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20 December 2019 - NW682

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the Government’s proposed land reform policy on expropriation without compensation will require that title deeds of properties earmarked for expropriation be published before being transferred to beneficiaries to verify that there is no active land claim on the property; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date does she intend to introduce amending legislation in the National Assembly to make provision for the publishing of the title deeds, (b) for which reasons, other than historical land claims, will a dispute for the change of ownership of the specified properties be allowed to be registered, (c) in which publication will the title deeds be published and (d) for what period of time will the title deeds be published?

Reply:

The function of amending the Constitution to allow for expropriation of land without compensation is currently the responsibility of Parliament.

(a)(b),(c),(d) Falls away.

19 December 2019 - NW1691

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the Government is negotiating with the banking sector to ensure that banks will be compensated for any loan(s) against a property that is expropriated; if not, what impact will this have on the economy; if so, what amount has been allocated to pay the banks as a result of the mooted expropriation without compensation and redistribution policy?

Reply:

No.

19 December 2019 - NW1486

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)Whether, with reference to the fact that the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) have sold licensed programmes to other broadcasters all over the world, she will supply a list of the (a) programmes licensed throughout the world in the past 10 years, (b) fees attached to each transaction and (c) individual share of profits due to each of the (i) producers, (ii) writers and (iii) performers for each transaction; (2) what are the details of the (a) programmes sold on DVD in the Republic and throughout the world, (b) fee attached to each transaction and (c) individual share of profit due to the producers, writers and performers for each transaction; (3) whether the SABC will be paying interest for late payment considering that the share in profit due to producers, writers and performers is by contract and should have been paid bi-annually; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?NW2754E

Reply:

I have been advised by the department as follows:

1. (a) The attached Pivot worksheets entitled, Programme sales FY2014 to FY2019, details all, the licensed programming sold worldwide, by the SABC, since 2014. Manual records were kept prior to 2014.

(b) The sheets named 2017/2018 royalty calculations and 2018/2019 royalty calculations, details all royalty calculations since formal records were kept. The sheet indicates all the fees payable, for each transaction, for the writers, producers and performers.

(c) The sheets named 2017/2018 royalty calculations and 2018/2019 royalty calculations, detail all share of the profits due, for each of the writers, producers and performers.

2. (a) The worksheet titled: Calculations of DVD royalties for Oct 2018-Jan 2019 details all programme’s sold on DVD in the Republic and throughout the world.

(b) and (c) The worksheet titled: Calculations of DVD royalties for Oct 2018 – Jan 2019, details for (b) fee attached to each transaction and (c) individual share of profit due to the producers, writers and performers for each transaction.

3. The SABC management had taken a decision not to pay interest on late payments.           

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER

19 December 2019 - NW1723

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will furnish Mrs G Opperman with a list of claimants of the Community Property Association (CPA) of Loeriesfontein in the Hantam Local Municipality who have been struggling for 25 years to receive their communal land; (2) (a) what number of claimants of the Loeriesfontein CPA have deceased and (b) on what date will the claimants receive their ancestral land; (3) what mechanisms are in place to ensure the CPA of Loeriesfontein becomes sustainable and economically viable?

Reply:

(1). Please find attached original list of 240 claimant beneficiaries.

(2). (a) Of the 240 claimant beneficiaries on the original verified list, 91 are deceased. There is a need to regularly update the verification list by the CPA to replace household representatives of those that passed away.

(b) Hantam Municipality donated the land (Commonages A, B and C) for restitution purposes. Commonage A was transferred to the CPA on 30 March 2017 However, this property is currently being used by the emerging farmers under a formal lease agreement with Hantam Municipality. The municipality is yet to issue the tenants with termination letters so that the CPA can fully occupy the land. The CPA can only occupy the land once the current tenants have been relocated elsewhere.

(3). There was a need for regularisation of the CPA and a new Executive Committee was elected on 05 November 2019. In addition, a panellist has been appointed to assist the CPA on disputes regarding access to the land.

19 December 2019 - NW1438

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) number of communal property associations (CPAs) exist in the Republic, (b) number of the specified CPAs are considered to be dysfunctional, (c) are the (i) structural and (ii) functional problems facing the CPAs and (d) steps is her department taking to resolve the specified problems?

Reply:

(a) 1612.

(b) It has been observed in previous CPA discussions in the Legislature that the concept of dysfunctional CPAs has been interchangeably used with that of non-complying CPAs. The Department has been tracking non-compliance with the CPA Act and Regulations as opposed to utter dysfunction. The number of non-complying CPAs is 1 370.

(c)(i)

  • A large proportion of CPA members are rooted in customary or indigenous ways of land management where decision making is a little bit centralised to some higher authority. The CPA regulatory framework encourages direct participatory democracy and therefore CPA founding documents tend to require direct participation by members. This creates contradictions in approaches by members and sometimes results in the emergence of or undesirable domination by rogue leadership elements.
  • CPAs generally exist in areas that were systematically subjected to underdevelopment and poorly resourced education institutions. A substantial part of CPA members is either illiterate or have no more than primary level of education. At a very basic level, this has an impact on the ability of CPA members to understand and apply documented and yet unfamiliar land management rules
  • CPAs comprise of diverse groups of people who are tied together by their parents’ or grandparents’ or great grandparent’s historical relationship with the claimed land. They generally tend to share nothing in common except the desire to regain ownership of the land.
  • The land use at the time of restoration is generally substantially different from what it was at the time of dispossession. Land claimants therefore tend to receive sophisticated businesses which compel them to become forced business partners who had never consciously conceived of going into business together.

(c)(ii)

  • Some CPAs are so under-resourced that they simply don’t have physical space from which to run their affairs and keep their records. This creates access to information challenges for new CPA leaders, depending on how the previous committee has vacated office.
  • Well performing CPA businesses do not yield positive outcomes in the livelihoods of CPA members due to the ratio between revenue and large numbers of CPA members. Whilst there may have been visible wealth amongst the owners of the property prior to the CPA taking control, the larger numbers of CPA members shrink any possible redistributable revenue to nothingness. This creates endless instability as members tend to suspect that revenue is misappropriated by the leaders or managers of CPA businesses.
  • CPAs are generally established prior to all possible land restitution claimants in community claims being located and verified. Provisions in CPA constitutions are then created for the future inclusion of claimants that were not verified during the settlement of a claim. This is the major source of conflict within CPAs since membership is permanently contested.
  • Some CPAs comprise of very large groups like 53 villages that never converge in a single place. This necessitates some form of representative democratic mechanisms for decision making and yet claimants desire to have direct participation.
  • Some CPAs comprise of unrelated groups of claimants whose claims were consolidated purely on the basis of proximity, without the informed consent of claimants. A lot of such CPA members do not regard themselves as a single group and therefore do not desire to be in a single entity.
  • The CPA as an institution is sometimes not the appropriate entity to run businesses that get conducted on its property hence they get stretched beyond their institutional capacity to manage.
  • The creation of separate CPA business ventures and joint ventures also tends to create conflict because of general lack of understanding of institutional relationships that should exist, inability to manage such relationships and lack of clarity regarding the sharing of benefits.
  • A lot of CPAs have got factions that work against each other from the date of election to the next election. Executive Committees therefore have got no fair space to commit and correct honest mistakes due to the permanence of factions.

(d)

  • There’s collaboration being explored with institutions of higher learning to provide customised training to all willing members of CPAs, in a language they commonly understand.
  • The focus of CPA capacity building programmes will become more inclusive to accommodate general membership in order to promote general awareness amongst CPA members that CPAs are indeed community entities where members have to directly hold their leadership accountable instead of passing that responsibility to Government.
  • The language spoken by the majority of CPA members will be identified and CPA founding documents will be translated into that language as one of the ways of encouraging effective participation of members in the affairs of their entities.
  • In instances where CPAs do not have the necessary infrastructure to keep records, the Department shall, in its District Offices, make available basic CPA documents like constitutions, membership lists, lists of CPA leadership, and financial records (where such financial records are available).
  • Strict enforcement of existing legal mechanisms is now being undertaken to promote a culture of accountability within CPAs and discourage rogue CPA executives from operating in a manner that is inconsistent with the aspirations of the CPA membership.
  • The Departmental CPA monitoring capacity will be improved in order to better understand the needs of CPAs and provide on time support.
  • Internal capacity building needs are continuously being identified in order to improve departmental regulatory capability and discourage unlawful interventions on CPAs by departmental officials.
  • The possibility of deconsolidating big CPAs that comprise of various communities who do not regard themselves as a single community, is being explored.
  • The Departmental post settlement support mechanisms are being improved and will be made accessible to CPAs. Such mechanisms shall be set in motion as soon as land restoration is chosen by claimants for timeous enterprise planning, setting up of appropriate enterprise management structures, identification of capacity building needs and provision of training.

19 December 2019 - NW1595

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Free State; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 410.

(2)(a) 233.

(2)(b)

  • Some leases are currently being taken through administrative lease approval processes.
  • There are reallocations that are currently being done, which have been occasioned by the death of lessees.
  • There are instances where multiple farmers have been allocated a single farm, which has not yet been officially subdivided hence lease units are still being created.
  • There are instances where the land is the process of being donated to a municipality for commonage purposes.
  • Some farms are in the process of being transferred to farm dwellers.
  • Some farms are being used by neighbouring communities and have therefore become unleasable.

(3)(a) R353 956.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1599

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the North West; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 467.

(2)(a) 251.

(2)(b)

  • Some previously allocated farms are in the process of being reallocated to lessees.
  • Some leases are currently being taken through administrative lease approval processes.
  • Some farms are in the process of being transferred to farmers and farm dwellers.
  • There are instances where the beneficiaries are still sorting out issues relating to the legal entity that must contract with Government.
  • Some farms are no longer leasable since they are occupied by communities.
  • There are instances of illegal invasion, which impacts on orderly allocation processes.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3) (a) R995 614.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW919

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What total number of parcels of land are still registered as being owned or under the custodianship of the former homelands in each province, (b) where is each land parcel located and (c) what is the total area of said land?

Reply:

a) 3 824 land parcels.

b) Please refer to Annexure A.

c) 531 789 ha.

ANNEXURE A OF NA 919 OF 2019

Province and Municipality

Parcels

Area (Ha)

EASTERN CAPE

3186

173,150.41

Amahlathi Local Municipality

295

9,293.72

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

442

6,299.79

Elundini Local Municipality

14

462.04

Emalahleni Local Municipality (EC)

21

1,675.21

Engcobo Local Municipality

8

3.53

Enoch Mgijima Local Municipality

59

29,928.44

Intsika Yethu Local Municipality

15

2,409.32

King Sabata Dalindyebo Local Municipality

255

3,683.82

Matatiele Local Municipality

48

23,135.56

Mbhashe Local Municipality

18

323.48

Mbizana Local Municipality

6

664.36

Mhlontlo Local Municipality

33

3,992.99

Mnquma Local Municipality

114

3,059.47

Ngqushwa Local Municipality

1251

47,141.62

Ngquza Hill Local Municipality

19

798.94

Ntabankulu Local Municipality

8

11.24

Nyandeni Local Municipality

10

695.44

Port St Johns Local Municipality

13

18.50

Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality

472

36,591.19

Sakhisizwe Local Municipality

49

1,571.15

Senqu Local Municipality

2

4.63

Umzimvubu Local Municipality

34

1,385.96

FREE STATE

8

1,076.33

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

7

1,076.18

Matjhabeng Local Municipality

1

0.15

GAUTENG

87

632.10

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

16

2.08

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

69

629.72

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

2

0.30

KWAZULU-NATAL

141

62,942.62

Endumeni Local Municipality

1

29.16

eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

16

0.80

KwaDukuza Local Municipality

2

0.15

Newcastle Local Municipality

1

0.15

The Msunduzi Local Municipality

4

0.65

Umzimkhulu Local Municipality

117

62,911.71

LIMPOPO

31

59,301.55

Blouberg Local Municipality

12

27,073.88

Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

2

4,123.53

Greater Giyani Local Municipality

1

2,063.64

Greater Letaba Local Municipality

1

756.18

Greater Tubatse/Fetakgomo Local Municipality

6

13,019.96

Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality

1

2.57

Lepelle-Nkumpi Local Municipality

3

2,225.14

Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality

4

9,971.93

Mogalakwena Local Municipality

1

64.72

MPUMALANGA

49

27,850.99

Bushbuckridge Local Municipality

11

13,121.59

Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality

6

3,146.66

Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality

5

2,171.32

Emalahleni Local Municipality (MP)

1

0.17

Nkomazi Local Municipality

2

506.58

Thembisile Local Municipality

24

8,904.67

NORTH WEST

300

135,840.74

City of Matlosana Local Municipality

1

0.20

Ditsobotla Local Municipality

14

8,194.14

Greater Taung Local Municipality

23

31,916.18

Kagisano-Molopo Local Municipality

1

1,516.87

Local Municipality of Madibeng

26

1,883.61

Mafikeng Local Municipality

27

5,997.22

Moretele Local Municipality

7

3,015.52

Moses Kotane Local Municipality

149

50,643.60

Naledi Local Municipality

3

0.52

Ramotshere Moiloa Local Municipality

18

23,721.34

Ratlou Local Municipality

2

4,018.63

Rustenburg Local Municipality

22

3,309.60

Tswaing Local Municipality

7

1,623.31

NORTHERN CAPE

22

70,994.38

Ga-Segonyana Local Municipality

1

542.03

Joe Morolong Local Municipality

21

70,452.35

Grand Total

3,824

531,789.11

19 December 2019 - NW1600

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Northern Cape; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 259.

(2)(a) 34.

(2)(b)

  • Some previously allocated farms are in the process of being reallocated as consequence of death, abandonment of the property and lease termination due to breach of lease terms
  • There are disputes regarding allocation as well as property boundaries.
  • Illegal invasion of leased farms by neighbouring communal settlements.
  • Some farms are no longer leasable since they are occupied by communities.
  • Existence of land restitution claims on leasable properties.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3)(a) R222 543.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1282

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

- What steps has her department taken to support the activities of the group of emerging farmers called Poo Pedi in Ga-Segonyane Local Municipality and Joe Morolong Local Municipality in the Northern Cape?

Reply:

  • The Department has requested the Northern Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to compile a comprehensive response to the question raised by Mr P G Moteka (EFF).
  • The comprehensive response will be submitted in January 2020.

                                                                                                       

19 December 2019 - NW992

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of applications to register as community property associations is currently outstanding, (b) on what date did each specified association apply for registration and (c) what is the reason that each association is not yet registered?

Reply:

(a) 6.

(b) and (c) Please refer to Annexure A.

ANNEXURE A OF NA QUESTION 992 OF 2019

 

Province

Community Name

Status

  1. Date of application
  1. Reason for not registering

1.

Free State

Iketsetse

Not registered

20 October 2018

Constitution was not compliant with requirements and registration documents were incomplete.

2.

Limpopo

Kgashane Mamatlepa

Not registered

11 August 2018

Constitution was not compliant with requirements and registration documents were incomplete.

3.

Mpumalanga

Mmamashianoka - Mdibani

Not registered

4 November 2018

Constitution was not compliant with requirements and registration documents were incomplete.

4

North West

William Bere Moiloa

Not registered

26 January 2019

Constitution was not compliant with requirements and registration documents were incomplete.

5

North West

Majoe Mokuane

Not registered

21 July 2018

Constitution was not compliant with requirements and registration documents were incomplete.

6

North West

Pooyane

Not registered

3 November 2018

Membership list was not submitted and Constitution was not compliant with requirements.

19 December 2019 - NW1142

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 250 on 20 August 2019, (a) what are the details of the department’s annual target vs achievements year-to-date on the (i) trade figures vs achieved target, (ii) new jobs target vs achieved and (iii) the targeted number of black farmers to be provided with market access vs achieved, (b) why are other AgriParks not functional and (c) what is the detailed action plan to ensure that all AgriParks are functional?

Reply:

(a)(i) Details will be provided by 31 January 2020.

(a)(ii) The target for 2019/2020 financial year is 4109 and achieved to date is 2149

(a)(iii) The target for rural enterprises for 2019/2020 financial year to be supported is 227 and achieved to date is 114

(b) AgriParks are a network of several components. The establishment of AgriParks is a process.

  • The Farmer Production Support Unit (FPSU), is the first component. It is a rural small-holder farmer outreach and capacity building unit that is established closer to farmers with primary production. The FPSU does primary collection, some storage, provides some processing for the local market, and extension services including mechanization.
  • The Agri-hub(AH), is the second component, depending on the effectiveness of the first component. It is a production, equipment hire, processing, packaging, logistics, innovation and training unit.
  • The Rural Urban Market Centre (RUMC), is the third component. It links to rural urban and international markets through contracts. This level has not as yet been reached. Acts as a holding facility, releasing produce to urban markets based on seasonal trends; and provides market intelligence and information feedback, to the AH and FPSU using the latest information and communication technologies.

(c) The Department is in the process focusing on the first component, which is the establishment of the Farmer Production Support Unit (FPSU). There are 27 prioritized FPSU’s.

19 December 2019 - NW1601

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Western Cape; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 192.

(2)(a) 70.

(2)(b)

  • Some properties were acquired to pilot a policy for the benefit of the First Nations that were disadvantaged by the land restitution deadline of June 1913. A notarial land use right is envisaged for registration instead of a lease.
  • Dispute between the allocated beneficiaries and farm workers.
  • Ongoing investigation by the Special Investigating Unit thereby resulting in the non-conclusion of a lease since any affected party may become a suspect.
  • Some leases are currently being taken through administrative lease approval processes.
  • Some previously allocated farms are in the process of being reallocated.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3)(a) R 47 000.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1596

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Gauteng; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 223

(2)(a) 227

(2)(b)

  • Conflict among beneficiary members.
  • Some leases are currently being taken through administrative lease approval processes.
  • Some farms are in the process of being reallocated.
  • Some farms are in the process of being transferred to farm dwellers.
  • Some farms are not leasable since they are occupied by communities.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3)(a) R51 577.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1593

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)     (a) on what date was Mjindi Farming (Pty) Ltd established, (b) What was the reason for its establishment? (c) What amount did the enterprise receive in each year since its establishment and (d) Who are the directors of the specified enterprise? (2) Whether any politicians and/or departmental officials are part of the specified enterprise; (3) What (a) is the salary of each director and/or employee of Mjindi enterprise and (b) was the total value added to the community by the establishment of the specified enterprise; (4) Whether the audited books of Mjindi enterprise were submitted in each year

Reply:

  • The Department has requested the provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to compile a comprehensive response to the question raised by Mrs A Steyn (DA).
  • The comprehensive response will be submitted in January 2020.

                                                                                                       

19 December 2019 - NW1594

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Eastern Cape; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 472

(2)(a) 432

(2)(b)

  • Farms that were originally meant to be leased were subsequently earmarked for other programmes like the Animal and Veld Management Programme as well as the One Household One Hectare Programme.
  • There are instances where multiple farmers have been allocated a single farm, which has not yet been officially subdivided hence lease units are still being created.
  • There are unlawful occupations that make it impossible to conclude lease agreements whilst unlawful occupations are still being sorted.
  • Some farms are in the process of being transferred to farmers and farm dwellers.
  • Some farms are in the process of being reallocated.
  • Some farms have become unleasable because of the growth of settlements in surrounding communities.
  • Some farms are claimed in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act and the claims have reached an advanced stage.
  • Some farmers are still getting their legal entities registered.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.
  • Disputes amongst beneficiaries.

(3)(a) R159 503.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1602

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the KwaZulu-Natal; (1) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 282.

(2)(a) 787.

(2)(b)

  • Some farms are still being reallocated as a consequence of abandonment.
  • There are instances where multiple farmers have been allocated a single farm, which then requires an official subdivision.
  • Some leases are currently being taken through administrative lease approval processes.
  • Some farms are in the process of being transferred to farm dwellers.
  • There are instances where the beneficiaries are still sorting out issues relating to the legal entity that must contract with Government.
  • Some farms are no longer leasable since they are occupied by communities.
  • There are unlawful occupations of leasable farms.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3)(a) R 378 347.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1223

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What is the current status of the land claim of Mr Peters, reference number L3/3/4/1/8; (2) what is the envisaged date for the finalisation of the specified claim? NW2434E

Reply:

The Commission is unbale to verify the reference number referred to. Most of Restitution claims have a reference number that start with KR….

However, if the writer provide the Commission with updated information including the name of the claim and from which Province we will be in a position to respond adequately.

END

19 December 2019 - NW510

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the announcement made by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in the State of the Nation Address on 20 June 2019, that the Government allocated R3,9 billion to the Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa in the 2019-22 medium term budget, what (a) amount is earmarked for each financial year in the medium-term budget and (b) amount was allocated for (i) land reform projects and farms, (ii) the commercialisation of black farmers and (iii) small holding farmers in each financial year in the medium-term budget; (2) what amount has been spent for each designated programme to date in the 2019-20 budget allocation; (3) what performance measures are in place to monitor the implementation and success of each programme that receives a budget allocation; (4) (a) what number of farmers does the Government intend to support on an annual basis with the budget allocations to the Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa and (b) by what date will the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, receive the first briefing in this regard? NW1503E

Reply:

RESPONSE BY THE DEPARTMENT:

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

  1. A detailed response to Question 510 will be submitted by 31 January 2020.

19 December 2019 - NW1597

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Limpopo; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 218.

(2)(a) 609.

(2)(b)

  • Some farms are still in the process of being allocated to lessees.
  • Some previously allocated farms are in the process of being reallocated.
  • There are instances of illegal invasion of farms.
  • There are instances of disputes with lessees regarding the suitability of the farm, which result in refusal by prospective lessees to sign lease agreements whilst the matters giving rise to a dispute are still being dealt with.
  • Some farms are no longer leasable since they are occupied by communities.
  • There are instances where multiple farmers have been allocated a single farm, which has not yet been officially subdivided hence lease units are still being created.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3)(a) R252 391.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1440

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

By what date will her department settle the land claim of the community of Lower Zingcuka in Keiskammahoek in the Amahlathi Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The claim is targeted for settlement during the fourth quarter of 2019/2020 financial year, pending acceptance of the Standard Settlement Offer by the Lower Zingcuka community, which will be presented to the Community by end of November 2019.

END

19 December 2019 - NW1203

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What amount has been (i) budgeted and (ii) paid towards social facilitation in respect of each programme in each province since 1 April 2016, (b) who were the service providers in each project and (c) were tenders put out in respect of each project?

Reply:

(a) (i) None. Social facilitation has been an internally delivered process.

(ii) Falls away.

(b) Falls away.

(c) Falls away.

19 December 2019 - NW511

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department will offer title deeds to the eight black citrus farmers farming under the Alice Kat Citrus Primary Cooperative in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the (a) beneficiaries receive communication from her department in this regard and (b) transfers of the title deeds be finalised?

Reply:

Yes, provided that the sale terms are concluded. Approval was granted during the year 2006 for the sale of various Kat River Citrus farms to the farmers at specific market values. The sales would have been funded through the combination of Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development Grant and own finance. The farmers never secured financing and therefore the transactions were not taken any further.

The Department cannot offer title deeds without the terms of the transaction being honoured by any of the purchasers.

a) The Department is already in communication with the farmers, with a view to finalise the transactions and also deal with issues of farm dwellers who are occupying some of the farms.

b) The transfers will commence upon the farmers satisfying the sale conditions.

19 December 2019 - NW1439

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of hectares of land (a) are under the management of communal property associations in the Republic and (b) have been left unused for the past two years?

Reply:

(a) 3 097 117.7820 hectares.

(b) The Communal Property Associations Act, 1996 and Regulations do not require the Communal Property Associations to report this type of information to the Department hence it is currently unknown.

19 December 2019 - NW1598

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of land reform farms are leased to beneficiaries in the Mpumalanga; (2) what (a) is the total number of state-owned farms that do not have a lease agreement currently in place and (b) are the reasons that there is no lease agreement in place; (3) what (a) is the total income received by the State for the lease on each land and (b) are the details of the bank account where the money for the leases must be paid?

Reply:

(1) 397.

(2)(a) 529.

(2)(b)

  • Some farms which were previously allocated are in the process of being reallocated.
  • There are instances where multiple farmers have been allocated a single farm, which has not yet been officially subdivided hence lease units are still being created.
  • Some leases are currently being taken through administrative lease approval processes.
  • Some farms are occupied by farm dwellers hence land rights enquiries are still being conducted.
  • Some farms are in the process of being transferred to farm dwellers.
  • There are instances where the beneficiaries are still sorting out issues relating to the legal entity that must contract with Government.
  • Some farms are no longer leasable since they are occupied by communities.
  • There are instances of illegal invasion, which impacts on orderly allocation processes.
  • Disputes among beneficiaries.
  • There have been changes in the leasing policy in the past three years, which impacted on the conclusion of leases.

(3)(a) R375 819.00 (April – November 2019).

3(b)

  • Agricultural Land Holding Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 407 449 8283
  • Department of Rural Development and Land Reform Account: ABSA Bank Account No.: 405 400 6793

19 December 2019 - NW1515

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What number of land claims lodged before the 1998-deadline still need to be settled, (b) on what date is it intended that the specified claims will be settled, (c) where are the outstanding claims and (d) what amount of money is it estimated to cost her department to settle all outstanding land claims?

Reply:

a) 8940 is inclusive of pure and phased claims (and this figure is still subject to external audit and verification audit)

b) In order to accelerate the settlement of claims, the Commission on Restitution of Lands Rights participated in the Operation Phakisa of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development and as a result the services of external experts were used in the development of a Backlog Reduction Strategy which is still in progress for settlement of all old order land claims (lodged as at 31 December 1998). The Commission at this point is unable to provide specific dates, however the Annual Performance Plan is used as baseline to determine the number of claims to be settled per financial year.

c) 

 

Total claims as at 1st October 2019

(subject to verification)

Province

 

Eastern Cape

805

Free State

8

Gauteng

460

KwaZulu-Natal

3270

Limpopo

1501

Mpumalanga

2036

North West

233

Northern Cape

88

Western Cape

539

TOTAL

8940

d) The completion of the Backlog Reduction Strategy will assist in the cost estimation for the settlement of the old order outstanding claims.

 

19 December 2019 - NW1205

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Which branch of her department is responsible for the administration of the Land Titles Adjustment Act, Act 111 of 1993, (b) what number of (i) persons work under the specified branch, (ii) posts are vacant and (iii) persons are in acting positions; (2) (a) what number of applications has her department received under the specified Act, (b) what number of applicants have received title deeds to land and (c) what are the reasons that applicants do not get title deeds?

Reply:

(1)(a) Land Tenure and Administration[1].

(b)(i) 225

(ii) 30

(iii) 5

(2)(a) The applications in terms of the Land Titles Adjustment Act, 1993 were never tracked as part of land delivery statistics hence that information is not easily accessible at the moment. Diligent attempts have been made to collect data for purposes of this question and it became clear that substantial time is required to construct a database in this regard.

(b),(c) Falls away.

  1. This Branch was established in April 2014.

18 December 2019 - NW1677

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 137 on 14 October 2019, he will furnish Ms H Ismael with a detailed report of all National Health Insurance pilot projects, including the name of facilities; (2) whether any of the pilot projects have failed; if so, what (a) are the names of the pilot projects that have failed and (b) has he found to be the reasons that the projects failed?

Reply:

(1) A copy of the independent report “Evaluation of the Phase 1 Implementation of the Interventions in the National Health Insurance Pilot Districts in South Africa. NDOH10/2017-2018. Final Evaluation Report. August 2019 is attached to this response as Annexure 1.

(2) (a) No specific facilities that have failed were identified in the report.

Overall, the implementation of the pilot interventions had mixed success across the pilot districts. None of the interventions can be considered “failures”, as all were implemented at scale.

Where successful, a few common factors were identified:

  1. Strong political will;
  2. Adequate human and financial resources for implementation;
  3. Good coordination and communication; and
  4. Good monitoring systems put in place at the time of implementation.

(b) The interventions also faced a number of challenges, and, to varying degrees, these factors hindered their success:

  1. Inadequate planning;
  2. Lack of resources;
  3. Inconsistent communication;
  4. A lack of coordination where necessary; and
  5. Insufficient mechanisms to monitor progress to ensure course correction.

Reports regarding specific projects are contained in the Report and are summarized as follows:

1. Ward-based Primary Healthcare Community Outreach Teams (WBPHCOTS)

  1. A total of 3 323 WBPHCOTs providing basic health services to children and adults were in place at the end of 2017/18.
  2. These teams were able to successfully fulfil their mandate to provide outreach health services within the community.
  3. WBPHCOTs completed community visits and were also able to report on the health status of the individuals at the households visited.
  4. Teams often lacked the envisioned team composition, with many teams lacking outreach team leaders.
  5. Data collection was insufficient to adequately monitor the effectiveness of the referral systems and follow up processes.
  6. At times there were insufficient funds for transport and equipment; this impacted the team’s ability to successfully undertake their work.

2. Integrated School Health Program (ISHP)

  1. A total of 4 339 875 learners had been screened through ISHP since 2012; of these 504 803 were identified to have various health barriers and referred for treatment.
  2. The ISHP intervention was particularly successful in its ability to demonstrate good inter-departmental collaboration between the NDoH and Department of Basic Education (DBE).
  3. There was a lack of data to support the effectiveness of the referrals and a lack of feedback mechanisms between school teams and facilities.
  4. The lack of sufficient equipment, such as measurement scales and transport to travel to schools, often impacted negatively on the success of this intervention.
  5. There was a lack of prioritisation and targeting of learners within this intervention.
  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination campaign as part of the ISHP was launched in 2014. Of 2,289,699 girls in Grade 4, 1,934,635 received HPV vaccines.

3. General Practitioners (GPs) Contracting

  1. A total of 330 General Practitioners (GP) had been contracted by end of 2017/2018.
  2. Where contracting of GPs was implemented successfully, the access to doctors improved at PHC facilities. Patients also perceived that the quality of care improved at facilities due to the presence of GPs.
  3. Inadequate monitoring of contracted GPs caused some challenges during implementation.
  4. Unforeseen challenges including negotiations that were outside of the DPSA rates as well as inadequate monitoring of contracts resulted in GPs claiming substantially higher expenses than budgeted for.

4. Ideal Clinic Realisation Model (ICRM)

  1. A total of 3434 facilities had been assessed of which 1507 had attained ideal clinic status at end of 2017/2018.
  2. This project is deemed to have improved the ability of facilities to procure much needed equipment.
  3. Where the ICRM was believed to have been implemented as planned, there was a perceived improvement in quality of care by both facility managers and patients.
  4. One of the challenges identified was that ICRM limited flexibility and the ability for managers to adapt facilities to the local context and to the needs of the facilities at the time.
  5. The changing manual and frequent change of standards in the ICRM made it difficult for managers to keep up with the changes and resulted in managers experiencing frustration.

5. District Clinical Specialist Teams (DCST)

  1. At the end of March 2017, 45 of 52 districts in nine provinces had functional DCSTs with at least three members per team to provide specialist oversight within the districts.
  2. The introduction of these teams was perceived by some stakeholders to have promoted clinical governance within the districts.
  3. The team composition, which often lacked critical specialists, limited their ability to provide the envisioned training and support structures.
  4. The lack of gynaecologist and paediatricians meant that DCSTs were not able to adequately improve child and maternal health as envisioned.
  5. Not all specialists were seen necessarily as good mentors and they may have been unable to provide adequate support.
  6. The DCST model was assessed to be a costly model and it stretched the limited specialist resources in the public sector.

6. Centralised Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD)

  1. A total of 2 182 422 patients enrolled on the CCMDD, collecting medicines in over 855 pick-up points (PUPs) at the end of 2017/2018.
  2. The strong political leadership and will behind CCMDD contributed towards its successful implementation.
  3. CCMDD was scaled up beyond target and the consistent monitoring of the programme contributed to the availability of reliable data to support continued implementation.
  4. Changes of service providers threatened the intervention’s continuity.
  5. The lack of sufficient integration between CCMDD pick-up points and facilities resulted in inadequate tracking of patients between the two systems.

7. Health Patient Registration System (HPRS)

  1. At the end of 2017/2018, 2968 PHC facilities were using HPRS and there were over 20 million (20 700 149) people registered on the system.
  2. Good communication and feedback loops are seen to have facilitated implementation success.
  3. The poor connectivity at some facilities and challenges with hardware have contributed to the challenges experienced during NHI phase 1 implementation.
  4. The lack of human resources and lack of capacity in some districts to implement affected the success of HPRS

8. Stock Visibility System SVS

  1. At the end of 2017/2018, SVS was being implemented in 3167 clinics and community health centres (92% coverage).
  2. The successful training of available staff led to an in-depth understanding of the system at facility level. The introduction of SVS led to reduced stock outs and improved efficiency at facilities.
  3. The lack of reliable internet connectivity and hardware in some districts , impacted its success.
  4. The minimal number of available pharmacists and pharmacy assistants limited facilities ability to ensure the smooth running of the system.
  5. The sustainability of this intervention poses a challenge as implementation during NHI phase1 relied heavily on the support from external funders.

9. Infrastructure

  1. Since 2013/2014, work in 139 of 140 identified CHCs and clinics has been completed through the NHI rehabilitation projects.
  2. In 2017/2018 alone, 107 facilities were maintained, repaired and/or refurbished in NHI districts.
  3. Where completed, patients perceived an improvement in the quality of care as a result. Small infrastructure changes had a positive impact on the overall environment at facilities.
  4. Projects were rarely implemented or completed due to the lack of planning capacity to release the assigned funds.
  5. Funds which were released were used mainly for new infrastructure projects
  6. However, insufficient attention was paid to the maintenance of facilities, which is critical to both access and the provision of quality services and preventing unnecessary new-build costs due to deterioration because of a lack of basic maintenance.

10. Human Resources for Health

  1. The introduction of Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN) provided a standardised, evidence-based staffing needs assessment at facility level. These assessments were implemented widely across the pilot districts.
  2. The resource constrained environment meant that hiring of staff had been frozen and as a result the WISN findings were not always implementable and caused further frustration among facility managers who had done the assessment.

END.

18 December 2019 - NW1685

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What budget or grants are provided for the South Rand Hospital, (b) what mechanisms and processes exist to ensure that the highest level of service is provided at the hospital and (c) on what date will the current staff vacancies be filled?

Reply:

a) The budget or grants for the 2019/2020 financial year, South Rand Hospital is as follows:

  • Voted funds - R274 213 000
  • Programme 8 - R 9 140 000
  • HIV/AIDS Conditional Grant - R 21 719 000
  • TB Conditional Grant - R 1 841 000

b) The hospital implements quality improvement programme that was initaited by the Premier of Gauteng called “deliverology”. Through this programme, the hospital is able to monitor staff absenteesim through attendance registers, monthly leave reports for both planned and unplanned leaves. This programme ensures that all staff are at service stations to ensure prompt service delivery.

Processes that exist to ensure that the highest level of service is provided at the hospital are as follows:

  • Quality meetings. These meetings monitor patients complaints, patient waiting times and where problem areas are identified, corrective measures are put in place.
  • Vetting committee (Bid and Adjudication committee at the hospital level) is used to ensure proper adherence to supply chain management process are followed and goods and services, equipment and the tools of trade are available in good quantities where required.
  • Governance structures such as EXCO meetings, Clinical Executive meetings, hospital board meetings) are held to ensure accountability of the staff and these are aligned with the department’s APP.

c) The recruitment process is under way to fill the vacancies and the details are as follows:

  • 13 Vacant posts
  • 13 Advertised
  • 10 Interviews held
  • 7 candidates recommended

A total of 3 Posts will be readvertised due to inability to get the suitable candidates.

END.

18 December 2019 - NW1678

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What (i) is the reason for the Good Hope Clinic in the Eastern Cape not being fully built, (ii) was the initial amount budgeted for the building of the clinic and (iii) total amount has been spent to date and (b) who was the appointed contractor?

Reply:

(a) There is a mobile clinic service called Gope Hope. The community in the Eastern Cape receives through the mobile clinic which visits monthly. There is no budget or plans for the construction of a clinic at mobile service point “Good Hope”.

(b) Not applicable.

END.

18 December 2019 - NW1725

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How many properties under the custodianship of her department were sold to a certain company (name furnished) since 2006 and (b) what is the (i) extent, (ii) size, (iii) selling price and (iv) intended purpose of the sale in each case?

Reply:

a) The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs has never sold any properties to the company called Woodglaze PTY LTD.

b) (i)(ii)(iii)(iv) Not applicable.

End.

18 December 2019 - NW1694

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to access to health care by the transgender community, what is the (a) current process for and (b) budget allocated to hormone replacement and gender re-assignment surgery in Government hospitals; (2) whether there is a backlog in respect of hormone replacement and gender re-assignment surgery in Government hospitals; if so, what number of persons are affected by the backlog?

Reply:

1. (a) The patient comes for assessment in the Endocrine Clinic by a muti-disciplinary team inclusive of Physicians and Psychologists. The patient is placed on hormonal treatment and when ready, then referred for transgender surgery.

(b) There is no dedicated budget allocated for the treatment of Transgender patients. The budget comes from voted funds under the Clinical and Surgery business unit and Pharmacy budget.

(2) No, there is no backlog. At present there are only 3 patients that are waiting for surgery.

END.

17 December 2019 - NW1630

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

What is the (a) status of the investigation into case 122/08/2018 reported at the Sebenza Police Station and (b) name of the investigating officer? NW2987E

Reply:

(a) The investigation of Sebenza Police Station, CAS 122108/2018, is finalised. The blood report from the Department of Health is outstanding.

(b) In the interest of the case being investigated without fear or favour, the particulars of the investigating officer cannot be divulged.
 

Reply to question 1630 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1630 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1689

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

Whether any safety inspections were conducted in SA Police Service stations across Gauteng (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; if not why not; if so, on what date was each inspection conducted?

Reply:

(a) and (b) Yes, safety inspections were conducted in all the South African Police Service (SAPS) stations, in Gauteng, in 2016/2017, 2017/2018, 2018/2019 and from 1 April 2019, to date. Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) Representatives have been appointed at all the 142 police stations, in Gauteng. The SHE representatives conduct monthly inspections and the inspection reports are submitted to the SAPS Provincial SHE Management office.

Reply to question 1689 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1631

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to his replies to questions 1783 on 18 June 2018 and 2664 on 5 October 2018, where he states that the Norkem Park Police Station currently has 29 police officers for visible policing for the four sectors, he has found that the police station actually requires an additional 35 police officers for visible policing instead of an additional eight police officers for visible policing in order to reach the optimum number of 64 police officers for visible policing, in correlation with four members in each shift and sector for four shifts in a 24-hour day; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will the police station receive the required number of police officers for visible policing?

Reply:

No, the South African Police Service (SAPS) has a total Fixed Establishment (FE), which is subject to the compensation budget. The equitable distribution of resources is guided by the ratio between the Theoretical Human Resource Requirement (THRR), which is the ideal personnel requirement and the FE, which is the approved allocation.

The current FE, for Visible Policing at the Norkem Park Police Station, is 72, which includes 23 members for Sector Policing.

The Norkem Park Police Station received an additional seven members, which resulted in an actual, of 75 members at Visible Policing, of which 24 are placed at Sector Policing.

Reply to question 1631 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1513

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What are the reasons that her department has failed to install water infrastructure in Wonderkop, Marikana, in the North West and (b) on what date does her department intend to install the water taps in the area?

Reply:

(a) Rustenburg Local Municipality (LM) is a Water Service Authority (WSA) with a mandate for the provision of water and sanitation services within its jurisdiction which includes areas such as Wonderkop and Marikana in the North West Province. However, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) has allocated R88 million for the 2019/20 financial years to Rustenburg Local Municipality for additional projects.

Rustenburg LM submitted their Business Plans for the three (3) projects highlighted below and funding was allocated accordingly by DWS. Refer to the table below for the breakdown:

No

Project Name and Description

Project Cost

Allocation

Progress

1

Marikana

Upgrading Marikana rising mains, conservancy tank, size of the pumps, pump station.

R12 513 355,9

R12 513 355,9

The progress is at 67%

2

Rustenburg DMA Zones

Water audit, meter replacement, sub-zoning, advanced metering infrastructure, reservoir telemetry, repair and replacement of infrastructure, pressure management, water monitoring dashboard and water conservation campaigns.

R37 000 000

R37 000 000

The progress is at 97%

3

Rustenburg North

Replacement of AC pipes with uPVC pipes and aged water meters, fire hydrants, valves.

R57 082 000

R38 486 645

The progress onsite is at 65%

(b) DWS does not have a mandate for reticulation and to install water taps in local government areas.

The Honourable Member is requested to refer the question to the Minister for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs who will be in a better position to respond to plans in place to supply water reticulation in Wonderkop and Marikana including the installation of water taps.

 

17 December 2019 - NW1611

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What are the details of the (a) company the SA Police Service (SAPS) contracted to provide rape kits in 2017 and (b) value of the contract; (2) what are the details of the (a) company the SAPS contracted to provide rape kits in 2018 and (b) value of the contract; (3) what are the details of the (a) company the SAPS contracted to provide rape kits in 2019 and (b) value of the contract; (4) what are the reasons for awarding the contract to each company in each of the specified years?

Reply:

Introduction

The collection kits, which are used to collect evidence from victims of sexual assault and rape, are termed as "rape kits" in the public domain. However, the South African Police Service (SAPS), makes use of 16 different types of evidence collection kits to collect various samples at crime scenes. These include the two types of evidence collection kits, namely; the Adult Sexual Assault Collection Kit (D1) and the Paediatric Sexual Assault Collection Kit (D7), which are used to collect evidence from victims of sexual assault and rape. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) Reference Buccal Sample Kits (DB), are used to take buccal samples from persons, who are arrested and charged, for schedule eight offences (this includes serial murderers and serial rapists), as required by the DNA Act.

(1)(a)(b) The South African Police Service (SAPS) did not have a contract in place, in 2017. A bid, 19/1/9/1/112TD(17), was advertised. However, it was cancelled because the bids received did not meet the requirements.

(2)(a)(b) The SAPS did not have a contract in place, in 2018. A bid, 19/1/9/1/28TD(18), was advertised. However, it was cancelled because the bids that were received, did not meet the requirements.

(3)(a) The SAPS awarded a contract to Acino Forensic, on 16 August 2019.

(3){b) The estimated value of the contract, is R497 679 306,82, for a period of three years, on an "as and when required", basis.

Prior to the awarding of the contract to Acino Forensic, on 16 August 2019, evidence collection kits were procured, on a quotation basis, from the following service providers:

~ Bathe Pele Health.

~ Letsepe Investments.

~ Yhira Investments.

(4) The contract was awarded to Acino Forensic because it was the only bidder who met all the requirements of the bid.
 

Reply to question 1611 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1611 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1478

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Police

What is the (a) total number of (i) women and (ii) children who were reported to be missing in the Republic in each of the past three years and (b)(i) race and (ii) age of each specified woman and child?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of women who were reported to be missing in the Republic of South Africa (RSA), in each of the past three years, is reflected in the table below:

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

1 206

1481

1 825

(a)(ii) The total number of children who were reported to be missing in the RSA, in each of the past three years, is reflected in the table below:

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

887

852

967

(b)(i) The race of the women who were reported to be missing in the RSA, in each of the past three years, is reflected in the table below:

Race

2016/2017

2017/2018

201812019

African

941

1 225

1 432

Coloured

151

168

276

Indian

17

17

29

White

99

71

88

The race of the children who were reported to be missing in the RSA, in each of the past three years, is reflected in the table below:

Race

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

African

727

720

764

Coloured

103

106

170

Indian

10

5

12

White

47

21

21



Find here: (b)(ii) The age of the women who were reported to be missing in the RSA, in each of the past three years, is reflected in the table below:

17 December 2019 - NW1528

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What was the total cost of travel incurred by her department in bringing departmental officials to the joint meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs and the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation on (i) 29 October 2019 and (ii) 5 November 2019 and (b) what number of officials from her department were present at each of the specified meetings?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation has indicated that the cost incurred by departmental official to attend meetings called by the Portfolio Committee of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation as per the Honourable member’s question is as follows:

  • R 43 034,02 was incurred to attend the meeting of 29th October 2019 and
  • R 44 218,76 was incurred to attend the meeting of 5th November 2019

(b) Four officials stationed at the Department’s offices in Pretoria attended the meeting of 29th October and five officials attended the meeting of 5th November 2019. These officials were supported by officials who are stationed in Cape Town for sessional duties and/or those who were in Cape Town for other meetings.

17 December 2019 - NW1298

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of (a) SA Police Service (SAPS) members and (b) their immediate family members are doing business with the (i) SAPS and (ii) entities reporting to him, where doing business includes the direct awarding of tenders and/or SAPS members being directors and/or members of companies directly doing business with SAPS and/or entities reporting to him as at the latest date for which information is available,(2) what (a) is the monetary value of and (b) are all relevant details of the services rendered and/or goods delivered in terms of the top 20 of the specified contracts, where top 20 refers to the biggest monetary values within the past five financial years; (3) what number of SAPS members doing business with SAPS or entities reporting to him declared a conflict of interest during the bidding or tender process of the specified contracts within the past five financial years?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) A total of 99 South African Police Service (SAPS) officials, were found to be doing business with the SAPS, from 2014 to 2019.

(1)(b)(i) A total of 101 family members, were found to be doing business with the SAPS, from 2014 to 2019.

(1)(a)(b)(ii) For reply by the entities, who report to the Minister of Police.

(2)(a) The monetary value of the services rendered and/or goods delivered, in terms of the top 20 of the specified contracts, from 2014 to 2019, is R6 798 593,86.

(2)(b) The relevant details of the services rendered and/or goods delivered, in terms of the top 20 of the specified contracts, from 2014 to 2019, is reflected in the table below:

Find here: Table

17 December 2019 - NW1690

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether his department has a (a) budget and (b) plan to build a new police station for the Bedfordview area; if so, on what date will the construction of the police station commence; (2) whether his department has a (a) budget and (b) plan to house the inspectors at the Bedfordview SA Police Station in a rented facility; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will the move take place?

Reply:

(1)(a) A plan to build a new police station for the Bedfordview area is not budgeted for, in the current Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) cycle.

(1)(b) There are no plans in place for the construction of a new police station, due to the fact that the existing station is ranked as a category C3 station, which indicates that it is in a fair condition, in line with the prescripts of the User Asset Management Plan (U-AMP).

(2)(a) No, there is currently no budget allocated for a new or alternative lease.

(2)(b) The detectives at the Bedfordview Police Station are currently accommodated at the police station, in park homes, that are on the station premises. There are no immediate plans for the procurement of a new or alternative lease.

Reply to question 1690 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1690 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1715

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 984 on 29 October 2019, any number of the 1 366 persons that were arrested and/or criminally charged have been convicted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are details of (a) the sentence given to each person convicted and (b) each person who has been convicted?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The required information is not readily available. A request is hereby made for an extension of three weeks, in order to obtain and provide the information.

Reply to question 1715 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1715 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1629

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) cases of (i) murder, (ii) rape, (iii) housebreaking, (iv) carjacking, (v) theft of motor vehicles, (vi) house robbery and (vii) drug-related crimes were reported at the Norkem Park Police Station, (b) such cases were sent to court and (c) convictions were obtained for the specified cases in the past three financial years?

Reply:

a) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv)(v)(vi) (vii) (b) ( c)

 

Norkem Park

Police Station

(a

Reported

(b) Cases to Gourt

{c) Convictions

   

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

2018/

20J 9

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

2018/

2019

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

2018/

2019

(i) 

Murder

11

9

15

5

1

11

3

1

0

(ii) 

Rape

22

26

37

16

17

23

7

5

3

(iii) 

Housebreaking

1065

863

873

33

24

34

15

18

9

(iv) 

Carjacking

36

102

81

12

8

6

3

J

1

(v)

Theft of motor

vehicles

224

202

222

7

10

4

4

1

0

(vi)

House robbery

113

138

140

7

8

7

3

3

2

(vii)

Drug-related

crime

186

220

186

186

220

186

30

65

25

 

Reply to question 1629 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1629 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1747

Weber, Mr WL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Where does her department plan to build the storage dams in the Special Economic Zone in Limpopo?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is continuing to engage with all stakeholders to develop various water resources to meet the water needs for the growth nodes in Limpopo, including the designated Musina/Makhado Special Economic Zone, as well as the proposed Tubatse Special Economic Zone as I detail below:

MUSINA/MAKHADO SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONE

This is a severely water stressed area and the Department of Water and Sanitation is investigating various options for the contemplated development. At this stage, indications are that water needs for Musina/Makhado Special Economic Zone will be met from a mix of sources that include:

  • Drawing water from the Limpopo River;
  • Reuse of wastewater from Musina town for construction and process operations in the metallurgical/mineral beneficiation complex;
  • Groundwater from boreholes in the area;
  • Importing of water from catchments in Zimbabwe, under the auspices of the bilateral to jointly develop and manage water resources of the two countries for mutual benefit.
  • Mainstreaming water conservation and water demand management in production processes through maximising water reuse, to minimise the uptake of new make-up water. This will also ensure that the water quality of the local water resources is not compromised by pollution from the heavy industries planned;

PROPOSED TUBATSE SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONE

The Department of Water and Sanitation’s outlook for availing water to the proposed Tubatse Special Economic Zone and other growth nodes in the Olifants catchment will be from the resources in the Olifants catchment including the Olifants River Water Resources Development Project, comprising of dams and bulk water infrastructure, which is under implementation.

 

17 December 2019 - NW1743

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) steps has her department taken against the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality with regard to complaints that the sewerage pump stations and manholes are overflowing and leaking into the Sundays River, (b) remedial measures will her department make available to the municipality to deal with the situation and (c) methods of rehabilitation will be used to restore the areas affected by sewarage spills; (2) whether additional funding will be made available to the specified municipality to address the problems it faces; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) issued the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality with a Directive dated 4 November 2019, to which the Municipality responded on 18 November 2019, confirming that all three sewage pump stations are repaired & operational 24 hours per day and evidence of spill areas have all been rehabilitated. Procurement of new pumps to ensure back up pumps in each pump station will take twelve (12) weeks to implement.

2. The Department, Regional Office in the Eastern Cape has allocated R 7 mil WSIG funds to Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality for planned projects in the 2019/20 financial year. Due to the declaration of drought disaster, DWS has allowed the WSIG funds to be re-prioritised and most of these funds have been assigned to emergency water supply schemes.

3. The Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality has rehabilitated each site by removing solids, papers and screenings for safe disposal, disinfecting the sites and improving general housekeeping at all three sites to comply with industry norms & standards.

4. The Department (DWS) has allowed the WSIG to be re-prioritised and most of these funds have been assigned to emergency water supply schemes. Emergency Drought funding of R 30.02 mil has been given by National Treasury in 2018/9 and Provincial GoGTA has granted R 6.4 mil for drought interventions to drill & equip a total of nine (9) boreholes in the 2019/20 financial year.

 

 

17 December 2019 - NW1582

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Ms Z Majozi (IFP) to ask the Minister of Police

Whether there are plans to build a police station at Tshepisong; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date will it be completed and (b) what are the relevant details? NW2938E NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION 1582 DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22 NOVEMBER 2019 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 29-2019) 1582. Ms Z Majozi (IFP) to ask the Minister of Police:Whether there are plans to build a police station at Tshepisong; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date will it be completed and (b) what are the relevant details? NW2938E REPLY: Yes, a need has been identified on the User Asset Management Plan (U-AMP), for the proposed construction of a new police station, at Tshepisong. The site clearance is projected to be initiated, in the 2020/2021 financial year.(a) The completion date of the construction of the Tshepisong Police Station is earmarked for realisation, in the 2028/2029 financial year, due to dependencies during the planning and design phase and project inherent risks, during execution.(b) The table below depicts the actual time frames, per project phase, leading up to the construction of a new police station. Cognisance must be taken that the depicted time frames are based on a straight-line projection, without having taken into consideration the delays encountered, due to interdepartmental dependencies. No Project Phase Process 1 Site clearance --> Site selection (suitability, accessibility and availability).--> Estimated period of completion of this phase (12 to 18 months). 2 Acquisition of land --> Planning phase (12 months): this includes approaching the owners and appointment of consultants, e.g. Property Valuer and the Land Affairs Board (LAB) submission. --> Execution (acquiring and vesting) phase (24 to 36 months): this includes the stages from the signing of the Deed of Sale by the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service, until the transfer of property by the appointed conveyancer. 3 Planning and design --> Procurement for the appointment of consultants and preparation of tender documents. --> Estimated period of completion of this chase (12 to 18 months). 4 Construction --> Procurement for the appointment of the contractor. --> Building of police station. --> Occupation of police station --> Estimated period of completion of this phase (24 - 36 months). Reply to question 1582 recommended GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICEKJ SITOLE (SOEG)Date: 2019-12-10 Reply to question 1582 approved GENERAL BH CELE (MP)MINISTER OF POLICEDate: 15-12-2019

Reply:

Yes, a need has been identified on the User Asset Management Plan (U-AMP), for the proposed construction of a new police station, at Tshepisong. The site clearance is projected to be initiated, in the 2020/2021 financial year.

(a) The completion date of the construction of the Tshepisong Police Station is earmarked for realisation, in the 2028/2029 financial year, due to dependencies during the planning and design phase and project inherent risks, during execution.

(b) The table below depicts the actual time frames, per project phase, leading up to the construction of a new police station. Cognisance must be taken that the depicted time frames are based on a straight-line projection, without having taken into consideration the delays encountered, due to interdepartmental dependencies.

No

Project Phase

Process

1

Site clearance

--> Site selection (suitability, accessibility and availability).
--> Estimated period of completion of this phase (12 to 18 months).

2

Acquisition of land

--> Planning phase (12 months): this includes approaching the owners and appointment of consultants, e.g. Property Valuer and the Land Affairs Board (LAB) submission.


--> Execution (acquiring and vesting) phase (24 to 36 months): this includes the stages from the signing of the Deed of Sale by the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service, until the transfer of property by the appointed conveyancer.

3

Planning and design

--> Procurement for the appointment of consultants and preparation of tender documents.

--> Estimated period of completion of this chase (12 to 18 months).

4

Construction

--> Procurement for the appointment of the contractor.

--> Building of police station.

--> Occupation of police station

--> Estimated period of completion of this phase (24 - 36 months).

Reply to question 1582 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1582 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

17 December 2019 - NW1467

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the total cost of the War On Leaks programme as at the latest date for which information is available and (b) number of students have been trained for the purposes of the programme; (2) whether any students have been placed to work in the water sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) of the more than R7 billion worth of water losses, what amount was saved as a result of the specified programme?

Reply:

(1) (a) A total of R3 022 978 951 was spent on the War on Leaks Programme over the five (5) financial years, from 2015/16 to 2019/20

(b) A total of 5520 students have completed their training; of these 4671 are water agents and 49 are artisans

(2) From the 10 469 recruited learners for both phases of the programme, a total of 7 762 learners have been placed for experiential training whilst 1 417 learners were lost through attrition. The Department is exploring options to place the 4 671 water agents by assigning them to regional bulk infrastructure projects to facilitate water conservation. Another consideration is to place them in water services infrastructure projects for advocacy, communication and basic leak detection.

(3) Despite the placements of water agents and artisans (most of whom obtained their experiential training with the private sector) the national average Non Revenue water is 41% with an estimated value of R9.9 billion. The involvement of the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs as well as Water Service Authorities is essential in reducing the water losses

17 December 2019 - NW1632

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to his replies to questions 1785 on 18 June 2018 and 2665 on 4 October 2018, where he states that the Primrose Police Station currently has 35 police officers for visible policing for the three sectors, he has found that the police station actually requires an additional 13 police officers for visible policing instead of an additional six police officers for visible policing in order to reach the optimum number of 48 police officers for visible policing, in correlation with four members in each shift and sector for four shifts in a 24-hour day; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will the police station receive the required number of police officers for visible policing?

Reply:

No, the South African Police Service (SAPS) has a total Fixed Establishment (FE), which is subject to the compensation budget. The equitable distribution of resources is guided by the ratio between the Theoretical Human Resource Requirement (THRR), which is the ideal personnel requirement, and the FE, which is the approved allocation.

The current FE for Visible Policing at the Primrose Police Station is 72, which includes 23 personnel for Sector Policing.

The Primrose Police Station has 30 Sector Policing personnel, which exceeds the FE and therefore, is not eligible to receive additional Visible Policing personnel.

Reply to question 1632 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-12-10

Reply to question 1632 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 15-12-2019

15 December 2019 - NW1681

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of dam safety inspections were conducted by her department in each province in the past two years, (b) on (i) what date and (ii) which dam was each inspection conducted and (c) what were the findings in each case; (2) what number of dam rehabilitation processes were conducted by her department in each province in the past two years, (b) on what (i) date and (ii) dam was each rehabilitation process conducted and (c) what were the costs of each dam rehabilitation process?

Reply:

1. The number of Dam Safety Evaluations (DSE) conducted by the Department of Water and Sanitation in the past two business years is as follows:

  • 2017/18 - nine (9)
  • 2018/19 - twelve (12)

The table below contains the details with regard to the name of the dams; the date in which the evaluation was conducted by the Approved Professional Person (APP); the date in which the reports were received by the Dam Safety Office (DSO); and the condition rating (i.e. findings) if the report was accepted by the DSO.

 

No.

Loc No.

Province

Name of dam

Owner Name

WMA

Size Class

Hazard Rating

Category

Date Last Dam Safety Evaluation (DSE)

DSE Received Date

DSE Acceptance Date

Condition Symbol

DSE’s per province

1

Q940/17

EC

ROXENI DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

7

Medium

Significant

2

2019/01/25

2019/02/21

In progress

 

 

 

 

 

6

2

Q930/45

EC

RURA DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

7

Medium

Significant

2

2019/01/24

2019/02/21

In progress

 

3

Q930/44

EC

NQWELO

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

7

Medium

Significant

2

2019/01/24

2019/02/21

In progress

 

4

Q930/46

EC

SINQUMENI DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

7

Medium

Low

2

2017/09/22

2017/09/29

2017/10/24

D

 

5

R101/04

EC

PLEASANTVIEW DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

7

Medium

Significant

2

2017/09/20

2017/09/29

2017/10/17

B

 

6

T201/06

EC

MABELENI DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

7

Medium

Significant

2

2017/09/26

2017/09/29

2017/11/30

C

 

7

C805/73

FS

BOTTERKLOOF DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

5

Medium

Significant

2

2017/03/30

2018/04/24

2018/05/04

B

1

8

B501/13

LP

LOLA MONTES DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

2

Medium

Significant

2

2018/08/27

2018/10/26

2018/11/30

B

 

 

3

9

A702/43

LP

MASHASHANE DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

1

Medium

Significant

2

2017/07/12

2018/09/06

In progress

 

10

B502/25

LP

MOLEPO DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

2

Medium

Significant

2

2017/03/31

2017/05/31

2017/06/29

D

 

11

B502/23

MP

CHUNIESPOORT DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

2

Medium

Significant

2

2018/05/11

2018/11/23

2019/01/31

D

 

 

3

12

X302/32

MP

ACORNHOEK DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

3

Medium

Low

2

2017/10/31

2017/12/01

2017/12/18

D

 

13

B501/14

MP

MAHLANGU DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

2

Medium

Significant

2

2017/07/06

2017/07/06

2017/07/26

D

 

14

D730/37

NC

NEUSBERG WEIR

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

6

Medium

Low

2

2017/09/08

2017/09/29

2017/10/06

B

1

15

A215/47

NW

MIDDELKRAAL DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

1

Small

Significant

2

2017/07/07

2018/10/10

In progress

 4

16

A100/02

NW

NGOTWANE DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

1

Medium

Significant

2

2017/10/23

2018/09/07

In progress

 -

 

17

A304/18

NW

SEHUJWANE DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

1

Medium

Significant

2

2018/05/24

2018/09/06

2019/08/07

C

 

18

A303/21

NW

PELLA DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

1

Medium

High

3

2017/06/19

2017/10/24

2017/10/25

C

 

19

E100/04

WC

BULSHOEK DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

9

Small

Significant

2

2018/01/18

2019/03/14

2019/04/12

C

 

 

3

20

G100/06

WC

MISVERSTAND-STUWAL

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

9

Medium

Significant

2

2018/01/18

2018/10/25

2019/01/25

B

 

21

H800/03

WC

DUIVENHOKS DAM

DEPT. OF WATER & SANITATION

8

Large

High

3

2017/09/18

2017/10/02

2017/10/18

C

 

2. Two dams were rehabilitated namely as follows:

  • Elandsdrift Barrage (Eastern Cape);
  • Kalkfontein Dam phase 1 (Free State).

The table below contains the details with regard to the name of the dams, the date and the cost of rehabilitating the dams:

Name of Dam

(b)(i) Date

(b)(ii) Scope

c) Cost of rehabilitation

Elandsdrift Barrage

September 2016

Civil works:

The raising of the Non-Overspill Crest (NOC), Construction of the breaching section, Toe drain, construction of a gauging weir, access road, Construction of an RCC retaining on the downstream of the breaching section.

R 326 360 725

   

Mechanical Works: Refurbishment of Outlet works

 

Kalkfontein Dam

September 2017

  • Modification/upgrading of the civil structure of the outlet works in order to accommodate the proposed refurbishment of the mechanical/electrical components.
  • The stabilization of the downstream slope of the dam wall.
  • The widening and paving of the non-overspill crest to a paved crest width.

R 114 354 706

13 December 2019 - NW1713

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she has been informed of the fate of the residents of Summerville Estate, also known as Hagley, in Kuils River, who are now forced to pay levies and/or risk having their properties attached by a rogue home owners association that duped prospective home owners to buy houses under the pretext that the houses were in a security complex, only to find out that the development is not in a security complex area; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps is she taking to resolve the impasse?

Reply:

No, the matter raised by Honourable Member is being brought to my attention for the first time. May I request that the Honourable Member furnish my office with the relevant information and contact details of the relevant person so as to request my department to investigate the matter.