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24 June 2022 - NW33

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the State Security Agency is aware of any operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The State Security Agency is aware of operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed. The operations relate to unlawful and fraudulent manufacturing and distribution of fraudulent identification documents. These operations are attributed to the organised crime syndicates, which involve some Home Affairs officials.

As part of its counterintelligence mandate, the State Security Agency monitors risks relating to the integrity of the Department of Home Affairs documents and shares relevant information with the department of Home Affairs and also with the Security Cluster, of which the Department of Home Affairs is a member.

23 June 2022 - NW2098

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 479 on 16 May 2022, he has found that the Government’s rejection of the Centre for Development and Enterprises report entitled The Siren Song of Localisation undermines the Government’s commitment to an evidence-based policymaking approach as envisioned by the National Policy Development Framework; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government is committed to the implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, which is a series of measures to accelerate economic recovery and create employment. The plan was developed with important contributions from social partners and expert advisers through bodies like the Presidential Economic Advisory Council.

Localisation is one of several tools in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan to improve the dynamism of the economy, promote investment, develop new markets, transform the economy, promote equitable spatial development and contribute to the development of a capable state.

Localisation is pivotal in stimulating growth and transformation. It is about creating an enabling environment for inclusive growth, deepening the country’s industrialisation base and creating targeted transformation measures. It seeks to expand the economy to include more participants and to ensure that more parts of the population, including women, young people, black South Africans and the rural poor, can contribute to and benefit from growth.

The government’s approach is to make use of the entire policy toolkit including industrial policy, trade policy, localisation policy and social policy to drive growth.

We have already seen some of the results of this approach. In agro-processing, we have seen an investment of R1.7 billion by the SA Poultry Association as part of the Poultry Master Plan. In the automotive sector, we have seen a R3 billion investment by Ford Motor Company of South Africa and a R10 billion investment by Mercedes Benz to expand plants in Port Elizabeth and East London. In primary minerals processing, Komatsu SA has made a R300 million investment in an engine remanufacturing plant.

We have seen significant success in the textile industry where government has implemented 100% designation, requiring entities such as the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to purchase all of its uniforms from local producers.

While the evidence suggests that our localisation efforts are on the right path, the challenge of growth and employment is nevertheless challenging and complex. Contributions to the public discourse on how we improve our efforts, including those by the Centre for Development and Enterprise, should be encouraged and welcomed.

23 June 2022 - NW1151

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the educational requirements for early childhood development (ECD) workers and (b) is the (i) total number of ECD workers in the Republic and (ii) is the breakdown of the total for each province?

Reply:

What are the educational requirements for early childhood development (ECD) workers?

  • The Department of Basic Education is training the ECD practitioners on the National Curriculum Framework (NCF) from birth to four years on NQF level 4, which is the minimum qualification for ECD practitioners.

What is the total number of ECD workers in the Republic and the provincial breakdown?

  • The Department released the ECD Census Summary Report on 01 April 2022, which tells us that there is a total of 198,361 staff employed in ECD Programmes. The information on the provincial breakdown will however be available when the full report of the ECD Census is finalised and released. 

23 June 2022 - NW2189

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

. (1) What (a) is the total number of girls who gave birth in 2021 in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years and (b) monetary and/or otherwise support do the specified (i) learners and (ii) their children receive from her department; (2) what steps are being taken by her department to educate the learners with regard to the (a) long-term career implications, (b) monetary costs of raising a child and (c) implications of falling pregnant at a young age without finishing school?

Reply:

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 03/06/2022

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/2022

2189. Mrs D van der Walt (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education: to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

. (1) What (a) is the total number of girls who gave birth in 2021 in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years and (b) monetary and/or otherwise support do the specified (i) learners and (ii) their children receive from her department; (2) what steps are being taken by her department to educate the learners with regard to the (a) long-term career implications, (b) monetary costs of raising a child and (c) implications of falling pregnant at a young age without finishing school?

Response

1. (a) According to data from the Department of Health, the total number of girls who gave birth in the 2021 financial year in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years are provided below,  and

Province

Number of deliveries to girls aged 10-19 years (April 2021 - March 2022)

EC

12 582

FS

4 444

GT

13 814

KZN

24 230

LIM

11 287

MPU

8 840

NC

2 662

NW

5 635

WC

6 543

RSA

90 037

 

1. (b) Schools are required to provide an environment where all pregnant learners can access professional information advice, referrals, treatment, care, counselling and support. Therefore, other departments also have a role to play in ensuring that the pregnant learners are linked to services such as antenatal and postnatal care provided by the Health Department; and the Department of Social Development and SASSA for access to the Child Support Grant and other social support, amongst others. The department protects the rights of learners to education including continuation of schooling through accommodating reasonable absence due to pregnancy and provision of continuous educational support post-delivery while facilitating earliest return to school. Furthermore, through partners such as Global Fund, learners are given Early Childhood Development  (ECD) Vouchers so that they can leave their children in ECD Centres while the learner is continuing with schooling.

 2.  (a) The Comprehensive Sexuality Education that is offered through Life Skills and Life Orientation, educates all learners about goal setting and how they can reach their full potential. Furthermore, the department also holds Career Jamborees and Future Choice where learners get to see different career paths that they can choose.

 2. (b) and (c) The Career Jamborees and Future Choice campaigns are held with other government departments, including health. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services are provided, which includes content on the consequences of early and unintended pregnancy. 

23 June 2022 - NW2134

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, in light of the fact that Saturday 21 May 2022 marked 100 days since his State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022, wherein he promised to finalise a social compact to create jobs, build the economy and fight hunger, the social compact has been finalised; if not, what (a) progress has been made and (b) is the reason for the delay; if so, (i) what (aa) is the exact nature of the social compact, (bb) impact does he expect it to produce, (ii)(aa)which persons and/or organisations have been consulted and (bb) on what date(s) were they consulted and (iii) who has been leading the negotiations for the social compact?

Reply:

As I indicated in my address during the Presidency Budget Vote, we are working in earnest to conclude our negotiations on a social compact.

The engagements are taking place within the context of NEDLAC, which is a statutory forum for social dialogue.

We set ourselves the ambitious target of 100 working days to signal the urgency with which we need to find common ground on difficult issues that have wide-ranging implications for our economy. While all social partners share the same goals of inclusive growth and employment, there are differing views on how to achieve those goals.

 

We are determined that the social compact should be substantial and meaningful and make a real difference to the trajectory of our economy. We are therefore pushing ahead to achieve an agreement that is inclusive and lasting.

23 June 2022 - NW2135

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the announcement by the Minister in The Presidency, Mr Mondli Gungubele, that Cabinet approved the R22 million flag project in February 2022, (a) what was Cabinet’s justification for spending public money on the non-essential project when millions of South Africans are going hungry, (b) how did Cabinet process the public outrage toward the project and (c) what other non-essential projects have been approved by Cabinet for the 2022-23 financial year?

Reply:

The promotion of national symbols and the construction of monuments are important for building a common identity and advancing national unity.

The flag project, as with all programmes of government departments, is informed by the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), which is itself based on the electoral mandate of this administration. These programmes are reflected in departmental budget votes, which are extensively debated in Parliament.

In view of the current fiscal pressures and public concern, the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture directed his department to review the flag project.

Government will continue to work to ensure that its programmes and associated expenditure are informed by the priorities of the MTSF and the broader interests of the country.

23 June 2022 - NW2229

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

On what date is it envisaged that pit toilets will be eradicated in all schools in the North West?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the North West Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

23 June 2022 - NW2318

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1705 on 23 May 2022, what are the reasons that (a) KwaZulu-Natal, (b) Mpumalanga, (c) North West and (d) Northern Cape did not have placements in hotspots and all cases referred to district co-ordinators, something which might hinder the process of assisting learners who are in dire need of social intervention and psychological intervention?

Reply:

While the DBE responded to the initial question about the work we do with the Department of Social Development around provision of the psychosocial support to learners and educators with the intention of building resilience, minimizing mental health problems and ensuring continuity of teaching and learning in schools; the current question needs specifics about the three provinces which is the responsibility of the Members of the Executive Councils (MECs) of those provinces and not the Minister. 

23 June 2022 - NW2327

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her department’s assertion that, of the 125 000 pupils eligible for scholar transport in the Eastern Cape, only 10 000 can be accommodated due to budget constraints (details furnished), what mechanism will her department together with the Department of Transport use to ensure that 115 000 bicycles are delivered within a year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education is not aware of assertions made that of the 125 000 pupils eligible for scholar transport in the Eastern Cape, only 10 000 will be accommodated due to budget constraints.

However, Information received from the Eastern Cape Department of Transport who implement the Learner Transport Programme in the province indicates that for the 2021/2022 Financial Year, there were 111 127 learners who were eligible for Learner Transport Programme and of these, 125 423 learners were transported which was 112% more than the total need.

For the 2022/2023 Financial Year, there are 127 455 learners who are eligible for Learner Transport Programme and of these, 102 998 learners are targeted to be transported which is 81% of the total need. This leaves out 24 457 who are in need and qualify for learner transport due to Budget constraints

The Shova Kalula National Bicycle Project is an initiative of the National Department of Transport which was introduced as a pilot project in 2001. The project is an intervention to improve mobility and access to basic needs. The project aims to alleviate transport pressure on poor households and ensure access to public transport and schools.

The Department of Basic Education is not fully privy of the project schedule and thus request the Honorable Member to redirect the question to the Department of Transport as the custodians of the project. 

23 June 2022 - NW2059

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Pertaining to the failure of the Eastern Cape Department of Education failure to spend a total of R205 million of the education budget while there exist infrastructure problems with specific reference to mud schools and pit toilets in the specified province, how does her department intend to supervise the province to avoid such mistakes from happening?

Reply:

The DBE has intensified its monitoring activities of  the Eastern Cape DoE Infrastructure Programme.  Meetings with the provincial team are held twice every month. Monitoring addresses planning, budgeting, expenditure, procurement and project management. These are interrogated and a sample of projects are visited. Based on the findings from these visits, remedial actions are devised with the province and monitored by the DBE. Monitoring deals with both programme and project issues. 

1.  Programme matters include - 

- The pattern of overall expenditure being achieved;

-Comparisons of expenditure to projected cash flows;

- Progress being made with key groups of projects [eg. Water, sanitation, libraries, laboratories, Grade R]; and

- Management of the portfolio of projects [ie evidence that the programme of projects is being managed effectively through the project cycle].

2.  At the Project level the focus is on ensuring -

-that PSP appointments are being made;

- that planning and design processes are progressing;

- that the tender process for the appointment of contractors is progressing, that construction is progressing satisfactorily, [i.e. on programme, on budget, at acceptable quality…]; and

- that projects are being handed over and closed out and that final accounts are being wrapped up.

22 June 2022 - NW2260

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Given that it was revealed in the AfriForum court case against the Government that the grand total of the donation to the Republic of Cuba was actually to be R350 million and not just R50 million, and noting that this was revealed after the civil rights organisation’s legal team requested the court record as part of its review application, and taking into account that, according to the record, the Government has agreed to a contract with the government of the Republic of Cuba, in terms of which the R50 million will only be the first payment in the more than a quarter billion rand donation, what (a) are the reasons that this information was withheld from Parliament and the public and (b) is the total number of other (i) deals and (ii) donations that are in the pipeline with the Republic of Cuba that are being withheld from Parliament and the public?

Reply:

With regard to a reply to question 2260 on 24 May 2022, it can be stated that there is no link between what is currently before the courts, namely the donation of humanitarian aid by the South African Government to the amount of R50 million to the Republic of Cuba, and the Agreement that was signed in 2012 to make available an Economic Assistance Package (EAP) of R350 million to the Republic Cuba that consisted of grants and a loan facility, to be repaid, with interest, by Cuba.

a) The information regarding the Economic Assistance Package of R 350 million was shared with Parliament in response to Parliamentary Question 1665 from the Leader of the Opposition (DA) about Government expenditure on Cuba since 15 February 2018. Updates on the implementation of the Economic Assistance Package were also provided to the Parlaimantary Portfolio Committee on International Relations an Cooperation.

b) (i) All relevant information about the R 350 million EAP and R 50 Million humanatrian assistance have been disclosed to Parliament.

(ii) No information regarding donations to the Republic of Cuba has been withheld from Parliament and the public

 

 

22 June 2022 - NW794

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What progress has been made to find alternative accommodation for the staff of his department housed at the Al Fallah Towers on the corner of Govan Mbeki and Crawford Avenue in North End, Gqeberha, which houses the Department of Correctional Services on three floors; (2) what action has been taken currently to secure the vehicles of the staff from (a) theft and (b) vandalism; (3) what action has his department of Correctional Services taken to remedy some of the problems identified to them by the Department of Employment and Labour which fall within the day-to-day maintenance function of the Department of Correctional Services; (4) whether there is a deadline for finalising the move from the specified building to new premises for the staff; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

1. The request for procurement of alternative accommodation for Gqeberha Community Corrections offices was forwarded to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) on 19 April 2019. The request was resubmitted to the DPWI on 10 October 2021, after which the DPWI reported that the tender for procurement of alternative accommodation for Gqeberha Community Corrections will be advertised during the month of April 2022.

(2)(a) & (b) The alternative accommodation to be procured will have adequate parking facilities to secure the vehicles from theft and vandalism.

3. The landlord was placed in mora in terms of clause 11of the lease agreement, which resulted in minor refurbishments by the landlord, although full compliance was not achieved. Various engagements were undertaken with DPWI regarding poor condition of the facility and there has been little success in this regard; hence the request for alternative accommodation was submitted.

4. DPWI indicated that the procurement for the alternative office accommodation will be finalised by 30 October 2022, thereafter the relocation will commence. It is anticipated that the relocation will be finalised by 30 January 2023.

END

22 June 2022 - NW292

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) is the current state of overcrowding in correctional centres and (b) are the relevant details of overcrowding in each prison?

Reply:

a) The state of overcrowding in correctional centres as at 01 February 2022 was 27.41% above the approved bed space.

The table below reflects the level of overcrowding per region:

NATIONAL INMATE POPULATION

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

REGION

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

EASTERN CAPE

12583

19986

158.83%

58.83%

GAUTENG

23632

31989

135.36%

35.36%

KWAZULU-NATAL

18759

21743

115.91%

15.91%

LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA & NORTH WEST

18643

21821

117.05%

17.05%

FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE

19202

19005

98.97%

-1.03%

WESTERN CAPE

18017

26677

148.07%

48.07%

NATIONAL

110836

141221

127.41%

27.41%

(b) The tables below reflect the relevant details of overcrowding in each prison:

REGION: EASTERN CAPE (EC)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

FORT BEAUFORT

153

40

26.14%

-73.86%

GRAHAMSTOWN

281

508

180.78%

80.78%

KING WILLIAM's TOWN

275

797

289.82%

189.82%

MIDDLEDRIFT

590

1096

185.76%

85.76%

STUTTERHEIM

44

58

131.82%

31.82%

EAST LONDON MED. A

780

1330

170.51%

70.51%

EAST LONDON MED. B

480

1008

210.00%

110.00%

EAST LONDON MED. C

342

232

67.84%

-32.16%

MDANTSANE

697

1296

185.94%

85.94%

GRAAFF-REINET

70

143

204.29%

104.29%

JANSENVILLE

34

24

70.59%

-29.41%

KIRKWOOD

712

766

107.58%

7.58%

SOMERSET-EAST

122

156

127.87%

27.87%

BIZANA

48

158

329.17%

229.17%

ELLIOTDALE

50

26

52.00%

-48.00%

FLAGSTAFF

54

132

244.44%

144.44%

LUSIKISIKI

122

352

288.52%

188.52%

MOUNT AYLIFF

72

137

190.28%

90.28%

MOUNT FLETCHER

118

196

166.10%

66.10%

MOUNT FRERE

52

106

203.85%

103.85%

MQANDULI

70

110

157.14%

57.14%

NQGELENI

85

137

161.18%

61.18%

TABANKULU

51

32

62.75%

-37.25%

MTHATHA REMAND

607

1121

184.68%

84.68%

MTHATHA MEDIUM

672

1518

225.89%

125.89%

BARKLY-EAST

69

100

144.93%

44.93%

BURGERSDORP

220

476

216.36%

116.36%

BUTTERWORTH

130

336

258.46%

158.46%

COFIMVABA

99

28

28.28%

-71.72%

CRADOCK

319

352

110.34%

10.34%

DODRECHT

114

130

114.04%

14.04%

ENGCOBO

75

145

193.33%

93.33%

IDUTYWA

82

154

187.80%

87.80%

LADY FRERE

51

69

135.29%

35.29%

MIDDELBURG

351

493

140.46%

40.46%

NQAMAKWE

53

69

130.19%

30.19%

QUEENSTOWN

129

343

265.89%

165.89%

SADA

318

424

133.33%

33.33%

STERKSPRUIT

64

74

115.63%

15.63%

WILLOWVALE

44

92

209.09%

109.09%

ST ALBANS MAX.

1322

1962

148.41%

48.41%

ST ALBANS MED.A

686

1234

179.88%

79.88%

ST ALBANS MED.B

861

1243

144.37%

44.37%

PATENSIE

425

344

80.94%

-19.06%

PORT ELIZABETH

590

439

74.41%

-25.59%

REGION: GAUTENG (GP)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

BAVIAANSPOORT MAX

360

554

153.89%

53.89%

BAVIAANSPOORT MED

649

829

127.73%

27.73%

EMTHONJENI

192

172

89.58%

-10.42%

BOKSBURG MED A

2062

2433

117.99%

17.99%

BOKSBURG JUVENILES

271

318

117.34%

17.34%

HEIDELBERG MALE

517

642

124.18%

24.18%

JOHANNESBURG MED A

2468

5234

212.07%

112.07%

JOHANNESBURG MED B

1499

2216

147.83%

47.83%

JOHANNESBURG MED C

307

401

130.62%

30.62%

JOHANNESBURG FEMALE

711

866

121.80%

21.80%

KRUGERSDORP

1466

2180

148.70%

48.70%

LEEUWKOP MAX

688

1069

155.38%

55.38%

LEEUWKOP MED A

954

810

84.91%

-15.09%

LEEUWKOP MED B JUVENILE

673

640

95.10%

-4.90%

LEEUWKOP MED C

601

868

144.43%

44.43%

MODDERBEE

2309

3305

143.14%

43.14%

DEVON

347

188

54.18%

-45.82%

NIGEL

310

365

117.74%

17.74%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II MAX

294

277

94.22%

-5.78%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II LOCAL

2306

2944

127.67%

27.67%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II CENTRAL

1514

2010

132.76%

32.76%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II FEMALE

132

184

139.39%

39.39%

ODI

861

977

113.47%

13.47%

ATTERIDGEVILLE

546

532

97.44%

-2.56%

ZONDERWATER MED A

825

1062

128.73%

28.73%

ZONDERWATER MED B

770

913

118.57%

18.57%

REGION: KWAZULU NATAL (KZN)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

DBN MED A

2202

2900

131.70%

31.70%

DBN MED B

1936

3067

158.42%

58.42%

DBN MED C

552

814

147.46%

47.46%

DBN FEMALE

230

320

139.13%

39.13%

DBN YOUTH

732

273

37.30%

-62.70%

UMZINTO

378

197

52.12%

-47.88%

INGWAVUMA

71

50

70.42%

-29.58%

MTUNZINI

84

100

119.05%

19.05%

STANGER

81

72

88.89%

-11.11%

MAPHUMULO

44

47

106.82%

6.82%

ESHOWE

459

586

127.67%

27.67%

EMPANGENI

276

260

94.20%

-5.80%

QALAKABUSHA

1638

1713

104.58%

4.58%

GLENCOE

497

478

96.18%

-3.82%

DUNDEE

82

104

126.83%

26.83%

POMEROY

78

21

26.92%

-73.08%

LADYSMITH

307

599

195.11%

95.11%

BERGVILLE

24

25

104.17%

4.17%

GREYTOWN

57

76

133.33%

33.33%

ESTCOURT

513

503

98.05%

-1.95%

KRANSKOP

59

120

203.39%

103.39%

EBONGWENI

1536

518

33.72%

-66.28%

PORT SHEPSTONE

180

155

86.11%

-13.89%

KOKSTAD MED

345

426

123.48%

23.48%

MATATIELE

70

78

111.43%

11.43%

UMZIMKULU

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

NONGOMA

46

47

102.17%

2.17%

NCOME MED A

534

770

144.19%

44.19%

NCOME MED B

724

851

117.54%

17.54%

MELMOTH

44

52

118.18%

18.18%

VRYHEID

244

342

140.16%

40.16%

NKANDLA

36

36

100.00%

0.00%

PMB MED A

1493

3087

206.76%

106.76%

PMB MED B

328

364

110.98%

10.98%

SEVONTEIN

823

844

102.55%

2.55%

NEW HANOVER

110

147

133.64%

33.64%

IXOPO

79

96

121.52%

21.52%

WATERVAL MED A

608

661

108.72%

8.72%

WATERVAL MED B

359

470

130.92%

30.92%

UTHRECT

38

35

92.11%

-7.89%

NEWCASTLE

254

395

155.51%

55.51%

EKUSENI

608

44

7.24%

-92.76%

REGION: LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA AND NORTH WEST (LMN)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

BARBERTON MAX

795

1263

158.87%

58.87%

BARBERTON MED A

154

0

0.00%

-100.00%

BARBERTON MED B

655

928

141.68%

41.68%

BARBERTON TOWN

334

301

90.12%

-9.88%

LYDENBURG

82

82

100.00%

0.00%

NELSPRUIT

757

1086

143.46%

43.46%

BETHAL

765

936

122.35%

22.35%

GELUK

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

VOLKRUST

198

242

122.22%

22.22%

PIET RETIEF

245

351

143.27%

43.27%

ERMELO

499

622

124.65%

24.65%

STANDERTON

1462

718

49.11%

-50.89%

KLERKSDORP

1136

1314

115.67%

15.67%

POTCHEFSTROOM

636

721

113.36%

13.36%

CHRISTIANA

112

107

95.54%

-4.46%

WOLMARANSTAD

101

125

123.76%

23.76%

POLOKWANE

480

856

178.33%

78.33%

MODOMOLLE

315

526

166.98%

66.98%

TZANEEN

501

426

85.03%

-14.97%

ROOIGROND MED A

645

884

137.05%

37.05%

ROOIGROND MED B

249

367

147.39%

47.39%

MAFIKENG

100

64

64.00%

-36.00%

LICHTENBURG

264

262

99.24%

-0.76%

ZEERUST

140

160

114.29%

14.29%

BRITS

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

LOSPERFONTEIN

792

756

95.45%

-4.55%

MOGWASE

396

555

140.15%

40.15%

RUSTENBURG MED A

555

519

93.51%

-6.49%

RUSTENBURG MED B

152

97

63.82%

-36.18%

THOHOYANDOU MED A

685

955

139.42%

39.42%

THOHOYANDOU MED B

217

709

326.73%

226.73%

FEMALE & YOUTH

124

212

170.97%

70.97%

MAKHADO

303

626

206.60%

106.60%

KUTAMA SINTHUMULE

3024

3024

100.00%

0.00%

BELFAST

54

50

92.59%

-7.41%

CAROLINA

109

81

74.31%

-25.69%

MIDDLEBURG

287

344

119.86%

19.86%

WITBANK

1320

1552

117.58%

17.58%

REGION: FREE STATE AND NORTHERN CAPE (FSNC)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

COLESBERG

153

214

139.87%

39.87%

DE AAR MALE

265

244

92.08%

-7.92%

HOPETOWN

40

57

142.50%

42.50%

RICHMOND

39

41

105.13%

5.13%

VICTORIA WEST

81

100

123.46%

23.46%

GOEDEMOED A

769

368

47.85%

-52.15%

GOEDEMOED B

566

254

44.88%

-55.12%

BETHULIE

42

66

157.14%

57.14%

EDENBURG

92

44

47.83%

-52.17%

FAURESMITH

28

20

71.43%

-28.57%

ZASTRON

59

8

13.56%

-86.44%

GROENPUNT MAX

1531

1836

119.92%

19.92%

GROENPUNT MED

687

528

76.86%

-23.14%

GROENPUNT YOUTH

227

134

59.03%

-40.97%

FRANKFORT

61

93

152.46%

52.46%

HEILBRON

51

68

133.33%

33.33%

PARYS

68

85

125.00%

25.00%

SASOLBURG

310

390

125.81%

25.81%

VEREENIGING

739

1069

144.65%

44.65%

GROOTVLEI A

806

1693

210.05%

110.05%

GROOTVLEI B

237

242

102.11%

2.11%

BRANDFORT

146

19

13.01%

-86.99%

BOSHOF

56

47

83.93%

-16.07%

LADYBRAND

43

40

93.02%

-6.98%

WEPENER

113

93

82.30%

-17.70%

WINBURG

158

105

66.46%

-33.54%

MANGAUNG

2928

2928

100.00%

0.00%

KIMBERLEY

750

784

104.53%

4.53%

TSWELOPELE

2930

1659

56.62%

-43.38%

BARKLEY WEST

58

38

65.52%

-34.48%

DOUGLAS

279

223

79.93%

-20.07%

BIZZA MAKHATE A

974

998

102.46%

2.46%

BIZZA MAKHATE B

534

674

126.22%

26.22%

BIZZA MAKHATE C

210

319

151.90%

51.90%

BIZZA MAKHATE D

53

0

0.00%

0.00%

BETHLEHEM

201

297

147.76%

47.76%

FICKSBURG

70

56

80.00%

-20.00%

HARRISMITH

215

397

184.65%

84.65%

HENNENMAN

230

183

79.57%

-20.43%

HOOPSTAD

102

38

37.25%

-62.75%

LINDLEY

42

34

80.95%

-19.05%

ODENDAALSRUS

367

633

172.48%

72.48%

SENEKAL

106

127

119.81%

19.81%

VENTERBURG

229

136

59.39%

-40.61%

VIRGINIA

378

317

83.86%

-16.14%

UPINGTON

772

805

104.27%

4.27%

KURUMAN

338

364

107.69%

7.69%

SPRINGBOK

69

137

198.55%

98.55%

REGION: WESTERN CAPE (WC)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

ALLANDALE

292

826

282.88%

182.88%

HAWEQUA

201

158

78.61%

-21.39%

OBIQUA

235

321

136.60%

36.60%

STAART VAN PAARDEBERG

222

325

146.40%

46.40%

BRANDVLEI MEDIUM C

289

492

170.24%

70.24%

BRANDVLEI YOUTH

300

191

63.67%

-36.33%

BRANDVLEI MAXIMUM (MEDIUM)

981

787

80.22%

-19.78%

BRANDVLEI MAXIMUM

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

DRAKENSTEIN MEDIUM A

501

731

145.91%

45.91%

DRAKENSTEIN MEDIUM B

497

477

95.98%

-4.02%

DRAKENSTEIN MAXIMUM

375

546

145.60%

45.60%

STELLENBOSCH

54

113

209.26%

109.26%

BEAUFORT-WEST

75

165

220.00%

120.00%

GEORGE

517

1163

224.95%

124.95%

KNYSNA

167

378

226.35%

126.35%

LADISMITH

48

72

150.00%

50.00%

MOSSELBAAI

313

627

200.32%

100.32%

OUDTSHOORN MEDIUM A

273

573

209.89%

109.89%

OUDTSHOORN MEDIUM B

63

102

161.90%

61.90%

PRINCE ALBERT

38

76

200.00%

100.00%

UNIONDALE

39

66

169.23%

69.23%

GOODWOOD

1713

2625

153.24%

53.24%

BUFFELJAGSRIVIER

215

430

200.00%

100.00%

CALEDON RDF

192

389

202.60%

102.60%

HELDERSTROOM MED A

615

1000

162.60%

62.60%

HELDERSTROOM MAX

534

809

151.50%

51.50%

SWELLENDAM

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

MALMESBURY MEDIUM A

1105

1519

137.47%

37.47%

MALMESBURY RDF

158

278

175.95%

75.95%

RIEBEEK-WEST

185

149

80.54%

-19.46%

POLLSMOOR RDF

1423

2894

203.37%

103.37%

POLLSMOOR MEDIUM A

1028

1406

136.77%

36.77%

POLLSMOOR MEDIUM B

512

1135

221.68%

121.68%

POLLSMOOR MEDIUM C

520

360

69.23%

-30.77%

POLLSMOOR FEMALES

408

599

146.81%

46.81%

CALVINIA

29

46

158.62%

58.62%

VANRHYNSDORP

552

606

109.78%

9.78%

VOORBERG MEDIUM A

461

444

96.31%

-3.69%

VOORBERG MEDIUM B

1433

1464

102.16%

2.16%

DWARSRIVIER

179

325

181.56%

81.56%

ROBERTSON

203

369

181.77%

81.77%

WARMBOKKEVELD

554

476

85.92%

-14.08%

WORCESTER MALES

406

941

231.77%

131.77%

WORCESTER FEMALES

112

224

200.00%

100.00%

It should be mentioned that Barberton Medium A and Bizzah Makhate Medium D are designated COVID-19 sites. A total of three facilities were closed down due to dilapidation namely Swellendam, Brandvlei Maximum and Geluk Correctional Centres.

Brits and UMzimkulu centres are temporarily closed for upgrades, the latter has resulted in the facility not being occupied.

END.

22 June 2022 - NW1969

Profile picture: Engelbrecht, Mr J

Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Service

What (a) are the minimum professional requirements of members serving on parole boards and (b) specific reports must be considered by parole boards in determining whether parole should be granted or not?

Reply:

(a) The minimum requirements for the position of parole board Chairperson is a recognised and appropriate NQF level 07 qualification in any Criminal Justice field, Social Sciences or related. Five (05) years of experience in management or decision making position. He/She is required to have demonstrable experience of and ability to conduct effective evidence-based decision making, weighing facts and evidence, analysing and critically evaluating large volumes of complex information and identifying key issues, within tight deadlines and working on own initiative.

Demonstrable independence of mind and sound judgment, with the ability to make evidence based decisions that are accurately documented. Excellent interpersonal skills, the ability to gain respect and maintain rapport through effective communication and influencing skills with the confidence to challenge opinions where necessary, work collegiately and resolve differences to reach sound decisions.

The member should uphold corporate and personal integrity standards and conduct, such as a strong commitment to fairness, time management skills, organisational and administrative skills, strong personal motivation and commitment to professional self-development. Traceable experience of any aspect of the criminal justice system and understanding of the importance of the victim’s perspective.

The Vice-Chairperson is required to possess a recognised and appropriate NQF level 07 qualification in any Criminal Justice field, Social Sciences or related. Proven three (03) years supervisory role or community leadership experience as well as active involvement in community-based structures. Commitment to a corruption free administration. Good standing with the community with extensive life experience. Proven special interest in the Criminal Justice System as well as understanding of the importance of the victim’s perspective.

The Community Member is required to possess a NQF level 6 qualification in one of the following fields: Criminal Justice, Community Development, Social Science, Policing or Human Rights related field. Five (05) years’ experience in community development work and/or Criminal Justice. Previous experience in a decision making capacity is advantageous.

(b) In line with Section 42 (2)(d) of Correctional Services Act 111 of 1998, the Case Management Committee (CMC) is required to submit a report, together with the relevant documents, to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board regarding the offence for which the offender is sentenced including the judgement. The report referred to should contain the previous criminal record of such offender including the record of conduct, disciplinary, adaptation, training, aptitude, industry, physical and mental state of such offender.

The likelihood of a relapse into crime and the risk posed to the community including the manner in which this risk can be reduced and assessment results with the progress in relation to the correctional sentence plan are also required as part of the report.

A report on the possible placement of an offender under correctional supervision in terms of a sentence is provided for in section 276 (1) (i) or 287 (4) (a) of the Criminal Procedure Act (CPA), or in terms of the conversion of such offender’s sentence into correctional supervision under section 276A (3) (e) (ii) or 287 (4) (b) of the said Act, and the conditions for such placement: the possible placement of such sentenced offender on day parole, parole or medical parole, and the conditions for such placement.

A certified copy of the offender’s identity document and, in the case of a foreign national, a report from the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) on the residential status of such offender are a requirement.

END.

21 June 2022 - NW1774

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the Edenvale case 108/06/2017, State vs Melinda Mckenzie, prosecuted in the Germiston Regional Court, what are the details of the (a) criminal charges on which the accused was found guilty during 2020 in this case and (b) sentence imposed on the accused?

Reply:

Melinda McKenzie was convicted of one (1) count of corruption, having contravened section 3(b)(iv) of the Prevention and Combatting of Corrupt Activities Act 12 of 2004 (PRECCA).

The Senior Public Prosecutor at the Germiston Regional Court advised that the accused changed legal representation after conviction. The new legal representative requested transcripts of the record, which on its own delayed the matter.

The new legal representative now intends bringing an application on 21 June 2022 for the reopening of the defence case after conviction.

This application will be opposed by the State because judgment has been given, and the accused has been convicted.

The only available avenue for the defence would be to appeal the conviction, if there are grounds to appeal.

21 June 2022 - NW2199

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

As at 30 April 2022, what (a) was the total number of permanently-appointed magistrates in the Republic, (b) number of the specified magistrates will reach retirement age within the next five years, (c) was the total number of funded posts for magistrates in the Republic and (d) number of these positions were filled by acting magistrates?

Reply:

a) As at 30 April 2022, the total number of permanently appointed magistrates, excluding temporary/acting magistrates and vacant posts, is as tabulated below:

Post Class

Number

Magistrate

1 257

Chief Magistrate

16

Regional Magistrate

326

Senior Magistrate

124

Regional Court President

8

Grand Total

1 731

b) In responding to this part of the question, it is important to draw the Honourable Member’s attention to section 13 of the Magistrates Act, 1990 (Act 90 of 1993), which provides that a magistrate shall vacate office when attaining the age of 65. This section was amended with effect from 1 December 2017, and a magistrate holding office may, before attaining the age of 65 years, in written notice to the Magistrates Commission, indicate his or her intention to continue to serve in such office for such further period specified in the written notice: Provided that a magistrate must vacate his or her office on attaining the age of 70 years.

The table below provides the number of magistrates who will reach retirement age within the next five (5) years (only permanently appointed magistrates):

(i) Per age group:

Row Labels

Count of Age

60

70

61

57

62

46

63

53

64

31

65

18

66

23

67

10

68

5

69

11

Grand Total

324

(ii) Per Post Class (permanently appointed magistrates between 60 and 69 years of age)

Post Class

Number

Magistrate

179

Chief Magistrate

10

Regional Magistrate

96

Senior Magistrate

35

Regional Court President

4

Grand Total

324

c) The latest information at our disposal in respect of funded posts for magistrates in the Republic is contained in the table below:

Post Class

Approved Posts

Special Grade Chief Magistrate

1

Chief Magistrate                                

21

Senior Magistrate                               

162

Magistrate                                       

1 456

Regional Court President                          

10

Regional Magistrate 

386

Grand Total

2 036

d) In terms of section 9(3) of the Magistrates’ Courts Act, 1944 (Act 32 of 1944), the Minister may appoint any appropriately qualified, fit and proper person as an acting magistrate after consultation with the Head of the Court concerned in any vacant Office of Magistrate. In practice, the Chief Magistrate or the Regional Court President will submit applications to the Deputy Minister, as the delegated authority by the Minister, for consideration of appointment of an acting Magistrate in the vacancies that still need to be filled. Acting magistrates are therefore appointed in all the vacant offices where applications are submitted by the Regional Court President or the Chief Magistrate in his or her area of jurisdiction. Acting Magistrates are also in posts where the incumbent Magistrate is acting in a higher position such as an acting Judge, acting Chief Magistrate or Senior Magistrate, etc, for appointment in posts where a Magistrate is on leave, for appointment where a Magistrate is suspended or in the funded case backlog courts. The acting appointments are generally made for a period of three (3) months at a time where-after the acting Magistrate may be re-appointed as the need exists. During the period of 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022, the Deputy Minister appointed 2 251 acting Magistrates for the reasons mentioned above.

21 June 2022 - NW2187

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)(a) What number of law firms are contracted to the Ministry of Small Business Development, (b) for what period are the firms contracted and (c) what amount has been paid to each firm for the services rendered in the 2021-22 financial year; (2) whether the law firms are paid any retainer fees; if not, why not; if so, is there a pre-approved and agreed fee price schedule; (3) whether they are only paid for work conducted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Zero.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) Not applicable.

(2) Not applicable.

(3) Not applicable.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 June 2022 - NW1530

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Given that the Poultry Sector Master Plan indicates that the Republic needs to grow the poultry industry for both local and export production in order to expand local capacity, what plans and/or strategies does her department have in place to ensure that the Republic protects its poultry industry?

Reply:

The Department Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has drafted protocols to ensure that industry is able to export their poultry produce to a number of countries in Africa and to the Middle East from closed and bio secure facilities generally known as compartments. Compartments assist the poultry farmers to avoid introducing harmful poultry diseases in their farms. DALRRD continuously monitors these compartments.

21 June 2022 - NW1234

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What practical steps have been taken by her department recently to provide developmental assistance to persons living in rural, impoverished areas?

Reply:

The steps are as follows:

Government’s comprehensive support to farmers:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is part of the multispectral committee that is coordinated by the Presidency to implement the National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (NFNSP). There are a number of interventions implemented under the NFNS Plan towards ensuring food and nutrition security. Efforts are being strengthened on an ongoing basis to increase greater access to support for all farmer categories. The Presidential Employment Stimulus (PES) continues towards to support subsistence producer with the aim of ensuring food production at household level. Under this initiative more than 66 000 subsistence producers have been supported to retain self-employment in the agricultural sector, thereby contributing to food security and economic growth. The PES is implemented amidst deliberate efforts that are also made to transform the agricultural sector and allow new players from historically disadvantaged backgrounds. The number of Extension Officers in the 44 districts across the nine provinces is being increased to strengthen extension and advisory services to farmers.

Intensifying agricultural production:

The DALRRD continues to support agricultural producers and increasing domestic food production through departmental programmes such as the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) / Ilima-Letsema.

Land development and post settlement support:

The Land development and post settlement is implemented within the current budgetary constraints. The current policy and programmes are being strengthened to ensure an inclusive and holistic approach to support provided and maximise food production on available land.

Rural Development:

The Department’s Rural Development Mandate Outcome 6: Integrated and inclusive rural economy. The department is engaged with the finalisation of the Draft Integrated Rural Development Strategy, building on the lessons learnt from the implementation of Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and the Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Strategy (ISRDS). The department continues to play its role to Initiate, facilitate, coordinate and act as a catalyst for the implementation of a comprehensive rural development programme leading to sustainable and vibrant rural communities working closely with provincial and other national department through the District Development Model and Rural District Plans working with all national and provincial government departments and Traditional Councils.

The National Development Plan (NDP) (2012) identifies the following four key points relating to rural development: (i) Rural communities require greater social, economic, and political opportunities to overcome poverty; (ii) To achieve this, agricultural development should introduce a land reform and job-creation/livelihood strategy that ensures rural communities have jobs; (iii) Ensure quality access to basic services, health care, education, and food security; and (iii) plans for rural towns should be tailor-made according to the varying opportunities in each area. Intergovernmental relations should be addressed to improve rural governance.

The Department remains the driver of the Agri-Parks Programme that aims to uplift impoverished rural communities into the Agricultural value chain. The Department provides critical infrastructure such as fencing and irrigation to rural communities to assist them, with improving their production. These communities are linked into Farmer Production Support Units, which are constructed in rural areas to provide communities with agricultural support services. The Department continues to construct Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) that provide rural communities with a range of facilities such as mechanisation, pelleting machines for feed, silos to store grain, pack houses with refrigeration, access to state vets and training. Many of these services was in the past only reserved for commercial farmers in rural areas. This allows for rural communities to improve their production and enter the agricultural value chain with their small-scale produce and creates a sustainable path out of poverty. The current programmes through which the department executives its work includes:

  • Socio-economic infrastructure projects to support Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs), Animal and Veld Management Programme (AVMP) and River Valley Catalytic Programme (RVCP). This includes mechanization such as: fencing, animal handling facilities, stock water dams, boreholes, canals, dip tanks, pump houses, pack houses, irrigation pipes and schemes, silos and storage facilities and rural roads. The road infrastructure remains a high priority in national, provincial, municipal and farm roads to promote economic viability through safer, swift transport logistics of agricultural produce. As part of the implementation of the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP), repair and rehabilitation of rural roads is critical to facilitate road logistics from farm to habour and to market. The Department is co-ordinating a Public-Private Partnership initiative which will include national, provincial and local governments as well as agricultural organisations;
  • Development and Implementation of Skills development opportunities to rural youth through the National Rural Youth Services Corps (NARYSEC) which aims to build capacity of rural youth through various skills development interventions and working with public and private sector partners to facilitate the transitioning of recruited youth into economic activities; and
  • Research of new innovative technologies, including Information and Communications Technology (ICT), and promote indigenous knowledge systems into rural communities to contributes towards improving the quality of lives of rural communities working in partnership and collaboration with institutions of higher learning, research agencies and technology agencies.

21 June 2022 - NW2206

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 769 on 31 March 2022, (a) what progress has been made to date with the verification of beneficiaries of the land claim of the Lower Zingcuka in Keiskammahoek in the Eastern Cape and (b) on what date does she anticipate the conclusion of the verification process; (2) whether she has found that her department will meet its target of settling the land claim by the third quarter of the 2022-23 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.

a) The verification process was conducted on the 8th -14th May 2022 in Lower Zingcuka. Out of the original list of 160 households /ODIs that was submitted as the families that were affected by the dispossession, the Commission has verified 154 households that have submitted the necessary documents and 6 households have not been verified.

The outstanding 6 families have outstanding documents which have not been submitted to the Commission, it is however alleged that the list of ODIs is not comprehensive and the Commission will not entertain the allegations without comprehensive documentation submitted as evidence.

The Commission has scheduled a follow up visit for 22 July 2022 for the second phase to collect documents from the 6 families and receive any other information and records from any other party alleging that they are part of the claim.

b) It is anticipated that the verification process will be completed by 30 August 2022 barring any challenges that emanate from the community concerned.

2. The claim is projected to be settled in Quarter 3 of 2022/23 Financial Year, on condition that the Commission receives full co-operation from the community in submitting all the required documentation.

END

21 June 2022 - NW2028

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total number of land reform projects have been tied to strategic partners to help manage production on the land received through land reform, (b) has been the impact of the strategic partnerships over the past 15 years in the Republic and (c) are the names of the companies that are currently employed as strategic partners to land reform beneficiaries?

Reply:

a) 845.

b) To date the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has commissioned two independent studies on the Recapitalisation and Development Programme (RADP). In 2013 the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) was requested to conduct a mid-term review and six provinces (Eastern Cape, Free State Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and North West) were selected and the outcomes were as follows, but not limited to these:

  • The intervention seemed to have worked well in some provinces, whereas in others there were challenges. Overall 67% of the beneficiaries were effectively capacitated in the following areas:
  • technical expertise 66%; farm management 71%;
  • market output 88%;
  • funding 76% and market input 62%; and
  • in conclusion, it has been established that economic situation of farmers have improved significantly at about 72%.

c) Currently the intervention used to support farmers does not make use of strategic partners.

21 June 2022 - NW1907

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What total number of illegal migrants were apprehended and prosecuted for crimes over the past 10 years and (b) which crimes were they found guilty of?

Reply:

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) does not keep record of matters against illegal immigrants. We are moving towards electronic information where the nationality of an accused will be recorded but it does not reflect the legality of their residence or working permits. When an illegal immigrant is convicted and sentenced, they are channelled from the courts to the Department of Correctional Services until the Department of Home Affairs can deport such individuals after serving the sentence. The Department of Home Affairs would be the most appropriate Department to respond to the question as they keep records of these cases.

Since the information on part (a) of the question is not available, the NPA is not able to respond to the part (b) of the question relating to the categories of crimes.

21 June 2022 - NW1873

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the Cathedral Peak Outgrowers Project in the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, what are the details of the funding provided by her department and the Agribusiness Development Agency (ADA) to the (a) Emaswazini vineyard, (b) Miya vineyard and (c) Amangwane vineyard for each year since the project started in 2015 up to the 2021-22 financial year; (2) what total number of (a) permanent and (b) casual jobs have been created since the project was implemented in 2015; (3) what is the extent of land used for each specified vineyard; (4) on what date is it envisaged that the first grapes will be harvested from each vineyard; (5) what are the details of the (a) beneficiaries of the proceeds from the project at each of the three locations and (b) benefits accrued to and/or paid to the beneficiaries at each of the three locations since the inception of the project in 2015? NW2209E

Reply:

1. The project, Cathedral Peak Outgrowers (3 sites) has over the years of implementation to date been allocated a total budget of R54, 9 million. Below is a summary of budget allocation and sources over time:

a) Amaswazini Vineyard total R19 831 198;

b) Amazizi Vineyard total R13 975 876; and

c) Amangwane Vineyard amount R20 287 882.

CATHEDRAL PEAK OUTGROWERS BUDGET & EXPENDUTURE

 

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

COGTA Allocation

R2 500 000

R5 200 000

R551 978

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

Expenditure COGTA

R2 500 000

R4 979 352

R551 978

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

ADA/DARD Allocation

R0,00

R2 500 000

R11 162 560

R14 000 00

R8 420 000

R7 925 200

R3 487 715

R431 909

Expenditure ADA/DARD

R0,00

R5 144 658

R11 162 360

R14 000 00

R8 420 000

R4 437485

R3 355 806

R37 355

                 

Total Expenditure to date/annum

R2 500 000

R10 124 011

R11 714 338

R14 000 000

R8 420 000

R4 437 485

R3 355 806

R37 355

Expenditure to date is up to 12 May 2022. Total Allocation to date: R54 959 738. Total Expenditure to date: R54 588 994. Percentage budget spent 99%

(2)(a) There were no permanent jobs created over the period, all jobs created were linked to projects which ultimately came to an end.

(b) A total of 203 casual jobs were created including annually sustained over the period of project implementation (2015/16 to 2021/22).

3. Each vineyard is 15ha in extent, thus a total of 45 hectares altogether.

4. Date of first harvest was expected in each site as per table below:

Amaswazi Site

Amangwane site

Amazizi site

Feb 2021

Feb 2021

Feb 2023

5. Beneficiaries of the proceeds from the project at each of the three locations:

a) The intended beneficiaries of proceeds from the grape enterprise are the nominated cooperatives per site that the project was implemented with and funds transferred to over the period of implementation. These are:

  • Inkosi Mthethwa Cooperative for Amazizi Site;
  • Amangwane Primary Cooperative for the Amangwane Site; and
  • Madlangampisi Cooperative for the Amaswazi site.

b) The employment opportunities created in each site and for the overall project can be considered a benefit for those who were employed over the period of project implementation. From an accumulated budget of R54,9 million an estimated total of R30.3 million served to pay for labour and working capital. An estimated total of 203 employment opportunities of the amount over the years. All labour was compensated at sectoral determined rates per annum. These are not new jobs per annum but sustained opportunities per annum.

Year

Amaswazi Site

Amangwane Site

Amazizi Site

2015/16

65

73

0

2016/17

30

35

0

2017/18

30

30

60

2019/20

30

30

35

2020/21

30

30

37

2021/22

16

26

12

 

21 June 2022 - NW1697

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What measures has her department taken against municipalities, such as the Sekhukhune District Municipality, that have returned money that was meant for service delivery to the National Treasury?

Reply:

It is recommended that the question be transferred to the National Treasury as they have overview of the funds returned by the municipalities, causes of the inability to spend their budgets and the corrective measures to deal with this challenge.

21 June 2022 - NW1880

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) are the relevant details of the costs incurred thus far for the implementation of Onderstepoort Biological Products’ Good Manufacturing Practices project and (b) are the projected costs to complete the whole project?

Reply:

(a),(b) The Department has consulted with the Onderstepoort Biological Products (OBP) and requests that the OBP be given more time to provide the information necessary to respond to the questions. This will assist the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) to respond to the questions with certainty and accuracy, which it undertakes to do by 30 June 2022.

21 June 2022 - NW1395

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

By what date will the Government implement initiatives on digital agriculture ecosystems that target rural areas for increased food production and security?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has developed an electronic export certification system which already enables all farmers to apply for the inspection of orchards and of goods to determine if they adhere to the importing countries standards and food safety requirements, completely electronically. The system went live in November 2019, is used by more than 3000 agricultural sector clients throughout the country, including farmers or companies that do not have computer systems. This system is used by farmers, traders, logistics companies, Food Business Operators, Pack houses, exporters.

The Western Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture is collaborating with the eCert system in the development of the Export control office System (ECOS) system which is an animal meat export system which will enable the export of meat products. The system was tested in the Western Cape on 15 November 2021. The Northern Cape is busy with testing and piloting the system to be possibly rolled out later this year. The system focuses on the value chain from the abattoir onwards for meat and on the dairy milking parlour onwards. The system will work with/integrate with the Livestock Traceability System for South Africa (LITSA).

DALRRD in collaboration with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is busy developing a LITSA system which will manage the movement and traceability of cattle initially and later on all animals. This system affects all animal farmers but in particular the Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) affected provinces of South Africa and will help to manage the disease and facilitate trade in meat products once South Africa’s FMD free status has been re-instated. The system will integrate with the eCert System.

The Presidential Employment Stimulus Initiative has resulted in a system being developed that allowed rural farmers to get electronic vouchers which could be redeemed once they received their agricultural inputs from service providers. The survey 123 system also enables georeferencing of departmental projects.

The Western Cape and Free State Provincial Departments of Agriculture have been doing extensive research and development on the use of drones. The Free State is using them to manage stock theft. Western Cape mainly use them to monitor crops and apply precision arial spray, amongst others.

21 June 2022 - NW1781

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of persons (a) paid acknowledgement of guilt fines after being charged with offences in terms of the State of Disaster Regulations, as amended from time to time, declared and maintained by government from 15 March 2020 until 4 April 2022 in order to manage the COVID-19 pandemic and (b) have been found guilty after a formal trial and/or are being charged with offences in terms of the specified State of Disaster Regulations?

Reply:

The South African Police Service or Department of Justice and Constitutional Development would be in a better position to respond to the above question, especially due to admission of guilt options having been determined by the Judiciary on various of these contraventions.

Persons charged with offences related to contraventions in terms of the State of Disaster Regulations, may have paid admission of guilt at either a Police Station or any Court house. The dockets, in which admission of guilt were paid, would not be sent to the National Prosecuting Authority – except if the admission of guilt fine may have been set aside in in terms of Section 57(7) of the criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977. The National Prosecuting Authority will therefore not have the requested information.

21 June 2022 - NW2186

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, in light of the rising fuel prices and the devastating effect it has on small business, she will consider a Petrol Relief Support Scheme Programme for small-, medium- and micro-enterprises that cannot afford the rising cost of petrol; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) by what date will it be implemented and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Small Business Development is aware of the effects of the rising costs of fuel to small enterprises. However, the Minister has not considered further mechanisms to cushion the blow that small enterprises may have felt beyond the government fuel levy relief declared by government. The Minister of Finance announced that the general fuel levy would be temporarily reduced by R1.50 per litre from 6 April 2022 until 31 May 2022. The date of April has since been reviewed to end in August 2022 to provide relief. I believe that the Ministers of Finance and of Mineral Resources and Energy are handling the matter related to fuel relief.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 June 2022 - NW1551

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What additional assistance will her department provide to farmers who have been under extreme pressure to sustain operations for a period of time now and (b) how has the farming sector been transformed to allow for black entrants to participate?

Reply:

a) Since the start of the lock down as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic on 27 March 2020, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) implemented strategic projects to assist farmers inclusive of the following:

  • The COVID 19 relief programme for smallholder producers;
  • The Presidential Employment Stimulus for subsistence producers with a focus on women, youth people with disabilities and veterans;
  • Working on the Blended Finance modalities and launching the industrial leg of the programme with the IDC;
  • Intensely working with partners in implementation of the Jobs Fund Project with National Treasury;
  • Continuous support through Programmes such as CASP and Ilima/ Letsema to focus on strategic impact of sustainability;
  • The finalisation of the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP) with additional emphasis on increasing support for grains, red meat value chain, citrus and cotton; and
  • Working with Provincial Departments of Agriculture to employ additional extension personnel who will support farmers with technical advisory services

b) The transformation of the agricultural sector is an ongoing process to include all black entrants across the subsistence, smallholder and commercial levels. Different transformation programmes target different farmer groups but with a focus for overall integration. The main effort being undertaken by DALRRD in relation to transformation is the Agriculture and Agro Processing Master Plan which is a social compact that aims to enhance existing and future transformation efforts.

21 June 2022 - NW2078

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has strategies in place to (a) support and (b) create a platform in which rural farmers can meet new opportunities and grow and create pockets of success within the agricultural sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a),(b) Yes. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is implementing various strategic initiatives catering for farmer support. These include the Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) as a rural smallholder farmer outreach and capacity building unit. FPSUs provide primary production inputs, mechanization support, extension services, storage facilities and training to producers. FPSU serves as a one-stop service centre for rural smallholder farmers within the catchment area of the FPSU.

Production infrastructure in a form of irrigation infrastructure, livestock handling facilities, storage facilities, livestock water systems and fencing are amongst those provided to enhance productivity of the farmers.

Through conditional grants in a form of Ilima/Letsema and Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme, DALRRD also provide smallholder farmers with production support working closely with Provincial Departments of Agriculture. Land Development Support and Jobs fund initiative are the two other strategic interventions DALRRD is implementing targeting smallholder farmers.

21 June 2022 - NW2082

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) are the ownership patterns for the Vaalharts Katoen, (b) amount has her department spent on the projects and (c) is the role of (i) monitoring and (ii) evaluation in her department if they fail to ensure that farmers benefit from transactions that Government has spent money on?

Reply:

a) Vaalharts Cotton Workers Trust was established in 2004 and its workers became beneficiaries. The Vaalharts Katoen Produsente (Pty) Ltd (“the Company”) owns and operates the Cotton Gin in Hartswater town of Phokwane Local Municipality, Frances Baard District of the Northern Cape Province. The Company does not conduct any farming activities. The Company has two shareholders, namely Vaalharts Cotton (Pty) Ltd and the Vaalharts Cotton Permanent Workers Trust (“the Trust”). The ownership of the assets and shareholding in the Company was partly (49%) financed by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) in terms of a set of loan agreements. The payment of the IDC by the Company and the IDC’s requirements regarding shareholding of the Trust in the Company is well documented and the Trust has copies of the relevant documents as it was a signatory to the settlement agreements in terms of which the Company’s indebtedness to the IDC was settled (see attached copies).

b) The Department did not, in any form or manner, provide any funding or other assistance to the Company or its shareholders in acquiring and operating the Cotton Gin.

(c) (i),(ii) In view of the latter, Monitoring and Evaluation was not carried out since the contention from the company is that the Department had not provided any financial assistance during the acquisition process. However, workers have raised concerns with the Department, including the lack of participation in the operations of the company, power relations between management and worker-shareholders, skills transfer and labour relations, and tenure security. The Northern Cape Office of the Department has tried to mediate between management and workers.

21 June 2022 - NW1491

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What steps is her department taking to ensure that the Township Economy Partnership Fund set up by the Gauteng Department of Economic Development and the Gauteng Enterprise Propeller in partnership with the Industrial Development Corporation, which represents policy certainty and legal continuity to support small, medium and micro enterprises, is legally binding for all provinces in the future?

Reply:

The Department appreciates the initiative taken by the Gauteng Department of Economic Development, Gauteng Enterprise Propeller in partnership with the Industrial Development Corporations for the purposes of setting up the Township Partnership Fund. However, the Department is however not in a position to request other state organs such as the provinces to adopt or implement the Fund since the provinces are operating independently.

The Department continues to engage with Provinces with the aim of ensuring uniformity in support for township and rural areas-based enterprises. The DSBD continues to support SMMEs through its own Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP), which is a Programme with a dedicated budget to assist small enterprises operating in underserved and unserved locations such as townships and rural areas.

To compliment the fund established by the Gauteng provincial government, the DSBD has adopted a Portfolio approach comprising of the DSBD, the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) using an integrated approach for the support of SMMEs.

Both Seda and sefa have operational offices together with satellite and mobile facilities in provinces and districts throughout the country. This national footprint allows for ease of access and interaction with relevant public and private sector structures as well as with SMMEs that are located in rural areas.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 June 2022 - NW1953

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details of the (a) costs to her department of building the 35 houses at Mtsweni-Letswalo Communal Property Association (CPA) in the Emakhazeni Local Municipality and (b) contractors who did the work if work was done through awarding tenders; (2) what are the details of the current farming and/or business activities regarding the purchase of the (a) Paardeplaats and (b) Rietfontein farms which add up to a total of 377 ha; (3) whether her department is considering to divide the farms and provide each owner with a title deed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Details of the cost of building 35 houses are:

DETAILS OF THE COST

Qty

Rate

Amount

Planning and design services by architectural, civil and electrical engineer. Including construction supervision and monitoring for 12 months

1

R1 813 440,05

R1 813 440,05

Construction of 64m2 house, with three-bedroom, open plan kitchen and living room, bathroom with shower and toilet,

35

R 433 297,31

R15 165 405,85

Off-grid 5Kva solar power producing 10KWh per day, with power bank for two days. Including 150L Solar Geysers installed on 35 houses and 1 RDP house built by Municipality for storm damage victim was also powered with solar

36

R 176 975,14

R 6 371 105,04

Sewer reticulation and septic tanks installed to two sites divided by national highway in Paardeplaats Farm

2

R 961 865,51

R 1 923 731,02

Sewer reticulation and septic tanks installed to two sites divided by river stream in Rietfontein

2

R 300 178,75

R 600 357,50

Water reticulation in two sites in Paardeplaats including two 20 000L Elevated tanks, drilling of two Boreholes equipped with refurbished of old windmills

2

R 635 216,26

R 1 270 432,52

Water reticulation in two sites in Rietfontein including two 10 000L Elevated tanks, drilling of two Boreholes equipped with new of solar pumps

2

R 486 695,00

R 973 390,00

Rehabilitation of 4KM gravel access road in Rietfontein and rehabilitation of site drainage in Paardeplaats Farm

1

R 797 421,00

R 797 421,00

b) The details of the contractors who did the work is Masikhane Civil Contractors CC of 855 Longclaw Flight Street, Hazeview 1242 with registration number 1999/011128/23 and CIDB registration number 110071.

(2) Details of current farming and/or business activities:

a) The Department purchased the Remaining Extent of portion 15 of the farm Paardeplaats 380 JT measuring 39.9301 in settlement of 6 labour tenants claims and secured land tenure of 59 farm dwellers. The current agricultural activities are subsistence farming in the form of crops and livestock. The Department is in engagement with the beneficiaries to assist with other development activities.

b) The Department purchased portion 7 of the farm Rietfontein 365 JT measuring 126.1129 and portion 17 of the farm Rietfontein 365 JT measuring 212.5430 which makes a total of 338.6559 in extent in settlement of 2 labour tenants claims and secured land tenure of 23 farm dwellers. The current agricultural activities are subsistence farming in the form of crops and livestock. The Department is in engagement with the beneficiaries to assist with other development activities.

(3) Yes. The Department has assisted the communities to establish legal entities namely; Siyaphumula Communal Property Associations for Paardeplaats community and Mtsweni-Letswalo Communal Property Associations for Rietfontein community. Should the CPAs take a resolution to allocate title deeds to each household, the Department will then assist with subdivision and transfer of land to individual households in title guided by policy provisions.

21 June 2022 - NW1529

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What plans have been implemented in the Poultry Sector Master Plan adopted in 2019, in order to mitigate the effects of the importation and/or dumping of chicken products from Brazil and European countries?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) contributes to the Poultry Master Plan mainly from the Sanitary and Phytosanitary point of view. Veterinary guidelines relevant to poultry have been updated. This is supplemented with training of developing poultry farmers to ensure their participation in the sector. Challenges that are identified with some importing countries’ legislation are constantly being addressed to ensure compliance.

DALRRD continues to encourage poultry producers to use existing compartments which are monitored on a regular basis. An important market that has been identified includes Saudi Arabia and the questions they are asking are being addressed. Heat treated poultry is now consistently being exported to the United Arab Emirates as a health certificate has now been agreed to.

The poultry industry and DALRRD are working on an acceptable residue monitoring programme to make it possible for more markets to be opened. Recently, the United Kingdom has provided guidelines that will be taken into consideration as negotiations begin. The Sub-Region has managed to open its doors for South African poultry despite concerns of outbreaks of Avian Influenza in some provinces.

There are response mechanisms in place which are triggered whenever; there is a case of dumping from any of the country’s trade partners. In the year since the Poultry Master Plan, a new tariff was put on imported poultry to provide protection to local production. Industry complaints with regard to the observed dumping of bone-in chicken meat imports in the Southern African Customs Union market received a positive response in the form of Provisional Anti-Dumping duties imposed on the products in question. Anti-Dumping duties were imposed on the following countries by the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) between January and June 2022:

No.

Country

Rate of Duty Prior to January 2022

New Anti-Dumping Duties from January 2022 to June 2022

1

Brazil

MFN Duty of 62%

265%

2

Denmark

Duty free

67.4%

3

Ireland

Duty free

158.4%

4

Poland

Duty free

96.9%

5

Spain

Duty free

85.8%

To support the implementation of the poultry master plan, DALRRD entered into a collaboration with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) to provide blended funding to poultry producers and expand production to meet the local demand as well as for exports. The IDC has funded 5 black commercial producers to date at a combined value of R152 million of which R77 million was the grant portion, creating 149 jobs. The five applicants were from Gauteng, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal. Three of the approved transactions were poultry farm expansions with an average cycle of 430 000 chickens per cycle.

Furthermore, in the 2021/22 financial year, the DALRRD made available R130, 249 million from CASP and Ilima/Letsema as shown in the table below. This investment was meant to support 3 857 poultry farmers with poultry structures, feed and medication, and create 2 183 jobs; with an average cycle of 31 440 chickens per cycle. The table below further shows the planned outputs per province. The Provincial Departments of Agriculture implement these programmes and the 2021/22 annual reports are being audited.

Province

CASP Allocation R'000

Ilima/Letsema Allocation R'000

Total Invested in Poultry in 2021/22 through Conditional Grants

R'000

Planned Outputs

CASP Jobs

Ilima/Letsema Jobs

Total Jobs

Farmers Supported

Eastern Cape

4 300

3 600

7 900

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

23

0

23

15

Free State

3 500

1 522

5 022

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

4

0

4

2

Gauteng

11 491

14 500

25 991

3 Poultry structures; production inputs

6

70

76

35

KwaZulu Natal

22 682

0

22 682

3 Poultry structures; production inputs

348

0

348

386

Limpopo

1 544

14 370

15 914

1 Poultry structures; production inputs

23

1 589

1 612

1 046

Mpumalanga

30 150

0

30 150

4 Poultry structures; production inputs

55

0

55

9

Northern Cape

3 100

0

3 100

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

6

0

6

7

North West

10 600

0

10 600

2 Poultry structures; production inputs

22

0

22

2

Western Cape

 

8 890

8 890

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

22

15

37

54

Total

87 367

42 882

130 249

 

509

1 674

2 183

1556

21 June 2022 - NW2220

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What time frames have been put in place for addressing the findings of the Auditor General with regard to the Small Enterprise Development Agency?

Reply:

The following are time frames to address for each finding:

1. Review of the Performance Information

The new reporting system for Performance Information was procured. It is in the final stages of design and will be available for use from 01 August 2022.

2. Two Irregular expenditures were reported

Lease of office space in the KZN for R182 358 was condoned. The second expenditure of R84 281 was reported to National Treasury and there was additional information required by National Treasury. Management is busy with the National Treasury request and will resubmit to National Treasury, the process is anticipated to be completed by 31 July 2022.

3. Vacancies of Executives

Effective from June 2020, a moratorium was implemented on the recruitment and selection process due to the incorporation process between the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda), the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), and the Co-operative Banks Development Agency (CBDA) that is underway and critical vacant positions were advertised for 12 months fixed term contract. The Executive Managers positions are re-advertised as the most suitable candidates could not be sourced. On 19 May 2022 the Minister uplifted the moratorium on filling of vacancies with immediate effect, but the fixed term contract should not exceed twenty-four (24) months to ensure that there are no duplicate positions post the integration of sefa and CBDA into Seda. All vacant Executive Manager positions were re-advertised on 03 June 2022.

4. Provision for Bonus error on the notes to AFS

Resolved during the audit.

5. Revenue not collected

The amounts totaling to R151 000 was written off in line with internal policies and procedures. Debts older than a year are provided for as bad debts and the process to recover them continues. The finding is resolved.

6. ICT Controls and Cyber attack

The organisation has sourced services of Sizwe IT to implement ICT security solutions in all Seda estate and the monitoring of the estate. An awareness across the whole of Seda staff regarding their roles and responsibilities and security awareness is underway through the ICT Governance project that resumed in July 2021. The finding is resolved.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 June 2022 - NW2323

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of (a) agricultural extension officers (i) have been employed in (aa) Limpopo and Mpumalanga (bb) the Eastern Cape and Northern Cape, (cc) KwaZulu-Natal and (dd) North West in the past two financial years and (ii) qualified through government-funded bursary schemes in each province and (b) black emerging farmers were (i) provided with extension officers in the past two financial years and (ii) assisted with funding in the past two financial years in each province?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii),(aa),(bb),(cc),(dd) Agricultural Extension Officers: Please refer to the table below.

 

(a)(i) employed in the past two years

(a)(ii) qualified through bursary schemes in each province

(aa) Limpopo: 0 and Mpumalanga: 53 Extension Officers were on contract and were permanently absorbed during 2021/22 financial year

 

DALRRD employed Extension Officers:

Limpopo: 6 and Mpumalanga: 4 on contract for 3 months

 

Limpopo: 0

Mpumalanga: 0

(bb) Eastern Cape: 21 and Northern Cape: 0

 

DALRRD employed 3 Extension Officers in

Eastern Cape and 6 in Northern Cape on contract for 3 months

Eastern Cape: 0

Northern Cape: 0

 

(cc) KwaZulu-Natal:71

 

DALRRD employed 4 Extension Officers in

KwaZulu-Natal on contract for 3 months

KwaZulu-Natal: 8

(dd) North West:46

 

DALRRD employed 6 Extension Officers in North West on contract for 3 months

North West: 0

 

 

 

 

 

(b)(i),(ii) Black emerging farmers: Please refer to the table below.

 

(b)(i) provided with extension officers in the past two years

 

(b)(ii) assisted with funding in the past two financial years

 

A total of 38 203 smallholder producers were supported over a period of 2020/21 and 2021/22.  These are figures as reported by provinces on the Electronic Quarterly Report System (e-QPRS)

 

Province

2020/21 Smallholder producers supported as reported in eQPRS

Total

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

EC

0

240

3616

4169

8025

FS

0

0

58

228

286

GP

14

39

116

66

235

KZN

1797

1985

1205

1058

6045

LP

878

 

1927

1512

4317

MP

52

83

282

115

532

NC

0

12

711

298

1021

NW

0

110

95

160

365

WC

16

23

9

13

61

Total

 

 

 

 

20887

 

Province

2021/22 Smallholder producers supported as reported in eQPRS

Total

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

EC

753

917

479

3717

5866

FS

0

0

5

98

103

GP

73

37

90

46

246

KZN

0

1849

2259

1894

6002

LP

312

354

286

246

1198

MP

438

198

660

287

1583

NC

0

0

1237

795

2032

NW

0

0

61

182

243

WC

8

20

12

3

43

Total

 

 

 

 

17316

 

(aa)

 

Limpopo: 13 444, and

Mpumalanga: 5 100

 

 

(bb)

 

Eastern Cape: 18 351, and

 

Northern Cape: 3 075

 

 

(cc)

 

KwaZulu-Natal: 11 984

 

 

(dd)

 

North West: 14 356

 

 

 

20 June 2022 - NW1960

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Given that the Chief Ombudsman will be the chairperson of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Advisory Council in terms of section 18(2)(c) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 and the Council may be required to promote legislative amendments that restrict the powers of the Ombudsman Service, how will she ensure that the Chief Ombudsman, and by extension, the Ombudsman Service, do not exercise undue influence on the Advisory Council.

Reply:

The Chief Ombud will be required to recuse himself or herself from the discussion of matters that may cause a conflict of interest. Section 18(3) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 provides for the appointment of a deputy chairperson. Such matters will therefore be dealt with under the leadership of the deputy chairperson.

20 June 2022 - NW2004

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, with reference to case number D11859/2018 relating to the Centre for Fine Art, Animation and Design (CFAD), the necessary (a) assistance has been given to regularise the function of the centre which plays a significant role in the creative arts sector and (b) authority has been granted to CFAD to (i) continue its operations as an institution for education and (ii) be recognised as an accredited institution; if not; why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The concerns around the cancellation of registration of the Centre for Fine Art Animation and Design (Pty) Ltd (“CFAD”) has been ongoing for a long period of time. The following is a detailed response to the Question.

THE LEGAL CONTEXT

The Department has the statutory responsibility of regulating the activities of private higher education institutions in accordance with the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No. 101 of 1997) (the Act) and the Regulations for the Registration of Private Higher Education Institution, 2016 (the Regulation). To that end, the Department wishes to bring the following your attention:

1.  Article 29(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa requires every private provider of education and training to be registered with the State. The State in this case is the Department of Higher Education and Training. In this regard, there are two sets of legislation applicable to the registration of private providers of education and training:

a) Higher Education Act, 1997, Act No. 101 of 1997 for the registration of private higher education institutions; and

b) Continuing Education and Training Colleges Act, 1996 for the registration of private colleges.

2. The legal point of departure for registration with the Department begins with the registration of the qualification on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and the accreditation of the programme and the college or institution by the relevant Quality Council (QC). There are 3 QCs, each one responsible for managing its own qualifications sub-framework. The QCs and the qualifications sub-frameworks are as follows:

a) Council on Higher Education (CHE) manages the Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework (HEQSF);

b) UMALUSI which manages the General and Further Education and Training Qualifications Sub-Framework (GENFETQSF); and

c) QCTO which manages the Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework (OQSF).

3. The purpose of registration is to ensure that private providers of education and training operate within the law, have the necessary resources, capacity and expertise to offer acceptable standards of higher education, the programmes they offer are registered, the qualifications the students attain are aligned to the NQF and students are protected from fraudulent operators in higher education. Further, the Department is required to ensure the highest standards of integrity at all levels, that the Department discharges its responsibilities in an accountable manner and that it protects the public against any form of malicious and unscrupulous conduct threatening the higher education system.

4. With regard to the above, please note that accreditation and registration are two separate functions undertaken separately by two different bodies. For higher education, the registering authority is the Department, and the accreditation body is the CHE.

REASONS FOR THE CANCELLATION OF THE REGISTRATION OF THE CENTRE FOR FINE ART, ANIMATION AND DESIGN (PTY) LTD AS A PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

5. On 27 June 2016, the Registrar of Private Higher Education Institutions cancelled the registration of CFAD for its failure to submit a complete 2014 annual report, after due legal process was followed, and after much pleading with officials from CFAD to submit its annual report. The submission of the annual report is a legal requirement for maintenance of registration as a private higher education institution as it allows the Registrar to establish if the institution has discharged its responsibilities as a private higher education institution. Subsequently, on 15 September 2016, the appeal lodged with the erstwhile Minister, Dr BE Nzimande, was successful.

6. For the second time, on 20 November 2016, the Registrar cancelled the registration of CFAD for its failure to submit its 2015 annual report, after due legal process was followed, and after much pleading with officials from CFAD to submit its annual report. Subsequently, on 7 April 2017, the appeal lodged with the Minister, Dr BE Nzimande was unsuccessful, for the following reasons:

a) Failure to Submit the Institution’s Administrative Data;

b) Failure to Provide Staff and Student Data;

c) Failure to Submit Audited Annual Financial Statements;

d) Failure to Submit the Financial Surety which had expired;

e) Failure to Comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations;

f) Failure to Provide Proof of Certificate Awarded to Students;

g) Failure to comply with the Requirements of the National Learner’s Records Database (NLRD);

h) Failure to Provide the Updated Record of the Directors of the Company as Approved by the Consumer Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC);

i) Failure to Submit the List of Premises on which Teaching and Learning is Provided; and

j) Failure to submit the Declaration Signed by Every Student.

7. Since the start of the registration of private higher education institutions in 1998, it has never been the case that an institution of higher learning was unable to submit its annual report in the required manner, including basic information. It has also never been the case whereby the Department had to plead with an institution to submit its annual report and indefinitely prolong the period of extension. In 2015 and 2016, CFAD was the first such institution.

8. Even the appeal was submitted only after the Department pleaded with CFAD to submit the appeal for the simple reason that the Department wanted to protect the interest students. For that matter, the appeal was only submitted a month after the due date for the submission of the appeal.

9. After parents pleaded with the Department to extend the phase-out period to 31 December 2017 so that final year students will not be affected, the Department contacted Dr N Soobben and pleaded with him to make a formal request with Mr GF Qonde, the Director-General, for an extension to the phase-out period from 31 December 2016 to 31 December 2017. Since the Department no longer had the contact details of the institution, and CFAD was not communicating with the Department, the Department had requested a parent, Ms Allison Shepherd, to provide Dr N Soobben’s cell phone number.

10. At the time of the first cancellation of registration of CFAD, there was no communication or response from CFAD to the Department’s queries. For almost 3 years, repeated calls to CFAD went unanswered. At no stage did CFAD approach the Department or the CHE for assistance regarding the problems it claims to have experienced. It was the Department that had to initiate the communication with CFAD.

11. In August 2017, officials from the Department paid a site visit to the institution at 5 Walnut Road, Smart XChange Building in Durban to endeavour to assist the institution. Subsequent to the visit, two further site visits were made on 24 January 2018 and 25 April 2018, respectively. In the last site visit Dr Shaheeda Essack requested an improvement plan from CFAD which has not as yet been submitted.

12. On 7 June 2018, the Department was informed that on 31 May 2018, the Sherriff of the Court, repossessed all goods of value from CFAD. The pictures on the repossession were circulated on social media.

13. According to the accreditation report dated 28 February 2017, the CHE has withdrawn the accreditation of the institution and its programme. This means that CFAD is no longer accredited with the CHE. The outcome on the subsequent application for accreditation with the CHE is pending. Therefore, the application for registration submitted to the Department is awaiting proof of accreditation from the CHE and the submission of the improvement plan as requested in the meeting of 25 April 2018.

14 In 2018, the High Court in Durban acceded to CFAD’s request to operate in 2018 and 2019 so as to teach out the pipe-line and final year students. The High Court also ruled that no new students should be enrolled.

15. The Minister is also aware that CFAD has filed papers with the High Court in Durban to suspend the Registrar’s decision to cancel its registration and to suspend the Minister’s decision to dismiss the appeal. The Registrar and the Minister await the ruling of the High Court.    

DIRECT RESPONSE TO THE ENQUIRY

16. The Minister is fully aware of the challenges surrounding the cancellation of registration of CFAD and advises CFAD to ensure that its application for registration with the Department is complete to enable the Registrar to register the institution. Since accreditation is a separate function from registration and handled by the CHE, the institution is advised to contact the CHE directly for any enquiries on accreditation.

17.  The High Court had also allowed CFAD until 2019 to teach out final year students, most of whom were in their final year in 2018 and some in 2019. Therefore, the “situation of distress” always referred to is not understood.

18. The Department has done everything in its power to assist CFAD in the registration process. Unfortunately, the application currently does not qualify for registration since it has not provided the evidence that it meets the accreditation requirements of the CHE and the registration requirements of SAQA.

19. CFAD, therefore, does not have the legal authority to operate an institution of higher learning

20 June 2022 - NW2103

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the details of (a) all contracts awarded by the (i) KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and (ii) eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality using funds from her department in response to the KwaZulu-Natal flood disaster to date and (b) the (i) names of the companies and/or service providers who were awarded the contracts and (ii) values of each contract?

Reply:

Based on the report submitted by the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements as of 30 May 2022, the required information is as follows:

Table

Description automatically generated

20 June 2022 - NW2204

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Taking note of the Land Access Movement of South Africa 2 judgment by the Constitutional Court, in terms of which the processing of land claims lodged between 2014 and 2016 was put in abeyance until all land claims lodged by December 1998 are settled, (a) by what date will the land claims lodged by the December 1998-deadline be finalised, (b) on what date will the processing of the claims lodged between 1 July 2014 and 28 July 2016 begin and (c) what amount would it cost the State to settle the claims?

Reply:

a) The Commission has created a 5 year project plan which will be concluded depending on available resources.

Output

Indicator

 

PROVINCES

Outstanding land Claims

Pure Outstanding

Phased

Number of outstanding land claims

Eastern Cape

657

597

60

 

Free State

5

5

0

 

Gauteng

379

370

9

 

KwaZulu-Natal

2124

2045

79

 

Limpopo

1349

1073

276

 

Mpumalanga

1588

1170

418

 

Northern Cape

37

22

15

 

North West

208

22

186

 

Western Cape

338

326

12

 

TOTAL:

6685

5630

1055

b) When Parliament enacts new legislation to allow the processing of these New Order Claims.

c) It would be difficult to forecast for the 163 383 new order claims as we have not conducted any analysis because of the LAMOSA judgment which interdicted the Commission from processing these New order claims.

END

20 June 2022 - NW2064

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total amount in revenue has been lost by her department in purchasing land from white farmers to enable municipalities to provide land to build houses, particulary for displaced and evicted farm dwellers, who are pushed by farmers to the township and deprived buriel lands?

Reply:

Matters related to the eviction of farm dwellers including land purchase and accommodation thereof is a function of the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development.  The Human Settlements National and Provincial Departments provide support to farm dwellers as provided for by the Housing Code in terms of the Farm Residents Subsidy which covers the following:-

 

a) A flexible approach to cater to the variety of farm residents’ housing needs across the country;

b) The provision of secure tenure to farm workers;

c) The promotion of healthy and safe living environments;

d) The empowerment of farm residents’ (and in particular women) to participate in the provision of their own housing needs, as appropriate in the particular farming situation;

e) Where possible, promoting access to social and economic amenities;

f) Promoting access to economic opportunities not related to farming (particular when seasonal farm work is not available) (particularly when seasonal farm work is not available) for households where appropriate;

g) The encouragement of sustainable spatial settlement patterns and discouraging the development of farm residents housing that places an additional service delivery burden on municipalities;

h) The use of local labour and the development of skills in both developing and maintaining farm resident settlements; and

i) The upgrading of existing farm resident housing and improving the security of tenure where feasible and practicable

Total funds spent between 2020/21 - 2021/22 financial year by the Provincial Departments on housing programmes is shown below:

20 June 2022 - NW2129

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total amount did her department spend on (a) travel, (b) flights, (c) accommodation, (d) catering and (e) flowers whilst Ms Lindiwe Sisulu was Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation in the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii)2020-21 financial years?

Reply:

The following breakdown is the departmental expenditure incurred during the tenure of the previous Minister:

a) Expenditure on travel for;                                    (i) 2018-19 of R 68 531 385.59

                                                                            (ii) 2019-20 of R 68 211 236.86

                                                                            (iii) 2020-21of R 25 015 936.36

b) Expenditure on flights for;                                   (i) 2018-19 of R 26 230 031.61

                                                                            (ii)2019-20 of R 28 611 599.32

                                                                             (iii) 2020-21 of R 6 421 952.02

c) Expenditure on accommodation for;                      (i) 2018-19 of R 11 365 036.35

                                                                              ii) 2019-20 of R 13 115 787.37

                                                                              (iii) 2020-21 of R 4 103 731.22

d) Expenditure on catering for;                                   (i) 2018-19 of R 7 775 699.57

                                                                               (ii) 2019-20 of R 18 788 746.96

                                                                                (iii) 2020-21of R 11 386 717.55

e) Expenditure on flowers for;                                      (i) 2018-19 of R 18 245.16

                                                                                (ii) 2019-20 of R 4 200.00

                                                                                 (iii) 2020-21 of R 12 558.40

20 June 2022 - NW2116

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department provided a certain person (name and details furnished) with the production input costs that go with farm allocation to the farmers; if not, (2) whether her department is considering providing the specified person with production input costs; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. No. However, at the time of allocation of the farm to this certain person, various movable assets in the form of mechanization, implements and equipment to the value of R6 900 000.00 as well as biological assets (sheep) to the value of R3 933 000.00 with a combined total of R10 833 000.00 were in the register of the farm.

2. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has received a Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) application through the Western Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture which is being considered for provision of production inputs following its assessment of the farm and the farmer’s needs.

(a) The application is for the 2022/23 financial year. If this application is approved, funds are to be transferred to the Western Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture as per the approved business plan.

(b) The application under consideration is for production inputs to the value of R2 124 270 and maintenance of farm implements at a cost R147 576.

20 June 2022 - NW1914

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) What total number of housing opportunities were delivered and/or completed nationally, in terms of the Housing Code, in the 2021-22 financial year; (2) what total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units were delivered and/or completed in each province in the specified financial year; (3) what total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units were delivered and/or completed in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year?

Reply:

NOTE: The performance figures in this reply have not yet been audited.

1. The total number of housing opportunities delivered and/or completed nationally, in terms of the Housing Code, in the 2021-22 financial year is 46 489 serviced sites and 44 471 housing units.  The serviced sites and housing units are not added to avoid double counting as housing units are constructed on serviced sites.

2. The total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units delivered and/or completed in each province in the specified financial year is as follows:

(a) 

Province

2021/22 FY

 

Serviced sites

Eastern Cape

5 731

Free State

8 150

Gauteng

11 599

KwaZulu-Natal

2 380

Limpopo

2 525

Mpumalanga

3 907

Northern Cape

2 542

North West

6 723

Western Cape

2 932

Total

46 489

 

(b)

Province

2021/22 FY

 

Housing units

Eastern Cape

6 780

Free State

1 426

Gauteng

7 331

KwaZulu-Natal

11 803

Limpopo

4 928

Mpumalanga

2 961

Northern Cape

591

North West

2 734

Western Cape

5 917

Total

44 471

3. The total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units were delivered and/or completed in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year is as follows:

a) 

Metropolitan Municipality

2021/22  up to Q3

 

Serviced sites

Buffalo City

220

Nelson Mandela Bay

0

Mangaung

0

City of Ekurhuleni

1 340

City of Johannesburg

0

City of Tshwane

0

Ethekwini

0

City of Cape Town

1 077

Total

2 637

b) Metropolitan Municipalities do not deliver housing units as it is a Provincial function.

 

20 June 2022 - NW2036

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1).What total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units are planned for delivery in each province in the 2022-23 financial year in accordance with the Provincial Housing Plans; (2) What total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units are planned for delivery in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year in accordance with the Provincial Housing Plan; (3) What total amount in Human Settlements Development Grant funding has been allocated by her department to each (a) province and (b) metropolitan municipality for the specified financial year?

Reply:

  1. All plans are reflected in all Annual Performance Plans as tabled in various legislatures and available on websites with the targets
  2. Plans for the Metropolitan municipalities will be shared once councils have approved them. These are developed by Provincial departments.
  3. All the Human Settlements Development Grant allocation is reflected on the Annual Performance Plan.

20 June 2022 - NW2128

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1159 on 4 May 2022, wherein he stated that the matter has been engaged extensively within the department and proposed amendments by the legal opinion to the definition of indigenous languages contained in the Policy Framework are underway (details furnished), he has found that the amendments that are currently underway with regard to the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions are (a) consistent with the recommendation of the legal opinion and (b) designed to recognise Afrikaans as an indigenous language; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what is the deadline by which the amendments will be completed and formally gazetted?

Reply:

The recommended amendments to the Policy Framework are consistent with the recommendations of the legal opinion. Pre and post the amendment, the prime focus of the Language Policy has been and will always be an attempt at realising the Constitutional ideals of linguistic equality in post-apartheid South Africa.

Our primary objective is to extend to the historically marginalised African languages the same privilege historically enjoyed by Afrikaans and English as the exclusive languages of scholarship in pre-democratic South Africa. The definition of indigenous languages in the Policy Framework will be amended as per the legal advice received and there has never been dispute in the Language Policy Framework on the status of Afrikaans as an indigenous language.

20 June 2022 - NW1959

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Given that trustees and not managing agents, manage sectional title schemes and that managing agent have a conflict of interest and are consequently unable to represent the best interest of owners, how will she ensure that owners, via their trustees, are given direct representation on the Sectional Titles Schemes Managing Advisory Council in terms of section 18(2)(c) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011?

Reply:

The body corporate is represented by all the owners of a sectional title scheme. Regulation 5(3) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 provides for the election of trustees by the body corporate. The trustees exercise the body corporate’s powers and functions assigned and delegated to them in terms of section 7(1) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011.

Body corporates are not obligated to appoint a managing agent but may do so to perform the functions and exercise the powers that would otherwise be performed by the trustees in terms of Regulation 28(1) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011. The appointment of a managing agent is not imposed upon a body corporate but elected by the body corporate. As such, a body corporate has the right to challenge a managing agent through the available legislative mechanisms should it be of the view that its rights have been infringed through misconduct by the managing agent.

In appointing the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Advisory Council, the skills, knowledge and experience of the candidates in the management of a range of types of schemes will be taken into account. This includes trustees or owners who have skills, knowledge and experience in the management of schemes.

17 June 2022 - NW2313

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the placement of medical interns, particularly foreign qualified medical doctors for the 2022-23 mid-year cycle, (a) what total number of posts will be available in each province and (b) on what date is it envisaged that such posts will be filled?

Reply:

With regard to the placement of foreign qualified medical students for the 2022-23 midyear cycle, applicants are expected to first comply with registration requirements for medical internship as outlined in the Regulation by the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) prior allocation in a funded post.

(a) The number of posts that are currently being verified and finalized for the mid-year cycle are as follows per province:

Province

Number of Posts

Status

Eastern Cape

5

Posts are at the final stages of verification by Provinces in line with financial quantum

Free State

20

 

Gauteng

31

 

KwaZulu – Natal

29

 

Limpopo

7

 

Mpumalanga

3

 

Northern Cape

5

 

North West

18

 

Western Cape

6

 

(b) All posts are envisaged to be filled on 1 July 2022, with various commencement dates. Since these are replacement posts and current incumbents must first vacate the posts to allow new applicants to commence duty.

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2254

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the strategy of his department in terms of combating (a) diabetes and (b) obesity; (2) what (a) programmes are currently in place to combat (i) obesity and (ii) diabetes and (b) are the current allocations for the specified programmes?

Reply:

1. (a) The strategy of the Department to combat Diabetes is contained in the National Strategic Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases 2022- 2027 (NSP NCDs). The Plan provides strategic guidance on the prevention, early detection, screening, and control of non-communicable diseases including diabetes. The NSP NCDS is aligned to the Integrated Clinical Services Management Model as part of the Ideal Clinic, the Adult Primary Care Tool implemented at primary health care facilities, the Essential Medicines List and 1Associated Standard Treatment Guidelines, the Centralised Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) Model. NCDs are integrated into the Primary Health Care Service Package (2015).

(b) The department developed and implemented the “Strategy for the prevention and control of obesity in South Africa 2015 – 2020”. The strategy is aimed at the prevention and control of obesity through modifying the obesogenic environments and drivers of obesity, while enhancing opportunities for increased physical activity and healthy food options in every possible setting, including healthcare facilities, early development centres, schools, workplaces, and the community at large. The strategy reached the end of its term and the Department is in the process of developing the updated strategy which began by reviewing the 2015-2020 strategy using interrogation of the theory of change in line with South Africa’s international policy commitments and national legislation, policy and plans, a literature review of international and national best practices, wide stakeholder engagement through online survey and small physical meetings, and finally, a national workshop with stakeholders. The best practices, stakeholder engagements and the review reports have been produced. The Department is currently consulting key stakeholders on the first draft of the updated strategy.

(2) (a) (i) The following are programmes to currently in place to combat obesity:

  • Implementation of the National guide for Healthy meal provisioning in the workplace in collaboration with the Department of Public Service and Administration
  • Implementation of the Nutrition Guidelines for Early Childhood Development programmes in collaboration with the Departments of Basic Education and Social Development
  • Increasing the availability of healthy food options through Healthy Food Options Initiatives programme of the Consumer Goods Council of South Africa
  • Nutrition education, information and advocacy in health facilities, ECD centres, schools, workplaces and communities at large through various campaigns e.g. World Breastfeeding Week, National Nutrition Week, Healthy Lifestyle Awareness Day and World Obesity Day in collaboration with other government departments, non-government organisations, dietetics and nutrition profession associations and academic institutions.
  • Promotion of physical activity in collaboration with Department of Sport, Arts and Culture
  • Nutrition assessment, education and counselling of individuals in health facilities
  • Nutrition screening, assessment and referral of overweight and obese learners through the Integrated School Health Programme
  • Conducting research to guide policy and interventions i.e., National Dietary Intake Survey

(ii) Programmes currently in place to combat diabetes among others include.

  • Conducting health education and awareness programs on the need to promote wellness generally and on the causes of Diabetes during the commemoration of health events.
  • Undertaking screening for diabetes and referral of persons who fail screening or are at high risk, to health facilities including by trained Community Health Workers.
  • Creating access to medicines and consumables through the CCMDD Program,
  • Establishing a National Tender to ensure the availability of Strips for Glucometers
  • Ensuring that required medicines are on the Essential Medicines List.
  • Collaborating with relevant Stakeholders including civil society organisations and persons living with NCDS, including Diabetes.

(b) The current allocation to combat obesity and diabetes are inclusive of the Equitable Share received by provinces. The programme does not have a ring-fenced allocation however the Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion Levy budget is also used for these programmes.

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2246

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Police

Given that, according to a presentation by the SA Police Service (SAPS) to the Standing Committee on Appropriations on 20 May 2022, a pilot project to establish Gender-Based Violence (GBV) desks at the 30 GBV hotspot police stations was initiated and the evaluation process will take three to six months, and noting that the SAPS is more likely to fully roll out the process in the 2023-24 financial year, as the SAPS currently envision this roll-out will take, considering that a roll-out rate of 30 police stations per year would take 38,5 years and/or (b) does the SAPS intend to roll out GBV desks at a; the remaining 1 125 police stations during the 2023-24 financial year?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply