactional advisory services

Maya Group Consortium

R 31 307 458.62

 

0

Business analysis: Recruitment

Ernest & Young Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd

R 7 035 789.00

 

0

Summative evaluation of career development services

Kwem Management

R 629 339.00

 

0

Communication services

Angela Church

R 3 407 174.00

 

0

Forensic, communication and information services

Indigo

R 40 000 000.00

 

0

Subject matter expert for natural sciences

SAIDE

R 312 835.20

 

0

Fund manager for SAIVCET

SAB & T Chartered Accountants t/a Nexia SAB&T

R4.62% calculated on the actual amount spent (estimated funds to be managed R22m per year)

1 April 2017 –

31 March 2018

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Plumbing

Plumbing Industry Registration Board (PIRB)

Plumbing:

R 2 022.00/hour

 

0

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Welding

Southern African Institute of Welding (SAIW)

Welding: R 625.00/hour

 

0

0

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Bricklayer, carpenter and joiner; mechanical fitter

Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of Southern Africa (SEIFSA)

    1. Bricklayer R 950,00/hour
    1. Carpenter and Joiner

R 950,00/hour

    1. Mechanical Fitter
      R 950,00/hour
 

0

Enhancement, monitoring and evaluation of PSET

Underhill Investment Holdings

R 525 000.00

 

0

Develop costing model for occupational programmes

Learning Strategies

R 2 998 656.00

 

0

IT services

Praxis Computing

R 1 841 784.00

 

0

Development of self-directed learning material for adult programmes

SAIDE

R 6 042 004.00

 

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Mechanic, including automotive mechanic and diesel mechanic

Retail Motor Industry Organisation

  1. Mechanic, including automotive mechanic

R 1 425.00/hour

  1. Diesel mechanic

R 1 425.00/hour

 

0

Occupational Team Conveners: bricklayer

Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of Southern Africa (SEIFSA)

  1. Electrician R450.00/hr
  1. Millwright: R450.00/hr
  1. Boilermaker: R 950.00/hr
  1. Rigger: R950.00/hr
  1. Fitter and turner: R950.00/hr
  1. Pipefitter: R950.00/hr
   

Develop curriculum content and open learning material for electricians

Neil Butcher and Associates

R 3 284 904.30

   

Summative evaluation for Career Development Services

Tematha Investments cc

R 819 126.00

 

0

Call centre services

i-choice Call Centre Outsourcing

Year 1: R 5 324 162.81

Year 2: R 4 488 795.60

 

0

Subject matter expert for English

SAIDE

R 156 417.60

 

0

NSA fundholder

SAB & T Chartered Accountants t/a Nexia SAB&T

5.15% pa management of an estimated budget of R30m

1 April 2018 to date

0

Monitoring and evaluation framework and evaluation plan for teaching and learning development sector reform contract (TLDSRC)

Uweso Consulting

R 2 007 480.72

 

0

Forensic services

Pricewaterhouse Coopers (PWC)

R 939 599.22

The response below is based on the information provided by public entities reporting to the Department of Higher Education and Training:

Public Entities reporting to the Department of Higher Education and Training

Entities

Financial Year (Period)

Number of Employees

Company/ Contractor

Amount Paid

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

2015/16

1

Dimension Data

R 396 870.00

   

4

Deloitte

R 2 296 200.00

   

2

EOH

R 631 800.00

   

3

Argility

R 1 820 560.00

 

2016/17

2

Dimension Data

R 465 120.00

   

1

EOH

R 109 440.00

   

6

Argility

R 2 439 920.00

 

2017/18

2

Dimension Data

R 673 698.00

   

2

Deloitte

R 988 756.00

   

6

EOH

R 4 695 813.00

   

6

Argility

R 4 505 074.00

 

2018 to date

5

Dimension Data

R 2 424 257.00

   

3

Deloitte

R 1 493 947.00

   

2

Nambiti Technologies (Pty) Ltd

R 582 360.00

   

1

Ronauna Management Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 408 000.00

   

6

Argility

R 6 029 270.00

Council on Higher Education

April 2015 – March 2016

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 148 619.52

 

April 2015 – March 2016

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 148 619.52

 

April 2015 – May 2015

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 24 769.92

 

April 2015 – April 2016

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 143 433.81

 

April 2017 – June 2017

1

Ebus-Tech Consulting

R 36 750.00

 

2017/18

1

Ebus-Tech Consulting

R 147 000.00

 

2017/18

1

Raido Othila Kanaz Outsourcing

R 147 000.00

 

1 April 2018 to date

There are no employees outsourced from private companies and/or contractors since 01 April 2018

National Institute for Humanities

2015/16

1

Mindworx

R 33 120.00

 

2016/17

1

Mindworx

R 2 000.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 36 001.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 3 628.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 192 290.72

   

1

Mindworx

R 1 800.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 1 200.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 54 000.00

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 463 299.52

   

1

Acting Director: BRICS

R 69 165.38

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 101 594.88

   

1

Events Management Officer

R 210 196.99

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 96 394.08

 

2017/18

1

Mindworx

R 16 246.59

   

1

Mindworx

R 47 317.50

   

1

Mindworx

R 29 454.93

   

1

Mindworx

R 530 507.71

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 107 413.27

   

1

Acting Director: BRICS

R 1 118 141.58

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 520 912.72

   

1

Events Management Officer

R 463 648.27

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 488 532.57

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 687 384.41

   

1

IT Helpdesk Technician

R 291 004.41

   

1

Legal Consultant

R 251 268.03

   

1

Manager: IT

R 388 313.90

 

1 April 2018 to date

2015/16

1

Mindworx

R 14 630.90

   

1

Mindworx

R 278 675.26

   

1

iThemba

R 46 056.96

   

1

Senior Manager: Governance

R 56 666.67

   

1

Acting Director: BRICS

R 644 152.72

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 286 105.17

   

1

Events Management Officer

R 262 733.78

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 271 262.77

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 454 544.48

   

1

IT Helpdesk Technician

R 86 257.38

   

1

Legal Consultant

R 162 118.50

   

1

Manager: IT

R 411 884.07

   

1

IT Helpdesk Technician

R 49 718.85

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 172 170.41

   

1

Administrator: Marketing

R 161 994.72

South African Qualifications Authority

1 April –
11 June 2018

1 April –
31 May 2018

2

Dante Personnel

R 19 617 pm X2

 

May-September 2018 (Incumbent on maternity leave)

1

Express Personnel

R 19 617 pm

 

1 April –
11 June 2018

2

Kelly

R 19 617 pm

Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

1

Sifuna Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 99 066.00

 

2017/18

1

Blackseed (Pty) Ltd

R 456 000.00

 

2018/19

1

Human Communications (Pty) Ltd

R 18 762.00

Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Authority

2015/16

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

 

2016/17

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

 

2017/18

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

 

2018/19

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

1

Deloitte Consulting (PTY) Ltd

R 903 492.53

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

2

Deloitte IT Services

R 560 000.00
per Month

 

2017/18

2

Deloitte

IT Services

R 560 000.00
per Month

 

2018/19

1

Deloitte (Solugrowth)

IT Services

R 610 000.00
per Month

Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

Information not provided by the contracted company

21st Century Pay Solutions

R 10 830.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Cecilia Denton Independent Practice

R 14 394.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Dajo Associates CC

R 131 100.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

F R Research Services

R 84 360.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

HR Touch

R 9 904.32

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Ideaology Communication and Design

R 13 794.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Media Works

R 87 511.70

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Productivity Development t/a Moonshot

R 120 976.16

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 46 567.32

 

2016/17

Information not provided by the contracted company

21st Century Pay Solutions

R 104 880.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Consultancy in Session

R 41 952.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

ERS Biometrics

R 22 689.42

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Media Works

R 1 356.60

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

NUMSA Investment Co

R 130 000.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Sizwe Ntsaluba

R 37 661.33

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Skill Writer CC

R 25 373.02

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 60 509.82

 

2017/18

Information not provided by the contracted company

21st Century Pay Solutions

R 65 892.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Africa is Open for Business

R 82 872.90

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Brand Fischer Morgensen

R 149 216.40

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

BSI Group

R 11 104.74

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Emergence Growth

R 5 700.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Frainah’s Consulting and Projects

R 27 930.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Genex Insights

R 592 434.96

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Green Vision Consulting

R 60 600.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Jolenhla Consulting

R 9 405.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Laetoli

R 130 000.01

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

MIE

R 29 084.40

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Nantso Holdings

R 143 640.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Peter Tobin Consultancy

R 80 000.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Sizwe Ntsaluba

R 65 677.68

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Skill Writer CC

R 29 298.36

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 101 287.18

 

2018/19

12 Temp data capturers/filing clerks

Kgobolize Recruitment Consultancy

R 498 028.60

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

DSTNCTV Group

R 44 000.15

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

F R Research Services

R 85 962.18

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Genex Insights

R 197 478.32

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Jolenhla Consulting

R 9 288.55

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Laetoli

R 130 000.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Measure Value

R 79 988.90

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Skill Writer CC

R 34 090.28

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 18 450.98

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

Information not provided by the contracted company

Deloitte

R 9 967 625.00

 

2016/17

Information not provided by the contracted company

Deloitte

R 10 203 285.00

 

2017/18

Information not provided by the contracted company

Deloitte

R 10 712 572.00

 

2018/19

Information not provided by the contracted company

SOLU GROWTH (formerly Deloitte)

R 7 091 490.00

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

3

Deloitte

R 1 518 961.42

 

2016/17

5

Delloitte

R 4 029 087.52

 

2017/18

3

Delloitte

R 3 736 398.48

 

2018/19

3

Delloitte

R 1 567 641.15

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

2015/16

3

Grand Primacy

R 87 278.40

   

2

Financial Control

R 59 391.72

 

2016/17

3

Grand Primacy

R 171 641.01

   

8

Financial Control

R 101 552.25

 

2017/18

4

Grand Primacy

R 119 959.14

   

2

Watershed Consulting

R 237 987.33

   

4

Humantouch

R 97 204.00

   

2

Financial Control

R 129 456.44

Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority

2017/18

2

Phalamash Recruitment Agency

R 15 000.00

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

Financial services

Deloitte

R 9 230 866.89

   

Learning Programmes

Dajo Associates

R 995 600.00

   

Internal Audit services

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo

R 1 731 324.74

   

Communication and Marketing services

Zanenza Holdings (Pty) Ltd

R 190 608.00

 

2016/17

Financial services

Deloitte

R 5 202 731.58

   

Internal Audit services

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo

R 814 008.46

 

2017/18

Internal Audit services

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo

R 116 775.72

 

2018/19

Learning Programmes

Basadzi

R 33 247.62

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

1

Baruch Memoirs

R 791 037.50

   

1

Ngubane and Co Inc

R 277 169.48

 

2017/18

1

Baruch Memoirs

R 553 576.00

   

1

Ngubane and Co Inc

R 898 328.50

 

2018/19

1

Baruch Memoirs

R 257 730.00

   

1

Ngubane and Co Inc

R 223 603.00

Services Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

7

Best Enough t/a Talent Inc

R 3 738 013.17

 

2016/17

5

Gauge Imperial Services

R 5 009 831.25

   

8

Mampro IT Solutions Pty (Ltd)

R 6 613 800.00

 

2017/18

5

Gauge Imperial Services

R 3 011 774.19

   

8

Mampro IT Solutions Pty (Ltd)

R 9 768 896.55

   

1

Systems Cyber Operations and Resilience Excellence (Pty)Ltd

R 700 000.00

 

2018/19

8

IQ

R 5 570 056.07

   

1

Systems Cyber Operations and Resilience Excellence (Pty)Ltd

R 832 045.45

Quality Council For Trades and Occupations

2015/16

1

Sage VIP

R 16 837.80

   

3

Human Communication Capital

R 155 527.22

 

2016/17

01

Edge Executive

R 26 544.00

   

01

Professional Appointments CC

R 28 500.00

   

02

Dante Personnel

R 25 697.70

 

2017/18

01

Dante Personnel Recruitment

R 129 505.92

   

01

Ntirho Human Capital

R 187 499.87

   

01

Edge Executive Search CC

R 29 505.60

 

2018/19

01

Dante Personnel Recruitment

R 88 988.28

   

02

Hlabahlosile Recruitment Solutions

R 111 040.76

   

01

Ntirho Human Capital

R 25 219.30

National Skills Fund

2015/16

11

Afri Guard 2015/2016 (11 security guards)

R 143 096.59

 

2016/17

11

Afri Guard 2016/2017 (11 security guards)

R 143 096.59

 

2017/18

11

Cannabe 2017/2018( 11 security guards)

R 88 684.00

 

2018/19

11

Cannabe 2017/2018( 11 security guards)

R 88 684.00

07 November 2018 - NW2971

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What number of learners, excluding those being allocated the National Senior Certificate, Nated qualifications and the National Certificate (Vocational) Level 4, achieved full level 4 qualifications in the (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18 financial years; (2) what number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications were in learnership agreements when they achieved the qualifications in the (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18 financial years; (3) has she found that the learnership programme has been functioning at the levels and in accordance with the vision of Government since the learnership system was introduced in legislation; if not, what changes can be expected in the near future?

Reply:

  1. - (2) The table below provides the number of learners who received the full level 4 NATED and National Certificate (Vocational) Level 4 qualifications as well as the number of learners in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications:

Sector Education and Training Authority

Financial Year (Period)

  1. Number of full level 4 NATED and NC(V) Level 4 qualifications
  1. Number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications

Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 171

3 171

 
  1. 2016/17

3 365

3 365

 
  1. 2017/18

2 445

2 445

Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

None

125

 
  1. 2016/17

150

192

 
  1. 2017/18

163

370

Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Authority

  1. 2015/16

114

114

 
  1. 2016/17

124

124

 
  1. 2017/18

192

192

Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

0

0

 
  1. 2016/17

18

96

 
  1. 2017/18

0

5

Services Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

7 845

31

 
  1. 2016/17

5 275

252

 
  1. 2017/18

6 617

2 043

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 488

1 377

 
  1. 2016/17

2 450

1 286

 
  1. 2017/18

519

1 350

Sector Education and Training Authority

Financial Year (Period)

  1. Number of full level 4 NATED and NC(V) Level 4 qualifications
  1. Number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications

Transport Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

59

37

 
  1. 2016/17

319

252

 
  1. 2017/18

400

400

Banking Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

2 565

51

 
  1. 2016/17

481

149

 
  1. 2017/18

911

352

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

712

712

 
  1. 2016/17

766

766

 
  1. 2017/18

125

125

Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 671

322

 
  1. 2016/17

1 885

58

 
  1. 2017/18

1 102

67

Media, Advertising, Information and Communication Technologies Sector

Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 177

1 593

 
  1. 2016/17

1 984

1 345

 
  1. 2017/18

2 797

971

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

389

288

 
  1. 2016/17

439

381

 
  1. 2017/18

427

430

Mining Qualifications Authority

  1. 2015/16

505

505

 
  1. 2016/17

636

636

 
  1. 2017/18

723

723

Sector Education and Training Authority

Financial Year (Period)

  1. Number of full level 4 NATED and NC(V) Level 4 qualifications
  1. Number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 291

911

 
  1. 2016/17

751

301

 
  1. 2017/18

1 246

747

Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

4 632

7 962

 
  1. 2016/17

3 806

5 136

 
  1. 2017/18

2 926

7 250

Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 543

1 543

 
  1. 2016/17

1 180

1 180

 
  1. 2017/18

1 231

1 231

Agriculture sector education and training Authority

  1. 2015/16

229

229

 
  1. 2016/17

359

359

 
  1. 2017/18

704

704

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

952

952

 
  1. 2016/17

833

833

 
  1. 2017/18

796

796

Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 276

1 422

 
  1. 2016/17

3 939

755

 
  1. 2017/18

3 379

922

Construction Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

59

281

 
  1. 2016/17

82

213

 
  1. 2017/18

99

516

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 673

854

 
  1. 2016/17

1 923

1 082

 
  1. 2017/18

889

432

3.The Human Sciences Research Council Policy Brief (February 2014) regarding Learnerships and Apprenticeships: Key mechanisms for skills development and capability building in South Africa, demonstrates that learnership and apprenticeship systems lead to employment. They tracked the trajectories of individuals after completing these qualifications, with a hypothesis that it might be difficult for them to access the labour market.

It was evident that the majority of apprenticeship and learnership participants, i.e. 70% and 86% respectively, completed their qualifications and experienced a smooth transition directly into stable employment. For example, 90% of those who completed a learnership reported that they were employed in permanent positions. Most were absorbed by the formal sector in large private firms or by the public sector, and just over half were employed at the same workplace as their experiential training.

07 November 2018 - NW2949

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1) Was there an agenda for the meeting held at Xolobeni in the Eastern Cape on 23 September 2018; if so, (a) how was the agenda determined and (b) what were the agenda points; (2) were there specific stakeholders present at the meeting; if so, who were (a) the stakeholders and (b) their representatives; (3) was there a register at the meeting; if so, (a) who is listed on the register, (b) where are they from and (c) on what date were the respective stakeholders invited?

Reply:

(1) Yes, there was an agenda for the meeting.

(a) The agenda was determined by the need for the Department to engage with interested and affected stakeholders on recent community conflicts associated with a prospecting right application

(b) Part 1 (stakeholder representatives meeting): The first part of the programme did not take place as stakeholders agreed to rather have the meeting with the community.

Part 2 (Community meeting): Despite attempts by a grouping, the community meeting proceeded as planned. 10 organizations including King Zanozuko Sigcau made presentations

(2) Yes, there were stakeholders present at the meeting.

(a) Kindly see the attached register

(b) Kindly see the attached register

(3) Yes there was a register at the meeting.

(a) Kindly see the attached register

(b) Kindly see the attached register

( c) 18 September 2018

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

07 November 2018 - NW3139

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What are the top five products in each category and Rand value that South Africa (a) imported from and (b) exported to Israel in each of the past five years?

Reply:

Top 5 imported agriculture products from ISRAEL per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Vegetable seeds

19.7

Vegetable seeds

20.4

Vegetable seeds

17.4

Vegetable seeds

22.9

Vegetable seeds

20.4

Fresh Avocados

13.2

Fresh Avocados

5.9

Fresh Avocados

13.6

Fresh Avocados

11.2

Fresh Avocados

18.6

Fresh Mandarins (including tangerines and satsumas)

7.8

Fresh Mandarins (including tangerines and satsumas)

4.6

Other fruit, fresh.

3.8

Fresh Mandarins (including tangerines and satsumas)

5.6

Peaches, including nectarines

4.0

Other fruit, fresh.

4.2

Other fruit, fresh.

4.0

Fresh Mandarins (including tangerines and satsumas)

3.6

Other fruit, fresh.

3.6

Other fruit, fresh.

3.7

Fresh Grapes

3.2

Granadillas and litchis

2.0

Other Insects

3.0

Peaches, including nectarines

2.9

Fresh Mandarins (including tangerines and satsumas)

2.7

Top 5 imported manufacturing products from ISRAEL per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Other Non-industrial Diamonds, whether or not worked, but not mounted or set

187.9

Other Non-industrial Diamonds, whether or not worked, but not mounted or set

203.1

Other Electric generating sets and rotary converters

197.8

Other Non-industrial Diamonds, whether or not worked, but not mounted or set

372.7

Other Electric generating sets and rotary converters

424.8

Potassium chloride

146.8

Potassium chloride

172.1

Other Non-industrial Diamonds, whether or not worked, but not mounted or set

159.4

Other Plates, sticks, tips and the like for tools, unmounted, of cermets

206.1

Other Non-industrial Diamonds, whether or not worked, but not mounted or set

263.6

Other Plates, sticks, tips and the like for tools, unmounted, of cermets

125.3

Other Plates, sticks, tips and the like for tools, unmounted, of cermets

134.6

Other Plates, sticks, tips and the like for tools, unmounted, of cermets

157.1

Filtering or purifying machinery and apparatus for liquids for filtering or purifying water

144.4

Other Plates, sticks, tips and the like for tools, unmounted, of cermets

220.2

Other mineral or chemical fertilisers containing the two fertilising elements nitrogen and phosphorus

93.0

Other mineral or chemical fertilisers containing the two fertilising elements nitrogen and phosphorus:

114.0

Other Articles of cement, of concrete or of artificial stone, whether or not reinforced:

121.7

Other mineral or chemical fertilisers containing the two fertilising elements nitrogen and phosphorus:

130.9

Receiver or amplifier valves and tubes

157.8

Other Machines for the reception, conversion and transmission of voice, images.

92.2

Other Herbicides, anti-sprouting products and plant-growth regulators

99.5

Other Herbicides, anti-sprouting products and plant-growth regulators

116.8

Other Herbicides, anti-sprouting products and plant-growth regulators

97.1

Other Mechanical appliances

128.8

(B) Export to Israel

Top 5 exported agriculture products to ISRAEL per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Dried Grapes

13.6

Fresh Grapes

5.8

Other Citrus fruit, fresh or dried

16.4

Other Citrus fruit, fresh or dried

29.3

Other Citrus fruit, fresh or dried

53.7

Fresh Grapes

6.6

Dried Grapes

4.9

Almonds In shell

9.2

Millet Seed

6.5

Rye grass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., Lolium perenne L.) seeds

5.3

Almonds Shelled

5.9

Other cereals

1.4

Millet Seed

3.9

Grapefruit, including pomelos

2.3

Grapefruit, including pomelos

5.0

Other Seeds, fruits and spores, of a kind used for sowing

5.3

Other Seeds, fruits and spores, of a kind used for sowing

0.8

Figs

2.8

Other Seeds, fruits and spores, of a kind used for sowing

2.0

Almonds In shell

3.2

Vegetable seeds

3.6

Apricots

0.5

Grapefruit, including pomelos

1.0

Rye grass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., Lolium perenne L.) seeds

1.8

Pulp

1.8

Top 5 exported manufacturing products to ISRAEL per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Telephones for cellular networks or for other wireless networks.

68.8

Aircraft engines

244.3

Other Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa

60.4

Other Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa

87.4

Turbo-jets, turbo-propellers and other gas turbines of a thrust exceeding 25 kN

82.5

Other Grapefruit (including pomelo) juice

51.0

Other Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa

68.7

Other phosphates of calcium:

58.7

Turbo-jets, turbo-propellers and other gas turbines of a thrust exceeding 25 kN

80.3

Other parts of aeroplanes or helicopters

71.5

Other Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa

49.1

Telephones for cellular networks or for other wireless networks.

60.6

Undenatured ethyl alcohol

55.8

Undenatured ethyl alcohol

64.5

Undenatured ethyl alcohol

52.5

Other parts of aeroplanes or helicopters

42.1

Other Equipment for scaffolding, shuttering, propping or pit-propping.

43.0

Turbo-jets, turbo-propellers and other gas turbines of a thrust exceeding 25 kN.

44.5

Other fixed vegetable fats and oils.

41.8

Other Chocolate and other food preparations containing cocoa.

49.2

Aluminium plates, sheets and strip, of a thickness exceeding 0,2 mm of aluminium alloys.

29.4

Other parts of aeroplanes or helicopters

38.0

Telephones for cellular networks or for other wireless networks.

42.9

Instruments and appliances for aeronautical or space navigation.

37.2

Other fixed vegetable fats and oils.

36.1

07 November 2018 - NW2813

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1) What is the total land and sea area in the Namaqualand in the Northern Cape that was allocated for mining projects (a) in general and (b) for diamond mining purposes since 1 April 1994;  Sea Concession and coastal, refer to Appendix 1. The hacters are not included. (2) (a) which companies own the mining rights for the diamond areas, (b) what other minerals have been mined, (c) which companies mined other minerals except diamonds, (d) what is the approximate cost of rehabilitating each hectare, (d) what amount has been spent on rehabilitation in Namaqualand by each mining company and (e) what is the total area in hectares that has been rehabilitated by each mining company in Namaqualand to date?

Reply:

(a) Companies with valid Diamond Mining Rights for diamonds only

  1. Alexkor Bpk (Pty) Ltd
  2. De Beers Consolidated Mines (Pty) Ltd
  3. Trans Hex Operations (Pty) Ltd
  4. Richterveld Mining Company (Pty) Ltd
  5. West Coast Resources (Pty) Ltd
  6. Kori Diamonds (Pty) Ltd
  7. Mafisa Mining (Pty) Ltd
  8. African Star Minerals  (Pty) Ltd
  9.  Galputs Minerale  (Pty) Ltd

                                                                                                                                                                       

(b)other minerals have been mined

  1. Clay and Koalin (Clay)
  2. Cobalt
  3. Columbium
  4. Copper
  5. Feldspar
  6. Gemstones
  7. Gold
  8. Granite
  9. Gravel
  10. Hoshale o
  11. Iron ore,
  12. Kyanite
  13. Lead
  14. leucoxene
  15. Lithium
  16. Manganese
  17. Monazite
  18. Nickel
  19. Niobium
  20. Phosphate
  21. Platinum group metals
  22. Rare earths
  23. Rutile
  24. Salt
  25. Sand
  26. Silica sand
  27. Sillimanite
  28. Silver
  29. Silver Ore
  30. Stone Aggregate
  31. Sulphur
  32. Tantalum/Niobium Ore
  33. Tungsten
  34. Uranium
  35. Wollastonite
  36. Zinc
  37. Zircon
  38. Zirconium

 

(c) companies mined other minerals except diamonds

See appendix 2, this include mining Rights, Prospecting Rights and Mining Permits

(d) approximate cost of rehabilitating each hectare

  • each and every mining method has different costing, also depending on the depth of each trench as well as the constructed company. Big companies usually follow the tender processes.

(e) total area in hectares that has been rehabilitated by each mining company in Namaqualand to date

  • There has been rehabilitation in Namaqualand, however in obtaining the actual hectares of areas rehabilitate is challenging. There is a list of closures certificates that have been issued to companies who have fully rehabilitated their mining areas or if another company has taken an environmental liability of that area. The list is stated on appendix 3, inclusive of Namaqualnd, Kenhardt and Calvinia Districts

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2018

07 November 2018 - NW2962

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Energy

a) (i) Who are the equity shareholders for each Independent Power Producer (IPP) project signed in each of the bid windows of the IPP programme and (ii) what percentage is owned by each equity shareholder; b) How are the debt providers by percentage for each IPP project signed in each of the bid windows of the IPP programme; and c) who were the legal advisers for each IPP project signed in each of the bid windows of the IPP programme?

Reply:

(a) i) A list of all equity shareholders of the Sellers across all of the Renewable IPP Procurement Programme (REIPPPP) bid windows is provided in Table 1 below. Neither the Department nor the IPP Office is involved in the selection of participating shareholders, BEE or otherwise. It is important to note that Developers and/or Shareholders select BEE companies based on a stringent criterion. These Companies are further approved by the Project funders by following their own governance and investment approval processes.

ii) Information about shareholding (in the form of an extract from the share register of the company) can be obtained by making a request at the registered office of a private company. Details of the registered office are available through the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC).

Table 1: Equity Shareholders of the Sellers of all REIPPPP Bid Windows (IPPs), per Bid Window and percentage shareholding

Project

Project Company

Company Registration Number

Equity Shareholders

Shareholding (%)

Bid Window 1

Letsatsi Solar Photovoltaic Park

Letsatsi Power Company

2011/1454434/07

SolarReserve GCL Soutdrift PV 1 (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

Oakleaf Investment Holdings 83 (Pty) Ltd (Omlacsa)

50.0%

     

K2011141304 (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd (Kensani (17.5% and Community Trust 7.5%)

25.0%

Lesedi Solar Photovoltaic Park

Lesedi Power Company

2011/105139/07

SolarReserve GCL Soutdrift PV 1 (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

Oakleaf Investment Holdings 83 (Pty) Ltd (Omlacsa)

50.0%

     

K2011141315 (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd (Kensani (17.5% and Community Trust 7.5%)

25.0%

Witkop Solar Park

Core Energy (Pty) Ltd

2011/008464/07

SunEdison Renewable Energy Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd. (South Africa) (Owned by Brookfields)

51.0%

     

Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF)

39.0%

     

Kurisani Witkop (Pty) Ltd Community Trust

10.0%

Soutpan Solar Park

Erika Energy (RF) Pty Ltd

2011/008457/07

SunEdison Renewable Energy Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd. (South Africa) (Owned by Brookfields)

51.0%

     

Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF)

39.0%

     

Kurisani Soutpan (Pty) Ltd Community Trust

10.0%

Nobelsfontein

Phase 1

Coria (PKF) Investments 28 (Pty) Ltd

2011/108105/07

Noblesfontein One (Pty) Ltd (“N1”)

47.5%

     

Phembani Renewables (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

South African Renewable Green Energy (Pty) Ltd

12.5%

     

Thebe Noblesfontein (Pty) Ltd

12.5%

     

Noblesfontein Educational Trust

2.5%

         
         

Mulilo Solar PV

De Aar

Mulilo Renewable Energy Solar PV De Aar (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2009/010389/07

X-Elio Energy. S.L. (formerly, Gestamp Asetym Solar, S.L.) (Spain)

60.0%

     

Mulilo Group Holdings (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

Mulilo De AarSolar Community Trust (RF) (Pty) Ltd (South Africa)

20.0%

Mulilo Solar PV Prieska

Mulilo Renewable Energy Solar PV Prieska (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2009/010169/07

X-Elio Energy. S.L. (formerly, Gestamp Asetym Solar, S.L.) (Spain)

60.0%

     

Mulilo Group Holdings (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

Mulilo Prieska Solar Community Trust (Local Community Trust) SPV (Pty) Ltd)

20.0%

Touwsrivier Solar Park

CPV Power Plant No. 1 (Pty) Ltd

2009/019989/07

SOITEC GMBH HRB7492

20.0%

     

Pele Green CPV Plant 1 (Pty) Ltd

35.0%

     

CPV1 Equity (PIC company)

40.0%

     

The Touwsrivier Solar Community Trust

5.0%

Dorper Wind Farm

Dorper Wind Farm (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2009/022085/07

Main Street 886 t/a Sumitomo Corporation South Africa (Pty) Ltd

30.0%

     

Dorper Wind Development (Pty) Ltd

15.0%

     

GAIA RE1

30.0%

     

Limarco 64 t/a Dorper Wind Farm BEE Holdings (Pty) Ltd

12.2%

     

Marble Race Property 77 t/a Dorper Wind Farm BBBEE Holdings (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

12.8%

Kaxu Solar One

KaXu Solar One (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/109767/07

ABY South Africa (Pty) Ltd.(Abengoa)

51.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

29.0%

     

Newshelf 1152 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

20.0%

Khi Solar One

Khi Solar One (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/108898/07

Son Revieren (Pty) Ltd (Abengoa)

51.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

29.0%

     

Newshelf 1150 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

20.0%

Dassieklip Wind Energy Facility

Klipheuwel-Dassiefontein Wind Energy Facility (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/011734/07

SA Springbok Holdings (Pty) Ltd.(South Africa) Biotherm (owned by Brookfields)

65.0%

     

Overberg Wind Power (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

     

Doricap (RF) (Pty) Ltd (BEE company)

10.0%

     

Tundrasign (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Women’s Trust, Empowerment Trust and Community Trust)

20.0%

Konkoonsies Solar Energy Facility

Limarco 77 (Pty) Ltd

2011/008075/07

SA Springbok Holdings (Pty) Ltd.(South Africa) Biotherm (owned by Brookfields)

70.0%

     

Main Street 936 (Pty) Ltd (Winner’s Circle BEE Company)

10.0%

     

Main Street 937(Pty) Ltd (Women’s Trust, Empowerment Trust and Community Trust)

20.0%

Aries Solar Energy Facility

Sevenstones 159 (Pty) Ltd

2011/009086/07

SA Springbok Holdings (Pty) Ltd.(South Africa) Biotherm (owned by Brookfields)

70.0%

     

Main Street 933 (Pty) Ltd(Winner’s Circle BEE Company)

10.0%

     

Main Street 935 (Pty) Ltd (Women’s Trust, Empowerment Trust and Community Trust)

20.0%

Metrowind Van Stadens Wind Farm

Rubicept (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/123905/07

African Pioneer Services (Basil Read Energy (Pty) Ltd)

23.0%

     

Tewa Power (Afri-Coast Engineers SA (Pty) Ltd)

13.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

34.0%

     

Spilled Water Renewable Energy (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

MetroWind Community Trust

5.0%

Kouga Wind Farm

Kouga Wind Farm (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2010/017030/07

STANLIB Infrastructure Private Equity Fund 1

40.6%

     

Red Cap Investments (Pty) Ltd

5.5%

     

Evolution One Fund

26.6%

     

Eurocape Renewables (Pty) Ltd

1.2%

     

Micawber 864 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

26.1%

RustMo1 Solar Farm

RustMo1 Solar Farm (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/005878/07

Momentous Technologies (Pty) Ltd (owned by Hulusani)

66.0%

     

Momentous Solar Farm (Pty) Ltd

17.0%

     

Momentous Foundation (Pty) Limited (RF) (Community Trust)

17.0%

Kalkbult

Scatec Solar Kalkbult (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2010/011019/07

Scatec Solar SA 165 (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

10.0%

     

STANLIB Infrastructure Private Equity Fund 1

10.0%

     

Scatec Solar SA 155 (Pty) Ltd ta Simacel Kalkbult Holding (Community Trust)

20.0%

         

Slimsun Swartland Solar Park

Slimsun (RF) (Pty) Limited

2011/000611/07

Renewable Energy S (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Franco Afrique Technologies (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

K2011/118391/07 (Pty) Ltd BBBEE SPV (Community Trust)

20.0%

South African Mainstream Renewable Power De Aar PV RF (Pty) Ltd

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power De Aar PV (Pty) Ltd

2009/003357/07

Globeleq Holdings (South Africa Solar) Limited

56.8%

     

Thebe Investment Corporation

28.0%

     

Enzani De Aar Green Energy 2 (RF) Proprietary Limited (BEE Company)

3.6%

     

Usizo Engineering De Aar (RF) Proprietary Limited (BEE Company)

3.6%

     

Sibona Ilanga Trust (Community Trust)

8.0%

Jeffreys Bay

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Jeffreys Bay (RF) Pty Ltd

2009/007843/07

Globeleq Holdings (South Africa Solar) Limited

59.0%

     

Thebe Jeffreys Bay Wind (RF) Proprietary Limited

10.0%

     

Enzani Jeffrey Bay Green Energy 1 (RF) Proprietary Limited (BEE Company)

2.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

21.0%

     

Usizo Engineering Jeffreys Bay (RF) Proprietary Limited (BEE Company)

2.0%

     

Amandla Omoya Trust (Community Trust)

6.0%

South African Mainstream Renewable Power Droogfontein (RF) (Pty) Ltd

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Droogfontein (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2009/002635/07

Globeleq Holdings (South Africa Solar) Limited

56.8%

     

Thebe Droogfontein Solar PV (RF) (Proprietary) Limited

28.0%

     

Enzani Droogfontein Green Energy 3 (RF) (Proprietary) Limited(BEE Company)

3.6%

     

Marang Droogfontein (RF) (Pty) Ltd

4.0%

     

Usizo Engineering Droogfontein (RF) (Proprietary) Limited(BEE Company)

3.6%

     

Letsatsi Borutho Trust (Community Trust)

4.0%

Hopefield Wind Farm

Umoya Energy (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2008/010269/07

African Infrastructure Investment Fund

56.0%

     

Taylee Trust

4.5%

     

HNP Trust

0.3%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company South Africa

34.2%

     

Hopefield Wind Farm Local Community Company (an association incorporated under section 21)

5.0%

Cookhouse Wind Farm

Renewables Cookhouse Wind Farm 1 (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2009/006939/07

Apollo Investment Partnership II (En commandite South African Partnership)

61.0%

     

African Infrastructure Investment Fund 2 (Mauritius)

7.1%

     

African Infrastructure Investment Fund 2 Partnership

6.9%

     

ACED Cookhouse Community Trust BEE SPV 1 (RF) Proprietary Limited

25.0%

Greefspan PV Power Plant

AE-AMD Independent Power Producer 1 (Pty) Ltd

2010/011323/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.1%

     

Exoport 12 (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

AE-AMD Renewable Energy (Pty) Ltd

19.9%

     

Sunpower

5.0%

     

Greefspan Educational Trust Number 1 (Community Trust)

5.0%

Herbert PV Power Plant

AE-AMD Independent Power Producer 3 (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2010/011312/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

49.0%

     

Exoport 12 (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

AE-AMD Renewable Energy (Pty) Ltd

21.0%

     

Sunpower

5.0%

     

Herbert Educational Trust Number 1 (Community Trust)

5.0%

Kathu Solar Plant

Renewable Energy Investments SA (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2009/016537/07

BuiltAfrica Kathu 75 Solar (RF) (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company South Africa ( IDEAS Fund)

28.5%

     

African Infrastructure Investment Fund 2 (Mauritius)

14.4%

     

African Infrastructure Investment Fund 2 Partnership

19.6%

     

Zevoblox (Pty) Ltd (Building Energy)

10.0%

     

Kathu Solar Community Trust

2.5%

Solar Capital

De Aar

Solar Capital De Aar (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/111264/07

Solar Capital (Pty) Ltd

25.5%

     

Moncada Energy Group S.r.l

35.5%

     

Fifth Season Investments 134 (Pty) Ltd

6.0%

     

PIC (SOC) Ltd representing GEPF

25.0%

     

The Solar Capital De Aar Community Trust

8.0%

Bid Window 2

Bokpoort CSP project

ACWA

2011/010375/07

ACWA Power Bokpoort Holdings (Pty) Ltd

40.0%

     

Public Investment Corporation SOC Limited

25.0%

     

Lereko Solafrica Investments (Pty) Ltd

13.0%

     

Kurisani Solafrica Investments (Pty) Ltd (Youth Development Trust)

5.0%

     

Lereko Metier Sustainable Capital Fund Trust

3.0%

     

Lereko Metier Solafrica Fund 1 Trust

9.0%

     

Solafrica Community Investment Company (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

5.0%

Gouda Wind Project

Blue Falcon

2011/010684/07

Acciona Energy South Africa (Pty) Ltd

54.9%

     

CELANEX (PTY) LTD

25.1%

     

Main Street 801 (Pty) Ltd (Soul City BEE Company)

10.0%

     

Main Street 845 (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

10.0%

Sishen Solar Facility

Windfall

2010/021774/07

Acciona Energy South Africa (Pty) Ltd

54.9%

     

CELANEX (PTY) LTD

25.1%

     

Main Street 885 (Pty) Ltd(Soul City BEE Company)

10.0%

     

Main Street 908 (Community Trust)

10.0%

Solar Capital De Aar 3

Solar Capital

2011/111260/07

Solar Capital (Pty) Ltd

32.0%

     

Zim Energy Solutions (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

Mahlako Renewables (RD) (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

ESPI Holdings Mauritius Limited

20.0%

     

Moncada Energy Group S.r.l

10.0%

     

Solar Capital De Aar 3 Community Trust

18.0%

Amakhala Wind Project

Cennergi (Pty) Ltd

2011/003055/07

Cennergi (Pty) Ltd (Exxaro, TATA and BEE shareholding)

95.0%

     

Amakhala Emoyeni Cookhouse Wind Farm Community Trust

2.5%

     

Amakhala Emoyeni Bedford Wind Farm Community Trust

2.5%

Tsitsikamma Community Wind Farm

Cennergi

2011/121760/07

Cennergi (Pty) Ltd

75.0%

     

Watt Energy (Pty) Ltd (BEE Company)

16.0%

     

Main Street 1066 (Pty) Ltd (Development Trust)

9.0%

Wind Farm West

Coast 1

Aurora Wind Power

2011/110948/07

GSEATSA (GDF SUEZ Energy Asia Turkey & Southern Africa B.V)

43.0%

     

Investec Bank Limited

34.5%

     

Tiso Resources (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

OMOYA Local Trust (Community Trust)

2.5%

Waainek Wind Power

InnoWind (PTY) LTD

2011/004046/07

Innowind (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

14.0%

     

Makana Winds of Change BBBEE Co (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

26.0%

Grassridge Onshore Wind Project

Grassridge

2011/008564/07

Innowind (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

14.0%

     

Grassridge Winds of Change BBBEE Co (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

26.0%

Chaba Wind Power

InnoWind (PTY) LTD

2011/004053/07

Innowind (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

14.0%

     

Chaba Winds of Change BBBEE Co (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

26.0%

Aurora-Rietvlei Solar Power

Solairedirect

2011/144261/07

Solaire Direct Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

19.5%

     

Jay & Jayendra (Pty) Ltd

29.0%

     

Old Mutal Life Assurance Company South Africa (OMLACSA)

49.0%

     

Aurora Solar Community Trust

2.5%

Vredendal Solar Park

Solairedirect

2011/144407/07

Solaire Direct Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

19.5%

     

Jay & Jayendra (Pty) Ltd

29.0%

     

Old Mutal Life Assurance Company South Africa (OMLACSA)

49.0%

     

Vredendal Local Community Trust

2.5%

         

Stortemelk Power Plant

Stortemelk

2009/018298/07

Renewable Energy Holdings (Pty) Ltd (Comprising a consortium of investment funds and foundations)

70.0%

     

Vapotouch (Pty) Ltd (including Mergon Community Trust)

30.0%

Linde

Simacel

2011/148956/07

Scatec Solar SA 164 (Pty) Ltd

55.0%

     

STANLIB Infrastructure Private Equity Fund 1

10.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

10.0%

     

Scatec Solar SA 156 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

25.0%

Dreunberg

Scatec

2011/148980/07

Scatec Solar SA 164 (Pty) Ltd

55.0%

     

STANLIB Infrastructure Private Equity Fund 1

20.0%

     

Simacel 159 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

25.0%

Jasper Power Company

Solar Reserve - Jasper

2012/030036/07

Oakleaf Investment Holdings 90 (Pty) ltd

46.3%

     

Kensani Capital Investments

23.1%

     

Goldfish Solar ZA LLC

18.1%

     

Solar Reserve Humansrus PV2

5.0%

     

Peace Humansrus Community Trust

7.5%

Boshoff Solar Park

Sun Edison

2011/010969/07

Firefly Investment 245 (Pty) Ltd. (South Africa)

51.0%

     

GEPF rep by Public Investment Corp. (SOC) Ltd. (South Africa)

19.0%

     

Opiconsivia Trading 255 (Pty) Ltd. (South Africa)

20.0%

     

Kurisani Boshoff Trust (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

10.0%

Upington Airport

ACSA

2011/117480/07

Harvipax (Pty) Ltd (Consists of a consortium of investors: Built Africa 20.6% [BEE Company], Stonebridge Trading 19.4%, Esse 60%)

95.0%

     

Solar PV Community Development Trust of Upington

5.0%

Neusberg Hydro Electrical Project

Kakamas

2010/004595/07

Hydro 1 SA (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

35.0%

     

Hydro Tasmania South Africa (Pty) Ltd

25.0%

     

Kakamas Hydro Community (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

15.0%

Bid Window 3

Mkhuze

Navosync (Pty) Ltd

2012/135025/07

Building Energy Development Africa 3 S.R.L

51%

     

H1 Capital (Pty) Ltd

16.5%

     

Tiestemax (Pty) Ltd

30%

     

Mkuze Community Trust

2.5%

Ilanga CSP 1 / Karoshoek Solar One

Karoshoek Solar One (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/004386/07

Grazigystix (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

GEPF Renewable Energy Investments 1 (Pty) Ltd (Reg No. 2012/047980/07)

20.0%

     

Ricoblox (Pty) Ltd (including Emvelo, Pamaluba and SA Legacy Trust)

15.0%

     

HCI Invest 12 Holdco (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

20.0%

     

Ursiclox (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

15.0%

!XiNa Solar One

XiNa Solar One (RF) Proprietary Limited

2012/165171/07

Xina CSP South Africa (Pty) Ltd

40.0%

     

GEPF Renewable Energy Investments 1 (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

20.0%

     

Xina Community Trust BEE Holding (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

Joburg Landfill Gas to Electricity

ENER-G Systems Joburg (Pty) Ltd

2009/006759/07

ENER-G Systems (Pty) Ltd

51.7%

     

CEF (SOC) Ltd

28.3%

     

Secure Rock Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

17.6%

     

ENER-G Community Education Trust

2.5%

Longyuan Mulilo Green Energy De Aar 2 North Wind Energy Facility

Longyuan Mulilo Green Energy De Aar 2 North (RF) Proprietary Limited

2012/029125/07

Longyuan South Africa Renewables (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Mulilo Wind Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

ULE Energy (RF) (Pty) Ltd ( BEE Company)

7.5%

     

Mulilo De Aar 2 North Wind Community (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

12.5%

Longyuan Mulilo De Aar Maanhaarberg Wind Energy Facility

Longyuan Mulilo De Aar Wind Power (RF) Proprietary Limited

2012/029125/07

Longyuan South Africa Renewables (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Mulilo Wind Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

ETU Energy Resources (RF)(Pty) Ltd (BEE Company)

7.5%

     

Mulilo De Aar 2 North Wind Community (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

12.5%

Mulilo Sonnedix Prieska PV

Mulilo Sonnedix Prieska PV (RF) Proprietary Limited

2012/033518/07

Sonnedix Solar South Africa Holdings (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Mulilo Sonnedix Solar Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

20.0%

     

Ixowave (Pty) Ltd (BEE Company)

15.0%

     

Prieska PV Community Trust Holdco (RF) (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

Mulilo Prieska PV

Mulilo Prieska PV (RF) Proprietary Limited

2012/012349/07

Total Solar 328195193RCS Nanterre

27.0%

     

Andisol (Pty) Ltd (BEE Company)

25.0%

     

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

15.0%

     

“Futuregrowth” Old Mutual Life Assurance Company South Africa Limited

10.0%

     

Mulilo Solar Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

18.0%

     

Mulilo Klipgats PV Community Holdco (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

5.0%

Loeriesfontein 2

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Loeriesfontein 2 (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/134998/07

Lekela Power Round 3 Holdings

65.0%

     

Genesis Loeriesfontein 2 Wind (Pty) Ltd (incl Lereko Metier)

15.0%

     

Thebe Investment Corporation (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

5.0%

     

The Loeriesfontein Renewable Energy Community Trust

5.0%

Noupoort

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Noupoort (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/135143/07

Lekela Power Round 3 Holdings

65.0%

     

Genesis Noupoort Wind (Pty) Ltd (incl Lereko Metier)

15.0%

     

Thebe Investment Corporation (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

5.0%

     

The Noupoort Renewable Energy Community Trust

5.0%

Khobab Wind

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Khobab Wind (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/134231/07

Lekela Power Round 3 Holdings

65.0%

     

Genesis Khobab Wind (Pty) Ltd (incl Lereko Metier)

15.0%

     

Thebe Investment Corporation (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

5.0%

     

Khobab Renewable Energy Community Trust

5.0%

         

Nojoli Wind Farm

Nojoli Wind Farm (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/107902/07

Enel Green Power RSA (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Pele Green Energy Nojoli Wind Farm (RF) (Pty) Ltd

30.0%

     

Nojoli Wind Farm BEE SPV (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

10.0%

Red Cap - Gibson Bay

Gibson Bay Wind Farm (RF) Proprietary Limited

2013/098179/07

Enel Green Power RSA (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Gibson Bay Wind Farm Community Trust SPV (RF) (Pty) Ltd)

40.0%

Adams Solar PV 2

Adams Solar PV Project Two (Pty) Ltd

2012/114124/07

Enel Green Power RSA (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Lisinfo 245 Investments (Pty) Ltd(BEE Company)

30.0%

     

Adams Community Trust Investment SPV (RF) (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

Electra Capital (Pty) Ltd

Electra Capital (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/101903/07

Enel Green Power RSA (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Lisinfo 219 Trading (Pty) Ltd(BEE Company)

30.0%

     

Electra Community Trust Investment SPV (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

Tom Burke Solar Park

Tobivox (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/117111/07

Enel Green Power RSA (Pty) Ltd

60.0%

     

Tom Burke Community Trust Investment SPV (RF) Pty Ltd

40.0%

Pulida Solar Park

Pulida Energy (RF) Proprietary Limited

2011/010820/07

Enel Green Power RSA (Pty) Ltd

52.7%

     

Phembani Solar Energy 1 (Pty) Ltd (owned by Thebe Renewable Energy Holding)

20.0%

     

Shanduka Black Umbrellas Energy (Pty) Ltd (owned by Thebe Foundation)

15.0%

     

Pulida Community Trust Investment SPV (RF) (Pty) Ltd

12.3%

Bid Window 3.5

Kathu Solar Park

Kathu Solar Park Consortium

2010/021766/07

ENGIE Global Developments B.V. (EDV)

48.5%

     

GEPF Renewable Energy Investments 1 (Pty) Ltd

17.5%

     

Lereko Metier REIPPP Fund Trust

11.5%

     

Subrotouch (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

12.5%

     

Investec Bank Limited

7.5%

     

Kathu LCT (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

         

Redstone CSP

Redstone Solar Thermal Power Project Consortium

2014/287655/07

ACWA Power Redstone Holdings (Pty) Ltd

35.0%

     

CEF SOC Ltd

15.0%

     

Phakwe Energy (Pty) Ltd (BEECompany to be confirmed)

13.5%

     

Pele Green Energy Redstone CSP (Pty) Ltd

10.0%

     

Mainstreet 1235 (Pty) Ltd

10.5%

     

Govt. Employees Pension Fund

13.5%

     

Bowwood and Main No 101 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

Bid Window 4

Ngodwana Energy Project

Ngodwana Energy (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/108843/07

Sappi Southern Africa Limited

30.0%

     

KC Africa (Pty) Limited

30.0%

     

Fusion Energy Ngodwana (Pty) Ltd (AREP owned)

30.0%

     

Ngodwana Energy Employee Trust

5.0%

     

Ngodwana Energy Community Trust

5.0%

The Karusa Wind Farm

ACED Renewables Hidden Valley (Pty) Ltd

2009/00488/07

ACED Renewables Hidden Valley (Enel) (Enel has committed to reduce shareholding and sell additional shares to BEE company)

60.0%

     

Pele Green Energy Karusa BEE SPV (RF)(PTY) LTD

35.0%

     

Karusa Wind Farm Community Trust SPV (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

The Nxuba Wind Farm

Nxuba Wind Farm (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2014/114923/07

Enel Green Power RSA 2 (Pty) Ltd

51.0%

     

Pele Green Energy Nxuba BEE SPV (Pty) Ltd

35.0%

     

Request Renewables (Pty) Ltd

9.0%

     

Nxuba Wind Farm Community Trust SPV (RF) (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

Oyster Bay Wind Farm

Oyster Bay Wind Farm (Pty) Ltd

2014/115944/07

Enel Green Power RSA 2 (Pty) Ltd (Enel has committed to reduce shareholding and sell additional shares to BEE company)

60.0%

     

Oozz Trading (Pty) Ltd (Khana Energy)

35.0%

     

Oyster Bay Community Trust Investment (RF) (Pty) LTD

5.0%

         
         

The Soetwater Wind Farm

Soetwater Wind Farm (Pty) Ltd

2014/060191/07

Enel Green Power RSA 2 (Pty) Ltd (Enel has committed to reduce shareholding and sell additional shares to BEE company)

60.0%

     

Pele Green Energy Soetwater BEE SPV (RF)(PTY) LTD

35.0%

     

Soetwater Wind Farm Community Trust SPV (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

Garob Wind Farm

Garob Wind Farm (Pty) Ltd

2011/104011/07

Enel Green Power RSA 2 (Pty) Ltd (Enel has committed to reduce shareholding and sell additional shares to BEE company)

60.0%

     

Hepax Trade and Invest (Pty) Ltd (Khana Energy)

35.0%

     

Garob Community Trust Investment (RF) (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

Sirius Solar PV Project One

Sirius Solar PV Project One (Pty) Ltd

2012/113733/07

Scatec Solar South Africa BV

60.0%

     

H1 Holdings

35.0%

     

Scatec Solar SA 325 (Pty) Ltd ("Scatec Solar Upington Community Trust")

5.0%

Dyason's Klip 1

RE Capital 3 (Pty) Ltd

2013/022226/07

Scatec Solar South Africa BV

60.0%

     

H1 Holdings

35.0%

     

Scatec Solar SA 325 (Pty) Ltd ("Scatec Solar Upington Community Trust")

5.0%

Dyason's Klip 2

RE Capital 3B (Pty) Ltd

2014/098890/07

Scatec Solar South Africa BV

60.0%

     

H1 Holdings

35.0%

     

Scatec Solar SA 325 (Pty) Ltd ("Scatec Solar Upington Community Trust")

5.0%

Excelsior Wind Energy Facility

Amstilinx (Pty) Ltd

2011/106816/07

BTSA Netherland Cooperatie U.A. (Biotherm)

60.0%

     

Matshelo Energy 8 Proprietary Limited (Thebe SPV)

37.5%

     

Main Street 931 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

Golden Valley Wind

Amstilite (Pty) Ltd

2011/106825/07

BTSA Netherland Cooperatie U.A. (Biotherm)

60.0%

     

Matshelo Energy 8 Proprietary Limited (Thebe SPV)

37.5%

     

Wilduso 179 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

         
         
         

Konkoonsies II Solar Facility

Ramizone (Pty) Ltd

2011/106841/07

BTSA Netherland Cooperatie U.A. (Biotherm)

60.0%

     

Matshelo Energy 8 Proprietary Limited (Thebe SPV)

37.5%

     

Main Street 958 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

Aggeneys Solar Project

Main Street 957 (Pty) Ltd

2011/145737/07

BTSA Netherland Cooperatie U.A. (Biotherm)

60.0%

     

Matshelo Energy 8 Proprietary Limited (Thebe SPV)

37.5%

     

Friedshelf 1294 (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

Kruisvallei Hydro

Zevobuzz (Pty) Ltd

2014/092339/07

Building Energy South Africa Holding (Pty)Ltd

51.0%

     

H1 Kvh Hydro (Rf) (Pty) Ltd

46.5%

     

Zevobuzz Hydro Power Trust (Rf) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

2.5%

Roggeveld Wind Farm

Roggeveld Wind Power (Pty) Ltd

2011/005805/07

Brezza Africana (RF) (Pty) Ltd

51.0%

     

H1 Roggeveld Wind (RF) (Pty) Ltd

23.3%

     

GEPF Renewable Energy Investments 1 (Pty) Ltd

23.3%

     

Roggeveld Wind Power Trust (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2.5%

Kangnas

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Kangnas (Pty) Ltd

2012/052675/07

Lekela Power Round 4 Holdings

55.0%

     

OMLACSA

20.0%

     

AREP

11.3%

     

H1 Holding

11.3%

     

Kangnas Renewable Energy Community Trust

2.5%

Perdekraal East

South Africa Mainstream Renewable Power Perdekraal East (Pty) Ltd

2009/023000/07

Lekela Power Round 4 Holdings

55.0%

     

OMLACSA

20.0%

     

AREP

11.3%

     

H1 Holding

11.3%

     

Perdekraal East Renewable Energy Community Trust

2.5%

         
         
         

Wesley-Ciskei

Innowind (Pty) Ltd, Telagystix (Pty) Ltd, Riverbank Winds of Change BBBEE Co (RF) (Pty) Ltd, Uncedo Lwethu Winds of Change (Pty) Ltd

2012/092140/07

EDF Renewables (PTY) LTD

60.0%

     

Telagystix (Pty) Ltd (Calulo RE)

22.5%

     

Riverbank Winds of Change BBBEE Co (RF) (Pty) Ltd

12.5%

     

Uncedo Lwethu Winds of Change (RF) (Pty) Ltd (Community Trust)

5.0%

Copperton Windfarm

Copperton Wind Farm Consortium

2012/027010/07

Elawan Energy S.L (Gestamp)

59.0%

     

Pele Green Energy ("PGE") Copperton (Pty) Ltd

31.0%

     

Veld Renewables (Veld) (Pty) Ltd

5.0%

     

Copperton Community Trust SPV

5.0%

Solar Capital Orange

Consortium comprising of Solar Capital (Pty) Ltd, JA Solar Investment (Hongkong) Ltd, Solar Capital Orange Community Trust, Phakwe Power (Pty) Ltd

2012/009340/07

Solar Capital (Pty) Ltd

50.0%

     

Phakwe Power (Pty) Ltd

45.0%

     

Solar Capital Community Trust

5.0%

De Wildt

Zolograph Investments (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2010/009466/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.0%

     

Reatile Solar Power (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Business Venture Investments No. 1984 Propriety Limited(Owned by AREP)

15.0%

     

Phakwe Solar (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Ciscada Community Trust

5.0%

Bokamoso

Bokamoso Energy (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/145709/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.0%

     

Reatile Solar Power (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Business Venture Investments No. 1984 Propriety Limited(Owned by AREP)

15.0%

     

Phakwe Solar (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Ciscada Community Trust

5.0%

         

Zeerust

Re Capital 2 (Pty) Ltd

2013/217405/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.0%

     

Reatile Solar Power (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Business Venture Investments No. 1984 Propriety Limited(Owned by AREP)

15.0%

     

Phakwe Solar (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Ciscada Community Trust

5.0%

Greefspan PV Power Plant No. 2 Solar Park

Greefspan PV Power Plant No. 2 (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2012/147617/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.0%

     

Reatile Solar Power (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Business Venture Investments No. 1984 Propriety Limited(Owned by AREP)

15.0%

     

Phakwe Solar (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Ciscada Community Trust

5.0%

Droogfontein 2 Solar

Droogfontein 2 Solar (Pty) Ltd

2011/134229/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.0%

     

Reatile Solar Power (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Business Venture Investments No. 1984 Propriety Limited (Owned by AREP)

15.0%

     

Phakwe Solar (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Ciscada Community Trust

5.0%

Waterloo Solar Park

DP S79 Solar Energy (RF) (Pty) Ltd

2011/113467/07

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (South Africa) Limited

50.0%

     

Reatile Solar Power (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Business Venture Investments No. 1984 Propriety Limited (Owned by AREP)

15.0%

     

Phakwe Solar (RF) Propriety Limited

15.0%

     

Ciscada Community Trust

5.0%

(b) A list of all debt providers per project and percentage participation across all of the Renewable IPP Procurement Programme (REIPPPP) bid windows is provided in Table 2 below:

Table 2: Debt Providers, number of projects they participate in, and projects, across all REIPPPP Bid Windows

Bid Window and Project

Debt Providers

(%)

Bid Window 1

Letsatsi Solar Photovoltaic Park

First Rand

100.00%

Lesedi Solar Photovoltaic Park

First Rand

100.00%

Witkop Solar Park

Standard Bank

100.00%

Soutpan Solar Park

Standard Bank

100.00%

Nobelsfontein Phase 1

Standard Bank

100.00%

Mulilo Solar PV De Aar

IDC

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Mulilo Solar PV Prieska

IDC

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Touwsrivier Solar Park

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Dorper Wind Farm

ABSA

45.91%

 

Nedbank

45.91%

 

Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

8.19%

Kaxu Solar One

DBSA

23.32%

 

First Rand

22.49%

 

IDC

17.49%

 

IFC

14.21%

 

Nedbank

22.49%

Khi Solar One

DBSA

18.86%

 

EIB

21.12%

 

FMO

11.77%

 

IDC

11.74%

 

IFC

26.55%

 

Proparco

9.96%

Dassieklip Wind Energy Facility

IDC

30.00%

 

Standard Bank

70.00%

Konkoonsies Solar Energy Facility

IDC

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Aries Solar Energy Facility

IDC

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Metrowind Van Stadens Wind Farm

Standard Bank

100.00%

Kouga Wind Farm

IDC

30.00%

 

Nedbank

35.00%

 

Standard Bank

35.00%

RustMo1 Solar Farm

IDC

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Kalkbult

DBSA

15.03%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

24.25%

 

Liberty Group Limited

12.12%

 

Standard Bank

48.60%

Slimsun Swartland Solar Park

IDC

44.41%

 

Nedbank

55.59%

South African Mainstream Renewable Power De Aar PV RF (Pty) Ltd

ABSA

46.60%

 

DBSA

34.80%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

10.63%

 

Sanlam Capital Markets Ltd

5.26%

 

Sanlam Credit Conduit

2.72%

Jeffreys Bay

ABSA

39.91%

 

DBSA

39.91%

 

Liberty Group Limited

10.09%

 

Sanlam Capital Markets Ltd

7.51%

 

Sanlam Credit Conduit

2.59%

South African Mainstream Renewable Power Droogfontein (RF) (Pty) Ltd

ABSA

46.10%

 

DBSA

34.81%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

10.91%

 

Sanlam Capital Markets Ltd

5.39%

 

Sanlam Credit Conduit

2.79%

Hopefield Wind Farm

First Rand

100.00%

Cookhouse Wind Farm

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

19.76%

 

Nedbank

40.28%

 

Standard Bank

39.96%

Greefspan PV Power Plant

DBSA

28.74%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

21.71%

 

Standard Bank

49.55%

Herbert PV Power Plant

DBSA

18.83%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

22.04%

 

Standard Bank

59.13%

Kathu Solar Plant

DBSA

13.00%

 

First Rand

57.55%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

13.86%

 

Old Mutual Specialised Finance (Pty) Ltd

15.59%

Solar Capital De Aar

Standard Bank

100.00%

Bid Window 2

Bokpoort CSP project

ABSA

41.74%

 

Investec

41.74%

 

ACWA Power Africa Holding Proprietary Limited

16.52%

Gouda Wind Project

First Rand

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Sishen Solar Facility

Investec

51.55%

 

Nedbank

48.45%

Solar Capital De Aar 3

IDC

47.50%

 

Standard Bank

52.50%

Amakhala Wind Project

IFC

20.09%

 

Standard Bank

79.91%

Tsitsikamma Community Wind Farm

Nedbank

100.00%

Wind Farm West Coast 1

IFC

25.00%

 

Investec

25.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Waainek Wind Power

ABSA

60.00%

 

IDC

40.00%

Grassridge Onshore Wind Project

ABSA

60.00%

 

IDC

40.00%

Chaba Wind Power

ABSA

60.00%

 

IDC

40.00%

Aurora-Rietvlei Solar Power

First Rand

100.00%

Vredendal Solar Park

First Rand

100.00%

Stortemelk Power Plant

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Linde

Old Mutual Specialised Finance (Pty) Ltd

50.00%

 

Standard Bank

50.00%

Dreunberg

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

31.53%

 

Standard Bank

68.47%

Jasper Power Company

First Rand

100.00%

Boshoff Solar Park

OPIC

100.00%

Upington Airport

Standard Bank

100.00%

Neusberg Hydro Electrical Project

IDC

36.77%

 

Nedbank

63.23%

Bid Window 3

Mkuze

First Rand

100.00%

Ilanga CSP 1 / Karoshoek Solar One

ABSA

20.23%

 

DBSA

12.50%

 

IDC

12.55%

 

Investec

6.74%

 

Nedbank

20.23%

 

Standard Bank

16.24%

 

PIC

7.67%

 

Vantage

3.83%

!XiNa Solar One

ABSA

17.86%

 

DBSA

8.13%

 

First Rand

21.06%

 

IDC

8.13%

 

Nedbank

20.85%

 

AFDB

18.01%

 

IFC

5.95%

Joburg Landfill Gas to Electricity

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Longyuan Mulilo Green Energy De Aar 2 North Wind Energy Facility

IDC

49.43%

 

Nedbank

50.57%

Longyuan Mulilo De Aar Maanhaarberg Wind Energy Facility

IDC

49.44%

 

Nedbank

50.56%

Mulilo Sonnedix Prieska PV

Nedbank

57.81%

 

Standard Bank

42.19%

Mulilo Prieska PV

ABSA

33.65%

 

IDC

32.71%

 

Nedbank

33.65%

Loeriesfontein 2

ABSA

65.00%

 

DBSA

35.00%

Noupoort

ABSA

70.00%

 

DBSA

30.00%

Khobab Wind

ABSA

60.00%

 

DBSA

40.00%

Nojoli Wind Farm

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Red Cap - Gibson Bay

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Adams Solar PV 2

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Paleisheuwel

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Tom Burke Solar Park

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Pulida Solar Park

Corporate Finance

n/a 

Bid Window 3.5

Kathu Solar Park

ABSA

19.05%

 

DBSA

18.23%

 

First Rand

23.91%

 

Investec

19.08%

 

Nedbank

19.74%

Redstone Solar Thermal Power Project

Nedbank

16.67%

 

Standard Bank

16.67%

 

Industrial and Commercial Bank of China

16.67%

 

African Development Bank

16.67%

 

IDC

16.67%

 

FMO + DEG

16.67%

Bid Window 4

Ngodwana Energy Project

ABSA

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

The Karusa Wind Farm

ABSA

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

The Nxuba Wind Farm

ABSA

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Oyster Bay Wind Farm

ABSA

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

The Soetwater Wind Farm

ABSA

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Garob Wind Farm

ABSA

50.00%

 

Nedbank

50.00%

Sirius Solar PV Project One

DBSA

18.20%

 

Standard Bank

43.87%

 

Liberty Group Limited

16.24%

 

Prescient

5.44%

 

Sanlam

16.24%

Dyason's Klip 1

DBSA

18.20%

 

Standard Bank

44.16%

 

Liberty Group Limited

16.12%

 

Prescient

5.40%

 

Sanlam

16.12%

Dyason's Klip 2

DBSA

18.20%

 

Standard Bank

44.22%

 

Liberty Group Limited

16.09%

 

Prescient

5.39%

 

Sanlam

16.09%

Excelsior Wind Energy Facility

Nedbank

28.97%

 

Vantage

71.03%

Golden Valley Wind

Nedbank

64.01%

 

Vantage

35.99%

Konkoonsies II Solar Facility

Nedbank

64.12%

 

Vantage

35.88%

Aggeneys Solar Project

Nedbank

46.03%

 

Vantage

53.97%

Kruisvallei Hydro

Building Energy South Africa (Pty) Ltd

100.00%

Roggeveld Wind Farm

DBSA

21.47%

 

First Rand

78.53%

Kangnas

ABSA

37.37%

 

Liberty Group Limited

11.36%

 

Prescient

8.13%

 

Sanlam

12.96%

 

MMI Group ltd

13.93%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

16.25%

Perdekraal East

ABSA

36.35%

 

Liberty Group Limited

11.70%

 

Prescient

8.14%

 

Sanlam

12.31%

 

MMI Group ltd

15.23%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

16.27%

Wesley-Ciskei

Standard Bank

53.00%

 

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

47.00%

Copperton Windfarm

DBSA

50.00%

 

Standard Bank

50.00%

Solar Capital Orange

Standard Bank

100.00%

De Wildt

ABSA

30.34%

 

Old Mutual

69.07%

 

African Rainbow Energy and Power (AREP)

0.59%

Bokamoso

ABSA

29.07%

 

Old Mutual

65.69%

 

African Rainbow Energy and Power (AREP)

5.25%

Zeerust

Nedbank

64.83%

 

Old Mutual

12.09%

 

Vantage

19.45%

 

African Rainbow Energy and Power (AREP)

3.63%

Greefspan PV Power Plant No. 2 Solar Park

ABSA

30.24%

 

Old Mutual

67.20%

 

African Rainbow Energy and Power (AREP)

2.57%

Droogfontein 2 Solar

Nedbank

63.49%

 

Old Mutual

12.04%

 

Vantage

18.19%

 

African Rainbow Energy and Power (AREP)

6.27%

Waterloo Solar Park

ABSA

28.81%

 

Old Mutual

64.83%

 

African Rainbow Energy and Power (AREP)

6.36%

(c) The Department is not involved in the appointment of legal advisers for the different projects and as such does not have the information available. The IPP Office/Department does however appoint its own legal advisers to advise on programme and project issues throughout the life cycle of a programme from design, preparation to implementation.

During the design, preparation and evaluation phases for the procurement of the Renewable IPP Programme Bid Windows 1 to 4 (therefore between 2011 and 2016), the Department and IPP Office was advised by an appointed panel of Legal Transaction Advisors, as follows:

Legal firm

South African / International

Bid Window/s advised on

No of black advisors (%)

Bowman Gilfillan

South African

BW 1, 2,3,3.5 and 4

55%

Edward Nathan Sullivan

South African

BW 1, 2,3,3.5 and 4

44%

Ledwaba Mazwai (Including Mkhabela Huntley Adekeye Attorneys)

South African

BW 1, 2,3,3.5 and 4

100%

Webber Wentzel

South African

BW 1, 2,3,3.5 and 4

36%

Linklaters

International Review Function

BW 1,2,3 and 4

N/A

On average the BEE representation across all four legal firms increased from 44% in BW 1 to an average of 60% in BW 4. Both ENS and Webber Wentzel have a level 2 B-BBBEE Contributor Status and Bowman Gilfillan a Level 3 B-BBBEE Contributor Status.

It is of importance to note that the Department and IPP Office has since initiated a procurement process and appointed a new panel of Transaction Advisors in 2017. This panel include a multi-disciplinary set of advisers including Legal Advisors. The panel also includes a multi-disciplinary panel of Emerging Contractors, which include 8 Emerging Black Legal Firms.

All future REIPPPP design and procurement work will be submitted through the new Transaction Advisor Panel.

07 November 2018 - NW2893

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of institutions of higher learning in the country have contracts with a certain company (name furnished) as at 9 October 2018 and (b) what (i) is the (aa) value and (bb) length of the contract in each case and (ii) are the relevant details of the goods and services that the specified company provides in each case?

Reply:

(a) Seven (7) universities have confirmed that they have contracts with South Point while fifteen (15) universities have no contracts with the company. Four (4) universities, i.e. University of Cape Town, University of Fort Hare, University of KwaZulu-Natal and Vaal University of Technology did not respond.

(b)The details related to each confirmed contract, as provided by the institutions, are indicated in the table below:

Name of University

  1. (i) (aa) Value of the contract

(bb) Length of the contract

(ii) Goods and services provided

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

R45 729 920
(4 separate contracts for 4 residences)

1 February 2018 to
30 November 2018

Student accommodation for 1 535 students

University of Johannesburg

R13 942 442 for 2018
The amount (value) per annum will depend on the number of NSFAS qualifying students staying in the property in a particular year.

1 January 2018 to
31 October 2020

Student accommodation for NSFAS recipients

Mangosuthu University

Value of the three-year contract R51 734 664 (R1 437 074 per month)

Three-year contract ending in December 2020

Student accommodation

Nelson Mandela University

R12 906 625 for 2018

The length of the contract is one year subject to renewal if the company complies with the minimum accreditation requirements.

Student accommodation consisting of 607 beds, with a study area, kitchenettes, recreational areas, IT facilities, security and cleaning of common areas.

Sefako Makgatho University

R26 485 400 for 2018
(R2 207 200 per month)

1 January 2011 to
31 December 2018

Student accommodation for 992 students

University of Western Cape

R7 257 000
(R2 950 monthly rental per student)

01 February 2018 to
31 November 2018

Student accommodation for 248 students

University of the Witwatersrand

R 2 700 000 for six months

1 July 2018 to 30 November 2018

Emergency student accommodation for 270 students

07 November 2018 - NW2972

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of applications for accreditation of educational programmes were (a) received and (b) finalised by the Council on Higher Education in each of the past three financial years;

Reply:

The Council on Higher Education (CHE) provided the following response to the questions posed.

  1. - (2) The table below shows the number of applications received, finalised and accredited:

Financial year

Applications received

Applications finalised

Applications accredited

Percentage of finalised accredited

2015/16

483

424

292

68%

2016/17

463

681

549

81%

2017/18

580

784

610

78%

It should be noted that programmes submitted in one financial year might only receive a Higher Education Quality Committee outcome in the following financial year.

(3) (a) Currently, the CHE has 1 128 new applications for programme accreditation that are in various stages of the process. The sharp increase in submissions is due to higher education institutions, and in particular, the universities of technology, submitting replacement programmes for those that are not aligned to the Higher Education Qualifications Sub–Framework (HEQSF). This alignment process has to be completed by December 2019. From the 1 January 2020, first-year registrations will only be allowed in HEQSF aligned programmes.

(b) Over the past three years, the average time from receipt of an application to the final decision on accreditation was 8.5 months.

4. (a) Public universities do not pay any fees for accreditation applications. Private Higher Education Institutions (PHEIs) are required to make a payment before a programme application can be processed. The calculation of fees is based on a cost recovery basis.

(b) (i) The total income received from accreditation for private institutions in the 2017/18 financial year was R5 476 892. This includes fees for a range of different applications, including programme accreditation and site approval. The different application fees are published on the CHE’s website: http://www.che.ac.za.

(ii) The application fee to PHEIs for the accreditation per programme is currently R12 500.

07 November 2018 - NW3111

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, since she served in Cabinet, she (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of her department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) No.

(ii) No.

(aa) No.

(bb) No.

(cc) No.

(b) No.

07 November 2018 - NW2967

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of (a) students that each institution of higher learning can accommodate and (b) new rooms that are currently being built at each institution of higher learning?

Reply:

(a) The total number of students that the 26 public universities can accommodate is 128 714.

(b) The new beds that are in the process of being built at institutions from 2018/19 onwards are 39 332, as shown in the table below:

University

Number of beds 2017/18

Beds being developed from 2018/19

  1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

7 817

250

  1. Central University of Technology

944

500

  1. Durban University of Technology

3 411

610

  1. Mangosuthu University of Technology

1 910

612

  1. Nelson Mandela University

3 507

2 000

  1. North West University

9 881

1 760

  1. Rhodes University

4 232

264

  1. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

2 985

2 500

  1. Sol Plaatje University

1 021

320

  1. Stellenbosch University

7 878

250

  1. Tshwane University of Technology

10 614

250

  1. University of Cape Town

6 589

551

  1. University of Fort Hare

6 259

1 436

  1. University of the Free State

5 755

515

  1. University of Johannesburg

4 955

2 000

  1. University of KwaZulu-Natal

7 184

500

  1. University of Limpopo

6 435

3 500

  1. University of Mpumalanga

634

250

  1. University of Pretoria

8 771

300

  1. University of South Africa

0

0

  1. University of Venda

2 162

2 424

  1. University of the Western Cape

4 756

2 680

  1. University of Zululand

5 012

3 500

  1. University of the Witwatersrand

5 999

140

  1. Vaal University of Technology

4 385

1 836

  1. Walter Sisulu University

5 618

384

Total

128 714

39 332

The total number of students that can currently be accommodated at TVET colleges is 16 927.

In the past, the Department did not receive funding for the development or maintenance of student housing infrastructure at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

The Department received its first budget allocation for TVET infrastructure in the 2018/19 to 2020/21 Medium Term Expenditure Framework. The amount allocated in 2018/19 is R1.3 billion, which is set to increase to R1.484 billion in 2019/20 and R1.647 billion in 2020/21. Initially, this budget will be prioritised for the refurbishment of existing TVET infrastructure, including student housing. Once the maintenance and refurbishment backlog has been sufficiently addressed, consideration will be given to developing new TVET infrastructure. The Department is engaging with National Treasury and other stakeholders to source additional funding for the development of new residences at TVET colleges.

06 November 2018 - NW3127

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

Whether, since she served in Cabinet, she (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of her department's employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) No

(ii) No

(aa) NIA, (bb) NIA (cc) N/A

(b)No


MS. T XASA, MP

MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION

DATE:

06 November 2018 - NW3181

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 1435 on 5 June 2018, the relevant information has been sourced yet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Please find here: REPLY