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08 January 2024 - NW3373

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether his department has its own target for job creation and growth within the communications sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The DCDT does not have a target for job creation. However, it subscribes to Government’s overarching programme on job creation and reducing unemployment. In this regard, the ICT sector and digital economy are viewed as key levers. Some of the areas identified in creating jobs include: broadband connectivity; broadcasting digital migration; digital skills; electronic equipment installation and refurbishment such as set-top box installation, fibre rollout, Wi-Fi deployment, cell phone repairs and owner driver delivery etc. 

Thank You.

08 January 2024 - NW3546

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

As the custodian of the National Development Plan (NDP) that promotes the capacitybuilding of the State, what specific guidance did her Office give to the National Treasury not to work against the implementation of the NDP?                                                                                                [

Reply:

The Government has translated the Capacity of the State into Priority One which binds all Government Department including National Treasury. All government department participate in the implementation of the NDP, in terms of the MTSF.

This priority addresses the social, economic and governance issues that cuts across all government that affects all of society. The NDP remains the country’s guide and serves to inform all short- and medium-term plans including the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF).

08 January 2024 - NW2834

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he has found that Eskom assets are being sold off to private companies; if not what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will remain resolute in the face of opposition by encouraging public-private partnerships at (a) Eskom and (b) Transnet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No part of Eskom’s restructuring involves selling any of its assets. Eskom is being restructured into three separate and distinct subsidiaries – generation, transmission and distribution – which will be 100 percent wholly owned by the State.

2. Public-private partnerships have previously been acknowledged as a way to unlock critical investment opportunities for the SOEs. They are also critical in helping the state to address competing fiscal priorities by making SOEs more financially sustainable and self-reliant.  These partnerships also enable crowding in of appropriate skills and capital. This ensures that the national interest is best served by creating a collaborative ethos among all stakeholders, including labour.

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

08 January 2024 - NW753

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1) On what date was the position of the Eastern Cape Director of the National Rural Youth Service Corps advertised; 2) whether Mr Lubabalo Makapela applied for the specified position when it was initially advertised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Dr M M Gondwe with the proof of the specified person’s application; 3) whether the person met the criteria for shortlisting; if not, why was the person then shortlisted for the position; if so, on what date was the person interviewed for the position; 4) (a) what total number of candidates were shortlisted for the position, (b) on what date did the shortlisting take place and (c) what criteria were used to shortlist candidates for the position; 5) whether the (a) human resources department and (b) union(s) were represented during the entire recruitment and selection process; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

  1. 10 August 2021.
  2. Yes; however, the application form contains personal information and will not be disclosed in line with the Protection of Personal Information Act, 4 of 2013.
  3. All the issues related to the appointment of Mr Lubabalo Makapela are subjected to comprehensive investigation by the Department. The department will be guided by the outcome of the investigation report.
  4.    (a) 6.

               (b) 4 February 2022.

               (c) All the issues related to the appointment of Mr Lubabalo Makapela are subjected to comprehensive investigation by the Department. The                                 department will be guided by the outcome of the investigation report.

        5.(a) Yes. Deputy Director Human Resource Administration, Eastern Cape (EC), Assistant Director Recruitment and Selection, EC; Human Resource                        Administration Clerk, EC.

             (b) No, in terms of the Departmental Policy on Recruitment and Selection, “Trade union representatives may be present during the shortlisting and                       interview processes for posts on salary levels 1 to 12 and Occupation Specific Dispensations to observe that the process is fair and without any                        bias and discrimination.” The post of Director NARYSEC is at salary level 13 and therefore the unions were not required to be part of the                                  processes.

08 January 2024 - NW211

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the details of the (a) destination and (b) total costs for (i) accommodation, (ii) travel and (iii) any other costs incurred for international travel of each (aa) Minister and (bb) Deputy Minister of her department since 1 June 2019; (2) what is the total cost incurred for domestic air travel for each (a) Minister and (b) Deputy Minister of her department since 1 June 2019?

Reply:

 

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

(1)(a) Please refer to the table below.

       

(1)(a)

Reason for travel

Minister

July/August 2019

Johannesburg/ Addis Ababa/ Cook Islands/ Lome (Togo)/Porto Novo, Benin / Cook Islands/ Lome (Togo)/ Lagos/ Johannesburg

Attended a conference on Songhai farming methods and protecting Natural Resources.

Minister

September 2019

Johannesburg/ Accra Ghana/ Johannesburg

Attended 2019 African Green Revolution Forum

Minister

Oct/Nov 2019

Johannesburg/ Addis Ababa/ Johannesburg

Attended High level Food Security & Nutrition Conference

Minister

November 2019

Johannesburg / Addis Ababa/ Abidjan/ Entebe Uganda

Attended Land Policy Conference in Africa

Minister

December 2019

Johannesburg / Lome (Togo)/Addis Ababa/ Dubai

Attended State visits to Guinea Conakry, Ghana and Togo

Minister

December 2019

Lome (Togo)/Addis Ababa/ Pekoa

 

Minister

December 2019

Addis Ababa/ Dubai

 

Minister

December 2019

Pekoa /Addis Ababa/Johannesburg/ Johannesburg

 

Minister

December 2019

Dubai/ Wuhan/ Sanya (China)

Attended state visit to China

Minister

December 2019

Pekoa/ Doha/ Johannesburg

 

Minister

December 2019

Pekoa / Sanya /Pekoa

 

Minister

December 2019

Sanya /Pekoa

 

Minister

December 2021

Abidjan/Accra

Attended State Visit to Abidjan, Cote D”Ivoire and Ghana

Minister

March 2022

Dubai: United Arab Emirates,

Commemoration of the South African National Day of the Dubai Expo

Minister

June 2022

Johannesburg / Berlin – Germany / Johannesburg

Ministerial Conference on Food Insecurity

Minister

June 2022

Johannesburg /Addis/ Geneva / Addis / Johannesburg

Attended WTO’s 12th Ministerial Conference

Minister

October 2022

Johannesburg / Jeddah / Johannesburg

Attended State visit to Saudi Arabia

Minister

October 2022

Johannesburg / Paris / Johannesburg

Attended the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) meeting of agriculture ministers

Minister

October 2022

Johannesburg / Addis Ababa/ Johannesburg

Attended the High Level Food and Security and Nutrition Conference.

Minister

November 2022

Nairobi Kenya

Attended state visit

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL BY DM CAPA

DM

Date

Destination

Reason for travel

DM Capa

February 2023

Cape Town / Johannesburg / Addis Ababa/ Cape Town

Attended the investors’ roundtable common African Agro Park (CAAPs) programme held on the margins of the 36th Ordinary session of the African Union (AU) assembly.

DM Capa

Sept/October 2022

Johannesburg / Indonesia/ Johannesburg

G20 Agriculture Ministerial meeting

DM Capa

November 2022

Johannesburg / Muscat: Oman / Johannesburg

Attended the Third Global High Level Conference on Anti-microbial Resistance (AMR).

       

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL BY DM SKWATSHA

DM

Date

Destination

Reason for travel

DM Skwatsha

November 2021

Cape Town / Johannesburg / Geneva/ Johannesburg / Cape Town

Cancelled due to COVID 19 travel restrictions (12th WTO Ministerial Conference)

DM Skwatsha

September 2022

Cape Town / Johannesburg / Cairo/Johannesburg / Cape Town

Attending COP 27

DM Skwatsha

November 2022

Cape Town / Johannesburg/ Entebbe/ Johannesburg/ Cape Town

12th Conference of Ministers of Agriculture

(1)(b),(i),(ii),(iii),(aa),(bb) Please refer to the table below

             

Financial year

Minister accomodation

(b)(i)(aa)

Minister travel cost

(b)(ii)(aa)

Minister other costs

(b) (iii)(aa)

Deputy Minister(s) accommodation

(b) (i)(bb)

Deputy Minister(s) travel costs

(b)(ii)(bb)

Deputy Ministers other costs

(b)(iii)(bb)

2019/2020

R 12,800.00

R -

R -

R98,163.00-DM- Skwatsha

R381,803.00-DM Skwatsha

R8,875.00-DM Skwatsha

2020/2021

R -

R -

R -

R -

R -

R3,836.00-DM Skwatsha

2021/2022

R -

R29,426.00

R -

R -

R 91,287.00-DM Capa

R -

2022/2023

R66,581.00

R570,445.00

R -

R92,722.00-DM Capa

R185,059.00-DM Capa

R9,431.00-DM Capa

Total

R79,381.00

R699,871.00

R -

R 190,885.00

R658,149.00

R22,142.00

(2)(a),(b) Please refer to the table below.

Total Cost Domestic Air

 

Financial Year

(a) Minister

(b) Deputy Minister-Skwatsha

(b) Deputy Minister-Capa

2019/2020

R32464.8

R377519.44

0

2020/2021

R132408.29

R74372.76

R9777.45

2021/2022

R219798.87

R233453.98

R247203.55

2022/2023

R91277.44

R527487.61

R3209.51

Total

R475949.4

R1 212833.79

R260190.51

08 January 2024 - NW1394

Profile picture: Sukers, Ms ME

Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 268 on 3 April 2023 from the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, she and/or any member of her Office has met with any representative of any public and/or private company, nonprofit company, association and/or organisation in the tobacco industry and/or a company with an interest in public policy related to the import, export, distribution and/or control of tobacco-related products since her appointment as Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a)(i) on what date and (ii) where did each such meeting occur, (b) who was present at each meeting, (c) at whose request did each meeting take place and (d) what was discussed at each meeting?

Reply:

No, I have not, to the best of my knowledge, met with any representative of any public and/or private company, nonprofit company, association and/or organisation in the tobacco industry and/or a company with an interest in public policy related to the import, export, distribution and/or control of tobacco-related products since my appointment as Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

08 January 2024 - NW3159

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether the needs of any specific sector of the economy of the Republic that were reported to her office in the past financial year are receiving priority; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

I have been advised that:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has not assessed the sectoral needs of the small business development segment of the economy. However, there has been work around the challenges faced by SMMEs and Co-operatives. These challenges relate to excess red tape, access to finance, access to markets, a lack of inclusion of SMMEs in the value chains of big business, lack of access to information and a lack of skills and knowledge on entrepreneurship. To address some of these issues, the DSBD has formulated and executed several interventions aimed at ensuring the participation of MSMEs in the mainstream economy. These include, inter alia, increasing access to developmental funding, expanding support to township and rural enterprises, building access to markets, and improving the regulatory environment. These challenges remain prevalent in most of the sectors in which small businesses operate.

To demonstrate its commitment to the development of SMMEs in the various sectors of the economy, the DSBD established the Small Enterprise Manufacturing Support Programme (SEMSP), as one of the responses to the needs of the small enterprises operating within the manufacturing sector/industry. The programme is considered as one of the contributions to the localization strategy and supports manufacturing enterprises to increase the contribution of manufacturing within the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the South African economy.

The main intention of the Small Enterprise Manufacturing Support Programme (SEMSP) is to replace imports through locally manufactured goods thereby increasing small enterprises production capacity, growth, sustainability, and competitiveness. The support received by small enterprises through the SEMSP includes financial and non-financial to enhance technical skills, business infrastructure support (buildings and machinery) as well as market access. The programme prioritises various categories of manufacturing such as light consumer goods, hi-tech and industrial production which are associated with the sub-sectors such as furniture, basic iron and steel, petroleum and chemical, food and beverages (agro-processing), electrical, green technology etc.

Thus far, SEMSP performance overview for the past three financial years (i.e., 2020/21 to 2022/23) reflects approvals for all nine provinces at about R800M. The first year disbursements were at about R320M, second year being R237M and third year R274M as reflected below.

Figure 1: SEMSP approval 2020/21 to 2022/23

A rectangular orange rectangle with black text

Description automatically generated

The DSBD has increased its involvement in the Cannabis industry. The aim of this involvement is to address some of the challenges faced by MSMEs in the sector. These challenges include, among others, regulatory environment, research, and development (Biomass quality, processing, and product quality), branding (markets), and financing.

The DSBD is working on a Cannabis Pilot Project with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) to conduct research and gather information regarding the how we could create opportunities for the creation of small enterprises across the Cannabis value chains, as well as on establishing and increasing the manufacturing capacity of the South African Cannabis industry.

In the main, this initiative is aimed at the development of interventions that are informed by evidence; the promotion and advocacy for an enabling policy, legal and regulatory environment, especially advocacy for ease and accessible issuing of cannabis producing operating licenses for start-ups. It is also the intention of the Pilot Project to develop targeted instruments to support small enterprises (Business Development Services and Financial Support). The development of the Cannabis industry will require a collaborative effort from relevant stakeholders. It is for this reason that we encourage strategic partnerships (public and private) to be formed to advance an inclusive, sustainable, and globally competitive Cannabis industry in South Africa.

The DSBD has developed the Cannabis Small Enterprises Support Plan (CSESP), the aim of which is to develop an instrument for the support and promotion of small enterprises within cannabis industry value chains.

The DSBD–CSIR have also collaborated to establish an Incubation Programme that assists MSMEs to partake in the Cannabis industry. The intention of this programme is to conduct primary (not cultivation/harvesting), secondary, and downstream processing of Cannabis and Hemp biomass. Moreover, there is specific focus on the formulation and re-iteration of low THC cannabis/hemp product prototypes, as well as the upscaling and testing of the range of low THC cannabis-based products for the selected enterprises. The tail end of the process requires the partners to facilitate contract manufacturing of at least 100 market ready samples, at GMP facility, for each MSME to test the formal markets.

To respond to the needs of MSMEs operating in township and rural areas, the DSBD formulated the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP). The Scheme is aimed at supporting small enterprises to participate in the rebuilding and restructuring of the economy in townships and rural areas, improve the quality and competitiveness of small enterprises for both domestic supply and export market, and seize the opportunities in the various sectors of the economy. The Scheme supports all small enterprises operating in townships and rural areas that meet the qualifying criteria including but not limited to sectors such as Clothing & Textile, Bakeries & Confectionaries, Tshisanyama and Cooked Food, Retail (including restaurants, car washes, general dealers, etc.), Automotive, Personal Care, and Artisans.

To penetrate various local and international markets, the DSBD is implementing a localisation programme with the intention of building the manufacturing capacity of SMMEs. It is anticipated that the increased capacity and capability of SMMEs will assist with market access opportunities for SMME manufactured products. Essentially, the DSBD and its agencies, the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), provide support and preparation of SMMEs towards import replacement and export market penetration.

On the regulatory environment front, the DSBD continues to roll out the red tape reduction guidelines – working together with municipalities. Several municipalities have been covered across the country.

08 January 2024 - NW1448

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What monitoring interventions has her Office made to build the skills base of youth in rural areas to fight unemployment?

Reply:

The department has adopted a step change toward an all-of-government and all-of-society approach to livelihood restoration, wealth creation, poverty and hunger alleviation through special projects that will be rolled out across some of the country’s poorest district municipalities. These projects will have a training element for vulnerable groups in general and youth in particular.

(a) SANDF-led National Service (NS) – To address the current state of poverty, idleness, and general economic inactivity among our vulnerable population in general and the youth in particular, the SANDF led NYS programme is being introduced to build the youths’ character, empower them to serve in their communities, inculcate discipline and a sense of patriotism, train youth in leadership and entrepreneurship; and then provide them with technical capacity building in value chain driven sector specific industries with high absorption capacity. The training streams will range from food and agriculture value chain; oceans economy and maritime skills; engineering, manufacturing, and infrastructure development; digital technologies and platform economies; and defense industries, public safety and security stream. The programme participants will be trained to be resilient and self-sustaining and then linked with job opportunities in diverse sectors.

Cabinet has asked us to work with the following Departments who have the financial capacity to support elements of the National Service:

  • Department of Higher Education and Training
  • Department of Transport
  • Department of Forestry Fisheries and environment
  • COGTA
  • Department of Basic Education
  • Department of Employment and Labour
  • Department of Human Settlement

(b) Integrated Farming Value Chain Cooperatives - To address the key challenges of poverty, weakened livelihoods, hunger, limited or no economic opportunities, little to no income as well as inadequate access to resources contributing to the cycle of poverty, the DWYPD is mobilising women, youth, and persons with disabilities, particularly those in poor rural communities to establish integrated farming value chain cooperatives.

Additionally, the department is also partnering with the CSIR in the development of a national goat commercialization pilot project in all the 9 provinces. The goat farming value chain is identified as an initial focus area, because goat farming in South African has been practised since time immemorial, yet this sector has not been fully exploited for optimal economic value.

(c) Community Micro Bakery Training Projects – DWYPD will provide bakery training for women, youth, and persons with disabilities in some of the poorest districts in local municipalities, so that they can participate in this growing industry in order to reduce the impact of extreme poverty, unemployment, create community wealth, raise household incomes, and restore livelihoods as well as basic socio-economic insecurity. Once trained, the programme participants will be supported to become entrepreneurs thus facilitating their economic self-reliance whilst contributing to an all-of-government’s reconstruction and recovery efforts.

08 January 2024 - NW1635

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) For what total number of days has a certain person (name and details furnished) been on suspension, (b) what are the (i) circumstances surrounding the specified person’s suspension and (ii) reasons that the person was suspended and (c) what total amount has the State spent to date on the continued suspension?

Reply:

(a) As at 25 May 2023, the specified employee has been on suspension for approximately 654 working days owing to: 1) delays imposed by the employee in respect to disciplinary process, which was kickstarted within the prescribed 60 days period, and 2) the passing away of the chairperson of the disciplinary committee.

(b)(i) The employee is alleged to have committed serious misconduct (29 charges) including several allegations of prejudicing the administration of the department, failing to carry out lawful instructions, abuse, insolence and gross insubordination. The prolonged suspension is as a result of the protracted processes and applications that had to be dealt with within this process in different forum. To expedite the matter, the Director-General: DPSA, as the disciplining authority, has referred the matter to the GPSSBC as a hearing under section 188A(11) of the Labour Relations Act, 1995 triggered by the passing of the Chairperson of the disciplinary process, amongst others.

(ii) A professional public service starts with holding senior officials accountable to the highest standards of behaviour, decorum and ethics. The DPSA, as the leader of the charge to build a professional, ethical and capable State and the custodian of ensuring that the public service adheres to these enshrined Constitutional principles, must itself live and achieve this goal. Employees within the DPSA have a higher responsibility to act in a manner becoming of these aspirations. The employee in this instance has fundamentally failed in his/her responsibilities and was suspended as his/her continued presence in the workplace would jeopardise the current disciplinary processes, interfere with witnesses and actively undermine the administration of the department to the extent that key work of the department and public service at large would be hamstrung.

(c ) The employee is suspended on full pay, as per section 188A of the Labour Relations Act, read with the Disciplinary Code and Procedures contained in Chapter 7 of the Senior Management Services Handbook. Despite the delays not being at the instance of the Department, the Department is obliged to continue to pay the employee as there is no authority for an unpaid suspension. The DPSA is reviewing the relevant disciplinary codes to ensure that matters such as these are not a phenomenon that plagues the public service. The employees’ rights to fair labour practices must be balanced against the State's ability to hold public servants accountable for their conduct or misconduct. The Department is not in a position to share further details as the case is ongoing.

End

08 January 2024 - NW2533

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

1) With reference to his reply to question 882 on 24 July 2023. What is the reason that no response was furnished to paragraphs (2) and (3) although he explains in the same response that stolen firearms that are sold by members of the SA Police Service are investigated by Project Impi; 2) What (a) total number of the stolen firearms that were directly linked to the former Col Christiaan Prinsloo and David Charles Naidoo were recovered to date and (b) number of murders are linked to the specified firearms?

Reply:

Find reply here 

08 January 2024 - NW2285

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether, with reference to the institution of an inquiry by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, into matters surrounding the docking of the Russian vessel, Lady R, in Simonstown in December 2022, the import permits granted in 2019 and 2020 were still valid to offload Russian ammunition while the ship was docked and/or any applications for export permits for munitions to be loaded onto the specified vessel were received; if not, was the validity of the import permits extended by the National Conventional Arms Control Committee; if so, what are the details and reasons that the extension and the export permit application were not reported to the Joint Standing Committee on Defence?

Reply:

  1. The NCACC confirms that the import permits granted in 2019 and 2020 were not valid at the time of the offloading Russian ammunition while the ship was docked and/or any applications for export permits for munitions to be loaded onto the specified vessel were received.
  2. This is because the Permits issued at any given time have a limited lifespan and may only be extended to keep these valid but the extension in terms of legislation is limited. When such a time frame lapses so does the validity of the Permit. Thus, it goes without saying that the Import Permit issued in 2019 and 2020, would have lapsed.
  3. The Export Permits of munitions to be loaded on the specific vessel do not arise, since the NCACC has not received any application for such export permits therefore none would/were issued.
  4. Further, the Judge Mojapelo (retired) Panel Report also vindicated the NCACC by concluding that no ammunition was loaded onto that specific vessel.
  5. The Import Permits which were used in 2022 are linked to the same Order and Purchase by the Importer. However, the Order and Purchase are purely a commercial transaction and are not regulated under the NCAC Act.
  6. The Importer is entitled that in pursuance of their commercial interests to apply to the NCACC and should enjoy the full consideration by the Conventional Arms Control processes. This the Importer complied with in 2022 and was issued with the necessary Import Permits.
  7. The Importer applied for the Import Permits and these were issued as follows:

PERMIT 1 

(a) Import Permit IM0036810 which is the Final Import Permit that was issued and signed by the Secretariat of the NCACC in order for the Vessel that was carrying Equipment. This permit is referencing both Order Numbers of Armscor: KP467230/1 and KP467233. Further, this Import Permit also indicates that it is a replacement permit that replaced IM0036672, which had been cancelled earlier.

PERMIT 2

(b) The final issuing of Import Permit no IM0036677 was issued by the Secretariat as a result of a request for cancellation and an issue. This transaction resulted in the Permit being issued under a changed Import Permit to IM0036814 by the Importer.

Finally, the report(s) by the NCACC to Parliament in terms of s23 of the NCAC Act are compiled in a predetermined manner. Thus, ensuring consistency and probity when the respective Parliamentary Committee(s) have to exercise their Oversight Role.

Therefore, it is not an omission by the NCACC that the Export Permit(s) was not reported to Parliament. Such reporting is done/provided based on applications received and processed. Since no Export Permit was received by the NCACC, no report can be furnished to the Joint Standing Committee on Defence (JSCD).

I trust that this enables the Member to fully appreciate and accept the factual aspects of the matters at hand.

 

Thank You.

08 January 2024 - NW3228

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

In view of the fact that the coordination of the Sanitary Dignity Programme across the Republic falls within her department’s mandate, while her department is more of a regulatory department rather than a service delivery department, what are the details of (a) how her department monitors and evaluates the sanitary dignity programme across the Republic and (b) the findings of the monitoring and evaluation process in each province since the programme was launched?

Reply:

The equitable share budget for the sanitary dignity programme is disbursed directly to Provinces by the National Treasury. Consequently, provinces run their procurement processes independently to appoint service providers to deliver sanitary pads. As the department has no control over the budget, we have no control over the procurement processes in the programme.

In monitoring the programme, the department convenes quarterly Sanitary Dignity National Task Team meetings with representatives from all provinces to receive updates on progress in the implementation of the programme.

08 January 2024 - NW3068

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

(1)On what date(s) did the National Conventional Arms Control Committee (NCACC) hold its scheduled meetings in the (a) 2021, (b) 2022 and (c) 2023 calendar years to consider applications for all the (i) import and (ii) export permit applications as defined by the National Conventional Arms Control Act, Act 41 of 2002; (2) whether the NCACC has considered the instability that prevailed between Russia and Ukraine in both 2021 and 2022; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether the NCACC has considered any applications for imports and exports to and from Belarus, which has provided its territory to Russia since its first attacks on Ukraine, actively supported and participated in the Russian invasion of Ukraine and now houses the Russian Wagner private military group; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.

1.1 The NCACC Meetings are scheduled to take place on the last Thursday of each month from February to November in each year. Dates of scheduled NCACC meetings for 2021, 2022 and 2023 are as follows:

1.2 The 2021 meetings though scheduled as per ussual, were held virtually due to the protocols that were under COVID 19 Controls as prescribed under the State of Disaster as proclaimed at the time.

A. 2021

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

25

25

29

27

24

29

26

30

28

25

 

B. 2022

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

24

31

28

26

30

28

25

29

27

24

C. 2023

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

23

30

27

25

29

27

31

28

26

30

2.

2.1 The NCACC applies the provisions of s15 of the NCACC Act (as amended) to evaluate and approve application(s), presented for such consideration. The NCACC has not considered and approved any applications to export to Russia and/or the Ukraine. Unless there were any such transfers, in contradiction to s15 of the Act, the contradiction of s15 of the Act would have been a conterpoint of consideration. However, given that none were considered, s15 has been applied without fail.

2.2 Importation of equipment from Russia and/or the Ukraine would not have come into contention, since the importation of controlled items seeks not/does not contribute destabilization of the Region. But, contributes to South Africa’s defensive needs.

3.

3.1 The NCACC is provided with intelligence reports on a systematized frequency and this subscribes to the manner of the criteria contained in various estimates. The reports also target the type of equipment for assessment in terms of whether such transfers are in line with both our domestic and international obligations. Key to this assessment is the United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCR) that include arms embargo.

3.2 At no stage of assessment could the aspect of Belarus and/or the Wagner Group constitute an identified risk to consider at the time. Further, the applications that were destined for such a country would have come under scrutiny, given the applicable criteria of the NCACC Act.

3.3 Thus the question does not arise, other than it being postulate.

Thank you.

08 January 2024 - NW3246

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What was the total expenditure incurred by her Office in relation to the (i) BRICS Summit in August 2023 and (ii) BRICS Parliamentary Forum in September 2023?

Reply:

The total amount of R 10 571 360.75 was utilized for BRICS related expenditure. We do not have the split with regards to the Summit and the Parliamentary Forum.

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Thembisile C Majola

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3154

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether any of the funds that were allocated towards the repair of the bridge that was damaged in Ntuzuma in KwaZulu-Natal during the 2022 floods have been used; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total amount has been used to date and (b) repair work has been completed to date?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Ntuzuma Bridge in KwaZulu-Natal province does not fall under Department of Public works’ Welisizwe Bridges Programme.

It is therefore advised that the question be referred to the National department of Transport as well as the Provincial Department.

08 January 2024 - NW3528

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1) What urgent steps of intervention has she taken to create job opportunities for youth, in particular graduates, since she assumed office; (2) whether there has been any discussion to legislate job seeking allowances for unemployment graduates who seek employment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Addressing the youth unemployment challenge requires all of society to intervene. It requires all spheres of government to prioritise the creation business and employment opportunities for the Youth. The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD), plays a coordinating role in the all-of-government intervention particularly as the budget of the DWYPD is not proportional to the scale of the youth unemployment challenge in the Republic.

The National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) is part of Project Management Unit (PMU) established by government and placed at The Presidency. Through the PMU, the Presidency, (NYDA), and the DWYPD, are implementing the Presidential Employment Stimulus (PES) as a response of the sixth administration to impact on jobs and livelihoods. Using direct public investment, the PES supports job creation, job protection, and livelihood support programmes as part of a wider economic recovery progress. The PES has created 1 098 304 work and livelihood opportunities for unemployed South Africans. Of the participants, 84% are youth and 62% are women.

As part of the Employment Stimulus, the Department of Higher Education and Training is supporting a graduate placement programme in 21 universities - because even for graduates, lack of work experience creates barriers to labour market entry. These placements are for work that allows graduates to apply their skills in relation to their field of study, in order to directly enhance relevant work experience. University departments have been invited to create meaningful opportunities for graduates and in so doing increase their research and academic support capacity. 1052 graduates have benefitted from the programme.

The DWYPD also amended its 2023/24 Annual Performance Plan (APP) to include new priorities for implementation with various stakeholders within and outside of government that are aimed at creating jobs for youth, including for the graduates. These initiatives include:

a) SANDF-led National Service (NS) – To address the current state of poverty, idleness, and general economic inactivity among our vulnerable population in general and the youth in particular, the SANDF led NYS programme is being introduced to build the youths’ character, empower them to serve in their communities, inculcate discipline and a sense of patriotism, train youth in leadership and entrepreneurship; and then provide them with technical capacity building in value chain driven sector specific industries with high absorption capacity. The training streams will range from food and agriculture value chain; oceans economy and maritime skills; engineering, manufacturing, and infrastructure development; digital technologies and platform economies; and defense industries, public safety and security stream. The programme participants will be trained to be resilient and self-sustaining and then linked with job opportunities in diverse sectors.

Cabinet has asked us to work with the following Departments who have the financial capacity to support elements of the National Service:

  • Department of Higher Education and Training
  • Department of Transport
  • Department of Forestry Fisheries and environment
  • COGTA
  • Department of Basic Education
  • Department of Employment and Labour
  • Department of Human Settlement

b) Integrated Farming Value Chain Cooperatives - To address the key challenges of poverty, weakened livelihoods, hunger, limited or no economic opportunities, little to no income as well as inadequate access to resources contributing to the cycle of poverty, the DWYPD is mobilising women, youth, and persons with disabilities, particularly those in poor rural communities to establish integrated farming value chain cooperatives.

Additionally, the department is also partnering with the CSIR in the development of a national goat commercialization pilot project in all the 9 provinces. The goat farming value chain is identified as an initial focus area, because goat farming in South African has been practised since time immemorial, yet this sector has not been fully exploited for optimal economic value.

We are also working with the Department of Agriculture in implementing this program. We have also approached the Private Sector to support the beneficiaries of the farming value chain cooperatives.

c) Community Micro Bakery Training Projects – DWYPD will provide bakery training for women, youth, and persons with disabilities in some of the poorest districts in local municipalities, so that they can participate in this growing industry in order to reduce the impact of extreme poverty, unemployment, create community wealth, raise household incomes, and restore livelihoods as well as basic socio-economic insecurity. Once trained, the programme participants will be supported to become entrepreneurs thus facilitating their economic self-reliance whilst contributing to an all-of-government’s reconstruction and recovery efforts.

2. The National Treasury is better placed to respond on discussions to legislate job seeking allowances for unemployed graduates who seek employment. This part of the question may be directed to the Ministry of Finance for reply.

08 January 2024 - NW3182

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has purchased any new vehicles since her appointment to Office; if not, why not; if so, what (a) did each vehicle cost and (b) is the (i) make and (ii) model of each new vehicle?”

Reply:

Yes the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) purchased new vehicles during the Minister’s appointment to office. To note however, when the Minister was appointed in the department there was a procurement process already underway for one (1) vehicle for the previous Minister was later transferred to the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies.

Therefore, in total Eight (8) vehicles were purchased since the Minister was appointed in the department.

To avoid the cost of hiring vehicles within the department five (5) vehicles were purchased and the details of the vehicles purchased are provided below.

Detail

Breakdown

  1. Cost of each vehicle

Total cost

Eight (8) vehicles were purchased: three (3) for Minister of Small Business Development and five (5) for departmental pool purposes.

One (1) vehicle was procured in 2021/2022 financial year and was transferred to the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies

2021/22: Audi Q5: 1 @ R726 469.25

R 726 469.25

 

Five (5) departmental pool vehicles Nissan Almera 1.5 procured in 2022/2023 financial year

2022/23 Nissan Almera: 5 @ R242 955.03 each

R1 214 775.15

 

Two (2) vehicles were procured in 2023/2024 financial year and allocated to DSBD Pretoria and Cape Town Offices.

2023/24: Audi Q5: 2 @ R790 000.00 each

R1 580 000

     

R3 521 244.40

(b) Make and model of each vehicle:

Year

  1. Make of the Vehicle
  1. Model of each vehicle

2021/2022 financial year

Transferred to DCDT:

Audi Q5

Model: FYGCFY-E00,

Audi Q5 40 TDI 140KW quattro S line tronic, and Paint & Trim

2022/23 financial year

Five (5) X Nissan Almera

Model: Nissan Almera 1.5 Acenta MT

2023/2024 financial year

Audi Q5

Cape Town:

Model: FYGAFY-E00

Audi Q5 40 TDI 140KW quattro S tronic.

 

Audi Q5

Pretoria:

Model: FYGAFY-E00

Audi Q5 40 TDI 140KW quattro S tronic

08 January 2024 - NW2605

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a) What is the name of each company that will be created out of the unbundling of Eskom, (b) who is the director of each specified company, (c) what is the composition of their boards and (d) what are the relevant details of the initial capitalisation of each company; (2) whether he will furnish Mr N F Shivambu with the memoranda of incorporation of each company; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)

  • The Transmission Division will become the National Transmission Company South Africa (NTCSA SOC)
  • The Distribution Division will become the National Electricity Distribution Company South Africa (NEDCSA SOC)

(1)(b)

The National Transmission Company of South Africa (NTCSA) currently has the following directors:

  1. Elsie Pule
  2. Calib Cassim
  3. Segomoco Scheppers

The National Electricity Distribution Company of South Africa currently has the below-mentioned directors:

  1. Elsie Pule
  2. Calib Cassim
  3. Monde Bala

It must be noted that Mr de Ruyter is being replaced by Ms Elsie Pule on boards of the above two entities. So, in the near future Mr de Ruyter will not reflect as a director. It is to be noted that the removal of Mr de Ruyter from CIPC had been delayed by the lack of a recently certified ID copy from him and CIPC refused to make a change without a recently certified ID. The companies have since prepared an affidavit for consideration by CIPC to enable the deregistration of Mr de Ruyter as a director.

(c )

One African male, one coloured male and one African woman.

(d)

Details entailed in the MOI are attached.

(2)

MOI attached.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

08 January 2024 - NW2091

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What new ideas and solutions has the Republic adopted and implemented following her attendance in Moscow of the International Security Conference to share practical ideas and explore solutions on matters of global security in August 2022?

Reply:

Find reply here

08 January 2024 - NW3212

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1)On what date (a) did the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, and the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity, Dr K Ramokgopa, sign a performance agreement and (b) will the performance agreement lapse;

Reply:

(1) (a) The President and the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity, Dr K Ramokgopa signed a performance agreement on 31 July 2023 and (b) the performance agreement is until the end of the 2023/2024 financial year (31 March 2024);

(2) No. I will not furnish Ms S J Graham with a copy of the performance agreement; as it is an agreement is between the President and the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity;

(3) President meets regularly with Ministers to assess progress in their portfolios. Whilst the Minister in the Presidency for Electricity provides regular progress with regard to the performance of his portfolio. In addition, the management of the performance of ministers is a prerogative of the President in terms of the Constitution.

08 January 2024 - NW3433

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What measures have been taken to accommodate employees from closed post offices; 2. what (a) measures have been put in place to facilitate the payment of stipends and grants which would ordinarily have been paid at the closed Post Offices, (b) number of beneficiaries have been affected and (c) measures have been taken to assist the affected beneficiaries, including the means of communication?

Reply:

1. Employees from closed Post Offices are offered redeployment to other workplaces based on staffing requirements.

(2)(a) Beneficiaries are referred to the nearest branches, retailers and banks for access to their grants.

(2)(b) SAPO has closed a number of branches nationwide, and amongst the closed branches are SASSA paying offices. The SAPO does not have a measure of determining the number of affected beneficiaries as a result of closed branches.

(2)(c) The process below is followed when a branch is closed:

  • SASSA beneficiaries are referred to nearest branches, retailers and banks for assistance.
  • For a planned closure – a board indicating the intention to close is displayed prior to the actual closure for customer information. An SMS is sent to branch customers where the cell phone details are known.
  • For forced closure – a notice indicating closed status is displayed and left on the property for customer information.
  • List of closed branches is shared with SASSA for further communication with beneficiaries.
  • The list of closed offices is also placed on the SAPO website and updated weekly with details of alternative offices. The process has proven effective as beneficiaries have a choice to use retailers or banks.

Thank You.

08 January 2024 - NW754

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) On what date was Mr Lubabalo Makapela appointed as the Eastern Cape Director of the National Rural Youth Service Corps (Narysec); (2) whether his appointment was in line with human resources (a) recruitment and (b) selection processes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the person possesses the necessary (a) qualifications and/or (b) experience for the position of Eastern Cape Director of the Narysec; (4) on what date did the person (a) enrol for the Nyukela Programme and (b) obtain the Nyukela certificate?

Reply:

 

  1. 1 April 2023.
  2. (a) All the issues related to the appointment of Mr Lubabalo Makapela are subjected to comprehensive investigation by the Department. The department will be guided by the outcome of the investigation report.

            (b) Falls away.

       3.   (a) and (b) Falls away

       4.   (a) and (b) Falls away

08 January 2024 - NW1395

Profile picture: Sukers, Ms ME

Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 73 on 3 April 2023 from the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, she has ever met two certain persons (names furnished) and/or any other person who is or has been a director, associate and/or employee of a certain company (name furnished) and/or any company trading under the name of the specified company; if not, what is the position in each specified case; if so, in each case, (a)(i) on what date and (ii) where did each such meeting take place, (b) who was present at each meeting and (c) what was discussed at each meeting?

Reply:

No.
As the Minister of Cooperative Governance & Traditional Affairs, I was never part of a meeting with the referenced individuals.

08 January 2024 - NW3248

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, given that he did not table in Parliament the annual reports for SA Airways (SAA) for the 2019/20, 2020/21, 2021/22 and 2022/23 financial years, notwithstanding clause 17(6)(e) of the International Air Services Act, Act 60 of 1993, that requires the International Air Services Council to take into account the financial capability of the applicant, the SAA currently has a valid international air services licence; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what basis was the financial capability of SAA taken into account by the international air services council and (b) what date was the international air services licence issued to SAA?

Reply:

The previous years financial statements (2019/20, 2020/21, 2021/22 and 2022/23) have been tabled.

In adherence to the stipulations set by the Domestic Air Service Regulations 1991 Section D, Clause 5(a), the interim Chief Executive Officer of South African Airways (SAA) dutifully submits monthly management accounts to the council.

With these considerations SAA was issued its international air services license in February 2020 and the license is updated as new routes are added.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

08 January 2024 - NW2903

Profile picture: Sukers, Ms ME

Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, noting that the Policy on the Prevention and Management of Learner Pregnancy in Schools was published in the Government Gazette on 3 December 2021 and furthermore noting that the National Education Policy Act, Act 27 of 1996, requires that she shall within 21 days after determining policy in terms of section 3  table the policy instrument referred to in paragraph (a) in Parliament within 21 days after the notice has appeared in the Government Gazette (details furnished), the specified policy was tabled in terms of the specified Act; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

 

The policy has been tabled with Parliament in December 2023. 

05 January 2024 - NW3790

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What (a) total number of cases of transformer theft and/or sabotage to electrical infrastructure were reported in the (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21, (iii) 2021-22 and (iv) 2022-23 financial years and (b) was the financial cost in terms of each province; (2) (a) which areas are yet to be restored and connected as a result of the theft incidents and (b) what action has been taken to restore and protect the electrical infrastructure?

Reply:

The Ministry/Minister was appointed to oversee and direct the implementation of the Energy Action Plan, with its 5-outcome areas. As such, the focus of NECOM has been on strengthening/stabilising generation, enabling the fast tracking of new generation including addressing legislative bottle necks, and accelerating the scale and pace of implementation of renewable energy projects, as well as upscaling rooftop solar/embedded generation projects, and transforming the energy landscape through transformation of the energy sector, consequently, the Ministry has not kept the records of the financial and economic impact (since its establishment) associated with cable theft and/or sabotage of transformer.

2. Further, incidences of this nature are observed across Eskom distribution, Transmission and the Municipalities and as such the Ministry does not maintain a outage/response and repair log. This information will have to be sourced from (Eskom Distribution), through the Department of Public Enterprises or the respect Municipality (in municipal licensed areas)

05 January 2024 - NW4007

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1 ) What total number of (a) firearms and (b) ammunition of each (i) type and (ii) calibre were (aa) stolen and (bb) lost and/or went missing at each military unit in each province (aaa) in the past four financial years and (bbb) from 1 April 2023 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) What steps has her department taken to combat the theft and loss of the firearms and ammunition; (3) Whether any persons were (a) arrested and/or found guilty in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what total number of (i) persons were arrested and/or found guilty and (ii) the specified persons were members of the SA National Defence Force?

Reply:

Find reply here

05 January 2024 - NW4006

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

what total number of a firearms and ammunition of each (i) type and (ii) calibre were (aa) stolen and (bb) lost and/or went missing at each correctional centre in each province (aaa) in the past four financial years and (bbb) from 1 April 2023 up to the latest specified date for which information is available. (2) What steps has his department taken to combat the theft and loss of the firearms and ammunition (3) Whether any persons were (a) arrested and/or (b) found guilty in this regard; if not, why not, if so, what total number of (i) persons were arrested and/or found guilty and (ii) the specified persons were members of Correctional Services?

Reply:

  1. The total number of firearms and ammunition of each type and caliber which were stolen and lost and/or went missing at each correctional centre in each province in the past four financial years up to the latest specified date is as follows:

REGION

Centre

a) Total number of firearms (Type & calibre)

b) Total number of ammunition (Type & calibre)

(aa) Stolen

(bb) Lost/ missing

(aaa) period

(bbb) April 2023 till date

LMN

Modimolle CC

One (1) Glock 9mm

N/A

N/A

Lost

2020/21

N/A

 

Witbank CC

One (01) Beretta 9mm

15 ammunition

(magazine)

Stolen

N/A

N/A

2023/24

 

Makhado CC

One (01) Bereta 9mm

15 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Lost

2022/23

N/A

EC

King Williams Town

One (1) Glock 9mm

N/A

N/A

Lost

2021/22

N/A

 

Middeldrift CC

One (01) Z88 9mm

N/A

N/A

Lost

2020/21

N/A

 

Mdatsane CC

Two (02) Z88

9mm

30 ammunition (magazine)

X2 Stolen

N/A

N/A

2023/24

 

Mthatha Remand

One (01) Z88

9mm

15 ammunition

(magazine)

Stolen

N/A

2021/22

N/A

 

Flagstaff CC

One (01) Z88

9mm

10 ammunition

(magazine)

Stolen

N/A

2021/22

N/A

 

Lusikisiki CC

One (01) Z88

9mm

15 ammunition

Magazine

Stolen

N/A

2020/21

N/A

 

Sada CC

One (01) Z88

9mm

10 ammunition

Magazine

N/A

Lost

N/A

2023/24

 

St Albans Med B CC

One (01)

Barretta 9mm

10 ammunition

(magazine)

Stolen

N/A

2019/20

N/A

 

St Albans Med A CC

One Glock

9mm

30 ammunition

(magazine)

Stolen

N/A

2020/21

N/A

KZN

Eshowe CC

One (01) Glock

9mm

15 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Missing

N/A

2023/24

 

Ncome Max CC

One (01) Glock

9mm

15 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Missing

N/A

2023/24

FS/NC

Victoria West CC

One (01) Glock

9mm

25 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Missing

2022/23

N/A

WC

Brandvlei Youth CC

N/A

15 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Missing

2019/20

N/A

 

Brandvlei Med CC

N/A

45 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Missing

N/A

2023/24

GAUTENG

Johannesburg Med A

One (01) Z88

9mm

15 Ammunition

N/A

Missing

2020/22

N/A

 

Odi CC

One (01) Z88

9mm

15 ammunition

(magazine)

N/A

Missing

N/A

2023/24

Total

18

 

295

08

10

   

2. Steps taken to combat the theft and loss of firearms and ammunition are as follows:

  • Monthly inspections and proper handing over of firearms is conducted daily;
  • Continuous checking and control of firearms is done daily;
  • Physical counting of firearms and ammunitions is vigorously done;
  • Weekly certification is done and forwarded to the Area Commissioner according to the stipulations of Department B Order Chapter 16 Paragraph 5.6.4 and 5.6.5;
  • SAPS is also conducting random inspection to monitor compliance with Firearm Control Act 2000;
  • Continuous orientation of security officials and armoury controllers about the essence of registers;
  • New arsenal controllers were appointed in writing and strict security measures are implemented;
  • Fire arms are conducted for during unlock and lockup on daily basis;

3. (a) No arrest were made, however all incidents were reported to the South African Police Service for criminal investigation.

(3)(b) Yes, internal investigations have found that officials were involved and disciplinary processes were meted out. Details are as follows:

REGION

TOTAL NUMBER FOUND GUILTY

LMN

  • Five (05) officials were found guilty with one month leave without pay each.

EC

Five (05) officials were found guilty:

  • One (01) official- final written warning
  • Two (02) officials- 1 month leave without pay
  • Two (02) officials- dismissed

Four incidents of stolen firearms are currently under internal investigation and all cases have been registered with SAPS.

KZN

No officials have faced disciplinary charges as the cases are still under internal investigation.

FSNC

Eight (8) officials found guilty as follows:

  • Three (03) issued with final written warnings
  • Three (03) each granted 1 month leave without pay
  • Two (02) granted two months leave without pay each.

WC

  • One official issued with a verbal warning
  • Two incidents under internal investigation

GP

  • One official granted one month leave without pay

Total of nineteen 19 officials found guilty subsequent to disciplinary processes.

 

END

05 January 2024 - NW4056

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

With reference to her commitment at the BRICS Dialogue 2023 to conduct investigations into communication breakdowns with Gauteng Economic Development, what are the relevant details of the (a) progress and (b) timeframes for the investigation? [

Reply:

1.(a) It was subsequently concluded that there was no need for a formal investigation to be instituted in this regard as the measures in place to address the challenge are adequate. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) has a Frontline Monitoring and Support (FMS) programme implemented across all provinces in a holistic manner, which is a key monitoring mechanism that provides government not only with relevant, reliable information on the quality of service delivery on the ground, but also to facilitate improvements in service delivery.

(b) N/A

05 January 2024 - NW730

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What (a) are the relevant details of how the Secretariat of the National Council on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide has facilitated the implementation of the National Strategic Plan, given that the Council has not been established yet and (b) total amount has been spent on the Secretariat and its work to date?

Reply:

a) The Secretariat of the National Council on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF Secretariat) serves as an interim structure of the National Council on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (NC on GBVF) for the coordination and implementation of the National Strategic Plan on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (NSP on GBVF).

The functions/activities of the GBVF Secretariat include, but are not limited to:

  1. The compilation and submission of monthly progress reports on the implementation of the NSP on GBVF to all FOSAD Clusters;
  2. The compilation and submission of quarterly progress reports on the implementation of the NSP on GBVF to the Presidency;
  3. Providing secretariat services to the multisectoral END GBVF Collective, a voluntary platform with 700 members that creates space for stakeholders from government, civil society, development agencies, and private citizens to think, plan, and work together in the implementation of the 6 pillars of the NSP on GBVF;
  4. The convening of information sessions with national and provincial government departments on the integration of the NSP on GBVF targets to departmental plans;
  5. The implementation of the 100-Day Challenge Capacity Building Programme, which was a pilot to accelerate local implementation of the NSP on GBVF in seven districts with intentional focus and systems design to create the enabling conditions for collaboration, innovation and execution;
  6. The provision of technical support to the planning and organising of the Presidential GBVF Summit 2 working groups; organised Pillar Dialogues; and trained all nine provinces on pre-summits guidelines in line with the Presidential Summit theme: “Accountability, Acceleration and Amplification NOW”;
  7. Drafting the NSP on GBVF two and a half years reflective report which formed the key base document for the Presidential Summits on GBVF; and
  8. Provides secretariat support services to all Presidential Summits on GBVF inclusive of final summit reports.

These are some of the highlights of the overall work coordinated by the GBVF Secretariat to implement the NSP on GBVF.

b) The total amount incurred over the period 2020/21 to 2022/23 by the GBVF Secretariat amounts to R6 635 834.

05 January 2024 - NW4137

Profile picture: Mthethwa, Mr E

Mthethwa, Mr E to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether he has a mechanism in place when cases in courts are regularly postponed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) justifications for a postponement of a case in excess of 75 times and (b) are the cost implications that could be attributed to such postponements including the costs related to legal aid provided in such cases; (2) whether any mechanisms in the judiciary have been reported to him that alerts the Judge Presidents of the various divisions of the High Court of multiple postponements of cases for their attention in order to minimise unnecessary and further costs and delayed processes that deny justice to those who seek and are desperate for it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, there are mechanisms in place to address cases in courts which are regularly postponed. These include the quarterly meetings of senior members of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, with the Regional Court Presidents’ Forum as well as separately with the Chief Magistrates’ Forum, as Magistrates are in charge of Case-flow Management in courts. These meetings discuss blockages in the system and measures to address such blockages. The relevant actions on backlog cases, are further discussed at such meetings.

a) Please would the Hon member give me the details of the case that has been postponed in excess of 75 times, so that I can request the Department to follow up on such with the relevant Regional Court Presidents’ Forum or Chief Magistrates’ Forum, as well as the relevant Provincial Head of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development? I would not regard postponement of a case in excess of 75 times, as acceptable, but I do not know the reasons for such, i.e., it may have been caused by the accused himself or herself, by changing attorneys every now and then, which forces postponements because attorneys need to learn the history of the case.

(b) Legal Aid South Africa has informed me as follows:

(i) The mandate of Legal Aid SA in so far as the representation of accused persons in criminal matters are concerned, derives from section 35(3) of the

South African Constitution.

(ii) The accused in a criminal matter has the choice to conduct their own defence, alternatively, appoint a legal representative of own choice and, if they cannot afford a legal representative of their own choice, to apply for legal aid, in which case a legal representative will be appointed for them at no cost to them.

(iii) In the 2022/2023 Financial Year, Legal Aid South Africa represented a total of 322 337 accused persons in criminal matters across all courts. Legal

representation is provided using mainly salaried legal practitioners in the full-time service of Legal Aid SA. However, a small portion of matters, being 2% in

the 2022/23 Financial Year, are allocated to independent legal practitioners using Legal Aid SA’s Judicare and agency model.

(iv) In criminal matters, the state is dominus litis and all prosecutions are at the behest of the National Director of Public Prosecutions.

(v) Very few criminal cases are capable of finalization at the first appearance and most criminal cases will be postponed at least once, the number of postponements and the reasons therefore differing from case to case.

(vi) It must be understood that a matter may be postponed, whether or not substantive proceedings were conducted on the day the matter was postponed, ad whether or not substantive proceedings are to be conducted on the next date of appearance. The word ‘postponement’ therefore does not equate to wasted court time.

(vii) The postponement of a case impacts productivity and cost-effectiveness, only if it is unnecessary. It must be noted however, that what may be unnecessary for one court stakeholder may be seen as necessary by another. Presiding officers have the overall responsibility to see to the efficient operation of the courts and therefore, a party seeking a postponement, must provide sufficient reasons for the request.

(viii) Legal Aid SA has a comprehensive Quality Management Program and as part of this program, every practitioner’s case is reviewed so that no unnecessary postponements are caused by the practitioner. The practitioner is also required to oppose all requests for postponements by the prosecution, which are unnecessary, or are likely to prejudice the client. The quality management program is applied to all legal practitioners dealing with legal aid work, notwithstanding the fact that they may practice independently.

(ix) A productivity monitoring program is also in place and all practitioners’ cases exceeding targeted turnaround times, are monitored. This ensures that legal practitioners keep postponements to a minimum, so that their cases may be finalized speedily. On average for Legal Aid SA Internal Practitioners, there are 2.8, 3.5 and 2.4 postponements per District, Regional and High Court matter, respectively, as per Legal Aid SA Management Information Systems. In regard to Judicare Practitioners (Private Practitioners) there are on average 3.3, 4.3 and 3 postponements per matter in the District, Regional and High Courts, respectively.

(x) Both the quality and productivity targets form part of our practitioner’s performance contracts as well as those of their managers and supervisors.

(xi) Legal Aid SA also has stakeholder engagement programs aimed at improving efficiencies in the court system. These include Local Case Flow Management Committees, as well as National and Provincial Efficiency Enhancement Committees.

(xii) Legal Aid SA shares data trends with other court stakeholders in a bid to promote an inter-sectoral approach in fighting case backlogs.

(xiii) Because the bulk of Legal Aid SA’s work (97%) is done by their own internal practitioners, the cost of postponing a case cannot be distinguished from the cost of any other work performed by an employee on a given day. However, where a matter is handled by Judicare, every postponement is remunerated according to approved tariffs, currently being R295 per postponement but was R276 in the 2022/23 financial year.

(xiv) There were 18 137 and 13 324 court sitting days in the year where the District and Regional Courts, respectively, sat when Legal Aid SA did not cover the Courts due to capacity constraints. This will result in postponement of matters where accused persons require legal aid representation but there is no legal aid practitioner scheduled to appear at the court on these days. This will result in the postponement of matters to a date when a legal aid practitioner is scheduled to appear in the Court.

(xv) The estimated cost of postponements, without considering the rationale, is

estimated to amount to R266 million for the 2022/23 financial year in respect

of Legal Aid SA.

2. (a); and (b) I have been informed by the Secretary-General of the Office of the Chief Justice that the Office of the Chief Justice does not maintain a performance dataset on the number of postponements per case in the Superior Courts. However, the OCJ continues to embrace the advantages that technology presents and leverages on it. The modernization of court processes remains a key priority area for the OCJ, not only to improve access to justice for all in accordance with section 34 of the Constitution but to enhance effective record management. As such, the Court Online system has been rolled out to the Gauteng Division of the High Court in Pretoria and Johannesburg and a further rollout is imminent.

The Provincial Efficiency Enhancement Committee (PEEC) chaired by the Judge President of a Division interrogates the blockages and constraints that impact on the speedy resolution of cases. The performance of judicial functions falls however under the purview of the Judiciary and the Chief Justice. It was advised that requests for information relating to the performance of judicial functions, be directed to the Chief Justice.

 

05 January 2024 - NW3600

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Mkhwebane, Adv B to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What processes have been put in place to ensure that the National Prosecuting Authority handles cases in a fair and impartial manner, particularly cases that involve high profile individuals and politically sensitive matters?

Reply:

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa provides in section 179(4) that:

“National legislation must ensure that the prosecuting authority exercises its functions without fear, favour or prejudice.”

The National Prosecuting Authority Act, 32 of 1998, in compliance with the Constitution, provides in section 32 (1) (a):

“A member of the prosecuting authority shall serve impartially and exercise, carry out or perform his or her powers, duties and functions in good faith and without fear, favour or prejudice and subject only to the Constitution and the law.”

All prosecutors are required to take an oath in this regard, before commencing to exercise, carry out or perform their powers, duties or functions in terms of the NPA Act.

Not only does the law require prosecutors to handle cases in a fair and impartial manner, but the National Director of Public Prosecutions (NDPP) has issued directives which require prosecutors in the prosecution of sensitive or contentious nature, including cases involving high profile individuals, to inform the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) concerned in writing, of the nature and details of such matters, and for the DPP to similarly inform the NDPP.

This ensures that there is adequate oversight of cases that involve high profile individuals and politically sensitive matters.

05 January 2024 - NW3280

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether her department has a welfare unit in place that offers financial support to public servants who are about to leave the work system onto pensions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Employee Health and Wellness (EHW) Strategic Framework for the Public Service calls for all departments to provide pre-retirement support which includes advising employees to access financial planning advise from authorised advisors. This is a decentralised function that is not centrally located within the DPSA.

Pre-retirement financial counselling services is therefore one of the key aspects of the EHW Framework and is implemented in partnership with the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF). The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) as mandated by the Public Service Act monitors the implementation of the EHW programme in the Public Service; conduct audits on an annual basis to ensure the implementation of the EHW programme, including pre-retirement programme.

Pillar 4 (Wellness Management) of the EHW Strategic Framework calls for all departments in the Public Service to implement the following four sub-objectives of the pillar:

    1. Individual Wellness (Physical Wellness)
    2. Psycho-Social wellness (Social, Emotional, Spiritual, Intellectual and Financial/ Economical Wellness)
    3. Organizational Wellness (Creating and maintaining a positive and safe working environment)
    4. Work Life Balance (promoting a balance to ensure that work does not negatively interfere with the private lives of employees including family, leisure, and health and vice versa).

End

05 January 2024 - NW3770

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) total number of officials in the Public Service were implicated in irregular appointments in the (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21, (iii) 2021-22 and (iv) 2022-23 financial years, (b) number of the officials were (i) dismissed and (ii) not dismissed from the Public Service following an investigation into their involvement in irregular appointments and (c) are the reasons that the officials were not dismissed; (2) (a) in which national and/or provincial departments are the specified officials employed and (b) what positions did/do the officials hold in each case?

Reply:

Discipline management and appointments are a decentralized function across the Public Service. Any investigation into alleged violations of appointment processes would be managed directly by departments and the DPSA would not be privy to the contents of such investigations into irregular appointments and/or information on dismissals with regard to irregular appointments. The information sought would therefore be accessible via the departments directly.

As part of the Ministerial-Presidential Priorities for the 2023/24 Financial Year, the DPSA is coordinating the establishment of a Central Discipline Database to address the challenges identified above. The Database will include the detailed categorisation and documentation of all disciplinary matters including sanctions such as dismissals.

End

05 January 2024 - NW3200

Marais to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1 )Whether, with reference to the incidents of army brutality during the early days of the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 in 2020, she has communicated and/or reported any incidents of army brutality to the public and/or their parliamentary representatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2)(a) What are the details of accessible channels that were put in place by her department for citizens to report incidents of army brutality and (b) how were the reports handled; (3) What are the relevant details of the (a) support mechanisms that were established for victims of army brutality during the lockdown and (b) avenues that were available to persons for seeking justice, medical assistance and/or legal aid; (4) Whether any valuable lessons have been learnt from the incidents; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) Whether any resultant reforms and/or changes have been implemented in procedures, training and oversight of law enforcement during domestic deployments to prevent similar incidents in the future; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Find reply here

05 January 2024 - NW3853

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Dyantyi, Mr QR to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What (a) is the impact of the Brand SA campaign known as Made in South Africa and (b) measures are required to promote the local brands of the Republic in the international market? [

Reply:

(a) Brand SA does not have a campaign called Made in SA. However, in line with its mandate, Brand South Africa profiles and showcases South African talent, skills, people, product and services. The recent campaigns anchored under brand advocacy focused on the following pillars on;

1) creative arts: where Brand South Africa profiled a young entrepreneur from Eastern Cape who owns a brand called Inga. Inga produces proudly South African bags that are designed, crafted, and produced in South Africa. Innovation & Technology: where Dr. Reza who is an aesthetics specialist and also owns an aviation company which exports aviation products. Dr Reza, through his foundation also offers skills and education on the aviation industry to his employees who come from the community the aviation company operates from. Brand South Africa recorded a video and promoted it on international platforms such as News Central. CNN Africa, Africa News, BBC News Africa, Supersports Blitz. This assisted in driving awareness, demand creation and expansion of his brand.

2) Exporting South Africa to South Korea: where Brand South Africa collaborated with influencers in South Korea with an objective of increasing familiarity and favourability of creative talent in South Korea. Some of the South African designers included Black Coffee, Maxhosa, and David Tlale. This campaign assisted in driving awareness of the nation brand, skills and talent.

3) In line with the Believe in SA strategy, Brand South has implemented a media partnership with BBC broadcast and BBC.Com on a campaign called ‘The Next Generation’ which profiles young South African entrepreneurs. The campaign puts a spotlight on the young generation showcasing their innovations in medical innovation, fintech and energy. As innovators, they have found new ways to make an impact and are ideal advocates for South Africa’s business story. The campaign is currently flighting across North America, Europe, Middle East, Africa, Latin America and Asia Pacific until March 2024.

(b) While the focus of Brand South Africa is to instil confidence in South Africa and promote investment and tourism, Brand South Africa is equally committed to fostering the consumption of South African goods and services as a way to export the South African nation brand to the world and as a stimulus for economic growth and overall competitiveness of South African industries in the global market.

As part of its strategic initiatives, Brand South Africa conducts the Global Reputation Research Study, involving over 10,000 respondents across 14 international target markets. This research study evaluates South Africa's export competitiveness and appeal (among other measured variables) in key markets: the United Kingdom, United States, Germany, France, China, Japan, India, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia.

Furthermore, the country is also benched marked against emerging & established continental powers: Africa - Nigeria & or Egypt; Middle East: United Arab Emirates & Turkey; Asia: Vietnam & Thailand, Vietnam & Thailand, South America: Chile & Brazil, and UK.

  • Global businesses engaged in trade with South Africa, and those purchasing South African goods and services, consistently rank the country among the best, alongside esteemed counterparts such as the United Kingdom, United Arab Emirates, and Turkey.
  • Further attesting to South Africa's global standing, among the benchmarked nations, global businesses place it within the top five countries to do business with, sharing this distinction with the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Thailand, and Brazil.
  • Over 76 percent of all respondents across all 14 markets expressed a strong interest in purchasing South African export products. This affirmation underscores the resonance and desirability of South African goods on the global stage and reflects the positive perception of the Nation Brand but also signals a significant market potential for South African exports.
  • Notably, the export sector emerges as one of the nation's key economic strengths, followed closely by the pivotal contributions of tourism and investment. This multifaceted approach reinforces Brand South Africa's crucial role in shaping and elevating the nation's global identity and economic prowess.
  • prominence in Brand Finance’s Africa 200 report ranking stands as a testament to the robustness and resilience of its brands. Firmly positioned as the powerhouse of African brands, South Africa's influential role underscores its significant impact on shaping the business landscape across the continent. The top 200 brands in Africa have collectively experienced a commendable year-on-year brand value growth of 6%, culminating in an impressive total value of USD 54.4 billion. At the forefront of this success, South Africa emerges as the primary contributor, representing over half of the brands in the ranking and an impressive 75% (USD 40.8 billion) of the total brand value. This substantial leadership underscores South Africa's key role in driving and defining the narrative of African brands on the global stage.

05 January 2024 - NW2783

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Considering that youth and persons with disability programmes run by her Office have been merged into one programme which is underfunded, what are the details of the plans of her Office to protect the (a) budgets allocated to and (b) integrity of the programmes of the two critical components of the mandate of her Office?

Reply:

The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD) has obtained approval from the National Treasury to split the Youth and Persons with Disabilities into two separate programmes effective 1 April 2024.

The allocation of funds to departments from the fiscus is a mandate of the National Treasury. This question may be directed to the Ministry of Finance for reply.

05 January 2024 - NW3796

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With regard to the several observations and recommendations of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State regarding the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) and the fight against grand corruption, in giving effect to these, by what total amount has the annual budget of the NPA and specifically, the Investigating Directorate, been increased and/or supplemented to facilitate a more effective crime fighting operation?

Reply:

The NPA budget allocation increased by 5.39% over the MTEF period, from R4,9 billion to R5,7 billion in order to capacitate the NPA to deal with State Capture cases and the fight against corruption. This increase was as a result of the R1.3 billion additional funding allocated to the NPA during the 2022 MTEF.

However, the increase was against a background of an inadequate budget where the ratio of compensation to operational costs was 85:15. The budget increase improved the ratio to 77:33 which was soon reversed to 83:17 due to the virement to deal with the shortfall in the Compensation of Employees (CoE) budget, after the NPA had to absorb the Cost of Living Adjustment (CoLA) from its baseline and the ID, as part of the NPA, was also impacted.

The ID budget allocation increased by 11.60% from R243 million to R308 million over the MTEF period. However, this increase is below inflation and in fact, the budget has actually decreased, in real terms.

.

05 January 2024 - NW3873

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What total number of (i) pre-1994 elections Special Branch members applied for amnesty at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and (ii) such applications were (aa) granted and (bb) denied and (b) what (i) happened to the Special Branch members who were denied amnesty and (ii) were their names?

Reply:

(a) What total number of

(i) pre-1994 elections Special Branch members applied for amnesty at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and

(ii) such applications were (aa) granted and (bb) denied

The information on the total number of the pre-1994 elections Special Branch members who applied for amnesty at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and whose applications were granted and denied is available on the amnesty hearing transcripts and on volume 6 section 3 chapter 1 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report which are available on the Department of Justice website www.justice.gov.za/trc/index/html.

(b) What (i) happened to the Special Branch members who were denied amnesty

The National Prosecuting Authority has established a section in the National Prosecuting service handling TRC amnesty and prosecution related matters.

(ii) What were their names

Their names are available on the Department of Justice website on the amnesty hearing prescripts www.justice.gov.za/trc/index/html.

05 January 2024 - NW3163

Profile picture: Msimanga, Mr ST

Msimanga, Mr ST to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What total number of prisoners have (a) escaped and/or (b) attempted to escape in the past five years in both (i) public and (ii) private correctional facilities; (2) whether he has been informed of the total number of (a) prisoners who are currently under the care and/or supervision of correctional facilities and (b) prison guards in each province; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) Total number of inmates escaped in the past five years in both public and private correctional facilities as reported by regions.

Region

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

April 2023 To Date

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

01

06

07

05

02

Free State & Northern Cape

09

11

03

03

02

KwaZulu-Natal

05

03

06

02

03

Western Cape

04

75

03

05

02

Gauteng

10

12

02

02

01

Eastern Cape

05

10

01

10

03

TOTAL

34

117

22

27

13

The following number of escaped inmates were re-arrested to lawful custody

Region

2019/20

2020/21

22021/22

2022/23

2023/24

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

01

03

01

05

01

Free State & Northern Cape

08

09

03

03

0

KwaZulu-Natal

04

02

05

02

02

Western Cape

03

75

03

05

0

Gauteng

06

02

02

01

01

Eastern Cape

05

10

01

05

03

TOTAL

27

101

15

24

07

1 (b) Total number of inmates attempted to escape in the past five years in both public and private correctional facilities as reported by regions.

Region

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

April 2023 To Date

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

0

0

01

0

01

Free State & Northern Cape

03

03

03

01

02

KwaZulu-Natal

01

0

0

02

01

Western Cape

04

01

03

01

02

Gauteng

05

01

02

0

02

Eastern Cape

03

25

02

02

02

TOTAL

16

30

11

6

10

(2)(a) whether he has been informed of the total number of (a) prisoners who are currently under the care and/or supervision of correctional facilities; and

Community corrections population is composed of the three categories of offenders such as Probationers, Parolees and Awaiting Trial Persons. The national population / total caseload within the system of community corrections as at 30 September 2023, is outlined as per table below:

REGIONS

PROBATIONERS

PAROLEES

AWAITING TRIAL PERSONS(ATP)

TOTAL PER REGION

Eastern Cape

886

8 455

29

9 370

Free State & Northern Cape

568

5 179

123

5 870

Gauteng

595

7 810

54

8 459

KwaZulu-Natal

881

10 100

06

10 987

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

633

7 758

243

8 634

Western Cape

1 262

4 185

376

5 823

TOTAL

4 825

43 487

831

49 143

The total number of probationers and parolees within the system of community corrections is 48 312 and Awaiting Trial Persons (ATP) population is 831. The total nationally is 49 143.

(b) Prison guards in each province; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

The post establishment /structure within the system of community corrections per region as at 02 October 2023 is delineated/outlined as per table below:

REGION

FILLED POST

VACANT

TOTAL POST FUNDED

Eastern Cape

246

30

276

Free State & Northern Cape

233

31

264

Gauteng

346

52

398

KwaZulu-Natal

270

24

294

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

421

28

449

Western Cape

331

55

386

Head Office

19

18

37

TOTAL

1 866

238

2 104

A total of 1 866 posts are currently filled nationally within the system of community corrections with 238 vacant posts.

END.

05 January 2024 - NW3227

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Given that the SA Police Service (SAPS) remains the first line of defence in the fight against the scourge of Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF), (a) how does her Office work with the SAPS to ensure that proper training on GBVF is done and (b) will she furnish Ms N K Shariff with evidence of the work done?

Reply:

a) The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities in collaboration with the South African Police Service (SAPS) has developed a Gender-Based Violence and Femicide and sexual offences action plan. This plan is grounded on the priorities of the National Strategic Plan on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (NSP on GBVF) with one focus on training and development. The training which is provided by the SAPS includes both proactive and reactive training on GBVF related matters. The former is important for the prevention of GBVF, while the latter is important for ensuring appropriate services that inhibit secondary victimisation of those affected by GBVF.

b) The below table shows training embarked on the SAPS during the 2023/24 financial year reported to the DWYPD as part of NSP on GBVF implementation.

Proactive Formal Training

Name of Course

Trained

Competent

Human Rights and Policing Programme

984

984

Vulnerable Groups Course

1577

1577

First Responder to Sexual Offences

1442

1442

National Victim Empowerment Training Programme

656

656

 

Total Trained

4659

4659

Proactive Non-Formal Training

Name of Course

Trained

Competent

Buccal Sample

164

164

Dignity, Diversity and Policing

135

135

Missing Persons

35

35

Domestic Violence

515

515

Total Trained

849

849

 

Reactive Formal Training

Name of Course

Trained

Competent

Resolving of Crime Skills Training

586

586

Basic Crime Investigative Practice

658

653

Family Violence, Child Protection, Sexual Offences

221

220

Sexual Offenses for Investigations Learning Programme

559

559

Psychological Motivated Crimes Learning Programme

49

48

Missing Persons

420

420

Domestic Violence Learning Programme

2080

2079

Biological: DNA Evidence Recovery Crime Scene Examiner

78

72

Biological: Body Fluid Detection Dog Course

0

0

DNA Evidence Recovery for Bio Body Fluid Dog

0

0

Collection Non-Intimate Forensic DNA Buccal Sample

4494

4471

Dignity, Diversity and Policing

5087

5087

Total Trained

14232

14195

 

Reactive Non-Formal Training

Name of Course

Trained

Competent

Domestic Violence

31

31

Total Trained

31

31

05 January 2024 - NW4051

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

With regard to the planned smart meter programme, what contingency plans are put in place to mitigate potential delays or unforeseen challenges in the smart meter implementation process; (2) What measures has he undertaken to ensure that the smart meters meet all the necessary safety and quality standards; (3) Whether there are any provisions for consumer education and awareness campaigns regarding the benefits and usage of smart meters; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Whether there will be any associated costs or fees to be incurred by consumers in relation to the smart meter installation or usage; if not, why not; if so, (a) who is liable for funding the smart meter programme and (b) what are the further relevant details; (5) Whether there are plans in place for cost-sharing with consumers or other stakeholders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Ministry/Minister was appointed to oversee and direct the implementation of the Energy Action Plan, with 5-outcome areas. As such, the focus of NECOM has been on strengthening/stabilising generation, enabling the fast tracking of new generation including addressing legislative bottle necks, and accelerating the scale and pace of implementation of renewable energy projects, as well as upscaling rooftop solar/embedded generation projects, and transforming the energy landscape through transformation of the energy sector.

Whilst the deployment of smart meters is an important intervention (in particular to implement demand side management), it has not been a core focus the Ministry work. The level of the question is also largely operational, and assumes a national deployment of smart meters, whereas, smart meters will be deployed by respect distribution licence holders (Eskom and Municipalities). In respect of ESKOM the Department of Public Enterprises remains the shareholder department, to whom the Board of Eskom Holdings is accountable in terms of the Memorandum of Incorporation for strategic outcomes. As such, the question should either be directed to DPE (for Eskom supply distribution area) and the respective Municipalities and or COGTA for Municipal distribution areas

05 January 2024 - NW728

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether, with reference to the recent increase in the national minimum wage, and against the background that the implementation of a national minimum wage has already forced many sheltered employment workshops attached to various non-governmental organisations to close their doors as they cannot afford to pay the national minimum wage to their employees with disabilities, she has been or intends monitoring the impact of the national minimum wage increases on vulnerable groups for the purpose of making recommendations to Cabinet that will exempt the sheltered employment workshops from implementing the national minimum wage; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Sheltered employment workshops form part of the skills development programmes coordinated by the Department of Employment and Labour in collaboration with the Department of Social Development. This question may be directed to these relevant Departments for reply.

05 January 2024 - NW4165

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has records of (a) budget and (b) total spending towards the maintenance and refurbishment of courts in each province during the 2021-2023 period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) Yes

(b) Yes

(c) The table below is the summary of the DOJ&CD Day-to-Day maintenance budget and expenditure report.

Province

Budget

Expenditure

National Office

R1,808,000.00

R652,592.30

Eastern Cape

R4,634,000.00

R1,485,168.04

Free State

R1,970,000.00

R1,969,684.84

Gauteng

R10,931,000.00

R8,759,690.39

KwaZulu Natal

R2,631,000.00

R2,631,327.82

Limpopo

R795,000.00

R708,416.74

Mpumalanga

R7,082,000.00

R5,889,792.71

North West

R1,760,000.00

R1,760,150.34

Northern Cape

R2,655,000.00

R2,655,659.99

Western Cape

R3,902,000.00

R3,901,726.26

Grand Total

R38,168,000.00

R30,414,209.43

(d) The table below is the summary of the DOJ&CD Day-to-Day maintenance budget and expenditure report for 2022/2023:

Province

Budget

Expenditure

National Office

R2,216,000.00

R2,216,639.05

Eastern Cape

R1,875,000.00

R1,875,054.42

Free State

R1,556,000.00

R1,556,865.52

Gauteng

R14,695,000.00

R14,695,085.80

KwaZulu Natal

R8,627,000.00

R8,627,407.58

Limpopo

R898,000.00

R897,541.76

Mpumalanga

R4,843,000.00

R4,843,005.18

North West

R6,001,000.00

R6,000,933.88

Northern Cape

R5,072,000.00

R5,069,859.10

Western Cape

R10,820,000.00

R10,820,294.21

Grand Total

R56,603,000.00

R56,602,686.50

(e) The table below is the summary of the DPWI maintenance and refurbishment budget and expenditure report for 2021/2022:

Province

Budget

Expenditure

Eastern Cape

R80,706,214.00

R28,198,940.00

Free State

R13,362,994.00

R3,852,995.00

Gauteng

R0.00

R0.00

KwaZulu Natal

R1,805,833.00

R1,805,833.00

Limpopo

R45,551,811.00

R26,392,055.00

Mpumalanga

R4,464,708.00

R0.00

North West

R16,259,403.00

R8,066,016.00

Northern Cape

R1,494,062.00

R0.00

Western Cape

R16,698,230.00

R16,277,284.00

Grand Total

R180,343,255.00

R84,593,123.00

(f) The table below is the summary of the DPWI maintenance and refurbishment budget and expenditure report for 2022/2023:

Province

Budget

Expenditure

Eastern Cape

R78,858,841.00

R41,480,037.00

Free State

R27,695,015.00

R6,235,802.00

Gauteng

R2,300,000.00

R0.00

KwaZulu Natal

R200,000.00

R0.00

Limpopo

R24,809,728.00

R8,366,450.00

Mpumalanga

R2,296,356.00

R0.00

North West

R9,950,000.00

R9,408,015.00

Northern Cape

R2,775,459.00

R511,628.00

Western Cape

R25,311,261.00

R11,854,052.00

Grand Total

R174,196,660.00

R77,855,985.00

05 January 2024 - NW1564

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 1293 on 9 July 2021 regarding property at 398 Malherbe Street, Tshwane, (details furnished), the process of handover to the Department of Social Development was completed; if not, (a) why not and (b) will what remains of the property be donated to the Capital Park Ratepayers' Association who are still desperate for a shelter; if so, (i) was the house renovated as it was in a considerable state of disrepair, (ii) who was responsible for the renovation, (iii) what was the total cost of the renovation and (iv) which department paid for the renovations?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Kindly note that address provided on Parliamentary question number 1293 & 1564 which is 398 Malherbe Street Capital Park does not belong to state, it is privately owned. See attached Aktex.

Response provided on Parliamentary question number 1293 & 1564 provided relate to state owned property on address 227 Malherbe Street, Capital Park.

(a) Department of Public Works and Infrastructure is still waiting for response from the Department of Social Development. KAM sent email to DSD on the 01/06/2021 with three months to respond.

(b) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure does not have a record of an application seeking a donation of property in question from Capital Park Residents and Ratepayers Association. The organization is welcome to make such application through the Regional office to Director, REMS: Mr. Ndivhoni Mathivha or Deputy Director, REMS: Mr. Sylvester Tshilwane.

(i) There is no house on the property, it’s a vacant land.

(ii) Not applicable.

(iii) Not applicable.

(iv) Not applicable

05 January 2024 - NW1713

Profile picture: Alexander, Ms W

Alexander, Ms W to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether she will furnish Mrs W R Alexander with a comprehensive breakdown of the procurement allocation of (a) her Office and (b) every entity reporting to her in terms of the percentages allocated to (i) small-, medium- and micro-enterprises, (ii) cooperatives, (iii) township enterprises and (iv) rural enterprises with a view to evaluating the effectiveness of the set-aside policy of the Government in fostering an inclusive and diverse economic landscape (details furnished) in the (aa) 2021-22 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2023?

Reply:

The procurement allocation for the department is apportioned in line with the Annual Performance Plan (APP) and Operational Plan (OP) targets to ensure achievements of these targets. Further, procurement is facilitated through the Central Supplier Database (CSD) located in the National Treasury. The question may be directed to the Ministry of Finance for detailed reply.

04 January 2024 - NW4192

Profile picture: Essack, Mr F

Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What total number of kilometres of the transmission lines in the Eskom transmission network (a) have already reached their life expectancy, (b) will reach their life expectancy and (c) are due for replacement in the 202324 financial year?

Reply:

(1) Transmission owns and operates over 33 245 circuit kilometres of power lines, and regularly conducts asset health reviews on all its infrastructure, including the power lines, using international benchmark standards. Our last power lines condition assessment report was published in 2021 (the next revision is due in March 2024). The response below applies to the 2023/24 financial year:

(a) Transmission’s asset management approach prescribes that power lines do not generally reach life expectancy to the extent that they must be completely rebuilt. It is the transmission line components that reach the end of life and that are replaced. This applies to conductors, insulators, towers (steelworks), foundations and hardware. Therefore, individual parts are assessed for their performance and risk, and replaced or refurbished as needed.

Only when critical structural components such as foundations and/or tower member steel are condemned would an entire power line be deemed to have reached its expected life. A refurbishment or replacement project for such a power line would then be initiated.

(b)Same response as above.

(c) Projects are classified into two groups: Projects to address the end-of-life components, and projects to address the performance of lines.

  • End of life component: 23 lines, 1 105 circuit kilometres are currently being worked on with a total value of R523 million.
  • Performance: 28 lines, 2 358 circuit kilometres are currently being worked on (majority is bird guards in hotspot areas), total value R129 million.

More projects are planned for future years as Transmission continuously reviews the status of its transmission lines.

 

 

04 January 2024 - NW4169

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has the relevant details of the number of Government Subsidized Houses under construction in each province during the 2013 – 2023 period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Housing Subsidy System (HSS) reveals that since 2013 to date, the Department with the support of Provinces and Municipalities built the houses illustrated in the table below.

 

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

EC

12 646

13 469

13 198

12 491

11 123

9 817

8 757

5 427

6 833

5 550

FS

6 920

5 308

5 322

4 064

3 330

3 695

2 290

1 890

1 647

311

GP

22 352

14 984

14 968

16 003

17 606

9 623

12 153

9 495

7 354

6 982

KZN

29 151

29 312

26 552

22 467

20 290

20 564

15 737

10 315

12 033

9 325

LIM

3 080

2 149

8 476

10 251

9 050

10 513

8 135

4 518

4 269

4 808

MPU

8 126

8 293

9 226

3 670

8 739

8 522

6 710

4 522

2 955

1 900

NC

2 464

2 133

1 337

1 449

809

541

620

221

591

173

NW

9 362

9 206

10 873

9 152

6 552

6 523

6 739

2 847

2 734

3 918

WC

11 835

10 348

10 355

9 793

8 380

7 828

8 184

6 354

6 200

5 665

TOTAL

105 936

95 202

100 307

89 340

85 879

77 626

69 325

45 589

44 616

38 632

04 January 2024 - NW4182

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What are the full details of incentives that have been put in place for private households to install rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to mitigate the demand for electricity and lessen load shedding; (2) Whether the incentives that are currently in place will be extended; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he has been informed that certain municipalities are charging residents a fee (details furnished) where consumers are off the grid and using their own renewable energy; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which other local municipalities and/or metros are following the strategy of charging consumers for being off the grid, (b) on what basis is the levy being charged and (c) what steps will he take to stop this as a disincentive to private households to be part of the rooftop solar PV programme?

Reply:

1. To encourage the uptake of rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV), the government eased private generator regulation giving customers more private generation energy options through across-network wheeling and on-site self-generation. This year, the government introduced further incentives like SARS tax rebates and National Treasury energy bounce loan guarantee programmes making Roof Top PV systems more affordable to households and small businesses. This is against the backdrop of customers seeking reliability during loadshedding, affordable electricity and climate change objectives.

To make rooftop PV more attractive, in the same way that Eskom does, many municipalities also offer grid services like net-billing (i.e. using PV surplus energy to offset billed consumption), and

wheeling (i.e., using the grid to transport generator production to customers). In addition, work is being done through the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM) on the development of a feed-in tariff (i.e., the utility buying customer surplus PV energy) which also encourages uptake.  Eskom also has a standard offer programme in place where customers can sell excess energy to Eskom under a short-term power purchase agreement.  Under the NECOM draft, frameworks were developed on net billing and wheeling to guide the industry with a standardised approach. These two draft frameworks are currently with the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA).

2. The National Treasury is the custodian of the incentive and have not expressed any indication of whether the scheme will be extended. There is however an ongoing discussion on the expansion of scheme (coverage as opposed to time-line), to the extent that it be expanded to include the battery and inverter which are the largest cost components of roof top solar solutions.

3. With regard to Municipalities the determination of tariffs and fees is a function of municipal budgeting, as provided for by the Municipal Finance Management Act, and as such the legislative competence of the respective Municipal Council, subject to due process. Under these circumstances whilst the fees may be a counter-incentive to upscaling rooftop solar/embedded generation, the Minister cannot “stop” legitimate fees imposed by Municipalities. There is also a question of municipal revenue loss (which impact the viability of Municipalities), in the context of self generation. These are broader consideration in respect of division of revenue across government, and must be addressed through the structures of Government in the context of the strategic approach to the energy distribution sector.

In respect of Eskom, only grid-tied solar PV solar systems on the Eskom networks require Eskom permission even if they are not exporting their surplus on the Eskom network. Such grid-tied customers will be liable for upfront costs for quotation, and connections (including bi-directional time-of-use meters where required). It should be noted, if a customer is off-grid, this means there is no connection and therefore no charges will be raised by Eskom.  A customer that has grid-tied generation and uses the system as a backup must pay network fair charges for this backup.

 

04 January 2024 - NW4181

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) Whether his Office has determined the total cost of implementing the smart meter project; if not, (a) why not and (b) what cost modelling has been done; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) who is the designated service provider for the (i) installation and (ii) maintenance of the smart meter, (b) how was the service provider selected and (c) what criteria were used in the selection process; (3) what is the (a) commencement date of the specified project, (b) timeline for the completion of the smart meter roll-out and (c) timeline for each province?

Reply:

Annexure

Find reply here