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10 September 2021 - NW1874

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Deputy President

With reference to his most recent trip to the Russian Federation to receive medical treatment, what are the details of the (a) transport he used to travel (i) to the Russian Federation in June 2021 and (ii) back to the Republic in August 2021, (b) number of person(s) who accompanied him on the trip, (c) accommodation (i) he and (ii) any person(s) who accompanied him used during the trip and (d) transport he and any person accompanying him used while in the Russian Federation on the trip?

Reply:

In his oral reply to similar question posed by Mr Steenhuisen of the DA on 03 September 2021 in the National Assembly, President Ramaphosa outlined matters of principle with regard to the security and travel arrangements of the President and Deputy President.

The President said: Deputy President, is entitled to security wherever he is, including that of the President. This is not a personal choice. The Deputy President do not choose to be continuously shadowed by security people, but it is a requirement because it is taken that when the President, and the Deputy President are in positions that are in, they almost become state property, this is what comes with the job. Therefore, wherever the Deputy President and the President goes, they have to have security. They have security whether they are awake or asleep. The other issue is that whenever the President or the Deputy President goes, at any given time, their transportation is the responsibility of the government. When they fly it is the responsibility of the Air Force and as they travel on the ground it is the responsibility of the police, the Presidential Protection Unit. This is what comes with the job.

In this specific matter, the Deputy President flew commercial at his personal cost, and the supporting official was the Private Secretary. The Presidency was only responsible for costs that were incurred on behalf of the Private Secretary to the Deputy President in terms of flights, accommodation and S&T with the total budget allocation of R158, 542.54.

END

10 September 2021 - NW1911

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Deputy President

(1)With reference to his most recent trip to the Russian Federation to receive medical treatment, what are the details of the (a) total cost and (b) itemised breakdown of the specified total cost incurred by the Government in terms of (i) transportation, (ii) accommodation, (iii) medical treatment and (iv) any other related costs for (aa) him and (bb) any other person accompanying him on the trip; (2) whether he covered any of the costs related to the trip from his own pocket; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As indicated under question 1874 from the same Honourable member, the Deputy President paid for his flight costs to and from the Russian Federation as well as medical expenses.

The breakdown for the costs incurred for the support staff are hereby attached as Annexure A.

ANNEXURE 

  • END -

10 September 2021 - NW1912

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Deputy President

(1)Whether the Surgeon-General of the SA National Defence Force referred him for any form of medical treatment to the Russian Federation since 27 February 2018; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on which date(s) did the Surgeon-General refer him for medical treatment in the Russian Federation, (b) why was the Surgeon-General and the SA Military Health Service not able to provide the medical treatment that he required in each case and (c) what costs were incurred by the Government in each case for referring him to the Russian Federation; (2) whether, in light of his numerous postponements and cancellations of question sessions in the National Assembly, the Surgeon-General has found that in his current state of health he is fit to hold his current Office and perform the various duties as required by his Office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Deputy President like any other South African is entitled to choose his or her preferred medical practitioner. In recent past in Parliament, the Deputy President took South Africans into confidence about him taking ill and how he ended-up receiving lifesaving treatment from doctors in the Russian Federation.

It would thus be medically imprudent for anyone to abruptly abandon medical treatment by medical practitioners who are intimately au fait with one’s medical profile. Further details regarding the Deputy President’s consultations with the Surgeon-General can be obtained from the Office of the Surgeon-General, and the SA Military Health Service.

In instances where the Deputy President has had to postpone sessions for oral reply, such was communicated to the Presiding Officers of Parliament in accordance with Rule 144 (1) read together with Rule 11 (2). The Deputy President is fully competent to execute his responsibilities as delegated by the President.

-END-

09 September 2021 - NW1222

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that a number of Lesotho citizens were uprooted from their land during phase 1 of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, what steps has she taken to ensure that (a) compensation is paid to the specified persons and (b) there will be no further disenfranchisement of the citizens of Lesotho as a result of the specified project?

Reply:

All persons affected by the project were either relocated, resettled and/or had their assets compensated in accordance with the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP) Compensation Policy as well as the Treaty between the Republic of South Africa and Lesotho. Ccompensation was paid to the affected persons by adopting the following measures:

  1. The LHWP’s legal obligations to the people and communities affected by Project works are based on: The Lesotho Constitution, the LHWP Treaty - Article 7, the LHDA Order of 1986 and the LHWP Compensation Regulations, Legal Notice No. 50 of 1990, and specifically for the implementation of Phase II, the Phase II Agreement – Article 15.
  2. The LHWP Compensation Policy covers compensation for: Loss of assets, Uprootment (including resettlement), Income Restoration, Rural Development, Natural Environment and Heritage and in addition the implementation of Public Health plans with Lesotho.

The implementation and the execution of the Compensation Policy is also regularly monitored by an Independent Panel of Experts.

Complaints relating to compensation, relocation and resettlement issues are dealt with through various Lesotho Highlands Development Agency (LHDA) field officers, the Social Development and Environment Division, and the Public Relations Office. All queries that arise are dealt with by the LHDA on a case-by-case basis and captured on a database. Complainants also have access to the Compensation Ombudsman.

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09 September 2021 - NW1982

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether he will confirm that there are council members who are on the approved but not announced list for relief funding as the acting chairperson of the National Arts Council (NAC) said in a Facebook Zoom meeting on 3 March 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who approved the relief funding and (b) what is the name of each council member who applied; (2). (a) on what basis did the council members apply for relief funding, (b) for what amount did each member apply and (c) what is the total amount that was approved for the council members; (3). whether council members are remunerated for their service to the NAC, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the remuneration?

Reply:

(i) There was no Facebook meeting held on the 3 March 2021 involving any the Chairperson or any Member of Council . The NAC held two weekly Industry briefings on the 24th February and the 5th March 2021 respectively during the period mentioned.

(ii) Yes, there are Arts and Culture Industry practitioners who serve on the NAC Council whom are employed by organisations that applied for PESP funding prior to their appointment to Council.

(1).

a) All PESP applications were adjudicated by independent panel of experts prior to the commencement of the term of this Council before the 30 December 2020. The New Council commenced on the 1st January 2021 and found all respective applications already adjudicated and approved by the adjudication panels.

b) A list of the organizations that applied that employ the Council Members is attached below (*Please note that no member applied in their personal capacity*):

Project Number

Organisation name and Project Name

Lead Applicant name

Amount Applied for

Amount Approved /Declined

Declaration of Interest Received

1. 

BAT Centre Trust - Open Call

Nontsikelelo Ngqakayi

R 275 000

Not funded. Second application

YES

2. 

Federation of Community Arts Centre KZN

Samukelisiwe Dlamini

R 1 941 076

Declined

YES

3. 

Zikmo Consultants – Kapa Bokone Music and Cultural Festival

Zikie Molusi

R 4 350 000

Application withdrawn. (Council Member did not declare his interest)

Not Received, Council Member did not declare his application during 5 meetings he Chaired, which led to the Council suspending him and referring his matter to the Ministers office

4. 

Durban Music School – Skills development Programme

Kim Mathews

R 608 000

R414 010,00

YES

5. 

Durban Music School – Ignite a Flame

Kim Mathews

R 995 000

R 174 320

YES

6

 

Cape Town Opera -Monteverdi Vespers

Jade Lewis

R 500 000

R 500 000

YES

7. 

Cape Town Opera – Singing for sustainability

Lize Coetzer

R 496 000

R337 745,00

YES

8. 

BAT Centre Trust - Open Call

Nontsikelelo Ngqakayi

R 400 780

R151 780,17

YES

9. 

Afrocentric Talent Agency (Pty) Ltd – Giya M’aFrika Giya

Dr Sipho Sithole

R 3 518 828

R 1 089 500

YES

10.

BAT Centre Trust – 2021 Project Plan

Xolani Sithole

R 3 000 000

R 435 800

YES

11.

Federation of Community Arts Centre KZN

Samukelisiwe Dlamini

R 1 941 076

Declined

YES

(2) (a) i. Members of Council organizations applied on the basis of a funding call for PESP which was advertised on the 30 October 2020. Long before their appointment to serve on NAC Council was confirmed.

ii. The funding guidelines were broadly advertised on various media platforms, consultative processes done via zoom sessions and on the Grant Management System (GMS). The call was open to both individuals and formally registered organizations, institutions and groups active within the Arts, Culture and Heritage sector for the purposes of job retention wage subsidies in Stream 1 and for the creation of new work opportunities in Stream 2.

iii. In addition, the PESP is an initiative of government that is meant to benefit ALL South Africans by creating and/or retaining work opportunities to all practitioners in the sector that have been severely affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

iii.Their applications were adjudicated prior to their commencement to serve on NAC Council.

(b) Please refer to the table for how much each organisation applied for.

(c ) The total amount recommended for approval for the organisations that employ Council Members affected is R3,103155, 17.

(3). Council members are remunerated as per Treasury Guidelines. They are not paid a salary but receive an honorarium per sitting, preparation and are reimbursed for any costs incurred while undertaking any other approved work on behalf Council. The honoraria is paid as follows:

Chairperson – R 3 888 for sitting fee and R 3 888 for preparation fee;

Vice Chairperson – R 3 738 for sitting fee and R 3 738 for preparation fee and Members - R 2 382 for sitting fee and R 2 382 for preparation fee.

09 September 2021 - NW1317

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

1.Since the 2012-2013 financial year, (a) what number of members of the SA Police Service (SAPS) in each province who were accused of violent misconduct did the SAPS management place on provisional suspension and/or desk duty, pending the completion of the Independent Police investigative Directorate’s investigation (b) on what date was each member charged and (c) what was the charge against each specified member, 2. whether there are instances or occasions where one member of the SAPS has been accused and suspended more than once; if so, what are (a) their names and (b) the details of the charges? NW1511E

Reply:

Find here: Reply


 

08 September 2021 - NW2001

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether the National Arts Council’s Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme’s forensic investigation has terms of reference; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details; (2). whether the investigation includes the forensic accounting; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2236E

Reply:

(1). Yes, the (NAC) National Arts Council’s Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme’s forensic investigation has terms of reference, see the attached document.

 

(2). The accounting part of the investigation is included in the Terms of reference.                                                   

08 September 2021 - NW2059

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the recent crime statistics report, what (a) are the details of hospitals that have recorded the highest incidents of rape-related treatment and (b) total number of rape victims have died in hospitals in the period covered by the latest crime statistics report?

Reply:

This question is unfortunately beyond the scope of information that is available to the Department of Health. The determination of rape requires a conviction in a court rather than an allegation or complaint. The SAPS may be in a better position to provide information regarding this question. Rape is not recorded as a cause of death in any health statistics and deaths associated with sexual assault will usually be recorded as death due to unnatural causes, most frequently recorded as ‘blunt trauma’ or ‘sharp trauma’, etc.

END.

08 September 2021 - NW1931

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) are the reasons that racially inclusive demographics are not included in the (i) collection and (ii) sharing of COVID-19 related information and (b) effect does the lack of racial demographics have in relation to the response of the State in vaccine distribution across the Republic, but more importantly in Black communities?

Reply:

(a) and (b) When samples are taken from individuals the laboratory must complete the biographic data name, surname, ID, date of birth, address etc. This information is then captured into an electronic data system which is then used to analyse and publish statistics. Unfortunately biographic data is often not fully completed by the patient and health care workers consequently we do not have a full data set of biographic data in all cases. In the case of race specifically this data is often not reported at source. Consequently we have not been reporting COVID infections and vaccinations by race, since there is also no evidence that race is a significant risk factor.

END.

08 September 2021 - NW1886

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1706 on 21 June 2021, what (a) is the total expenditure breakdown of the R1 million that was allocated for the Men’s Forum, (b) were the total costs of (i) each of the two seminars and (ii) the virtual Disability Forum Workshop mentioned in the reply and (c) are the projected costs of the interventions in (i) August and (ii) December 2021; (2) Whether he will furnish Ms T A Khanyile with a copy of the contents of the seminars details conducted in the 2019-20 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant?

Reply:

1(a) The R1 million is allocated for the awareness material, to be distributed to all our 412 offices based in all provinces, on the fight against Gender Based Violence. R800 000 of the budget will be used for promotional materials, namely posters, pamphlets, banners and booklets. R200 000 for transport by participants for awareness sessions/workshops, hiring of venues and accommodation for participants and facilitators.

b(i) For Kwazulu Natal seminar, the Department spent R12 700 (This excludes the transport cost to transport officials to the event since they were using DHA vehicles) and for Eastern Cape the Department spent R69 000 (excluding transport amount).

(ii) The virtual Disability Forum Workshop costs were those for data.

(iii) The intended interventions are going to be hosted on virtual platform and therefore the cost will only be for data, therefore the expected cost will be around R5000.

2. Yes, the agendas and copies of presentations.

END

08 September 2021 - NW2060

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What are the details of hospitals that have recorded the highest infant mortalities in the Republic in 2021?

Reply:

Infant deaths are defined as deaths occurring during the first year of life, and are divided into newborn deaths that occur during the newborn period (0 – 28 days) and post-neonatal deaths that occur between 29 days and one year of age. The majority of infant deaths occur during the newborn period.

The thirty public sector hospitals with the highest number of infant deaths recorded thus far in 2021 are shown in the table below[1]. The hospitals with the highest number of infant deaths are predominantly national central, tertiary and regional hospitals – this is primarily due to the fact that these are large, referral hospitals which provide care to many newborns and other infants who are at highest risk of death.

Hospital

Level of care

No. of newborn deaths

No. of post-neonatal infant deaths

Total infant deaths

gp Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Tertiary hospital

299

62

361

ec Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

National Central Hospital

139

67

206

gp Dr George Mukhari Hospital

National Central Hospital

168

29

197

lp Mankweng Hospital

Tertiary hospital

159

27

186

gp Tembisa Hospital

Tertiary hospital

166

18

184

gp Rahima Moosa Hospital

Tertiary hospital

156

23

179

ec Dora Nginza Hospital

Regional Hospital

126

40

166

gp Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

Regional Hospital

149

17

166

kz Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

Regional Hospital

116

41

157

fs Bongani Hospital

Regional Hospital

135

22

157

kz Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

Regional Hospital

129

20

149

wc Tygerberg Hospital

National Central Hospital

118

31

149

nw Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

Regional Hospital

126

11

137

nw Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

Tertiary Hospital

119

17

136

gp Sebokeng Hospital

Regional Hospital

101

18

119

gp Steve Biko Academic Hospital

National Central Hospital

68

49

117

kz Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

Regional Hospital

95

17

112

fs Pelonomi Hospital

Tertiary hospital

92

17

109

kz Port Shepstone Hospital

Regional Hospital

87

21

108

kz General Justice Gizenga Mpanza Hospital

Regional Hospital

91

16

107

kz RK Khan Hospital

Regional Hospital

84

13

97

mp Witbank Hospital

Tertiary hospital

72

21

93

gp Kalafong Hospital

Tertiary Hospital

71

18

89

mp Rob Ferreira Hospital

Tertiary Hospital

65

22

87

gp Mamelodi Hospital

Regional Hospital

76

11

87

gp Leratong Hospital

Regional Hospital

67

18

85

ec Mthatha General Hospital

Regional Hospital

79

2

81

kz Newcastle Hospital

Regional Hospital

62

18

80

fs Universitas Hospital

National Central Hospital

69

11

80

gp Jubilee Hospital

District Hospital

77

3

80

END.

District Health Information System. Extracted 2nd September 2021.

08 September 2021 - NW1952

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Health

What (a)(i) studies has his department done to ascertain the extent of vaccine hesitancy in the Republic and (ii) are the causes of the hesitancy and (b) communication measures has his department put in place to allay the fears of persons who are hesitant to take the COVID-19 vaccines?

Reply:

a) Our goal must be to vaccinate at least 70% of adults in South Africa, and especially to ensure that all people over the age of 50 are vaccinated before Christmas 2021. If we do that, the number of people who are hospitalised or die from COVID-19 will be substantially reduced.

(i) In terms of vaccine hesitancy, the South African population falls into three main groups:

  • Those who are eager or willing – this is the biggest group, roughly two thirds.
  • Those who are uncertain and need to be supported to get them over the line by providing them with information and reassurance and making it easy for them to get vaccinated – a quarter of the population.
  • Those who are opposed to vaccination (roughly a sixth).

This is encouraging, because it means that the vast majority of South African adults may come forward for vaccination if their concerns are addressed and if it is easy for them to access the service. The challenge is likely to be due to lack of urgency to be vaccinated rather than being unsure of whether to vaccinate or not.

Extent of vaccine acceptance

The Department of Health has drawn on a number of national studies to understand the extent and reasons for vaccine hesitancy. They include:

  • The NIDS-CRAM series of panel surveys (which found that vaccine acceptance has increased from 71% in Feb/Mar to 76% in Apr/May 2021. Half of those who were vaccine hesitant in Feb/Mar 2021 had changed their minds were now willing to vaccinated.
  • HSRC/University of Johannesburg survey (Dec/Jan 2021: Two thirds of the SA adult population say they will definitely or probably get vaccinated.
  • Ask Afrika Survey: 62% of South Africans willing to get vaccinated.
  • African Response (May 2021): 74% of South Africans are willing to get vaccinated and are confident of government’s efforts to manage the vaccine rollout.
  • Afro Barometer (May 2021): 43% say they are willing to get vaccinated; 64% approve of government’s performance and 78% say government has done a good job of keeping public informed).
  • SAMRC VAX-scenes (April 2020): 62% willing to get vaccinated.

All surveys with the exception of the Afrobarometer survey find that the majority (about two-thirds) of South Africans are willing to get vaccinated. Another quarter are open to persuasion. Only about one in six say they definitely won’t get vaccinated.

Reasons for acceptance.

The main reasons for accepting the vaccine are to protect themselves or family from contracting the virus (~75% of those who are willing).

Reasons for hesitancy

The main reasons cited for hesitancy include:

  • Concern over side effects (about ¼ of those who are vaccine hesitant)
  • Distrust of the vaccine (about ¼ of those who are vaccine hesitant)
  • Unsure of its effectiveness

b) The Department’s response on communication measures put in place:

  • The NDoH and GCIS work together on a national communications strategy to tackle the reasons for vaccine hesitancy. This includes a social media strategy, radio PSAS in all 11 languages as well as printed material in all 11 languages distributed to all districts. Over the past months, over 20 million information leaflets have been printed and are being distributed.
  • The NDoH and GCIS also leverage the communications and social mobilisation capability of civil society organisations, labour and the business sector through the National Communications Partnership which has produced and disseminated contents through their networks.
  • The private sector has also come on board, with the PEPKOR group of companies distributing over 10 million of the NDoH leaflets through their stores. Posters have been placed in 30,000 spaza shops encouraging people to get registered.
  • A national Demand Acceleration Strategy has been developed and a National Task team established to direct its implementation. These activities will be accelerated over the next three months, even as efforts are expanded to make it easier for people to get vaccinated through mobile outreach and other access strategies.

END.

08 September 2021 - NW2058

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, given that the Cancer Association of South Africa partnered with the World Health Organisation to highlight the risks associated with tobacco use and in light of the fascination with hooker amongst party-going youth, his department recorded any number of deaths and/or severe illnesses directly connected to the use of hooker; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

No. The Department is not aware of any deaths or severe illness reported that are directly connected to the use of hookah in South Africa.

However, studies conducted in other countries on the chemistry of waterpipe smoke had shown hookah smoking contained seven carcinogens, 39 central nervous system depressants, and 31 respiratory irritants (Pratiti, R., & Mukherjee, D. (2019). Water-pipe smokers are found to have significantly higher carbon monoxide in blood which reduces tissue oxygenation, than cigarettes smoking (Theron, Ansa, Schultz, Cedric, Ker, James A, & Falzone, Nadia. (2010).

The main ingredient used in waterpipe is tobacco, and its use has both acute and long-term harmful effects on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Hookah users tend to also add other substances to it such as alcohol and drugs. (Theron A et al: Carboxyhaemoglobin levels in water-pipe and cigarette smokers Original Articles122 -124.)

Waterpipe use is associated with an increased risk of transmission of infectious agents, including respiratory viruses, hepatitis C virus, Epstein Barr virus, Herpes Simplex virus, tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori, and Aspergillus. WHO had raised concerns about waterpipe use and its risk of transmission of diseases, also indicated that it could also encourage the transmission of COVID-19 in social gatherings.

All innovative tobacco products, the related products, including the waterpipe should be strictly controlled in the country. The demand and supply of such products need to be reduced to ensure that we do not get more young people addicted to the products. Young people need to be continually made aware of the harm that goes with using these products and the tobacco industry needs to be controlled by, for example, development of the Control of Tobacco Products and the Electronic Delivery Systems Bill of 2018, which seeks to address all loopholes pertaining to these harmful products flooding our country as most countries are strictly regulating them or not permitting them at all.

Hookah/waterpipe, they uses molasses or moist tobacco. There are two types of waterpipes (hubbly bubbly, hookah pipes), the electronic (non-combustible) and those that cause emissions. A major source of tobacco addiction is nicotine, whose levels in hookah are extremely variable as they depend on the type of tobacco used.

A study conducted in South Africa found that while the tobacco was the norm in smoking hookah, significant numbers also reported using marijuana and/or alcohol-based products in combination with tobacco even among children as young as 13-15 years (Combrink, A., Irwin, N., Laudin, G., Naidoo, K., Plagerson, S., & Mathee, A. (2010). Results indicate that the hookah pipe is a gateway drug, as participants appear to use the hookah pipe with other substances like marijuana and alcohol. (Jacobs, L., Roman, N. V., & Schenk, C. (2015).

END.

08 September 2021 - NW1987

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the details of the progress that his department has achieved in addressing the arrears payments with regard to the medical depot accruals that have large outstanding amounts which have a negative impact on procuring medical equipment, medication and other medical supplies; (2) what was the actual total accrual amount at the beginning of the intervention compared to the current outstanding arrears to the medicine depot?

Reply:

EASTERN CAPE

1. The province had allocated sufficient budget at the beginning of the financial year for the settlement of outstanding accruals for medicines in the Depots. The interventions also included a process of ensuring that all invoices are received and processed on time from the suppliers to the payment stage.

2. The Eastern Cape depot had a total of R847 461 million on accruals at the end of the financial year. The high level of accruals was due in part to the cash flow challenges faced by the department as a result of the high medico legal claims.

The department prioritized the settlement of accruals in the first quarter of the current financial year. At the end of August 2021, the department had settled R689 042 million of the accruals. This is equivalent to 81% of the total accruals on medicines and medical supplies. The balance is expected to be settled in the month of September.

FREE STATE

1. The Free State department of health does not experience problems in paying the claims of medical depot. The strategy we use is that of prioritizing medical depot and making sure that they remain afloat to enable it to pay suppliers on time. The arrangement is that they submit their claims at the beginning of every week.

2. The total accruals amount to R542,443,773 and total paid amount to R443, 963,155 which translate to 82% of the total payment made to date. The outstanding amount R97,267,083 was settled by 31 August 2021 and R1,213,534 by 09 September 2021.

GAUTENG

1. The department and the depot had agreed to submit claims at least twice a month as opposed to once a month. This has helped to keep the depot afloat so that it is able to pay its suppliers on time while procuring more medicines as may be required by health facilities. The GDOH is now able to process payments for submitted claim within 30 days on receipt of a claim. The Medical Supplies Depot is able to fulfil its mandate of procuring Medicines that are mostly delivered direct to health facilities and to pay its creditors.

2. As at 31 March 2021 the balance owed to the Medical Supplies Depot was R925 million, the outstanding amount was settled in full in the first quarter of the current financial year (2021/2022). At the end of quarter one of 2021/2022 financial year amount owed to the depot was R664 million and was paid in full in the month of July and August. The new current balance owed is R412 million but is still within 30 days.

KWAZULU-NATAL

1. The Medical Depot is continuously engaging with the facilities to submit payment packs on time in order to be able to process them to pay suppliers. Monthly account reconciliations are done in order to identify old outstanding payments. Strict turnaround times to process the payments on time once all necessary supporting documents are received from the facilities.

2. The actual total accrual amount at the end of August 2020 (excluding less than 30 Days) was R1,053,308,923 and the current outstanding amount August 2021 (excluding less than 30 Days) is R455,859,740.

LIMPOPO

1. Limpopo pharmaceutical procurement is partially centralized with the exception of the Regional and Tertiary institutions that are on direct delivery system. Total budget allocation for the 2020/21 financial year was R1,6 billion whereas the accruals as at the end of the financial year was R96 million which translate to 6%.

2. Total Medical depot accruals amount to R96 million. Accruals are expected to be in line with the monthly expected percentage expenditure equal to 8,3%. The department in the year under review managed to contain the accruals to remain under the acceptable percentage of 8,3%. All the accruals have been paid in the 1st quarter of the current financial year.

MPUMALANGA

1. Mpumalanga Department of Health does not have any outstanding invoices not paid as all accruals have been paid during the first quarter.

2. Total accruals outstanding as at 31 March 2021 has been R195,813,681 and all the invoices have been processed during first quarter and currently invoices not paid are within 30 days of been received.

NORTHERN CAPE

1. The department is currently experiencing cash flow constraints, thus a number of invoices cannot be paid within the 30 days of receiving the invoice, as determined in terms of Treasury Regulation 8.2.3. There is continuous challenge to settle the accruals which mainly affects the Equitable share. The payments are prioritised in terms of the source of funding, contractual obligations, non-negotiables items and other payments.

2. Total Medical Depot accruals & payables as at 31 March 2021 amounts to R96.512 million, which results mainly from cash flow constraints affecting the provincial equitable share funding. Currently, there is no intervention from the oversight departments.

NORTH WEST

1. The North West Department of Health could not pay all of its invoices for goods and services for the 2019/2020 financial year, starting from the third quarter. In the main, the challenge has been inadequacy of goods and services budget allocation over the years as opposed to the ever increasing burden of diseases and price escalation on non-negotiable items such as medicine and medical supplies.

2. At the beginning of the intervention, the North West Department of Health had accruals amounting to R236,649,308 relating to the medical depot and at the end of 2020/2021 financial year an amount of R265,928,108 was disclosed as accruals. As at 31 August 2021 accruals totaling R215,568,490 which is 81% has already been settled and the intention is to pay in full all in the invoices which are not disputed by end of September 2021.

WESTERN CAPE

1. The Cape Medical Depot (CMD) procures Goods and Services on behalf of the whole Western Cape Health Department via its MEDSAS procurement system. Once the CMD issues stock to a particular health institution the relevant budget of that institution is expensed. Once invoices are received, payments are effected and paid within 30 days, so there is no need for Medical Depot accruals payment strategy.

2. CMD’s accruals are significantly below the accepted threshold and will not be prevented from continuing to procure the relevant goods and services on behalf of the department. In terms of payment days, the department is well within the 30-day payment threshold.

END.

08 September 2021 - NW1986

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)On what date will the findings of the forensic investigation into two companies (names furnished) be made available; (2) whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a detailed report on the (a) services, (b) challenges and (c) shortfalls of the emergency medical services in the North West province; (3) what are the details of (a) the involvement of Aurum’s Rustenburg Clinical Research Institute and his department and/or the SA Medical Research Council and (b) their contractual agreements; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he will provide Ms H Ismail with a full report regarding the senior officials in the SA Medical Research Council who were suspended; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (i), (ii) The NWDOH has not conducted any forensic investigation related to any of the Buthelezi entities. However a case was opened with the SAPS (Hawks) and the case number is: Mmabatho Case Number: 89/02/2018.

(2) (a) Services

The service is currently managed provincially with services decentralized to the sub-district level within Districts. The NWDOH has developed a Policy Framework and Strategy which details a number of interventions that the department is implementing to ensure improvements in EMS delivery. Key to the strategy is the centralization of EMS Command to the EMS district and provincial offices, moving away from the current decentralized command where district health services were responsible for management of EMS. However before vertical reporting of EMS could be implemented, a need was identified to capacitate both the districts and provincial EMS offices particularly with administrative support staff to enable the office to function. Critical vacant positions have been identified after funds were secured for this financial year and the department in process of advertising, and recruitment currently. Plans are that the centralization of command would be effected within the next financial year as the department continues to prepare accordingly.

Two other main objectives in the policy framework entails centralizing the 4 existing district call centres which are working on manual systems into one highly digitalized central communication centre and the establishment of the Planned Patient Transport (PPT) sub-program. The Infrastructure Development and Technical Services unit of the department has been allocated funds and has recently appointed consultants to refurbish and furnish the building identified for the Emergency Communications Centre. With regards to Planned Patient Transport the sub-programme responsible for budget (financial planning) within EMS is utilized to procure red fleet and does not have any staff attached to it. The function of PPT is currently done with the same EMS resources and this negatively impacts EMS operations. The revised EMS staff structure includes PPT and the entire ideal departmental structure is awaiting approval.

The primary response times of EMS in both rural and urban areas continue improving in order to meet the national norms and standards. The revised national standard for EMS response time is that Priority 1 (P1) patients should be reached within 60 minutes in rural areas and within 30 minutes in urban areas for 75% of the cases. EMS in the province over the previous financial year (2020/2021) registered an improved 76 per cent of rural patients and 70.9% per cent of urban patients serviced within the national norms. The target set for P1 urban and P1 rural in the current Annual Performance plan is ≥60% and ≥70% respectively given the resources available. EMS currently attends to 67 per cent of urban P1 patients in 30 minutes and 73 per cent of rural P1 patients within 60 minutes.

Currently there are 37 operational Paramedics and Emergency Care Practitioners (ECP) appointed across the districts which has helped reduce the reliance on private services. A number of ambulances are also upgraded to be utilized as Advance Life Support ambulances for ICU related cases.

(b) Challenges

The NWDOH is experiencing a shortage of ambulances. In addressing the gap the department has been using outright purchasing by procuring red-fleet using National Treasury approved RT57 contract. In 2018/2019 final year, the Department of Community Safety and Transport Management’s (DCST) Head of Department issued a circular instructing all provincial departments to cease procuring any fleet directly from RT57 as it results in unwarranted audit findings. DCST further indicated that they will no longer assist any department that procure their own fleet with any support from their Transport section, which is responsible for registration on e-Natis, licensing, e-fuel installations and maintenance/repairs of vehicles.

Following the circular, the Department transferred funds to DCST for procurement of red-fleet. However in January 2020, DCST returned funds to the Department proposing that the Department apply for roll-over of the same funds from Treasury. This was because the delivery period as per contract was going to overlap into next financial year whilst vehicle manufacturers were experiencing production challenges. As a result, the Department could not procure red-fleet in 2020/21 financial year. The Department applied for roll-over of funds to this financial year but the provincial Treasury did not approve the roll-over of funds.

For the 2021/22 financial year the department has already transferred R33 million allocated for motor vehicles to DCST to procure 41 ambulances and the DCST have committed a purchase order and is currently awaiting conversion of panel vans to ambulances before delivery to the NWDOH. The department is internally identifying funds which needs to be re-prioritized towards implementing an alternative strategy of procurement of red fleet through full maintenance leasing (this alternative procurement model is currently undergoing consultation processes). A further R30 million is estimated as the required budget for this initiative as part of the first phase.

(c) EMS Shortfalls

The lack of efficiency in the current manual based district call centers is affecting service delivery as well as management of resources and information management. The introduction of a comprehensive emergency communication solution which is technology based will greatly assist and also improve public access to these services. As already indicated above, a building has been handed over by the Department of Public Works and IDTS has appointed consultants to establish the central Emergency Communications Centre.

The inability to inject new fleet in the previous financial year has contributed adversely on the prevailing shortages, most specifically of ambulances. Furthermore, the current turnaround time for repairs (1 – 365 days) as well as replacement and repairs of red fleet is not responsive to the needs of the department, hence the department is pursuing leasing of vehicles as an alternative.

(3) (a) The SAMRC has a collaborative research agreement with Aurum Rustenburg to be a clinical trial site for Sisonke, the phase 3b open-label study of the Ad26 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine administered to health care workers.

(b) SAMRC entered into a collaborative agreement with Aurum to provide for funding to Aurum sites to participate in the Sisonke clinical trial. In terms of the agreement, Aurum is required to implement the study at its sites in accordance with the approved protocol and good clinical practice.

(4) There are no senior officials at the SAMRC that have been suspended.

END.

08 September 2021 - NW1981

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What is the total (a) amount that the official geographical name changes in each province had cost his department since 1 April 2016 and (b) number of official geographical names that were changed in each province in each of the specified financial years?

Reply:

The DSAC is not responsible for a cost Geographical name changes in the provinces. The provincial and local spheres of government are in the position to respond to that.

 

NO

NEW NAME

PREVIOUS NAME

PROVINCE/

FEATURE

DATE GAZETTED

 

Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport

Change of

name from Port Elizabeth Airport

Eastern Cape

Airport

22 February 2021

 

Chisirha

Correction of spelling from Cisirat)

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Chizele

Correction of spelling from Cizele

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 February 2021

 

Dontsa

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 February 2021

 

Gqeberha

Change of name from Port Elizabeth

Eastern Cape

City

22 February 2021

 

Kariega

Change of name from Uitenhage

Eastern Cape

City

22 February 2021

 

Khohlombeni

Change of name from Mfabantu

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement/Village

22 February 2021

 

King Phalo Airport

Change of name from East London

Airport

Eastern Cape

Airport

22 February 2021

 

Kom

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

KwaNyezi

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Lotha

correction of spelling from Lota

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Luxeni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 February 2021

 

Mantshilibeni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 February 2021

 

Mnyameni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Mphetshwa

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Ngqayi

Change of name from Katkop

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Nongqulana Mountain

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Mountain

22 February 2021

 

Ntabozuko

Change of name from Berlin

Eastern Cape

Town

22 February 2021

 

Nqanqarhu

Change of name from MaClear Town

Eastern Cape

Town

22 February 2021

 

Nyandeni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Pholela

Existing name registration)

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Pirie Mission

Correction of spelling from Pierie Mission

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Qonce

(Change of name from King William’s Town)

Eastern Cape

Village

22 February 2021

 

Amathole Mountains

(correction of spelling from Amatola

Eastern Cape

Mountain

23 March 2020

 

Bumbane

Existing name registration)

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Cildarha

Correction of spelling from Cildara

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Dayimane

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

EmaTolweni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

23 March 2020

 

Ezingcuka

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Gxulu

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

River

23 March 2020

 

Marhubeni

Correction of spelling from Marubeni

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Mbuthweni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Mhuku

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Qhankqu

Correction of spelling from Qanqu

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Sihlabeni

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

23 March 2020

 

Zithathele

Existing name registration

Eastern Cape

Village

23 March 2020

 

Chatha

correction of spelling from Cata

Eastern Cape

Village

22 Mach 2019

 

Chefane

Correction of spelling from Cefane

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

EmaBheleni

Correction of spelling from EmaBeleni

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Bompass

Registration of a new name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Gwili-gwili

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Khubusi

Correction of spelling from Kubusi

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

KwaNxakwe

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Dam

22 March 2019

 

Kwelerha

Correction of spelling from Kwelera

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Khwenxurha

Correction of spelling from Kwenxurha

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Lenye

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Lusasa

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Lusizini

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Luqhoqhweni

correction of spelling from Luqoqhweni

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Mangqukela

Registration of a long standing name be registered

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Makhazi

Correction of spelling from Makazi

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Mbholompo

Correction of spelling from Mbolompo

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Mbhongweni

Correction of spelling from Mbongweni

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Mqhekezweni

Correction of spelling from Mqekezweni

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Masincedane

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Magrangxeni

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Mnyameni Dam

Long existing name to be registered

Eastern Cape

Dam

22 March 2019

 

Mthwaku

(Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Mpethu

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Hill

22 March 2019

 

Mpintsho

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Stream

22 March 2019

 

Mchantsi

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

Mqukwana

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Mpheko

Correction of name from Mpeko

Eastern Cape

Forest

22 March 2019

 

Mvulane Dam

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Dam

22 March 2019

 

Mzwini

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Forest

22 March 2019

 

Ncalukeni

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Ndlovini

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Ngculu

Correction of spelling from Nculu

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Ngobozana

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Ngqumeya

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

Ngwevana

Correction of spelling from Gwevana

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

Ngxalawe

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Ngxingxolo

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Nomngxiki

Correction of spelling from Nomgxeki

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Phumlani

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

22 March 2019

 

Qumrha River

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

Quko

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

Sihlitho

Correction of spelling from Sihlito)

 

Village

22 March 2019

 

Sotho

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Sithebe)

(Correction of spelling from Sitebe

Eastern Cape

Administrative Area

22 March 2019

 

Sithungu

Correction of spelling from Situngu)

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Thembalethu

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Township

22 March 2019

 

Tshoxa

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Town

22 March 2019

 

Tyhalarha

Correction of spelling from Tyhalara)

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Xesi River

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

River

22 March 2019

 

Xhongorha

Correction of spelling from Xhongora)

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Zanyokwe

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Village

22 March 2019

 

Hamakete-kete

correction of

spelling from Ketekete

Eastern

Cape.

Settlement

22 MARCH 2018

 

Khanya

change of

name from

Khalazembe

Eastern

Cape.

Settlement

22 MARCH 2018

 

Linga Diko

change of name

from Kaffirskraal

Eastern

Cape.

Settlement

22 MARCH 2018

 

Sahlulo Chithwa

 

Eastern

Cape.

Settlement

22 MARCH 2018

 

Makhanda

change of

name from

Grahamstown

Eastern

Cape.

Town

29 JUNE 2018

 

Nompukane

Official

registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

Hamakete-teke

Correction

of spelling from “Kete-kete”

Eastern Cape

Administrative

area

30 JUNE 2017

 

Simakamaka

Official

registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

Qumrha

Correction of

spelling from Komgha

Eastern Cape

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

Cacadu

Change of name from Lady Frere

Eastern Cape

Town

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Chris Hani Bridge

Change of name from Thornhill

Bridge

Eastern Cape

Bridge

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

EmaZizini Dam

registration of a long standing of name

Eastern Cape

Dam

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eSinqumeni Dam

Registration of a long standing name

Eastern Cape

Dam

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZiflarheni

Official Registration

Eastern Cape

Valley

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

ILiwa Lamaxhalanga

Registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Cliff

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. I

ILiwa leRhini

Official registration

Eastern Cape

Cliff

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

imbazamasinga

Registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

iGgorha

Registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Stream

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

ISigingqi sikamhala

Registration of a name

Eastern Cape

hill

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

IntabakaXesibe

Official registration

Eastern Cape

hill

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

intabayeSwekile

Official registration

Eastern Cape

hill

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Komani

Change of name from Queenstown

Eastern Cape

Town

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Khwowa

Change of name from Elliot

Eastern Cape

Town

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

KwaBhanca

Change of name from Mount Frere

Eastern Cape

Town

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

lengwayo

Official registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Well

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Masizakhe

Correction of spelling from Umasizakhane

Eastern Cape

Township

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

MaXesibeni

Change of name from Mount Ayliff

Eastern Cape

Town

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Mchantsi

Correction of spelling from Mkantsi

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Msulungwana

Registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Hill

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Mzintlava

Correction of corrupted form of language

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Nkciyo

Change of name from ngciyo

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Ngculu

Correction of spelling from Nculu

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Ngwevana

Correction of spelling from Gwevana

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Ngoqo Dam

Registration of long standing name

Eastern Cape

Dam

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Iphungela Hill

Registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Hill

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Qwanti

Correction of spelling Quanti

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Mankazana

Dam registration of long standing

Eastern Cape

Dam

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Rholihlahla Residence

change of name from Silver

City and Ext 7

Eastern Cape

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Rhwantsini

registration of new name

Eastern Cape

Dam

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Rekhuditse ()

change of name from Mandela

Eastern Cape

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Xonxa

change of name from White Kei River

Eastern Cape

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Xolani

change of name from Smith Location

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Umjilo

change of name from Jimmy

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Thembisile

change of name from Lloyd Location

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Sotho

Correction of spelling from Soto

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Sithungu

correction of spelling from Situngu

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Ntsikana

correction of spelling from Tsinikane

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Nontongwana

change of name from Maarsdorp

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Ngquthu

correction of spelling from Ngqutu

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Ngcwengxa

change of

name from Kat River

Eastern Cape

River

17 JUNE 2016

  1.  

Ngcabasa

Official registration of a name

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Makhazi

correction of spelling from Makazi

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement and River

17 JUNE 2016

 

KwaNcaza

change of name from Readsdale

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

KwaDlomo Dam

change

of name from Sharpeville Dam

Eastern Cape

Dam

17 JUNE 2016

 

Gangqeni

change of name from Phillipton

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Khwenxurha

correction of orthography from Kwenxura

Eastern Cape

Administrative area (i.e.

conglomeration of human

settlements

17 JUNE 2016

 

eMabhofolweni (change of name from Woodlands

A Human Settlement in Ngqushwa Local Municipality in

the Eastern Cape

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Diphini

correction of orthography from Dipini

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Dikeni

change of name from Alice

Eastern Cape

Town, Post Office and Railway Station

17 JUNE 2016

 

Bhulurha

correction of

spelling from Bulugha

Eastern Cape

River

17 JUNE 2016

 

Bhola

correction of spelling from Bola)

Eastern Cape

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Sinqobile

Registration of an

existing name

Gauteng

suburb

30 JUNE 2017

 

Boiketlong

change of name

from Serope Seyabenye

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

Dlamini

correction of

spelling from Dhlamini

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

eMkhathini

correction of spelling from Emkatini

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Emndeni

correction of orthography from Emdeni

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

Esiphethweni (correction of orthography from

Isiphethweni)

correction of orthography from

Isiphethweni

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Ironside

change of name from Ironyside

Gauteng

Dam

17 JUNE 2016

 

Khayalami

correction of

spelling from Kyalami

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

Kgatlamping

correction of orthography from

Khatamping

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

Khaya sands

correction of orthographyfrom Kaya

Sands

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

KwaMpanza

correction of spelling from Mampinja

Gauteng

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Kwanele

correction of

spelling from Kwenele

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Leeupan

correction of

orthography from Leewpan

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Skilpaddam

correction of orthography from Skilpad

Gauteng

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Skhosana

correction of orthography from Skozana

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Sophiatown

change of

name from Triomph

Gauteng

Suburb

17 JUNE 2016

 

Spaarpwater

Correction of spelling from Sparwater

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Thembisa

correction of orthography Tembisa

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Thokoza

Correction of orthography from Tokoza

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Thulani Park

change of

name from Snake Park

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Tsakani

correction of spelling from Tsakane

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Tswelepole

Correction of orthographyfrom

Tswelapele

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Thulisa Park

correction of

spelling from Tulisa

Gauteng

Township

17 JUNE 2016

 

Vuyo

correction of orthography from Vivo

Gauteng

Human Settlement

17 JUNE 2016

 

Zonkizizwe

correction of spelling Zonkezizwe

Gauteng

Location

17 JUNE 2016

 

Chamdor

registration of an

existing name

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

iThembalethu

Correction of

orthography from

Ethembalethu

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Luipaardsvlie

Correction of

orthography from

Luipadsvlei

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Malatsi

Correction of

orthography from Malatjie

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Munsieville

Correction of orthography

from Munsienville

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Rantedal

Correction of

orthography from Rent-endal

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Rietvallei

existing name to

be registered

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Suikerbosfontein

Correction of orthography

from Zuikerboschfontien

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Tswelopele

Correction of

orthography from

Tswelapele

Gauteng

Township

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

Tudor Shaft

Change of

name from Dunusa

Gauteng

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

eCelakubani

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Village

30 JUNE 2017

 

eMthavuna

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Village

30 JUNE 2017

 

eNkonjaneni

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Fountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

iJozini

Correction of

spelling from Jozini)

KZN

Dam

30 JUNE 2017

 

iNkiwane

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

iNtonga

Name to be

registered

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

iSibandlana

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

iThuvukazi

Name to be

registered

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

KwaNikwe

Name to be

registered

KZN

Village

30 JUNE 2017

 

KwaShibe

Name to be

registered

KZN

Village

30 JUNE 2017

 

uCwele

Name to be

registered

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

uDingindawo

Name to be

registered

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

uGonya

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

uMabhumaneni

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

uMzimkhulwana

Name to

be registered

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

uNdende

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

uNtabingashi

Name to be

registered

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

uNyokeni

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

River

30 JUNE 2017

 

uSipholi

Name to

be registered

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

uSikhaleni

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

uQongwane

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

Mountain

30 JUNE 2017

 

eMthonjaneni

Change of

name Melomoth

KZN

Town

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

eMhlangeni

Change of

name from Ezitendeni

KZN

Village

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

eNgoleleni

Change of name

from oHlongeni

KZN

Village

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

iMahlungulu

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

Mountain

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

iNzalu

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

Mountain

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

iQurha

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

River

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

iSinyazi

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

River

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uMhulanja

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

River

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uMabhuqandlela

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

Mountain

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uMgubho

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

Mountain

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uMabhengwane

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

Mountain

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uMadwaleni

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

River

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uNhliziyonkulu

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

Forest

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uNgwaleni

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

River

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uSidada

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

Mountain

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

uYini

Registration of

a long standing name

KZN

River

15 DECEMBER 2017

  1. 59.

eFahla

 

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016.

  1. 60.

uFahla

 

KZN

Mountain

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 61.

eMagovini

Registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 62.

eMagovini

Registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Forest

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 63.

eMafikeni

Registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 64.

eMahhukwini

change of

name from Doornhoek

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 65.

eMakhasaneni

correction of spelling from Makhasaneni

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 66.

eMankonjane

registration

of a long standing of name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 67.

eManzawayo

correction of orthography from

Manzawayo

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 68.

iManzawayo

correction of spelling from Manzawayo Natal

KZN

Stream

09 FEBRUARY 2016

  1. 69.

eMaphinini

correction of spelling from Phinini

KZN

Stream

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMibuzweni

change of name from Kirkintulloch

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMkhindini

correction of spelling from Mkhindini

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMcakeni

registration of a long existing name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMhlosingeni

registration of a long existing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMhlwaneni

Change of

name from Drifontein

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMthinemide

correction of spelling from Mthinomude

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMtiwe

registration of a long existing name)

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMunywini

Registration of

name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eNhlanomkhize

registration

of name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eNkwenkwe

correction of spelling from Nkwenkwe

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

iNkwenkwe

correction of spelling from Nkwenkwe

KZN

Mountain

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eNkuthu

change of name

from Kleinfontein

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eNtantane

change of name

from Watershed

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

ePhondweni

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Ford

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eShayamoya

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eShiyabazali

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eThembeni

Correction of spelling from Entembeni.

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eSigodini

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Ford

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

EZakheni

correction of spelling from eZakheni

KZN

Post Office

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZikhonkwaneni

change of name from Rooderpoort

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZimpisini

registration of name

KZN

Forest

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZimpisini

registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZintombini

registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZinyokeni

registration of name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eZingulubeni

registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

iKubafazini

registration of a long standing of name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

iBiva

Registration of a long standing of name .

KZN

Forest

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

iBhukubhuku

registration of a long standing of name .

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

KwaCongco

correction of spelling from Gcongco

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

KwaGina

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

KwaNtababomvu

change of name from Skoeman

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Kwa-Welcome

Correction of orthography and registration of a name

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Margate Retirement village

change of name from Village of Happiness

KZN

Post Office

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Ndakheni

correction of spelling

 

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uBhodweni

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uBusobubi

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Forest

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uGadlabeza

Registration of a long standing name .

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uHlanjana

Registration of a long standing name

KZN

Fountain

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uKhungwana

Registration

of a long standing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMagwazithonga

Registration of a long

standing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMchamomanzi

Registration of a long standing name.

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMemfu

correction of spelling from Memfu

KZN

Mountain

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMhlabane

registration of long standing name .

KZN

Village

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMhlabane

registration of long standing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMhlabane

registration of long standing name

KZN

Forest

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMphosazembe

Correction of spelling from Mphosazembe

KZN

Stream

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMlonyeni

registration of long standing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uMgubulundwane

registration of long standing name

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uNcibidwane

registration of long standing name

KZN

Stream

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Unsonge

correction of orthography from Insonge

KZN

River

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

uNomatasi ()

A Lake in uMkhanyakude District Municipality in KwaZulu Natal

KZN

Lake

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

eMakinatini

Registration of an

existing name

KZN

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

eMboza

existing name to be registered

KZN

Village

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

eZigodini

existing name to be registered

KZN

lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

eSiphondweni

existing name to be registered

KZN

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uBhulabhula

existing name to be registered

KZN

Plain

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uKhwethe

existing name to be registered

KZN

Stream

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uKhwici

existing name to be registered

KZN

Stream

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uSikhunyana

existing name to be registered

KZN

Forest

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uMagalela

existing name to be registered

KZN

Human Settlement

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uMacambela

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Stream

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uMagcwalangenkung

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uMaguzu

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uMgxamu

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uMphondo

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uNdamukane

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uNtabende

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Mountain

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uPhoko

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uZigwenu

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

uZinyane

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Lake

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

eHlokohloko

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Village

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

eMahlaleni

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

eMkhayane

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Village

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

eMlobaneni

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Village

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

eMseshana

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

eSigqushu

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

iNgweni

existing name to

be registered

KZN

uMkhanyakude

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

KwaMadonela

existing name to

be registered

KZN

Village

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

U-Anyanisi

Registration of

An existing name

KZN

Forest

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uDabukane

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMakhongolo

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Stream

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMalomba

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Forest

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMamunyela

Registration of an existing name

KZN

Forest

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMaphuphu

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMatshane

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMhholomba

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Forest

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMhlanzela

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMkhuhlwana

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uMphuma

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uNomatshe

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uNtinini

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uShumbu

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uSigquluba

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Hill

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uSihosha

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Fountain

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

uSikhumba

Registration of

an existing name

KZN

Lake

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

eHlanganani

Change of name from Prospect Farm

Mpumalanga

Settlement

24 DECEMBER 2018

 

eSiyasebenza

Long existing name to be registered

Mpumalanga

Settlement

24 DECEMBER 2018

 

eSukumani

Change of name from Tafelhoek 1

Mpumalanga

Settlement

24 DECEMBER 2018

 

eThuthukani

Change of name from Tweefelhoek

Mpumalanga

Settlement

24 DECEMBER 2018

 

eZamokuhle

Long existing name to be registered

Mpumalanga

Settlement

24 DECEMBER 2018

 

Bumbanani

Registration of a long standing name

Mpumalanga

Settlement

27 DECEMBER 2019

 

eMvelo

Change of name from Amsterdam

Mpumalanga

Settlement

27 DECEMBER 2019

 

Insephe

Correction of spelling from Iswepe

Mpumalanga

Settlement

27 DECEMBER 2019

 

Entuthukweni

Change of name from kwaggafontein

Mpumalanga

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Joana Jiyane

Official registration

Mpumalanga

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Mthunjwa (E)

change of name from Kwaggafontein

Mpumalanga

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Sesakhile

change of name from Tweefontein Portion

540 220-JR ga

Mpumalanga

Village

09 September 2016

 

Thokozani

change of name from Tweefontein M (Portion

170) 22 JR

Mpumalanga

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Thoko Mabhena

change of

name from Embalenhle Extension 18

Mpumalanga

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Thuli Fakude

change of name from Leandra

Mpumalanga

Settlement

09 FEBRUARY 2016

 

Rametsi Country Estate

New Name

North West

Township

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

Bushbuck Hills Game Farm

Registration of a new township name

North West

Township

20 September 2019

 

George Dick Montshioa

Airport

Change of name

from Mafikeng

Airport/Mmabatho Airport

North West

Airport

15 DECEMBER 2017

 

Kgangkgang

Change of name from Klipan

North West

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

Lokotsi

Change of name

from Nooitgedacht

North West

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

Mararampe

Change of name from Heefers Lust

North West

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

Dithakwaneng

Registration of a new township name

North West

Village

20 September 2019

 

Tesselaarsdal

Correction of

spelling from Teslaarsdal

Western Cape

Human Settlement

09 DECEMBER 2016

 

Dorha Dam

change of name from Rockview

Western

Cape

Dam

17 JUNE 2016

 

Bo-Kaap

change of name

from Schotchekloof

Western

Cape

Suburb

10 OCTOBER 2016

 

District Six

Change of name from Zonnebloem

Western

Cape

Suburb

17 December 2019

 

08 September 2021 - NW1936

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). What (a) is the name of each consultant used by his department in the past three financial years and (b) total amount was spent on the specified consultants in the specified financial years; (2). whether any bonuses have been paid out to any employee in (a) each entity reporting to him and (b) his department in the past three financial years; if not, why not; if so, (i) to whom and (ii) what total amount in each specified case?

Reply:

1. Due to the integration process of the two formerly separate Departments; that is Department of Sport and Recreation and the Department Arts and Culture. The collation of information and integration of the information is taking longer than anticipated. Once the process is done and information verified we will forward to the Honourable Member.

08 September 2021 - NW1923

Profile picture: Kwankwa, Mr NL

Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of many challenges experienced by COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant beneficiaries and applicants in the 2020-21 financial year, such as money only being collected at the Post Office even though grant recipients provided banking details, as well as technical problems at the Post Office that resulted in many persons, more especially those from rural areas sleeping outside the premises to ensure they get their money and beneficiaries having had to stand in long queues at the Post Office, including some beneficiaries who did not get all their payments, what measures has she put in place to ensure that (a) money is deposited straight into the beneficiaries’ bank accounts to curb long queues, (b) COVID-19 protocols are observed in the queues and (c) beneficiaries get their full payments?

Reply:

a) In order to address some of the challenges which were experienced in the previous cycle of the R350 SRD grant the process has changed, to enable all applicants to provide banking details on application and not only when the application is approved. Information provided as at 18 August 2021 is that, of the 8 931 375 applications received, 6 817 229 (76%) have provided information on bank accounts. This information still has to be verified to confirm which accounts can be used for the grant to be paid into.

SASSA is dependent on the provision of information on bank accounts which is provided by the applicants. In cases where there is no bank account details provided, SASSA is obliged to effect payment through the post office, as there is no other alternative.

However, engagements with the post office and Postbank have been held to introduce alternative access channels for funds deposited into the accounts held by Postbank on behalf of the post office. This will allow for funds to be collected at participating merchants and Standard Bank ATMs thus reducing the number of people who have to collect over the counter at post offices. While this solution is yet to be tested, it is believed that it will significantly reduce the number of citizens who have to report in person at post offices.

b) COVID protocols will be enforced at all post offices. The post office has confirmed that they will stagger payments according to last 3 digits of the ID number, to reduce the number of people who report to any one post office in a single day, and that they will employ active queue monitors to manage compliance to the protocols.

c) Where beneficiaries use their own bank accounts, there are bank charges which they have to cover themselves. However, when they are paid through the post office, they are able to access their full grant amount without bank charges.

A full reconciliation is done with Post Office to ensure that all funds due to any beneficiaries are paid out when the beneficiary tries to access his/her funds.

08 September 2021 - NW1932

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What are the reasons that student funding was withdrawn for Mahlodi Welcome Matamela (details furnished), who is a student at Tshwane University of Technology Polokwane campus who had received the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding for the year 2021 and (b) who will be responsible for the accumulated debt that the specified student has incurred?

Reply:

(a) Ms Mahlodi Matamela applied and was provisionally approved for a NSFAS bursary for 2020. There was no registration claim submitted by any institution to NSFAS to confirm registration in 2020. The 2021 funding can only be confirmed where a 2020 registration was received, and the student passed the registered modules. In the case of Ms Matamela, both the registration data and results for 2020 have not been submitted to NSFAS. In addition, there is no record that the student applied for 2021 funding.

(b) If registration data for 2020 is submitted and the institution confirms through results that the student passed, the 2020 and 2021 years of funding will be covered by NSFAS.

08 September 2021 - NW2054

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

In light of the composition of Team South Africa at the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics, what steps (a) has the Government taken to ensure that in future events of a similar nature, the South African national teams will represent the demographic composition of the South African population and the transformative spirit of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and (b) is the Government taking to assist talented young persons from disadvantaged backgrounds and previously excluded populations to prepare and train to represent the Republic in international Olympics competitions?

Reply:

The Department recognizes that access to participation opportunities cannot be realized without provision of sporting facilities at the community level and at the school sport which both will act as feeders. The transformation of sport requires a multi-pronged approach which has fundamentals embedded in the lower level of participation to maximize access.

Whilst recognizing that provision of sport facilities is primarily a Constitutional Responsibility of Municipalities, the Department with its limited financial resources has over the years been providing multi-sport courts particularly in schools, community gyms and play parks.

This we believe will contribute significantly in the transformation of sport in all sporting codes to reflect the demographics of our society.

Notwithstanding the fact that talent identification, athlete development and athlete preparation is the responsibility of the Federations at National. Provincial and Local Level, the Department has been implementing the Schools Sport Programme. Through the MoU with DBE, the Department has been able to fully implement its part of the MoU i.e. deliver the school sport district tournaments, assist learners to participate at the provincial and national school sport championships. Annually we assist about 2500 schools with the equipment and attire. We also provide teachers responsible for School Sport with capacity building programmes in various skills like Sport coaching, administration and first aid.

The Department also has a Club Development Programme. This programme is meant to ensure that there is a structured process to support the community leagues in the provinces which are implemented with the Sport Federations.

In addition to these interventions the Department has been implementing the Athlete Support Programme.

Athletes supported through the scientific support programme seeks to provide dedicated support to identified talented athletes identified by National Federations to reach their optimal performance.

Athletes are also supported through the Provincial Sports Academies by providing dedicated support to talented athletes who are at a provincial level with the potential of progressing to national level of the through high performance sport system.

In addition, athletes are supported through the Sports Bursary programme which targets 50 athletes a year. While the number of athletes seems to be miniscule for any meaningful impact to be made, the reality is that as new intakes enter the programme, others exit on having completed Grade 12. Support is given to athletes who have been identified by different Sport Federations during the National School Sport Championships and then placed into Sport focus schools. The support provides R100 000 per athlete per year from Grade 8-12 for 5 years. Support is provided in particular, to previously disadvantaged individuals (women and athletes with disabilities) remains critical in Governments endeavour to achieve transformation in sport.

07 September 2021 - NW1649

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the full, relevant details on the (a) dates, (b) destinations and (c) costs of all flights boarded by a certain person (Mphumzi Mdekazi) (i) between 1 May 2019 and 1 October 2020 and (ii) during the National State of Disaster period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

The Department incurred the following costs in relation to Mr Mdekazi for the period 1 May 2019 and during the National State of Disaster period :

Category

Cost

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 1 763 878.00

---00O00---

07 September 2021 - NW1650

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the full, relevant details of (a) all travel and (b) additional expenses incurred by each member of the National Rapid Response Task Team (i) between 1 March and 1 October 2020 and (ii) during the National State of Disaster period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

The following expenses were incurred by the Members of the National Rapid Response Task Team for the period 1 March 2019 and during the National State of Disaster period.

Name of official

Category

Cost

Mr Zolile Burnsncamashe

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 306 296

 

Mr Lekgotla Dichoetlise

Car hire and transfers

R 116 709

Mr Mahle Khuzani

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 283 800

 

Ms Dudu Manana

Accommodation/ Car hire

R 48 319

Mr Mzwakhe Masoue

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 468 446

Mr Maxwele Chumani

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 335 875

Mr Mogomotsi Mogodiri

Car hire/domestic accommodation

R 53 216

Dr Mandisa Mokwena

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 27 709

Ms Carla Motau

Car Hire

R 59 801

Mr Likhaya Ngqezana

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 543 363

Mr Simphiwe Ngxakeni

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and laundry

R 386 727

Ms Nolonwabo Quanta

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R355 622

Ms Debbie Raphuthi

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 112 742.00

Ms Suliwe Shilwayi

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 488 736

Mr Samuel Thembani

Car hire and domestic accommodation

R 144 422

TOTAL

R 3 732 795

---00O00---

06 September 2021 - NW1956

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has her department taken with regard to the plight of matriculants from Hebron Technical and Commercial High School, who enrolled for Matric in 2019 and wrote some of their examinations in 2020, yet have not received their results to date?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Head of Examinations made contact with the Principal of Hebron Technical and Commercial High school and the principal confirmed that all learners that wrote the full examination at the school in November 2019 and November 2020  have been resulted.

However, there are seventeen candidates who have incomplete results in the November 2019 examination, due to them being absent for one or more subjects during the November 2019 examination. However, there is no record that these candidates with incomplete results, registered to write the examination in the subjects for which they were absent, in November 2020. 

It will therefore be appreciated, if the names and identity numbers of candidates that claim to have written the examination and not resulted, could be forwarded to the Department of Basic Education, so that these specific candidates can be investigated.   

06 September 2021 - NW1786

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

1)What total number of illegal foreign nationals were received at the Lindela Repatriation Centre for the period 1 January 2020 to 1 August 2021; (2) what total number of persons were successfully deported; (3) (a) what total number of persons were released back into the Republic and (b) for what reason; (4) what total amount does his department spend on housing an illegal migrant per day at the specified repatriation centre?

Reply:

1. The total number of illegal foreign nationals received at the Lindela Repatriation Centre for the period 1 January 2020 to 1 August 2021 is 17514.

2. 16 782 foreign nationals were successfully deported.

(3)(a-b) As per the table below:

Released to avoid 120 days in detention, due to closure of the borders

Released after claiming asylum

Released and handed over to the family as they were very sick to avoid death in detention

Released from the facility to arresting officer for further investigation. e.g. Claiming to be South African and Asylum permit holders

573

141

7

11

(4) The costing of the housing is not calculated on a daily basis according to the current Service Level Agreement. It is separated according to 3 categories and these are on an occupancy of 1 500 persons, including the items:

Fixed – R6,057,779.04

General Maintenance, Group support and shared services, Insurance, Kitchen Fees, Licence and Subscriptions, Medicines and Medical Services, Office Automation, Pest Control, Professional Services, Property Rental, Security, Staffing, VPN Connectivity, Cost of Sales General, Vehicle Expenses (lease payments and repairs, maintenance and other)

Head Count – R1,193,550.19

Food costs, Consumables, Laundry, Utilities (including Water, Electricity and Municipality rates)

The total per month is R7, 251,329.23 for an average occupancy of up to 1500 inmates per month.

END

06 September 2021 - NW1997

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What are the (a) details of each case that is currently being handled by the counter-strategic litigation unit in his department and (b) reasons for pursuing each case?

Reply:

Draft Reply

The Department of Home Affairs doesn’t have a counter strategic litigation unit and therefore we are unable to give responses on the question. We however have a Branch responsible for Counter Corruption and also a Litigation Directorate under Chief Directorate Legal Services.

END

06 September 2021 - NW2021

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to the violent looting that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July 2021, what (a) was the national total cost to her department in damages to schools, (b) is the total value of looted goods from schools in Rands that was recovered and (c) is the total number of persons who have been arrested and prosecuted in this regard; (3) what is the national total cost to her department for school vandalism in each year since 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available

Reply:

The question has been referred to provincial education departments for detailed information. The response will be forwarded as soon as all responses have been received and collated.

06 September 2021 - NW2043

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to learner pregnancies according to each grade in each province (a) during the (i) 2019 and (ii) 2020 academic years and (b) since 1 January 2021, what (i) is the total number of pregnancies reported to her department, (ii) is the name of each school, (iii) total number of learners returned to complete school, (iv) total number of learners left school, (v) number of learners wrote exams whilst pregnant, (vi) number went into labour whilst at school and (vii) are the details of any assistance that was given to the learners by her department and/or schools?

Reply:

With regards to the question on learner pregnancy, it is necessary to note the difficulties in reporting accurate information on the number of learners that are pregnant at schools.  The school Principal or school Administrator captures the information on the South African School Administration and Management System (SA-SAMS), provided that the learners declare their pregnancy. There are many instances where the Principal might not be aware of a learner being pregnant, as it is not declared; and therefore, it cannot be recorded.  Furthermore, societal norms regarding teenage pregnancy, may prohibit learners from reporting that they are pregnant; hence there is under-reporting of teenage pregnancy on SA-SAMS.  The Department uses the General Household Survey (GHS), which provides the best information on learner pregnancy statistics.  Given that the GHS survey is sample-based, and that the proportion of learners that report pregnancy is very low, the actual number of pregnancies should be interpreted with extreme caution.

06 September 2021 - NW1959

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of learners has been recorded in her department to have fallen pregnant in the 2015-20 period?

Reply:

With regards to the question on learner pregnancy, it is necessary to note the difficulties in reporting accurate information on the number of learners that are pregnant at schools.  The school Principal or school Administrator captures the information on the South African School Administration and Management System (SA-SAMS), provided that the learners declare their pregnancy.  There are many instances where the Principal might not be aware of a learner being pregnant, as it is not declared; and therefore, it cannot be recorded.  Furthermore, societal norms regarding teenage pregnancy may prohibit learners from reporting that they are pregnant; hence, there is under-reporting of teenage pregnancy on SA-SAMS.  The Department uses the General Household Survey (GHS), which provides the best information on learner pregnancy statistics.  Given that the GHS survey is sample-based, and that the proportion of learners that report pregnancy is very low, the actual number of pregnancies should be interpreted with extreme caution.

03 September 2021 - NW1899

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With regard to his reply to question 695 on 6 April 2021, (a) how are lawyers and/or legal firms chosen from the list of service providers, (b) what are the reasons that Ndobela Lamola Incorporated was selected to do so much work that they earned approximately 25% of all fees paid by the National Lotteries Commission between 2016 and 2020 and (c)(i) how was R5,7 million spent on the Mzukisi Makatse case, (ii) what are the full total breakdown of the costs associated with the case and (iii) what were the reasons for the costs having been so high?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

a) “ The National Lotteries Commission is required to fulfil its mandate and ensure that the Commission performs its functions efficiently and effectively in compliance with this Act and any other applicable law. The NLC applies the principles of openness and transparency to advise the Minister on the efficacy of legislation pertaining to lotteries and ancillary matters, exercises its power to institute legal proceedings to properly discharge its functions and responsibilities and approach any court for any order the board deems appropriate for effective regulation and enforcement of the Lotteries Act.

In order to fulfil the above legislative requirements, law firms are chosen on the basis of expertise, skills, availability, capacity and urgency of the matters amongst others. The principle of rotation is always one that plays a part in which firm gets the brief, however the above criterion should not be viewed in isolation as capability of executing the work together with proven track record becomes key.

b) Ndobela Lamola Inc has been duly appointed through an SCM processes to serve on the NLC legal panel for two consecutive terms. The firm would have been issued with instructions that have overlapped to other financial years resulting in protracted matters that inevitably incur legal costs equivalent to the time spent on each matter. This firm specialises in conducting investigations and a bulk of the matters they have been instructed to do would commence as investigations and thereafter lead to labour and/or litigation matters which they would be requested to continue with such instructions due to it being a more efficient and effective manner of managing the brief.

Fees paid to Attorneys vary and include disbursements that would relate to travel and accommodation and those that would have been paid to other professionals outside the firm, for instance, in cases where consultants were utilised to advice in complex matters, the brief of junior and senior counsel and/or expert witnesses called in to testify. The notion of Attorney’s fees needs to be understood in context of how legal practice works.

c) (i) The Makatse matter commenced as a purely labour relations matter wherein a Disciplinary Hearing was held, thereafter the matter was subsequently referred to the CCMA situated in East London. The employee opted to abandon the CCMA process and lodged proceedings in the High Court situated in East London. The NLC defended and the matter is still ongoing. It is worthy to note that the NLC was successful in the High Court proceedings, and costs were awarded in favour of the NLC, such costs will be duly recovered. An application for an appeal was subsequently lodged by Makatse and the outcome of those proceedings are still pending.

(ii) Legal fees were spent on chairperson and evidence leader’s fees, attorney’s fees, counsel fees both junior and senior counsel, expert witnesses, travel and accommodation for trial that was held in the East London High Court for 5 days that included over 10 witness and counsel travelling outside of East London to attend the trial. Numerous postponements that were outside of the NLC’s control would have contributed to the escalation in cost.

(iii) The history of the Makatse matter is articulated in (i) above which informs reasons for costs incurred. Costs related thereto were in line with reasonable costs associated with professional services rendered for successful pursuance of instituting legal proceedings to properly discharge our functions and responsibilities in the best interest of the National Lotteries Commission. The Commission was successful in the High Court proceedings, and costs were awarded in favour of the NLC, such costs will be duly recovered.”

-END-

03 September 2021 - NW1880

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to his budget speech and the department’s policy statement on localisation dated 18 May 2021, (a) what are the 42 products identified for strategic localisation and (b) how were the 42 products identified? [

Reply:

As indicated in the Localisation Policy Statement, in a society with extraordinary levels of unemployment and poverty, all efforts will need to be made to find commercially sustainable ways to create new jobs in the private sector, to complement what can be done through public employment opportunities. New job growth will be stimulated by demand for the products and services so produced – these can come from a combination of expanded domestic demand and increased levels of exports. To create jobs on scale, both these drivers of new private sector job growth must be pursued.

Localisation must focus on strategic industries, defined by their capacity to be labour-absorbing or providers of critical goods or significant export earners. Localisation can provide such strategic industries, as well as other infant industries, with the space and opportunity to develop and to become globally competitive. This strategy has been followed in a number of countries, including in East Asia, where advanced manufacturing sectors have flourished under a focused strategy to direct and focus demand for goods and services towards those produced locally. The drive to create competitiveness is thus key to ensuring that investment in localisation provides the long-term dividend the South African economy recovers.

The process followed to set a target for localisation and finalise a list of products involved inter alia research on import levels, a comparative analysis of global import levels in leading economies, a number of meetings with business executives in specific sectors or from firms in specific product markets, review of the Master Plans applicable for sectors, consideration of the products that have been designated by the state for local procurement by public entities in terms of applicable legislation and engagement with social partners at Nedlac, resulting in agreements on targets and products.

First, from June 2020, Government commenced discussions with a number of different business groups, such as the Consumer Goods Council of SA and CEOs of different sectors. Separate meetings were held inter alia with CEOs of the following sectors:

  • Fast-food operators;
  • Grocery retailers;
  • Food and beverage manufacturers;
  • Clothing, textile, footwear and leather retailers and manufacturers;
  • Hardware retailers; and
  • Construction companies.

Discussions also took place with Business Unity SA leaders and with firms.

These discussions focussed on ways to develop a partnership between the private sector and the public sector to promote the deeper industrialisation of the SA economy, through a significant reduction in the level of imported products and considered what would be pragmatic and achievable targets over a reasonable period of time; and the identification of potential products that could be localised.

Second, the Department compiled and evaluated data on the import levels of different products and in a number of cases, shared data with business representatives, to help identify products that could be localised.

For example, the research showed that SA imported R9,1bn of edible-oils during 2019. Work was done on the local capacity in SA to be able to supply the market. Consideration was given to the decision by a large importer to refine a significant quantity of palm oil locally, adding at least 20% local value in the process.

Research was conducted on the comparative position of other leading economies, in respect of imports measured against GDP. The results of the study showed that South Africa has an over-propensity to import goods which could otherwise be produced in South Africa. Every year, the South African economy spends approximately 25% of the national wealth created, on goods imported from other countries. (See TABLE below.)

 

This propensity is far greater than in other similar countries and is out of line with our developmental needs, and impedes the opportunity for South Africa to develop its manufacturing capacity across carefully-identified selected strategic industries to take advantage of the enormous export potential, particularly in the context of the African Continental Free Trade Area.

Third, the work done with firms and associations at sector level that led to industry Master Plans being developed, were used to identify both specific products and opportunities to localise.

By way of example, the auto industry set a target to localise the components used in SA-assembled vehicles, from 39% to 60% over a 15 year period. In the sugar industry, the parties agreed to improve local sourcing from 60% to initially 80% and thereafter to improve it further. In the poultry industry, R1.5 billion was committed by local producers to expand production, with an additional more than 1 million chickens produced in South Africa per week during 2020, when compared to the prior year. In the clothing industry, retailers committed to improving the level of local procurement by 21 percentage points over a 10 year period to 2030.

Fourth, the Department undertook a review of products included in the designated public procurement list to identify further products which the private sector could be encouraged to localise. These products had been designated over a number of years and the demand available from the public sector can be enhanced by collaboration with the private sector. For a complete list of designated products, see http://www.thedtic.gov.za/sectors-and-services-2/industrial-development/industrial-procurement/.

Fifth, Government engaged social partners at Nedlac in August and September 2020 in an economic recovery plan, which resulted in a Nedlac Agreement reached in October 2020, that contained a number of pillars, including localisation.

The Agreement provided inter alia as follows:

Strategic localisation for jobs and growth

Social partners recognise that localisation and import replacement have significant potential for job retention and creation, the development of new SMMEs and start ups and the initiation of new technology platforms that can strengthen South Africa’s human resource endowment. Further, import replacement lowers South Africa’s vulnerability to global value-chain disruptions in strategic sectors.

The social partners agree to work jointly to:

  • Reduce the proportion of imported intermediate and finished-goods;
  • Improve the efficiency of local producers; and
  • Develop export competitive sectors that can expand the sales of South African made products on the continent and beyond. They thus commit to:

…  Implement measurable and significant increases (by volume and value) in public and private-sector procurement from local manufacturers across value-chains set out in Annexure B by, inter alia:

    1. Establishing targets for improvement of current levels of localisation in value chains, with the first set of targets to be announced within six weeks; and subsequent targets to be materially completed by the end of November 2020;
    2. Establishing supplier development programmes, as appropriate, on a sectoral or large firm basis;
    3. Expanding the platform used to locally manufacture personal protective equipment (PPE) to other targeted sectors and large volume items where practical and feasible; and
    4. Ensuring that public and private sector infrastructure investment is underpinned by the procurement of locally-manufactured inputs and capital equipment where practical and feasible.

Ramp up buy-local campaigns through inter alia:

    • Joint public awareness, education and social media campaigns;
    • Retailer promotions;
    • Clearer labelling of South African manufactured products;
    • A commitment to promote ‘buy local’ statements;
    • Training of procurement entities in the public and private sector; and
    • Working with buyers and procurement entities to support and develop programmes to maximise orders with local producers.

The Agreement contained the following value-chains in Annexure B, which the parties agreed should be the primary focus of localisation:

[NEDLAC-AGREED] VALUE CHAINS FOR PRIORITY ACTION IN RESPECT OF LOCALISATION

Agro-processing value chain, including poultry, sugar, oils, grains, juice concentrates and dairy products used in the food and grocery industries.

Health-care value-chains: pharmaceuticals, personal protective equipment and medical equipment, (e.g. ventilators) used in public and private healthcare facilities.

Basic consumer goods: clothing and footwear, home textiles, consumer electronic products and appliances (including televisions, mobile phones, and white goods like fridges, stoves and washing machines), household hardware products, packaging material, furniture.

Capital goods: equipment and industrial inputs particularly used in infrastructure projects, mining, agriculture, the green economy and digital infrastructure.

Construction-driven: value-chains, such as cement, steel, piping (plastic and steel), engineered products and earth-moving equipment.

Transport rolling stock: automobile and rail assembly and component production, in preparation for the African Continental Free Trade Area.”

A working group with senior representatives of the Nedlac constituencies was composed, led by the CEO of BUSA and the general secretaries of some of the largest labour federations, which considered proposals on localisation. In addition, a number of bilateral meetings took place between Government and BUSA, which worked on establishing a quantitative target on localisation. A number of product-specific suggestions and proposals were considered. Discussions took place with organised labour, who generally favoured a robust and ambitious target. The discussions identified those products that were regarded as capable of implementation or where significant opportunity existed.

The results of the bilateral discussions were shared with the other Nedlac parties and the Nedlac working group was also able to draw on the work on trade flows, compiled by Government. Finally, a pragmatic target was agreed based on all the available information, the value of a metric against which progress could be measured and a recognition that the parties will need to approach implementation with flexibility, with the first two years setting the platform for greater localisation in subsequent years.

On 14 December 2020, Nedlac agreed to a Localisation Targets and Modalities Plan, which contained the following:

“Overview: the framework for the common commitment to promote localisation is set out in the Nedlac Economic Recovery Plan. This document sets out the agreed approach following discussions between BUSA, Government, [Organised labour/Community].

It covers the implementation of the commitments made by social partners, based on:

  • A set of targets
  • A set of products
  • Private sector Champions
  • A simple and effective monitoring and reporting arrangement.

Targets (macro):

It is agreed that the parties would use their best efforts to reduce imports of all products (excluding crude oil) into SA by 20%, to be achieved over a 5 year period. Based on the 2019 import data of R1,1 trillion (non-oil imports), this target would entail a reduction of R220 billion and an indicative annual target of R45bn a year in current prices. 

List of Products

The following products, contained in the Nedlac Economic Recovery Plan, will form the list where immediate efforts will be undertaken, with parties adding to the list as further products are identified.

Agro-processing value chain, including

  • poultry,
  • sugar
  • edible oils
  • grains
  • juice concentrates
  • dairy products

Health-care value-chains:

  • pharmaceuticals
  • personal protective equipment
  • ventilators
  • other medical equipment

Basic consumer goods:

  • clothing
  • footwear
  • home textiles
  • televisions
  • mobile phones
  • other consumer electronics
  • fridges,
  • stoves
  • washing machines
  • household hardware products
  • packaging material
  • furniture.

Capital goods

  • agriculture equipment
  • mining equipment
  • green economy inputs and components
  • digital infrastructure inputs, components and equipment

Construction-driven value-chains, such as

  • cement
  • steel products
  • plastic piping
  • steel piping
  • engineered products
  • earth-moving equipment.

Transport rolling stock:

  • automobile assembly
  • auto components
  • rail assembly
  • rail components

Product targets:

In order to achieve the overall goal of a 20% reduction in total non-oil imports, some products will need to have a target above 20% and some will be below this target, based on what is practicable.

To enable the process to start, the parties agree that the general goal will be 20% and this will be adjusted based on the work undertaken, provided they are able to still achieve the overall goal of a 20% reduction.

The targets in this document are indicative and seek to provide a set of goal posts to galvanise social partners towards greater levels of localisation across the value chains identified.”

Subsequently, at the request of the private sector, additional products were added, namely

  • wheelie bins
  • personal care products
  • cleaning materials
  • oil and gas value chains
  • fire engines
  • boats.

To facilitate a partnership, Chief Executive Officers and other senior leaders have agreed to serve as product champions across a number of the product areas (“Localisation Champions”).

The localisation programme will help to stimulate aggregate demand and strengthen support for the local manufacturing sector. This is an added incentive for both domestic and foreign direct investment in the production sectors of the economy.

The government’s policy in this matter is encapsulated in the Policy Statement on Localisation for Jobs and Industrial Growth, which was released on 18 May 2021. The policy is aimed at building local industrial capacity for the domestic market and for export markets. It is not a turn away from engaging in global markets, but it is about changing the terms of the engagement to one where we are no longer mainly an exporter of raw materials.

Implementation of the strategy will not be without challenges – and finding the policy blend and careful execution required to promote deeper levels of localisation, will require drawing on the skills and expertise in the private and public sectors. SA can build on a number of successes with localisation, draw the lessons and scale these up.

-END-

03 September 2021 - NW1882

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(a) What are the 27 products referred to in his department’s policy statement on localisation dated 18 May 2021, wherein it is stated that since 2014, 27 key products that have been procured by Government have been successfully prioritised for purchasing by the State from local manufacturers and (b) how were the 27 products identified? [

Reply:

Government has designated 27 products for local production and content through the Preferential Procurement Regulations. Some of the products already designated are rail rolling stock, boats/ working vessels, power pylons, bus bodies, valves, pumps, certain pharmaceutical products, furniture products as well as the Textile Clothing Leather and Footwear sector.

For a complete list of designated products, see http://www.thedtic.gov.za/sectors-and-services-2/industrial-development/industrial-procurement/.

the dtic conducts research before a product can be designated for local production, including on procurement trends, local industrial capacity jobs implications and import profiles. During the research stage, there is consultation with the industry (associations and local manufacturers) as well as procuring authorities. Designated products have different thresholds for local production informed by the research studies looking at the economic variables aimed at supporting the manufacturing sector. Once the research is completed, the dtic reviews the designation proposals before the Minister of Trade, Industry & Competition approves it. Thereafter, the designation is forwarded to the Minister of Finance for consideration and publication of the instruction notes/circulars and implementation by organs of state.

-END-

03 September 2021 - NW1038

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total number of persons between the age of 16 and 25 are incarcerated in correctional services facilities and (b) number of the specified persons were convicted for (i) murder and (ii) grievous bodily harm?

Reply:

a) As at 11 May 2021 a total of 12 542 persons between the age of 16 and 25 were incarcerated in Correctional services facilities. The breakdown per region is as follows:

Total Number Of Persons Between The Age Of 16 And 25 Incarcerated In Correctional Services Facilities

Region

Age group 16 to 25 years incarcerated

Eastern Cape

2 238

Gauteng

1 226

KwaZulu-Natal

1 763

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

1 776

Northern Cape & Free State

2 219

Western Cape

3 320

Grand Total

12 542

(b)(i) Murder

Number of the specified persons between the age of 16 and 25 incarcerated for murder

Region

Murder

Eastern Cape

440

Gauteng

218

KwaZulu-Natal

402

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

347

Northern Cape & Free State

430

Western Cape

616

Total

2 453

(b)(ii) Grievous Bodily Harm (GBH)

Number of the specified persons between the age of 16 and 25 incarcerated for grievous bodily harm

Region

Grievous Bodily Harm

Eastern Cape

153

Gauteng

58

Kwazulu-Natal

61

Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West

100

Northern Cape & Free State

130

Western Cape

193

Total

695

END.

03 September 2021 - NW1900

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Whether, with regard to Uprising Youth Development 153-190 Non-Profit Organisation, he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a copy of the certified application form received by the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) in respect of their application for R5,5 million in the 2019-20 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the organisation has been referred to the Special Investigating Unit and/or the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, also known as the Hawks, as part of the broader investigation into corruption and malfeasance at the NLC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details, including the case numbers?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

1.. “ The Uprising Youth Development file is in the custody of the Special Investigating Unit and was seized and has been in the custody of the SIU since 8 December 2020 with other files which are under investigation as per Proclamation No. R. 32 of 2020. The application form as requested by the Mr M J Cuthbert is in the file with SIU. The record has been requested from the Special Investigation Unit and will be provided in response to PQ 1900 as soon as available.

2. The organisation was funded in the period covered by the scope of the Special Investigations Unit’s Proclamation No. R. 32 of 2020 and related documents seized by the SIU on 8 December 2020.”

-END-

03 September 2021 - NW1832

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements [Interdepartmentally transferred from Home Affairs with effect 27 August 2021]:

What is the total number of incoming calls at the offices of the Estate Agency Affairs Board that were (a) picked up by the automated welcome voice message, (b) answered by staff members and (c) disconnected without being answered in each (i) office, (ii) location and (iii) month from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2020?

Reply:

(a) Number of incoming calls picked up by the automated welcome voice message

(i) Each office

(ii) Location

(iii) Month

19984

Call centre

January

19306

Call centre

February

0

Call centre

March

0

Call centre

April

3806

Call centre

May

13759

Call centre

June

17425

Call centre

July

15859

Call centre

August

19681

Call centre

September

23393

Call centre

October

19750

Call centre

November

13097

Call centre

December

(b) Number of incoming calls that were answered by staff members (call centre)

(i) Each office

(ii) Location

(iii) Month

11684

Call centre

January

10922

Call centre

February

0

Call centre

March

0

Call centre

April

3526

Call centre

May

12643

Call centre

June

15592

Call centre

July

14218

Call centre

August

16319

Call centre

September

18412

Call centre

October

14706

Call centre

November

9780

Call centre

December

(c) Number of incoming calls disconnected without it being answered

(i) Each office

(ii) Location

(iii) Month

8285

Call centre

January

8372

Call centre

February

0

Call centre

March

0

Call centre

April

280

Call centre

May

1116

Call centre

June

1833

Call centre

July

1641

Call centre

August

3362

Call centre

September

4981

Call centre

October

5044

Call centre

November

3317

Call centre

December

03 September 2021 - NW1881

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)With regard to the target of 20% of non-petroleum imports that are to be substituted for locally produced goods, which he communicated to the National Economic Development and Labour Council, (a) how was the figure of 20% established and (b) what is the time frame for reaching the set target; (2) Whether his department has done any research and/or analysis to motivate the target of 20%; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? [NW2109E]

Reply:

A focus on localisation is at the heart of Government’s strategy to create sustainable jobs for South Africa and build the economic base for long-lasting prosperity. The reliance on imports is a challenge to the South African economy in that it makes our business and consumers vulnerable to supply shocks in other parts of the world, amply demonstrated in the Covid-19 pandemic. The undue reliance on imports also means longer lead times to get the necessary goods; and it results in South African businesses being price-takers in international markets. It undermines our strategic autonomy, and it means that we create fewer jobs at home.

At the same time, it is not desirable nor feasible to seek to manufacture all goods in a local economy – there are considerable advantages in a global trading system where countries play to inherent strengths (and create or enhance these). The issue is about an appropriate balance of locally-made and imported goods. In South Africa, it is clear the balance has not been struck at a level that enable sufficient jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities, particularly for young people.

The process followed to set a target for localisation and finalise a list of products involved inter alia research on import levels, a comparative analysis of global import levels in leading economies, a number of meetings with business executives in specific sectors or from firms in specific product markets, review of the Master Plans applicable for sectors, consideration of the products that have been designated by the state for local procurement by public entities in terms of applicable legislation and engagement with social partners at Nedlac, resulting in agreements on targets and products.

First, from June 2020, Government commenced discussions with a number of different business groups, such as the Consumer Goods Council of SA and CEOs of different sectors. Separate meetings were held inter alia with CEOs of the following sectors:

  • Fast-food operators;
  • Grocery retailers;
  • Food and beverage manufacturers;
  • Clothing, textile, footwear and leather retailers and manufacturers;
  • Hardware retailers; and
  • Construction companies.

Discussions also took place with Business Unity SA leaders and with firms.

These discussions focussed on ways to develop a partnership between the private sector and the public sector to promote the deeper industrialisation of the SA economy, through a significant reduction in the level of imported products and considered what would be pragmatic and achievable targets over a reasonable period of time; and the identification of potential products that could be localised.

Second, the Department compiled and evaluated data on the import levels of different products and in a number of cases, shared data with business representatives, to help identify products that could be localised.

For example, the research showed that SA imported R9,1bn of edible-oils during 2019. Work was done on the local capacity in SA to be able to supply the market. Consideration was given to the decision by a large importer to refine a significant quantity of palm oil locally, adding at least 20% local value in the process.

Research was conducted on the comparative position of other leading economies, in respect of imports measured against GDP. The results of the study showed that South Africa has an over-propensity to import goods which could otherwise be produced in South Africa. Every year, the South African economy spends approximately 25% of the national wealth created, on goods imported from other countries. (See TABLE below.)

This propensity is far greater than in other similar countries and is out of line with our developmental needs, and impedes the opportunity for South Africa to develop its manufacturing capacity across carefully-identified selected strategic industries to take advantage of the enormous export potential, particularly in the context of the African Continental Free Trade Area.

Third, the work done with firms and associations at sector level that led to industry Master Plans being developed, were used to identify both specific products and opportunities to localise.

By way of example, the auto industry set a target to localise the components used in SA-assembled vehicles, from 39% to 60% over a 15 year period. In the sugar industry, the parties agreed to improve local sourcing from 60% to initially 80% and thereafter to improve it further. In the poultry industry, R1.5 billion was committed by local producers to expand production, with an additional more than 1 million chickens produced in South Africa per week during 2020, when compared to the prior year. In the clothing industry, retailers committed to improving the level of local procurement by 21 percentage points over a 10 year period to 2030.

Fourth, the Department undertook a review of products included in the designated public procurement list to identify further products which the private sector could be encouraged to localise. These products had been designated over a number of years and the demand available from the public sector can be enhanced by collaboration with the private sector. For a complete list of designated products, see http://www.thedtic.gov.za/sectors-and-services-2/industrial-development/industrial-procurement/.

Fifth, Government engaged social partners at Nedlac in August and September 2020 in an economic recovery plan, which resulted in a Nedlac Agreement reached in October 2020, that contained a number of pillars, including localisation.

The Agreement provided inter alia as follows:

Strategic localisation for jobs and growth

Social partners recognise that localisation and import replacement have significant potential for job retention and creation, the development of new SMMEs and start ups and the initiation of new technology platforms that can strengthen South Africa’s human resource endowment. Further, import replacement lowers South Africa’s vulnerability to global value-chain disruptions in strategic sectors.

The social partners agree to work jointly to:

  • Reduce the proportion of imported intermediate and finished-goods;
  • Improve the efficiency of local producers; and
  • Develop export competitive sectors that can expand the sales of South African made products on the continent and beyond. They thus commit to:

…  Implement measurable and significant increases (by volume and value) in public and private-sector procurement from local manufacturers across value-chains set out in Annexure B by, inter alia:

    1. Establishing targets for improvement of current levels of localisation in value chains, with the first set of targets to be announced within six weeks; and subsequent targets to be materially completed by the end of November 2020;
    2. Establishing supplier development programmes, as appropriate, on a sectoral or large firm basis;
    3. Expanding the platform used to locally manufacture personal protective equipment (PPE) to other targeted sectors and large volume items where practical and feasible; and
    4. Ensuring that public and private sector infrastructure investment is underpinned by the procurement of locally-manufactured inputs and capital equipment where practical and feasible.

Ramp up buy-local campaigns through inter alia:

    • Joint public awareness, education and social media campaigns;
    • Retailer promotions;
    • Clearer labelling of South African manufactured products;
    • A commitment to promote ‘buy local’ statements;
    • Training of procurement entities in the public and private sector; and
    • Working with buyers and procurement entities to support and develop programmes to maximise orders with local producers.

The Agreement contained the following value-chains in Annexure B, which the parties agreed should be the primary focus of localisation:

[NEDLAC-AGREED] VALUE CHAINS FOR PRIORITY ACTION IN RESPECT OF LOCALISATION

Agro-processing value chain, including poultry, sugar, oils, grains, juice concentrates and dairy products used in the food and grocery industries.

Health-care value-chains: pharmaceuticals, personal protective equipment and medical equipment, (e.g. ventilators) used in public and private healthcare facilities.

Basic consumer goods: clothing and footwear, home textiles, consumer electronic products and appliances (including televisions, mobile phones, and white goods like fridges, stoves and washing machines), household hardware products, packaging material, furniture.

Capital goods: equipment and industrial inputs particularly used in infrastructure projects, mining, agriculture, the green economy and digital infrastructure.

Construction-driven: value-chains, such as cement, steel, piping (plastic and steel), engineered products and earth-moving equipment.

Transport rolling stock: automobile and rail assembly and component production, in preparation for the African Continental Free Trade Area.”

A working group with senior representatives of the Nedlac constituencies was composed, led by the CEO of BUSA and the general secretaries of some of the largest labour federations, which considered proposals on localisation. In addition, a number of bilateral meetings took place between Government and BUSA, which worked on establishing a quantitative target on localisation. A number of product-specific suggestions and proposals were considered. Discussions took place with organised labour, who generally favoured a robust and ambitious target. The discussions identified those products that were regarded as capable of implementation or where significant opportunity existed.

The results of the bilateral discussions were shared with the other Nedlac parties and the Nedlac working group was also able to draw on the work on trade flows, compiled by Government. Finally, a pragmatic target was agreed based on all the available information, the value of a metric against which progress could be measured and a recognition that the parties will need to approach implementation with flexibility, with the first two years setting the platform for greater localisation in subsequent years.

On 14 December 2020, Nedlac agreed to a Localisation Targets and Modalities Plan, which contained the following:

“Overview: the framework for the common commitment to promote localisation is set out in the Nedlac Economic Recovery Plan. This document sets out the agreed approach following discussions between BUSA, Government, [Organised labour/Community].

It covers the implementation of the commitments made by social partners, based on:

  • A set of targets
  • A set of products
  • Private sector Champions
  • A simple and effective monitoring and reporting arrangement.

Targets (macro):

It is agreed that the parties would use their best efforts to reduce imports of all products (excluding crude oil) into SA by 20%, to be achieved over a 5 year period. Based on the 2019 import data of R1,1 trillion (non-oil imports), this target would entail a reduction of R220 billion and an indicative annual target of R45bn a year in current prices. 

Product targets:

In order to achieve the overall goal of a 20% reduction in total non-oil imports, some products will need to have a target above 20% and some will be below this target, based on what is practicable.

To enable the process to start, the parties agree that the general goal will be 20% and this will be adjusted based on the work undertaken, provided they are able to still achieve the overall goal of a 20% reduction.

The targets in this document are indicative and seek to provide a set of goal posts to galvanise social partners towards greater levels of localisation across the value chains identified.”

Chief Executive Officers and other senior leaders have agreed to serve as product champions across a number of the product areas (“Localisation Champions”).

The localisation programme will help to stimulate aggregate demand and strengthen support for the local manufacturing sector. This is an added incentive for both domestic and foreign direct investment in the production sectors of the economy.

The government’s policy in this matter is encapsulated in the Policy Statement on Localisation for Jobs and Industrial Growth, which was released on 18 May 2021. The policy is aimed at building local industrial capacity for the domestic market and for export markets. It is not a turn away from engaging in global markets, but it is about changing the terms of the engagement to one where we are no longer mainly an exporter of raw materials.

Implementation of the strategy will not be without challenges – and finding the policy blend and careful execution required to promote deeper levels of localisation, will require drawing on the skills and expertise in the private and public sectors. SA can build on a number of successes with localisation, draw the lessons and scale these up.

-END-

03 September 2021 - NW1667

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the total number of convicted schedule 08 offenders that have been (a) imprisoned at and (b) released from facilities of his department in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19, (iv) 2019-20 and (v) 2020-21 financial years?

Reply:

a) Imprisoned

REGIONS (In prison Schedule 08 offenders)

Imprisoned

2016/17

Imprisoned

2017/18

Imprisoned

2018/19

Imprisoned

2019/20

Imprisoned

2020/2

Grand Total

RC EASTERN CAPE

18 955

18 588

17 663

17 074

14 090

22 821

RC GAUTENG

32 978

32 373

31 600

29 944

23 309

41 462

RC KWAZULU-NATAL

26 663

26 038

25 094

23 563

18 894

32 366

RC LIMPOPO MPUMALANGA & NW

21 963

21 708

21 856

21 518

17 551

27 007

RC NORTHERN CAPE & FREE STATE

19 032

19 078

18 934

17 971

14 440

22 465

RC WESTERN CAPE

25 537

24 885

24 318

23 434

17 827

36 179

Grand Total

145 128

142 670

139 465

133 504

106 111

182 300

(b) Released

REGIONS (Released Sch 08 Offenders)

FY 2016/17

FY 2017/18

FY 2018/19

FY 2019/20

FY 2020/21

Grand Total

RC EASTERN CAPE

4 799

4 710

4 515

5 112

3 685

22 821

RC GAUTENG

8 242

7 917

8 294

10 209

6 800

41 462

RC KWAZULU-NATAL

6 643

6 351

6 249

7 394

5 729

32 366

RC LIMPOPO MPUMALANGA & N.W.

5 263

4 817

4 999

6 728

5 200

27 007

RC NORTHERN CAPE & FREE STATE

4 328

4 211

4 272

5 320

4 334

22 465

RC WESTERN CAPE

7 729

7 066

6 848

9 163

5 373

36 179

Grand Total ALL types of releases

37 004

35 072

35 177

43 926

31 121

182 300

Number of convicted Schedule 8 not added to the National Forensic DNA Data base (Released on parole without DNA) PQ 1660 - NW1806E

22 325

18 470

19 556

20 772

15 752

96,875

Number of other release types other than parole release E.g. Sentence Expiry Date (SED)

14 679

16 602

15 621

23 154

15 369

85 425

Grand Total ALL types of releases

37 004

35 072

35 177

43 926

31 121

182 300

END

02 September 2021 - NW1951

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) systems does her department have in place to ensure that privately-run schools, such as a certain school (name and details furnished), are compliant with the SA Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and (b) steps has her department taken to deal with the prevailing situation of maladministration, corruption and racism at the specified school?

Reply:

Independent schools are registered in line with terms and conditions laid down by the Department and Provincial Regulations. The Department monitors compliance to the conditions set out during registration through Circuit Managers for support and intervention purposes. This is followed by the deregistration of the independent school should the provided support and intervention fail.

The Provincial Education Department in North West is finalising its investigation at Naledi Christian School. Recommendations will be forwarded to the Head of Department and the Administrator for their final decision on the future of the school, which is still operating with a provisional registration certificate that will be due for review.

02 September 2021 - NW1885

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Health

Whether social workers are (a) categorised as frontline workers and (b) prioritised for the vaccination roll-out; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) Yes, Social Workers are front-line workers in the care of the public.

b) Yes Social Workers were prioritised in the vaccination roll-out. After the healthcare workers the vaccination programme embarked on vaccination of workers in the basic education sector, police, social development and several other priority essential services sectors. Social Workers (public and private), along with all Social Service Professions registered with the Council were offered vaccination. The table below provide the details.

NO

CATEGORY / ELIGIBILITY

RATIONALE

1

Group A: DSD National and Provincial Staff (all on PERSAL) (Incl. of SACSSP Staff as well as cleaning and security staff)

Rationale: All frontline staff who are in direct contact with members of the public through NPO registration, monitoring and evaluation, processing of child protection register applications, consultations for adoptions, engagements with CSOs, civil society and stakeholders, incl. distribution of food parcels to the public, customer related queries etc. amongst others.  

2

Group B: SASSA Staff Nationwide (all on PERSAL)

All front frontline staff dealing with grant applications incl. home visitations to assist i.e. the elderly, persons with disabilities, and child support grant beneficiaries amongst others,

3

Group C: National Development Agency: (all on NDA database)

Our staff are in direct contact with the public collecting applications on a daily basis for consideration of grant funding for projects, in addition, they do capacity building training and monitor projects on sites across the republic. Furthermore, they include a cohort of people who assist in manning SASSA queues.  

4

Group D: Social Service Professions; (incl. SW +ASW + CYCCs + ACYCCs +Student Social Workers + CDPs)

Social workers who provide psychosocial support to citizens affected and infected by covid-19 as well as other social ills, conduct site visits and work with DoH across the country. Incl. of CDPs.

Incl. Private sector/ NGO’s / Public Sector etc.

5

Group E: ECD Workforce: (Incl. of entire workforce)

A cohort of educators looking after children at ECD centers which remain open during the current lockdown alert level, and are thus at risk in the a similar manner in which school teachers are.

Data base from ECD PES + ISF (for unregistered ECDs) 

 

END.

02 September 2021 - NW2044

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of sexual misconduct cases reported to her department for each grade in each province (i) in the past two financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2021, (b) total number of cases involved (i) teachers and (ii) general workers, (c) number of cases were referred by her department for investigation to the SA Police Service, (d) number of cases were finalized by her department, (e) number of cases were pending in her department, (f) number ended in dismissals by her department, (g)(i) is the extent of the misconduct in each case and (ii) measures were put in place by her department to ensure all cases are reported by principals and teachers in each province?

Reply:

In respect of Question(s): (a)(i) and (ii); (b); (c); (d); (e); (f) and (g)(i):

Sexual misconduct cases are reported to the employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, is the Head of the Provincial Education Department entrusted with the responsibility to enforce the disciplinary code and procedures against all employees employed at the provincial level.

Therefore, the question is more relevant to the provincial administration, since it is the responsibility of the employer. 

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant employer for details and response.

Consequently, the Department has a zero-tolerance against any educator who has committed sexual misconduct towards any learner. 

In respect of Question (g)(ii):

The provision of section 54 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 32 of 2007, (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) and section 110 of the Children’s Act, 38 of 2005, put an obligation on any person who becomes aware of any abuse or incident, involving a child, to report such incident to the South African Police Service (SAPS) or Department of Social Development (DSD);

Section 26 of the Employment of Educators Act and section 26 of the SACE Act, also put an obligation on the employer to report to SACE every case, where disciplinary steps were taken against an educator, resulting in a sanction other than caution or reprimand.

Besides the above legislative provisions, the Department of Basic Education has developed two (2) Protocols, namely, Standard Operating Procedures for the Employers of Educators and Protocol for Reporting and Management of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in schools.  These protocols outline the responsibilities of the PEDs (schools, Circuits and Districts officials), ELRC, SACE, SGBs, including the Department of Social Development and Department of Justice and Constitutional Development on reporting and handling misconduct cases committed by educators, learners and other PEDs employees.

The latest amendment to the Regulations of the Employment of Educators Act, Government Gazette No 44433, dated 09 April 2021, provides that an educator found guilty of sexual misconduct towards a learner, is indefinitely prevented from re-employment in education. 

There is also the ELRC Collective Agreement 3 of 2018 "Providing for Compulsory Inquiries by Arbitrators in Cases of Disciplinary Action Against Educators Charged with Sexual Misconduct in Respect of Learners" which provides for an expedited, independent disciplinary process against an educator for alleged sexual misconduct committed towards any learner.

02 September 2021 - NW1925

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the recent remarks by Dr Susan Vosloo discouraging persons from getting vaccinated against COVID-19, which comes at a time when the Republic is facing increased vaccination hesitancy, what (a) are the relevant details of the COVID-19 vaccination education drives planned in the Republic in the coming months, (b) budgets have been set aside for this and (c) are the relevant time frames?

Reply:

a) The COVID-19 vaccination education drive is a multi-faceted programme that involves the public and private sectors across the entire government (all departments and all three spheres) and that has many contributing private companies.

  • High programme visibility: Specific Activities
  • Visible signage of the vaccine roll-out on large key billboards in high transit areas
  • Use of taxi rank TV, Digital Billboards and others to promote vaccination messages
  • Conspicuous telescopic and other large banners at malls, places of worship, taxi ranks, retail stores, schools
  • Conspicuous and recognizable branding and clear signage at vaccine sites
  • Champions: Identifying apolitical vaccine champions that are relevant to the target group and have wide reaching influence (key influential leaders; Traditional Leaders, Faith Based, Business sector, Civil society and Celebrities) e.g. Limpopo targeted ZCC church leader
  • Involvement of Political leaders as champions: Health MEC and other political leaders such as Premiers, Mayors, Ward Counsellors
  • Partnership with private sector to collaborate on media campaigns and vaccine roll-out branding e.g. Medical Aids like GEMS, Discovery etc. and other businesses
  • Information in people’s hands: Specific Activities
  • Guide the community on where they should go to, who they should listen to and which number they should call to get the correct information on anything to do with vaccines
  • Use the time that clients spend at vaccination sites to empower them to be vaccine ambassadors
  • Use the observation time to educate the clients and equip them to be able to answer common misinformation questions e.g. Is it true that people are dying after they vaccinate?
  • Provide comprehensive IEC material on vaccines and adverse events following immunization with the call center number clearly visible that they can refer to and share with others.
  • Share information on the nearest functional vaccination sites; operating hours; dates for outreach with all stakeholders: radio stations, newspapers, community leaders, religious leaders, schools, workplaces, and all social media platforms
  • Use of social media to get the correct information into young people’s hands so that they do not discourage the elderly from vaccinating through sharing of misinformation they consume on social media
  • Use of teachers to get the right information into young people’s hands so that they can correct misinformation from social media and other sources at home
  • Address the play-off between various vaccines and preferences
  • Use of local media: Specific Activities
  • Continuous engagement to reinforce positive messages about vaccinations and to counter misinformation and disinformation
  • Ongoing “human” stories by individuals representing the target group to show authentic stories of registration and vaccination on radio, local newspapers, and all social media platforms
  • Radio stories addressing identified concerns about vaccines in local languages
  • Radio slots to boost confidence in vaccination explaining all the key steps in the vaccination journey
  • Collaboration with local newspapers, Radio stations, leadership, NGOs, Civil society organizations, tertiary institutions, schools, Unions, businesses, private vaccination sites in spreading correct information about vaccines
  • Public health messaging to raise public awareness of the notable fatality rate and potential long-term sequela of COVID-19
  • Weekly local radio station slots for advocacy messaging, adverts in local print media.
  • Local mobilisation and canvassing: Specific Activities
  • Whole society area based (ward-based) approach improving reach and raising capacity through collaboration with other stakeholders i.e. Private sites, Sector engagements (Business, Civil Society, FBOs, Traditional Authorities, Men’s Forum, Older Person’s Forum and people with disabilities e.tc. to be engaged during the month of August)
  • Identify and appoint area-based leads, local civil society activators and communicators who will play the catalytic role of bringing all these people together
  • Out-reach service: share the schedule with the sites, times and dates; plan well with all relevant local stakeholders to ensure that there is sufficient demand creation and social mobilization in the community leading up to the out-reach date including use of loud hailers
  • Identify individuals who can be vaccination ambassadors or champions with vaccine branded clothing with messages like do have any questions about vaccines? ‘Ask me’, who can be easily identifiable as they walk around the community and use local media to inform the community about them and to ask them questions.
  • Use of community WhatsApp groups to communicate correct information and counter misinformation and disinformation.
  • Work with local comedians to create fun videos on platforms like TikTok that can be shared on social media
  • Coordinating all of the community development practitioners, health care workers and resources to intensify the together with Door-to-door, Site visits by Executive Council and Mayors to mobilise communities.
  • Access strategies: Specific Activities
  • Transport: provide transport where possible; ensure that clients know when, how, which number to call, where to go and who is eligible to access this service
  • Home based vaccinations
  • District based promotion of vaccination sites, available assistance at all sites, pop up sites taken to remote areas, ward-based vaccination sites, mass vaccination sites opened across the districts, more sites opened on weekends to provide access to those at work during the week.
  • Increase outreach/mobile sites and strategical place them in areas with low uptake as informed by data
  • Increase sites in underserved areas
  • Increase sites that operate on weekends and make sure they are advertised widely including operation hours
  • Adopt specific strategies like Churches on Sunday, Malls on Saturdays, especially on weekends
  • Build trust in the system by providing excellent client friendly service so that positive reviews spread by word of mouth
  • Use familiar sites as vaccination sites e.g. churches, synagogues, mosques, malls
  • Other Activities
  • Continue with regular feedback and monitoring of daily performance through feedback sessions between Province & districts Mon-Fri
  • Each district, through the district vaccination coordinating committees meets at least three times a week to monitor progress and identify pressure points and problem areas to reaching targets.
  • Retain focus on >60 years as the most vulnerable population group until targets are met
  • Encourage clinicians to counter patients’ anecdotal “bad reaction” stories with “good reaction” stories rather than statistics.
  • Use messaging like “your parents made sure you were vaccinated as a child now it’s your turn to return the favour”, to encourage younger people to bring older people.
  • Coming up with little songs about vaccinations that can be taught at ECDs and Schools and share it through ECD networks (Vaccine, Vaccine on your arm, Will keep you safe from COVID-19).

b) Budgets that have been set aside for this come from all partners. Some are directly budgeted items funded from government departments, including GCIS, but the majority are cash and cash-in-kind contributions from the private sector (through Solidarity Fund and by media houses). We do not have a Rand value for all of these contributions at this stage.

c) The relevant time frames are that several activities have already commenced and all are continuing for the remainder of this year and into 2022.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1894

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the reasons that two certain health professionals (names furnished) are not yet disciplined by the SA Nursing Council and the Health Professionals Council of South Africa for the Life Esidimeni deaths; (2) whether investigations regarding the disciplinary cases of the two health officials are still ongoing; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the reasons for the delays, (b) by what date will the outcomes of the disciplinary proceedings be announced and (c) who is responsible for the disciplinary proceedings?

Reply:

South African Nursing Council (SANC)

1. The SANC is looking into allegations made against Dr Manamela as nurse practitioner, registered in terms of the Nursing Act, 2005 (Act No. 33 of 2005).

The process to discipline nurse practitioners is prescribed in regulations, and the SANC follows the legislated processes to investigate any allegations of unprofessional conduct against nurse practitioners so that where there is evidence of unprofessional conduct, appropriate action is taken.

The time it takes to finalise cases is dependent on the complexity of the matter as well as the number of and co-operation from role players involved in the matter and the timeous submission of the required information to SANC

2. (a) The disciplinary cases of the health official is still ongoing.

There was no delay on the side of SANC. Several correspondences to Gauteng Province were issued as soon as the matter was brought to the attention of SANC to request for further information to enable the relevant committee of Council to conduct the investigation accordingly.

There was, however, a delay in the provision of such information despite several follow ups made by the office of the Registrar at SANC.

(b) This is not possible to predict as it is dependent on many external factors and procedural factors for instance but in no way limited to:

  1. Availability of evidence;
  2. Availability of witnesses;
  3. Any legal challenges against or during the process; and
  4. Volume of the evidence both written and oral to be considered and or canvased

(c) Two committees of Council are responsible for the majority of the process, the Preliminary Investigating Committee, which has finalised the preliminary investigation and the Professional Conduct Committee, to which the matter has been referred, to effect a formal hearing.

The Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA)

1. The HPCSA has taken disciplinary steps against Dr TE Selebano following the report of the Health Ombudsman.

The investigation was conducted and on the 11&12 October 2018 the matter was placed before the Fourth Preliminary Committee of Inquiry of the Medical and Dental Professional Board (“the Committee”).

After deliberations based on the available evidence the committee determined that there are grounds for a professional conduct inquiry into the conduct of Dr TE Selebano and directed that an inquiry into matter be held.

2. (a) The disciplinary cases of the health official is still ongoing

The matter had been set down for hearing on several occasions and had been postponed for a variety of reason including the obtainment of the transcripts from Judge Moseneke’s arbitration, lockdown due to COVID 19 making it impossible to have a physical hearing (and respondent objecting to virtual hearing), the delays in the appointment of new professional boards in 2020, unavailability of respondent legal representative, and inquest proceedings.

(b) The parties have agreed to set the matter down for 13-15 October 2021.

(c) Fourth Preliminary Committee of Inquiry of the Medical and Dental Professional Board.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1892

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the current total cost of school vandalism that occurred in the 2020-21 financial year, (b) is the breakdown of the total cost in respect of each province, (c) is the total number of vandalised schools that are (i) not operational, (ii) semi-operational and (iii) fully operational, (d) is the breakdown of learner capacity of the schools that are not operational (i) in each province and (ii) nationally and (e) total number of schools that have been vandalised in the specified period have plans underway to repair damages?

Reply:

The question has been referred to all provincial departments of education for detailed information. The response will be provided as soon as all provinces have submitted and the responses collated.

02 September 2021 - NW1898

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the COVID-19 transmissions statistics in each month since the beginning of the National State of Disaster, what is the total number of persons in each province who have contracted COVID-19 in (a) restaurants, (b) gyms, (c) cinemas, (d) parks, (e) bars & taverns, (f) nightclubs, (g) casinos, (h) conferencing, exhibition and entertainment facilities, (i) museums and (j) libraries, archives and galleries?

Reply:

When an individual is exposed and then infected with COVID–19 the signs and symptoms usually appear after 5 to 7 days. If these symptoms are significant the person would then probably seek medical attention. It is at that point usually that a COVID test is recommended and results become available about 2 days later so from the time of infection an individual will be confirmed as positive only 7 to 9 days later. Most infected persons have very limited recollection of all the activities they were involved in a week ago and of those activities it would be impossible for a person to know exactly where or when exactly he/she became infected or the circumstances that lead to them becoming infected. Provincial health departments also report that persons that test positive are either unable to recall or reluctant to share information about their contacts as well which has hampered contact tracing efforts.

We therefore do not have data on exactly where a particular person has been infected.

END.

02 September 2021 - NW1920

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Regarding disruption of basic education brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic since its emergence in 2020, what is the (a) Government’s long-term strategy to reduce the impact of COVID-19 disruptions on learning and (b) envisaged outcome of such a strategy; (2) what has the Government learnt from the COVID-19 situation that could help to reduce the impact of future disruptions on basic education teaching and learning?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) The Department of Basic Education has put in place a three year Recovery Annual Teaching Plan for each subject in each grade, to help guide teachers focus on key concepts, content and skills to be taught per subject over the next three year period. The curriculum statement for each grade and subject was evaluated by a panel of curriculum content experts and the content was reduced so as to ensure that only the core concepts, knowledge and skills are taught for each subject and grade. It is anticipated that over the next three years, learners would have covered the core content in the subject and the curriculum statement, post the three year period, would be reviewed to take learners forward in their learning process. The three year recovery period, is tentative at this stage and may be extended if necessary based on the findings from the continuous research, monitoring and support provided by the DBE and PEDs to schools

The DBE has developed guidelines for teachers on fundamental content that must be prioritised and the guidelines will be used on an annual basis, as they are aligned to the curriculum. In terms of this strategy, and given the variation in teaching time across the schools, there is now a higher dependence on the teachers professional judgment. Teachers are provided with a Planner and Tracker, which lists the reduced content to be covered in the week, and teachers must record coverage so as to ensure that every teacher has a record of curriculum coverage, per grade, which will be transferred to the next teacher. This will ensure continuity from one grade to the next. The new strategy also moves the focus to Assessment for Learning (formative assessment) as a teaching strategy.  This implies that the teacher not only assesses at the end of the learning process to make judgment on the learning gains but assess the learner on a continuous basis during the learning process to support the learning process. Assessment weightings in Grades 4-11 have also been adjusted to ensure that optimal time is used for teaching and learning.

The key tenet of the strategy is to reduce the curriculum to focus on key concepts, skills and knowledge that are essential for deeper learning and the development of cognitive skills that will promote creative thinking, problem solving and effective communication. 

(2) The DBE has learnt that plans that are put in place to reduce the impact of future disruptions must be agile and must take into consideration the various school contexts. In accommodating the various school contexts, much is left to the teacher's professional judgment and expertise. Hence, teacher development, training and support is now more crucial in capacitating the teacher to manage his/her classroom context. The DBE has also learnt  that the continuous monitoring of teaching and learning in the classroom is important as the data gathered from such monitoring will help adjust the intervention strategy and the long term plan to recover the teaching losses. The ongoing monitoring will inform the additional support programmes , such as TV and Radio broadcast lessons, that are aligned to the Annual Teaching Plans. Collaboration with stakeholders such as Teacher Unions, School Governing body Associations, Professional Bodies and research institutions is vital as to ensure buy-in, support and input on latest developments as the situation unfolds.

02 September 2021 - NW1975

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to (a) Micheal Komape and (b) Siyamthanda Mtunu, aged five and six years respectively, who died due to unsafe and dilapidated pit toilets that are reported mostly in Limpopo, what measures has her department taken to ensure that the Limpopo Department of Education eradicates unsafe and unhygienic toilets at rural schools as ordered by the courts; (2) what specific initiatives have been implemented to ensure the safety of children since 2018 when the matter of unsafe and unhygienic toilets was heard in the High Court; (3) what immediate interventions will ensure that parents in the rural areas do not continue to lose their children to unsafe toilets between now and 2026 when the eradication of pit toilets is planned to commence?

Reply:

1.  The SAFE (Sanitation Appropriate For Education) programme was launched to eradicate BASIC PIT toilets.  Countrywide, there are currently 2 913 schools on this programme.  1 159 of these 2 913 schools, appropriate toilets have already been constructed.  In Limpopo, there are 455 schools that form part of the SAFE programme.  Of these 455, 170 projects have already progressed to Practical Completion. 

2.  There are 2 initiatives related to BASIC PIT toilets to ensure the safety of children.  The first is to build appropriate toilets at schools (see progress reported above).  The second is to demolish the old BASIC PIT toilet structures.  This second initiative is driven by the Provincial Departments of Education.  For example, in Limpopo there are 239 schools that have appropriate toilets, but the old BASIC PIT structures were still on site.  At 86 of these 239, contractors have been appointed and the old BASIC PIT toilets have been demolished.

3.  The eradication of BASIC PIT toilets has already commenced with progress as indicated above 

02 September 2021 - NW1891

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What are the national minimum standards for (a) air ambulances, (b) helicopters and (c) fixed-wing aircraft?

Reply:

The national minimum standards for provision of air ambulances, regardless of whether is a rotor-wing helicopter or a fixed-wing aircraft used, is prescribed in the EMS Regulations, 2017.

EMS Regulations in relation to aeromedical services indicate that:

  • the provider is required to be registered to provide such services within the category of Aeromedical Services with the respective provincial Department of Health where it is operating from.
  • This registration should also involve the inspection and accreditation of the station/hangar operated from.
  • The aircraft operator must hold the appropriate G7 licence and CATS Part 138 accreditation as specified by the Civil Aviation Authority of South Africa.

An extensive minimum list of equipment is detailed in the attached Annexure B of the EMS Regulations.

With regards to the medical crew:

  • The senior medical staff member on the air ambulance must be registered in the category of a Paramedic or Emergency Care Technician or Emergency Care Practitioner with the Health Professions Council of South Africa, who shall hold valid CAT 138, Aviation Health Care Provider, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Intermediate Trauma Life Support or Advanced Trauma Life Support and Paediatric Advanced Life Support or equivalent certificates.
  • The minimum staffing requirement for the second staff member on an ambulance shall be a person registered in at least the category of Basic Ambulance Assistant with the Health Professions Council of South Africa.
  • All crew are required to practice within their respective scope of practice as approved by the Health Professions Council of South Africa: Professional Board for Emergency Care.

Annexure B