Questions and Replies

Filter by year

13 December 2022 - NW4695

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)With reference to one of the priorities of her Office of ensuring that the rights of women, youth and persons with disabilities are mainstreamed across all sectors of society, what is her department’s position regarding the recommendation of the Department of Basic Education that schools provide unisex toilets and change rooms and individual stalls to create a safe, inclusive schooling environment for pupils of all sexual orientations and identities; 2) whether she has found that the introduction of unisex toilets in schools may lead to an increase in teenage pregnancies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her Office intends to collaborate with the Department of Basic Education to work towards the protection of children against sexual abuse in schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the collaboration? NW5818E

Reply:

1 & 2  The Department of Basic Education issued the attached Press Statement on 16

November 2022 wherein the department indicated that the matter was taken out of context and the subject of single sex toilets was extracted out of a myriad of issues in the discussion document which is yet to be formally released. These are draft guidelines for the socio-educational inclusion of diverse sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) in schools. The official discussion document will be released for comments in 2023.

Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities has already corresponded with the Department of Basic Education DBE in preparation for various interfaces and sessions on document that is to be formally released for comments so as to make informed views and subsequently draft our comments as a department, from an informed premise.

2. The Department is collaborating with the Department of Education through implementation of Pillar 2 of the NSP on GBVF where it is allocated the responsibility to lead on prevention of the scourge in the schooling environment, Per se. However, at National level, the Department also monitors progress on interventions that are implemented by the Department of Education.

The Department of Education is expected to submit monthly reports detailing progress on their gender based violence and femicide prevention initiatives they are implementing in schools in order to amongst others prevent sexual abuse in schools.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

13 December 2022 - NW4176

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Which municipalities are owed outstanding rates and taxes for parcels of land owned by her department and (b) in each case, (i) what total amount is owed, (ii) since what date has the specified amount been outstanding and (iii) for which parcel(s) of land are the amounts owed?

Reply:

(a),(b)(i),(ii),(iii) Please refer to Annexure A.

ANNEXURE A OF NA-QUES 4176 OF 2022

Office

(a) municipalities are owed outstanding rates and taxes for parcels of land owned by the Department

(b)(i) total amount is owed

Total

(b)(ii) since what date has the specified amount been outstanding

(b)(iii) for which parcel(s) of land are the amounts owed

Comments

EC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

R 2,301,941.27  

 

R 53,073,498.58

2022/2023

KING WILLIAMS TOWN RD

-

       

2022/2023

PEDI RD

-

       

2022/2023

BELL

-

       

2022/2023

BODIAM

-

       

2022/2023

HAMBURG

-

 

Raymond Mhlaba Local municipality 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R10,543,255.36  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

VICTORIA EAST RD

-

       

2022/2023

STOCKENSTROOM RD

-

       

2022/2023

QUEENSTOWN RD

-

       

2022/2023

ALICE

-

       

2022/2023

KING WILLIAM'S TOWN RD

-

       

2022/2023

ANNSHAW

-

       

2022/2023

SEYMOUR

-

       

2022/2023

NEWAZI VALLEY

-

       

2022/2023

MABANDLA

-

 

KSD Local Municipality

R21,037,558.89

 

2022/2023

 1910

-

 

Kouga Local Municipality

R 1,238,297.69

 

2022/2023

 PTN 16(OF 15) Farm Loerie Rivier Hoogte NO,435

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Koukamma Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 327,560.32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Ptn 0 of Farm No 437 Humansdorp

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 of Farm Gypjies Gat No. 285 humansdorp

-

       

2022/2023

ptn 84 of Farm Twee Rivieren No 358 Joubertina rd

-

       

2022/2023

ptn 87 of Farm Twee Rivieren No 358 Joubertina rd

-

       

2022/2023

ptn 88 of Farm Twee Rivieren No 358 Joubertina rd

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 of Farm No. 409 Joubertina rd

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 68 of Farm Twee Rivieren no. 358 Joubrtina RD

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Ptn 0 of Farm Hooge Kraal no. 233 Humansdorp RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of Ptn 1 of Farm Canaga no 382 Humansdorp RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 6 of Farm Witte Klip no. 134 Humansdorp RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of Ptn 0 of Farm Witte Klip no 134 Humansdorp RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 10 of Ptn 4 of Farm Adjoining Klipheuvel No. 296 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 61 of farm Klippeuvel no 291 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 81 of farm Klippeuvel no 291 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of Ptn 5 of farm Lauterwater's River no 299 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 6 of farm Lauterwater's River no 299 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 62 of farm Klipdrift no 300 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of Ptn 0 of farm Vierwinde no 457 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2 of farm Vierwinde no 457 Joubertina RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 of farm No 480 Joubertina RD

-

 

Great kei Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 4,052,729.36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Ptn 8 Of Farm No.26 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 11 Of Farm No.26 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 14 Of Farm No.26 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2(of Ptn 1) of Farm No.4 RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.49 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.48 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2 Of Farm No.52 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm No.51 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.185 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.187 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.184 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.186 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 3 Of Farm No.433 KOMGA RD

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Ptn 2 Of Farm No.433 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2 Of Farm No.11 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm No.52 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm No.179 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 Of Farm No.433 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 4 Of Farm No.433 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm No.251 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.216 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 Of Farm No.251 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.1458 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2 Of Farm No.472 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 13 (Of Ptn 26) Of Farm No.26 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 3 Of Farm No.180 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm No.432 KOMGA RD

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.248 EAST LONDON RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm No.425 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 Of Farm Gold Ridge No.425 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm Woodbury No.282 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of Ptn 1 of Farm No.4 RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2 Of Farm No.186 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 (Goubie) Of Farm No.426 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.169 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 4 Of Farm No.47 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm Ridge Valley No.441 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 Of Farm Philton No.413 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm Carlton No.443 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of Ptn 0 of farm Courtlands No.205 Komga RD

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm Swiss Valley No.454 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 Of Farm No.12 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 2 Of Farm No.169 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 of Farm No.6 RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 3 Of Farm No.54 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 3 Of Farm No.171 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

R/E of ptn 0 of farm No.12 Komga RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 1 of farm No.64 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.423 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm Eversley No.161 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.424 KOMGA RD

-

       

2022/2023

Ptn 0 Of Farm No.8 KOMGA RD

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makana Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 2,914,050.46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

121

-

       

2022/2023

122

-

       

2022/2023

586

-

       

2022/2023

42

-

       

2022/2023

45

-

       

2022/2023

46

-

       

2022/2023

120

-

       

2022/2023

302

-

       

2022/2023

473

-

       

2022/2023

649

-

       

2022/2023

205

-

       

2022/2023

365

-

       

2022/2023

477

-

       

2022/2023

338

-

       

2022/2023

363

-

       

2022/2023

369

-

       

2022/2023

371

-

       

2022/2023

378

-

       

2022/2023

392

-

       

2022/2023

459

-

       

2022/2023

472

-

       

2022/2023

477

-

       

2022/2023

798

-

       

2022/2023

19

-

       

2022/2023

11

-

       

2022/2023

478

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inxuba Yethemba Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 6,527,591.20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

37

-

       

2022/2023

6145

-

       

2022/2023

66

-

       

2022/2023

69

-

       

2022/2023

123

-

       

2022/2023

139

-

       

2022/2023

201

-

       

2022/2023

206

-

       

2022/2023

356

-

       

2022/2023

358

-

       

2022/2023

360

-

       

2022/2023

361

-

       

2022/2023

362

-

       

2022/2023

492

-

       

2022/2023

523

-

       

2022/2023

527

-

       

2022/2023

574

-

       

2022/2023

600

-

       

2022/2023

606

-

       

2022/2023

523

-

       

2022/2023

59

-

       

2022/2023

69

-

       

2022/2023

357

-

       

2022/2023

358

-

       

2022/2023

360

-

       

2022/2023

362

-

       

2022/2023

362

-

       

2022/2023

479

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

523

-

       

2022/2023

527

-

       

2022/2023

552

-

       

2022/2023

554

-

       

2022/2023

563

-

       

2022/2023

597

-

       

2022/2023

3

-

       

2022/2023

169

-

       

2022/2023

171

-

       

2022/2023

174

-

       

2022/2023

175

-

       

2022/2023

212

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mnquma Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 2,075,755.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

5710

-

       

2022/2023

571

-

       

2022/2023

595

-

       

2022/2023

6466

-

       

2022/2023

105111

-

       

2022/2023

6897

-

       

2022/2023

2577

-

       

2022/2023

6762

-

       

2022/2023

3393

-

       

2022/2023

200

-

       

2022/2023

19382

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ndlambe Local Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 2,054,759.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Erf 8 Extension 800

-

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

Erf 410 Extension 810

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 233 Extension 810

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 252 Extension 810

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 6 Extension 800

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 29 Extension 800

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 8 Extension 800

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 398 Extension 800

-

       

2022/2023

Erf 299 Extension 800

-

       

2022/2023

800-000000206-000005-0000

-

       

2022/2023

810-000000330-000001-0000

-

       

2022/2023

810-000000247-000002-0000

-

       

2022/2023

800-000000028-000000-0000

-

       

2022/2023

800-000000100-000000-0000

-

       

2022/2023

800-000000298-000003-0000

-

     

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

800-000000006-000000-0000

-

       

2022/2023

800-000000008-000002-0000

-

       

2022/2023

810-000000233-000001-0000

-

 

 

 

 

2022/2023

800-000000031-000000-0000

-

FS

 

SETSOTO

R 1,677,651.95

R 1,924,892.95

2022-2023

Portion 2 No.57

Invoices not paid, not compliant

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No.1179

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 1 No. 57

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No.302

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 303

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 402

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No.1108

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 3 No. 76

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 337

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 1 No. 76

-

       

2022-2023

PortiOn 0 No. 144

-

       

2022-2023

No. 980

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 1 No. 24

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 59

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 50

-

       

2022-2023

No. 520

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 761

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 759

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 758

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 1 No.6 Senekal Road

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No.47 Senekal Road

-

       

2022-2023

Portion 0 No. 1351 Senekal Road

-

 

NKETOANA

R 247,241.00

 

2022-2023

ZANDFONTEIN 183

Invoices not paid, not compliant

       

2022-2023

PUNT 390

-

       

2022-2023

BRONKHORSTFONTEIN P5/991

-

       

2022-2023

BRONKHORSTFONTEIN P8/991

-

       

2022-2023

Excelsior 1177

-

       

2022-2023

Landhoek 362

-

       

2022-2023

Hilgard Steyn 1046

-

       

2022-2023

Kraalpunt 1759

-

       

2022-2023

Farm1046 Kaffirskraal

-

       

2022-2023

Dorpsgrond Van Reitz

-

       

2022-2023

Stoffelina 1247

-

       

2022-2023

Erfdeel 919

-

       

2022-2023

Rondebult 917

-

       

2022-2023

Grootdam 918

-

       

2022-2023

Zandlaagte 522

-

       

2022-2023

Yeomanrykopje 579

-

       

2022-2023

 

-

       

2022-2023

 

-

       

2022-2023

 

-

       

2022-2023

 

-

       

2022-2023

 

-

       

2022-2023

 

-

MP

 

 

 

 

Msukaligwa

R 6,607,413.60

R 49,051,350.23

   

-

       

2022-2023

BANKPLAATS

-

       

2022-2023

BELLEVUE

-

       

2022-2023

BLESBOKHEUVEL

-

       

2022-2023

Bloemkrans

-

       

2022-2023

BONNIE BRAES

-

       

2022-2023

COALBANK

-

       

2022-2023

DAVELFONTEIN

-

           

-

       

2022-2023

DE VEREENIGING

-

           

-

       

2022-2023

DRIEHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

BANKFONTEIN

-

           

-

       

2022-2023

DWARSTREK

-

       

2022-2023

ELIM

-

       

2022-2023

GOEDE HOOP

-

       

2022-2023

GOEDVERWACHTING

-

       

2022-2023

Grasdal

-

       

2022-2023

GRASPAN

-

       

2022-2023

Grassridge

-

       

2022-2023

KLIPFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

KLIPRUG

-

       

2022-2023

KNAPDAAR

-

       

2022-2023

KRANSPOORT

-

       

2022-2023

LAKE BANAGHER

-

       

2022-2023

LANGVERWACHT

-

       

2022-2023

LOTHAIR

-

       

2022-2023

Middelplaat

-

       

2022-2023

MOOIPLAATS

-

           

-

       

2022-2023

NOOITGEDACHT

-

       

2022-2023

OSHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

REPUBLIEK

-

       

2022-2023

Rietkuil

-

       

2022-2023

RIETVALLEI

-

       

2022-2023

RIVERSDALE

-

       

2022-2023

ROTTERDAM

-

       

2022-2023

SHEPSTONE

-

       

2022-2023

Sihanahana

-

       

2022-2023

Smutsoog

-

       

2022-2023

SPION KOP

-

       

2022-2023

SPRINGBOKFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

SUNNYSIDE

-

       

2022-2023

TARBERT

-

       

2022-2023

TRANENDAL

-

       

2022-2023

TWYFELAAR

-

       

2022-2023

UITZIGT

-

       

2022-2023

VLAKFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

Volharding

-

       

2022-2023

WELGEVONDEN

-

       

2022-2023

WITBANK

-

       

2022-2023

WITPUNT

-

       

2022-2023

ZWARTWATER

-

 

Dipaleseng

R 9,585,559.20

 

2022-2023

BAKKIESFONTEIN

-

           

-

       

2022-2023

BRAKSPRUIT

 
           

-

       

2022-2023

DRUKFONTEIN

-

           

-

       

2022-2023

GOEDGEDACHT

-

       

2022-2023

GROOTVLEI POWER STATION

-

       

2022-2023

GROOTVLEY

-

       

2022-2023

HERPSFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

HEXRIVIER

-

       

2022-2023

KLEINFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

LEEU

-

       

2022-2023

MAHEMSFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

MALANSKRAAL

-

       

2022-2023

OUDHOUTDRAAI

-

       

2022-2023

PANFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

RIETBULT ESTATES

-

       

2022-2023

RIETFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

ROODEPOORT

-

       

2022-2023

SPRINGFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

TWEEFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

VLAKFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

VOGELSTRUISFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

VRISGEWAAG

-

       

2022-2023

WELTEVREDEN

-

       

2022-2023

ZYFERFONTEIN

-

 

City of Mbombela

R 7,694,435.47

 

2022-2023

AYRTON

-

       

2022-2023

BELLEVUE A2

-

       

2022-2023

BELLEVUE B

-

       

2022-2023

BONGANI

-

       

2022-2023

BOSCHFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

BROEDERSHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

BURGERS HALL

-

       

2022-2023

CAMELOT

-

       

2022-2023

CASTLE KOP

-

       

2022-2023

CLARENDON VALE

-

       

2022-2023

COPPICE

-

       

2022-2023

DAGBREEK

-

       

2022-2023

DE GAMA

-

       

2022-2023

Esperado

-

       

2022-2023

ESPERADO ANNEX

-

       

2022-2023

GELUK

-

       

2022-2023

GUTSHWA

-

       

2022-2023

HANDSUP

-

       

2022-2023

HANGING STONE

-

       

2022-2023

JERUSALEM

-

       

2022-2023

JERUSALEM KOPJE

-

       

2022-2023

KOFFIEPLAAS

-

       

2022-2023

LINCOLN

-

       

2022-2023

LOGOGOTU

-

       

2022-2023

LUNDI

-

       

2022-2023

MAC'S HILL

-

       

2022-2023

MADELIEFJE

-

       

2022-2023

MASHUSHU

-

       

2022-2023

MASOYI

-

       

2022-2023

MASOYI SHOPPING CENTRE

-

       

2022-2023

MBUYANE

-

       

2022-2023

MDLUI I

-

       

2022-2023

MELTON

-

       

2022-2023

MIDDLETON

-

       

2022-2023

MIDDLETON ABATTOIR

-

       

2022-2023

MISSION

-

       

2022-2023

MPAKENI

-

       

2022-2023

MTHETHOMUSHA

-

       

2022-2023

M'TIMBA

-

       

2022-2023

Nkambeni

-

       

2022-2023

NKOSI CITY

-

       

2022-2023

OORSCHOT

-

       

2022-2023

OORSPRONG

-

       

2022-2023

QUOTHQUAN

-

       

2022-2023

RIETVLEY

-

       

2022-2023

RIVERSIDE

-

       

2022-2023

ROUXVILLE FARM

-

       

2022-2023

SANDFORD

-

       

2022-2023

SIGAMBULE

-

       

2022-2023

STERKSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

SUTHERLAND

-

       

2022-2023

THE CASTLE

-

       

2022-2023

THE RANCH

-

       

2022-2023

THE TWO SISTERS

-

       

2022-2023

THORNYLEA

-

       

2022-2023

UITVAL

-

       

2022-2023

WHITE WATERS

-

 

Thembisile Hani

R17,104,018.16

 

2022-2023

ARMOED

-

       

2022-2023

BARNETEIN

-

       

2022-2023

BLAAUWPOORT

-

       

2022-2023

BOEKENHOUTFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

BOSCHBULT

-

       

2022-2023

BRAKFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

BREYTENBACHSRUS

-

       

2022-2023

BUFFELSHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

BULTPLAATS

-

       

2022-2023

DOORNFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

DOORNNEK

-

       

2022-2023

DROOGVELD

-

       

2022-2023

ENGELSCHE DOORNBOOM

-

       

2022-2023

ENKELDOORN

-

       

2022-2023

ENKELDOORNOOG

-

       

2022-2023

ENKELDOORNSPOORT

-

       

2022-2023

ENKELDORINGOOG

-

       

2022-2023

GEMSBOKFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

GEMSBOKSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

GOEDEREDE

-

       

2022-2023

HARTBEESTFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

HARTEBEESTSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

HELOISE

-

       

2022-2023

HOUTENBEK

-

       

2022-2023

KAMEELPOORTNEK

-

       

2022-2023

KLIP FONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

KLIPDRIFT

-

       

2022-2023

KLIPFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

KLIPSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

KRANSPOORT ALIAS BLACKWOOD CAMP

-

       

2022-2023

KWAGGAFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

KWAMHLANGA

-

       

2022-2023

LANGKLOOF

-

       

2022-2023

LANSERIA

-

       

2022-2023

LEEUWFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

LOOPSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

MALOEKZIJNKOP

-

       

2022-2023

MATHYS ZYN LOOP

-

       

2022-2023

NOOITGEDACHT

-

       

2022-2023

PAPKUILFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

PRINS ANNA

-

       

2022-2023

RHENOSTERKUIL

-

       

2022-2023

RIETFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

ROODEPOORT

-

       

2022-2023

ROODEPOORTJE

-

       

2022-2023

SILVERHILL

-

       

2022-2023

SIMPKINSVALE

-

       

2022-2023

SPITSRAND

-

       

2022-2023

STROOMWATER

-

       

2022-2023

SYBRANDSKRAAL

-

       

2022-2023

TAAIFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

TWEEFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

VALSCHSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

VAN DIJKSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

VRISCHGEWAAGD

-

       

2022-2023

WELVERDIEND

-

       

2022-2023

WOLVENGATEN

-

       

2022-2023

WOLVENKOP

-

       

2022-2023

WORSTAL

-

       

2022-2023

YZERVARKFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

ZUSTERSHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

ZWARTFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

ZWARTKOPJE

-

 

Emakhazeni

R 8,059,923.80

 

2022-2023

BERG-EN-DAL

-

       

2022-2023

BLOEMFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

BUTTON

-

       

2022-2023

DE GOEDEHOOP

-

       

2022-2023

DE SUIKERBOSCHKOP

-

       

2022-2023

DOORNHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

DRIEFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

DRIEKOP

-

       

2022-2023

EERSTE GELUK

-

       

2022-2023

ELANDSFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

ELANDSHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

FORELWATER

-

       

2022-2023

GENERAALSDRAAI

-

       

2022-2023

GOEDEVERWACHTING

-

       

2022-2023

GROENVLEI

-

       

2022-2023

HARTEBEESTFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

HARTEBEESTSPRUIT

-

       

2022-2023

HONINGKLOOF

-

       

2022-2023

KAALBOOI

-

       

2022-2023

KONTERDANSKLOOF

-

       

2022-2023

LAKENVALEI

-

       

2022-2023

LEEUWKLOOF

-

       

2022-2023

NOOITGEDACHT

-

       

2022-2023

ONVERWACHT

-

       

2022-2023

PAARDEKRAAL

-

       

2022-2023

RIETFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

RIETVALLEY

-

       

2022-2023

RIETVLEI

-

       

2022-2023

ROODEKRANS

-

       

2022-2023

SCHOONGEZIGHT

-

       

2022-2023

STEYNSPLAATS

-

       

2022-2023

TREURFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

UITKOMST

-

       

2022-2023

UITVLUGT

-

       

2022-2023

VLAKPLAATS

-

       

2022-2023

VLUCHTFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

VOGELSTRUISPOORT

-

       

2022-2023

VRISCHGEWAAGD IS HALF GEWONNEN

-

       

2022-2023

WAAIKRAAL

-

       

2022-2023

WACHTEENBEETJESHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

WELGELUK

-

       

2022-2023

WELGEVONDEN

-

       

2022-2023

WELTEVREDEN

-

       

2022-2023

WELVERDIEND

-

       

2022-2023

WINDHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

WINTERSHOEK

-

       

2022-2023

WITBOOI

-

       

2022-2023

WITKLIP

-

       

2022-2023

ZEVENFONTEIN

-

       

2022-2023

ZONDAGSKRAAL

-

       

2022-2023

ZWARTKOPPIES

-

KZN

 

 

 

UMHLATHUZE

R 218,387.40

R 602,509.05

2022-2023

PTN 4 Confluence 11728

Approved 14/11/2022

       

2022-2023

REM Umfuli 16250

-

       

2022-2023

REM Thorncreek 11542

-

       

2022-2023

PTN 0 Empangeni 12061

-

       

2022-2023

PTN 16 Reserve 5 15824

-

       

2022-2023

Lot 263 Empangeni 12144

-

       

2022-2023

PTN 0 Shorragh 14625

-

       

2022-2023

PTN 0 Needmore 11386

-

       

2022-2023

REM Newlands 11588

-

       

2022-2023

Farm Pyramids 11425

-

       

2022-2023

REM Lot 241 Empangeni 11058

-

       

2022-2023

REM lot 252 Empangeni 13313

-

 

UMSHWATHI

R 120,298.18

 

10/31/2022

 REM Berlin 6353

On route for approval

       

10/31/2022

REM PTN 1 Berlin 6353

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 2 Berlin 6353

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 3 Berlin 6353

-

       

10/31/2022

REM Frenchhay 2241

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 1 Frenchay East 2241

-

       

10/31/2022

REM Frenchay West 2235

-

       

10/31/2022

Rem PTN Frenchay West

2235

-

       

10/31/2022

Rem PTN 2 Frenchay West 2235

-

       

10/31/2022

Farm Glen Roy 3166

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 3 Frenchay West 2235

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 7 Hoghton 1358

-

       

10/31/2022

REM PTN 8 Paard Fontein 1299

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 13 Paard Fontein 1299

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 20 Paard Fontein 1299

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 5 Twee Fontein 5721

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 1 Umvoti Slope 2239

-

       

10/31/2022

REM PTN 3 Umvoti Slope

2239

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 4 Umvoti Slope 2239

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 12 Welte Vreden 1346

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 5 Lot 37 1294

-

       

10/31/2022

Farm Ecaweni 9080

-

       

10/31/2022

Farm Ifaye 1346

-

       

10/31/2022

Rem Redcliff Vale 8365

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 2 Redcliff Vale 8365

-

       

10/31/2022

REM PTN 3 Aasvolgel Krans 1226

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 16 Aasvolgel Krans

1226

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 8 Aasvogel Krans 1233

-

       

10/31/2022

REM PTN 9 Aasvogel Kraans

1233

-

       

10/31/2022

Farm Sunshine 17503

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 45 Wagenbetjies Draai 872

-

       

10/31/2022

PTN 39 Wagenbeetjies Draai 875

-

 

RICHMOND

R 52,016.27

 

10/21/2022

REM of PTN 3 Wonder Geluk 1273

Sent to ALHA on the 11/11/2022

       

10/21/2022

Farm Inhlazuka Ridge 11437

-

       

10/21/2022

REM of PTN 3 Keerom 1190

-

       

10/21/2022

PTN 47 Wonder Geluk 1273

-

       

10/21/2022

Farm Rothwell 13294

-

       

10/21/2022

PTN 21 Wonder Geluk 1273

-

       

10/21/2022

Farm Warringsford 3535

-

       

10/21/2022

Farm Waterfalls 16803

-

       

10/21/2022

PTN 22 Wonder Geluk 1273

-

       

10/21/2022

Rem Umhlateen 1006

-

       

10/21/2022

PTN 9 Stacpoole 6055

-

       

10/21/2022

Farm Waterfall 5763

-

       

10/21/2022

REM PTN 2 Wonder Geluk 1273

-

       

10/21/2022

REM PTN 1 Election 13562

-

 

IMPENDLE

R 211,807.20

 

4/11/2022

PTN 1 Lot 85 1815

Memo will be on route the 16/11/2022

       

4/11/2022

Farm Duart Casstle 9426

-

       

4/11/2022

REM Smithfield 14796

-

       

4/11/2022

PTN 2 LREM Crowle 2260

-

       

4/11/2022

PTN 2 Lot 85 1815

-

       

4/11/2022

REM PTN 8 New Forncett 13651

-

       

4/11/2022

PTN 5 Crowle 2260

-

       

4/11/2022

LOT FP 289 8554

-

       

4/11/2022

REM Lot 93 1821

-

       

4/11/2022

PTN 1 LOT 93 1821

-

       

4/11/2022

REM Lot 85 1815

-

LIMP

 

 

 

Elias Motswaledi Municipality

R 4,896,191.68

R 17,822,435.61

2022/23

552

-

 

Makhuduthamaga Municipality

R 1,964,144.00

 

2022/23

239

-

 

Lepelle-Nkumpi Municipality

R 1,718,717.00

 

2022/23

241

-

 

Molemole Municipality

R 3,745,594.80

 

2022/23

244

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greater Letaba Municipality

R 871,003.01

 

2022/23

249

-

 

Makhado Municipality

R 3,328,895.52

 

2022/23

250

-

 

Musina Local Municipality

R 177,319.30

 

2022/23

252

-

 

Thulamela/Mutale Municipality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 1,120,570.30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022/23

253

-

       

2022/23

255

-

       

2022/23

256

-

       

2022/23

260

-

       

2022/23

262

-

       

2022/23

265

-

       

2022/23

268

-

       

2022/23

269

-

       

2022/23

270

-

       

2022/23

271

-

       

2022/23

274

-

       

2022/23

275

-

       

2022/23

276

-

       

2022/23

279

-

       

2022/23

305

-

       

2022/23

315

-

       

2022/23

316

-

       

2022/23

317

-

       

2022/23

321

-

       

2022/23

322

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

2022/23

323

-

       

2022/23

325

-

       

2022/23

327

-

       

2022/23

328

-

       

2022/23

329

-

       

2022/23

334

-

       

2022/23

334

-

       

2022/23

340

-

       

2022/23

341

-

       

2022/23

342

-

       

2022/23

343

-

       

2022/23

346

-

       

2022/23

348

-

       

2022/23

349

-

       

2022/23

353

-

       

2022/23

354

-

       

2022/23

356

-

       

2022/23

357

-

       

2022/23

362

-

       

2022/23

370

-

       

2022/23

374

-

       

2022/23

377

-

       

2022/23

384

-

       

2022/23

6

-

       

2022/23

73

-

       

2022/23

82

-

       

2022/23

86

-

       

2022/23

87

-

       

2022/23

91

-

       

2022/23

143

-

       

2022/23

145

-

       

2022/23

154

-

       

2022/23

272

-

       

2022/23

275

-

       

2022/23

276

-

       

2022/23

277

-

       

2022/23

278

-

       

2022/23

305

-

       

2022/23

306

-

       

2022/23

308

-

       

2022/23

309

-

       

2022/23

310

-

       

2022/23

311

-

       

2022/23

312

-

       

2022/23

313

-

       

2022/23

324

-

       

2022/23

326

-

       

2022/23

328

-

       

2022/23

329

-

       

2022/23

360

-

       

2022/23

365

-

       

2022/23

370

-

       

2022/23

438

-

       

2022/23

440

-

       

2022/23

684

-

       

2022/23

685

-

       

2022/23

687

-

       

2022/23

688

-

       

2022/23

689

-

       

2022/23

691

-

       

2022/23

692

-

       

2022/23

196

-

       

2022/23

525

-

       

2022/23

526

-

       

2022/23

527

-

       

2022/23

59

-

       

2022/23

81

-

       

2022/23

82

-

       

2022/23

92

-

       

2022/23

101

-

       

2022/23

104

-

       

2022/23

105

-

       

2022/23

106

-

       

2022/23

112

-

       

2022/23

113

-

       

2022/23

114

-

       

2022/23

123

-

       

2022/23

164

-

       

2022/23

168

-

       

2022/23

170

-

       

2022/23

198

-

WC

BERGRIVIER MUNICIPALITY

R 1,388,229.11

R 1,710,533.38

from 2015 to 2022

FARM RIETKLOOF

In Head Office for Payment: The municipality previously sent invoices starting from 2017 but their system could not go back as far as 2015 and the department needed a letter writing off the information but through engagement we went to the municipality and they were able to provide us with the information we needed hence this big amount to be paid

 

GEORGE MUNICIPALITY

R 4,534.14

 

 

FARM NO.321

In Head Office for payment

 

GEORGE MUNICIPALITY

R 2,542.41

 

2021/2022

WELGEMEED

In Head Office for payment

 

GEORGE MUNICIPALITY

R 1,978.71

 

2021/2022

GOLD DIGGINGS

In Head Office for payment

 

GEORGE MUNICIPALITY

R 37,863.38

 

2021/2022

LANGFONTEIN

In Head Office for payment

 

GEORGE MUNICIPALITY

R 8,005.32

 

2021/2022

KRANSFONTEIN

In Head Office for payment

 

SALDAHNA MUNICIPALITY

R 161,323.11

 

2021/2022

 CALEDONIA

In Head Office for payment

 

DRAKENSTEIN MUNICIPALITY

R 44,320.10

 

Sep-22

 BELLEVUE

The municipality has been paid part of this amount allocation has not been done by municipality we are department will be paying what is owing according to their records

 

WITZENBERG MUNICIPALITY

R 61,737.10

 

2021/2022

 OSDAM ABBATOIR

In the process for payment

NW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORETELE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 6,000,000.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R 21,800,525.42

2021 - 2022

BEZUIDENHOUTSKRAAL 96.1

-

       

2021 - 2022

BEZUIDENHOUTSKRAAL 96.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

BEZUIDENHOUTSKRAAL 96.3

-

       

2021 - 2022

BEZUIDENHOUTSKRAAL 96.4

-

       

2021 - 2022

BEZUIDENHOUTSKRAAL 96.6

-

       

2021 - 2022

BEZUIDENHOUTSKRAAL 96.7

-

       

2021 - 2022

COMO

-

       

2021 - 2022

DE GRENS 168.22

-

       

2021 - 2022

DE GRENS 168.6

-

       

2021 - 2022

DE GRENS 168.7

-

       

2021 - 2022

DE GRENS 168.8

-

       

2021 - 2022

DE GRENS 168.20

-

       

2021 - 2022

DE GRENS 168.63

-

       

2021 - 2022

DOORNDRAAI 12.0

-

       

2021 - 2022

FARM RUIGTESLOOT 160.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

FARM RUIGTESLOOT 160.130

-

       

2021 - 2022

FARM RUIGTESLOOT 160.137

-

       

2021 - 2022

FARM RUIGTESLOOT 160.320

-

       

2021 - 2022

HAAKDOORNLAAGTE 167.0

-

       

2021 - 2022

HAAKDOORNLAAGTE 167.1

-

       

2021 - 2022

HAAKDOORNLAAGTE 167.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

SYFERSKUIL 15.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

SYFERSKUIL 15.3 (1)

-

       

2021 - 2022

SYFERSKUIL 15.4

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021 - 2022

VOORUITZICHT 7.1

-

       

2021 - 2022

WORCESTER 481.1

-

       

2021 - 2022

WORCESTER 481.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

WYNANDSKRAAL 64.3

-

       

2021 - 2022

WYNANDSKRAAL 64.4

-

       

2021 - 2022

BUFFELSDRIFT 51.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

BUFFELSDRIFT 51.3

-

       

2021 - 2022

WITGAATBOOM 65.4

-

       

2021 - 2022

WITGAATBOOM 65.0

-

       

2021 - 2022

RHNENOSTERDRIFT 172.1

-

       

2021 - 2022

RHNENOSTERDRIFT 172.2

-

       

2021 - 2022

RHNENOSTERDRIFT 172.5

-

       

2021 - 2022

RHNENOSTERDRIFT 172.8

-

       

2021 - 2022

RHNENOSTERDRIFT 172.9

-

 

 

 

 

KGETLENG

 

 

 

R 1,041,417.32

 

 

 

 

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 2 Of Farm Goedgedacht No.377 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 3 Of Farm Goede Hoop No.490 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 11 Of Farm Sterkstroom No.411 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 17 Of Farm Koornfontein No.385 JP

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019 - 2022

Ptn 1 Of Farm Koornfontein No.385 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 17 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 16 (Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 11 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 12 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 10 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 9 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 20 (Of Ptn 13) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 35 (Of Ptn 15) Of Farm Doornkom No.418 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 2 Of Farm Winkelhaak No.403 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 5 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 31 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 39 (Of Ptn 1) Of Farm Brakspruit No.402 JP

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 161 (Of Ptn 7) Of Farm Brakfontein No.404 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 0 Of Farm Cyferfontein No.401 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 4 Of Farm Bankdrift No.443 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 8 of farm Bankdrift No.443 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 26 of farm Bankdrift No.443 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 21 of farm Blokkloof No.422 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 24 (Of Ptn 3) Of Farm Otterfontein No.438 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 25 (Of Ptn 3) Of Farm Otterfontein No.438 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 26 (Of Ptn 3) Of Farm Otterfontein No.438 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 27 (Of Ptn 3) Of Farm Otterfontein No.438 JP

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 43 (Of Ptn 27) Of Farm Otterfontein No.438 JP

-

 

 

RATLOU

 

R14,759,108.10

 

 

2019 - 2022

Expath no 156\Ptn 2 of Expath No.206

-

       

2019 - 2022

Expath no 156\R/E of Ptn 1 of Expath No.206

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019 - 2022

Expath no 156\Ptn 5 of farm Expath No.206

-

       

2019 - 2022

Shepards Bush\R/E of Ptn 0 of Sherpards Bush No.178

-

       

2019 - 2022

Dover\Ptn 2 of farm Dover 209 JO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Dover\Ptn 3 of farm Dover 209 JO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Dover\Ptn 4 of farm Dover 209 JO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Dover\Ptn 6 of farm Dover 209 JO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Dover\Rem of farm Dover 209 JO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Shaftsbury561 IO\Rem ext of Ptn 0 of Shaftburg No. 561 IO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 2 of farm Vryhof No.518 IO

-

       

2019 - 2022

R/E Of Ptn 0 of Farm Kliparani No.519 IO

-

       

2019 - 2022

Ptn 2 of farm Kliparani No.519 IO

-

NC

 

 

 

 

 

Gasegonyana Municipality

R 6,089,808.73

R 9,124,968.80

Mar-22

The farm Auod No 128

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm masadifontein No 140

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Compton No 169

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of ptn 1 (Rustfontein) of the farm Fairfield No 153

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 2(Excelsior)(a ptn of ptn 1) of the farm Fairfield No 153

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 3 (Bothasdal)(a ptn of ptn 1) of the farm Fairfield No 153

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Westderby No 164

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1 (Bothaville) of the farm West Derby No 164

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 2(Wesrand) of the farm West Derby No 164

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 3(Doringbult) of the farm Westderby No 164

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 4(Gamorei) of the farm West Derby No 164

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Phakane 165

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of ptn 1(Sweethome) of the farm Phakhane No 165

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of ptn 2(a ptn of ptn 1) of the farm Phakhane No 165

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 3(a ptn of ptn 3) of the farm Phakhane No 165

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 4 (Subsidie) of the farm Phakhane No 165

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Yale No 168

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1(Schik Rust) of the farm Yale No 168

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 3 of the farm Yale No 168

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Harvard No 171

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1 of the farm Harvard No 168

-

       

Mar-22

The farm Thamoanche No 212

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Kuruman Reserve No 690

-

       

Mar-22

The farm No 715

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm No 720

-

       

Mar-22

The farm No 721

-

 

Sol Plaatje Municipality

R 215,916.64

 

Mar-22

Remainder of the Farm Rust en Vrede No 83

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the Farm Welgevonden No 84

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the Farm Vaal Bosch Hoek No 85

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the Farm Doornlaagte No 97

-

 

Dawid Kruiper Municipality

R 2,041,603.52

 

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Grootwitpan No 327

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 34 of lot 445 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 35 of lot 445 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 36 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 254 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 255 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 257 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 609 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 611 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 612 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 613 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 614 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 616 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 704 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 705 Karos

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 21 (Duinplaas) of the farm Kalahari West No 251

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 23 (Tierkop) of the farm Kalahari West No 251

-

       

Mar-22

The farm Ceres No 373

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 6 (a ptn of ptn 2) of the farm Rooipoort No 315

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1 of the farm Abiquasputs South No 227

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1 of the farm Verloren Rivier No 240

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 6 of the farm Springbok Vlei No 239

-

       

Mar-22

The farm Elandsvlei No 339

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1 of the farm Vilander No 318

-

       

Mar-22

The farm Loch Na Gar No 217

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 1 of the farm Loch Leven No 215

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 6 of the farm Eenbeker No 220

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 112 (Koeipan) of the farm Kalahari West No 251

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder ptn 3 (a ptn of ptn 1) of the farm Norokei No 317

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 12 of the farm Kurrees No 369

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 150 (a ptn of ptn 17) of the farm Kalahari West No 251

-

       

Mar-22

The farm Langhoek No 311

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Vilander No 318

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 95 (Vooruitsig) of the farm Kalahari West No 251

-

 

Karreeberg Municipality

R 151,486.45

 

Mar-22

Ptn 1 of the farm Kalk Bult No 241

-

       

Mar-22

Ptn 63 (Potsepan) of the farm Kalaharis West No 251

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 7 (a portion of Portion 1) of the farm Van Wyks Kloof No. 39, Carnarvon RD

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of Portion 2(Kransfontein East) (portion of Portion 1) of the farm Titus Pan No. 136, Prieska RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 3 (Kransfontein Noord) (a portion of Portion 2) of the farm Titus Pan No. 136, Prieska RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 4 (Kransfontein Huis) (portion of Portion 2) of the farm Titus Pan no. 136, Prieska RD

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Kalkput No. 137, Prieska RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 1 of the farm Kalk-Put No. 137, Prieska RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 17 (Vleiplaas) (porion of Portion 6) of the farm Kareebosch Fontyn No. 78, Carnarvon RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 2 (Goodhope) of the farm Naauwe Kloof No. 122, Prieska RD

-

 

Thembelihle Municipality

R 23,374.66

 

Mar-22

Portion 4 (Klein Doorn-Pan A) of the farm Klein Doorn-Pan No. 133, Prieska RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 1(annex) Brak Pan) of the farm Droge Dam No 199

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of portion 1 of the farm Brak Pan No 204

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 2 (Vlak Pan) of the farm Brak Pan No 204

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Brak Pan No 204

-

 

Kheis! Municipality

R 602,778.80

 

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Rooisand No. 387, Gordonia RD

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of the farm Poortjes No. 317, Kenhardt RD

-

       

Mar-22

Remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rooisand No. 387, Gordonia RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 5 of the farm Rooisand No. 387, Gordonia RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 7 (a portion of Portion 2) of the farm Rooisand No. 387, Gordonia RD

-

       

Mar-22

Portion 4 of the farm Hedley Plains No. 266, Kenhardt RD

-

GP

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

R10,346,342.80

R 45,545,844.81

Mar-11

122

-

 

City of Joburg Metropolitan Municipality

R 4,136,131.75

 

Nov-14

17

-

 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

R 3,235,545.00

 

Aug-12

11

-

 

Randwest Local Municipality

R 4,920,891.14

 

Jul-15

33

-

 

Mogale City Local Municipalities

R 4,331,668.22

 

Sep-20

45

-

 

Midvaal Local Municipality

R 2,841,329.00

 

Mar-19

15

-

 

Merafong Local Municipality

R 641,594.20

 

Mar-19

16

-

 

Lesedi Local Municipality

R 6,676,089.70

 

Apr-19

56

-

 

Emfuleni Local Municipality

R 8,416,253.00

 

Apr-18

78

-

 

TOTAL

 

R 200,656,558.83

     

13 December 2022 - NW3768

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Noting that the Republic has been elected to a three – year term in the United Nations Human Rights Council, what meaningful (a) contributions and (b) decisions will the Republic make regarding the instabilities caused by the western powers on the African continent?

Reply:

a)  On 11 October 2022, South Africa was voted overwhelmingly by United Nations (UN) member states to take a seat in the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) beginning 1 January 2023 for the next period of three years (2023-2025). In support of its campaign, South Africa submitted pledges to the UN General Assembly detailing what meaningful contributions the country would make, namely, to work with other countries in the Council to promote and advance human rights globally; to ensure that the mandate of the Council (to promote human rights) is kept intact and that the Council is not ‘manipulated’ by other countries to promote their own political objectives (politicisation and securitisation of human rights); to ensure that the Council pays equal attention to all human rights (civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights); and that the agenda items dealing with the fight against racism and the self-determination of the Palestinian people, amongst other issues, are kept intact and their objectives promoted. Consistent with our constitutional commitment, South Africa intends to take its rightful place as a sovereign and responsible state in the HRC to contribute to the development of norms and standards in the field of human rights that will promote global cooperation, multilateralism, peaceful resolution of conflicts, women empowerment, and a system of interstate relations based on agreed rules (respect for the rule of international law) and not brute economic and military force.

b) With regard to decisions South Africa will make in the HRC regarding the instabilities caused by the western powers on the African continent, it should be noted that issues of peace and security are addressed by the UN, primarily through the UN Security Council and the General Assembly and not in the HRC. South Africa is opposed to the idea (which idea is cherished by some big powers) of “securitisation of human rights,” meaning, the use of human rights to achieve political-security objectives.

It is trite, that some of the five Permanent Members of the Security Council (P5) members try to bypass the Security Council (in order to avoid a situation where their resolutions would be vetoed by other P5 members) and use institutions such as the HRC (where no country has veto rights) to pursue their narrow political-security objectives. In this regard, South Africa will continue playing a key role in the HRC, particularly in the ongoing discussions aimed at considering how the activities of private military and security companies (PMSCs), transnational corporations (TNCs) and other business enterprise (OBEs) can be regulated to ensure that these entities do not violate human rights, and where human rights violations are detected, which flow from the activities of these entities. that accountability and redress are fostered.

 

13 December 2022 - NW4243

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

In light of the R3,2 billion Blended Finance Scheme with the Land Bank to assist farmers in which her department and the specified bank have each invested R325 million in each year, which will effectively result in the creation of a R650 million fund a year which will grow to R1,95 billion in three years, how does she and her department plan to ensure that (a) funds are not wasted through corruption and wasteful expenditure and (b) the fund benefits small and medium-scale farmers?

Reply:

a) To ensure that funds are not wasted through corruption and wasteful expenditure the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has done the following:

  • Defined the categories of producers (smallholder, medium commercial and large commercial) to be supported through Blended Finance Scheme;
  • Developed the grant gliding scale per category of farmer to be supported which clearly outlines the grant cap per producer category that cannot be exceeded;
  • Ensured that the operational manual clearly spell out processes to be followed before funds are released to qualifying beneficiaries;
  • Ensured that there is a checklist that guides the Fund Administrator on what information should be produced before payments are made; and
  • Furthermore, the credit committee’s responsibility is to ensure that only commercially viable applications are supported and the grant caps per category are not exceeded.

b) To ensure the fund benefits smallholder and medium scale commercial farmers the DALRRD has done the following:

  • Signed an agreement with Land Bank to prioritise only smallholder and medium scale commercial farmers;
  • Developed the Economic Benefit Criteria calculator that automatically reject large scale producer applications once the information of the farmer is populated into the calculator;
  • The Blended Finance Scheme Steering Committee will receive performance reports from the bank and evaluate if the programme is being implemented as agreed, and the targeted beneficiaries are being supported; and
  • The scheme will be subjected to audit by the bank annually to assess if the programme is being implemented as agreed and if the controls put in place are adequate.

13 December 2022 - NW4696

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Considering the crime statistics that were released in November 2022, which indicate an alarming escalation in crime statistics across the Republic as murder cases increased by 13,6% and sexual offences by 11%, with the murder of women and children once again having increased in the second quarter (details furnished), and considering that the Republic is in the period of the 16 Days of Activism for No Violence against Women and Children Campaign, (a) what plans and initiatives has her Office put in place to foster collaborative efforts in dealing with issues around the protection of women and children and (b) how is her Office working together with other government departments to ensure the protection of women and children?

Reply:

a) The Department facilitated the development of Comprehensive National Gender Based Violence and Femicide Preventions Strategy. The strategy identifies prevention mechanisms that will foster effective collaboration of stakeholders in order to address the issues of prevention of GBVF, including protection of women and children. The department is in the process of consulting stakeholders who are key in the fight against gender based violence in provinces and districts in order to facilitate the development of locally based GBVF Prevention plans and evidence informed interventions that will ensure inclusion and active participation of all locally based stakeholders in the fight against gender based violence and femicide, including and protection of women and children.

The Department is also in the process of reviewing the Integrated Development and District Development Plans of Municipalities and one of the key areas of focus are the safety plans that have been developed by Municipalities and the extent to which the Municipalities are planning to work with locally based stakeholders in order to enhance issues of safety. For example Ethekwini Municipality is collaborating with Safer Cities and local NGOs and CBOs to implement GBV prevention programmes that will ensure safety of women and children.

The Department is working with COGTA and GIZ to develop guidelines of elements to be included in Integrated Development plans and District Development Plans, in order to ensure the safety of women and children at Local Municipality levels.

b) The Department is fostering collaboration between various government departments through the implementation of the Comprehensive National GBVF Prevention Strategy. This strategy identifies the roles of the various government departments in the prevention of GBVF and collaboration that is expected between the departments and Civil Society Organisations in order to ensure effective prevention of GBVF, including protection of women and children.

In addition to the above, the department is facilitating the District and Local GBVF Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) to develop Multi Stakeholder GBVF Prevention Plans, which clearly indicate how the various department are going to work together amongst themselves and with various Civil Society Organisations (CSOs)to ensure effective prevention of GBVF. The implementation of these plans is monitored by all the respective departments and Civil Society Organisations who are members of the GBVF Rapid Response Teams.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

13 December 2022 - NW4473

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) What are the relevant details of the monitoring and evaluation process for the call centre of the National Arts Council (NAC). (2) whether he has found it feasible for one person to operate the call centre; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (3) what (a) is the name of the Chairperson of the Marketing and Communications Unit and (b) are the reasons that the chair and other council members are influencing management decisions on the appointment of the specified role. (4) whether he has found that the NAC is adhering to the requirements of the Department of Labour with regard to staff taking their maternity leave; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details. (5) what are the relevant details of the process followed to submit approved motivations to payroll?

Reply:

1. Once the reports are received, they are categorised and analysed according to the topic. Then investigated by the relevant team assigned to a particular identified category. Thereafter the team investigates and depending on the outcome of the investigation, it can either be resolved and closed or taken for further action.

2. The NAC call centre is staffed by five people.

3.(a) The Chairperson of the Marketing and Communications Unit is Mr. Tembe.

(b). Council Members do not influence any decisions on the appointment of staff members, that function would be under the authority of the CEO. Where an instance has previously been proven to have occurred, it was dealt with expeditiously and appropriately by the NAC, and it did not involve the position of any member within the marketing and communications department.

4. The NAC is proud to adhere to the requirements of the Department of Labour with regards to staff taking maternity leave. The NAC will always reaffirm the rights of women to be pregnant in the workplace and for them to retain their jobs notwithstanding pregnancy. Preventing staff to perform their duties/roles due to being pregnant concerns is unethical, discriminatory, and prejudicial. The NAC does not prescribe to such regressive acts against women.

5. A motivation is drafted by the relevant Manager and sent to the CEO’s office for approval. Once approved, it is submitted to HR for submission to the finance unit to process.

13 December 2022 - NW4673

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Considering the approaching school holidays, what plans has her department put in place regarding feeding schemes for learners who rely on school feeding schemes to sustain them on a weekly basis?

Reply:

The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) aims to provide daily school meals for targeted learners during the school term (as per school calendar), and not during school holidays.  It's day-to-day operations is designed to serve meals at schools.  National Treasury allocates a specific budget for NSNP in line with the school calendar i.e., count per child per day.  In the 2022/23 financial year, all Provinces feed learners for 203 school days.  This excludes school holidays.

13 December 2022 - NW4330

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the relevant details of the detailed budget and business plan of the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra (MNPO), including the (a)(i) total number of musicians, conductors and support staff who will be permanently employed and (ii) proposed salaries as well as other remunerations and (b) breakdown of budgets for all planned concerts and tours for 2022, including (i) transport and accommodation, (ii) venue and instrument hire and transportation, as well as (iii) the estimated income from the concerts and tours and (iv) an indication of (aa) what amount of the total amount designated to the MNPO has already been made available to Mr Bongani Tembe, The Chief Executive Officer of MNPO and (bb) how it was used?

Reply:

The Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra (MNPO) is updating its business plan. This process is being informed by the realities on the ground and the continuous engagement with various stakeholders. The MNPO board will then hold a strategic session early next year and forward the revised business plan to the National Arts Council of South Africa first, before it is forwarded to the Department, before 31 March 2023.

While the Department transfers ring-fenced funds to the MNPO via the National Arts Council, the MNPO has a board of women and men of the highest integrity, who then run that institution and are required and expected to report back on utilization of all resources provided. At the end of the financial year, the MNPO board will submit audited financial statements to the National Arts Council, which will contain financially related matters. The NAC will the scrutinize the AFS and then report to the Department. If there are any serious problems, with the AFS, then the Department will take the necessary steps, but it doesn’t act before that process has been followed. In this case, based on engagement with the NAC and the MNPO board, there are no indications of any problems.

13 December 2022 - NW4469

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). (a)(i) On what date and (ii) where did his department advertise for the appointment of the service provider to conduct a feasibility study for the establishment of the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra, (b) what total number of applications were received, (c) which service provider was appointed and (d) who sat on the panel. (2).what are the terms of reference for the appointment of the service provider to conduct a feasibility study for the establishment of the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra?

Reply:

1. It is not mandatory that the Department advertises a tender for and appoint a service provider to conduct certain tasks that are needed for service delivery. A service provider is only appointed in certain special circumstances such as instances where the capacity and expertise are limited or not existing. The purpose is for the service provider to provide solutions and services within the scope of work and their breadth of knowledge. In this instance, a task team made of experts from the sector was appointed to provide the needed solution.

2. The terms of reference for the task team were broadly to conduct a feasibility study for the establishment of the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra and to develop a concept document thereof. Inputs were received from all the members of the team who participated in the process. The team of experts included the following: Mr Louis Heyneman (CEO of the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra), Mr Kutlwano Masote (Independent Educator and Conductor), Mr Lindumuzi Mngoma (Independent Educator and Conductor), Mr Bongani Tembe (CEO of the KZN Philharmonic Orchestra), Mr Shadrack Bokaba (former Acting CEO NFVF), Ms Julie Diphofa ( Acting CEO NAC), and Ms Lindi Ngcobo (Project Manager: NAC).

13 December 2022 - NW4685

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) practical steps has the Republic taken over the past five years to support the struggle of the people of Palestine and (b) are the reasons that the specified steps have not included the cutting of diplomatic ties between the Republic and Israel?

Reply:

a) Practical steps taken by South Africa over the past five years include:

  • In May 2018, South Africa downgraded the Embassy in Tel Aviv by recalling its Ambassador;
  • The Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) hosted the State of Palestine Africa Heads of Mission Conferences in South Africa during the periods 2018 and 2022;
  • On 8 June 2021, the Permanent Missions of South Africa and Namibia to the United Nations (UN) in New York jointly hosted a Ministerial virtual side event in partnership with the State of Palestine on “The Importance of Upholding the Principles of Self-Determination and Non-discrimination: Justice for the Palestinian People”. The event was borne from South Africa and Namibia’s own experience against racial segregation and oppression in their fight for liberation against Apartheid.

The purpose of the event was to create awareness around the political, economic and social subjugation Palestinians face daily under Israeli laws; to recognise Israel as an Apartheid state, and to mobilise the UN and its member states, the international community and civil society to double its efforts to strengthen international action and coordination to uphold international norms and apply pressure on Israel to implement UN resolutions and to end its targeted violations of human rights and discriminatory practices;

  • South Africa’s objection to the granting of official observer status by the African Union (AU) on 22 July 2021. The matter was raised by South Africa at the AU Summit on 6 February 2022. As a result of this action, the decision to grant Israel observer status was unanimously suspended. In this regard, a committee was set up to study the issue and the conclusions thereof to be presented at the AU Summit in 2023. The objection was based on the fact that, the decision to grant observer status to Israel was taken unilaterally and without adequate consultation with all AU Members. The AU strenuously objected to the deaths of Palestinians and the destruction of civilian infrastructure. It is trusted that this misstep will be corrected; and
  • In August 2022, Honourable Deputy Minister Mashego-Dlamini’s undertook a working visit Palestine. The main objectives of the visit to Palestine were: (i) To establish a strategic dialogue on all key issues; (ii) Reaffirm South Africa’s commitment to the Palestinian cause, domestically and globally; (iii) Review South Africa’s initiatives and strengthen bilateral relations, discussions on coordination of efforts aimed at the establishment of the State of Palestine based on UN Resolutions and international law, and strategies for galvanising support in the international community; and (iv) Exchange views on recent political developments in Africa and the Middle East.
  • During the working visit, Deputy Minister Mashego-Dlamini together with her Palestinian counterpart, Dr Amal Jadou, launched the Strategic Dialogue on 21 August 2022. The formation of the Strategic Dialogue between the two countries is aimed at galvanising support for the Palestinian cause on the African continent, as well as in the international arena.

The Strategic Dialogue agreed to:

  • Mobilise African countries to support Palestine and to enhance bilateral relations with Palestine on the Continent;
  • Exchange views based on the South African experience that will assist to end Israeli domination in Palestinian territories, and raise international awareness of the plight of Palestinians, especially the increase of settlements by Israel in the Occupied Territory;
  • Lobby for the withdrawal of Israel as an observer member of the African Union;
  • Continuation of efforts towards support for the two-state solution and the right to self-determination;
  • Support Palestinian efforts for full membership of the United Nations and the creation of positive, credible, and lasting international mechanisms to address the Palestinian cause based on international law;
  • Formulate practical strategies towards taking up the Palestinian cause to the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the International Court of Justice (ICJ), to declare Israel as an Apartheid state; and
  • Mobilise civil society both in South Africa and Palestine, as well as internationally, to support the Palestinian cause.

b) As the custodian of foreign policy and inter-state relations, DIRCO gave effect to a resolution taken at the governing party’s 54th National Conference of December 2017, whereby the South African Government was directed to downgrade its Embassy in Israel to a Liaison Office.

The downgrade was aimed at giving “practical expression of support to the oppressed people of Palestine,” and the Government’s concern at the violation of the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination and the refusal of the government of Israel to enter into meaningful negotiations.

The governing party’s resolution was also guided by a sentiment that given the continued intransigence and belligerence of the Government of Israel, that relationship with South Africa and the Government of Israel could not be typified as being ‘business as usual.”

To give effect to this decision, South Africa currently does not have an Ambassador accredited to Israel. The Government of South Africa recalled its Ambassador to Israel in May 2018, the South African Mission in Tel Aviv is currently headed by a Chargé D’Affaires.

The ongoing flagrant abuse of the human rights of Palestinians places a moral responsibility on South Africa to act. South Africa is therefore in the process of conceptualising a comprehensive South African Initiative on Palestine (SAIP), to support and consolidate the Palestinian cause, build international consensus, and recalibrate our relations with Israel.

South Africa cannot have normal relations with Israel until the creation of a free Palestine. In 2023, South Africa will continue to strengthen her fraternal relations with Palestine through the holding of various structured bilateral meetings, culminating in a State Visit by President Mahmoud Abbas to South Africa.

13 December 2022 - NW3769

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In light of the fact that the State of Palestine and the Kingdom of Eswatini are facing the biggest forms of oppression and persons are being brutally killed without any form of intervention from the United Nations’ bodies, what is the position of the Republic regarding the specified countries?

Reply:

With regard to the State of Palestine, South Africa’s position has always been clear and consistent. South Africa has called on the UN to decisively act on all conflicts and not ignore long-standing ones such as Palestine that has been on the United Nations agenda throughout the seven decades of the existence of the UN.

Furthermore, South Africa’s stance is that Israel should be classified as an “Apartheid State” and a Committee be established under the auspices of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to verify that it meets the criteria. South Africa is of the view that there should be effective ways to make use of the General Assembly to call for international action on Israel.

South Africa remains deeply concerned as to how Israel’s policies impact on the human rights and the unequal treatment of Palestinians, the application of different standards in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT) and Israel’s failure to ensure the protection and welfare of Palestinians living under its occupation.

In this regard, South Africa has expressed its support for Palestine’s request to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) to urgently render an advisory opinion and has stressed the need for revitalized international action amid mounting violence in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, especially in East Jerusalem.

With regard to the situation in the Kingdom of Eswatini, South Africa is working with other Member States within the framework of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to assist Eswatini to address the worrying political and security situation in that country. During South Africa’s tenure as the Chair of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security, South Africa facilitated a high-level and technical fact-finding mission to Eswatini. The outcome of this mission was a Draft Framework for the Conduct of National Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue in Eswatini, which was shared with the Government of Eswatini. South Africa is still awaiting feedback from the Government of Eswatini

Meanwhile, the Government of Eswatini briefed the 42nd SADC Summit on the security situation in that country. The Summit mandated the Organ Troika on Politics, Defence and Security, which is now chaired by Namibia, assisted by the Panel of Elders (PoE) and Secretariat, to conduct a follow-up fact-finding mission to Eswatini. The Chairperson of the Organ, President Hage Geingob of Namibia, paid a courtesy call on His Majesty King Mswati III on 18 November 2022. An Extra-Ordinary Organ Troika Summit, which also include Eswatini is slated to take place in January 2023. South Africa believes that such persistent regional efforts, and not unilateral efforts, will yield positive results in resolving the situation in Eswatini as was the case with other countries in the region that went through challenging political transitions.

13 December 2022 - NW4464

Profile picture: Breedt, Ms T

Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will furnish Ms T Breedt with a breakdown of how the R3,2 billion of the Blended Finance Scheme (BFS) launched by her department and the Land Bank to assist farmers, as indicated in the media statement dated 24 October 2022, will be spent; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the requirements to qualify for the BFS; (3) how will the funds be broken down demographically; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has committed R325 million annually for the next three years and has signed an agreement with Land Bank for 10 years, bringing the commitment of DALRDD to not less than R3,25 billion over the 10 year period.

The funds will be used to blend with the loan that Land Bank will issue to black smallholder and medium scale commercial producers at 60% grant for smallholder producers but not exceeding R15 million per transaction and 50% grant for medium scale commercial producers but not exceeding R30 million per transaction.

The Blended Fund facility will be used by the parties to provide loan and grant funding to black producers or majority black owned enterprises for:

  • The acquisition of primary agricultural land parcels and/or commercially viable agricultural sector value chain operating entities (agri-businesses);
  • Support existing operations for expansion in production on privately owned or land reform farms (Brownfields and Greenfields operations);
  • The purchasing of capital equipment and infrastructure (“CAPEX”);
  • Working capital and/or production loan (“Production Facility”); and
  • Insurance pool provision for subsidisation of insurance cover for the applicable farmers (capped at 6% (six percent) of each total Grant Funding Facility amount).

2. The following are the requirements to qualify for Blended Finance Scheme:

  • South African citizens with a valid identity document involved in agriculture or value adding enterprises;
  • Black owned and managed farming enterprises that are commercially viable in commodities prioritised in the AAMP, Aquaculture and Forestry;
  • In the case of Joint Ventures, the non-black partner should have 40% but not less than 26% ownership in the enterprise;
  • Enterprises with 10% Farm worker profit sharing;
  • Transactions that are youth owned, women owned or owned by people with disability and military veterans; and
  • Qualifying applicants who are 60 years and above but demonstrate evidence of a successor.

3. This is a national scheme accessible to all provinces equally. The scheme is demand driven and will support applicants from all provinces. The steering committee will evaluate the spread of support and address any poor take-up from any province by engaging the bank officials in that province as well as the relevant department of agriculture.

4. No. A statement was made at the launch on 24 October 2022, which was broadcasted in local newspapers and the SABC news.

13 December 2022 - NW4618

Profile picture: Khakhau, Ms KL

Khakhau, Ms KL to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) With reference to the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra, (a) what total amount in funding has each of the regional orchestras received in the past five financial years and (b) will he furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the financial statements to reflect on how the public money was utilised; (2) what is the breakdown of the salaries of (a) each board member and (b) the top management structure, including the chief executive officer (CEO) and artistic directors; (3) whether, in cases where a person held both positions, such a person received two salaries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the relevant details of the fruitless and wasteful expenditure for each financial report; (5) what are the relevant details of the expenditure on (a) flights, including if the management, board and CEO made use of first-class flights and how regularly any flight tickets were lost due to persons being late for flights, (b) transport, including if any chauffeurs were used and (c) accommodation, including the use of 5-star

Reply:

We are still awaiting response from the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra.

13 December 2022 - NW4331

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What are the relevant details of the (i) plan and (ii) budget which will be submitted for the proposed artistic development of young musicians, (b) in which towns and provinces will such development take place, (c) how will the Chief Executive Officer avoid (i) any duplication of efforts and/or (ii) undermining the artistic development of other philharmonic orchestras and (d)(i) who will teach the young musicians and (ii) how will those who teach be compensated?

Reply:

(a). The Department does not micromanage organisations that it funds to the level of getting involved in transportation, accommodation matters, instrument hire, etc. These organisations have boards and other experts who are charged with managing them.

13 December 2022 - NW4508

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of business incubators that operate within the agricultural sector are (a) government funded (b) privately funded and (c) internationally funded?

Reply:

The management of business incubators is not within the mandate of the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. This mandate is with Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA).

(a),(b),(c) Falls away.

13 December 2022 - NW4537

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the trained youth under the National Rural Youth Service Corps (NARYSEC) and the current non-quantifiable socio-economic impact of the members of the NARYSEC corps, what are the relevant details of the steps that she and/or her department is taking to provide the youth with support and assistance which will assist them with the use of their skills to make a living and ultimately allow the entry into the economy?

Reply:

The Minister of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development approved a revised NARYSEC Policy, 2022, to ensure youth will be recruited with the purpose of securing employment opportunities on graduation. The Department achieves this by signing employment agreements with government and the private sector stakeholders.

The 2010 Narysec Policy recruited youth with the sole purpose of up-skilling youth to enter the job market, but this policy didn’t result in the desired employment creation opportunities.

The new revised Narysec Policy, 2022 focuses on three main intervention areas for sustained employment, by recruiting youth for skills development programmes based on the following:

  • negotiated guaranteed, job placement opportunities after graduation;
  • established youth enterprises supported by the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) and the Department of Small Business; and
  • re-skilling/training and provision of job placement opportunities for youth trained under the 2010 Narysec Policy.

13 December 2022 - NW4706

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to her department’s irregular expenditure amounting to R1 471 583 000 and the lack of proactive and effective consequence management relating to the investigations of this, what is her department doing to ensure that its (a) financial management improves and (b) irregular expenditure is decreased; (2) whether her department will be making any changes to implementing agencies to ensure that their corrective measures are in accordance with her department’s corrective steps; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) The Department ensures 100% compliance to Supply Chain Management (SCM) processes and all financial management policies and procedures as well as instructions from National Treasury are adhered to. This has led to a material decrease in irregular expenditure in 2021/22 compared to 2020/21.

  1. DBE disclosed the irregular expenditure as part of a drive to clean up the accounting of infrastructure projects.
  2. ASIDI started in 2012 and SAFE started in 2018.
  3. DBE assessed all procurement processes on ASIDI and SAFE.  This revealed the following deficiencies in the procurement documents:
    1. Tenders not advertised for 21 days;
    2. Local content – no SBD6.2 included;
    3. Non-compliance to Preferential Procurement Regulations;
    4. Non-compliance to CIDB regulations;
    5. Non-compliance to mandatory subcontracting; and
    6. Non-compliance to Implementing Agent own SCM policies.
  4. The bulk of these projects have been completed and schools are already benefiting from the use of the facilities provided.
  5. Some implementing agents have applied for condonation from National Treasury.  This process has not been concluded

Response to question 1.(b)

  1. Allocation of projects to be implemented to Implementing Agents are done in Batches that can range from anything from 15 large schools to over 200 sanitation projects. A single process issue (such as not including a SBD6.2) in a bulk tender process, can thus have a large monetary impact as all the expenditure in a batch will have to be declared Irregular Expenditure.
  2. Expenditure may be multi-year or across financial years and process issues in previous years influences the Irregular Expenditure declared in the current financial year.

Response to question 2.

  1. The DBE implemented a standard operating procedure to check all procurement processes to avoid a repeat of this historical default. A checklist has been introduced in the SCM directorate to ensure that all procurement complies to SCM processes

13 December 2022 - NW4444

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

How does he justify launching the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra, a project that will cost R21,5 million each year and benefit a few white persons when a lot of artists, creatives, sportsmen and sportswomen, who are black in majority, are still crying to be saved from the COVID-19 pandemic devastation? NW5572E

Reply:

We are fully aware that an incorrect narrative has been promoted with the sole purpose of causing mistrust on what the department is doing. However, the truth of the matter is that the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra sets a new trajectory for addressing apartheid legacies and/or the past injustices in general. These practices are so pervasive and only aimed at maintaining the status quo of separate development. To put this into context, funding of the orchestras in the country remained skewed and only benefited certain social grouping, in particular the white minority. While policy restructuring was done in the 1990s, with the creation of a National Arts Council (NAC) a process that centralised the distribution of arts and culture funding, the annual ring-fenced funding for the three orchestras in three different provinces was also established and kept until recently. It is well known that this practice largely benefited the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra (Durban), the Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra (Johannesburg) and of course the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra (Cape Town), to the exclusion and at the expense of many township orchestras, let alone the impediment of the development of orchestras in other provinces.

Without the policy changes that was introduced recently, the R21,5 million would have been directed to support the previously advantaged particularly the KwaZulu Natal Philharmonic Orchestra, the Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra and Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra. I am certain that this is not what we want. Our progressive policies demand, inter alia, greater black economic participation and access to basic social services for all. Therefore, the orchestral landscape cannot be left behind to be same. As progressive government, our intention is to take development of orchestral music to other areas other than Cape Town, Joburg and Durban so that we can advance the country and develop our indigenous orchestras and genre. For instance, the National Orchestra has started making real changes to touch the lives of the previously disadvantaged.

I am proud to announce to the house that the National Orchestra is currently in consultation with the Mpumalanga Chamber Orchestra to provide necessary assistance and training, this as part of development of orchestral music in the Mpumalanga province. We never had something like this before in Mpumalanga, as well as other provinces such as Limpopo, Northwest, and the Northern Cape to mention but few. As part of this drive, the National Orchestra will on 10 December 2022 send about 30 professional musicians and a conductor to be part of the Mpumalanga Chamber Orchestra concert. Prior to the concert, a workshop and rehearsals will be conducted, this as part of skills development.

Informed by the Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage, it is our intention to effectively contribute to the elimination of poverty, inequality, unemployment, and the building of a cohesive and united society in which the diverse artistic, cultural and heritage traditions of the society, flourish. We can only achieve this if the available resources are spread beyond the colonial urban centres of Cape Town Durban and Johannesburg but into the peri-urban and rural communities.

13 December 2022 - NW4681

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What methods of assistance has her department provided to the Gauteng Department of Education in respect of the more than 35 000 Grade 1 to 8 learners who have not been placed in schools for the 2023 academic year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) holds regular meetings with the Gauteng Department of Education to plan, administer the admission programme and placement of learners. The DBE assists the provincial Department on:

a) conducting advocacy on how the Gauteng admission process works;

b) handling queries of unplaced learners received through the DBE's call centre, website and social media;

C) working with principals and SGB associations to accommodate additional learners where necessary; and following up on appeals lodged with the DBE.

13 December 2022 - NW4226

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any agreements were signed / or agreed to during the visit by the Deputy Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Mr A Botes, to the (a) Czech Republic and (b) Lithuania; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a)  Czech Republic

No.

Why not: No bilateral agreements were scheduled for signing, and none were agreed to during the visit.

(b) Lithuania

No.

Why not: No bilateral agreements were scheduled for signing, and none were agreed to during the visit.

Additional details on the Czech Republic Visit

Deputy Minister Botes undertook an official visit to the Czech Republic from 10 to 12 October 2022 at the invitation of his Czech counterpart, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr Martin Tlapa. The purpose of the visit was to conduct political consultations, promote trade and investments, and explore more areas of cooperation.

While in Prague, Deputy Minister Botes also promoted economic diplomacy in line with the Department of International Relations and Cooperation’s priority focus, and promoted cooperation in areas of trade and investment, higher education and science and technology, amongst others. In addition, the Deputy Minister met with existing and prospective Czech investors.

Economic relations between South Africa and Czech Republic are managed through a Joint Committee on Economic Cooperation (JCEC). The JCEC was established through the signing of an Agreement on Economic Cooperation between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Czech Republic in December 2006.

In terms of Agreement, the Department of Science and Innovation is currently engaged in a process of developing a science technology and innovation cooperation instrument with the Czech Republic. Much progress has been achieved, negotiations are being finalised and both sides are in agreement with the contents and provisions of the draft partnership agreement.

Although the formal bilateral Defence relationship is currently still limited in scope, it has progressed to the level where it was formalised by means of the signing of two bilateral agreements. Despite the two agreements, high level contacts have been established and defence-industrial cooperation has expanded during the recent past. No substantial business transactions have been concluded recently. It is, however, foreseen that future defence-industrial cooperation has the potential to expand and that joint ventures could become a possibility.

Additional details on the Lithuania Visit

Deputy Minister Botes undertook an official visit to Lithuania from 12 to 13 October 2022 at the invitation of his Lithuanian counterpart, Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dr Mantas Adomėnas. The purpose of the visit was to conduct political consultations, promote trade and investments, and explore areas of technical cooperation. The visit was also in recognition of 30 years of bilateral relations with Lithuania.

During the visit Deputy Minister Botes met with Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dr Mantas Adomėnas, the Vice Minister of Economy and Innovation, and participated in a Business Roundtable hosted by the Vilnius Chamber of Commerce and Crafts.

In terms of bilateral Agreements, South Africa and Lithuania had signed a Visa Waiver Agreement for Diplomatic and Official passport holders on 29 August 2022. Parliamentary processes have been completed on both sides and the Agreement will enter into force on 14 December 2022. An agreement on the Avoidance of Double Taxation is under consideration by the parties but this did not form part of the Deputy Minister’s discussions.

13 December 2022 - NW4617

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. What (a) was the total budget allocation towards the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra (MNPO) for each of the past three financial years and (b)(i) total amount of the money has already been spent, (ii) by whom, (iii) how and (iv) on what; 2. (a) on what basis and in terms of what financial authority does the Chief Executive Officer of the MNPO, Mr Bongani Tembe, state that the MNPO will also contribute towards the funding of regional professional orchestras, among others and (b) on what date was the policy of his department changed to provide for such an action; 3. whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the annual reports of all philharmonic orchestras in the Republic, including the relevant details of (a) their artistic development of young musicians and (b) if they receive adequate support from his department and/or the National Arts Council of South Africa; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the full, relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The total budget allocation towards the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra (MNPO) for each of the past three financial years is as follows;

1.1 R11 515 600 (Eleven Million, Five Hundred and Fifteen Thousand Six Hundred Rands Only), allocated in the 2019 – 2020 financial year cycle;

1.2 R21 583 000 (Twenty-One Million, Five Hundred and Eighty-Three Thousand Rands Only), allocated in the 2020 – 2021 financial year cycle;

1.3 R21 583 000 (Twenty-One Million, Five Hundred and Eighty-Three Thousand Rands Only), based on 2021 – 2022 financial year cycle.

Therefore, the total funds ring-fenced over the three financial years is R54 681 600. This is inclusive of the administrative costs that remained with NAC. Spending of this amount only started after the funds were transferred to the MNPO in December 2021 and report detailing the expenditure will be submitted to the NAC when the right time arrives.

  1. One of the key role of the MNPO is to ensure the development and nurturing of regional orchestras. This mandate has got financial implication. It is on this basis that the MPNO has raised the matter. This does not in any way take away the role of funding from the NAC, but is a simply way of recognising and acknowledging that when they do developmental programmes, such will need strong financial resourcing by the MNPO than mere leap service.
  2. Honorable Mrs V van Dyk is aware that the funding of the orchestras is done by the National Arts Council (ANC). In line with the Constitution, there is direct accountability to Parliament by national departments and national public entities. Likewise, the NAC and or the Department will report will provide reports and such will include the funding that was allocated to various bodies this include philharmonic orchestras in the Republic.

13 December 2022 - NW3842

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, in light of the fact that the Republic has over the years campaigned for the democratisation of the United Nations Security Council by advocating for the fair representation, the Government is considering to discontinue the campaign to be Africa’s representative on the Council seeing that it has lost its moral standing after it failed to support resolutions condemning the illegal invasion of Ukraine or the annexation of its territory; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The United Nations Security Council should play a constructive role in the resolution of conflict, in line with its Charter mandate for the maintenance of international peace and security.

We regret that in the case of the war in Ukraine the Security Council continues to abdicate this mandated responsibility. The Security Council has thus far failed the people of Ukraine as it has in the case of long-standing matters on its agenda such as the situation in Palestine and the Western Sahara.

A key reason for its failure to act is that the failure of the Council to reform and reflect current global dynamics.

South Africa will therefore continue to consistently call for the reform of the United Nations, including its Security Council, and to that end will continue to engage extensively with all member states of the United Nations to advance the reform agenda.

South Africa believes that there must be a common acknowledgment, particularly by those member states maintaining the status quo, that the international political and economic system remains unequal, unfair, unjust and represents a world created in the aftermath of the Second World War. The reform of the international order must therefore be primarily to ensure that the contemporary international order becomes equitable, fair, and just.

South Africa subscribes to the Ezulwini Consensus, agreed to by the African Union in 2005, which calls for two permanent, and five non-permanent seats for the African continent. Further, it states that the veto privilege, which accrues to the five permanent members of the Security Council should be abolished, but for as long as the privilege exists, it should be extended to new members of an extended permanent category in a reformed Council. The Ezulwini Consensus also states that the African Union would choose which African states will get the seats in a reformed permanent category of the Security Council.

13 December 2022 - NW4664

Profile picture: Mogale, Mr T

Mogale, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of schools in the Nkomazi region have scholar transport, (b) amount is her department spending on scholar transport in the Nkomazi region in Mpumalanga, in particular and (c) are the reasons that (i) Sophungane Combined School and (ii)(aa) Hoyi, (bb) Mshengu, (cc) Majembeni and (dd) Zenzele Primary Schools are without scholar transport?

Reply:

The question asked by the Honourable Member falls within the Executive Authority of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Mpumalanga and not the Minister of Basic Education.  We advise the Hon Member to refer the Question to Mpumalanga Department of Education.

13 December 2022 - NW4620

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Given that the high inflationary environment has meant that most emerging farmers are shouldering high input costs as they prepare for the 2022-23 farming season, what steps has her department taken to cushion emerging farmers against high input costs in order to ensure a successful farming season?

Reply:

The below three tables highlight in summary, the state of readiness with regards to the upcoming planting season. The funds are made available to assist producers with production inputs.

  • Table 1 depicts the different commodities and the hectares to be covered. In total approximately 81 000 of hectares will be planted with different commodities;
  • Table 2 depicts the state of preparation of hectares per province;
  • Table 3 depicts cost incurred on grain production support; and
  • Based on the data received from all provinces, a total of 29 514 producers will benefit from the intervention. This constitutes 11 809 males and 17 704 females.

A1 Table 1- Planned Ha under production per commodity in 2022/23

COMMODITIES

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NC

NW

WC

TOTAL

FRUIT

24

 0

0

0

291

10

0

10

17.8

352.8

WINE & TABLE GRAPES

 0

 0

 

0

0

0

0

12.8

12.8

VEGETABLES

1 216

12

200

2 073

878

1 140

140

267

30

5 756

GRAINS (MAIZE, DRY BEANS, GROUNDNUTS, WHEAT, SUNFLOWER, SORGHUM)

26 660

1 414

4 000

10 465

6 314

15 050

200

11000

848

71 951

MACADAMIA/ NUTS

 0

 0

 

30

0

0

0

24

0

54

CHICORY

40

 0

 

0

0

0

0

 0

0

40

COTTON

 0

 0

 

0

462

0

0

 0

0

462

FODDER

1 845

210

0

0

0

0

0

110

206.3

2 371.3

TOTAL

29 785

1 636

4 200

12 568

7 945

16 200

340

11 411

1 114.9

80 999.9

A2: Progress overall – Table 2

Province

Planned hectares

Land preparation done

HA planted

HA harvested

Budget Allocated - RANDS

EC

28 529

0

0

0

125 000 000

FS

1 636

654.4

0

0

39 870 000

GP

4 200

       

KZN

12 568

1 344

1 144

0

55 542 000

LP

7 945

0

0

0

46 256 000

MP

16 240

8 460

921.9

602

42 069,00

NC

200

0

0

0

5 000 000

NW

11 411

555

0

0

54 401 328

WC

1 114.9

1 114.9

1 114.9

8

12 998 835

Total

83 843.9

12 128.3

3 180.8

610

292 900 488

A3 COSTS INCURRED – Table 3

PROVINCE

TARGETED HECTARES

SEEDS ORDERED AND DELIVERED

FERTILIZER ORDERED

MECHANISATION UNITS (TRACTORS)

PESTICIDES (LITRES)

TOTAL COSTS INCURRED

   

TONS

COSTS INCURED

(Rands)

TONS

COSTS INCURED

(Rands)

REPAIR / MAINTENANCE

COSTS INCURRED

(Rands)

LITRES

COSTS INCURRED

(Rands)

(Rands)

EC

28 529

226

27 150 552

1 103

24 167 293

Not yet contracted

Not yet contracted

846

1 124 114

52 441 959

FS

1 636

TRANSFERS TO BENEFICIARY HOLDING ACCOUNT

26 340 000

GP

4810

70.750

11 595 660

1 000

13 000 000

None

N/A

240

56 400

24 639 060

KZN

22 310

61

7 216 838

0

0

12

810 470

0

0

8 027 308

LP

7 945

0

0

0

0

0

4 080 000

38 914 liters &

4 988 kg

4 520 000

4 928 000

MP

16 200

274.7

40 418 812

1 100.1

23 297 371

58

600 000

43 050

5 567 035

69 883 218

NC

200

None

None

None

None

0

0

0

0

 

NW

9489

63

8 026 840

1088

19 388 972

0

0

4900

691 902

28 057 714

WC

321.3

134

765 143

237

1 437 911.08

0

118 000

1 198

1 034 112.50

3 355 166.58

TOTAL

91 440.3

829.45

95 173 845

4 528.1

81 291 547.08

70

5 608 470

89 148

12 993 563.5

217 672 425.58

13 December 2022 - NW4228

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

How does her department, with regard to the 26,7 million that was written off as being part of the deposits not collected and attributed to bad revenue management and compromised capacity, intend to adequately capacitate and ensure that capacity is not compromised through the deployment of employees to missions (b) What measures are in place for overall better financial management in her department, considering the high irregular expenditure they have recorded?

Reply:

1.  Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) have been implemented. Chief Directorate Property and Facilities Management in the Department of International Relations and Cooperation liaises with the Missions on active accommodation lease agreements, as well as the signing of the indemnity forms once officials occupy the accommodation. Debt management is implemented once officials are informed of their date of return to South Africa by Corporate Management.

2. The current irregular expenditure has been reduced significantly in the last two financial years by terminating major irregular contracts and implementing audit action plan controls including a checklist, to curtail and prevent irregular expenditure. Policies, delegations and SOP are also being amended as per need and circulars are being drafted to address compliance matters.

The Department will also focus on finalising investigations and disciplinary actions and that must be finalised in line with the National Treasury Framework, to condone historical irregular expenditure.

A financial misconduct committee has been established in order to assist management with implementing consequence management within the whole department. Audit steering committee has also been appointed to strengthen financial control and oversee audit related matters.

13 December 2022 - NW4277

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What role is the Indian Ocean Rim Association playing in preventing ocean piracy and ocean crimes?

Reply:

South Africa views the Indian Ocean Region as a region of peace, stability, development, and prosperity within which to pursue the goal of promoting economic cooperation for the well-being and development of the countries and peoples of the Indian Ocean Rim.

The Indian Ocean Rim Association’s (IORA) Working Group on the Blue Economy has adopted in its workplan a programme of action for combating, amongst others, Illegal Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing in the IORA region. The Working Group has also made progress in the assessment of capacity needs for the IORA region including, prioritising the exchange of information on IUU fishing vessels amongst IORA member states. Member states and dialogue partners are currently implementing appropriate measures against IUU vessels and other illegal activities. What is currently significant is the funding mechanism required to undertake military-type exercises and render training for maritime personnel, port managers, maritime inspectors, law enforcement and legal personnel within the IORA region.

The Maritime Safety and Security (MSS) Coordinating Country within IORA, which is Sri Lanka, has:

  • Established legal frameworks in the Indian Ocean region in the field of Maritime security, working together with India.
  • Held an IORA Workshop on Maritime Assistance, Search and Rescue, and Search and Rescue Exercise, working together with Australia.

The Indian Ocean Rim Association is therefore playing an important role in preventing ocean piracy and ocean crimes.

13 December 2022 - NW4579

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. Whether the R22 million that was allocated to erect the 100 meters tall South African flag was reallocated to other projects; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the projects it was reallocated to?

Reply:

1. The budget of R22 million that was allocated for the monumental flag project over two fiscal years has been reallocated to other projects within the Department. It is important to note that, only R5 million of the R22 million budget was made available during the current fiscal year (2022/2023). The R5 million budget allocation for the monumental flag was redirected towards the Presidential Sea Board project.

13 December 2022 - NW4227

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether her department, in light of the terror alert that the United States (US) government issued, regards our bilateral agreements with the US as being healthy and respectful; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether her department regards the alert by Washington as a clear infringement of the territorial integrity of the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether her department has conducted a threat assessment to verify the credibility of the alert; if not, why not; if so, (a) has her department engaged with the US on their chosen channels to broadcast the possible attack and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. South Africa continues to enjoy cordial bilateral relations with the United States, which are underpinned by robust cooperation across a wide range of sectors that are aligned to South Africa’s national interests and domestic priorities. The strategic nature of these relations has been reinforced by recent high-level engagements at Head of State, Minister and Director-General level, which were conducted in a spirit of mutual respect and a common desire to advance bilateral, regional and multilateral cooperation in areas of shared interest and concern.

2. The Department considers it an unfortunate breach of diplomatic protocol. The Embassy was of the view that their actions were in accordance with their duty to warn American citizens of credible threats to safeguard US Government employees.

3. No. The mandate to conduct threat assessments lies with the Security Cluster.

a) The Department has conveyed to the US Embassy that sensitive information of this nature should be formally communicated to DIRCO in accordance with the relevant diplomatic protocols.

b) The security agencies from the two countries also have established channels of communication through which to engage and share information related to terrorist activities, amongst others. These channels should always be utilised to allow for proper assessment and communication to the public about possible terror attacks.

13 December 2022 - NW4427

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). Which processes were followed in changing the Ngove Project from a cultural village to a lodge, (b) which (i) consultations and (ii) legal process were followed, (c) what consequence management measures did he apply against those involved in changing the project and (d) what steps has he taken to restore the project to its original planning of a cultural village?

Reply:

We have no such a project as the department.

13 December 2022 - NW4491

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools offer an indigenous African language as a (a) home language and (b) first additional language; (2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with (a) a list of schools and (b) the language of instruction in each specified school; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) percentage of schools have (aa) English and/or (bb) Afrikaans as a home language?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Table 1: Number of schools number offering indigenous African language as home language, by province, in 2022

Province

IsiNdebele HL

IsiXhosa HL

IsiZulu HL

Sepedi HL

Sesotho HL

Setswana HL

SiSwati HL 

Tshivenda HL 

Xitsonga HL 

EC

 

4 688

 

 

206

 

 

 

 

FS

 

73

73

5

725

100

1

 

2

GT

10

254

958

445

522

460

3

71

207

KZN

4

224

5 093

4

5

3

2

1

2

LP

61

5

66

2 469

5

57

 

723

598

MP

246

4

433

425

18

64

493

1

264

NC

 

43

 

1

4

241

1

 

1

NW

 

44

1

3

40

1 301

 

 

 

WC

13

1 516

17

 

98

2

1

 

2

SA

334

6 851

6 641

3 352

1 623

2 228

501

796

1 076

Table 1 above indicates that  6 851 schools are offering IsiXhosa as home language and 6 641 are offering IsiZulu home language.

(1)(b) 

 

Table 2: Number of schools offering an indigenous African language as first additional language, by province, in 2022

 

Province

IsiNdebele FAL

IsiXhosa FAL

IsiZulu FAL

Sepedi FAL

Sesotho FAL

Setswana FAL

SiSwati FAL

Tshivenda FAL

Xitsonga FAL

EC

 

269

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

FS

 

3

8

1

75

11

 

1

 

GT

 

 

589

121

142

117

 

19

33

KZN

8

15

727

10

9

3

2

 

10

LP

2

2

5

55

5

3

2

26

25

MP

4

 

33

15

1

2

51

2

8

NC

1

4

1

1

1

6

 

 

 

NW

 

1

2

 

2

52

1

 

 

WC

12

299

14

 

5

5

 

4

 

SA

27

593

1 379

203

242

199

56

52

76


Table 2 indicates that majority of schools,   (1 379 ) schools offers IsiZulu first additional language followed by IsiXhosa with 593 schools.

(2) List of schools by Language of learning and teaching is attached.

Note: All data represented above is self-reported by schools

13 December 2022 - NW3841

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Since the illegal invasion of Ukraine by Russia began in February 2022, the Government has always said that its position will always be guided by the principles of the United Nations (UN) Charter, does the government consider its failure to support resolutions condemning the illegal invasion of Ukraine or the annexation of its territory to be in line with the principles of the UN Charter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South Africa attaches significant importance to the maintenance of international peace and security, a key mandate of the United Nations, through its Security Council.

South Africa has consistently maintained in relation to the Russia-Ukraine matter, like any other armed conflict, that diplomacy and negotiations are the best avenues towards durable peace. The position is not only premised on the strong belief that wars have no winners and that the real heroes are those that work for peace, but by Article 2(3) of Chapter I of the Charter of the United Nations that directs all Members to settle their international disputes by peaceful means in such a manner that international peace and security, and justice, are not endangered.

Furthermore, Chapter VI of the Charter of the United Nations urges Member States to seek the pacific settlement of disputes that are likely to endanger the maintenance of international peace and security. Means of doing so include, inter alia, negotiation, enquiry, mediation and other peaceful means of the disputing parties. South Africa remains resolute in appealing to the parties to choose diplomacy and negotiation over violence to resolve their differences. A cessation of hostilities is thus required to create the necessary environment for a political process that would lead to sustainable peace in Ukraine.

Over and beyond advocating for the peaceful resolution of the conflict through diplomacy and negotiations, South Africa has further reiterated that the territorial integrity of States, including that of Ukraine, must be respected and that we reject all actions that undermine the Purposes and Principles of the UN Charter, and International Law.

South Africa also believes that the UN Security Council should play a constructive role in the resolution of this conflict, in line with its Charter mandate for the maintenance of international peace and security. South Africa regrets that in the case of the war in Ukraine the Security Council continues to abdicate this mandated responsibility. Due to the paralysis of the Security Council on this issue, the UN General Assembly henceforth convened a Special Emergency Session to address the matter. Through this format, the General Assembly adopted five resolutions on the matter.

With regard to the voting, aside from the principle relating to diplomacy and negotiation over war being overlooked, South Africa abstained during the voting of the General Assembly resolutions on Ukraine because it believed the resolutions would further polarise the General Assembly, thus prolonging the war. The first four resolutions were devoid of actions that would persuade the parties to the conflict to engage in political dialogue to end the hostilities. Furthermore, the last resolution sought to create a problematic precedence for the General Assembly and exceptionalism that reparations matter in some cases and do not matter in others.

It should be underlined that during the past seven decades the General Assembly has heard clarion calls for reparations from slavery, colonialism, apartheid and from many other contemporary conflicts. Regrettably, in all these instances Member States have not been able to find agreement on reparations due to the opposition of many countries in the Global North. We need to avoid double standards if indeed all Member States have equal standing in the UN.

Article 14 of the United Nations Charter directs that the role of the General Assembly be guided by the interest of establishing peace when the provisions of the Charter have been violated. Therefore, the immediate focus of the General Assembly should be to seek peace and call for an immediate end to the war.

In the absence of constructive and decisive action by the Security Council, the General Assembly should then focus on efforts to stop the conflict and consider resolutions that contain concrete proposals towards that end. The General Assembly should create conditions conducive to dialogue, mediation, and diplomacy as the only path that will lead to a peaceful resolution of the conflict. This is a role that the General Assembly has played before and there is no reason it cannot do so now.

Furthermore, the Secretary-General should directly engage the parties to the conflict towards an immediate cessation of hostilities. This is a process that should contain clear deliverables and timelines.

The Secretary-General has already illustrated the constructive role that he can play by facilitating the agreement on the Black Sea Grain Initiative. As we have stated before, this important example could be the basis for an agreement leading to a diplomatic resolution of the conflict. Constructive actions, such as these are urgently required to ensure that we move towards peace.

Our proposed way forward is consistent with Article 1 of the Charter of the United Nations which states that the purpose of the UN is “to maintain international peace and security, and to that end: to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace, and for the suppression of acts of aggression or other breaches of the peace, and to bring about by peaceful means, and in conformity with the principles of justice and international law, adjustment or settlement of international disputes or situations which might lead to a breach of the peace”. This is what the international community should be endeavouring to do.

 

13 December 2022 - NW4461

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Apart from a single meeting at his department to which the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra (CPO), Mr Louis Heyneman, was invited, (a) on what dates and (b) at which venues did the other formal meetings and/or consultations with the CPO take place as referred to by the CEO of the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra, Mr Bongani Tembe?

Reply:

It is incorrect to imply that Mr. Louis Heyneman was only invited to a single meeting with the Department for the purpose of the conceptualization of the National Orchestra. Prior to the board of Mzansi NPO being appointed by the Minister, the Department managed the process and was the custodian of the task team of experts. Our records indicate that several meetings were called by the office of the Director General between September 2018 and November 2019. This does not include the meetings that the task team held at the National Arts Council offices in Johannesburg. Mr. Heyneman was invited to the said meetings where, in certain instances he attended, while in some instances he forwarded formal apologies. Noteworthy is that in March 2019, Mr. Heyneman made a written submission titled ‘National Philharmonic Orchestra: A Working Document’. We have attached evidence as Annexure A on his insightful contribution. One of the strong and progressive ideas that he presented in this document related to the issue of audience development and he said, ‘If it is the intent that the NPO [National Philharmonic Orchestra – as it was called] must be the “orchestra by the people for the people”, audiences for this new national ensemble must be found and developed. Without enthusiastic support and “bums on seats” the noble idea of a national orchestra that reflects the demographics of South Africa, catering for the musical taste of the majority of the population, will die a premature death.’ These kinds of ideas, among others, informed the entire conceptualization of the National Orchestra, feeding into the outcomes of the report of the task team that was presented to my office.

While there was an expectation for all task team members to attend and participate in the scheduled activities or meetings, the reality is that members also had commitments outside the work of the task team. However, this should not be used to cast aspersions on the validity of the processes and imply that there was no consultation when due processes were followed. On the occasions when some could not attend, meetings continued with the other participants.

13 December 2022 - NW4601

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee advertised the position for a safeguarding company to assist federations with safeguarding matters; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) where was the specified advertisement placed. (2) what (a) were the criteria for applicants and (b) does the contract entail. (3) (a) what total number of companies applied and were invited to be interviewed and (b) on what date did this take place. (4) (a) on what date was a certain company (name furnished) appointed and (b)(i) what safeguarding documents are prepared by the specified company for federations and (ii) at what total cost. (5) what total number of federations have adopted safeguarding policies?

Reply:

The Department is awaiting response from the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC).

13 December 2022 - NW4472

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) (a) What are the reasons that the Marketing and Communications Manager at the National Arts Council (NAC), Ms Thola Phetla, was moved to another unit and (b) has he found that there was a need to move her. (2) (a) who is managing the corruption watch line and/or emails (details furnished) at the NAC and (b) what was the total number of calls and emails received each day in the past financial year. (3) what (a) total number of the (i) specified calls and emails are investigated and/or still pending and (ii) reported cases are closed, but not investigated and (b) steps has the NAC taken with regard to the allegations?

Reply:

1 The Minister or the Department does not get involved in the movement of operational staff within the NAC. This is the matter that is within the responsibilities of the CEO of the entity.

2. Ms. Mopeli is managing the corruption watch line staff and we like to protect the persons managing this extremely sensitive line.

3.(a) total number received is five (5). Pending is (two) 2

(a) (i) Three (3) were investigated and closed

(a) (ii) no case closed without investigation

(b) NAC investigated the complaints and as stated above 3 were closed and 2 are still being investigated.

13 December 2022 - NW4372

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) On what date will the Acting Chief Executive Officer, Julie Diphofa, go on sick leave, (b) who will be appointed to act in her absence, (c) on which media will the acting position be advertised and (d) for how long will the specified person act in the position?

Reply:

We are not Sangomas, therefore unable to predict the illnesses of any human being.

13 December 2022 - NW4682

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he has considered separating the departments responsible for arts, culture, and heritage; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture has no authority in separating the departments/programmes responsible for Arts, Culture and Heritage. The office of the President is responsible to provide guidance and directive to the Minister on which Departments he/she is responsible for.

13 December 2022 - NW4573

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Which measures of intervention have been taken to assist the Simelane family at Anhalt farm in Ward 15 in Mkhondo Local Municipality which had their graves flattened and a plantation planted over it?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has reported the matter to the Cultural, Religious and Linguistic (CRL) Rights Commission to investigate the allegation of desecration of graves belonging to the Simelane family by the landowner.

CRL Rights Commission has committed to investigate the matter and report back once the investigation is completed and can be contacted at (+27) 011 358 9100 or by email at info@crlcommission.org.za.

13 December 2022 - NW4332

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) With reference to his reply to question 2599 on 15 September 2022, what are the total legal costs incurred in Rands (a) by the National Arts Council of South Africa (NAC) from its own attorneys and (b) from unsuccessful litigation of opposing parties, whilst fighting the SA Roadies Association (SARA) (i) in the (aa) 2018-19, (bb) 2019-20, (cc) 2020-21 and (dd) 2021-22 financial years and (ii) from 1 April 2022 to date. (2) what are the reasons for proceeding to court and incurring such costs, considering that an agreement between NAC and SARA was concluded on 9 November 2021, where matters would be settled amicably?

Reply:

As I have indicated in my response to question 2599 by the Hon. Member that:

Legal costs are annually budgeted, however, it is difficult to make precise determination in budgeting for legal costs, as a result, periodically, the legal costs budget is adjusted informed by case at hand. This is in line with Audit requirements that prescribe adequate contingency provisioning for legal costs and in line with National Treasury Regulations that allow Goods and Services budget adjustments.

13 December 2022 - NW4225

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any agreements were signed and/or agreed to during the State visit by the Prime Minister of Spain to the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

During the State Visit to South Africa on 27 October 2022 by H.E. Mr Pedro Sánchez, the President of Spain, a total of four (4) Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) were signed between South Africa and Spain.

1. Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the Field of Industry 4.0

The MoU seeks to promote cooperation and exchanges between the governments, governmental institutes, related governmental organisations, enterprises and any other institutions of the two countries in the field of Industry 4.0. Specific areas of focus include knowledge exchanges and sharing policies and technologies to increase added value and skilled employment in the industrial sector; sharing policies, technologies and related research to strengthen and develop digital solutions for the industrial sector; exploring new opportunities for industrial cooperation through the sharing of information on industrial areas with a potential for cooperation; identifying sectors with high potential for new diversification for smart manufacturing that could be mutually beneficial; participating in congresses, conferences and events related to Industry 4.0 hosted by the other country; and jointly hosting events such as seminars and workshops related to Industry 4.0.

2. Memorandum of Understanding between the National Library of Spain and the National Library of South Africa

The MoU falls within the purview of the Agreement on Cooperation in the Fields of Arts and Culture between South Africa and Spain, signed in 2004. The MoU encompasses the following: Cooperation in the fields of research; information and communication; technology (lCT); librarianship; exchange of documentary information or publications of mutual interest; and the sharing of knowledge of modern technology; Facilitation of the participation of experts in meetings; training courses; workshops; seminars; exhibitions; events and conferences on Library and Information Services (LIS) Sector; Exchange of experience with specialists in the areas of digitisation, preservation, conservation, cataloguing, technical information and public service; Exchange of exhibits reflecting the cultural heritage and social life of both countries; Facilitation of reciprocal official visits of experts and officials of their respective institutions; Protection and safeguarding of bibliographic heritage;

3. Memorandum of Understanding in the Field of Sport

The MoU seeks to implement programmes of cooperation in the field of sport on the basis of reciprocity and mutual benefit and to strengthen and intensify the partnership between the public or private structures responsible for the development of sport. Areas of Cooperation include: the development of athletes and coaches; institutional cooperation; the field of science and technology applied to sport; sports medicine; anti-doping; the fight against harassment and discrimination in sport; sport and inclusion; sports sponsorship and patronage; the organisation of sports events; the training of sports specialists and managers; programmes to support and promote sports for disabled people; the protection of young athletes; women and sports; sports education; sports for all; the maintenance of sports facilities; and school and university sports programmes.

4. Memorandum of Understanding between South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation and Spain’s Compañía Española de Financiación del Desarrollo (COFIDES)

The MoU establishes a framework for cooperation between South Africa’s IDC and Spanish-owned COFIDES with the main objective to enhance the relationship between the two entities. Potential collaboration in private sector investments in various industries will be explored and special focus will be given to initiatives on climate change related investments, Just Energy Transition, automotive industry and agribusiness. The MoU was signed during the South Africa – Spain Business Forum. In addition, President Sánchez announced that Spain will make available €2.11 billion in the next five years to support the participation of Spanish companies in renewable energy and climate-related projects in South Africa.

 

13 December 2022 - NW4616

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) What are the reasons that public announcements regarding the progress in establishing the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra (MNPO) were not made until July 2022, although the Memorandum of Understanding establishing the MNPO was already signed in September 2021; (2) whether the MNPO was in front of all council members at the National Arts Council of South Africa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a list of (a) individual musicians, (b) ensembles, (c) orchestras and (d) other entities in the classical and other music fields in the Republic that were consulted about the establishment of the MNPO; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The need for establishment of the national orchestra is embedded in the Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage. This policy document was approved by cabinet in August 2018 and endorsed by Parliament in February 2020 and thus automatically making it a public document. Like many other recommendations of the Revised White Paper, the establishment of the MNPO was effected and implemented by the Department. In terms of project management, it is a normal practice for a project to be launched once specific goals of the project are accomplished, and there is nothing untoward about lauching the MNPO in July 2022, several months after the signing of the agreement. This only tells us that certain deliverables had to concluded before the actual launch was done.
  2. There was no need for the MNPO to be brought in front of all council members at the National Arts Council of South Africa. In this instance, the role of the National Arts Council (NAC) is to fund the MNPO, just like other institutions that are being funded. In line with the Act that establishes the NAC, the Council has appointed the Chief Executive Officer for the Council to deal with all matters relating to funding and other administrative matters. The CEO is responsible for the management of the affairs of the Council and reports those affairs to the Council as often as possible, and therefore the matter regarding the MNPO was also also reported as such.
  3. As mentioned before, the need for establishment of the national orchestra is embedded in the Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage. This policy document was approved by cabinet in August 2018 and endorsed by parliament in February 2020. Likewise, it is a requirement for all policy document to undergo public consultation before approval is granted. In as far as the implementations of the Revised White Paper is concerned, such mandate is constitutionally with the Ministry of Sports, Arts & Culture and/or the Department Sports, Arts & Culture. It was for that reason that a panel of experts was appointed by my office to kick-start the implementation of the recommendation. A list of the the members of the panel was provided before to this house by way of answering previously raised questions relating to the matter.

13 December 2022 - NW4396

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the (a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in (i) his and (ii) the Deputy Minister’s private offices and (b)(i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package of each specified person?

Reply:

The number and the positions of the staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in the Ministry are illustrated by the table below. Job titles are provided together with the remuneration for each of them.

MINISTRY

 

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL ANNUAL REMUNERATION PACKAGE

MINISTRY

DRIVER/MESSENGER

498762

MINISTRY

SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST

290019

MINISTRY

REGISTRY CLERK

298791

MINISTRY

ASSISTANT APPOINMENT SECRETARY

491403

MINISTRY

CHIEF OF STAFF

1409157

MINISTRY

SPECIAL ADVISOR: MINISTRY

1451754

MINISTRY

SPECIAL ADVISOR: MINISTRY

1688373

MINISTRY

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

MINISTRY

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

MINISTRY

ASSISTANT APPOINMENT SECRETARY

513846

MINISTRY

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

766584

MINISTRY

CABINET AND PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER

903006

MINISTRY

MEDIA LIAISON OFFICER : MINISTRY

1173231

MINISTRY

PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER : MINISTRY

1105383

MINISTRY

PRIVATE SECRETARY

1105383

MINISTRY

ADMIN SECRETARY : MINISTRY

1190826

DEPUTY MINISTER

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL ANNUAL REMUNERATION PACKAGE

DEPUTY MINISTER

DRIVER/ MESSENGER

181599

DEPUTY MINISTER

REGISTRY CLERK

269214

DEPUTY MINISTER

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

DEPUTY MINISTER

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

DEPUTY MINISTER

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

766584

DEPUTY MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY AND CABINET SUPPORT

766584

DEPUTY MINISTER

PRIVATE SECRETARY

908502

DEPUTY MINISTER

HEAD OF OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

1105383

13 December 2022 - NW4297

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With regard to the total number of infrastructure jobs and/or projects that his department has been busy with since the 2018-19 financial year, what (a) is the proposed (i) starting date and (ii) completion date for the specified projects and (b)(i) total number of the projects have exceeded their completion date and (ii) with how much time. (2). whether additional funding was allocated towards the projects; if not, why not; if so, what total amount was allocated? NW5360E

Reply:

  1. There are seven Projects that are in the process of completion. These projects experienced various challenges that led them to delays.
  2. In light of the delays and stoppages that the projects encountered, it was a foregone conclusion that additional funds will be required to address cost escalations arising because of these delays, price adjustment provisions, and to do remedial work to the defective works that were discovered during the assessment of the quality of work done by previous contractors.

13 December 2022 - NW4371

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) On what date will the National Arts Council South Africa (NAC), which has four positions available, advertise the position of the (a) Chief Executive Officer, (b) Chief Financial Officer, (c) Communications Manager and (d) Arts Development Officer. (2) (a) what number of (i) full-time and (ii) part-time positions does the NAC have, (b) what total number of positions are vacant, (c) by what date will the vacant positions be filled, in the event that each position has been vacant for more than three months and (d) what are the reasons that the NAC is taking long to fill the vacancies? NW5496E

Reply:

1. The NAC will formerly advise the Department once the current processes for the recruitment of the CEO and CFO have been completed and advertisement published. Other vacancies that need to be filled in accordance with NAC’s budget and timing requirements will also be published upon approval of the advertisement of the positions. The NAC is completing its evaluations for the appointment of a recruitment firm for the filling of the CEO and CFO vacancies at the entity.

2.(a) (i) Full-time positions: 30

(ii) Part-time positions: 18

(b) Vacant positions: 5

(c) The NAC is completing its evaluations for the appointment of a recruitment firm for the filling of the CEO and CFO positions at the entity.

(d) The reduction of budgets restricts the filling of all desired vacancies, due to budgetary constraints NAC may fail to match expected salary expectations. Due to negative media reports, NAC stands in a position of disadvantage in attracting best suitable applicants.

13 December 2022 - NW4677

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What are the details of the (a) policy that is being used to guide the procurement of various foods for the school feeding schemes and (b) role of the school governing bodies as part of implementing the policy of the school feeding programme of her department; (2) (a) what are the details of the measures that her department has put in place to ensure that the procurement of foods by schools benefits local communities and (b) what portion and/or percentage of the budget allocated to various schools in the past two years benefited local black communities in the areas where the schools are located?

Reply:

1. (a) The NSNP Grant Framework as gazetted in the Division of Revenue Act, stipulates menu specifications, which include protein, carbohydrate, fruit and/or vegetable for procurement by Provinces, using the Food Specification Guide developed by the Department of Health.

(b) The NSNP Guidelines for Schools stipulate the role of SGBs, which includes among others, participation in the school based NSNP Committees, whose responsibility includes NSNP finances related to procurement of goods, especially in a decentralised procurement model.  The SGB is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Programme. 

2.  (a) The Grant Framework makes provision for the promotion of local economic empowerment, including the procurement of fresh produce from smallholder farmers. The NSNP Financial Management Training Guidelines give special focus in promoting the empowerment of local communities.  Provinces are obliged to follow the supply chain management (SCM) processes in line with the Preferential Procurement Policy Act.

(b) No specific percentage of the budget is allocated for local black communities per se;  however, in principle Provinces follow the PPPA, whether its the open tender (centralised procurement), or transfers to schools (decentralised procurement).  The  PEDs' quarterly reports in the last two years show that a total of 3 599 SMEs and Local Cooperatives in black communities, benefit from the NSNP. 

13 December 2022 - NW4470

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). What (i) research methodology and (ii) work plan was used for the formation of the Mzansi National Philharmonic Orchestra and (b) will he furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the concept document containing the detailed (i) scheduling and (ii) budget in this regard?

Reply:

The need of a National Orchestra is embedded in the revised White Paper, of the then Department of Arts and Culture, which was approved by cabinet in August 2018 and endorsed by parliament in February 2020. So, the Department did not have to prove the need of a National Orchestra. All it did was to implement one of the recommendations of the revised White Paper. In doing so, it followed a clear four-step process. The Department appointed a three-person committee of arts policy experts who travelled around the country consulting different organisations and stakeholders. And they reported to the Department.

The Department established a task team to formulate the objectives and the mission and the purpose of the National Orchestra. Part of this process was conducting international best practice for national orchestras and other orchestral development initiatives. Such as the El Sistema in Venezuela.

The Department entered into an engagement with the National Arts Council and this process led to a signed agreement with the National Arts Council.

The Department appointed a board of the National Orchestra, which actually runs the day-to-day affairs of this national institution.

Lastly, the Department together with the NAC and the National Orchestra, submitted comprehensive reports to the Portfolio Committee of Sport, Arts and Culture and engaged with them at least twice this year, including the meeting of 16 September 2022.

13 December 2022 - NW4366

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether small-, medium- and micro-enterprise farmers are defined in her department’s policies on the agricultural sector; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of the Beneficiary Selection and Land Allocation Policy, producers in the agricultural sector are categorised as follows:

  • Household Producer (Vulnerable)”: Is defined as a producer or entity that produces primarily for household consumption[1] and has limited resources and skills to operate a market-oriented production system. This category includes child headed households and households producing on communal land and commonages that are registered as indigents or they meet the criteria for registration as indigents with their municipality.
  • “Household Producer (Subsistence)”: Is defined as a producer or entity that produces primarily for household consumption. These producers are not or would not be classified as indigents by their municipality. They may market limited surplus production with an annual turnover of less than R50 000.
  • “Medium Scale Commercial Producer”: Is defined as an individual or entity that produces and sells agricultural commodities for the purpose of making a profit. These are established enterprises producing for market to make a profit with an annual turnover ranging from R1 000 001 – R10 million) and are eligible for VAT registration.

These categorisations are also contained and expanded on as outlined in the draft National Policy on Comprehensive Producer Development Support.

  1. The word household consumption includes own use of non-edible agricultural products such as cotton etc.

13 December 2022 - NW4471

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) With reference to the National Arts Council (NAC), (a) what are the relevant details of the NAC policy on the extension of acting in positions, (b)(i) who are those that are currently acting and (ii) in what capacity and (c) has he found that the specified policy applied was in order regarding their acting and/or extension appointment. (2) what is the total number of vacant positions in the NAC. (3) whether any of the vacant positions have been vacant for more than three months; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons that the NAC is taking so long to fill such positions. (4) what is the involvement of the Council Chairperson in the vacancies (5) what is the name of the former marketing and communications manager of the NAC?

Reply:

(1)(a). The Labour Relations Act stipulates that the maximum period for acting in a higher position shall not be more three (3) months. The NAC allows an employee to act in a higher position for a three (3) months period and thereafter allow for rotation (where there are suitable candidates) if the position is still vacant. Should a need persist, the acting period can be extended.

(b) Currently three people are serving in an acting capacity for the positions of CEO, CFO and the Marketing and Communications Manager.

(c) The policy was applied in that extensions were granted and approved.

(2). The NAC has six (6) vacancies

(3). Yes, five positions have been vacant for more than three (3) months. The reason is that the NAC had to procure the services of a recruitment agency to handle the recruitment of the CEO and CFO position. The other three positions have been delayed due to budgetary constraints.

(4). The Chairperson is involved in the recruitment process of the Chief Executive Officer.

13 December 2022 - NW4312

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with regard to the steep challenges the Republic is facing in relation to issues such as food insecurity and unemployment, her department has improved its rural strategy which would promote and increase rural incomes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether, considering that importing food increases the cost of food for South Africans, her department has considered the establishment and/or support of a southern regional trade bloc as a way to create a more food secure region through the exploitation of diversity in the region; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes. The Integrated Rural Development Sector Strategy is being processed for gazetting for public comments in the second quarter of 2023. The strategy focuses on strengthening four pillars:

  • The rural economy;
  • Community and human development;
  • Rural safety and social cohesion; and
  • Cooperative governance and local government.

The Strategy seeks to coordinate and manage sectoral rural development interventions and catalytic projects addressing challenges facing rural communities in line with the National Development Plan (2030) and District Development Model (DDM).

Some of the work mentioned in the strategy has commenced already. These include improving farm access and village access rural roads, working with the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) and Provincial Departments of Agriculture and Rural Development in the identification and establishment of 5 agri-hubs and agro-processing facilities; supporting at least 71 farmer production support units to become functional to adequately support smallholder farmers for food production and commercial activities by 2024 and to implement, in the medium to long-term, the development and support of 7 other agri-parks including identification, drawing and locking in of investors through a dedicated investment strategy. This also includes targeted land redistribution to rural women, youth and persons with disabilities.

The strategy also emphasises working with the key sector departments on other rural economic challenges e.g., the rehabilitation of dams and rural bridges. The Department has further aligned the strategy with the Agriculture and Agro-Processing Masterplan, working with the National House on Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership, and will identify catalytic projects in terms of the 8 other approved masterplans with the relevant lead departments.

The strategy is aligned to the Rural Safety Strategy and the Department currently participates in the Rural Safety Priority Committees. The Department will also partner with the Department of Basic Education on the development of Early Childhood Development Centres (ECDs) in rural areas and the scaling up of the Rural Education Assistant Programme in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education, targeting unemployed rural youth to improve literacy and numeracy in rural schools.

2. The decision to establish regional trade blocks is beyond the scope of the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. Such decisions are usually led by the Department of International Relations and Trade and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition. Additionally, the Republic of South Africa has ratified the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), which works through the regional value chains to promote food security initiatives in the continent. One of the regional value chains that are promoted under the AfCFTA is agriculture and agro-processing. Under the afore-mentioned regional value chains, the various regional economic communities (REC’s) are encouraged to develop agricultural hubs that are aligned to prioritized commodities such as horticulture, grains, tea, poultry, etc.

13 December 2022 - NW3923

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With regard to her visit in Taung in the North West province in 2020, where she made commitments which were not implemented thus far, by what date will (a) the farmers of Taung see the implementation of the Farmer Production Support Unit model and (b) she (i) revamp and (ii) return the Lesedi stores to be used by farmers in Taung?

Reply:

(a),(b)(i)-(ii) DALRRD is unable to commit a specific date due to the following reason: in 2021, the Directorate: Rural Infrastructure Development within the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) in the North West Province planned to implement the first phase of the project by fencing the Old Lesedi Building premises and renovating the guardroom to enable DALRRD to provide security. Phase 2 of the project was planned to unfold in the following years. However, the plans for infrastructure for the implementation failed due to alleged illegal tenants occupying the Old Lesedi building, who refuse to move. The provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development is in the process of negotiating with the mentioned tenants.

However, an alternative site for livestock farmers was identified and some work was done such as paving of the access road into the auction pen site i.e. the identified Farmer Production Support Unit (FPSU) site; renovation of the existing two houses; drilling and equipping of the borehole; construction of the guard room for security personnel; construction of kraals for small stock and construction of the pavilion at the auction pen.

In terms of production and mechanisation support, DALRRD through the Directorate: Cooperatives and Enterprise Development facilitated the establishment of the Taung FPSU and has supported these farmers with the following:

  • 98kw Tractor;
  • 1 x small Lucerne baler;
  • 2 x Lucerne mowers; and
  • 3 x Lucerne rakes.

These implements were registered and are currently being used by the farmers in the Taung Irrigation Scheme. The above support amounted to R3 195 855.75 during the 2021/ 2022 financial year.

13 December 2022 - NW4278

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

How will the lack of ocean security in the Indian Ocean affect the Ocean economy in the context of the implementation of the African Continental Free Trade area?

Reply:

The Indian Ocean region faces many traditional and non-traditional safety and security challenges including piracy, armed robberies at sea, terrorism, human trafficking, irregular movement of persons, drug trafficking, illicit trafficking in wildlife, trafficking of weapons, crimes in the fisheries sector, degradation of ocean health, unlawful exploitation of marine resources and climate change with its related repercussions on environmental security.

Over 60% of the world’s trade passes through the Indian Ocean and nine African states are members of the Association. Therefore, any impact on trade will impact on the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). It is therefore important that it is able to succeed and that the safety of sea routes from any of the listed threats is crucial.

In this regard, the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) has an established Working Group on Maritime Safety and Security which coordinated the IORA’s role in securing trade routes. Covering a vast maritime zone of nearly 68.56 million sq. km, IORA’s Maritime Security includes elements of international peace and security, sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence, security from crimes at sea, security of resources and environmental security, while Maritime Safety is concerned with training (both technical and personnel), transport, construction and equipment-related issues, and assistance in distress situations.

A focussed discussion on the AfCFTA is critical to help guide the IORA’s role in enabling the free trade area to ensure mutual benefit. This discussion is encouraged by both the African Union (AU), and the IORA. The IORA has proposed a draft MoU with the AU and this would be crucial to consolidating Africa’s regional maritime interests.

The existing Maritime Safety and Security (MSS) initiatives are the following:

  • The ‘IORA Working Group on Maritime Safety and Security’, also known as the WGMSS, established in September 2018 and presently chaired by Sri Lanka. In August 2019, Sri Lanka hosted the First Meeting of the IORA Maritime Safety and Security Working Group, which finalized the regional Work Plan drawn up for a period of two years (2019 – 2021). This meeting provided an opportunity for Member States to discuss the way forward and to initiate concrete actions in the sphere of MSS.
  • During the Council of Ministers (COM) held in Dhaka on 24 November 2022, India advised that the Discussion Paper on the draft legal frameworks in the Indian Ocean region in the field of Maritime Safety and Security had been finalised. The draft discussion paper will be taken forward by the Working Group on Maritime Safety and Security (WGMSS) for further implementation.
  • Sri Lanka to host the Third Meeting of the IORA WGMSS in the first quarter of 2023 (possibly March), along with a Workshop on the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).
  • IORA has also devised flagship initiatives such as the Indian Ocean Dialogue, which is held annually, bringing together key representatives including scholars, experts, analysts, and policy makers from think tanks, civil societies and governments from IORA Member States to discuss pertinent issues including MSS.
  • The IORA aims at building upon existing national, regional and multilateral measures to support a more effective utilization of resources for enhanced cross-border cooperation and sharing of knowledge, experiences and best practices to secure the Indian Ocean as an ocean strengthening maritime cooperation for a peaceful, stable, and prosperous region.