Questions and Replies

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14 June 2021 - NW1262

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What are the (a) reasons that Project Thusano was extended to other operational matters in the SA National Defence Force (SANDF), like the inclusion of the Cuban techniques into basic infantry training and (b) benefits for the SANDF from (i) a South African and (ii) an African security perspective; (2) whether the specified project was first analysed and compared to the existing SANDF and best international techniques; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what are the costs related to the extension of the project and (b) how is this justified given the economic pressures and budget cuts in the SANDF?

Reply:

(1) (a) Project THUSANO has not been extended to operational matters in the SANDF, only the basic maintenance and utilisation at technical level information was exchanged with SANDF members in order to ensure proper servicing of equipment developed together with the Cubans as part of skills transfer.

(1) (b) (i) and (ii) Project THUSANO activities are beneficial to the SANDF as its internal capability is being built. The SANDF dependency on industry for maintenance and repair will be reduced. The cost of training will be drastically reduced, including improving shooting capability in simulation of different types of combat arenas which may be encountered, thereby, reducing the need for physical travel of trainees and the concomitant costs.

(2) Project THUSANO was analysed and compared with SANDF and best international techniques and proved to be the cheapest and cost-effective way of reducing costs of maintenance and repair, as well as acquiring skills through imparting technical knowledge to SA Army artisans.

(3) (a) According to Contract TI 17-001 South Africa Annexure 6 signed in October 2018, the total cost is US$ 5,975,545.00 (ZAR 86,645,402.50) based on a rand-dollar exchange rate of R14,50:US$1.

(3) (b) Economic pressures and budget reductions require innovative and creative approaches as the funds to outsource maintenance and repair are limited. Building internal capability is one of the initiatives intended to manage the limited budget and/or budgetary constraints. The skills could have been acquired very expensive if these members were sent to private institution for training and skills development.

14 June 2021 - NW1263

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she will furnish Mr S J F Marais with the details of the use of the Automated Shooting Range System used by the SA National Defence Force (SANDF); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) whether the use of the Automated Shooting Range System benefits the SANDF and the protection of the land, sea and air borders; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any comparable system from an SA Defence Industry entity was considered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether a tender was advertised for the procurement of the system; if not, why not; if so, what are the costs involved for the (a) SANDF and (b) the Department of Defence?

Reply:

(1) Details requested entail the SANDF’s tactical employment of strategic assets, any information so required may only be disclosed in a closed session.

(2) The Automated Shooting Range (ASR) system will benefit the SANDF as it is intended to improve its members’ shooting skills and combat effectiveness with limited ammunition and the simulation of different combat scenarios in the midst of the dwindling budget allocation.

(3) The ASR was specifically designed for the SANDF; the Department is not aware of a similar capability within the local defence industry.

(4) The system was benchmarked and requested at a bi-lateral (Cuba/RSA) level, thereby no tender process was followed.

14 June 2021 - NW1048

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with all responses received by her department to the (a) requests for quotation and/or (b) tender adverts for personal protective equipment ultimately awarded to certain suppliers (names and details furnished) during the period 1 March to 1 October 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

I wish to indicate to the Honourable Member that the names of contractors or service providers involved in the provision of the services indicated in the reply have been concealed because the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from providing names of individuals or companies in parliamentary questions. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”.

The information provided in the table below relates to service providers that provided quotations for Personal Protective Equipment:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R675 700.00

100 points

 

R800 800.00

64.18 points

 

R1 249 500.00

32.06 points

 

R11 600 200.00

-1193.42 points

The information provided below relates to service providers that conducted screening of employees and visitors in the Department of Human Settlements:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R 345 000.00

100 points

 

R 388 000.00

90.02 points

 

R 465 000.00

72.17 points

 

R 562 650.00

49.53 points

 

R 661 200.00

26.67 points

 

R 1 884 000.00

-256.86 points

Quotations received from service providers for the provision of fumigation services is provided in the table below:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R 242 213.00

80 points

 

R 447 803.26

    1. points

Quotations received from contractors for deep cleaning and sanitizing of buildings in the Department of Human Settlements:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R467 386.20

100 points

 

R498 291.00

    1. points
 

R 733 500.00

    1. points
 

R174 464.00

80 points

 

R411 298.88

-8.60 points

 

R476 504.80

-58.50 points

 

R879 896.50

-243.47 points

 

14 June 2021 - NW1346

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she has been informed that the waste water treatment plant in the Naledi Local Municipality in the North West has broken down to such an extent that it is leading to the pollution of natural and/or bulk water sources and constitutes a health risk to the local community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has she taken to compel the responsible water provider to take urgent steps to comply with its licence conditions?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), as the water sector leader is required to ensure compliance with minimum water quality norms and standards as well as the efficient use of water in its pursuit to strengthen the regulation of the water sector. However, the maintenance of Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) is the responsibility of Water Service Authorities (municipalities) and DWS plays a regulatory role. 

In accordance with the above, the Department is aware of the state of the Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) in the Naledi Local Municipality in the North West. The Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mopati District Municipality is the water service authority while Naledi Local Municipality is the water service provider. I am informed that Service level agreement disputes between the two municipalities have resulted in a breakdown of services to the community. 

Contractors are appointed by Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mopati District to operate and maintain the Vryburg WWTW on a short term basis which contributes to the plant payment disputes between the municipalities and the service provider. In addition, the capacity of the plant is also inadequate for the increased sewer requirements. Therefore, there are spillages from the sewer pipelines and partially treated and untreated sewer spillages from the plant. 

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) issued a Directive in terms of Sections 19(3) and 53(1) of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No 36 of 1998) to the DRSM DM addressing both the Vryburg WWTW and the Farm Rosendale 673 pollution in October 2018. There were some improvements in infrastructure and operation and maintenance of the WWTW thereafter, as the municipality implemented corrective measures. 

However, there were recurring sewer spillages and the DWS took legal action against the municipality. A court order was granted on 18 September 2020 against the DRSM DM by the High Court of South Africa (North West Division) for the municipality to take all necessary steps to ensure that raw sewage is not discharged. The following were long term interventions that were part of the action plan to remedy the situation: 

  • The Naledi Local Municipality recommended construction of a new WWTW as the existing plant was originally designed for 4.8 ML/d but the daily flow had reached 8-9 Ml/day overtime 
  • The DWS recommended an amount of R314 410 500 towards the upgrade and development of a new 16Ml/d WWTW in Vryburg to be funded through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant and issued a water use license to the facility. 
  • The DWS also provided R5.2 million to the Municipality through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the refurbishment of the pump station, the sewer network and refurbishment of the Sludge handling facilities.

The DWS conducted inspections during May 2021 and found that the situation has not improved despite the undertakings in the Action Plan submitted by the municipality. Given the non-compliance to the Directive and the court order, the department will proceed with additional legal action to ensure that the municipality implements corrective action. 

 

11 June 2021 - NW1617

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

With regard to his statement during the Mini Plenary of his department’s Budget Vote concerning the raising of the electricity generation licencing threshold to 10MW, alternatively 50MW, (a) on what date was the survey conducted, (b) what was the format of the survey, (c) what were the exact questions asked and (d)(i) what was the total number of respondents and (ii) what total number of respondents were (aa) in favour of limiting the threshold to 10MW and (bb) in favour of raising the threshold above 10MW? NW1823E

Reply:

a) The word “survey” was used to refer to public comments received by the Department following the gazetting of Schedule II of the Electricity Regulation Act (ERA) in relation to the threshold for embedded generation licencing.

b) The comments were received through the post and email.

c) There were no questions as comments were on the gazette notice.

d) (i) Over 15000 comments were received.

(aa) Majority is in support of the 10MW threshold.

(bb) The remainder is split between those who disagree completely with embedded generation and those who prefer a higher threshold.

11 June 2021 - NW1428

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether his department has embarked on a learnership programme for the 2021-22 financial year; if not, will his department hold the learnership programme in abeyance until all existing trainees have been absorbed; if so, (a) what number of learners are enrolled and (b) what steps will be taken to ensure that these learners are absorbed into his department when they qualify, (2) whether the unsuccessful candidates who are not going to be absorbed will be advised personally; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the unsuccessful candidates will be removed from the persal system so that they can pursue alternative employment; if not, why not; if so, by what date will they be removed?

Reply:

1. No, the Department of Correctional Services has not yet embarked on the 2021/22 Learnership Programme. The enrolment will be determined by the human resource needs and the availability of funds. The absorption of learners who have completed their learnership is not a determining factor for the enrolment of the next group of learners on the programme. The aim of the programme is to provide training and skills development opportunities to the youth preparing them for the labour market.

(1)(a) None

(1)(b) Not applicable

2. No, the learnership programme is a 12 month development programme and not an employment contract, in the case of group 1 of 2019/20 the contract was extended as the programme was suspended for two months during the lockdown levels 5 and 4. The programme came to an end on 31 December 2020.

3. Yes, their contract appointment on the PERSAL system is created in such a way that, when the contract end date is reached, the learner is automatically removed from the PERSAL system enabling them to pursue alternative employment.

END

11 June 2021 - NW1478

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) has never concluded any agreement with the Republic of Cuba or any entity in Cuba for work exchange and/or employment during the period from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year.

The DoJ&CD is currently negotiating an Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance agreements with Cuba. These agreements have not yet entered into force and are not linked to any work exchange programme and/or employment between the two countries.

The position is that the DoJ&CD does not currently have any plans to conclude work exchange programme and/or employment with any entity of the Republic of Cuba.

Neither the Department of Correctional Services concluded any work exchange or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba since 2010/11 financial year up to 2020/ 21 financial year.

(a) Not applicable

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

2. Not applicable

(a) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

END.

11 June 2021 - NW1615

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether his department and/or the National Energy Regulator of South Africa received any licence applications from DNG Energy for its proposed Khensani Gas to Power Plant in Komatipoort; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the current status of such application; 2) Whether any public participation has taken place regarding the proposed Khensani Gas to Power Plant to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1821E

Reply:

  1. No, the Department is not responsible for the licensing of power generation, that is the function of Nersa. Nersa was consulted and they have confirmed that they have not received any licence application from DNG Energy for its proposed Khensani Gas to Power Plant in Komatipoort.
  2. See (a) above.

11 June 2021 - NW1146

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 421 on 1 April 2021, every regulation issued in terms of section 134 of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, has been referred to the relevant Parliamentary committees overseeing his department, as is required by subsection 134(5), since the inception of the specified Act; if not, (a) which regulation(s) has or have not been referred to the relevant Parliamentary committees and (b) what are the reasons that each specified regulation was not referred to the relevant Parliamentary committee; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Yes, every regulation issued in terms of section 134 of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998 as amended was referred to the relevant parliamentary committees as required by section 134(5). The 2004 regulations (promulgated in government gazette 26626 dated 30 July 2004) and 2012 regulations (promulgated in government gazette (35277 dated 25 April 2012) are the only regulations issued and there have been no amendments since 2012.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

END.

11 June 2021 - NW1200

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether, in light of the popular Netflix documentary series titled Inside the World’s Toughest Prisons, whose Season 5 featured a hard look inside the Brandvlei Correctional Centre in the Western Cape that is home to the notorious number gangs, he has been informed of the show as it portrays to the world a daily account of the lives of the inmates at the prison; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether his department has done anything to address the challenges that the wardens are faced with at this particular centre and others like it; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. Permission to access to Correctional Centres is permitted under section 99 of the Correctional Services Act, 111 of 1998. This section must be read together with Section 123 which relates to prohibited publication. The Department has a gang combating strategy in place to deal with gangsterism in our facilities.

In the case of the mentioned documentary, permission was granted during 2019 for filming of the documentary at the Brandvlei Correctional Centre, filming then commenced in January 2020.

2. Yes, It is also common practice for the Department to provide qualified Employee Assistance Practitioners (EAP) to officials. Group awareness and therapy programmes are regularly presented to correctional officials. Individual consultations are also arranged for officials who are either referred to the EAP for debriefing or through voluntary personal requests. In the event that further assistance and intervention is required, the cases are referred to external practitioners.

END.

11 June 2021 - NW1676

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What are the (a) full relevant details of the various agreements signed by him and his predecessors over the past 10 financial years on behalf of the Government with the Republic of Cuba, (b) reasons and (c) total amounts paid to any Cuban entity in the past 10 financial years by (i) his department and (ii) any entity reporting to him?

Reply:

a) The DMRE has no Inter-Governmental Agreements with Cuba.

b) N/A

c) (i) N/A, (ii) N/A

11 June 2021 - NW1622

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) What is the position regarding the mining licence of the Shiva Uranium and Gold mine; 2) Whether buyers for the mine are still being sought; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 3) Whether there have been any offers to buy the mine; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the reasons the offers were refused, (b) are there any prospects for a sale this year and (c) on what date will his department withdraw the mining right if no buyer is secured; 4) Whether his department communicates with the previous employees of the mine; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how and (b) on what date; 5) What (a) is the position regarding the mine’s rehabilitation guarantee, (b) will the estimated cost of rehabilitation be and (c) amount of it will be funded by the rehabilitation guarantee?

Reply:

(1) Shiva Uranium has been issued with three mining rights, and they are all valid

(2) This matter is still before the Business Rescue Practitioner (BRP) and is yet to be finalised. The Department does not get to be involved in the process of appointing the potential buyers, it is only once purchase has been concluded wherein an application to transfer ownership would be made in accordance with the provision of section 11 of the MPRDA. At this stage, such application has not been brought for our attention as the BRP’s process is not yet concluded.

(3) (a) Please see (2) above

(b) Please see (2) above

(c) The date cannot be confirmed as the rescue process is still underway

(4) (a) The Department is of the view that the issue of communicating with previous employees of the mine remains to be the responsibility of the BRP as they are assuming the responsibility of the right holder (b) 31 May 2021

(5)(a) There is financial provision to the value of R61 424 275.00 that has been deposited into Rehabilitation Trust (Cash Deposit) held by the Department.

(b) The environmental liability that was determined by the independent environmental assessor (before the mine went through the BRP’s process) was estimated at R101 018 658. 57, the mine was further directed to address the shortfall of R39 594 383.57, which is still pending.

(c) The shortfall of financial provision has be discussed with the Business Rescue Practitioner in the sense that the potential buyer will be required to demonstrate that they have financial capacity to address the required financial provision before section 11 application is finalised.

 

11 June 2021 - NW1623

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Given that mining and prospecting rights can be obtained with a shelf company that could incur major financial liabilities, what are the reasons that applications for mining rights do not require Financial Intelligence Centre Act, Act 38 of 2001, information from applicants, including banking details, tax numbers and proof of residence? NW1829E

Reply:

Section 16 for prospecting right and 22 for mining right read with Regulation 5 and 10 of the MPRDA outlines granting criteria for such rights.

10 June 2021 - NW1520

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to a certain instruction (details furnished) issued by a principal of a certain school (name and details furnished) to parents and staff not to allow learners to discuss and/or debate the latest Israeli-Palestinian fighting at school and in which the specified principal threatens to take further action in line with the school’s Code of Conduct should anyone overstep the specified instruction, her department will take any steps against the principal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps; (2) whether her department will issue a directive to all educational institutions to refrain from issuing threats to learners, parents and teachers who wish to address any crisis involving humanitarian matters; if not, what is the position in this regard if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) It is not yet necessary for the Department of Basic Education (DBE) to take any steps against the Principal until the Gauteng Department of Education, through its relevant Education District authority, has had an opportunity to interact with the School Principal to provide proper hearing on how the standpoint of the Code of Conduct at the school on such matters has been interpreted.

The Provincial Department and District Office will be advised ahead of time of their interaction with the School Principal, to clarify with the School Principal the fundamentals of the DBE Human Rights Education programme offering, in raising awareness among learners, regarding constitutional imperatives; as well as violence and crimes against humanity.  Thereafter, the necessary adjustments and modifications will follow, which could include further clarification in the provisions in the Code of Conduct, or retraction of the instruction by the Principal where violation is detected.

(2) The DBE will not be issuing any such directive at this stage.  Instead, an invitation is being extended to all Provincial Departments and schools to participate in the Oral History, Moot Court, and Youth Citizen Action programmes, where such matters are safely discussed and debated, to support the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) existing provisions in Social Sciences, Lifeskills and Life Orientation.

10 June 2021 - NW1492

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether the National Treasury took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

  1. & (2)

The National Treasury has not concluded any work exchange and / or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba during the period 2010/11 FY to 2020/21 FY. The National Treasury is an equal opportunity employer and follows all prescripts in terms of employment in the public service. The department does not hold any formal position in regards to work exchange and / or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba.

10 June 2021 - NW1661

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What is the (i) normal age when members of the Department of Defence (DoD) and the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) are obliged to go on pension and (ii) policy of the DoD and SANDF with regard to the obligated retirement age of permanent force members and (b) if the age is still 60 years, what would be the reasons and motivations for certain persons not retiring at the age of 60; (2) what were the reasons (a) that the employment term and contract of a certain person (name and details furnished) was extended when the specified person turned 60 and (b) for a further extension of the person’s employment contract to a certain position (details furnished) in the SANDF, from which the person will only retire at the age of 66?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii) Section 19 of the Government Employees Pension Law, 1996 (Proclamation No. 21 of 1996) states, inter alia, that a member shall have the right to retire on pension and shall be so retired on reaching the age determined by the law governing his or her employment. Section 52 of the Defence Act, 2002 (Act 42 of 2002) makes provision for members to be appointed and utilised in the Regular Force from the age of 18 to 65 years of age. In terms of Regulation 21 of Chapter III of the General Regulations for the South African National Defence and the Reserve an officer serving in the Permanent Force shall have the right to retire on pension and shall be so retired, on the date when he or she attains the age of 60 years. Regulation 22 of Chapter III also states that the maximum age limit for temporary service in the Permanent Force shall be 65 years. In terms of the Regulation 29 of the Regulations for the Reserve Force, the date of retirement of a Reserve Force member may be extended to the date on which he or she attains the age of 75 years.

(b) The following are the reasons and motivations for certain persons not retiring at the age of 60:

i) To ensure continuous effective strategic direction and management to the SANDF.

ii) To ensure the effective management of medical and health services to the Department of Defence (DOD).

iii) To retain specialist skills, especially where there is a shortage of skilled members in the Senior Management System, such as Medical Officers and Special Forces Operators.

iv) To ensure the retention of experienced members to mentor young and inexperienced members.

(2) The Defence Act makes provision for members to be appointed and utilised in the Regular Force from the age of 18 to 65 years, while the Regulations for the Reserve Force makes provision for the extension of the retirement of a Reserve Force member from 65 to 75 years.

10 June 2021 - NW1590

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What was the total number of unplaced learners (a) of each grade and (b) in each province (i) when schools re-opened on 15 February 2021 and (ii) on the latest date for which information is available; (2) whether each province removes a learner from the list of unplaced learners once the learner has been offered a place and/or once a place has been accepted by the learner’s parent; (3) what is the total number of learners who have been removed from the list of unplaced learners in each province without parents having accepted any of the places that were offered?

Reply:

(1)       What was the total number of unplaced learners (a) of each grade and (b) in each province (i) when schools re-opened on 15 February 2021 and (ii) on the latest date for which information is available; 

Response:

Kindly refer to the attached consolidated table as provided by provinces.

(2)       whether each province removes a learner from the list of unplaced learners once the learner has been offered a place and/or once a place has been accepted by the learner’s parent;

Response:

Learners are removed from the list of unplaced learners as and when placement is confirmed.

(3)       what is the total number of learners who have been removed from the list of unplaced learners in each province without parents having accepted any of the places that were offered? 

Response:

There are no learners removed from the list of unplaced learners without the consent  of the parents. They are only removed when placement is made and confirmed by parents.                                                                  

10 June 2021 - NW1764

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed that the R431 million paid to service providers in Gauteng for decontaminating schools was awarded without following due procedure; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who was responsible for issuing the specified contracts and (b) what steps will be taken in this regard?

Reply:

(a) and (b) As the Minister of Basic Education, I do not know who was responsible for issuing the specified contracts, and what steps will be taken by the Gauteng Administration in that regard.  Matters of procurement in all the 9 Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), are processed and finalised by the respective PEDs; and the national Department of Education (DBE) has no jurisdiction over any of the PEDs on such matters.  PEDs, similar to the DBE, have an obligation in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), Treasury Regulations, Treasury Instruction Notes, Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA) and PPPFA Regulations, to follow due process when procuring goods and services. 

10 June 2021 - NW1566

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a)(i) are the details and (ii) is the total breakdown of the expenditure of the $4,3 billion loan approved and granted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to the Republic in July 2020, (b) are the reasons that part of the loan has not been saved for procurement of vaccines and (c) were the terms and conditions of the IMF bailout?

Reply:

a) The loan from the International Monetary Fundf (IMF) was a Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI) facility, which was a temporary arrangement by the IMF for its member countries in response to the Covid outbreak. It is a loan that provides rapid and low-access (including low-interest) financial assistance to member countries facing an urgent balance of payments need, without having to agree to a full-fledged IMF structural adjustment program. It provides support to meet a broad range of urgent needs, including those arising from commodity price shocks, natural disasters, conflict and post-conflict situations, and emergencies resulting from fragility. South Africa applied for the loan in the context of an unprecedented fall in government revenues, coupled with a spike in borrowing costs in the market. The loan was for the following purposes:

  • 1. Implement a counter-cyclical fiscal policy, by avoiding a dramatic and damaging reduction in government spending in response to an unprecedent fall in tax revenues as a result of the CoVid-induced economic crisis; and
  • 2. Finance a sizeable potion of the Covid relief package announced by the President on 21 April 2020 and implemented in the Special Adjustments Budget of 24 June 2020. At the time, this loan financed was estimated to finance between R70 billion and R75 billion of the overall fiscal relief package overall.

The loan supported the spending plans in the 2020 Special Adjustments Budget of 24 June 2020, along with other sources of borrowing. At the time of the Special Adjustments Budget, the total planned borrowings amounted to R776.9 billion. This was revised substantially down to R670.3 billion at the time of the 2021 Budget, with the IMF loan being around R75 billion of this. South Africa will repay the loan over a maximum 5-year period as stipulated in the Letter of Intent (LOI).

b) The loan is part of the overall pool of government borrowings and all the financing instruments that are accessed by government are used to finance spending appropriated by Parliament. At the time of finalizing the RFI arrangement with the IMF, there was no credible information internationally on a widely-available vaccine, and this was not the intended purpose of the loan. Following the development of a vaccine, government has made allocations for a full-vaccination programme over the MTEF. The spending ceiling was lifted in 2021/22 mainly for the vaccine, meaning that borrowings are in part directed towards the vaccine.

c) The loan was given with the broad understanding that it would assist with mitigating the effects of the economic crisis, and did not require earmarking of the funds towards specific spending items. The loan was not subject to conditionalities that compromised fiscal sovereignty. However, as outlined in the Letter of Intent (LOI) signed by the Minister of Finance and the Governor of the South African Reserve Bank (SARB), government is obligated to provide broad spending reports to the IMF in line with the requirements of the PFMA. The National Treasury has published spending reports on the 2020 Special Adjustments Budget in terms of section 32 of the PFMA, and provided an update on the spending against this package in the Budget Review published on 24 February 2021.

10 June 2021 - NW1061

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)In light of confirmation by the Director-General of the Department of Public Service and Administration of endemic post vacancies within various government departments (details furnished), (a) what total number of posts are currently vacant in the National Treasury, (b) for what time period has each specified post been vacant and (c) what are the relevant details of each such post; (2) (a) what total number of vacant posts currently in the National Treasury have been filled on an acting basis, (b) for what time period has each such post been vacant and (c) what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) The total number of posts currently vacant in the National Treasury is 170.

(1)(b)(c) The time period and relevant details are as follows:

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

VACANT SINCE

Receptionist

2019/12/01

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support (OMIN)

2019/12/01

Administrative Support and Co-Ordination (OMIN)

2020/01/07

Director: Office of Deputy Minister

2019/06/30

Parliamentary Officer

2018/03/31

Private and Appointment Secretary (OMIN)

2019/12/01

Chief Director: Office of Minister

2018/03/31

Assistant Administrative/Appointment Secretary

2020/01/03

Administrative Assistant

2018/12/31

Director: Corporate Law

2021/02/01

Deputy Director: Corporate Law

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: Litigation and Administration

2020/05/31

Assistant Director: Legislation (ODG)

2021/02/01

Deputy Director: Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations

2020/10/01

Junior Graphic Designer

2020/02/29

Enterprise Risk Management Analysts

2021/02/28

Driver

2021/01/31

Analyst: Corporate Governance

2020/10/16

Snr Analyst: Prov Fin Development Institution

2021/01/01

Director: Treasury Operation

2018/04/01

Chief Director: Liability Management

2020/12/15

Analyst: Debt Issuance and Management

2020/02/01

Snr Analyst: Debt Issuance and Management

2021/01/31

Director: Debt Issuance and Management

2020/09/30

Helpdesk: Retail Bonds Operations

2021/02/13

Analyst: Accounting and Information

2021/03/01

Director: Accounting and Information

2020/09/01

Analyst: Market Risk

2020/12/10

Director: Energy and Telecoms

2021/03/31

Deputy Director-General: Budget Office

2017/12/01

Deputy Director: Programme Coordination

2020/09/01

Policy Analyst: National Budgets

2020/02/01

Snr Policy Analyst: Budget Reform

2021/04/01

Chief Director: Public Finance Statistics

2021/02/01

Policy Analyst: Extra Budgetary Accounts and Funds

2021/03/15

Snr Policy Analyst: Extra Budgetary Accounts & Funds

2019/09/30

Snr Policy Analyst: Portfolio & Strategic Management

2021/03/31

Snr Policy Analyst: Infrastructure Finance

2020/02/01

Assistant Director: Fiscal Research (BO)

2020/10/01

Snr Policy Analyst: Fiscal Research

2021/03/13

Chief Director: Public Sector Remuneration Analysis

2021/01/26

Snr Policy Analyst: Civil Pension

2020/02/01

Senior Budget Analyst: Public Finance

2020/12/17

Programme Coordinator

2019/06/30

Senior Budget Analyst: Public Finance

2020/10/01

Budget Analyst: Basic Education Sports & Recreation

2020/12/01

Senior Budget Analyst: Public Finance

2020/07/25

Director: Higher Education & Training

2020/11/11

Budget Analyst: Communications and Energy

2021/02/01

Senior Budget Analyst: Public Finance

2020/09/01

Director: Public Finance

2020/04/01

Director: Forecasting

2019/07/01

Economist: Econometric Research

2021/02/01

Economist: Econometric Research

2021/02/01

Senior Economist: Sectoral & Revenue Modelling

2020/10/01

Chief Director: Microeconomic Policy

2020/12/01

Snr Economist: Primary Sectors

2020/02/01

Director: Sectors

2021/04/07

Senior Economist: Secondary Sectors

2020/01/01

Director: Secondary Sectors

2020/09/01

Director: Environmental Economics

2020/10/01

Chief Director: Macroeconomic Policy

2020/08/07

Snr Economist: Growth

2020/11/01

Economist: Fiscal Framework (IGR)

2020/02/26

Director: Fiscal Framework (IGR)

2018/11/01

Director: Local Government Fiscal Framework

2020/11/11

Economist: Budget Process

2019/12/01

Snr Budget Analyst: Provincial Budget Analysis

2021/04/01

Snr Budget Analyst: Provincial Budget Analysis

2019/11/01

Director: Provincial Budget Analysis

2021/03/31

Deputy Director: Spatial Planning

2019/09/30

Project Coordinator

2020/09/30

Project Manager

2020/04/01

Budget Analyst: Provincial Budget Analysis

2020/10/01

Budget Analyst: Provincial Budget Analysis

2020/10/01

Snr Economist: Local Government Budget Analysis

2020/03/31

Director: Local Government Budget Analysis

2019/04/30

Snr Economist: Local Government Budget Analysis

2018/12/31

Director: Local Government Budget Analysis

2019/08/02

Manager: Investment Planning

2020/05/31

Project Manager

2021/04/01

Urban Economist: NDGP

2020/09/30

Project Manager

2020/11/09

Snr Economist: Financial Inclusion

2020/10/01

Snr Economist: Financial Sector Charter

2020/10/01

Snr Economist: Banking Development

2019/08/15

Chief Director: Financial Services

2020/10/01

Chief Director: Financial Markets & Stability

2020/07/31

Economist: Business Taxes

2020/11/01

Director: Business Tax

2018/10/15

Senior Economist: Tax Revenue Database

2019/09/01

Director: Environment & Fuel Taxes

2020/10/01

Team Assistant

2021/03/01

Deputy Director: International Tax Treaties

2021/02/01

Deputy Director: International Tax Treaties

2021/02/01

Economist: Africa Economic Integration

2020/10/31

Deputy Director: International Organisations

2020/10/01

Senior Economist: G20

2020/12/11

Director: BRICS

2020/11/04

Chief Procurement Officer

2016/12/31

Deputy Director: Transversal Contract Management

2020/10/31

Assistant Director: Transversal Contract Management

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: Transversal Contract Management

2020/12/31

Deputy Director: Transversal Contract Management

2020/02/29

Director: Central Supplier Database

2020/10/01

Assistant Director: Strategic Procurement

2020/10/01

Director: SCM Strategic Procurement

2021/03/15

Assistant Director: Strategic Procurement

2020/10/01

Director: SCM Client Support Local Gov

2020/06/30

Deputy Director: SCM Monitoring & Compliance

2020/09/30

Deputy Director: SCM GMC (OCPO)

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: SCM GMC (OCPO)

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: SCM GMC (OCPO)

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: SCM GMC (OCPO)

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: Programme Coordination

2020/09/01

Facilities Generalist: Help Desk

2020/06/30

Facilities Generalist: Help Desk

2018/11/01

Human Resources Support: Service Delivery

2020/01/01

Manager: Talent Development & Performance Management

2020/05/31

HR Support: Employee Wellness Programme

2020/01/01

Employee Relations Practitioner

2020/02/01

Manager: Organisational Development

2021/03/31

Deputy Director: Employee Health Wellness & Trans

2020/09/01

Human Resources Support: Recruitment

2019/10/01

Financial Admin Specialist: Internal Control

2019/12/01

Financial Admin Specialist: Budget

2020/02/01

SCM Database Administrator

2020/10/01

Bids Administrator

2021/03/12

Assistant Manager: Travel Coordination

2021/01/01

Manager: Performance & Risk

2019/11/30

Manager: Strategic Sourcing / Acquisition (Corporate Services)

2020/05/31

Receipt and Inventory Coordinator

2021/03/15

Deputy Director: SCM Operations (Corporate Services)

2019/07/03

Financial Analyst: Public Entities Oversight Unit

2020/10/01

Team Assistant

2020/06/03

ICT Administrator

2020/10/01

Deputy Director: Information Security

2020/10/01

Senior Security Officer

2020/12/18

Senior Security Officer

2020/09/30

Director: Security Management

2021/03/09

Chief Audit Executive

2019/07/31

Team Assistant

2019/12/01

Business Support Manager

2019/04/04

Jnr IT Audit Specialist

2020/04/30

Manager: IT Audit

2020/02/24

Manager: IT Audit

2020/08/31

Senior Manager: IT Audit

2019/05/31

Jnr Performance Audit Specialist

2019/09/30

Senior QA and Compliance Audit Specialist

2019/10/17

Senior Manager: Quality Assurance & Compl Audit

2019/06/17

Project Manager

2020/01/10

Accountant-General

2015/10/09

MFMA Advisor

2019/07/01

Director: MFRS

2019/10/31

Financial Analyst: NRF & RDP (Banking Services)

2019/08/31

Financial Analyst: NRF & RDP

2021/01/31

Director: Justice & Protection Services Cluster

2020/07/31

Director: MFMA Support

2020/10/01

Chief Director: Specialised Audit Services

2020/07/04

Snr Fin Analyst: Fin Man & Int Contr Systems Audit

2021/04/01

Chief Director: Capacity Building

2018/12/01

CAA Trainees

2021/03/11

Deputy Director: SCM Education Training & Development

2020/11/16

Chief Director: Financial Systems

2020/06/30

Refreshment Coordinator (Corporate Services)

2020/05/20

Financial Systems Administrator

2019/07/23

Systems Specialist: Projects Management

2021/02/11

Snr Systems Specialist: Projects Management

2021/03/31

Snr System Specialist: Training & Support

2021/02/28

Training Administration Officer (Financial Systems)

2019/07/01

(2)(a) The total number of vacant posts currently in the National Treasury have been filled on an acting basis is 17.

(2)(b)(c) The time period and relevant details are as follows:

VACANT POSTS FILLED ON AN ACTING BASIS

PERIOD POSITION HAS BEEN VACANT

ANY OTHER RELEVANT DETAILS IN EACH CASE

Deputy Director-General: Chief Procurement Officer

December 2016 to date

Headhunting stage

Deputy Director-General: Accounting General

October 2015 to date

Headhunting stage

Chief Director: Financial Systems

June 2020 to date

Waiting Organitational Review process finalisation

Chief Director: Capacity Building

June 2020 to date

Recruitment is underway: re- advertisement

Director: Provincial Fiscal Framework

July 2020 to date

Recruitment is underway: at offer stage

Chief Director: Microeconomic Policy

December 2020

Recruitment is underway

Director: Forecasting

July 2019 to date

To be re-advertised

Director: Secondary Sector

September 2020

Recruitment is underway: re- advertisement

Deputy Director-General: Budget Office

December 2017 to date

Recruitment is underway

Chief Director: Fiscal Policy

March 2021 to date

Awaiting funding confirmation, then will start with recruitment

Chief Director: Public Finance Statistics

February 2021 to date

Awaiting funding confirmation, then will start with recruitment

Chief Director: Public Sector Remuneration

January 2021 to date

Awaiting funding confirmation, then will start with recruitment

Director: Security Management

March 2021

The previous Director: Security Management got promoted to Chief Risk Officer

Assistant Director: Travel Coordinator

November 2020

Previous incumbent resigned pending disciplinary action

Chief Director: Financial Markets, Stability and Prudential Regulations

July 2020 to 15 March 2021

Recruitment is underway-assessment stage

Director: Treasury Operations

April 2018 to date

Recruitment is underway- assessment stage

Chief Director: Liability Management

August 2020 to date

Recruitment is underway: re- advertisement

10 June 2021 - NW1762

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of unqualified teachers are employed by her department across the Republic and (b) subjects do the specified unqualified teachers mainly teach?

Reply:

There is a total of 1 139 unqualified educators employed by Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) across the country.  This number is made up of 1 038 temporary and 101 permanent educators.  The 101 permanent educators are the protected group, who were made permanent in 2001.  The number of unqualified educators has declined, and is down to zero in some PEDs.  Some of these educators, are either in scarce skills subjects; or are teaching in farm and rural schools.  Some are in technical schools, where they teach technical-vocational subjects.

10 June 2021 - NW1760

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What progress has she made in resolving the conflict amongst the Ndabeni Land claimants and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the claimants will be able to use and benefit from their land?

Reply:

a) Independent Trustees were appointed by the Master of the High Court Cape Town in 2018 and letters of authority were issued for these Trustees to finalise the verification of members of the Ndabeni Community Trust in collaboration with the Office of the Regional Land Claims Commission: Western Cape. The Trustees are assisted by a committee of six representatives appointed from the community and regular meetings are held by the parties to resolve all the outstanding issues.

b) We are unable to confirm the date envisaged for the claimants to have full use and benefit of the land as yet because negotiations with the City of Cape Town, the Commission, the Department and representatives of the unlawful occupiers are still on going.

END

10 June 2021 - NW1443

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the report of the Public Affairs Research Institute that found that R9 billion budgeted and disbursed by the Government to municipalities in the 2019-20 financial year for the provision of free basic electricity (FBE) was misappropriated and/or misspent on unauthorised purposes, what is the National Treasury's position on the misappropriation of funds meant to alleviate the plight of indigent persons by municipalities; (2) whether the National Treasury has put any mechanisms in place to monitor that funds allocated to municipalities for the provision of basic services to indigent persons are not misappropriated and/or misspent on unauthorised purposes; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the National Treasury has been informed of the misappropriation and/or misspending of the specified R9 billion budgeted and disbursed to municipalities for the provision of FBE; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what action does the National Treasury intend to take against municipalities that have been found to have misappropriated and/or misspent the FBE funds?

Reply:

In terms of section 227 of the Constitution, local government is entitled to an equitable share of nationally raised revenue to enable it to provide a package of free basic services to poor households and to support additional costs for municipalities with limited own revenue 1. potential. The local government equitable share (LGES) is an unconditional transfer that supplements the revenue that municipalities can raise themselves (including revenue raised through property rates and service charges). The components and sub-components of the LGES formula are neither an indicative budget nor a guideline as to how much should be spent on each service. Its annual baseline growth is determined, taking into account household growth (typically about 3% per year) and cost increases, including for bulk electricity and bulk water, which are typically above inflation. Despite the government's progress in ensuring that millions of households receive basic services, the demand for services remains high and outstrips the pace of delivery. Municipalities are able to use a variety of targeting methods to distribute free basic services to households, including household income, geographical, property and service value. This flexible approach means arbitrary decisions may exclude certain households. The intended recipients of free basic services should be poor households. Each municipality identifies households falling within their prescribed classification method and municipalities develop a subsidy framework based on targeting mechanisms designed to ensure that wealthy or middle-income people do not benefit from free basic service; that is, so long as the household has a municipal account and is registered on the municipality’s indigent register, it can get the free basic services package. Therefore, the R9 billion is indicative of how much it costs to cover the costs of providing free basic electricity to poor households and is therefore used to determine a fair and equitale allocation that each municipality is entitled to receive. Some municipalities have actually a Free Basic Services (FBS) policy that provides higher level of services than the norm indicated by the formual. The decision of how and where these funds are spent is up to the respective municipal councils. The Division of Revenue Act (DoRA) as a legislation that governs how grants are monitored does not give National Treasury and the National Transferring Officer (NTO) the powers to monitor spending on Equitable Share in line with indicative amounts reflected by the formula. This is different for direct grants whereby the DoRA is explicit on the monitoring mechanisms to be applied on a monthly basis.

2. The LGES is transferred by the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG). Due to being an unconditional transfer, the DoRA does not give National Treasury and DCoG the powers to monitor LGES expenditure. This is different for conditional grants as the DoRA is explicit on the monthly and quarterly reporting and monitoring requirements for these transfers. As noted above, the poverty threshold used in the LGES formula - which along with the cost factor for each service – determines each municipality’s allocation for each service in the FBS component, is not an official poverty line or a required level to be used by municipalities in their own indigence policies. The Explanatory memo to DoRA does however state that, if municipalities choose to provide free basic services to fewer households than what they are funded for through the LGES, then their budget documentation should clearly set out why they have made that choice and how they have consulted with their community during the budget process.

  • Different national departments or NTOs administer conditional grants, and these departments are responsible for monitoring and ensuring that the conditional grants they allocate to municipalities are spent on their intended purpose. This is done through ensuring compliance with DoRA and the applicable conditional grants framework by municipalities, including providing business plans, implementation plans and cash flows. Municipalities also need to report on a monthly and quarterly basis to the national department administering the grant. The administering department also monitors and undertake site visits to ensure compliance by municipalities. Where there is non-compliance, they ought to apply the levers available to them through DoRA, which includes withholding transfers and they may propose the stopping and reallocation of a portion or an entire municipality's grant allocation.

In order to guard against the misuse of conditional grants, if the National Treasury (NT) anticipates that a municipality may underspend on the allocation or a portion of the allocation, NT may in its discretion or on request of a transferring officer, withhold, stop and re-allocate the transfer of a Schedule 4B or 5B allocation, or a portion to a municipality. This is in line with sections 17,18 and 19 of the 2020 DoRA and Section 38 of the Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003) (MFMA). Further, in instances where municipalities commit serious or persistent breach of any of the provisions of the DoRA or the MFMA, NT may decide to stop or withhold funds to a municipality by invoking section 216(2) of the Constitution and section 39 of MFMA for no more than 120 days subject to an approval by Parliament.

3. NT has not been informed and would not be in a position to determine that the funds for free basic services have been spent on other areas given that the allocations indicated by the formulal are not meant to be indicator of budgets but to ensure equitable allocations per muncipality. What can be of assistance is for the respective municipal councils to have ways of monitoring budget spending by municipalities and ensure that there is consequence management for non-compliance with the DoRA prescripts as the councils and municipal managers have powers to implement such measures.

10 June 2021 - NW1688

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the effects of budget cuts on feeding schemes in each province and (b) is the total number of meals that have had to be reduced as a result of budget cuts?

Reply:

a) The budget cut on the Grant in 2020/21 totaled 1.5% over the 2021 MTEF.  This cut has affected all provinces; especially on priorities, such as the meal costs, which were not substantially increased against the rising food prices.  Also the honoraria for Volunteer Food Handlers could not be increased in line with the Ministerial Determination of the Department of Employment and Labour.

b, The number of learners/meals was affected by the rotation timetable. However, no meals were reduced, as all learners attending school or collecting meals/food parcels were catered for at the school. 

10 June 2021 - NW1438

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the court action by Astral Foods Limited compelling the National Treasury to prepare a financial recovery plan for the Lekwa Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, what are the reasons that such a financial recovery plan could not have been prepared by the Government without court action being taken by residents (2) on what date is the financial recovery plan expected to be (a) finalised and (b) implemented; (3) whether the National Treasury is currently a party to any other case that seeks to compel the Government to intervene in the financial management of a municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of each of the cases

Reply:

1. The court order granted in favour of the applicant Astral Operations Limited related to a failure of the Provincial Executive to ensure implementation of the financial recovery plan rather than a failure of government to prepare a financial recovery plan for the Lekwa Local Municipality. When the application for a national intervention was first sought by Astral Operations Limited in 2018, it was agreed that a national intervention at that time was premature, since the Province had already resolved to intervene in the Lekwa Local Municipality in October 2018. A national intervention is a last resort remedy in terms of the hierarchy of interventions outlined in S139 of the Constitution. Consequently, the key role players agreed to support the provincial intervention and the application was subsequently held in abeyance to allow the provincial intervention to unfold and for the financial recovery plan to be implemented with the view that the intervention would address the concerns raised by Astral.

However, since the approval of the financial recovery plan for the Lekwa Local Municipality by the MEC for Finance in the Mpumalanga Province in October 2019, no significant improvement has been noted in the Municipality. Astral Operations Limited has now revived the application on the principle basis that the financial recovery plan was not implemented and ultimately the provincial intervention has failed. Astral now insisted on a national intervention.

2. Section 139(1) (a) (v) (bb) of the Municipal Finance Management Act, No. 56 of 2003 (MFMA) requires that a financial recovery plan be prepared within a period not exceeding 90 days determined by the MEC for Finance in the Province. The court order issued on 12 April 2021 allows for a period of 6 months from the date of the order, however, the financial recovery plan will be prepared in terms of the timeframes in the MFMA.

3. There are court applications and orders in this regard against the following municipalities:

  • Emalahleni Local Municipality in Mpumalanga - a High court application brought by Save Emalahleni Action Group and Others to compel the province to invoke a mandatory intervention in the municipality. An order by consent of all parties was granted by the Court for the mandatory intervention. If the province fails to comply with statutory provisions relating to mandatory intervention and if the applicants intend to review any decision the applicants may enrol the matter file supplementary papers seeking appropriate relief which might possibly also include national intervention in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution.
  • Enoch Mgijima Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape - a High Court application brought by Let’s talk Komani against the Premier and Others seeking a mandatory intervention in terms of section 139 of the Constitution. An order by consent of all parties was granted by the Court to the effect that the financial recovery plan approved by the province was made an Order of Court; the province reports quarterly to the High Court on progress on the implementation of the financial recovery plan.
  • Makana Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape - a High Court application was brought by the Unemployed Peoples Movement against the Premier of the Eastern Cape and Others seeking a mandatory intervention by the province into the Makana Local Municipality; the dissolution of the municipal council; and the appointment of an administrator.
  • Kannaland Local Municipality in the Western Cape - a High Court application brought by the municipality against the provincial government for judicial review of decisions of the provincial executive to intervene in the municipality, claiming that the financial recovery plan of March 2017 and appointment of administrators was unlawful and unconstitutional.
  • Maluti-A-Phofung Local Municipality in Free State province - a High Court application which was brought by Harrismith Business Forum to interdict Eskom from discontinuing electricity supply to Maluti-A-Phofung municipality and to compel national government to intervene in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution. An order by consent of all parties was granted by the Court to, amongst others, establish a consultative committee chaired by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and prepare a financial recovery plan;
  • Mafube Local Municipality in Free State province – a High Court application brought by Mafube Business Forum and Afriforum seeking declaration that the provincial intervention has failed and jurisdictional facts for national intervention in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution are present.

08 June 2021 - NW1591

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) was the total number of learners in each (i) quintile and (ii) province in the (aa) 2018, (bb) 2019 and (cc) 2020 and (b) are the details of the data source from which the figures were sourced in each case; (2) what was the total number of learners in each province according to the SNAP Survey for Ordinary Schools undertaken (a) in the past nine academic years and (b) since the beginning of the 2021 academic year?

Reply:

(1)

 (i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc) Table 1 (ATTACHED ANNEXURE) indicates the number of learners by quintile and province between 2018 and 2020. (see attached).

 

Province

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Eastern Cape

1 951 523

1 938 078

1,946,885

1,953,397

1,961,547

1,795,563

1,840,780

1,843,814

1,843,297

Free State

 661 974

 664 508

672,290

682,704

688,349

701,487

707,166

716,080

719,847

Gauteng

2 075 387

2 129 526

2,191,475

2,262,319

2,326,584

2,413,225

2,402,576

2,447,377

2,508,387

KwaZulu-Natal

2 877 969

2 866 570

2,901,697

2,881,518

2,877,544

2,863,316

2,821,221

2,844,764

2,867,271

Limpopo

1 715 778

1 714 832

1,720,585

1,753,734

1,765,555

1,776,467

1,724,791

1,753,819

1,759,322

Mpumalanga

1 054 783

1 052 807

1,057,788

1,079,280

1,074,352

1,096,428

1,045,972

1,094,941

1,107,890

Northern Cape

 277 494

 282 631

289,004

290,139

292,595

292,377

295,339

298,888

304,237

North West

 775 142

 788 261

800,316

813,873

829,467

825,776

840,640

852,589

863,071

Western Cape

1 038 019

1 052 435

1,075,396

1,097,509

1,116,572

1,127,634

1,141,057

1,188,926

1,243,150

South Africa

12 428 069

12 489 648

12,655,436

12,814,473

12,932,565

12,892,273

12,819,542

13,041,198

13,216,472

(b) The data provided in question i and  ii, were extracted from the 2018, 2019 and 2020 School Master list data which is also published on the Department's Website.

 

(2) Table 2  shows the number of learners, by province, between 2012 and 2020. Please note that the 2021 data is not yet available.

Table 2: Number of learners in ordinary schools, by province, between 2012 and 2020

Sources: 2012-2016 SNAP Survey. 2017-2020 LURITS

08 June 2021 - NW1523

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Given the current political and economic challenges affecting the neighbouring countries of the republic, and in light of the impact on the Republic of the influx of undocumented immigrants fleeing their countries and seeking better opportunities in the Republic, what, (a) strategies does the Government have in place to assist the affected states to stabilise politically and economically and (b) are the challenges if any, towards those endeavours?

Reply:

South Africa is one of the biggest economies in Africa and has always been an attractive destination to citizens from neighbouring countries seeking better economic opportunities. Although South Africa, the region and Africa face similar challenges of poverty, inequality and unemployment, South Africa is seen as providing better economic opportunities. Inevitably this has also attracted illegal and irregular migration.

South Africa’s Foreign Policy priorities are centred on the region first and in Africa, being cognisant of the fact that South Africa’s prosperity and her ability to address inequality, poverty and unemployment are interlinked and inseparable to that of the region and Africa. In this regard, South Africa has bilateral engagements with all the countries in the region and eight countries have engagements on the highest level of Bi-National Commissions. It is through cooperation within these mechanisms that South Africa seeks to address the challenges within the areas of peace and security, social, economics and politics.

08 June 2021 - NW1580

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is funding to community tourism organisations (CTOs) determined and (b) what (i) are the criteria that a CTO must meet to qualify for funding and (ii) is the consequence management plan for municipalities that fail to pay legislated funding to CTOs?

Reply:

The Honorable member is referred to previous responses to Hon HS Gumbi, Question numbers: 467,468,469,651 and 652, as tabled on 21 April 2021 in this regard.

The Department of Tourism does not keep data on Community Tourism Organisations. The Department’s point of entry to community organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate. The Department maintains this approach as it has worked effectively in terms of outreach and engagements with local tourism communities as well as from an intergovernmental relations point of view. Thus, the department acknowledges concurrent legislative competence and that local govenment is responsible for the development of local tourism including matters related to community tourism organisations.

a) How is funding to community tourism organisations (CTOs) determined.

Community Tourism Organisations (CTOs) are independent associations based on voluntary participation by their membership. The organisations are responsible for their own operations including financial aspects thereof. The Department of Tourism does not fund CTOs.

b) (i) and (ii) Not Applicable

 

08 June 2021 - NW1579

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has engaged with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to address the issue of (a) sewage spills and water course pollution that is severely impacting tourism, for example the status of blue flag beaches, and (b) dam and river pollution that has an impact on sporting events such as the Duzi Canoe Marathon; if not, (i) why not and (ii) how does her department intend to address the specified problem; if so, what are the details of the plan to address the impact of water pollution on tourism?

Reply:

The management of water resources and water infrastructure is the competency of the relevant Local Authority and the Department of Water Affairs and Sanitation as well as the relevant Water Board. The matter of sewerage spills and water pollution are usually addressed by these competent authorities. Where these matters are raised directly with the Department of Tourism, they are then brought to the attention of the competent authorities for resolution. It is suggested that the Honourable member refers her question to the Minister of Water Affairs and Sanitation as well as the relevant Provincial and Local Authority.

08 June 2021 - NW1594

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What was the purpose of the Ministerial cook off with Mr Somizi Mhlongo on 17 May 2021 ahead of the Budget Vote of her department; (2) whether any State resources were used to host the event; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount did the event cost, (b) from what budget were the funds obtained and (c) on what statutory grounds did she rely in this regard?

Reply:

(1) The Ministerial cock-off was part of the pre-Tourism Budget Vote departmental awareness activities, showcasing the work of the department in terms of the participation of graduate Chefs from its training programmes as well as promoting a culture of eating out particularly at township establishments.

(2) (a) The event cost was R150 000,00 (One hundred and fifty thousand rand) covering the venue and mobile kitchen hire, event staffing, safety and event compliance requirements, the stage, sound system, food supplies, exhibition setup, publicity including live-streaming of activities and sound system.

It is also important to state that there was no payment made to Mr Somizi Mhlongo and the department notes with concern the general public perception that he benefited from the event, which is not the case.

(b) The funds were obtained from the Chief Directorate: Communications from its 2021/22 MTEF allocation.

(c) The Tourism Act, No 3 of 2014 provides for development and promotion of tourism in South Africa.

07 June 2021 - NW1588

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department has been informed of the Nico Bekker Intermediary School Hostel that is standing abandoned and vandalised in Williston in the Northern Cape; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the reason that her department has not intervened earlier; (2) what (a) is the total worth in Rand of repairs that the specified building needs and (b) steps will her department take against persons holding official positions in other departments who are found guilty of stealing state-owned property at the specified hostel; (3) what are the reasons that the building was transferred to the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture when it and was intended to be used as accommodation and/or a hostel for primary school learners?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Northern Cape Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

07 June 2021 - NW1365

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) processes were followed in the appointment of a certain person (name and details furnished) in the Gauteng Department of Education and (b) are the reasons that the candidate recommended by the panel was not appointed for the specified position?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The question asked falls within the Executive Authority of the Member of Executive Council (MEC) for Education in Gauteng Province, not the Minister of Basic Education.  

07 June 2021 - NW1444

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the criteria of the allocation schools to quintiles across the Republic and in each province and (b) percentage of schools (i) should be in each quintile in each province and (ii) are in fact allocated to each quintile in each province?

Reply:

What (a) are the criteria of the allocation schools to quintiles across the Republic and in each province and (b) percentage of schools (i) should be in each quintile in each province and (ii) are in fact allocated in each quintile in each province.

(a) The National Norms and Standards for School Funding (NNSSF) prescribes that the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), when determining the relative poverty of a school and consequently in which quintile a school is placed, should base their decisions on the relative poverty of the community around the school, using national census data; and taking into account indicators, such as income; dependency ratio (or unemployment rate); and level of education of the community (or literacy rate). Schools may dispute the correctness of the poverty score assigned through representation to the provincial Head of Department.

The cut-off line between quintiles within a province is guided by the national poverty distribution table as provided in the school funding policy (Paragraph 111 of the NNSSF). This poverty distribution table basically determines the percentage of learners within a province which should be in the different quintiles.

(b)(i) Each year, the Minister of Basic Education publishes a national poverty distribution table, which also indicates the breakdown of the 60% of learners that would not pay school fees. Guided by that table, provinces are required to submit their list of schools that would be no-fee paying schools for the following year. The Minister also annually publishes the no-fee paying schools lists. The following Gazetted ‘national poverty distribution table’ or ‘poverty table’ should be used by provinces in determining how the target table (Paragraph 109 of the NNSSF) finds expression in each province. For example, Eastern Cape must consider the national quintile 1 target to be applicable to as many schools on the resource targeting list as it takes to cover 27.3% of learners, starting from the poorest school.

National Poverty Distribution Table

Quintiles

%

1 poorest

2

3

4

5

Total

EC

27.3

24.7

19.6

17

11.4

100%

FS

20.5

20.9

22.4

20.8

15.4

100%

GP

14.1

14.7

17.9

21.9

31.4

100%

KZN

22.1

23.2

20.2

18.7

15.8

100%

LP

28.2

24.6

24.2

14.9

8

100%

MP

23.1

24.1

21.5

17.7

13.5

100%

NC

21.5

19.3

20.7

21.4

17.1

100%

NW

25.6

22.3

20.8

17.6

13.7

100%

WC

8.6

13.3

18.4

28

31.7

100%

SA

20

20

20

20

20

100%

 

(b)(ii)    Percentage of learners that are in fact allocated in each quintile in each province:

Actual percentage of learners accommodated in each quintile in 2021

Quintiles

%

1 poorest

2

3

4

5

Total

EC

33,11%

20,00%

44,90%

1,00%

1,00%

100%

FS

28,61%

22,75%

28,88%

9,58%

10,17%

100%

GP

14,83%

15,32%

18,21%

21,09%

30,55%

100%

KZN

22,47%

26,40%

32,72%

10,11%

8,31%

100%

LP

34,82%

39,44%

21,35%

1,43%

2,96%

100%

MP

45,22%

37,61%

9,67%

3,90%

3,60%

100%

NC

23,33%

23,58%

25,18%

16,30%

11,62%

100%

NW

28,77%

19,92%

40,04%

10,53%

0,75%

100%

WC

9,85%

13,69%

17,80%

27,21%

31,45%

100%

SA

25,96%

24,47%

27,13%

11,24%

11,16%

100%

All PEDs accomodate more learners in no-fee schools than have been provided for by the policy. In 2021, approximately 87% of all schools have been declared as no-fee paying schools, accommodating approximately 83% of all learners nationally.

07 June 2021 - NW1066

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the current status of the Incremental Introduction of African Languages initiative in public schools and (b) how does her department intend to ensure that everyone’s right to receive education in the official languages and/or languages of their choice in public schools are realised?

Reply:

(a) The Incremental Introduction of African Languages (IIAL) continues to target schools that did not offer a previously marginalised official African language (2 584) and is currently being implemented in 2 144 (83%) schools. There is thus a shortfall of 440 schools. The IIAL strategy has been implemented in Grades 1-3, and it was supposed to move to Grade 4 in 2021.  However, its implementation has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic; and the Department of Basic Education's (DBE) primary focus has been and continues to be on fundamentals, which is the Home Language and the First Additional Language levels (reading and writing).  It is worth noting that there are schools that are already implementing the IIAL strategy up to Grade 7, as evidenced through the 2021 Annual Performance Plan monitoring report. 

(b) All the language related legislation, policies, programmes and strategies that are developed, adopted and used by the DBE advocate for learners to primarily learn through their home languages.  Section 29(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa provides that "everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is reasonably practicable."  This Bill of Rights is further echoed by the National Education Policy Act (1996), the South African Schools Act (1996), and the Language in Education Policy (1997). The National Development Plan is also very explicit and recommends that learners' Home Language be used as a language of learning and teaching for longer.

The National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 supports mother tongue education, particularly in the Foundation Phase where learners learn the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and counting.  Consequently, African languages are mainly used as languages of learning and teaching in the Foundation Phase.

The DBE developed the Language Framework document, which aims to support the utilisation of African languages as languages of learning and teaching in the early grades and beyond. 

Provinces continue to support and extend the use of mother tongue education. The Eastern Cape, forexample, initiated the Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education, wherein 2 024 schools are using IsiXhosa and Sesotho for learning and teaching beyond the Foundation Phase.  Learners in these schools are taught Mathematics, Natural Science and Technology in their Home Languages of  IsiXhosa and Sesotho.  The 2020 Grade 12 learners, for the first time in the history of the NCS, had access to preliminary examination question papers in their Home Languages (IsiXhosa and Sesotho).

07 June 2021 - NW1463

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of returning students at (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges did not receive National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding during the 2021 academic year and (b) were the reasons for non- funding?

Reply:

a) (i)  93 532 TVET college students
            

b) (ii)  52 992 University students

Un-funding Reason

TVET Colleges

Universities

The academic pathway that is not funded as per the DHET guidelines for TVET colleges

5 376

 

Highest qualification level already achieved

 

22 014

N+ exceeded

140

22 649

Student failed

88 016

8 326

Student funded by other bursary

 

3

Total

93 532

52 992

07 June 2021 - NW1120

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the details of exemptions granted by the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to the SA Airways (SAA) in order to enable the SAA flights to and from Brussels to transport COVID-19 vaccines on or about 24 February 2021; (2) whether, given the exemptions for these flights granted by the SACAA, it is not a conflict of interest for the SACAA to investigate the Alpha Floor incident that occurred during the SAA flights to or from Brussels on or about 24 February 2021, as it may constitute SACAA investigating itself; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of action taken or to be taken to ensure that the investigation of the SAA Alpha Floor incident is independently investigated and reported; (3) what are the details of the person(s) and/or institution(s) that are investigating the SACAA aircraft that crashed near George in the Western Cape on 23 January 2020?

Reply:

South African Airways (SAA) wanted to conduct a flight and one of the regulatory provisions required to conduct this flight is the consideration to regain recency of the nominated pilots. Due to the fact that SAA’s Aviation Training Organization (ATO) has not been operational since 27 March 2020, the cessation of all SAA operations as of October 2020, and other factors the airline pilots needed to comply with the South African Civil Aviation Regulations (SACAR) in respect of training and recency before undertaking the planned flight.

SAA therefore applied for an exemption from the following provisions of the South African Civil Aviation Technical Standards as they relate to the crew training and recency:

1.1 SA CATs 121.03.2 2. (1)(a)(c) (d) and (g) - relating to approval of an external training facility.

1.2 SA CATS 121.03.1 point 3 (5) (v) to (viii) & (7) (ii) (cc) & (dd) - relating to external instructor qualification to conduct training for SAA pilots.

1.3 SA CATS 121.03.3 10.1- relating to pilots regaining recency. 

1.4. SA CATS 121.03.3 3 This pertains to recurrent training:

The exemption was granted in respect of four pilots only.

In relation to the provisions of the exemptions: The SACAA is vested with the power to monitor and oversee safety and security in civil aviation. These powers are prescribed in legislation, being the Civil Aviation Act, 2009 (Act No. 13 of 2009). This Act gives powers to the Director of Civil Aviation to consider and, where good cause is shown and after being satisfied that the safety has been properly mitigated, grant an exemption to any person or body from compliance with the provisions of the regulations and associated technical standards.

(2) In terms of Section 37 of the Civil Aviation Act, the SACAA has a duty to investigate any occurrence, which does not fall under the definition of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annex 13. This is an international standard practice by all National Aviation Regulators.

The primary distinction in this provision is that there was no damage to the aircraft, property nor injury to personnel.

The South African Civil Aviation Regulations (SACAR) state that:

Functions of Civil Aviation Authority

73. (1) The Civil Aviation Authority has the function of conducting the safety and security oversight of civil aviation in the Republic by—

(2) In addition to the functions referred to in subsection (1) the Civil Aviation Authority has the following functions:

(m) to investigate aircraft accidents and aircraft incidents that the Aviation Safety Investigation Board has determined not to investigate in terms of Chapter 4 and for purposes of regulatory compliance with this Act;

A conflict of interest cannot be confirmed before the cause of the incident is determined. The SACAA investigation extends beyond the Alpha Floor incident and encompasses the lack of timely reporting of the incident to the SACAA as required by the Civil Aviation Regulations.

(3) The Minister of Transport appointed an independent investigating authority for the ZS-CAR accident. The Ethiopian Civil Aviation Accident Prevention and Investigation Bureau was duly appointed.

07 June 2021 - NW1366

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) engagements has she had with the parents and staff of the Theresa park Primary School in Pretoria, to find out what the relevant details were about the issues that led the parents to eject the principal from the specified school and (b) kind of assistance has her department given to the principal to deal with the trauma of her violent eviction from the school?

Reply:

This matter falls within the competence of Gauteng Department of Education (GDE); and as such I had to consult with MEC Lesufi. 

(a) I am informed that MEC  Lesufi visited the Principal, Ms Mabaso, at her home on 14 May 2021; and on the same evening, held a meeting with the  School Governing Body (SGB) members and the SMT of Laerskool Theresapark.  In this meeting, the SGB members (old and new) made submissions on the issue of the Principal. An independent investigation has since been instituted into the allegations of financial mismanagement, and the reported resignation of staff at the school.

(b) On 17 May 2021, the GDE Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) unit visited the Principal, Ms Mabaso at her home to provide support. She was advised to do self-referral and was provided with contact details.

07 June 2021 - NW1446

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the fact that the annual School Realities report is normally published not more than three months into the next year, (a) what is the reason that the School Realities report for 2020 has not been published on her department’s website, (b) on what date will it be available and (c) what is the reason for the delay?

Reply:

(a) The design of the School Realities report has not yet been completed.  However, the School Realities data has been approved by the Accounting Officer in October 2020 and is available from the Department.

(b) The School Realities report will be published by the end of June 2021 on the Department's website.  

(c) School closures in 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent suspension of normal programming in the Basic Education Sector, led to the delay.

07 June 2021 - NW581

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that her department’s annual statement reflected that an amount of R372,4 million was spent on consultants for the 2019-20 financial year, what (a) is the name of each individual consultant, (b) total amount was spent on each consultant and (c) is the specific service that was provided and/or rendered by each consultant?

Reply:

It should be noted that the above expenditures marked A, B, and C were incurred using the services of the suppliers and NPOs appointed through Community Work Programme.

SUPPIER

SERVICES RENDERED

AMOUNT

SEKELA XABISO

AUDIT SERVICES

R5 019 449,89

AUDIT COMMITTEE

AUDIT COMMITTEE SERVICES

R962 101,00

THEMBALETHU

IMPLEMENTING AGENCY SERVICES

R8 613,50

TOP MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS

COMMUNICATION SERVICES

R199 594,40

PRICEWATER COOPERS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R408 405,88

INSIKA

SAFTEY AND HEALTH SERVICES

R41 800,00

SAYM

ORGANISATIONAL ADVISORY SERVICES

R129 277,06

VARIOUS IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES (CWP)

RESEARCH & ADVISORY SERVICES

  1. R16 694 301,27

ALEXANDER FORBES

RESEARCH & ADVISORY SERVICES

R16 319,40

SAQA

VERIFICATION OF QUALIFICATIONS

R641 414,73

MAGAGSON BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

TRANSLATION & TRANSCRIPT SERVICES

R644 257,98

ISILUMKO STAFFING

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

R2 123 291,63

ADVERT & RESPONSE HANDLING HCM

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

R221 005,13

FEMPOWER PERSONNEL

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

R16 701 942,96

OBVIOUS CHOICE

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

R728 206,45

ULTIMATE RECRUITMENT

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

R209 656,70

GIJIMA HOLDINGS

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

R24 351,00

VARIOUS IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES (CWP)

RECRUITMENT SERVICES

(B) R7 401 633,17

PALMER DEVELOPMENT GROUP

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R748 991,50

KIJAMI DEVELOPMENT CC

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R1 613 586,40

RESILIENCE GLOBALE

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R199 507,80

21ST CENTURY PAY SOLUTIONS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R106 375,00

BONAKUDE CONSULTING

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R7 647 703,69

KAGISO TRUST

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R9 214 315,20

DBSA

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R14 585 171,24

NKONKE TRADING

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R11 010 020,00

BIGEN AFRICA

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R9 939 051,27

DATAWORLD

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R7 898 684,21

DUCHARME

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

R3 146 100,00

UBAC

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FEES

R10 800 000,00

VARIOUS IMPLEMENTING AGENCIES (CWP)

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FEES

( C ) R243 280 602,79

 TOTAL

 

372 365 731,25

04 June 2021 - NW1423

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the reasons that R666 million was not billed in the 2018-19 financial year, (b) who is not paying as her department is struggling to recover debts and only two material irregularities were found which amount to a loss of R1,9 million and (c) how far is the investigation regarding the lease agreement with the Department of Defence?

Reply:

I would like to inform the Honourable Member that neither the Department nor any of its entities has a lease agreement with the Department of Defence.

04 June 2021 - NW1433

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she will furnish Mr D W Bryant with the information relating to the latest issued and audited annual financial reports indicating the financial performance of each (a) national park, (b) regional office business unit and (c) national corporate business unit of the SA National Parks (SANParks) in terms of income, (ii) operating and capital expenditure and (iii) staffing number of staff; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a)(b)(c)

The SANParks 2020/21 financial statements are not available because they are in the process of being audited. The only available audited information is from the 2019/20 financial year, on page 191 of the SANParks 2019/20 Annual report.


The attached Excel document (Annexure A) provides a breakdown of the Audited 2019/20 Annual Financial reports indicating financial performance of each National Park, Regional Office and National Corporate Business Unit (Head Once) in terms of:

(i) income;

(ii) operating and capital expenditure; and

(iii) the number of staff in each National Park and Regional Office is provided in the table below.

PARK NAME

TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT

Grand Total

 

PERMANENT

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPORARY

EMPLOYMENT

INTERSHIP

PROGRAM

LEARNERSHIP

PROGRAM

 

Addo Elephant National Park

162

10

0

2

174

Agulhas National Park

25

0

0

0

25

Augrabies National Park

37

4

0

0

41

Biodiversity and Special Projects

0

1419

2

0

1421

Bontebok National Park

17

0

0

4

21

Camdeboo National Park

29

3

1

1

34

Cape Town Office

9

0

0

0

9

Golden Gate Highlands National Park

196

2

1

0

199

Groenkloof National Park

Head Office

 

273

18

2

0

293

Karoo National Park

45

1

0

2

48

Kgaiagadi National Park

118

7

0

1

126

Kimberly Game Capture Office

28

1

0

0

29

Knysna National Park

65

0

0

1

66

Kn/sna Regional Office

14

0

0

0

14

Kruger National Park

2258

167

2

0

2427

Mapungubwe National Park

82

0

1

0

83

Marakele National Park

60

0

0

2

62

Meerkat National Park

7

2

0

0

9

Mokala National Park

48

5

0

0

53

Mountain Zebra National Park

34

2

1

2

39

Namaqua National Park

21

0

0

0

21

Port Elizabeth Regional Office

7

3

0

0

10

Richterveld National Park

33

4

0

0

37

Rondevlei Research Office

19

1

1

0

21

Table Mountain National Park

209

3

2

4

218

Tankwa Karoo National Park

15

0

0

0

15

Tsitsikamma National Park

130

27

1

2

160

Up

ington Regional Office

3

2

0

0

5

West Coast National Park

31

0

0

0

31

Wilderness National Park

82

0

0

1

83

Grand Total

4057

1681

14

22

5774

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE:

04 June 2021 - NW1434

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) What was the capital expenditure on the Table Mountain National Park’s (TMNP) Hoerikwaggo Trail which was meant to be the TMNP flagship overnight trail intended to stimulate tourism and create much-needed jobs; (2) whether there has been any consequence management for the TMNP management who have allowed the Hoerikwaggo Trail to fall into disrepair; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether the issue of falling into disrepair of the Hoerikwaggo Trail has been raised as fruitless and wasteful expenditure in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what has happened to the skills upliftment programme associated with the specified trail; (5) whether the affected individuals and/or employees have been offered alternative opportunities at the Hoerikwaggo Trail; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The capital expenditure for the Table Mountain National Park’s (TMNP) Hoerikwaggo trail was approximately R15 million.
(2) No consequence management needed to be implemented because the trail is still functional and no staff member acted negligently. As a result, SANParks did not incur any fruitless or wasteful expenditure. Currently, there are two tented camps which are not operational: the Silvermine Tented Camp was destroyed in the devastating 2015 fires and the Orangekloof tented camp was closed due to persistent crime incidents and security challenges in the area. SANParks will establish a feasible commercial opportunity at the Silvermine camp. The Orangekloof tented camp is harder to secure as it is situated in close proximity to human settlements and is easily accessible through various non-controlled access points as Table Mountain is an open access national park.
(3) The trail is still functional, and the organisation derives value from the use of the trail for Tourism purposes. Guests still book into the Wash houses, Overseers Cottage, Slangkop and Smitwinkel tented camps for overnight stays and to hike sections of the trail. Therefore, the amount spent on the trail does not qualify to be declared fruitless and wasteful expenditure in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (No. 1 of 1999).
(4) The skills development of employees is an ongoing exercise and staff have been trained on various courses or skills as part of the program outputs.
(5) Employees who had been employed at the tented camps that were closed down were redeployed in other areas of the Park and are all still employed at TMNP. Therefore, there were no job losses as a result of the closure of the two camps.

Regards
MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
:4/6/2021

04 June 2021 - NW1458

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether any gas-to-power projects have (a) applied for and (b) been granted generating licences by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa in the past five years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what (i) is the name of each applicant, (ii) are the relevant details with regard to (aa) output capacity, (bb) location of the project and (cc) any other licencing requirements such as environmental approval and (c) is the current status of the project in terms of (i) financial closure, (ii) expected date of completion, (iii) offtake agreements and/or (iv) power purchase agreements?

Reply:

a) No gas to power projects were applied for in the past five years

b) No.

(i) See (a) above

(ii) See (a) above

(aa) See (a) above

(bb) See (a) above

(cc) See (a) above

c) See (a) above

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

04 June 2021 - NW1553

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is the planned final deadline for the finalisation of the Tourism Recovery Plan, (b) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines for the finalisation of the plan, (c) how was the plan drawn up, (d) who was consulted, (e) what data was (i) obtained and (ii) used and (f) what are the budget allocations for each line item?

Reply:

(a) & (b) (i) – (iii) Finalisation of the Tourism Recovery Plan.

The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan was approved by Cabinet on 21 April 2021 and is a three-year recovery plan for the tourism sector ending in March 2024.

(c) How was the plan drawn up.

The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan was drafted in consultation with the entire tourism sector including private and public sector.

(d) Who was consulted.

Every South African was provided an opportunity to provide inputs into the Plan noting that the Plan was published for Public Comment in August 2020. This was in addition to focused and targeted meetings and webinars with both public and private stakeholders within the tourism sector value chain.

(e) What data was (i) obtained and (ii) used.

To properly baseline the pandemic’s impact a modified dynamic input-output table was used to model the effect of exogenous changes in tourism spending on final demand, This analysis approximated COVID-19 impact on tourism at a subsector level and enabled estimation of income and employment levels based on proposed interventions and stimuli. The model used existing data sources, amongst others, the Tourism Satellite Account and the Domestic and International Tourism Surveys. The model also drawed on survey data gathered during the development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan.

(f) What are the budget allocations for each line item.

Noting the fiscal contrains within Government and mitigating against the risk of not receiving any additional funding for the implementation of the Plan the Annual Performance Plans, for both the Department of Tourism and South African Tourism, focus on the implimentation of the priorities identified in the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan.

04 June 2021 - NW1441

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the submissions made by his department in the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Transport on 7 May 2021, where the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) and Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) delivered their 2020-2021 Annual Performance Plans, his department is currently forging ahead with the process to amalgamate RTIA, RTMC and the Driving Licence Card Account; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how far is the amalgamation process and (b) what are the full relevant details regarding the amalgamation process?

Reply:

The process of legislative mandate review of RTMC and RTIA, has started and National Treasury has been engaged on the issue of the DLCA and we are awaiting their response on the migration of their functions to the RTMC.

This is work in Progress, particularly the Legislative mandates pertaining to RTMC and RTIA , and this will need Parliamentary process to give ratification on the proposed amalgamation.

 

04 June 2021 - NW1473

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether her department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. No, the department does not have any agreement with any agency of the Republic of Cuba in regards to exchange programmes.

(a) (i) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

© Not applicable.

2. Not applicable.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 4/6/2021

04 June 2021 - NW1435

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) In view of a certain undertaking by the SA National Parks that the Table Mountain National Park (TMNP) would soon establish a Mission Area Command, Control and Communications Centre for the execution of Sustainable Asset Protection, Safety and Security in TMNP in accordance with the 2020 Area Integrity Management Plan, which has been planned for two years with no tangible results yet, on what date will the Joint Operations Centre be (a) completed and (b) operational; (2) whether she will furnish Mr D W Bryant with the project plan for fundraising, planning, planning approvals, specification compilation, commercial tender process, tender evaluation, implementation and/or construction and final commissioning of the planned Joint Operations Centre; (3)(a) what is the budget breakdown for the (i) new Joint Operations Centre and (ii) associated security improvements for TMNP and (b) how will the Joint Operations Centre be complemented by adequate resources on the ground; (4) does SANParks intend to recruit additional rangers to prevent and react to crime; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what are the details of the various security solutions such as cameras, drones, helicopters, tactical response units, canine unit and rangers?

Reply:

(1) The plan to establish a command centre for Table Mountain National Park originated in 2019.. The command centre was officially established on 1 October 2020 and it is located at Newlands fire base in Cape Town. Although the Command Centre is still in the process of establishment, specifically with regards to the specialized technical infrastructure and specialized training of staff, it is already partially operational and in use by SANParks and other key security cluster stakeholders. Once completed the capacitated Command Centre will be resourced with capabilities to take action based on the intelligence it collects.
The implementation plan for the Command Centre will be divided into Phases. Phase 1 has been implemented effective from 1 April 2021 and Phase 2 implemented from 1 June 2021.
Despite the fact that the Command Centre was not fully functional during the December 2020 festive season, a successful special operation, which included aerial observation support, was conducted. A similar operation was conducted during the April 2021 festive season, with similar positive effects.
(b) The Command Centre will be complimented with a special taskforce/response team which is anticipated to be operational by November 2021. The Command Centre control room is already 60 percent functional and manned by SANParks officials.
(2) Operational plans from the security cluster are not normally placed in the public domain.
(3) SANParks wishes to clarify that a Command Centre is established, not a Joint Operations Centre.
(a)(i) Approximately R500 000 has been set aside for Operational Expenditure while an amount of R1.5 million has been budgeted for Capital Expenditure under Phase 1. To date an amount of R24,899.15 has been spent on operations and R76,569.85 has been spent on capital related expenditure.
(ii) The Command Centre aims to integrate the Ranger staff with the special taskforce/response team as well as external role players in the security cluster, namely SAPS, Metro Police, City Law Enforcement and others. This integrated approach will streamline and facilitate a more focussed response to area integrity.
b) The Command centre will be complemented by external resources such as SAPS, Metro Police, Environmental monitors and other relevant City Law Enforcement officials. It will ensure those whose primary responsibility is law enforcement also focus on safety of user in the Table Mountain National Park.
(4) The Table Mountain National Park has a total of 112 Rangers, 14 Environmental Monitors and 59 Tourism Monitors. The command centre is manned by a dedicated team who come from a Conservation and Tourism background and thus have the knowledge and experience to ensure effective and efficient deployment.
Twenty of these staff members will be trained to operate as a tactical response team, to respond to any sea, mountain and other incidents reported through the Command Centre.
(5) At this stage, SANParks is testing appropriate technologies. The organisation will select those technologies which are most feasible and deliver the intended outcomes. SANParks will also pursue partnerships, where appropriate, to further enhance safety and security and share technology, such as the existing partnership with the Table Mountain Arial Cable Company.
Helicopters will also be deployed from time to time on joint planned operations, especially during festive seasons as was done during the December 2020 festive season.

A Canine Unit for the Table Mountain National Park will be in place by August 2021.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 4/6/2021

04 June 2021 - NW1398

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who are in breach of their contracts with her department dealt with, (b) what number of service providers and suppliers have been in breach of contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021, (c) what are the reasons for the breach of the contracts, (d) what steps are taken to reduce the instances of breach of contract and (e) what financial losses have been incurred regarding the breach of a contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

Note: This response should be read in conjunction with the response to Question No: 1396.

Breach of contract is when either of the parties did not comply with any or all the terms of conditions. Thus a notice of breach of contract is issued when the supplier defaulted on the terms and conditions. Breach of contract is a pre -requirement for the contractor to be declared as a defaulter (Non-compliance of contract) (PFMA Regulation 16A.9.2 and Treasury Guidelines – Government Procurement – General Conditions of Contract – Annexure A)

a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who are in breach of their contracts with the department dealt with.

  • Service Providers who are in breach of their contracts are informed immediately of such breach and remedy is usually sought from the service provider as per the signed Service Level Agreement (SLA).
  • If the service provider does not cooperate in providing the required remedy, a notice of breach is then drafted to compel the service provider to rectify the breach
  • Upon non-cooperation after a notice of breach , the Departments’ standard process in terms of the Agreements is to call for a meeting with the Service Provider chaired by a senior official to resolve any impasse.
  • If the meeting with the Service Provider does not yield any resolution and the Department has suffered loss or rights and obligations have been undermined, the Office of the State Attroney is instructed to initiate court proceedings against the Service Provider.

b)) What number of service providers and suppliers have been in breach of contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

The Honourable member is referred to the letter and report submitted to the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 3 February 2021 by the Minister and subsequently distributed to members of the committee.

c) What are the reasons for the breach of the contracts.

  • Failure to comply with the provisions contained in the signed Service Level Agreement/Contract between the Department and the Service Provider.
  • Non adherence to the terms and conditions of the contract by the service Provider with regards to project reporting or fraudulent transactions and expenditure
  • Collusion in obtaining the tender

d) What steps are taken to reduce the instances of breach of contract.

  • Project and contract management principle are used to manage issues as they arise in order to make sure these projects are successful in the end. Issues are rectified the moment these are identified,
  • Changes are implemented such as putting limits to advance payments to the service providers for EPWP contracts;
  • Systems are put in place to support service providers adherence to Departmental supply chain management policies and guidelines as determine by the PFMA Act;
  • Close monitoring of the service providers in order to detect potential issues before they materialise; and
  • Putting management control mechanisms in place in terms of processes to be followed for approvals without and quality assurance of all evidence e.g. invoices before they get paid. The Department also pursues the following methods to deal with cases of alleged non-compliance:
    • Mediation,
    • Issuance of Notices of breach,
    • Issuance of Letters of demand
    • Recovery of funds

e) What financial losses have been incurred regarding the breach of a contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

Financial Year

Financial losses incurred

Since 1 April 2021

Information will only be audited in 2022/ not audited as yet.

2020-2021

Information in process to be audited

2019-2020

Information can be obtained from that tabled Annual Performance Report of 2019/20 as tabled on 22 October 2020 ( ATC no 151 – 2020)

2018-2019

Information can be obtained from the tabled Annual Performance Report of 2018/19 as tabled on 1 October 2019 (ATC no 72 -2019)

04 June 2021 - NW1503

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether the newly implemented Post-Lockdown Economic Recovery Stimulus Package clearly stipulates the trade-offs associated by the proposal to transition to cleaner energy; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how does it differ from previous policies on climate change and cleaner energy?

Reply:

Questions relating to energy security should be addressed to the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 4/6/2021

04 June 2021 - NW1490

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. The Department of Transport has never concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010/11 financial year to 2020/21 financial year.

The Department has no intention/need to enter into agreement with Cuban Government for skills acquisition of any kind during the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period.

2. There are no skills sets identified by the Department of Transport that can be sourced from Republic of Cuba which are not available in South Africa hence there were no steps taken in this regard.