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02 December 2019 - NW1461

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) Which tenders did the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality award to certain companies (names and details furnished) in each of the past six financial years and (b)(i) which services were rendered and (ii) what was the cost of the rendered services in each specified financial year; (2) whether she has found that any of the specified contracts were awarded by means of a deviation from supply chain management processes and legislation; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs is not governing tender awards in municipalities.

END.

02 December 2019 - NW1472

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to her reply to question 861 on 20 September 2019, what are the details of the four properties listed for agricultural purposes where the user department is Rural Development and Land Reform in terms of the (a) farm name and (b) size of the farm; (2) whether the farm has been allocated to a beneficiary; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether the farm is productive; if not, why not; if so, what is being done by her department to ensure that the farm becomes productive?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. As per the Immovable Asset Sector Guide: The National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) shall record all facilities constructed and used by the national government on land where DPWI is not the custodian.

The four properties in question are constructed on land under the custodianship of the Department of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform.

(a) and (b)

Details on farm names and the size of the land parcels are listed below.

FARM NAME

LAND DESCRIPTION

SIZE OF THE FARM ( HA)

ADENDORP FARM

Ptn 0 Of ERF Adendorp No.1198 GRAAFF REINET RD

1.7131

ADENDORP FARM

Ptn 0 Of ERF Adendorp No.1198 GRAAFF REINET RD

1.7131

ADENDORP FARM

Ptn 0 Of ERF Adendorp No.1198 GRAAFF REINET RD

1.7131

ADENDORP FARM

Ptn 0 Of ERF Adendorp No.1194 GRAAFF REINET RD

3.4261

2), 3) The user department, i.e. the Department of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform, should be able to respond to these questions.

02 December 2019 - NW1464

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) is the reason for the increase in the number of bucket toilets from 8628 to 8672 in the Northern Cape in the past year and (b) total number of bucket toilets and/or ventilated improved pit toilets still exists in (a) Loeriesfontein, (b) Brandvlei and (c) Williston?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

02 December 2019 - NW1476

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether her department has undertaken any impact assessment study to ascertain how effective and efficient her department and the entities reporting to her will implement its new mandate after the pronouncement was made by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, of the reconfigured department; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the findings of the study and (b) will she furnish Mrs S P Kopane with copies of the study?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

No. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has not undertaken any impact assessment study to ascertain how effective and efficient the Department and its Entities will implement its new mandate. However, the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure is currently engaging through the Department of Public Service and Administration’s National Macro Organisation of Government (NMOG) processes that provides guidance with regard to the reconfigured Department. This process is further based on principles articulating that Departmental organisational structures are limited to the realignment of macro organisational structures and that functions will be transferred with staff and resources, including budget. Where a need for additional resources is identified, the necessary stakeholders will be engaged, i.e. National Treasury and the Minister for the Department of Public Service and Administration.

(a) and (b) Fall away.

02 December 2019 - NW1462

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the Kareeberg Local Municipality in the Northern Cape only spent 14% of the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant funds it was allocated, (a) what was the outcome of the court case involving the unsuccessful bidder and (b) how long will the residents of Van Wyksvlei be without water considering that the municipality decided not to budget for the project in the next financial year?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

02 December 2019 - NW1475

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) Whether any (a) Ministers and (b) Deputy Ministers are occupying houses in both parliamentary villages and ministerial houses at the same time; if so, what are the (i) details of each minister and/or Deputy Minister and (ii) reasons that the Ministers or Deputy Ministers occupy the houses simultaneously?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. (a) No Ministers are occupying a house in Parliamentary Villages

(b) No Deputy Ministers are occupying a house in Parliamentary Villages

02 December 2019 - NW553

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Transport

What was the total cost of the N2/N3 Information Corridor Roadshow across KwaZulu-Natal?

Reply:

The N2/N3 Information Corridor Roadshows was held to inform small to medium-sized construction, engineering and related industry businesses of the estimated 15 000 job opportunities available for SMMEs on the planned N2/N3 projects, and enable their registration in database of potential SMME’s. The workshops were held over a period of five (5) days at 3 venues in Pietermaritzburg, Hammarsdale and Durban during June 2019, with estimated 11 000 attendees targeted.

The total cost incurred pre- and during the workshops was R19 075 507,20. This amount covered the costs for the following services: event logistics, printed booklets, pre-event advertising and digital media buying.

Cost breakdown per item

 

Item

Amount

SMME workshops logistics

R16 170 402,47

Booklet detailing projects

R23 440,00

SMME Radio production

R12 190,00

SMME Print production

R30 576,20

Radio mainstream placement

R1 420 503,43

Radio community placement

R365 430,21

community print placement

R437 496,17

mainstream print placement

R600 468,72

digital placement

R15 000,00

Total

R19 075 507,20

   

Attendance and participation report

Area

Number of people

Pietermaritzburg: two days event

2500

Hammarsdale:one day event

1000

Durban: two days event

2500

Total attendance

6000

Breakdown of items and costs

SERVICE

COMPANIES

COST excl VAT

APPOINTED SP

ADDITIONAL COSTS/

Venue Hire (Pietermaritzburg)

Msunduzi Municipality

R13 190,00

 

 

Venue Hire and Food/Beverage Rights (Durban)

The Sharks Stadium

R204 400,00

 

 
 

Tags for delegates

Promotional Plastics

R8 375,00

 

 
 

The real house of Pure Events

Unresponsive Bids

 

 

 

Goodie bags for the event

The Paper Packaging Place

R39 500,00

 

 
 

The real house of Pure Events

Unresponsive Bids

 

 
 

Promoters and Event registration Assistants

Spotlight

R103 000,00

Spotlight

R3 000 Additional hours due to over-subscription in Durban

 

K-BAM Activation

R104 535,00

 

 
 

Exige Promotion and Events

R122 200,00

 

 
 

Catering: Pietermaritzburg

Sandisamambatha

R1 600 000,00

 

 
 

K&T Event Co-ordinators

R720 000,00

 

 
 

Nomarondo Projects

R396 000,00

Nomarondo

 
 

Catering: Durban

Ocassion Shiner

R1 157 500,00

Occasion Shiner

Additional R248 940,76 for catering due to event over-subscription

 

Singangawe

R1 826 000,00

 

 
 

Kwadanki Investments

R1 420 800,00

 

 

  

Catering: Hammarsdale

Nto's Catering

R310 500,00

 

 
 

Ingqayi Trading

 

 

 
 

Nuh-Weh Trading Enterprise

 

 

 
 

Photography: Hammarsdale

Inathi Kangwane Group

R6 800,00

Inathi Kangwane Group

 
 

Howard S Productions

R9 595,00

 

 
 

BSB Productions

R7 775,00

 

 

  

Photography: Durban

Inathi Kangwane Group

R13 600,00

Inathi Kangwane Group

 
 

Limile Media

R16 000,00

 

 
 

Wild Cam

Non-Responsive Bid

 

 
 

Media 757

R19 000,00

 

 
 

SANRAL SMME Stand

KD Events

R199 677,24

KD Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photography: Pietermaritzburg

Inathi Kangwane Group

R13 600,00

Inathi Kangwane Group

 
 

BSB Productions

R15 500,00

 

 
 

Howard S Production

R19 251,00

 

 
 

Safety Officer: All 3 events

uBhejane Projects

R87 200,00

uBhejane

 
 

Structures: Hammarsdale and Durban

Uzimatu Events and Comms

R2 605 000,00

Uzimatu

 
 

Rawknait Concepts

R5 200 000,00

 

 
 

Dlaliphi

Unresponsive bid

 

 
 

Structures: PMB

Wanda Ennies

R 4 920 000,00

Wanda Ennies

 
 

Rawknait Concepts

R5 200 000,00

 

 
 

Umgungundlovu Events and Municipality

R5 200 000,00

 

 
 

Wi-Fi

360 Advanced Technology

R68 000,00

360 Advanced Technology

 
 

Maxposure

Unresponsive Bid

 

 
 

Digital FWD

R141 200,00

 

 
 

Furniture: Pietermaritzburg

Nomarondo Projects

R599 800,00

Nomarondo

 
 

Bongathina Trading

R750 200,00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibition shell schemes

Scan Display

R140 736,00

Scan Display

 
 

Expo Solutions

Unresponsive Bid

 

 
 

KD Events

Unresponsive Bid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Master of Ceremonies

Fortune Nkwanyana

R75 000,00

Fortune

 
 

Sihle Bolani

R117 000,00

 

 
 

Fezile Makhanya

R175 000,00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sound and PA System

SG Works

R606 800,00

 

 
 

Rawknait Concepts

R504 128,95

 

 
 

Chulumanco

R470 398,74

Chulumanco

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Recording and Videography

Lorile Media

R232 070,00

Lorile

 
 

Bantu Afrika Productions

R445 800,00

 

 
 

Kutaya Productions

R432 457,50

 

 

02 December 2019 - NW1305

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) What number of asylum seekers who are currently registered in the Republic are alive and within the borders of the Republic; (2) Whether the Republic receives any monetary amount for each asylum seeker, if so, (a) from which organisation and (b) what amount in each case?

Reply:

1. The total number of asylum seekers actively extending their Section 22 permits as at 30 June 2019 were 186 210. By law all asylum seekers are expected to remain within the borders of South Africa.

2. The government does not receive any monetary amount for asylum seekers.

END

02 December 2019 - NW1404

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether, with reference to the replies to question 1448 on 21 July 2017 and 2210 on 30 October 2017, the planned upgrades to the Windsor Pump Station at the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, including but not limited to upgrades to the (a) generator and (b) prevention of more water outages have been completed; if not, why not; (2) What is the (a) total cost of the upgrades to this pump station and (b) amount budgeted for the upgrades? NW2618E

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

1. (a) That it be noted that subsequent to challenges of power failure at Windsor pump station, the City of Ekurhuleni procured 500KVA diesel generator to mitigate power failure challenges and since then the supply has been efficient. The generator is being serviced at least twice a year per the schedule and also depending on the usage.

(b) That it be noted that the City of Ekurhuleni is in engagements with Rand Water for the construction of 30ML reservoir to complement existing storage. The 30 ML reservoir water storage retention period, and at this stage Geotechnical report has been completed and Professional Service Provider appointed is at detailed design stage.

2. (a) The pump station upgrade cost depends on the size of the water tower and the bulk 400mm diameter line which are at detail design stage. Once the design is completed, we will prepare a bill of quantities to allow for the project estimation cost.

(b) Due to the criticalness of this project, the City of Ekurhuleni has budgeted over R50 Million for the project to take off the ground and we are ready to identify further financial reserves should the need arise.

END

02 December 2019 - NW1403

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the reply to question 2211 on 30 October 2017, (a) on what date was the last inspection for possible structural damages of the Windsor Water Tower situated in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, (b) who conducted the inspection, (c) what were the findings, (d) by what date will repairs to the tower take place and (e) what are the projected costs of any repairs?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

(a) The last structural inspection was last conducted in October 2018.

(b) The inspection was conducted by the appointed consultant through the City’s aqua leap programme. The consultant’s name is Southern Ambition Consulting Engineers.

(c) Two options were given. One option recommends that the tower be refurbished at a high cost and 5 years after the refurbishment, further refurbishment be done again. The second option recommends that another tower be constructed to replace the existing one where a life span of 70 years will be achieved.

(d) The city opted for the replacement option after a cost benefit analysis. The design is currently in the process of approval for the implementation of a new tower. A panel of contractors to implement the project is already appointed by the City.

(e) The projected costs for option 1 which is to refurbish the tower to last 5 years before another refurbishment, is R17 000 000.00 and the approval of design reports to replace the tower are currently underway. Final costing will be determined once approvals are finalised.

END.

02 December 2019 - NW1196

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In light of the Foreign Mission Observation Report that was submitted by the Auditor-General to his Department in March 2018, highlighting risks that were identified, what are the details of the interventions that have been undertaken by his department on the (a) applications for passports and identify documents that have been outstanding for a long time, (b) applications dispatched from missions of which his department has no record, (c) training of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation staff who assist with the visa application process, (d) lack of access to virtual private server for mission officials to perform proper risk profile assessment, (e) applications received directly by missions, where Visa Facilitation Service (VFS) is available, and paid in cash creating a fraud risk, (f) overriding of Home Affairs officials by heads of missions, particularly where fraudulent documents are involved in the application, (g) allegations that Indian nationals are receiving free permits without supporting applications, (h) challenges of the citizens of the Republic struggling to get responses regarding their application status and (i) VFS passing fraudulent documents with applications put through his department?

Reply:

a) A working group has been established by the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) and International Relations and Co-operation (DIRCO) respectively, aimed at reducing the turn-around time for applications lodged in foreign missions. This process will integrate the workflow of DIRCO and that of DHA into one workflow. This process will be concluded as soon as possible. Furthermore, there is a process underway to restructure and automate passport dispatch which will result in the current work team being deployed to augment the citizenship and passports applications administration.

b) Unfortunately there is currently no automated application process and track and trace system from the mission to DIRCO thereby the Department is not able to track any application until it arrives at the Department’s processing centre in Pretoria. This matter is the subject of discussion at the monthly meetings of the Working Group.

c) The training of officials is co-ordinated between the Department of Home Affairs and the Department of International Relations and Co-operation (DIRCO). The officials at the Missions have been trained and where there is a need for further training. DIRCO will indicate to the Department.

d) The Missions are connected to the Visa and Entry stop list on the electronic Visa Processing System which allows the Missions to do the risk profiling.

e) All visa applications in Lubumbashi are submitted through Visa Facilitation Services. Both the Mission and the Visa Facilitation Company are aware of this process.

f) The Department has not come across any overriding of decisions by officials which involves submission of fraudulent documents. However, the Head of the Mission constantly discusses matters of mutual interest as he/she is the Representative of the South African Government and takes responsibility for all functions of government in the Mission.

g) Indian nationals are exempted from paying visa processing fees but are however subject to the prescribed visa requirements.

h) The Department is able to provide status update on applications lodged in Foreign Missions only once the applications are in its possession. Also to speed up communication between the Department of Home Affairs and Foreign Missions, generic email addresses have been established for each Mission so that if there are non-complaint applications, messages are sent through emails to the relevant Mission informing them of such instead of sending the hard copy applications back to the Mission through the diplomatic bag. A checklist will also be submitted to DIRCO for onward transmission to Missions to assist with the quality assurance process. The above Working Group has also agreed to send one communication about turn-around times to reduce enquiries about the status of applications.

i) VFS performs front office functions of accepting applications on behalf of the Department, transmits such applications to the Mission and hand over outcomes to the clients. The adjudication process is performed by officials at the Missions. This includes verification of supporting documents.

END

02 December 2019 - NW1454

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 652 on 16 September 2019, she is now in a position to indicate whether her department is aware of outstanding payments to third parties such as pension funds, medical aids and the SA Revenue Service by various municipalities; if so, will she provide Mr W W Wessels with a list of the relevant municipalities and each amount owed to each third party; (2) whether her department has a plan in place to intervene in the specified municipalities that are allegedly guilty of utilising third party deductions for operational expenditure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department has been informed of syndicates of municipal officials who paid third party deductions to their own bank accounts; if not, will her department investigate the allegations; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) how is her department assisting municipal officials who are at retirement age but whose pensions are affected by the non-payment of contributions by the municipalities to the respective pension funds?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

02 December 2019 - NW1361

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

All registers and Logis were checked and these names could not be found or traced on any of the Departmental registers or the Central Supplier Database.

It is therefore not clear if these are Sole Proprietors or shareholders in companies, as there were no companies registered under these names perhaps because they are not companies, but directors. Perhaps if the company names can be given that may enable the department to verify the directors/ownership.

02 December 2019 - NW1247

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply of the former Minister to question 607 on 22 March 2019, the City of Ekurhuleni has provided the information; if not, what steps/action does she intend taking to ensure that the City of Ekurhuleni provides the requested information account?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

1. Waste Management Services are transport reliant and depends largely on Mechanical Workshops for repairs and maintenance to ensure the availability of vehicles when breakdowns are experienced. It is thus imperative to have maximum vehicle availability at all times in order to deliver seamless services. Due to turnaround times of repairs, it sometimes becomes a challenge to be on schedule owing to the shortage of trucks.

2. (a)Twice.

(b) Kempton Park.

(c) Shortage of vehicles due to breakdowns.

(d) It is the endeavour of the department to ensure that residents receive at least one service per week in accordance with the National Domestic Waste Collection Standards. Whenever backlogs are created the City, re-allocates resources within the next day or same week to deal with the existing backlogs. In such instances, residents are informed about the challenges experienced and when to take out their bins for collection.

END.

02 December 2019 - NW1474

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether (a) her department and /or (b) any entity reporting to her signed any contractual agreements with a certain company (name furnished) and/or any of their affiliates from the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Parliament with regard to the three parliamentary villages; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what (aa) was the nature of the contract, (bb) is the monetary value of each contract, (cc) are the details of the process that was undertaken for the signing of each contract, (dd) was the amount of each tender quote and (ii) who (aa) are the company owners and (bb) tendered for each contract that was awarded?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

In respect of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) Yes, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) informed me that DPWI has an agreement with Broll Property Group (Pty) Ltd from the period of the 5th Parliament and part of the period of the 6th Parliament.

(i) (aa) The company was appointed to provide facilities management services for all official residences for Members of the Executive, including all three (3) Parliamentary Villages.

(bb) The monetary value is R420 000 000.00, including VAT.

(ccb) The details of the procurement process that was followed for this contract are outlined in ANNEXURE A, enclosed.

(ii) (aa) See ANNEXURE A, paragraph 23, page 9.

(bb) See the answer in (ii) (aa) above.

In respect of the Entities reporting to the Department:

(b) The Department has informed me that none of the four public entities that report to the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure have entered into contractual agreements with the said company or its affiliates during the stipulated period. As such (i) (aa), (bb), (ccc), (dd) and (ii) (aa) and (bb) fall away.

02 December 2019 - NW1477

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) What (a) measures has her department put in place to strengthen the oversight and regulatory role of the Council for Built Environment (CBE) over the Engineering Council of South Africa, (b) measures has the CBE put in place to ensure enforcement, alignment and adherence to transformation policies of the built environment professions and (c) incentives have been offered to private built environment companies to assist with internships and to make sure that the graduates are professionally registered; (2) whether the CBE has a register or tracking instrument of the built environment graduates becoming registered professionals; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) (a) In 2013 the Department finalised the Policy Framework for Professional Registration, to ensure among others, that professional councils are consistent in the application of registration standards and policies and also to ensure transparency in the process of professional registration. The Council for the Built Environment (CBE) has been instrumental in enforcing the application of the Policy Framework. Part of the CBE’s oversight over the professional councils entails ensuring compliance to principles of good governance, as well as the consistent application of policies. The process followed by the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) of assessing applications of prospective professional registration applicants is based on Council approved policies and standards that have been benchmarked to policies and standards applied across the globe by countries that are members of the International Engineering Alliance (IEA). The latter conducts periodic reviews of ECSA processes to ensure that they are fair, ethical and transparent.

(b) With regard to transformation, the Department has got information through research conducted by the CBE that the manner in which the Built Environment Industry is configured currently is inimical to transformation objectives and perpetuates and entrenches the existing racial inequalities. For instance, through the tendering system black professionals compete with white professionals who have got more resources are thus more enabled to acquire work. The inaccessibility to work opportunities for black firms has a detrimental effect in the transformation of the Built Environment Industry in that even black candidates for professional registration more often than not tend to find opportunities for work and training in black-owned firms.

The CBE does work with the Construction Industry Education and Training Authority (CETA) to drive transformational objectives. Mentors are assigned to candidates and roadshows are conducted to provide a mature route to professional registration. But, the challenge is influencing the private sector. CETA funding is available to assist candidates. However, black candidates have difficulties in securing work and mentors in white owned companies, thus transformation becomes stagnant.

(c) The CBE has a Work Integrated Learning (WIL) programme and it entails supporting interns from the Universities of Technology (UoTs) to undertake WIL, to complete the practical training requirement of their tertiary qualifications. The CBE provides funding for stipends as incentives to private built environment companies to assist with placement in internships.

(2) The CBE has identified the gap of not having a centralised tool to manage, store, monitor, track and report on the applications and registration of different types of stakeholders including the Students, Candidates, Professional and Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). CBE has initiated a project to develop an integrated system that will be used by all six professional councils. The target is to have this system by 31 March 2020 with the population thereof to take place afterwards. The Pilot of the system has been signed-off by the three councils for usage.

02 December 2019 - NW1253

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Khanyile, Mr S to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is the (a) extent of the current backlog in the number of applications for South African visas and (b) breakdown of each category of visa applications for which a backlog exists?

Reply:

It will be premature to answer your question now. The Department will finalise a reconciliation report by 30 November 2019 after confirmation that all applicants received their outcomes.

In 2014, the Department introduced an online application system, Visa Adjudication System. The system had glitches in the beginning such as frequent offline and damaged electronic files. As such, some applications would appear as pending even though they were finalised manually. Hence, the numbers may mislead if the is no reconciliation.

END

02 December 2019 - NW1463

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

On what date will the sanitation backlog be addressed in the (a) Hantam Local Municipality and (b) Karoo Highlands Local Municipality with specific reference to the eradication of bucket and/or ventilated improved pit toilets in (i) Loeriesfontein, (ii) Brandvlei, (iii) Fraserburg, (iv) Sutherland and (v) Williston?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

02 December 2019 - NW1337

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 188 by the former Minister on 25 March 2019 and her reply to question 331 on 1 August 2019, the City of Ekurhuleni has now provided the information; if not, what steps/action does she intend taking to ensure that the City of Ekurhuleni provides the requested information?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

29 November 2019 - NW1623

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with compliance certificates for each (a) clinic and (b) hospital in the Northern Cape?

Reply:

We have requested information from the Province to enable me to respond to this question. The response will be submitted as soon as the Province has sent us the details.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1458

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of (a) learners are currently enrolled at the Thabakhibidu Primary School in Rooiberg, Thabazimbi, (b) permanent teachers have been appointed at the specified school and (c) vacant positions are on the staff; (2) what number of (a) classrooms does the school have and (b) learners does the school have in each classroom; (3) what number of educators reside on the school premises; (4) whether buildings that were previously used as offices are now being used as a school building; if so, (a) since what date and (b) on what date will a suitable school be built on the allocated stand for the community of Thabazimbi? NW2724E

Reply:

(1) Thabakhibidu Primary School has (a) 370 learners and (b) 8 permanent teachers in 2019 with (c) 2 vacant positions;

(2) (a) (b) It has 8 classrooms with between 37 and 57 learners per class. There are 10 educators residing on the schools premises. Please see Table 1 below for more detail.

Table 1: Number of learners per class, in Thabakhibidu Primary School, in 2019

2b)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of learners in each classroom:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gr R

37

   

Gr 1

55

   

Gr 2

32

   

Gr 3

48

   

Gr 4

53

   

Gr 5

57

   

Gr 6

54

   

Gr 7

34

   

Total

370

Source: 2019 Limpopo Provincial Warehouse

(3) Number of educators residing on school premises is 8

(4) (a) Yes, the building were previously used as office, (b) since November 2003.

4 (b) Donor funding has been sourced to start construction in the next financial year.

29 November 2019 - NW1563

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What number of deaths have been recorded as a result of medical negligence across the Republic in the past five years?

Reply:

Information is still being sourced from provinces to enable us to respond to this question. The final response will be submitted to Parliament as soon as the relevant information has been received from provinces.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1545

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What percentage of (a) persons living with mental health conditions are receiving the professional care they need, (b) the total budget of his department is used for the care of patients with mental health conditions in each province, (c) the mental health care budget is used on treating severe symptoms and (d) the mental health care budget is used for the early evaluation and prevention of mental health conditions; (2) what total number of public hospitals (a) are compliant with the mental health care legislation, (b) are providing the requisite 72 hours assessments and (c) have qualified child psychiatrists in each province?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Nationally representative psychiatric epidemiological study, the South African Stress and Health (SASH) survey, found that 25,2% of participants with a mental disorder had sought treatment within the previous 12 months of which 5,7% with a mental disorder received mental health care.

(b) The national survey on the evaluation of health system costs of mental health services and programmes in South Africa undertaken by the University of Cape Town using the 2016/17 Financial Year provincial health budget expenditure found the following in respect of expenditure on Mental Health in 2016/17.

Province

2016/17 financial year total inpatient and outpatient mental health expenditure

 

Millions

Eastern Cape

R806

Free State

R253

Gauteng

R2,334

KwaZulu-Natal

R1,831

Limpopo

R422

Mpumalanga

R178

Northern Cape

R177

North West

R296

Western Cape

R1,504

The above budgets does not include funds that are transferred to private health care providers who are contracted by some provincial departments of health to provide mental health services in provinces where such contracts exist.

(c)-(d) The budget for provision of mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation is not separated in terms of severity of mental health symptoms or type of mental health intervention. Available budget data separation is in terms of percentage spent on inpatient mental health care and percentage spent on outpatient mental health care as reflected in the table below.

Province

Total mental health budget

% of total mental health budget spent on inpatient mental health care

% of total mental health budget spent on outpatient mental health care

 

Millions

%

%

Eastern Cape

R806

86%

14%

Free State

R253

88%

12%

Gauteng

R2,334

89.1%

10.9%

KwaZulu-Natal

R1,831

82.3%

17.7%

Limpopo

R422

70.2%

29.8%

Mpumalanga

R178

76.2%

23.8%

Northern Cape

R177

82%

18%

North West

R296

86.2%

13.8%

Western Cape

R1,504

90.5%

9.5%

The above budgets do not include funds that are transferred to private health care providers who are contracted by some provincial departments of health to provide mental health services in provinces where such contracts exist.

(2) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

 

Total number of public hospitals

 

Province

Compliant with Mental Health Care Legislation

Providing 72 hour assess-ments

Have qualified child psychiatrists

   

(a)

(b)

(c)

 

Eastern Cape

7

39

0

 

Free State

1

29

1

 

Gauteng

13

17

5

 

KwaZulu-Natal

27

56

1

 

Limpopo

5

35

0

 

Mpumalanga has 28 public health facilities providing mental health services BUT they do not meet the basic requirements prescribed

0

28

0

 

Northern Cape

13

1

1

 

North West

2

6

0

 

Western Cape

11

31

3

 

TOTAL

67

254

11

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1566

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the guidelines and/or protocols that provinces should have in place to ensure safety (a) at health facilities and (b) of Emergency Medical Services personnel; (2) does his department require any basic level safety requirements to be met by each province; (3) what total number of healthcare professionals have been killed in the line of duty by patients and/or criminals in the past five years?

Reply:

1. (a) Health Facilities

The Department has security guards in all the health facilities. The purpose is to protect both the staff and the patients on continuous basis. The security guards conduct patrol in the health facilities throughout the day. The Ideal Hospital Realisation and Management Framework and the Ideal Clinic Realisation and Maintenance as well as the Office of Health Standards Compliance, have measures compelling all health facilities to introduce safety and security features. The health facilities have been declared gun free ones. These are measured at regular intervals by means of inspections and reports being submitted.

(b) Emergency Medical Services Personnel

  • Through engagement with the National Joint Intelligence Structures, a PROJOC instruction was issued that SAPS is required to escort ambulances to calls in volatile areas.
  • Provinces are required to establish a response protocol to areas identified as hot zones.
  • A comprehensive National EMS Safety Guideline is in place to ensure that the (EMS) personnel work in an environment consistent with accepted minimum safety and security standards. This encompasses the development of provincial EMS safety plans and of mainstreaming the individual and collective sense of security and safety awareness and responsibility.
  • A National EMS Safety Forum has recently been considered to advise the National and Provincial Departments of Health on safety challenges, undertaking risk assessments and proposing risk reduction measures in addition to mitigating, developing, maintaining, updating and implementing safety protocols and standard operating procedures according to the changing situation, where necessary.

2. Each province is required to develop and implement their respective Safety Plan in line with the National EMS Safety Guideline depending on the level of threat/incidents in their respective provinces. The guideline is as follows:

STRATEGIC FOCUS

OUTPUT

ACTIVITIES

SUCCESS PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Focus on Staff

Staff Preparedness

  • Promote staff operational readiness
  • Staff are encouraged to take part in Wellness Initiatives.

Reduce the risk to staff member being targeted by criminals

 

Staff Vigilance / Awareness

  • Staff members to be sensitised in vigilance and awareness of surroundings

Staff members have access to all information regarding high risk zones

 

Staff Resilience

  • Regular debriefing and mental health training sessions to be attended by staff members

Mentally fit staff

 

Staff Safety Course

  • A Safety course is currently being developed

Awareness & Preparedness of EMS in hostile situations

Focus on Community

Informal

  • Awareness campaigns within communities highlighting challenges with regards to limitations and barriers and implementation of red zones

Staff members will be familiar to community members and a level of trust can be built between all parties.

 

Formal

  • Active participation in Community Police forums, neighbourhood watches and farm watches – meeting scheduled with agenda item tabled

Greater awareness within the community of incidents that have occurred. Also to provide support to staff that needs to testify

Focus on Management

Before the incident

  • Keep staff informed of all pertinent activities within their district so as to increase their vigilance and awareness.

Ensuring a fluid process during and after an incident

 

During the Incident

  • Immediate response of officers to scene of incident if safe, or to place of safety

Ensuring staff support

 

Post Incident

  • Staff wellness to investigate a more proactive and efficient external staff support service for ongoing management of individuals that have been subjected to traumatic incidents especially attacks on their person

Supported staff members will feel they are able to contribute to the service and this will assist in their recovery.

 

Provincial

  • Regular stakeholders meeting with the Community Police Forum (CPF), Business South Africa, Private Security in the identified affected areas;

Regular feedback to staff on stakeholder meetings.

 

National

  • Regular feedback to NHC -TAC on prevention and mitigation strategy to reduce the attacks on EMS.

Support from NHC-TAC.

Monitoring on the implementation of the Emergency Medical Support in Hostile Environments) training.

National and Provincial feedback on Health Care In Danger Project

Focus on Technology

 
  • Panic button located in the front and rear of vehicles to be tested on a regular basis to check their status
  • Use of social media/ digital media,
  • Use digital media to campaign with other platforms on the management of EMS
  • Safety Vest specifications were approved at the National Committee for EMS meeting held on the 15th October 2019

Improved responsiveness and confidence in service capacity

Ensure safety and protection for EMS personnel.

 

3. One EMS personnel was fatality shot in Gauteng Province in 2017, and one security guard in Limpopo province

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1559

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Health

What progress has his department made in establishing Ketlaphela, the state-owned pharmaceutical company that will supply anti-retroviral drugs to his department as the former President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, announced during the state of the nation address in 2016?

Reply:

The establishment of the State-owned company Ketlaphela was led by the Department of Science and Technology. The initial plans were to establish a State-owned active pharmaceutical ingredients company producing the API’s for the widely used ARVs. After the expression of interest advert for companies to partner on API production, there was no economically viable proposal.

The project has since been taken over by NECSA with a change in focus towards medicines formulation and packaging as an initial step toward final API production. The business case in this regard suggests that this approach would be economically viable. The Department of Energy would be able to provide full details regarding progress with Ketlaphela given that it is now with that Department.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1622

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What number of ambulances are available in the Northern Cape?

Reply:

The Northern Cape has 88 ambulances available for operations.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1235

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 324 on 15 August 2019, (a) what are the details of (i) each of the stakeholders in the private sector and (ii) other specified stakeholders who are being engaged with as stated in the reply, (b)(i) what is the format and nature of the engagements that took place in each case and (ii) for how long have each of the engagements been taking place respectively in each instance and (c) what are the results of the engagements as at the latest specified date in each instance?

Reply:

As stated in the reply to question 324, key measures that are put in place to meet targets also include ongoing engagement with the private sector, other government departments and other stakeholders in their respective roles in achieving the target set by the President in the June 2019 State of the Nation Address. The targets will form part of the Strategic Plan within the new MTSF period of the department and SAT.

There are ongoing engagements with the Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) which is the umbrella organization representing the unified voice of business in the travel and tourism sector. TBCSA comprises of 14 travel and tourism sub-sector associations and 28 business members. These engagements have ensured that TBCSA is integral in the planning that is aimed at meeting the 21 million international tourist target, and in strategizing on various mechanisms that are aimed at growing the tourism sector. Minister has had, since her arrival, more than 4 engagements with the Chairperson and CEO of TBCSA and has been invited to address a full TBCSA board meeting at beginning of December.

The minister also met with the Airline industry operating in the country during the month of November in order to improve collaboration and partnership. She also held a meeting with representative of Association of Southern African Travel Agents (ASATA) after they raised a concern of the regulation for South Africa still requiring unabridged certificate during the month of November. She was invited to share her vision with Southern Africa Tourism Services Association (SATSA) Gauteng Chapter during the month of November and plans to continue with these kind of engagements with other associations.

Furthermore, the Minister hosts a quarterly tourism leadership forum (TLF) which brings together representatives from various associations in the tourism sector and this was held during October month. These engagements gave an opportunity for the Minister to outline her plans and the need for working together.

Since she took Office, the Minister has convened two MinMec meetings, to ensure collaboration and alignment of strategies between National government and provinces.

The Minister has also convened a meeting with business leaders from the rail tourism industry and representatives of state owned enterprises (Transnet and Prasa). The engagement, the first of its kind, was aimed at ensuring that rail tourism is mainstreamed and forms part of the tourism marketing programmes so that it can attract more tourists.

The Minister hosted a Youth summit that shared the work of the Department with the youth. The summit also provided a platform for young people to engage the Minister and the Department on opportunities and challenges in the tourism sector. The summit also provided an opportunity for the participants to provide feedback on their experience in the sector and in dealing with the Department with a view on how to collectively improve the sector.

The Minister met with Tourism BBBEE Council during the month of July, to welcome them and receive the state of transformation report prepared by the outgoing council at the time.

The Minister has also hosted an Imbizo in Limpopo aimed at engaging with communities and community leaders. These engagements have played an important role in ensuring continued improvement of society’s understanding of the importance of welcoming tourists in the various destinations across the country and in ensuring that they enjoy a safe and memorable experience.

Minister has engaged with tour operators, media and influencers to get feedback on what we need to do to ensure that we increase our international arrivals. These engagements took place in China, Japan, New York, Ghana and Nigeria.

More engagements will continue in 2020 and the underlying message that the Minister has been conveying to various stakeholders relates to the importance of working together as a sector in order to ensure that we grow the sector and meet the 21 million target that we have set.

Key Strategic Stakeholders

The key strategic stakeholder comprised of the following but not limiting sector stakeholders as per the engagement structure below:

a) (i) Private Sector:

Private sector stakeholder

  1. (i) Format and nature of engagements

(b)(ii)How long have each of the engagements been taking place

(c ) What are the of the engagements as at the latest specified date in each instance

Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA)

The association is the umbrella organisation representing the unified voice of business in the travel and tourism sector.

The organisation serves to unite and influence the diverse travel and tourism sector to contribute to a competitive, responsible and inclusive tourism economy and comprises of 14 travel and tourism sub-sector associations and 28 business members.

The engagement is through a collaborative MOU between two entities.

The MOU covers areas of joint marketing, exhibitions, roadshows, knowledge sharing and grading.

Engagement is through monthly meetings and performance reporting.

The MOU is concluded every three years and both entities have just finalised a new five-year agreement from April 2019 -March 2024.

TBCSA and SA Tourism embarked on a roadshow to Europe (September 2019) and North America (October 2019) to affirm the industry’s commitment to the markets by gathering valuable insights from valued trade partners to better understand the current market challenges, barriers, and opportunities to achieve greater success together.

Insights gathered from these roadshows will assist in addressing challenges that may hinder efforts of reaching the 2030 target.

Furthermore, a debrief was conducted post-roadshows to discuss the way forward. Some of the key outcomes of the debrief were:

  1. Conduct a global market mapping to identify key trade driving volume and value markets
  1. Develop joint marketing initiatives to be done with trade in market.
  1. Working with the department to address supply side issues such as language challenges through relevant training and development of tour guides for different key markets.

b) (ii) Other stakeholders: Public Sector

Other stakeholders

  1. (i) Format and nature of engagements

(b)(ii)How long have each of the engagements been taking place

(c) What are the latest results

Provincial Tourism Authorities (PTAs)

The engagement is through collaborative MOU. The purpose of the MOU is for both parties to collaborate, commit and align their strategic and tactical plans and resources of whatever nature in relation to their tourism mandate and to achieve the 2030 targets. The engagement is conducted through the following structures:

1. Quarterly CEO Forum (Effective Marketing Pillar of NTSS)

2. Quarterly marketing forum

3. Quarterly Business Events Coordinating Forum

Engagements have been in place for years since provinces established PTAs, however the main focus in line with the 6th administration is to work towards achieving 21 million visitors by 2030.

CEO Forum: 10 October 2019

The CEO Forum met on 10 October 2019 to discuss the alignment of business planning processes. This is the first time that SA Tourism and provincial tourism authorities conducted a joint business planning session, and this provided an opportunity to develop the 5-year strategic plan in line with the 6th administration. Furthermore, to focus on key focus areas, working towards achieving the 2030 targets.

Marketing Forum: 13 November 2019

The marketing forum met on 13 November 2019 to discuss the development of key action plans for the 2020/21 financial year.

Key outcomes:

1. Consolidation of annual calendar of events

2. Develop destination stories to package destinations content.

3. Package key flagship products.

4. Identify other stakeholders to partner in destination marketing i.e. Film Commissions, Department of Arts, Culture and Sports and Brand SA.

The above outcomes will form part of integrated annual plans.

29 November 2019 - NW1567

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What total number of healthcare professionals are on incapacity leave for longer than one year in each province, (b) what are the posts that they occupy and (c) at what cost has their leave been to each provincial health department?

Reply:

Information is still being sourced from Provinces. The answer will be submitted to Parliament as soon as the information is received from Provinces.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1621

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of (a) clinics and (b) hospitals are in the Northern Cape; (2) what total number of (a) doctors and (b) nurses are employed at each (i) hospital and (ii) clinic; (3) (a) who received the contract to build and/or upgrade the Good Hope Clinic and (b) how far is the building/upgrade of the clinic?

Reply:

1. (a) 161 clinics based on the Ideal clinic database (on the software) and

(b) 14 hospitals based on the regulation relating to categories of hospitals 2012 in the Northern Cape province.

2. (a) (i) Total doctors employed in hospitals in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Medical Officer employed in Hospital as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Medical Officer

54

 

Medical Officer (Community Service)

17

 

Medical Specialist

1

Northern Cape Total

 

72

(ii) Total doctors employed in clinics in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Medical Officers employed in Clinics as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Medical Officer

1

b) (i) Total nurses employed in hospitals in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Nurse Professionals employed in Hospital as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Assistant Manager Nursing (Head Nursing Service)

3

 

Clinical Nurse Practitioner (Prim H Care)

3

 

Nursing Assistant

168

 

Operational Manager Nursing (General)

11

 

Operational Manager Nursing (Primary H Care)

1

 

Operational Manager Nursing (Speciality Unit)

4

 

Professional Nurse

250

 

Professional Nurse ( Speciality Nursing)

37

 

Professional Nurse (Community Service)

29

 

Staff Nurse

64

Northern Cape Total

 

570

(ii) Total nurses employed in clinics in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Nurse Professions employed in Clinics as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Staff Nurse

37

 

Assistant Manager Nursing (Primary H Care)

3

 

Professional Nurse

162

 

Deputy Manager Nursing (Level 1 & 2 Hospital)

1

 

Professional Nurse ( Speciality Nursing)

2

 

Nursing Assistant

173

 

Professional Nurse (Community Service)

20

 

Operational Manager Nursing (General)

17

 

Assistant Manager Nursing Area

1

 

Operational Manager Nursing (Primary H Care)

89

 

Clinical Nurse Practitioner (Prim H Care)

111

Northern Cape total

 

616

3. Good Hope is a mobile point in Flagstaff in the Eastern Cape province. The community from the village has been requesting the department to build a clinic for them. The department could not build it due to budgetary constraints. The community is being serviced through a mobile clinic which visits once per month.

(a) There is nobody who has been awarded a contract to build and/or upgrade the Good Hope clinic;

(b) Due to the fact that there was no tender awarded to anyone, there is no progress on the building/upgrade of the clinic.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1143

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

1) What (a) is the total number of agricultural research farms in each province, (b) is the size of each research farm, (c) activities take place on each farm, (d) are the current conditions of each farm, (e) is the breakdown of the annual budget of each farm, (f) were the most recent research (i) activities conducted and (ii) outcomes from each farm; 2) Whether any of the specified farms are being leased; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the (a) name of each person and/or institution that leases the farm and (b) amount paid for each farm that is leased?

Reply:

RESPONSE TO PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 1143/NW2303E

The Agricultural Research Council is a statutory body established in terms of the Agricultural Research Act, 1990 (Act no.86 of 1990) (the ARC Act) and is listed as a Schedule 3, Part A Public Entity in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act no.1 of 1999) (the PFMA).

The response to the Parliamentary Question 1143/NW2303E is postulated as per the 3 tables.

In the event that your office requires any further information, please do not hesitate to contact my office.

Table 1: REPLY: (1) (a), (b), (c), (d) supporting documents attached

Province

Number of farms

Size

Activities

Current conditions

Gauteng

3

7826ha

Vegetables research, animal breeding and animal production

Good

Mpumalanga

1

66ha

Cattle farming

Good

Western Cape

9

Between 243,8 and 227,917ha

Research on fruit and vine

Fair

Eastern Cape

3

657,65ha

Cattle farming, agricultural training and SAPS stock theft training

Poor

Mpumalanga

1

66ha

Cattle farming

Good

Free State

2

1039.5ha

Plant breeding, National cultivar evaluation and plant diseases

Good

North West

2

594,92ha

Maize trials and Research

Fair

Limpopo

3

5591haha

Vegetables production, research, commercial farming and grazing

Good

Table 2: REPLY: (1) continues (i), (ii), supporting documents attached

Province

Activities

Outcome from each farm

Gauteng

Vegetables research, animal breeding and animal production

-Animal breeding

-Maize seeds production

-Training of farmers

-Cash revenue on social events

Mpumalanga

Cattle farming

Generating external revenue

Western Cape

Research on fruit and vine

Fair

Eastern Cape

Cattle farming, agricultural training and SAPS stock theft unit

-The farm is in a bad state due to underutilization.

-Farming

-Training

Mpumalanga

Cattle farming

Generating external revenue

Free State

Wheat commercial

R800 000

North West

Maize trials and research

-Research

-Maize harvest

Limpopo

Vegetables production, research, commercial farming and grazing

Good

Table 3: REPLY: (2) (a), (b), supporting documents attached

Province

Person or individuals that lease the farm

Amount paid for farm leased

Gauteng

United Seeds

Naka breeders

R220 000 p/a

Mpumalanga

AA HUNN

R4716 p/m

Western Cape

None

N/A

Eastern Cape

-SAPS

-Chumani Water Solutions

-Asante Management Services

-SAPS R21059

-Chumani R12160

-Asante R26827

Mpumalanga

Cattle farming

R4716 p/m

Free State

None

N/A

North West

Agricol

R5617 p/m

Limpopo

Oppierandjie

R35727 p/m

29 November 2019 - NW1634

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What progress has his department made in implementing the National Strategic Plan for HIV, TB and STIs 2017 – 2022; (2) how does his department intend to address the issue of noncommunicable diseases that have been identified as forming part of the quadruple burden of diseases; (3) what (a) number of Gene Xpert TB diagnosis machines has his department acquired, (b) is the coverage of the machines and (c) has he found to be the impact of the machines on TB (i) testing and (ii) treatment?

Reply:

(1) The South African National AIDS Council secretariat is currently finalising the midterm report against activities and targets set in the National Strategic Plan, 2017-2022. Highlights of the review were presented, on 23 November 2019, to the SANAC Extended Plenary meeting, co-chaired by the Deputy President and Ms Steve Letsike representing civil society. Once the midterm report is finalised copies can be made available to Members of Parliament.

In brief, South Africa has made progress against the various pillars of Strategic Plan as reflected by data on reduction in new infections as well as access to antiretroviral treatment. With respect to HIV incidence, the number of new infections has fallen from 270,000 in 2012 to 222,000 in 2018. Whilst this reduction is welcome it is clearly too slow and more needs to be done to reduce new infections.

The mother to child transmission rates at 10 weeks postpartum have declined to 0.74% which means that fewer children are being born HIV positive. Although condom distribution has increased, condom utilisation is on the decline, particularly in the 15-24 year old age group. Combination prevention and differentiated service delivery, addressing the needs of each target population in a more holistic and comprehensive way, has been prioritised.

In terms of treatment, South Africa has reached the 5 million people on treatment. The majority of the patients are in the public sector (4.8 million) with the remainder in the private sector. With respect to the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets (90% of people with HIV know their status, 90% of these on treatment, and 90% of those on treatment virally suppressed), the country has reached 91-71-88. This means that South Africa has achieved the 1st 90, and is steadily progressing towards achieving the 2nd and 3rd 90’s. Three districts (in KwaZulu-Natal) have reached the 90-90-90 targets with another 14 nation-wide likely to reach this target by March 2020.

We need to test and treat more men and young people and retention on treatment continues to be a challenge which government and its partners are working on. Internal and external migration together with a lack of an electronic information system across the health system are contributory to a higher than acceptable percentage of patients retained in care.

The burden of tuberculosis remains large with South Africa being one of the high burden countries. We have recently completed the first ever national TB prevalence survey and the results are currently being verified by the World Health Organisation. Once verified we will have a better understanding of the TB incidence and prevalence rates. The TB prevalence survey report can also be made available to Members of Parliament once finalised. From routine data we know that notifications are on the decline but that we are still missing an estimated 160,000 patients – as for HIV, we are missing young people as well as men. Efforts are underway to intensify screening, testing and initiation of young people and men on treatment and finding the missing TB patients.

(2) The Department intends addressing the issue of non-communicable diseases that have been identified as forming part of the quadruple burden of disease through the National Strategic Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases 2020-2035 which is in the process of being approved. This Strategy aims to strengthen existing initiatives on the prevention and control on non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Such initiatives include:

PREVENTION AND PROMOTION

South Africa has taken a number of legislative/regulatory/policy steps to prevent NCDs. Specific preventive interventions include (by main risk factors):

Tobacco

a. A new Draft Control of Tobacco Products and electronic Delivery Systems Bill has been tabled;

b. The key areas that the Bill will regulate are:

- restrictions on public smoking;

- the sale and advertising of tobacco products and electronic delivery systems;

- the prohibition on financial or other support;

- the prohibition of vending machines;

- the standardisation of the packaging and appearance of tobacco products; and electronic delivery systems; and

- restriction on the sale of products.

Diet

a. A regulation on Trans-fats in Foodstuffs was passed in 2011 (R127). According to this regulation the trans-fat content of any oils and fats cannot exceed two grams per 100 grams. Products with higher trans fats levels are prohibited from entering or being sold in the country.

b. A regulation on reduction of sodium in 13 categories of foodstuffs that are the most common source of sodium for the majority of South Africans was passed in 2013 (R214) and amended in October 2017.

c. A levy on sugar sweetened beverages (Health promotion levy) was passed in 2018. The levy is foxed at 2.1 cents per gram of sugar content that exceeds 4g per 100ml. Fruit juice is exempt.

d. South Africa adopted a Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Obesity in South Africa (2015-2020).

e. National Nutrition Week and National Obesity Week took place annually from 09 to 15 and 15 to 19 October respectively. For the past three years (2016, 2017 and 2018) the Department of Health campaigns focused on the importance of eating regular, healthy meals to prevent obesity and consequently non-communicable diseases and to promote health.

Physical activity

a. The Country commemorates the Move for Health campaign on an annual basis on the 10th of May. The campaign is led by the Sport and Recreation South Africa in collaboration with the Department of Health.

b. The Department of Sports and Recreation hosts an annual Big Walk on the first Sunday of October each year. The Big Walk is the South African version of the World Walking Day. Since 2012 it has taken place in all provincial capital cities with more than thirty thousand (30,000) participants in 2017.

c. The Cabinet of South Africa also declared the first Friday of October as the National Recreation Day since 2014. The campaign is targeting all Citizens to be physically active.

The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination programme

a. The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination programme was launched in 2014 by the National Department of Health in partnership with the Department of Basic Education, as part of primary prevention against cervical cancer.

b. The aim was to target an estimated 550,000 girls in grade 4, aged 9 years in 17,000 public and special schools, before they were exposed to HPV infection.

c. A bivalent vaccine (Cervarix) is given at five to six month intervals using a campaign approach implemented through the Integrated School Health Programme.

d. The first round is conducted during February to March and the second round in August to September of each year.

e. Between 2014 when this programme started and February 2019 a total of one million nine hundred and thirty four thousand six hundred and thirty five (1,934,635) Grade 4 girls had received Dose 1 and one million two hundred and seven thousand four hundred and seventy seven (1,207,4077) Dose 2.

HEALTH SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENT

a. An Integrated Clinical Services Management Model that incorporates all chronic diseases, whether communicable or non-communicable, was introduced through the Ideal Clinic initiative. This means that patients are seen for whatever chronic disease they have, including for multiple conditions, at the same visit. As of 2018, 97,2% of clinics had reorganized with designated consulting areas for management of chronic conditions and had patient appointment systems for people with chronic conditions (up from 87% and 73% respectively in 2017).

b. Medicine for many patients that are stable on Non Communicable Diseases medication are provided through the Centralised Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) model.

c. Together with the Affordable Medicines Directorate (AMD), concerted efforts have been made to improve drug availability at hospital and primary care levels and systems are in place to monitor medicine stock outs.

(3) (a) Table 1: The provincial distribution of GeneXpert devices in South Africa

PROVINCE

GX4

GX16

GX48

GX80

Total

Eastern Cape

17

28

0

2

47

Free State

11

9

0

1

21

Gauteng

25

27

1

2

55

KwaZulu-Natal

25

51

0

1

77

Limpopo

19

25

0

0

44

Mpumalanga

3

14

0

1

18

North West

8

17

0

0

25

Northern Cape

2

6

0

0

8

Western Cape

17

13

0

1

31

Total

127

190

1

8

326

(3) (b) The National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) laboratory were mapped in Figure 1 to show the coverage of laboratories in South Africa. This was generated using Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates provided by the National Priority Programme (NPP).

C:\Users\pajayi\Documents\GIS DataBase\Project Folders\NPP\Xpert locations ii.jpg

Figure 1: The geographic coverage of NHLS laboratories across South Africa

(3) (c) (i)-(ii) The impact of GeneXpert has been:

- Early diagnosis of TB and initiation of treatment resulting in reduction in deaths from 33,300 patients (in 2011) to 16,133 (in 2017), a 51% reduction in deaths due to TB;

- The universal drug susceptibility testing for all patients has enabled early triage of patients with rifampicin resistant TB to appropriate second line treatment. This has resulted in a reduction in treatment failure from 5 062 (in 2011) to 934 (in 2017); and

- Reduction in number of patients hospitalised for DS and DR-TB, saving on hospitalisation costs.

Figure 2 summarises the progress of the GeneXpert program over time from March 2011 to September 2019. This was generated using the monthly data provided to the Research and Development team by the NPP. The figure shows a general decrease of both Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MTB) detection (despite seasonal trends of increased MTB detection in the winter months) and Refampicin-resistant Tuberculosis (RIF) resistance. The “trace”/MTB Indeterminate rate is relatively consistent.

The yearly NPP reported figures for the GeneXpert program are shown in Tables 2 and 3. Table 2 shows the operational programmatic indicators for test outcomes. Table 3 shows the RIF outcomes for MTB detected tests.

Figure 2: The temporal progression of the GeneXpert program at national level. The figure shows the number of tests (for both Xpert MTB/RIF and Xpert MTB/RIF Ultra), the MTB detection rate, “trace”/MTB Indeterminate rate and RIF resistance rate.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW610

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

Department of Basic Education (DBE):

(a) (i) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has signed a Public Private Partnership (PPP) for the finance, design, construction and maintenance of the head office building. The DBE pays a unitary monthly fee for the capital as well as maintenance cost. The unitary fee cannot be broken down into the various services provided.

(ii) Not applicable

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(cc) Not applicable

(aaa) Not applicable

(bbb) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

UMALUSI RESPONSE:

(a) (ii) Umalusi paid for the following services to the indicated service providers:

Services

Service Provider

(aaa)

2017/18

R

(bbb)

2018/19

R

(aa) Cleaning

Total cleaning

369, 517. 41

370, 758.88

 

Servest Group

369, 517.41

227, 237.26

 

Mamulo Trading

-

143, 521.62

(bb) Security

Total Security

786, 546.85

880, 277.24

 

Brinant Security

786, 546.85

425, 058.39

 

Rise Security Services

-

455, 018.85

(cc) Gardening Services

Persequor Tuindienste

22, 000.00

28, 473.16

Service Provider

Service

(aaa)

2017/18

R

(bbb)

2018/19

R

(C)

Total

R

Servest Group

Cleaning

369, 517.41

227, 237.26

596, 754.67

Mamulo Trading

Cleaning

-

143, 521.62

143, 521.62

Brinant Security

Security

786, 546.85

425, 058.39

1, 211, 605.24

Rise Security Services

Security

-

455, 018.85

455, 018.85

Persequor Tuindienste

Gardening Services

22, 000.00

28, 473.16

50, 473.16

SACE RESPONSE:

(ii) (aa) The South African Council for Educators spent R129 718,30 on cleaning during the 2017/18 financial year.

(bb) The South African Council for Educators spent R347 355,70 on security during the 2017/18 financial year.

(cc) N/A

 

(ii) (b) TOTAL SECURITY COSTS FOR 2017/18

Consisting of:

BLOEMSEC

5424

ASKARI DEVELOPMENT

263 874,9

NATIONAL SECURITY & FIRE

6 296.76

BRATFORCE SECURITY AND PROJECTS

71 760

TOTAL

347 355,7

 

TOTAL SECURITY COSTS FOR 2018/19

Consisting of:

BLOEMSEC

5832

ASKARI DEVELOPMENT

230176,2

NATIONAL SECURITY & FIRE

6306,13

BRATFORCE SECURITY AND PROJECTS

40420

THLAPI SECURITY AND PROJECTS

79624

TOTAL

362 358,4

 

TOTAL CLEANING FOR 2017/18

Consisting of:

RENTOKIL INITIAL

88058,16

MALETSATSI HOME

5118,6

KA-NTLE TRADING ENTERPRISE

8076,5

PETTY CASH

1078,47

DGR DISTRIBUTORS CC

4983

LUPHA TRADING & PROJECTS

5695

KATSHEMONG (PTY) LTD

10046

MAYFAY SERVICES

646,02

IPOPENG OFFICE SUPPLIES

2229,56

LEBOMCAPITAL

1014,98

UNICOPY STATIONERS

567,04

ABIYOT EMPIRE ENTERPRISE

2205

TOTAL

129 718,

TOTAL CLEANING FOR 2018/17

Consisting of:

     

CANNON HYGIENE

89025,96

MALETSATSI HOME

6666,72

REFHUMUDZE TRADING (PTY) LTD

32978,25

PETTY CASH

3812,88

EXPERTS TRADERS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT

7090

LUPHA TRADING AND PROJECTS

16635

OKS INVESTMENT 2009

6440

EXTRAODINARY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD

21750

MC TREND SYSTEM

4724,3

KHONGI HOLDINGS

37500

THLALEFO YA KA TRADING (PTY) LTD

336,3

BURUDANI PTY LTD

10230,4

UNI COPY & STATIONERS CC

1121,25

ENGETELA SUPPLIERS

2462,5

SEKGOTO BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

2601,16

TOTAL

243 374,7

   

29 November 2019 - NW1544

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the fact that the SA Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) recently commissioned an investigation and report into potential human rights violations by the Limpopo Department of Health, (a) on what date was the SAHRC’s report presented to the Limpopo Department of Health, (b) will his department make the report available to the Portfolio Committee on Health and (c) what (i) actions have been taken against persons involved in human rights violations and (ii) are the details of the persons against whom the SAHRC recommended action?

Reply:

(a) The Report was issued in February 2019 to the Limpopo Department of Health.

(b) Yes. The Preliminary report (for comments by the Limpopo Department of Health) is attached.

(c) (i) and (ii) Information is still awaited from the province and will be submitted once received.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW687

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What has she found to be the reason that the budget allocated to South African Tourism (SAT) has no correlation with the increase in tourism and (b) how was the budget to SAT calculated (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) for the 2019-20 financial year?

Reply:

a) South Africa Tourism is entrusted with responsibilities of primarily focusing on marketing South Africa as a domestic and international tourist destination (leisure) and as a business tourism destination. Each year SAT develops an annual performance plan derived from its five year strategy. SAT’s five year strategy is guided by the strategic plan of the department. Each annual performance outlines priorities and programmes that SAT will be driving for that particular year and a budget for each priority or programme is allocated accordingly and approved by parliament. The primary goal of the marketing programmes driven within SAT is the increase in the number of tourists both International arrivals and domestic travellers.

Objectively getting travellers to choose South Africa as a destination of choice and getting South Africans to travel is influenced by factors that are within SAT’s control and those that are outside SAT’s control.

SAT can control factors such as the intensity of its campaigns, the countries it targets, the demographics it targets, and etc. which are outlined in the funded marketing framework. The strategy as expressed in each APP gives expression to how much budget is allocated to maximise on the factors that are within the control of SAT towards achieving the main goal which the increase in numbers.

Notwithstanding the investment in marketing, negative perceptions about South Africa are a significant barrier for international tourists. These issues lead to the divergence between budget allocations and the performance of SAT. The following are key issues that adversely affect the number of tourists visiting the country:

  • Safety and security concerns
  • The Cape Town Water Crisis Messaging that exaggerated the situation.
  • Inappropriate wildlife interaction
  • Immigration regulations particularly visa application processes and the recently scrapped requirement for unabridged birth certificate for minors travelling to South Africa.

(b) How was the budget to SAT calculated in the (i) past three financial years and (ii) for the 2019-20 financial year

The following table indicate the budget of SA Tourism’s budget for the past three financial years and for the 2019/20 financial year.

Name of the Programme

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

 

 

 

 

 

(R’000)

(R’000)

(R’000)

(R’000)

1.

Corporate Support

102 127

151 212

132 271

135 171

2.

Business Enablement

99 907

60 926

85 929

89 700

3.

Leisure Tourism Marketing

846 955

955 996

1 026 270

1 066 602

4.

Business Events

154 552

172 123

129 287

137 869

5.

Visitor Experience

54 035

49 596

65 807

68 695

             Total

1 257 576

1 389 853

1 439 564

1 497 857

Programme 1: Corporate Support

Corporate Support provides support services to the organisation and ensures compliance with statutory Requirements.

 

Programme 2: Business Enablement

Business Enablement ensures that the strategic plan is developed and integrated with business performance monitoring, governance and evaluation. It provides centralised research insights and analytics to support the core business and provide an open source for information-sharing with the tourism sector.

 

Programme 3: Leisure Tourism Marketing

Leisure Tourism Marketing provides destination tourism marketing, targeting both international and domestic leisure tourists.

 

Programme 4: Business Events

The Business Events programme markets South Africa as a business events

 

Programme 5: Tourist Experience

The Tourist Experience programme aims to deliver a quality experience expected by international and domestic tourists by grading establishments, developing product capacity and building itineraries for tourists.

 

29 November 2019 - NW1565

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the current waiting period for treatment for patients who have been diagnosed with cancer from time of diagnosis to first phase of treatment?

Reply:

Treatment of different types of cancer differ by province, facility and type of cancer The estimated waiting period for patients diagnosed with cervical cancer ranges from 6-11 weeks and for prostate cancer 11-28 weeks.

Waiting times at selected hospitals such as Frere Hospital, Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Livingstone Hospital, Polokwane Hospital ranges between 6 to 8 weeks. In Tygerberg, Groote Schuur and Universitas Hospitals the waiting times are between 12-14 weeks.

We are currently conducting an audit on cancer services and the outcome will be made available once the audit is completed.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1428

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether the Mokala Primary School in the Ratlou Local Municipality in North West was closed by her department; if so, what are the alternative measures that have been put in place to assist the learners to go to school and/or continue with their education?

Reply:

Mokala Primary School was initially a farm school about 13km from Setlagole Village. In 2011, due to the low enrolment of learners the school was forced to close. Learners from the school were moved to Senwamatsana Primary School in Setlagole in 2012. In 2013 the school was reopened in Lopapeng Section in Setlagole. This school was merged with Badiri Primary School from Westend Ranch Farm (34 kms from Setlagole) and Segakeng Primary School was added to the school in 2015.

The schools mentioned above received learners from Setlagole. Now that Mokala Primary, Badiri Primary and Segakeng Primary merged to become Mokala Primary it meant that learners will no more have to move to the farms as the learners are all from Setlagole.

To provide space for learners, mobile classrooms were given to replace the tents which were initially erected to serve as classrooms. The Hon Mec Matsemela instructed the closure of such tents in favour of mobile classrooms.

At the moment the learner enrolment is 660 with a staff compliment of 18 educators. There are 14 mobile classrooms provided. A new school was supposed to be built in 2016 but due to a new site having sought a delay was experienced.

29 November 2019 - NW1564

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What number of government health care facilities in each province offer reproductive healthcare, including termination of pregnancies, pap smears and mammograms?

Reply:

All primary health facilities are providing sexual and reproductive health services however the table below is for Termination of Pregnancy facilities:

Public Health Facilities Providing TOP services per Province

Eastern Cape

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Cacadu District

 
  1. Andres Vosloo hospital

Nelson Mandela Bay

 

1. Dora Ndiza hospital

2. Uitenhage provincial hospital

Amathole District

 

1. Madwaleni hospital

2. S.S Gida hospital

3. Frere hospital

4. Cecilia-Makwane hospital

5. Empilweni-Gompo CHC

6. Elliotdale CHC

7. Ngqamakwe CHC

UKhahlamba

 

1. Empilisweni hospital

2. Toylor-Bequest hospital

OR Tambo

 

1. Umthata-General hospital

2. St Pats hospital

3. St Barnaba’s hospital

4. St Liz hospital

5. Nessie Night hospital

6. Qumbu CHC

Chris Hani

 

1. Cofimvaba CHC

2. Cala Hospital

3. Elliot hospital

4. Cradock hospital

6. Glen Grey hospital

Gauteng

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Ekurhuleni

 

1. Natalspruit hospital

2. Tembisa hospital

3. Pholosong hospital

4. Far Eastrand hospital

5. Germiston hospital

6. Nokuthela-Ngwenya CHC

7. Jabulane-Dumane CHC

8. Pholopark CHC

Sedibeng

 

1. Sebokeng hospital

2. Kopanong hospital

3. Heidelberg hospital

4. Johan Heyns CHC

Tshwane

 

5.Kalafong hospital

2. George-Mokhari hospital

3.Odi hospital

4. Tshwane-district hospital

5. Phedisong 4 CHC

6. Laudium CHC

7. Soshanguve CHC

8. Kgabo CHC

City of Johannesburg

 

1. Chris-Hani Baragwaneth

2. Charlotte-Maxeke hospital

3. Raheema-Moosa hospital

4. Edenvale hospital

5. Hilbrow CHC

6. Chawelo CHC

7. ZolaCHC

8. Lenasia South CHC

West Rand

 

1. Leratong hospital

2. Dr-Yusuf-Dadoo hospital

3. Carltonville hospital

Free Sate

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Lejweleputswa

 

1. Bongani hospital

Thabo Mofutsanyane

 

1. Elizabeth Ross

Motheo

 

1. National hospital

Fezile Dabi

 

1. Matsimaholo

Limpopo

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Capricorn

 

1. Batlokwa

2. Lebowakgomo

3. Mankweng

4. Polokwane

5. Seshigo

6. WF Nnobel

7. Ratshatsha CHC

8. Rethabile

9. Mamottshwa clinic

Mopani

 

1. C N Phathudi

2. Kgapane

3. Letaba

4. Maphutha L Malatji

5. Nkhensani

6. Sekororo

7. Van Velden

Duiwelskloof Clinic

  1. Duiwelskloof CHC
  2. Shilivane CHC
  3. Bolobedu Clinic
  1. Raphahleol Clinic

Sekhukhune

 
  1. Jane Furse
  1. Matlala
  1. Mecklenburg
  1. Philadephia

Vhembe

 
  1. Dolnald Fraser
  1. Elim
  1. Louis Tritchardt
  1. Malamulele
  1. Siloam
  1. Tshilidzini
  1. Makhado CHC
  1. Thohoyandou CHC

Waterberg

 
  1. Ellisras Hospital
  1. FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital
  1. Mookgopong CHC
  1. Voortrekker Memorial Hospital
  1. Warmbaths Hospital

Mpumalanga

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Nkangala

 
  1. Mammethlake hospital
  1. Kwamhlanga hospital

Gert Sibande

 
  1. Bethal hospital

Northern Cape

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Frances Baard

 
  1. Galeshwe CHC

John Taolo Gaetsewe

 
  1. Tshwaragano level 1 hospital

Siyanda

 
  1. Gordonia level 1 hospital
  1. Askam CHC

Kwa-Zulu Natal

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

UThungulu

 
  1. Ngwelezane hospital
  1. Mbongolwane hospital
  1. Catherine Booth hospital

Zululand

 
  1. Nkonjeni hospital

UMkhanyakude

 
  1. Bethesda hospital

UGu

 
  1. GJ Crookes hospital

EThekwini

 
  1. Prince Mushiyeni hospital
  1. Wentworth hospital
  1. Addington hospital

ILembe

 
  1. Maphumulo hospital

UMgungundlovu

 
  1. Edendale hospital
  1. Northdale hospital
  1. Applesboch hospital

UThukela

 
  1. Escourt hospital
  1. Emawusi hospital

Amajuba

 
  1. Newcasle hospital

Sisonke

 
  1. Christ the King hospital
  1. St Appllinaris hospital
  1. EG Usher hospital

North West

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Dr K Kaunda

 
  1. Klerksdorp hospital
  1. Potchefstroom hospital
  1. Grace Mkhomo CHC
  1. Nic Bodenstein hospital

Dr RS Mopati

 
  1. Taung hospital
  1. Vryburg hospital
  1. Sweitzereneke hospital
  1. loemhof hospital

Dr M Molema

 
  1. Mafikeng hospital
  1. Gelukspan hospital
  1. Thusong hospital
  1. Ottosdal CHC
  1. Delareyville CHC
  1. Sannieshoff CHC
  1. Ratlou CHC
  1. Montshioa Stdt CHC

Bojanala

 
  1. Phokeng CHC
  1. Mogwase CHC
  1. Makapanstad CHC
  1. George Stegman hospital
  1. Lethlabile CHC
  1. JS Tabane hospital

Western Cape

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Cape Town Metro

 
  1. Groote Schuur hospital
  1. Somerset hospital
  1. Wesfleur hospital
  1. False Bay hospital
  1. Victoria hospital
  1. 2 Military hospital
  1. GF Jooste hospital
  1. Michell’s Plain CHC
  1. Carnation-ward Lentegeur hospital
  1. Karl Bremer hospital
  1. Tygerburg hospital
  1. Eerste River hospital
  1. Helderburg hospital
  1. Michael hospital
  1. Mapongwana CHC
  1. Nolungile clinic
  1. Kuayasa clinic

West Coast District

 
  1. Clan William Hospital
  1. Swartland Hospital
  1. Vredenburg Hospital
  1. Vredendal Hospital

Cape Wine lands District

 
  1. Paarl Hospital
  1. TC Newman CDC
  1. Stellenbosch Hospital
  1. Ceres Hospital
  1. Worcester Hospital
  1. Montagu Hospital
 

Overberg District

 
  1. Caledon Hospital
  1. Hermanus Hospital
  1. Otto-du-Plessis Hospital

pap smears services

All primary health care facilities are providing Pap Smear services

Mammogram services

Province

Facilities

Limpopo

  1. Pietersburg Hospital
  1. Mankweng Hospital

Mpumalanga

  1. Witbank Hospital
  1. Rob Ferreira Hospital

Free State

  1. Universitas Hospital;
  1. Pelenomi Hospital

North West

  1. Klerksdorp Tshepong Complex
  1. Job Shimankane Tabane Hospital
  1. Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

Western Cape

  1. Groote Schuur Hospital
  1. Tygerberg Hospital

Northern Cape

  1. Kimberly Hospital

Eastern Cape

None

Gauteng

  1. Chris Hani Hospital
  1. Charlotte Maxeke Hospital
  1. George Mukhari Hospital
  1. Kalafong Hospital
  1. Mamelodi Hospital
  1. Steve Biko Hospital
  1. Tembisa Hospital
  1. Helen joseph Hospital
  1. Rahima Moosa Hospital
  1. Sebokeng Hospital
  1. Thelle Mogoerane Hospital

KwaZulu Natal

  1. Ngwelezane Hospital
  1. Addington Hospital
  1. Prince Albert Luthuli Hospital
  1. Ngwelezane Hospital
  1. Greys Hospital
  1. RK Khan Hospital
  1. Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

Annexure A: Current Facilities Providing Oncology Treatment and Availability of Equipment (NDoH Audit, 2017)

Province

Facility

Chemo-therapy

Radiation Oncology

Paediatric Oncology

Contracting

No of Linacs

Eastern Cape

Frere Hospital

X

X

X

 

1

 

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

X

   

Yes

 
 

Livingstone Hospital

X

X

X

 

2

Free State

Universitas Hospital

X

X

X

 

2

Gauteng

Steve Biko Hospital

X

X

X

 

3

 

Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital

X

X

X

 

4

 

Chris Hani Baragwabath Academic Hospital

   

X

   
 

Kalafong Hospital

X

       

Kwa Zulu Natal

Greys Hospital

X

X

X

 

1

 

Addington Hospital

X

   

Yes

 
 

Ngwelezane Hospital

X

   

Yes

 
 

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

X

X

 

Yes

3

Limpopo

Polokwane Hospital

X

X

X

Yes

1

Mpumalanga

Rob Ferreira Hospital

X

   

Yes

 

Northern Cape

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

X

X

X

Yes

 

Western Cape

Tygerberg

X

X

   

3

 

Groote Schuur

X

X

   

3

 

George Hospital

X

X

 

Yes

 
 

Red Cross Hospital

   

X

   

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1433

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there is a proper drainage system at Middelburg Provincial Hospital; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of how the drainage system is maintained on a timeous basis?

Reply:

Yes.

Middelburg Provincial Hospital has a working drainage system. Maintenance of the drainage system (plumbing works, etc) is done internally by the Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport (DPWRT) artisans based at the Hospital on a day-to-day basis.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1543

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his department’s financial report on the R31 million virement that was requested for vaccines for Limpopo, (a) what was the Limpopo budget for vaccines in the (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 financial years, (b) why was a R31 million virement necessary, (c) which budget in his department was this virement taken from and (d) what engagements has he had with the Member of the Executive Council for Health to curb poor planning and jeopardising the health of Limpopo citizens?

Reply:

(a)

Limpopo budget for vaccines (as allocated by Provincial Treasury)

 

2017-18

(i)

2018-19

(ii)

 

R268,920,000

R317,781,000

(b) The National Department of Health responded to a request for support from the Acting Head of Department of Limpopo Department of Health who asked for help as the province had run out of funds to procure vaccines.

(c)

 

Amount

Budget from which funds were taken and motivation

1.

R6,000,000

HIV/AIDS & STI'S: Male Condoms due to supplier being unable to supply male condoms and the National Department of Health did not project at that stage a condom shortage or stock outs.

2.

R9,000,000

HIV/AIDS & STI'S: Consultants. No tender for Mass Media communication was in order and expenditure were done through the three quotations process. Note: Mass Media Communication is budgeted for under Consultants on BASS.

3.

R16,000,00

Chronic Diseases: Health Promotion Levy part of Mass Media Communication that could not be spent as no tender was in place and expenditure were done through the three quotation system.

(d) Following the Presidential Health Summit Compact (2018) it was resolved that a budget planning process for pharmaceuticals be instituted and that National Treasury earmark funds for procurement of pharmaceuticals (ring-fencing of the budget). The National Department has embarked on a process to generate a budget for pharmaceutical products for FY2020-2021 for each of the provinces based on accurate demand forecasts. This was discussed at the National Health Council and will be submitted to National Treasury in line with budgeting processes.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1534

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the Compensation Commission for Occupational Diseases (CCOD) is a listed entity; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether CCOD was a listed entity; if so, what are the reasons that it was removed from the list?

Reply:

1. The Compensation Commissioner for Occupational Diseases (CCOD) is not a listed entity. The Compensation Commissioner is currently in discussions with National Treasury about the status of the Mines and Works Compensation Fund in terms of the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act, No. 78 of 1973 and the Public Financial Management Act, No. 1 of 1999.

Section 61(1) of the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act, No. 78 of 1973 (ODMWA) provides for the establishment of the Mines and Works Compensation Fund. Section 61(2) of the ODMWA states that the Compensation Fund shall be managed by the Compensation Commissioner for Occupational Diseases (CCOD).

2.  The Fund was listed as a Public Entity in terms of schedule 3A of the Public Finance Management Act, No. 1 of 1999. However, it was removed in terms of Gazette Notice 3366 of 2003 on 18 November 2003.

Since then, the CCOD was referred to as a trading entity or account of the National Department of Health and produces its Annual Financial Statements separately. The acronym the CCOD and the Fund has been used interchangeably.

The Fund should be classified as an Unlisted Public Entity as it is not listed in Schedule 3A of the PFMA and does not meet the definition of a Trading Account or Entity. The Compensation Commissioner is to apply to National Treasury to have the Fund re-instated as a Public Entity, once the current status as an Unlisted Public Entity has been confirmed by National Treasury. Correspondence in this respect is expected from National Treasury.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1533

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of (a) public health facilities throughout the Republic provide oncology treatment and (b) the specified facilities has he found to possess the necessary equipment to provide oncology services; (2) what are the details of the lack in oncology treatment in each province, as reflected in the National Cancer Registry?

Reply:

1. ​(a)-(b)      There are Twenty (20) hospitals in the Public Service that provide oncology services as reflected in the table below.

 

Facility

Chemo-therapy

Radiation Oncology

Paediatric Oncology

Frere Hospital

X

X

X

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

X

 

 

Livingstone Hospital

X

X

X

Universitas Hospital

X

X

X

Steve Biko Hospital

X

X

X

Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital

X

X

X

Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital

 

 

X

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

X

 

 

Greys Hospital

X

X

X

Addington Hospital

X

X

 

Ngwelezane Hospital

X

 

 

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

X

X

 

 

Facility

Chemo-therapy

Radiation Oncology

Paediatric Oncology

Polokwane Hospital

X

X

X

Rob Ferreira Hospital

X

 

 

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

X

X

X

Tygerberg Hospital

X

X

 

Groote Schuur Hospital

X

X

 

George Hospital

X

X

 

Red Cross Hospital

 

 

X

Klerksdorp Hospital

X

X

 

2. The details of the lack in oncology treatment in each province is not reflected in the National Cancer Registry. The National Cancer Registry is a pathology based registry which registers cancer incidence and not the status of treatment for cancer. 

Waiting times at selected hospitals such as Frere Hospital, Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Livingstone Hospital, Polokwane Hospital ranges between 6 to 8 weeks.  In Tygerberg, Groote Schuur and Universitas Hospitals the waiting times are between 12-14 weeks.

The National Department of Health are currently conducting an audit on cancer services and details will be made available on completion of audit.

28 November 2019 - NW1432

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of nurses are employed at the Middelburg Provincial Hospital; (2) whether any nursing positions are vacant at the specified hospital; if so, (a) what number of nursing positions are vacant and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled?

Reply:

1. The table below reflects the total number of nurses who are employed at Middelburg Provincial Hospital, Mpumalanga.

2. (a) The table also indicates the vacant nursing posts and (b) Since each post was vacated at a different date, it is not possible to mention the specific date that a post will be filled, however, in accordance with the Department of Public Service and Administration directive on reducing the recruitment period and the vacancy rate in the public service dated 08 June 2015, a median period to fill a vacant funded post is six (6) months.

Table 1

Middelburg Hospital in Mpumalanga as at end September 2019

Filled / Vacant

 

 

Province

Profession: NURSE

Filled

Vacant

Grand Total

Mpumalanga

OPERATIONAL MANAGER NURSING (SPECIALITY UNIT)

2

 0

2

 

NURSING ASSISTANT

37

 0

37

 

OPERATIONAL MANAGER NURSING (GENERAL)

7

 0

7

 

PROFESSIONAL NURSE

117

1

118

 

PROFESSIONAL NURSE (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

9

 0

9

 

STAFF NURSE

61

 0

61

Mpumalanga Total

 

233

1

234

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1469

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)On what date will the upgrade of the 20 ML Madibeng Water Purification Plant be completed; (2) whether she has found that the total cost to complete the upgrade will be higher than the original estimate; if so, how much higher will the cost be to complete the upgrade compared to the original estimate?

Reply:

(1) Madibeng Water Purification Plant will be completed in two phases as follows:

  • Civil work will be completed in June 2020, and
  • Mechanical and electrical in February 2021.

(2) The total cost for completion will be higher than the cost of R480 million initially estimated, amounting to R671 million. This is due to the additional scope on pipe re-routing, storage dams, and time wasted on stoppages.

 

28 November 2019 - NW1431

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the boiler at the Middelburg Provincial Hospital is in working condition; if so, (a)(i) who is the coal supplier and (ii) on what date was the supplier appointed and (b) what amount did the specified hospital spend on maintenance of the boiler in the past financial year?

Reply:

Yes, the boiler in Middleburg Provincial Hospital is in working condition.

a) (i) The appointed coals supplier is Kiabuse (Pty) Ltd.

(ii) The appointment of Kiabuse was done in August 2017.

b) The Hospital spent R800 000 on maintenance of the boiler in the past financial year.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1568

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the President of the Republic

What are the specific roles of the envoys that he has appointed in (a) 2018 and (b) 2019, including their (i) targets, (ii) annual remunerations and (iii) other benefits; (2) how are each of the envoy’s responsibilities different from those of the Cabinet Ministers in their respective portfolios?

Reply:

1. In April 2018, I appointed four Presidential Envoys on Investment – Mr Trevor Manuel, Mr Mcebisi Jonas, Ms Phumzile Langeni and Mr Jacko Maree – to engage with domestic and foreign investors on the opportunities for investment in South Africa, and to understand any impediments they experience in pursuing those opportunities.

The Envoys do not have specific targets. Instead, their activities support the investment mobilisation drive which has a stated intention of ensuring an additional R1.2 trillion of investment in South Africa over five years.

The State is only responsible for the travel and associated expenses of the Envoys in carrying out these duties.

To strengthen the work of the Investment Envoys, the President in November 2019 appointed Mr Jeff Radebe, Mr Derek Hanekom and Ms Elizabeth Thabethe as new Presidential Envoys on Investment targeting specific areas, in addition to general investment promotion. Mr Radebe will drive investment promotion in the energy sector, focusing on oil and gas, while Mr Hanekom and Ms Thabethe will both be responsible for investment mobilisation in the tourism sector.

Details relating to these recent appointments are still in the process of being finalised.

2. The Special Envoys do not have any executive responsibilities and are not members of the Government. They are deployed to convey messages about the investment climate and to generate goodwill with investors. They are not responsible for the formulation or implementation of policy nor the exercise of any administrative authority.

28 November 2019 - NW1496

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Why is the clinic in Makolokwe Ward 29 in Rustenburg, North West dysfunctional, (b) what total amount was spent to build the clinic and (c) who was the service provider contracted to built the clinic?

Reply:

(a) It is not true that the clinic in Makolokwe, ward 29 is dysfunctional. It operates for limited number of days because it is not a fully-fledged clinic. It is a health post which is supported by Bethanie Clinic which is about 7km away and it provides 24 hour services. It is visited by a mobile clinic twice per week. Due to the small catchment population and its proximity to Bethanie Clinic the facility could not be made a fully-fledged clinic. The structure is a health post that was built in the 2004-2005 financial year.

(b) The costs for the structure at the time was approximately R 250 000.

(c) The departmental records do not show who the service provider was as it was built over 15 years ago and at the lowest costs at the time.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1498

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that the patients at the Rob Ferreira Provincial Hospital are expected to pay R700,00 for a date stamp after completion of the insurance forms for chronic diseases?

Reply:

1. The Uniform Patient Fee Schedule (UPFS) is Ministerial approved annually, based on the MTBS (CPI).

2. A UPFS Technical Tariff Task team has been established and consist of both provincial and national representatives of which national facilitates the process and provide guidance;

3. The UPFS makes provision for three groups of users: Full paying, subsidized and free users:

  • Full Paying

This category of users includes but is not limited to externally funded users, users being treated by their private practitioner and certain categories. They are liable for the full UPFS fee.

  • Subsidised

Subsidised users are categorised based on their ability to pay for health services into four categories: H0, H1, H2 and H3. The fees payable by subsidised users are expressed as a percentage of the fees payable by full paying users as determined by the latest edition of the Uniform Patient Fee Schedule (UPFS).

  • Free

There are certain circumstances under which users will receive services free of charge independently of their classification as full paying or subsidised users. These circumstances have a statutory basis and apply only to the episode of care directly related to the circumstances under which the user has qualified for free services.

4. The UPFS further makes provision for non subsidised services and the full UPFS tariff applies irrespective of the classification of the patient.

  • Cosmetic Surgery (None Medical Reasons)
  • Medical Reports
  • Mortuary services
  • Autopsies
  • Port Health and Travel Medicine

MEDICAL REPORTS (Examinations)

This tariff is levied for the completion of a report for insurance or any other purpose e.g. medico-legal and / or procedure above that required for the purposes of the report are undertaken. If a clinical examination and/or procedure are undertaken in addition to the examination, the relevant categories of that particular tariff should also be charged.

The tariff fee is payable strictly in advance before any information is disclosed. This tariff grouping accommodates: the issue and/or the completion of original medical reports and the completion of certificates/forms; as well as the issue of copies of reports/records.

Current UPFS

The tariff payable by e.g. Medical Scheme, Insurance Company etc. is R620.00 for

the financial year 2019/2020

CODE

DESCRIPTION

BASIS

Professional Fee

FACILITY FEE

     

 

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

     

R

R

R

R

04

Medical Reports - 100%

0410

Medical Report – Facility Fee

Report

 

185

185

185

0411

Medical Report – General medical practitioner

Report

435

 

 

 

0412

Medical Report – Specialist medical practitioner

Report

435

 

 

 

Response from the Mpumalanga Health Department after consultation with Rob Ferreira Hospital on the process followed for Medical Reports and stamps:

The patient will request the completion of the medical report in writing or verbal. The Patient Accounts or Patient Admission will request payment upfront before the completion of the form, immediately payment is received, the form will be forwarded to the specific doctor for completion and the relevant section will stamp it after either Patient Admission or Accounts. The charging of the completion of the form is as per the UPFS tariffs regardless of the level of the hospital.

If is difficult to reply to the question as more information is needed on the patient and exactly what form is referred too to give a more defined answer

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1434

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there is a governing board in Middelburg Provincial Hospital; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what (i) is the total number and (ii) are the qualifications of members serving on the board and (b) on what date were the board members appointed?

Reply:

Yes, there is an appointed Hospital Board at the Hospital

(a) (i) There are three (3) external Board Members. The others are five (5) Hospital Management Team Members;

(ii) The three external members are having the following qualification

  • Ms S. Mculu = Bachelor of Information
  • Mr A.J. Nethononda = Diploma in Government Finance
  • Mr R.M. Xaba R.M (Chairperson) = Standard 10 (Matric) only

(b) 01 August 2017

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1532

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of suppliers that his department did not pay within 30 days as at the latest date for which information is available and (b) by what date will the suppliers be paid?