Questions and Replies

03 October 2018 - NW2560

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to involve Parliament in the process of appointing a new National Director of Public Prosecutions to ensure that the process is transparent and open; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Section 179(1)(a) of the Constitution provides that the National Director of Public Prosecutions is appointed by the President, as head of the national executive. It is an executive appointment, constitutionally distinguished from those institutions whose members’ appointment involves Parliament.

03 October 2018 - NW2626

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Filtane, Mr ML to ask the President of the Republic

In light of the fact that earlier this year the Eastern Cape Department of Public Works started the process for the disposal of residential properties across the province through sale using market-related values (details furnished), and with reference to his reply to oral question number 13 on 22 August 2018, he intends to discourage and stop the sale of land and residential properties currently owned by the Eastern Cape Department of Public Works; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The disposal of non-core residential state land in urban areas is required when such properties do not contribute to the line function needs of government. The disposal of land is guided by national legislation, the State Land Disposal Act No. 48 of 1961, as well as provincial legislation – the Eastern Cape Land Disposal Act No. 7 of 2000.

Further, in April 2009, the Government Immovable Asset Management Act No. 19 of 2007 was promulgated to regulate uniformity in the management of state assets through its life-cycle, including a surrender plan for assets that do not meet the service delivery objectives of the State.

The properties that are advertised under SCMU5-18/19-PM002 are all vacant or dilapidated residential sites. The systematic release, through the prescribed legislative frameworks, of the State’s immovable assets that are surplus to the needs of Government and that are lying dormant in the urban areas, will promote residential development in municipal areas, as well as provide our people with security of tenure through the attainment of title deeds and also stimulate socio-economic development. The one way of addressing the latter is through the upgrading of dilapidated structures in the urban centres, and by so doing increase the revenue stream of municipalities and generally upgrade the facade of towns.

The Eastern Cape Province, through the said disposal process, aims at addressing the imbalances of the past, which contributed to the skewed land ownership patterns, with the focus on ownership transfer to the designated groups, such as black people, women, youth, military veterans and the disabled. First time home owners will be targeted as preferred bidders.

The province has committed that any site beneficially occupied or identified for strategic economic development will not be disposed.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2388

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Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) Whether she or her department is planning to identify certain properties and farms, for a test case concerning expropriation in terms of section 25 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, or is already doing so; if so, (a) how many properties and farms, (b) where is each of the specified properties and farms situated and (c) how many hectares each specified property and farm comprises; (2) whether each such property and farm is owned by a private person, the State or a trust; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) for what purpose is each of the properties and farms being expropriated; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. No.

(a),(b),(c) Falls away.

2. Falls away.

3. Falls away.

4. No.

03 October 2018 - NW2333

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2510E

Reply:

1. (a)(i) The Department is currently facing 48 (those with more than one applicant counted as one) disputes.

(a)(ii) No disputes are currently being faced by the Ingonyama Trust Board (ITB) and the Office of the Valuer-General, both entities under the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(b) These vary but include the following:

  • Non-renewal of fixed-term contracts
  • Performance assessments and related bonuses
  • Non OSD translations
  • Non-payment of leave days not taken
  • Non- upgrading to higher salary levels
  • Placement on pre-cautionary suspension
  • Outcomes of Disciplinary Enquiries

(c) Nature of dispute. This includes:

  • Unfair dismissals in terms of section 186(1) of LRA
  • Unfair labour practice relating to promotion in terms of section 186(2)(a) of the LRA
  • Interpretation of collective agreements
  • Unfair labour practice relating to benefits in terms of section 186(2)(a) of the LRA
  • Unfair labour practice relating to unfair suspension of an employee or disciplinary action short of dismissal in terms of section 186(2)(b)

(d)(i) see information relating to dates of disputes reported Annexure A.

(d)(ii) see information relating to dates of disputes resolved Annexure B.

(2) (a)( i) The Department dismissed 51 employees during the past 5 years

(a)(ii) Reasons for dismissal

8 employees dismissed for absenteeism.

1 employee dismissed for assault.

6 employees dismissed for fraud / forged signature / fraudulent medical certificate and overtime claim.

1 employee dismissed for damage to state vehicle

7 employees dismissed for abscondment

1 employee dismissed for falsification of performance assessment

1 employee dismissed for having two employment contacts

1 employee dismissed for insubordination

1 employee dismissed for irregular appointment of service provider

6 employees dismissed for irregularities in Land Reform projects

1 employee dismissed for misrepresentation of beneficiary information

3 employees dismissed for misrepresentation of disciplinary record from previous employment.

1 employee dismissed for misrepresentation of information related to service provider

1 employee dismissed for misrepresentation of criminal record on appointment

2 employees dismissed for misuse of GG vehicle / use for private purpose

3 employees dismissed for negligence and misrepresentation of information in handling Land Reform projects

1 employee dismissed for negligence with regard to payment and verification of restitution claimants

2 employees dismissed for soliciting bribe from a land reform beneficiary

1 employee dismissed for unauthorized use of GG vehicle

1 employee dismissed for unauthorized use of hired vehicle

1 employee dismissed for financial misconduct regarding e-cadastre project

1 employee dismissed for unauthorized use of Ministry letterhead.

(b)(i) no employee was paid a severance package in the past 5 years

(b)(ii) no monetary value as there were no severance packages.

03 October 2018 - NW2561

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

With regard to his speech that he delivered during the Armed Forces Day celebrations in Kimberley on 21 February 2018 (details furnished), has he found that the (a) former President, Mr J G Zuma, intended to remain in power by force and (b) army considered intervening in the politics and democratic processes of the country; if not, what is the position in this regard in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The speech that the President delivered in Kimberley as the Commander-in-Chief of the South African National Defence Force on the occasion of Armed Forces Day, on 21 February 2018, does not make reference to any of the assertions made in the question of the Honourable Member.

The section of the speech quoted by the Honourable Member reflects the primary mandate of the SANDF, as prescribed in the Defence Act No. 42 of 2002, Section 2(b), which states: “The primary object of the Defence Force is to defend and protect the Republic, its people and its territorial integrity”.

The President’s speech on Armed Forces Day 2018 is attached for information.

03 October 2018 - NW2253

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Robertson, Mr K to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) Whether she will furnish Mr K P Robertson with copies of the rental agreements signed between certain companies (names furnished) relating to the Mala Mala land claim; (2) whether she will furnish Mr K P Robertson with copies of the financial statements indicating the (a) revenue received by the specified community investment company from the specified management company and (b) payments made to beneficiaries in the N’wandlamharhi community property association (CPA); (3) which members of the specified CPA are (a) receiving and (b) not receiving any payments?

Reply:

1. No. The current lease agreement between (names furnished) is a private document which involve third parties and therefore the Minister is not in a position to furnish such documents without the consent of the parties.

2. (a),(b) No. (name furnished) is a private company and does not report to the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform.

3. (a) Please refer to Annexure A.

(b) The Department does not have a list of members who are not receiving payment.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2409

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

Since the inception of the Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) programme, what (a) number of beneficiaries have participated in the programme, (b) extent of land in terms of the (i) number of farms and (ii) total hectares has been purchased and/or leased by or for beneficiaries through the LRAD programme in each (aa) year and (bb) province and (c) extent of this land has been transferred to the ownership of beneficiaries? NW2657E

Reply:

a) 72 000 beneficiaries participated in the programme.

b) (i) 2 400 farms.

(ii) 1 167 000 hectares.

(aa),(bb) Please refer to Annexure A.

c) 1 167 000 hectares were transferred; land acquired through the Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) programme is not leased.

03 October 2018 - NW2325

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2502E

Reply:

DAFF RESPONSE

(1)   (a) WHAT NUMBER OF LABOUR DISPUTES ARE CURRENTLY BEING FACED BY (i) HIS DEPARTMENT AND (ii) THE ENTITIES REPORTING TO HIM, (b) WHAT IS THE CAUSE OF EACH DISPUTE, (c) WHAT IS THE NATURE OF EACH DISPUTE AND (d) ON WHAT DATE WAS EACH DISPUTE (i) REPORTED AND (ii) RESOLVED;

Q(1)(a)(i): Number of current disputes face by the department

Q(1)(a)(ii): Number of current disputes face by entities of the department

Q(1)(b): cause of each dispute

Q(1)(c): nature of dispute

Q(1)(d)(i):

Date of dispute referral

Q(1)(d)(ii):

Date of dispute resolved

Twenty (20)

NA

Employee not shortlisted for a post she applied for.

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

03 November 2017

Awaiting arbitration award from General Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (GPSSBC).

   

Precautionary suspension

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

8 September 2016

Arbitration adjourned to 4 & 5 September 2018.

   

Job Evaluation results

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

29 January 2018

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Resignation due to allegedly intolerable work environment

Unfair dismissal (constructive dismissal)

17 October 2016

Awaiting arbitration award from GPSSBC.

   

Job grading

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

17 February 2018

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Pay progression

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

7 July 2017

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Dismissal

Unfair dismissal (s186(1)

10 August 2017

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC after matter was postponed.

   

Dismissal

Unfair dismissal (s186(1)

22 November 2017

Awaiting notice of setdown from GPSSBC.

   

Job Evaluation (JE) results

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

15 December 2017

Awaiting arbitration award from GPSSBC.

   

Implementation of Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD)

Interpretation and application of collective agreement

21 July 2017

Awaiting arbitration award.

   

Disciplinary sanction: suspension without pay

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

13 November 2017

Arbitration adjourned to 11 & 12 September 2018.

   

Precautionary suspension

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

18 January 2017

Arbitration adjourned to 5, 6 & 7 September 2018.

   

Leave payout

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

12 February 2018

Matter withdrawn on 21 August 2018.

   

Discrimination during salary upgrades

Unfair Labour Practice (promotion)

12 May 2017

Awaiting ruling on jurisdiction.

   

Suspension

Unfair Labour Practice (unfair suspension)

5 November 2017

Part-heard matter. Commissioner has given the date of 17 September 2018 as the date for finalisation of the matter.

   

Dismissal

Unfair Dismissal

6 February 2018

Settlement agreement entered into with the applicants. Awaiting Ministerial approval. Minister has approved the submission. Human Resources unit to facilitate the JE process.

   

Conditions of employment

Unfair Labour Practice (conditions of employment)

09May 2018

Settlement agreement entered into with NEHAWU. The post is to be job evaluated.

   

Victimization

Unfair Labour Practice (occupational detriment).

09 July 2018

Awaiting arbitration date

   

Non-payment of pay progression

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

17 June 2018

Awaiting award to be issued by the Arbitrator.

   

Payment of subsidized vehicle.

Unfair Labour Practice (Benefits)

03 November 2017

Arbitration scheduled for 3 October 2018.

(2) (a)(i) WHAT NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN DISMISSED BY HIS DEPARTMENT IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS AND (ii) FOR WHAT REASON WAS EACH EMPLOYEE DISMISSED AND (b)(i) WHAT NUMBER OF THE SPECIFIED EMPLOYEES WERE PAID SEVERANCE PACKAGES AND (ii) WHAT WAS THE MONETARY VALUE OF EACH SEVERANCE PACKAGE? 

Q2(a)(i): Number of dismissed employees in the past five years

Q2(a)(ii): reason for dismissal for each employee

Q2(b)(i): employees paid severance packages

Q2(b)(ii): monetary value of each severance package

Twenty two (22)

Employee 1: Fraud

None (0)

R0.00

 

Employee 2: Fraud

   
 

Employee 3: Absenteeism and misuse of state vehicle

   
 

Employee 4: Gross insubordination

   
 

Employee 5: Fraud

   
 

Employee 6: Fraud

   
 

Employee 7: Assault

   
 

Employee 8: Abscondments

   
 

Employee 9: Assault

   
 

Employee 10: Absenteeism

   
 

Employee 11: Absenteeism

   
 

Employee 12: Abscondment

   
 

Employee 13: Fraud

   
 

Employee 14: Rhino poaching

   
 

Employee 15: Fraud

   
 

Employee 16: Timber theft

   
 

Employee 17: Fraud

   
 

Employee 18: Abscondment

   
 

Employee 19: Rhino poaching

   
 

Employee 20: threatening to kill supervisor and gross insubordination

   
 

Employee 21: Absenteeism

   
 

Employee 22: Fraud

   

ARC RESPONSE

1.There are only two disputes in this category that are in superior courts of law in the ARC.

a) One is in the Labour Court regarding the calculation of interest in the past dispute. The other is in the High Court as a claim for consequential damages for dismissal.

b) The cause of the labour court dispute was the result of a finding by the CCMA that the failure to renew a fixed term contract amounted to a dismissal.

2. a. (i) 36 employees were dismissed and reasons are attached to the annexure to this document.

    (ii)Reasons are attached as annexure to this document.

b. (i) The ARC has not offered any employee severance package during this period.

    (ii)The question is not applicable.

NAMC RESPONSE

1. None

2. (a)(1) 4 Employees

(ii) Misconduct

(b) (i) None

(ii) None

SAVC RESPONSE

1 (a) The SAVC does not have any current labour disputes.

2 (a) (i) The SAVC had one (1) dismissal in the past (5) years; and

(ii) The employee was dismissed for Gross Misconduct due to gross continued abuse of organisation resources / property.

(b) (i) One (1) employee was paid a separation package subsequent to a settlement agreement during a disciplinary hearing; and

(ii) The monetary value of the voluntary separation package was R107 484.00 equivalent to three month’s salary.

OBP RESPONSE

No

Cause of the dispute

Nature of dispute

Date reported

Date resolved

Outcome

1

The employee was dismissed after an internal disciplinary hearing for being AWOL.

Employee alleged unfair dismissal and lodged a dispute at the CCMA.

April 2017

On going

CCMA ruled in favour of OBP.

The employee has referred the matter to the Labour Court

2

The employee was suspended for gross violation of OBP manufacturing practices.

Employee lodged 2 cases of unfair suspension with CCMA

February 2017

December 2017

The CCMA ruled in favour of OBP on both occasions

3

The employee was dismissed for gross violation of OBP manufacturing practices.

Employee lodges a case with the CCMA for access to information

August 2017

28 February 2018

The CCMA ruled in favour of OBP

4

The employee was dismissed for gross violation of OBP manufacturing practices.

Unfair dismissal lodged at CCMA

August 2017

On going

The matter is set down for 30 August 2018

5

Employee was dismissed for gross insubordination

Unfair dismissal

June 2017

December 2017

Matter settled

6

Employee was dismissed for not following quality procedures.

Unfair dismissal

February 2018

June 2018

Matter settled

7

Employee alleges unfair labour practice for equal pay for equal pay

Unfair labour dispute

February 2018

On-going

Matter set down for 26 July 2018 and will continue on 10 and 11 September 2018

8

Wage Bargaining

The Unions rejected the last offer from OBP and lodged an MMI with CCMA

July 2018

Ongoing

The matter is set down for 24 August 2018

9

Unfair dismissal

The employee refer the matter to the labour court

2015

On-going

The matter is set down for March 2019

PPECB RESPONSE

(1)  (a) The PPECB currently has one dispute that has been reffered to the CCMA.Details are depicted below:

No.

(b)

Cause of Dispute

(c)

Nature of Dispute

(d)(i)

Date Reported

Date

CCMA

Outcome

Remarks

1

Contract Employee has an expectation of permanent employment.

Section 198 of Labour Relations Act

25-May-18

12-Jun-18

Referred to arbitration.

Pending until 12 Sep-18

(2)  (a)(i) The table below depicts dismissals that occurred at the PPECB over a period of 5 years. 

             (i)

Employee Nr

Dismissal Date

(ii)

Reason for Dismissal

(b)

Severance Package

1

05/08/2013

Misrepresentation

R-nil

2

09/05/2014

Misrepresentation

R-nil

3

04/05/2015

Misrepresentation

R-nil

4

21/05/2015

Misrepresentation

R-nil

5

23/08/2016

Misrepresentation

R-nil

6

25/05/2017

Absconded and Dishonest

R-nil

7

09/06/2017

Misrepresentation

R-nil

8

31/08/2017

Inappropriate use of company property

R-nil

9

12/03/2018

Material breach of contract

R-nil

It is worth noting that majority of the cases relates to misrepresentation meaning that people were dismissed for fraudulent claims relating to timesheets.

03 October 2018 - NW2638

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to each Special Envoy on Investment appointed by him, (a) what number of investors has each special envoy engaged with, (b) what is the name of each investor engaged with, (c)(i) on what date and (ii) where was each specified investor engaged with, (d) what total value of investment (i) was secured and/or (ii) was pledged by each specified investor and (e) what was the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of such costs of the engagements with investors?

Reply:

(a) - (b) The envoys were appointed to create an additional channel through which business can alert government of possible investment opportunities as well as impediments they experience in pursuing those opportunities. The envoys combined have had more than 150 engagements. These include meetings with individual companies, business chambers, business groupings and embassies.

(c) (i) The meetings referred to above have been held since the envoys were appointed, up to date.

(ii) Meetings were held in various locations including Johannesburg, Cape Town, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, China, Canada, Ireland, London and Poland.

(d) (i) (ii) Envoys are volunteers who are deployed to convey messages about the investment climate and to generate goodwill with investors. They are not tasked with deal-making, but with opening doors. It is up to the government to pursue the investment opportunities where appropriate, or to resolve the issues that may be blocking private sector investment.

(e) (i) (ii) To date, the total cost is at R369,644.14, which includes:

- Ticket fares: R225,397.90

- Hotel Accommodation: R57,798.69

- Delegation fee: R86,447.55

 

03 October 2018 - NW2633

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Carter, Ms D to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) Whether, with reference to the Government’s intention to expropriate portions of Akkerland game farm, in particular those portions known as Lukin and Salaita in the Makhado area of Limpopo, the Government can provide any assurance that the motive for the intended expropriation is for land reform purposes and not an alleged attempt to exploit its coal reserves; if not, what is the Government’s position in this regard; if so, what assurances can the Government provide in this regard; (2) who are the intended beneficiaries of the specified expropriation? NW2921E

Reply:

1. The farms Lukin 643 MS and Salaita 188 MT are amongst the farms that were claimed by Mr. Nthambeleni Hendrick Musekwa, on behalf of the Musekwa Community, before 31 December 1998. This claim was gazetted in 2006, long before it was known that there are coal deposits on the land under claim, and before the Government declared the area a Special Economic Zone. The intention of the Department to expropriate the farms Lukin 643 MS and Salaita 188 MT is for land restoration purposes.

2. Musekwa community.

03 October 2018 - NW2628

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he intends to give evidence before the Judicial Commission of Enquiry into State Capture (the commission); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he responded to the letter; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did he respond and (b) what was the name of the addressee? NW2904E

Reply:

(1) - (2) The Commission of Inquiry into State Capture is empowered to decide who should give evidence before it. If the Commission asks me to appear before it, I will gladly oblige.

Any person, including members of Cabinet and senior government employees, who may have information that would assist the Commission in its work, is encouraged to make that information available to the Commission and, if necessary, to give evidence.

 

03 October 2018 - NW2610

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he has ever received a letter from the leaders of Abahlali baseMjondolo in his capacity as Deputy President and/or President or; if so, on what exact date did he receive the letter; (2) whether he responded to the letter; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did he respond and (b) what was the name of the addressee? NW2904E

Reply:

(1) Yes, the letter from the leaders of Abahlali baseMjondolo was received by the President, in his capacity as President, on 6 June 2018.

(2) The letter was responded to on 11 July 2018, addressed to the President of Abahlali baseMjondolo, Mr S. Zikode.

02 October 2018 - NW2733

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What are the names of the (a) individuals and (b) organisations that undertook the research and wrote the White Paper 6: Special Needs Education, Building an Inclusive Education and Training System; (2) whether the persons who undertook the research and wrote the paper were external contractors; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount were they paid in each case? NW3025E

Reply:

1. There were two structures, namely, National Committee for Education Support Services (NCESS) and National Commission on Special Needs in Education and Training (NCSNET). Below are the members of each of the structures:

  • National Committee for Education Support Services (NCESS)

Ms Hawa Bawa

Ms Cornelia Elizabeth Aucamp

Mr Arthur John Jervis Brownell

Dr Keith Cloete

Prof Priscilla Fihla

Rev Ertol Randall Gradwell

Prof Patrick Sibaya

Mrs Nozicelo Abigail Tukulu

Ms Deborah Anne van Stade

Mr Edcent Williams

  • National Commission on Special Needs in Education and Training (NCSNET)

Dr Johan Hamilton

Mrs Sumboornam Moodley

Mrs Shirley Makutoane

Dr Anbanithi Muthukrishna

Mr Sigamoney Manicka Naicker

Ms Gretta Mazwi

Ms Colleen Rulten

Ms Marie Schoeman

Mr Thinyane Frank Molelle

Ms Lidia Pretorius

Prof Petrus Van Niekerk

Ms Belinda Ngoqo

  • Secretariat

Ms Colleen Howell

Ms Berenice Daniels

Ms Donell Trimmel

Ms Sheila Manko

2. The registry does not retain information for longer than five years.

02 October 2018 - NW2583

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1) (a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in his department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to him and (b) what is the total number of women in each case? NW2873E

Reply:

(1) (a)

DAFF

(1) (a) Total number

(i) DDGs

(ii) CDs

(i) DDGs

(ii) CDs

(aa) Acting capacity

(aa) Acting capacity

(bb) Permanent capacity

(bb) Permanent capacity

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

1

(12/9-20/9)

0

3

1

6

1

21

15

* Men and women

(2) (a)

ARC

(2) (a) Total number

(i) Chief Executive Officers

(ii) Directors

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

1

0

21

8

* Men and women

NAMC

(2) (a) Total number

(i) Chief Executive Officers

(ii) Directors

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

1

0

8

4

* Men and women

PPECB

(2) (a) Total number

(i) Chief Executive Officers

(ii) Directors

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

1

0

4

2

* Men and women

OBP

(2) (a) Total number

(i) Chief Executive Officers

(ii) Directors

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

1 (Acting)

0

6

3

* Men and women

MLRF – N/A as it does not have employees of its own

(2) (a) Total number

(i) Chief Executive Officers

(ii) Directors

*Total

(b) Women

*Total

(b) Women

0

0

0

0

* Men and women

02 October 2018 - NW2727

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of employees in her department at each post level are currently suspended on full salary; (2) what number of the specified employees at each post level has currently been suspended for (a) less than 60 days, (b) 60 to 90 days, (c) 90 to 120 days and (d) longer than 120 days; (3) what is the total cost attached to the days of service lost in each specified case?

Reply:

1. Currently, there are no officials suspended in the DBE

2. (a) There are no officials suspended for less than 60 days.

(b) There are no officials suspended for 60 to 90 days.

(c) There are no officials suspended for 90 to 110 days.

(d) There are no officials suspended for longer than 120 days.

3. Not applicable

02 October 2018 - NW2278

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Hugo, Mr RT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) amount in funding did her department allocate to eradicate pit latrine toilets at schools in each province (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018 and (b) number of schools in each province still make use of pit latrine toilets as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii). The DBE does not allocate funding for specific sub programmes on the provincial infrastructure programme funded through the Education Infrastructure Grant and the equitable share. Provinces are allocated funding based on approved User Asset Management Plans and PED’s allocate funding to sub programmes. On the ASIDI programme, the table below indicates the budget allocated to sanitation projects per province.

Table 1: ASIDI Expenditure on sanitation projects.

Province

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

EC

R62,330,603

R59,606,644

R65,180,090

R58,576,264

FS

 

 

R9,767,708

 

KZN

R35,381,425

R49,221,256

R23,747,468

R1,302,244

LIM

R10,361,152

R84,688,051

R251,509,822

R62,851,525

MPU

R26,972,511

R79,970,983

R1,779,464

 

(blank)

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

R135,045,691

R273,486,934

R351,984,552

R122,730,033

Table 2: ASIDI Allocation to sanitation in the current financial year

Row Labels

Planned Expenditure 2018/2019

EC

R803,270,651

KZN

R50,339,526

LIM

R297,844,277

Grand Total

R1,151,454,454

   

(b)The table below indicates the number of schools with pit latrines that are not in the current year’s project plans. This is as per the sanitation audit conducted in May/June 2018.

Table 3: Schools with pit latrines.

 

Schools with pit latrines ONLY and Unacceptable sanitation

School with proper sanitation but pits not demolished

Eastern Cape

1598

323

Free State

156

42

Gauteng

0

5

KwaZulu Natal

1365

1477

Limpopo

507

853

Mpumalanga

127

278

North West

145

47

Northern Cape

0

15

Western Cape

0

0

TOTALS

3898

3040

02 October 2018 - NW2801

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the total number of schools for the (a) hearing impaired, (b) visually impaired and (c) learners with profound and severe intellectual disabilities that have been built in each province in the past five financial years; (2) (a) what is the total number of learners with disabilities that were on waiting lists in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) of these learners, what number was accommodated in schools in the specified years?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) (c) No schools have been built in the past five financial years.

(2) (a) The total number of learners with disabilities that were on waiting lists in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years is depicted in the table below:

Province

(i) 2016-2017

(ii) 2017-2018

EC

2 106

0

FS

257

548

GT

14 081

852

KZN

1 363

770

LP

53

0

MP

445

393

NC

300

687

NW

16

72

WC

Use a centralised waiting system (CEMIS) 0

Use a centralised waiting system (CEMIS) 0

Total

18 621

3 322

Source: Provincial Quarterly Stats

(b) Learners on the waiting list are awaiting alternative placement in other schools, and are supported in their current schools until they are placed.

02 October 2018 - NW2729

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her reply to question 1410 on 28 June 2018, what progress has her department made to put in place measures that will ensure that all school educators and other personnel who may come into contact with children have been vetted in accordance with the National Register for Sex Offenders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Discussion is at an advanced level with the South African Council for Educators (SACE), the Department of Social Development (DSD) and the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) with regards to putting in place measures that will ensure that all school educators and other personnel who come into contact with children are vetted in accordance with the National Register for Sex Offenders.

These discussions have culminated in a draft Protocol between the SACE, the employers of educators, the DSD and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ) on the management of educators’ conduct, accessing the registers and the reporting of offences against children to the DSD. It is envisaged that the protocol will be concluded before the end of this year.

Since conditions of employment of other personnel appointed in terms of the Public Service Act are determined by the Minister of Public Service and Administration, a request to the Minister to amend the Public Service Regulations to accommodate the requirements of the Children’s Act, 2005 and the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act 32 of 2007 may be necessary, alternatively to work together with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) to develop a similar protocol.

2. The events leading to the finalisation of the protocol will guide the Minister on whether to issue a statement or not.

02 October 2018 - NW2106

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 134 on 28 February 2018, has she received the outstanding information from the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The response is in response to National Assembly Question 880. The question is attached for ANNEXURE A ease of reference. The response to NA 880 was without a response from Eastern Cape and as a result a number of follow ups were made with NA 2106 being the last. The response to NA 880 and subsequent follow-up questions is attached as ANNEXURE B

a) (i) 995 (ii) 1187

b) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

c) Small and non-viable

d) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

e) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

f) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

g) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

ANNEXURE A

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 880

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 31/03/2017

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2017

880. Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her department’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 7 March 2017, (a) how many schools are due to be (i) closed and (ii) merged with other schools in each province, (b) what is the name of each of the specified schools, (c) what is the reason in each case, (d) to which school(s) will the affected pupils be transferred, (e) what is the timeline in each case, (f) what arrangements will be made to transport the affected learners to the specified school(s) and (g) what additional resources will be allocated to such schools, including educators, infrastructure and learning and teaching support materials;

(2) did any consultation with stakeholders take place in each case; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW946E

RESPONSE:

1. (a) – (e) The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Departments and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

(f) As part of the process of rationalisation, merging and closing of schools, learners who will need to be transported from their current schools to the host school are identified, the routes finalised and approved. These are then factored into the transport plan that is submitted to the Department of Transport for the transportation of these learners.

(g) The LTSM resources of the closed school are transferred to the host school that has been identified to accommodate the learners from both schools that are merged. Where there are shortages, additional orders are placed to ensure the requisite LTSM resources are supplied to the school.

However, it must be noted that provisioning of educators at receiving schools is in terms of the post provisioning norms, which takes into account the number of learners as one of the factors.

2. The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Departments and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

01 October 2018 - NW2452

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Works

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

a) (i) and (b) (i), (ii) and (iii):

The Department of Public Works currently has no method of calculating or quantifying the amount of investments into its properties by private parties/tenants nor does it have a record of all the parties who have invested in State-owned properties.

This question is very much appreciated, because now I will urge that consideration be made to ensure all future letting out agreements with private parties to state, in detail, the investor details, the investment plan, as well as the proposed investment amount.

Nevertheless, the Departments’ Acquisition and Disposal Framework requires all applicants who wish to lease a State-owned property to submit a business proposal detailing the intended capital expenditure on the required property.

b) (ii) Response on the Entities reporting to the Department of Public Works:

and (b) (i), (ii) and (iii)

Name of the Entity

(a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by

(ii) each entity reporting to him

(b)(i) nature

(ii) value

(iii) length of each investment

Agremént South Africa

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

Council for the Built Environment

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

 

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

Construction Industry Development Board

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

Independent Development Trust

The land is not leased out.

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

None / Not applicable

01 October 2018 - NW2641

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With regard to the plan of his department to build the Nwamitwa Dam downstream of the confluence of the Greater Letaba and Nwanedzi Rivers, (a) on what date was the dam planned, (b) what will be the height of the dam wall, (c) what will be the capacity of water, in cubic metres, to be stored, (d) on what date will the project (i) start and (ii) be completed, (e) what will be the total cost for the project, (f) what is the total number of jobs that will be created through the project, (g) for what period has the project been delayed and (h) what are the reasons for the delay of the specified project?

Reply:

(a) The first major study undertaken for this area was the Letaba River Basin Study in 1985 (DWAF,1990), which comprised the collection and analysis of all available data on water availability and use, as well as estimates of future water requirements and assessments of potential future water resource developments. This was followed by a Pre-feasibility Study (DWAF, 1994), which was completed in 1994. The focus of the Pre-feasibility Study was the complete updating of the hydrology of the Basin. The next study undertaken was a Feasibility Study of the Development and Management Options (DWAF, 1998), which was completed in 1998.

(b) The Dam Height (Above river bed) 34 m and 43.5 m (Above estimated lowest foundation).

(c) It is envisaged that a dam at the Nwamitwa site would have a storage capacity of 187 million m3 and will increase the firm yield from the river system for domestic use by 14 million m3 per annum.

(d)(i) We plan to appoint the Contractors for the roads and advanced works in March 2020 and the appointment of the Contractor for the Construction of Dam in March 2022. This is purely subject to the availability of funding and finalisation of certain land matters.

(d)(ii) The estimated project completion date is in 2026.

(e) Current Estimated cost of the project is R4 650 000 000.

(f) Total jobs to be created will be determined on finalisation of the procurement strategy on the project.

(g) The project has been delayed by five (5) years.

(h) Insufficient funding for project implementation.

01 October 2018 - NW2522

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Works

Whether a dolomite risk management programme has been put in place in Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the dolomite risk management programme in the Department of Public Works is in place. Due to a considerable amount of assets built on dolomite land, the department has established a Dolomite Risk Management Unit (DRMU), which is mandated to monitor the dolomitic conditions of these areas. The DRMU is, among others, responsible for monitoring the department’s facilities constructed on dolomite land, to classify the dolomitic status for every greenfield and brownfield project and to monitor the designs and construction of projects executed on land underlain by dolomite formations to ensure compliance with standards and specifications.

The DRMU has a full time Dolomite Specialist Consultant appointed for a period of three years, whose tasks comprise of the monitoring and investigation of reported and urgent dolomite incidences. The consultant is also responsible for surveying and conducting integrity inspections of current infrastructure (especially wet services) to ensure that deteriorated infrastructure with a high likelihood of causing subsidence and sinkholes is proactively replaced. The Department is also in a process of finalising the appointment of an emergency contractor (after the previous contract had expired in the previous financial year), who will assist in addressing emergency dolomite-related requests. In the previous financial year, a total of R2.2 million was spent on dolomite-related professional consultancy fees for monitoring, investigations, and issuing of technical specifications for the repair of already occurred and reported dolomite incidences. This represents 93% of the R2.4 million allocation for the 2017/2018 financial year. A total of R118 million was spent on preventative and remedial dolomite capital and maintenance projects. This represents 105% of the R112 million allocation for the 2017/2018 financial year.

In the current financial year, a total of R127 million has been allocated for dolomite related projects and services, which include the professional consultancy services for the specialist consultant, emergency construction services, and preventative capital projects. About R55 million of this allocation has already been spent. Most of the preventative projects are concentrated in the City of Tshwane area covering Thaba Tshwane, Centurion, Waterkloof and Swartkop. There are however, other projects implemented across the Gauteng Province, which include Lenasia (Westonaria), Katlehong (Ekurhuleni), Olifantsfontein (Ekurhuleni), Carletonville (Merafong), KwaThema (Ekurhuleni), Protea (Johannesburg) and Dobsonville (Johannesburg). In the coming financial year of 2018/2019, the department is planning on continuing to strengthen its dolomite risk management programme by, among others, strengthening the DRMU through the recruitment of suitably qualified and experienced persons to carry-out the mandate of the unit, and prioritisation of more preventative capital and maintenance projects with more focus on the Thaba Tshwane and Centurion areas.

01 October 2018 - NW2521

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Works

What was the total (a) cost for administering his department’s receipts in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) amount received in receipts in each case?

Reply:

a) The costs for the administration of receipts/revenue are limited to the salary of the cashier, and below are the costs per financial year:

  1. 2016/17 - R325 869.00
  2. 2017/18 - R335 916.00

In addition to receipt/revenue management for the Department, the cashier is responsible for the following functions:

  • management of the petty cash - Giving out the petty cash, reconciliation, replenishment and safe-keeping thereof;
  • receiving and safekeeping cash, issuing of receipts, reconciliation and safe-keeping of the cash;
  • deposit cash received into the Department’s bank account;
  • capturing of sundry payments;
  • updating of the Reapatela system (30 days payment monitoring system).

b) The following amounts were received per financial year:

2016/17 = R14.608 million, calculated as follows:

   
 

R’000

Sales of goods and services other than capital assets

1 261

Interest

12 361

Sales of capital assets

70

Transactions in financial assets and liabilities

916

Departmental revenue collected

14 608

2017/18 = R10.358 million, calculated as follows:

   
 

R’000

Sales of goods and services other than capital assets

295

Interest

8 498

Transactions in financial assets and liabilities

1 565

Departmental revenue collected

10 358

01 October 2018 - NW2712

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Works

What amount has been spent by his department on upgrades to the homes of the (a) President, Mr M C Ramaphosa and (b) Deputy President, Mr D D Mabuza, since they took office in February 2018?

Reply:

a) The Department of Public Works has refurbished the official residence of the President of the Republic of South Africa, namely Mahlamba-Ndlopfu, which entails repairs to the following:

  • the leaking roof, including gutters and down pipes;
  • internal and external paintwork to walls, including areas where water damages were identified;
  • ailing existing plumbing systems;
  • faulty electrical systems, including the existing security system.

The total cost for the repairs was R7 314 514, 48. No works were registered for the in Cape Town Presidential residence.

b) The Department has conducted repairs to the existing security system, including the faulty electrical system at O.R Tambo House, the official residence of the Deputy President of the Republic. The cost of the repairs amounted to R856 000, 00. No works were registered at the Cape Town official residence of the Deputy President.

_______________________________________________________________________

01 October 2018 - NW2520

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Works

(a) What amount did his department spend on operating leases for properties located in foreign territories (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) where is each property located, (c) what is the purpose of leasing each property and (d) from whom was each property leased?

Reply:

The Department of Public Works is not leasing any properties abroad. The function of providing accommodation for Government use in foreign territories was allocated to the then Department of Foreign Affairs in 1999, today known as the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO).

It is recommended that the question be directed to DIRCO for an accurate and comprehensive response in this regard.

(a), (b), (c) and (d) Fall away.

01 October 2018 - NW2442

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b)(i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

(a)(i) None.

(a)(ii) Refer to the table below for responses from entities.

(a)(ii)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)

Amatola Water

None

None

None

Bloem Water

None

None

None

Lepelle Northern Water

None

None

None

Magalies Water

None

None

None

Mhlathuze Water

None

None

None

Overberg Water

Investing private parties:- Transnet, Telkom, MTN and Vodacom

Transnet: Rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water.

Transnet: R45 265.65 pa (annual escalation of 8%)

Transnet: Area 338 hectares – Indefinitely but based on a five-year review basis

 

Telkom: Rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water.

Telkom: R51 757.49 pa (annual escalation of 8%)

Telkom: Area 224 hectares – Indefinitely but based on a five-year review basis

 

Vodacom: Rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water.

Vodacom: R40 528.38 pa (annual escalation of 10%)

Vodacom: Area 262 hectares – Indefinitely but based on a five-year review basis

 

MTN: Rent income for s to the servitude land of Overberg Water.

MTN: R40 528.38 pa (annual escalation of 12.38%)

MTN: Area 230.25 hectares - Indefinitely but based on a five year review basis

Rand Water

None

None

None

Sedibeng Water

None

None

None

Umgeni Water

Brookdale farm in Howick - Cattle Farming

R19 835.92

200.0408 hectares. 5 Years Lease duration

 

Doorenhoek farm (Pietermaritzburg) - Sugarcane Farming

R18 163.11

297.4926 hectares. 10 Years Lease duration

TCTA

None

None

None

WRC

None

None

None

01 October 2018 - NW2651

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What is the name of each (i) organisation and/or (ii) association that her department met with regarding (aa) the sale of lion bone and (bb) lion hunting (aaa) in each of the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018, (b) what format did each meeting take, (c) on what date did each meeting take place, (d) what is the name of each person who was present at each meeting and (e) what were the outcomes of each meeting?

Reply:

(a) (i) and/or (ii) (aa)

It is assumed that this question relates to the lion bone export quota allocation.

The decision on lion bone export quota arose from the 17th meeting of Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), in 2016. The initial determination of the quota was in 2017, whereby an export quota of 800 skeletons (with or without skull) was determined. The quota was subsequently implemented as such.

As part of the quota determination, the Department conducted a meeting with various stakeholders as listed below:

  • Provincial conservation departments
  • South Africa Breeders Association
  • NGO (anti sustainable use and pro sustainable use NGOs)
  • Media
  • Hunting organizations
  • Lion bone traders
  • Lion breeders
  • Private individuals

(bb) Hunting of lions is regulated in terms of the National and Provincial legislations. Due to the fact that hunting permits are issued by the Members of Executive Council (MECs) at the Provincial level (regulation of hunting occurs at the Provincial level), the Department is not actively involved in decision making of hunting activities.

It is for this reason that the Department had not had a meeting with an organisation or association specifically regarding lion hunting in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2018.

(b) Presentations were made by the Department (as the CITES Management Authority) and the Chair of CITES Scientific Authority (South African National Biodiversity Institute – SANBI). Organisations who were willing to make presentations at the consultation meeting, were also afforded an opportunity to present (such as EWT, Linda Tucker Foundation and Save the Rhino). In addition, the meeting was open for discussions, the participants were given an opportunity to voice their views.

 

(c) On 17 January 2017 there was a meeting between the National Department of Environmental Affairs, Scientific Authority and relevant Provincial Departments. On 18 January 2017 there was a consultation session between all the organisations mentioned in (a)(aa) above and the Department, including the Scientific Authority.

(d) Please refer to the attached attendance register for both the meetings.

(e) The comments raised were considered when determining the 2017 and 2018 lion bone export quota. The decision on the quota was also communicated to the public.

The meeting on 17 January 2017 agreed that government stakeholders will provide comments. The wider stakeholder meeting on 18 January agreed to provide comments to the Department by 2 February 2017 and it was agreed that the Department forward those comments to the Scientific Authority for consideration in order to establish the quota.

 

It was therefore agreed that the Department will meet with the Scientific Authority by end of February 2017 and the quota be set by the beginning of March 2017.

---ooOoo---

27 September 2018 - NW2611

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Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has been informed of (a) the allegations and (b) the case that has been opened against the Chief Executive Officer and members of the board of the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) has she instituted an investigation and/or followed up on the allegations and the case; if not, why; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Minister has received two letters containing allegations of maladministration and corruption against the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and the Board from NIHSS staff, as well as a whistle-blower.

(b) The Minister has not been made aware of any case opened against the CEO or the Board.

2. The Director-General on 20 August 2018 requested the Board of NIHSS to investigate the allegations mentioned above and provide a response to the Department on how they have been addressed. The response was received on 04 September 2018 and is currently being analysed. This response covers the allegations made by the staff and a whistle-blower. The Board has requested the CEO and Human Resource unit to respond to the allegations contained within the formal letter of collective grievance.

27 September 2018 - NW2607

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What are the names of all institutions of higher learning where (a) cleaning, (b) gardening, (c) catering and (d) security staff are insourced?

Reply:

The Department does not routinely collect information on the way in which services are managed at individual universities and the management thereof. The Department requested all universities to respond whether or not they have insourced cleaning, gardening, catering and security staff. The responses from universities are provided in the table below.

Institution

(a) Cleaning

(b) Gardening

(c) Catering

(d) Security staff

1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

No response

2. University of Cape Town

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

3. Central University of Technology

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Insourced

4. Durban University of Technology 

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

5. University of Fort Hare

No response

6. University of the Free State 

No response

7. University of Johannesburg 

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Insourced

8. University of Limpopo

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

9. Mangosuthu University of Technology

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

10. University of 
Mpumalanga

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced (Insourcing will be done with effect from 1 January 2019)

Outsourced University pays a subvention

11. Nelson Mandela University

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

12. North-West University

Outsourced

Outsourced

Potch Campus

Insourced: 19%

Vaal Campus

Insourced

Mafikeng Campus:

Outsourced

Potch Campus

Insourced: 59%

Vaal Campus

Outsourced

Mafikeng Campus:

Insourced: 9%

13. University of Pretoria

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

14. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

15. Sol Plaatje University

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced University pays a subvention

Insourcing in process and will commence on
1 October 2018

16. University of  South Africa

Insourced

Insourcing underway

Outsourced

Insourced

17. Stellenbosch University 

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

18. Tshwane University of Technology 

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

19. Vaal University of Technology 

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

20. University of Venda 

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced (except for student catering)

Insourced

21. Walter Sisulu University

Outsourced: 90%

Outsourced: 90%

Insourced only for staff on Mthatha campus

Outsourced: 95%

22. University of the Western Cape

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

23. University of the Witwatersrand

No response

24. University of Zululand

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Insourced

27 September 2018 - NW2635

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture”

1. Has his department made an annual financial contribution to the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra for the current financial year; if not, why not; if so, what was the amount of the contribution; 2. whether his department is still planning to make financial contribution to the orchestra; if so, (a) what is the expected amount and (b) when does his department expect to make such contribution; 3.Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Over the last few years, we have engaged the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra and KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra around the issues of funding of Orchestras. Our point of departure is informed by the understanding that the resources allocated to us must be used prudently and spread fairly across the sector in the whole country.

For a few years in the past we used to fund the two Orchestras cited above. This was unfair practice.

We engaged them and inform them that this practices is unsustainable and unfair because it is only two provinces who are benefiting out of the nine.

We informed them that the Department of Arts and Culture has taken a decision to fund only a National Orchestra and the Cities in which the Orchestras are based will have to fund them.

To this extent out of their own volition, the City of Johannesburg decided to put aside an amount of 20 Million Rands (R20 Million) to fund the local Orchestra.

We call and encourage all the Cities and Provinces to fund their own Orchestras.

Of critical importance in this process is the transformation of the Orchestras to reflect the South African demographics. South Africans across the board must embrace and support them, however this support will come through when people feel the sense of ownership.

27 September 2018 - NW2686

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Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

What has he found to have been the causes of the delays in funding the Cape Town philharmonic orchestra? NW2978E

Reply:

Over the last few years, we have engaged the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra and KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra around the issues of funding of Orchestras. Our point of departure is informed by the understanding that the resources allocated to us must be used prudently and spread fairly across the sector in the whole country.

For a few years in the past we used to fund the two Orchestras cited above. This was unfair practice.

We engaged them and inform them that this practices is unsustainable and unfair because it is only two provinces who are benefiting out of the nine.

We informed them that the Department of Arts and Culture has taken a decision to fund only a National Orchestra and the Cities in which the Orchestras are based will have to fund them.

To this extent out of their own volition, the City of Johannesburg decided to put aside an amount of 20 Million Rands (R20 Million) to fund the local Orchestra.

We call and encourage all the Cities and Provinces to fund their own Orchestras.

Of critical importance in this process is the transformation of the Orchestras to reflect the South African demographics. South Africans across the board must embrace and support them, however this support will come through when people feel the sense of ownership.

27 September 2018 - NW2403

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of (a) the number of times SA Airways (SAA) provided aircraft for the use of the President of the Republic, Mr MC Ramaphosa, since 15 February 2018, (b) routes flown on each occasion, (c) the number of passengers on each flight, (d) the (i) total cost and (ii) detailed breakdown of such cost of each flight and (e) the aircraft used for each flight; (2) Whether any of the specified flights took place without any passengers on board; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether SAA provided any (a) cabin and/or flight crew for any of the specified flights; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) Whether SAA made any changes to the configuration of any aircraft for any of the specified flights; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW2651E

Reply:

(1) – (4) The Department of Defence is responsible for President’s air travel, including logistical arrangements and costs, for both domestic and international official trips.

The Presidency assists with the logistical arrangements when the President travels commercially.

26 September 2018 - NW2745

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)On what date was his department first made aware of G4S’s refusal to abide by its Broad-based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) Employee Share Ownership Plan, whereby 13% of the company would be allocated to a G4S staff trust to comply with its BBBEE agreements, with employees becoming shareholders and being entitled to dividends after five years of uninterrupted service; (2) whether his department is investigating the matter; if so, (a) what is the status of the investigation and (b) on what date did the investigation start? NW3038E

Reply:

1. According to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Commission (“B-BBEE Commission”), some G4S employees visited its offices on 13 June 2017 for informal guidance and process to be undertaken on a matter where employees believed there may be a violation of the B-BBEE Act. The employees were advised to lodge a complaint and provide details of the issue for consideration by the B-BBEE Commission.

On 5 April 2018 following a media report on the G4S employee ownership scheme, the B-BBEE Commission decided to intervene on its own initiative in the absence of a complaint to gather details of the scheme to determine if the scheme is compliant to the B-BBEE Act. A letter was dispatched to G4S on 13 April 2018 requesting the entity to provide all relevant documents in relation to the trust and its B-BBEE status for the B-BBEE Commission to determine whether the scheme is compliant to the B-BBEE Act.

Pursuant to receipt of requested documents, a meeting was held on 21 June 2018 with representatives of G4S to obtain further clarity on the ownership structure of G4S in detail with specific focus on the employee trust as one of the reported black shareholders in the company. Further documents and information were received from G4S subsequent to the meeting.

Subsequent to the B-BBEE Commission’s intervention, the B-BBEE Commission received a formal complaint on 16 July 2018, which is being considered in terms of the B-BBEE regulations as part of this process. The matter is receiving attention and the B-BBEE Commission will communicate its decision regarding the matter in due course in the interest of the public.

2. According to the B-BBEE Commission, the matter is under consideration in line with regulation 15 of the B-BBEE Regulations, and the B-BBEE Commission is not in a position to communicate on this matter at this stage as this may prejudice the complaint process and the parties thereto.

25 September 2018 - NW2671

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 1040 on 4 May 2018, (a) on what date was the committee established, (b) who are the members of the committee, (c) who elected the members, (d) what number of meetings have been held to date and (e) on which date were these meetings held?

Reply:

a) The Committee is not yet established.

b) Refer to (a)

c) Refer to (a)

d) Refer to (a)

e) Refer to (a)

25 September 2018 - NW1756

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether Statistics South Africa publishes data on the per capita gross domestic product; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Stats SA does not publish per capita gross domestic estimates, as it can easily be calculated. It will consider including these estimates if a regular need for it is identified from its users. The South African Reserve Bank does, however, also publish these statistics annually, so they are in the public domain.

2. The gross domestic estimates are published in both current and real/volume terms. The relevant annual per capita details are as follows:

 

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, MP

Minister in the Presidency: Planning Monitoring and Evaluation

Date:

25 September 2018 - NW2496

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Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister in the Presidency

1. What amount did Solomon Mahlangu’s gravestone cost 2. Which company received the contract to build the gravestone 3. What was the value of the contract 4. Who were the other bidders?

Reply:

a) The total cost of the Solomon Mahlangu tombstone was R128 200.  The said amount covered:           

  1. Refurbishing of the tombstone including re-polish and wright parts of the old stone
  2. Headstone with an addition of the book
  3. Monument
  4. Laser photo on the stone
  5. All granite border around the stone including stands, roofs and pillars
  6. Engraving
  7. Transportation
  8. Installation

2. Which company received the contract to build the gravestone

    (a) Lomanthosi was a successful bidder

3. What was the value of the contract

(a) The total value of the procurement was R128 200.

4. Who were the other bidders?

a) Lomathonsi

b) Arise

c) Eventoption

25 September 2018 - NW2716

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of mini-bus taxis are (a) currently operating on the country’s roads and (b) in each province?

Reply:

a) Currently operating on the country’s roads

In terms of approved operating licenses on our systems there are approximately 130, 996 mini-bus taxis:

b) In each Province:

The breakdown of mini-bus taxis operating in each province is as follows:

Province Name

Number of mini-bus taxis in each Province

1. Gauteng

31519

2. Western Cape

14012

3. KwaZulu-Natal

27778

4. Limpopo

10970

5. Mpumalanga

15175

6. Eastern Cape

12011

7. Free State

7992

8. North West

9709

9. Northern Cape

1830

TOTAL

130,996

25 September 2018 - NW2674

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to summonses issued by the SA National Road Agency Limited (SANRAL) for outstanding e-toll fees in the past three financial years to date,(a)(i) who are the issuing attorneys for High Court matters and (ii) what is their location, (b)(i) who are the issuing attorneys for magistrates courts matters and (ii) what is their location, (c) how were the attorneys selected in each case, (d) what tender process was followed in each case and (e) what payment arrangements were reached between SANRAL and the issuing attorneys?

Reply:

a) (i) The issuing attorneys for High Court matters are Morris Fuller Williams Attorneys;

(ii) Morris Fuller Williams Attorneys are in Westville, Durban;

b) (i) The issuing attorneys for High Court matters are Morris Fuller Williams Attorneys;

(ii) Morris Fuller Williams Attorneys are in Westville, Durban;

c) The attorneys are selected by Electronic Toll Collection (Proprietary) Limited (ETC), the toll operator, for debt collection and the issuing of summonses, in relation to outstanding e-toll fees. According to ETC, MFW were selected in terms of their capacity, experience, rates and network of corresponding attorneys located all over the country.

d) The SANRAL tender that was advertised in relation to the design, build and operation of the toll system for the GFIP toll roads, included these functions/duties as part of the scope of the works to be performed by the successful service provider. ETC is the appointed service provider.

(e) SANRAL does not appoint the issuing attorneys, by that set forth above. Payment arrangements in respect of the issuing attorneys are part of the contractual terms between ETC and MFW.

25 September 2018 - NW2614

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 457 on 8 March 2018, what (a) summary reports can be supplied by each province and (b) are the details of each report?

Reply:

a) Summary reports for each region indicating the number of maintenance events per region per sub-area of the asset for electrical, Perway (track) and Signal infrastructure.

b) Detail of the report: (planned = preventative maintenance jobs scheduled)

Perway / Track:

 

Electrical:

SIGNALS:

In Gauteng addressing faults occurring in the signal system has priority over planned maintenance.

25 September 2018 - NW2209

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether all municipalities in the Eastern Cape have water restrictions in place, in view of the current drought in the specified province; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the details of the municipalities that are not enforcing water restrictions; (2) whether his department intends to implement water saving measures in the specified province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) No, not all municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province have water restrictions, only those in the western side of the Province, where water resources are under severe threat due to the drought. The drought is most severe in the Sarah Baartman District Municipality (DM) and Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality (MM); and these are the only two municipalities to renew their ‘declaration of state of disaster’.

(1)(a) The Blue Crane Route and Sundays River Valley Local Municipalities (LMs) are not restricted as their water comes from the Gariep Dam on the Orange River via the Fish-Sundays River Scheme, which is not restricted. Municipalities on the Eastern side of the province received fairly good summer rains and their dams had recovered to levels not requiring water restrictions.

(1)(b) The Nelson Mandela Bay MM, Dr. Beyers Naude and Gamtoos Irrigation Board have been very diligent and have complied with the water restrictions, however Kouga, Koukamma, Makana and Ndlambe LMs are battling to achieve the required water restrictions and have recently introduced the severe actions of water rationing through water cuts during night hours. Joe Gqabi District Municipality (DM) also introduced water rationing through water cuts at night and is practiced in Burgersdorp and Lady Grey due to infrastructure constraints and vandalism. In Alfred Nzo DM, the towns of Mt. Ayliff, Mt. Frere and Ntabankulu also have water cuts at night due to high demand of illegal connection and low yields.

(2) Yes, the Department has implemented water saving measures in the Eastern Cape Province. Water Restrictions are implemented in accordance with the Drought Operating Rules for each dam / scheme affected by drought. The War-on-Leaks programme, which is meant to fix leaks and create awareness, has been rolled out and media and other awareness campaigns undertaken. The monthly Algoa Drought Monitoring Committee meetings between role-players, stakeholders and Departments have greatly aided communication and maintained focus to achieve the restrictions and water savings.

(3) Communication out there including this response is adequate.

25 September 2018 - NW2229

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Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has put any plans in place to provide water for (a) human and (b) livestock consumption in the eMaswazini community in the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified plans?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Uthukela District Municipality (DM) is the Water Services Authority for the Uthukela District area including the Okhahlamba Local Municipal area and they are responsible for the provision of water services. The Uthukela DM has provided the following report on the availability of water in the area and their plans to provide access to water.

The following water sources are available in the area:

  • A total of twenty eight (28) out of forty (40) boreholes are operational.
  • Water is provided in Thunzini, Diepsloof, Emmaus and Ndiya areas.
  • Water is provided through spring protections in the Mamfemfetheni area.

The Uthukela DM has the following plans to provide water:

No

Findings on site

Recommended action – Cost estimate

1

The elevated tank next to the Emmaus rank - the rank was abandoned. The community is concerned that there is an individual that is using water from the elevated tank to wash cars.

A - Install an isolation valve.

B - The individual has connected onto the Municipal asset, Disconnect the illegal connection.

2

Further up the road - KwaNgubane - it used to be a windmill. When it collapsed, the community bought a generator. The community was promised a supply of 10 houses per stand pipe.

S28º517,3656, E 29º2228, 2792

Establish the capacity of the borehole – how many households can benefit. The Uthukela DM to upsize the production borehole and provide an elevated tank. Refurbish the existing water pipe (reticulation).

3

In the vicinity of the Nkunzi mountain there is a spring in the forest. Consultants are busy with a plan for spring protection.

Spring protection is necessary. Storage is required. Gravitate to the community, 500m to each side totalling 1km (1,5km).

No

Findings on site

Recommended action – Cost estimate

4

Esiqhingini (vicinity of Fisokuhle School) – the community has a hand pump (pitsi), and they are proposing a hand pump be converted to a production borehole, so that it can augment supply to Emmaus Hospital.
S28º49,8768", E 29º248, 9028

Uthukela DM will provide an elevated tank and will connect onto the existing system, if the production borehole has sufficient yield.

5

Ethunzini  - production borehole - vandalised pump
S28º5230,4896 E29º2035, 7216

Refurbishment of the borehole, elevated tank, joins onto the existing line.

6

Khwela - production borehole - the community collects money to pay for electricity.
S28º517,3656 E29º2228, 2792

The community built their own pump house. The Uthukela DM needs to build an appropriate pump house and apply for electricity. Provide an elevated tank.

7

Nyonyana High School - there is an existing spring that requires spring protection.

Provide Spring protection, elevated tank. Drill and equip another production borehole for the other community.

Ward 12

8

Epotshini - hand pump – the community is proposing an elevated tank to provide a gravity feed.
S28º4924,3948 E29º2222, 2748

As proposed.

9

Egolokodo – the community is proposing a hand pump - DWS provided a borehole but did not provide a hand pump.

S28º4929,316 E29º225, 2648

The Uthukela DM will provide a production borehole; storage will be in Epotshini. A break pressure tank will also be provided.

10

Egolokodo behind the Emhlambozini community hall - spring protection is required because water is captured in a concrete ring.

S28º4918,3864 E29º2154, 0072

Provide spring protection, fence the perimeter. Provide storage (JoJo tank).

11

Egolokodo mountain spring - spring protection is required.
S28º488,2152 E29º2221, 244

An excavator will be utilized to assist with providing a suitable water source. The community will be requested to assist.

12

Nyonyana upper area borehole.

Uthukela DM will provide a production borehole an elevated storage tank and associated reticulation.

13

Khwela borehole.

Uthukela DM will provide a production borehole an elevated storage tank and associated reticulation.

(1)(b) The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development is responsible for the provision of water for livestock production purposes.

25 September 2018 - NW2673

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With regard to summons issued by the SA National Roads Agency Limited for outstanding e-toll fees (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 January 2018, what number of summonses were (i) issued, (ii) served at the courts and (iii) served on defendants in each month; (2) (a) what number of the issued summonses were not served on a defendant in each month, but were attempts of service by the sheriff, (b) what were the main reasons for non-service of summonses, (c) what number of the served summonses were defended in each month and paid for or for which payment arrangements were made after receiving a summons and (d) what was the total amount (i) collected per month through this legal process and (ii) for legal fees and expenses paid to get the summonses issued and served?

Reply:

Status

(a)

 

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Summons Issued

331

4 323

6 626

Summons Served at Court

331

3 597

5 869

Summons Served on Defendants

112

384

1 881

Defended Matters

108

115

582

Return of Non-Service

65

650

  1. 325

(b) Issued since 1 January 2018 month on month

Status

Jan-18

Feb-18

Mar-18

Apr-18

May-18

Jun-18

Jul-18

Aug-18

(i)

Summons Issued

814

214

840

99

52

19

1 200

2 855

(ii)

Summons Served at Court

1 035

879

660

472

237

83

116

1 104

(iii)

Summons Served on Defendants

412

345

324

362

306

334

202

143

  1. (a)

Defended Matters

131

116

106

140

130

106

97

42

Return of Non-Service

303

250

150

216

173

153

89

91

(2) (b) What were the main reasons for non-service of summonses

  • Address insufficient
  • Debtor unknown at given address
  • Debtor left given address
  • Premises Locked

(c) (i) above.    

(b) (i) collected per month through this legal process

 

2016

2017

2018

Jan

R236 905

R76 996

R69 060

Feb

R82 871

R77 665

R127 963

Mar

R1 212 475

R17 177

R593 658

Apr

R2 702 325

R2 842

R89 738

May

R1 968 279

R15 266

R456 480

Jun

R287 597

R14 467

R236 623

Jul

R234 872

R2 756

R77 384

Aug

R189 849

R800

R798 425

Sep

R297 390

R1 000

 

Oct

R115 319

R881

 

Nov

R171 901

R72 288

 

(b) The Contractor (ETC) incurred R4,6m on legal fees to date.

25 September 2018 - NW2541

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What tenders have been (i) issued and (ii) awarded by SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd in the past three financial years, (b) what were the reasons for the delay in awarding tenders in each instance, (c) to whom were they awarded, (d) what criteria was used to determine the winner of the tender in each case, (e) what was the value of the awarded tender in each case and (f) on what date did each tender (i) commence and (ii) conclude in each instance?

Reply:

The spreadsheet of information is attached with 3 tabs denoting the tender awards for different financial period.

25 September 2018 - NW2213

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to a media statement issued on 8 May 2018 by the Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) on Nelson Mandela and Albertina Sisulu Centenary celebrations that the name of the Vanderkloof Dam in the Northern Cape is to be changed to the Nelson Mandela Dam, there are any plans to officially put such name change into effect; if so, when will this take place; (2) whether his department has taken note of the petitions against such name change by the residents of the Renosterberg Local Municipality within which the dam falls; if not, why not; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) No, as a Minister of Water and Sanitation I do not have powers to change the name of the Vanderkloof Dam in Northern Cape. This power is vested in the Minister of Arts and Culture.

(2) No, the Department is not aware of a petition against such change by the Residents of the Renosterberg Local Municipality.

(3) No, as the Minister of Water and Sanitation I will not be making any statement.

25 September 2018 - NW2543

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How is his department or any of the entities reporting to him involved in the elections of the leadership of the SA National Taxi Council (SANTACO), (b) what reports have been provided to him and his department in this regard in the past three financial years, (c) what are the main achievements of SANTACO in the past three financial years and (d) how did his department or any of the entities reporting to him benefit from this?

Reply:

(a) How is his department or any of the entities reporting to him involved in the elections of the leadership of the SA National Taxi Council (SANTACO)?

Although government was involved in the establishment of SANTACO, the Department does not get involved in the election of its leadership. As a Section 21 company SANTACO is entitled to elect its own leadership independent from government.

(b) What reports have been provided to him and his department in this regard in the past three financial years?

Regarding the general administration of SANTACO, government committed to funding the organization to support the formalization of the taxi industry. In this regard, SANTACO submits a Business Plan at the beginning of each financial year and based on that, a Service Level Agreement is then entered between SANTACO and the Department to:

(i) Set milestones whereby funds are transferred upon achievement thereof; and

(ii) Require that reporting for expenditure monthly be in place and also that SANTACO provides audited financial statements in order to release funds for any new financial year.

(c) What are the main achievements of SANTACO in the past three financial years?

The rollout of the Hlokomela Programme/Campaign in all nine provinces has been a positive step in the right direction. The programme is aimed at reducing road accidents through checking and monitoring taxi vehicles, monitoring driver behavior and conditions as well as ensuring commuter wellness and safety. This is an ongoing programme by SANTACO to try and change the face of the taxi industry for the better.

(d) How did his Department or any of the entities reporting to him benefit from this?

Although progress has generally been slow, the biggest benefit for the Department, is the ability to engage with a formalized structure regarding any taxi related issues and allow the Department to utilize this platform for engagement with the industry at large.

25 September 2018 - NW2615

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the details of incidents of taxi violence that have been recorded (i) in each province, (ii) in each month in the past three financial years and (iii) since 1 January 2018, (b) for how long did each incident continue in each instance, (c) what were the reasons for each incident, (d) how were the incidents resolved in each case and (e) what is being done to reduce such incidents in future?

Reply:

a) Taxi conflicts and violence are handled by provinces because they are largely inter or intra provincial. Therefore, the information required is not readily available with the Department and has been requested from provinces since they are responsible for the coordination of land transport functions. The Department will, as soon as it receives these reports from provinces, submit a consolidated national response.

(i) to (iii) See a) above

b) See a) above

c) See a) above

d) See a) above

e) See a) above

21 September 2018 - NW2538

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Who will (a) benefit from the additional shredding machines sourced by the Waste Management Bureau at significant cost and (b) be the recipient of the processing machines?

Reply:

a) The beneficiaries will be the citizens of South Africa through continued downsizing and recycling of OTR (Oversized Tire Reduction) waste tyres, irrespective of the outcome of the liquidation process.

b) The Waste Bureau is the recipient of the processing machines.

---ooOoo---

21 September 2018 - NW2572

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

DBE RESPONSE

(1) (a) Total number of:

(i) Deputy Directors-General: 8

(ii) Chief Directors employed in:

(aa) an acting capacity: 2

(bb) a permanent capacity: 14

(b) Total number of women in each case:

(i) Deputy Directors-General: 3

(ii) Chief Directors: 5

(2) (a) To be answered by the Office of the DG.

NW2862E

SACE RESPONSE

(1) (a) SACE does not have deputy director- general’s (ii) or chief directors on its approved organogram.

(bb) not applicable

(b) not applicable

(2) (a) (i) SACE has 1 Chief Executive Officer

(ii) Not applicable

(b) 01 – Chief Executive Officer

UMALUSI RESPONSE

(1) N/A to Umalusi.

(2) Umalusi management employees statistics are as follows for the period ending 31 August 2018:

Designation

(a) Total number

(b) Number of women

(i) Chief Executive Officers

1

0

Chief Directors / Executive Managers

3

2

(ii) Directors / Senior Managers

10

7

Total

14

9

21 September 2018 - NW2550

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Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to the report (details furnished) that was provided to her by the Centre for Environmental Rights on 04 June 2018, (a) on what statutory grounds did she rely when she authorised two coal Independent Power Producers (IPPs) which will be two of the most greenhouse gas emission-intensive coal plants in the world to proceed with production contrary to the Government’s Nationally Determined Contribution under the Paris Agreement (details furnished), (b) what is her response to the claim that the coal plants are not needed and (c) what does authorising these coal IPPs mean for South Africa’s climate change policies and commitments under the Paris Agreement?

Reply:

a) Both, an official acting under delegated authority, and the Minister in general, exercise their powers in terms of sections 2, 24, 24E, 24K, 24N, 24O, respectively, of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 and the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, when considering applications for environmental authorisations. There are no specific provisions that deal with climate change impact assessments per se, nor are guidelines currently available in respect of acceptable range, standards, or parameters against which the impacts of climate change can be measured.

In the absence of specific provisions that deal with climate change impact assessments, the Department also considered the Integrated Resource Plan for Electricity (‘IRP’) 2010-2030. The promulgated IRP 2010-2030 (2011) factors in an increase in generating capacity to meet future demand, incorporating provision for new coal-based generation, but with an emphasis on low-carbon energy sources, including nuclear power and renewables, to ensure that South Africa’s dependence on coal-based electricity generation is reduced. In line with this, the Independent Power Producers Procurement Program (IPPPP) has the mandate to procure energy from Independent Power Producers (IPP) aligned to the capacity allocated to different electricity generation sources in the IRP, including 2 500 MW from coal.

b) The cabinet approved Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) identified the preferred power generation mix required to meet expected electricity demand up to 2030. This includes a mix of power generation technologies to be pursued, including coal. The IRP was informed by, amongst other things, South Africa’s development priorities, cost of supply and demand balance required to meet the country’s electricity requirements.

c) South Africa’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) is contextualised within its national circumstances and priorities, which considers both development needs and climate change imperatives. The NDC further specifies that, “in the short-term (up to 2025), South Africa faces significant rigidity in its economy, and any policy-driven transition to a low carbon and climate resilient society must take into account and emphasise its overriding priority to address poverty, unemployment and inequality”. The NDC should therefore be understood in the context of these national circumstances and priorities. Emissions from the two coal IPPs are within the “Peak, Plateau and Decline” range - taking the timetable for the retirement of the current plants into account. Thus, the approval of these two coal IPPs does not lead to South Africa contravening its commitment to the Paris Agreement.

---ooOoo---

21 September 2018 - NW2687

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) teachers and (b) principals in each province are (i) male and (ii) female?

Reply:

a) Number of (i) male and (ii) female teachers in each province.

PROVINCE

(b)(i)MALE TEACHERS

(b)(ii)FEMALE TEACHERS

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

11 450

35 007

46 457

FREE STATE

6 195

15 626

21 821

GAUTENG

15 959

49 405

65 364

KWAZULU-NATAL

21 560

65 813

87 373

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

17 020

29 419

46 439

MPUMALANGA

9 828

21 674

31 502

NORTH WEST

6 672

17 974

24 646

NORTHERN CAPE

2 650

6 900

9 550

WESTERN CAPE

7 675

19 549

27 224

Grand Total

99 009

261 367

360 376

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

Note: The figures reflect the number of teachers (Post Level 1-3) including Grade R teachers/Practitioners. They are not a reflection of the number of posts.

b) Number of (i) male and (ii) female principals in each province.

PROVINCE

(b)(i)MALE PRINCIPALS

(b)(ii)FEMALE PRINCIPALS

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

2 991

1 924

4 915

FREE STATE

619

299

918

GAUTENG

1 298

757

2 055

KWAZULU-NATAL

3 239

2 184

5 423

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

2 278

1 286

3 564

MPUMALANGA

1 031

565

1 596

NORTH WEST

823

527

1 350

NORTHERN CAPE

334

175

509

WESTERN CAPE

949

380

1 329

Grand Total

13 562

8 097

21 659

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

Note: The figure reflects Principals. They are not a reflection of the number of posts.