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31 July 2020 - NW1185

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What number of (i) implementing agents does her department currently have and (ii) projects are currently assigned to each implementing agent, (b) why have all implementing agents been advised to finish their projects with no new projects assigned to them and (c) what (i) is the strategy of her department to implement projects going forward and (ii) interim measures are in place to ensure that there is no delay in project implementation pending the adoption and implementation of the specified strategy?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) (i)DPWI is working with (4) four implementing agents namely Coega Development Corporation (CDC), Independent Development Trust (IDT), Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) and Government Technical Assistance Centre (GTAC).

(ii)In terms of the construction projects; CDC were allocated 65 projects from the Mthatha Region, IDT were allocated 41 projects from the all Regions, DBSA were allocated 71 projects from the all Regions and GTAC has 1 project. The projects are at various stages in the project life cycle; wherein there are projects in the planning stages (i.e. Town Planning and unfunded projects), design stages and construction.

b) The implementing Agents are required to focus on the current portfolio of projects and bring the projects to completion. The Department is holding the Implementing Agents accountable to complete projects. No decision was taken not to award new projects to the Implementing Agents.

c) (i)The Department will continue to use Implementing Agents to assist the Department in the implementation of infrastructure projects.

The Sustainable Infrastructure Development (SID) methodology aims at consolidating the infrastructure pipeline to address the fragmentation of infrastructure delivery. The methodology compliments and reinforces the requirements for infrastructure development in South Africa, as envisaged by the Infrastructure Development Act of 2014.

(ii)Through the governance structures, the DPWI isconducting oversight.

31 July 2020 - NW1461

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted some critical vacancies in his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, COVID-19 has had little impact on the filling of vacancies within the National Department of Health due to the fact that we issued directions in terms of regulation 10(1)(a) of the regulations made under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002, (Act 57 of 2002). Section 2(1) states that “the recruitment process in relation to critical COVID-19 related posts should be shortened by advertising a post and effecting appointments within a period of a week, on condition that an appointment may be set aside depending on the outcome of personnel suitability checks and verification processes…”

A total of 332 appointments have been made in the National Department of Health since the declaration of a COVID-19 disaster, 304 of which are critical posts.

END.

31 July 2020 - NW1630

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Whether she appointed a certain person (name furnished) to a position within her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what were the processes followed in making the appointment, (b) what total number of other applications were received for the position, (c) what is the job title of the position and (d) does the specified person have the requisite skills and competencies for the position?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Yes, Ms Melissa Whitehead is appointed in a position as an Adviser to the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure.

(a) Ms Whitehead was appointed in accordance with the Dispensation on the Appointment and Remuneration of persons (Special Advisers); appointed to Executive Authorities in terms of Section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended by Act 30 of 2007.

(b) None. The appointment was made in terms of Section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended by Act 30 of 2007

(c) Adviser to the Minister

(d) Yes.

31 July 2020 - NW1522

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to certain incidents that took place in Polokwane on 30 June 2020 (details furnished), what are the reasons that the members of the emergency medical services (EMS) team at the Polokwane Provincial Hospital have not yet been issued with masks after months of lockdown to prepare the health system for the Covid-19 pandemic; (2) what number of other (a) EMS teams and (b) hospitals in Limpopo are still not equipped with the appropriate personal protective equipment, despite assurances that the Limpopo Department of Health has prepared for the growing pandemic; (3) whether he intends to take any action to ensure optimal availability of personal protective equipment in the Limpopo health sector; if not, why not; if so, what action?

Reply:

1. All EMS personnel in Limpopo Province have been issued with personal protective equipment (PPE) from the onset of the lockdown. Limpopo Department of Health procured an additional 5000 three-layer cloth face masks and issued each employee with two face masks. EMS orders and collects PPE from the departmental pharmaceutical depot on a weekly basis to ensure that there is constant supply.

2. There are no EMS teams or hospitals that are not equipped with PPE. The Department has been supplying all the staff members with PPE since the start of the lockdown and the records of the department show no personnel without PPE.

3. In Limpopo, just like in other provinces, the department ensures that there is a constant supply of PPE that is available to issue to the staff hence there are no operational staff without PPE. The pharmaceutical depot orders the PPE which get supplied to various sections/institutions according to their needs.

END.

31 July 2020 - NW1532

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)On what date will a permanent appointment be made for the position of Director-General of her department; (2) has the contract of a certain person (details furnished)- “Acting Director-General”) been extended after it expired at the end of March 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) on what date will a permanent appointment be made for the position of Director: Foreign Branch; (4) (a) what number of positions for deputy director-general within the State Security Agency (SSA) are currently occupied in an acting capacity and (b) on what date will permanent appointments be made for the specified positions; (5) (a) what number of positions for General Manager within the SSA are currently occupied in an acting capacity and (b) on what date will permanent appointments be made for the specified positions?

Reply:

1. The matter on permanent appointment of the Director-General is a work in progress, details on the process including the date will be provided to the Parliament Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

2. Yes. The contract has been extended until 31 August 2020.

3. The permanent appointment for position of Director: Foreign Branch was made with commencement date of 1 July 2020

4 The number of Deputy Director-Generalpositions occupied in an acting capacity is four (4), permanent appointment to these positions is a workin progress.

5. The Number of General Manager positions occupied in an acting capacity is ten (10), permanent appointment to these positions is a work in progress.

 

31 July 2020 - NW1476

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

By what date will he (a) ensure that the seven vacancies in the maternity ward at the Mamelodi Hospital are filled to ease the burden on existing staff (details furnished) and (b) prioritise and address the national crisis of shortages of (i) midwifery, (ii) nurses and (iii) sisters in maternity wards in public hospitals?

Reply:

a) A total of 72 posts are attached to both the Maternity Ward and the Neo Natal Ward, allocated per category type as follows: There are 45 Professional Nurses (PNs) of which 27 are assigned to the Maternity ward, this number includes 2 PNs already issued with job offers and are expected to resume duty on the 1st of August 2020. There are also 17 Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and 8 Enrolled Nursing Assistants (ENAs), of which 8 ENs and 5 ENAs are allocated for the Maternity ward. Currently there are no vacant posts that exist in the maternity Ward.

The Hospital fills replacement /vacant posts within 30 days when they became vacant, especially in the Medical and Nursing(clinical) departments. The Hospital also utilises the service of a Nursing Agency to provide nursing personnel to alleviate pressure in critical areas.

However, it needs to be mentioned that the Hospital was a day hospital, that has since been upgraded recently to a Regional Hospital. A new Organisational Structure has been finalised and approved for the package of care for a Regional Hospital, and a phased-in approach for filling of the posts is being pursued dependent on the available budget. This has not been realised currently, and the Hospitalcontinues to operate with an inadequate structure for the level of care to which it is upgraded.

b) (i) (ii) (iii)

CORRECT DESCRIPTION OF NURSING CATEGORIES IN SOUTH AFRICA

There are three categories of nurses as follows:

  • Professional nurses /midwives (also called nursing sisters)
  • Enrolled Nurses
  • Enrolled Nurse Assistants

PRODUCTION OF NURSES

The training of midwives has been ongoing. Since 1986, all nurses doing the Bachelor degree programme in nursing, offered at universities, as well as the 4-year diploma programme in nursing, offered at nursing colleges, completed their training with a qualification as a midwife. The trend in output of both these nursing programmes, which produced professional nurses (with a midwifery qualification) is as follows:

  • 3 528 in 2016,
  • 3 322 in 2017 and,
  • 3 564 in 2018.

It is envisaged, that this trend will continue in the following years until the teach-out period is reached in 2024.

Additional numbers of professional nurses were produced through the 2-year Bridging programme. These nurses could go on to do the 1-year diploma in Midwifery, which was offered.

In addition, the Department of Health prioritised midwifery by accrediting five provincial nursing colleges to take an additional intake in the second half of 2019 in order to increase the production of 4-year Diploma programme nurses (who will have midwifery as a qualification) and prevent shortages during the transition to higher education in 2020.

Production of enrolled nursing auxiliaries and enrolled nurses were through the old legacy of both one year and two-year programme, respectively. An overproduction of these categories resulted in many of these nurses not being employed over the last ten years. According to a survey by the South African Nursing Council, up to 60% of these nurses were not employed after completion of their studies.

The abovementioned basic nursing programmes, will be phased out by 2024 and replaced by the new nursing programmes as follows:

  • Bachelors degree Nursing & Midwifery National Qualification Framework (NQF) level 8 started 2020
  • Advanced midwifery NQF level 7 which will be phased in from 2021
  • Diploma in Nursing NQF 6
  • Higher Certificate nursing NQF 5

The above information shows that the shortage of nurses is not due to a lack of production of nurses.

OFFSETING OF SHORTAGES

On an Annual basis, a minimum of 3500 Community Services Professional Nurses joins the Public Health Sector, distributed across Provinces, mainly in rural and underserved areas where it is difficult to recruit.

During the period, January 2020 to 30 June 2020, 7393 Nurses were added to the Public Health Sector, which reduces the vacancy rate in the Nursing field with 27%. This is a giant step taken by the Public Health Sector to reduce the number of unemployed nurses to assist in managing, amongst others the Covid-19 pandemic.

CHALLENGES

The challenges observed amongst others include:

The lengthy time span it takes to fill vacant posts.

The non-appointment of community service nurses post their community service training due to budget constraints.

RESPONSE TO ALLEVIATE THE CHALLENGES

The Minister of Health, Dr ZweliMkhize, issued a directive in April 2020, instructing that the recruitment process should be shortened by advertising a post and effecting appointments within a period of a week, on condition that an appointment may be set aside depending on the outcome of personnel suitability checks and verification processes.

Since 2019, Province are expected to develop their Annual Human Resources Plan that includes recruitment plans making provision for the continued appointment of community services nurses post their community service training period. Since Covid-19 surge, a National Data Base System has also been created at the National Department where all unemployed health professionals including nurses are capture. Province have been given rights to access the database when required.

END.

31 July 2020 - NW1431

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Whether a certain person (name furnished) and/or any company with which he is associated is part of the media and communications service provider database and/or panel of the National Lotteries Commission (NLC); (2) whether the specified person and/or any associated company of which he is a part has ever received any remuneration from the NLC in return for services rendered; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what was the value of the services rendered? NW1802E

Reply:

MsThabangMampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission furnished me with a reply to the question submitted, which is reproduced below.

Reply by the National Lotteries Commission, MsThabangMampane:

1. Mr. TebogoSithathu is not part of the media and communications service provider database and/or panel of the National Lotteries Commission. To the best of NLC records, no companies associated with Mr. TebogoSithathuare part of the media and communications service provider database and/or panel of the National Lotteries Commission.

2. Mr. TebogoSithathu has never received any remuneration from the NLC in return for services rendered. To the best of NLC records, no companies associated with Mr.TebogoSithathu have ever received any remuneration from the NLC in return for services rendered.

-END-

31 July 2020 - NW1231

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What requirements has her department put in place to ensure that all the construction work contracted by her department will commence without putting lives at risk as construction is resuming under alert level 3 of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

In relation to the requirements put in place by the department, regarding resumption of construction activities, the department requested Contractors to conduct a Risk Analysis in terms of lockdown regulations and Method Statements with risk mitigation plans to covid-19 prior to returning to sites.

The method statementsare required to ensure Contractors commit and comply with the key risk compliance areas in terms of the lockdown regulations. This includes thedisinfection of the workplace on regular intervals; ensure Security Staff have PPEs (masks, glove, sanitizers, etc.) and are wearing them all the time; thermal scanners to check temperature of all staff and visitors; register to be implemented for staff and visitors to site with identification criteria “ ID Number, Name, Age, Health Status and Contact details”;

Isolation room identified/constructed on site; ensure sanitizers and soap are available in locker rooms for  staff;ensure staff or visitors are wearing masks before entering; “touch-experience” must be limited as much as  possible; ensure Social distance on site and;

notification about the restriction of the number of people  allowed on site at one time;

31 July 2020 - NW1348

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What total number of healthcare workers have been lost to the (a) public and (b) private health sectors due to the Covid-19 pandemic in each province?

Reply:

We had requested provinces to provide us with a full breakdown of Health Care Workers who had acquired the Coronavirus. In addition the Hospital Association of South Africa (HASA) provided us with data from the private sector. We now share the data collated and verified as at 4 August 2020.

                                                   

The total number of 27,360 health care workers were reported. Of those, 6,027 (22%) were from the private sector and 21,333 (78%) were from the public sector. The overall infection rate amongst health care workers as compared to the total number of cases identified nationally is 5% which is well below the global average of 10%.

A total of 1,644 (6%) of these health care workers were doctors, 14,143 (52%) were nurses, 28 (less than 1%) were Port Health workers and 11,545 (42%) were from other categories of health workers.

Sadly, 240 of our health care workers have succumbed to COVID-19, 37 from the private sector and 203 from the public sector. We salute these fallen soldiers and pay tribute to them for their commitment to serving the people of South Africa right until the very end. We extend our condolences to all the family, friends and col-leagues of these valuable members of society.

The mortality rate amongst health care workers is 0,9%.

The number of health care workers reported to have recovered as at 4 August 2020 is 16,005, which translates to a 58% recovery rate amongst health care workers.

The Provincial Breakdown is as reflected in the following table.

 

Table 1

Province

Doctors

Nurses

Other categories combined

Mortality

Recoveries

Eastern Cape

182   

2,748

2,234

85

3,225

Free State

86

369

1,350

21

784

Gauteng

483

4,983

2,702

43

4,509

KwaZulu Natal

319

2,257

1,244

30

1,376

Limpopo

47

302

248

0

464

Mpumalanga

64

392

309

3

329

Northern Cape

17

84

132

4

73

North West

109

654

1,178

16

867

Western Cape

337

2,354

2,176

38

4,378

TOTAL

1,644

14,143

11,573

240

16,005

 

In addition, we have been provided with a snapshot of active cases amongst health care workers as at 7 August 2020. On this day we registered 7,500 active cases of which 751 (10%) were being hospitalized, 6,557 (87%) were in self isolation and 192 (3%) were being isolated in a facility.

 

We wish all health care workers currently battling COVID-19 a speedy recovery and look forward to welcoming them back to the workforce when they are fully recovered.

 

 

END.

31 July 2020 - NW1325

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total cost of the scooter ambulances purchased in the Eastern Cape and (b) to whom was the tender awarded?

Reply:

a) The cost of the 100 scooters is R10,148,750-00 inclusive of VAT.

b) The tender was awarded to Fabkompt (Pty) Ltd.

END.

31 July 2020 - NW1264

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What number of (a) new and (b) existing beneficiaries of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) are currently on the waiting list to see a SASSA-contracted assessment doctor in George, Riversdale, Knysna, Mossel Bay and PlettenbergBay; (2) For what period are SASSA beneficiaries expected to wait before they can be seen by a SASSA-contracted assessment doctor in the specified areas; (3) What number of SASSA contracted assessment doctors are assigned to the specified areas; (4) What are the reasons that SASSA only use SASSA-contracted doctors and not doctors from the Department of Health to see clients in the specified areas; (5) What measures have (a) SASSA and (b) her department put in place in order to address the backlog of SASSA beneficiaries waiting to see SASSA-contracted doctors in the specified areas?

Reply:

1. All clients seeking to apply for disability related grants are booked at SASSA Local Offices using the Electronic Medical Assessment Statistical Template. Such clients are booked for an assessment to a particular assessment site on a particular date and there is no differentiation on new and existing beneficiaries. This booking is to assist the Agency to monitor service demands and the time clients have to wait before they are assessed. At this stage clients awaiting an assessment who have already been booked for the specified offices are as below:

  • George: 1 385; Knysna: 120; Riversdale: 31, Mossel Bay: 125 and Plettenberg Bay: 32

2. SASSA strives to ensure that all clients booked are assessed within 30 days and clients waiting for longer than 30 days are referred to as backlogs, and programme managers are required to come up with innovative measures to avoid the emergence of backlogs.

3. The South African Social Security Agency contracts doctors provincially so as to allow for the flexibility to deploy such resources to deal with service demands at specific time periods and to allow for rotation as a risk mitigation strategy. SASSA has directly contracted a total of 10 doctors in the Western Cape. The Western Cape SASSA has a contract with all Provincial Health Districts so that the Department of Health doctors can conduct assessments for SASSA clients and claim an assessment fee for each assessment undertaken.

4. SASSA utilises a hybrid model for medial assessment for social grant assessments. This model relies on doctors from both the Department of Healthin accordance with a contract entered into as well as privately contracted medical officers. As reported, SASSA has only 10 privately contracted medical officers in Western Cape. There was an open tender advertised for services, but there was a very low response rate to the process that was undertaken. The Health District in the George area is not coping with the social assistance demands which has resulted in the large number of backlog assessments.

5. The Electronic Medical Assessment Template, flags all clients scheduled more than 30 days for an assessment from the date of booking. In such situations programme managers are expected to either add a resource in the form of a doctor, an additional assessment day within that week or utilise doctors from other areas in the province. In urgent cases, SASSA will request assistances from doctors contracted in other provinces.

In response to the shortage of contracted doctors, SASSA in the Western Cape has on 5 May 2020 been granted approval for deviation from normal tender processes by the National Treasury to appoint doctors in the George and Boland areas through a closed bidding process. The process to be followed is to approach all doctors listed on the Health Professions Council of South Africato ensure that the process is fair and transparent.

31 July 2020 - NW1578

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the procurement of personal protective equipment (PPE) for early childhood development centres (ECDs) and programmes by her department, (a) what are the details of the qualifying criteria for ECDs to receive the procured PPEs, (b) how will the procured PPEs be allocated to ECDs across the Republic and (c) by what date will ECDs receive the procured PPEs?

Reply:

a) The ECD programmes that qualify to receive PPEs are those both registered and unfunded; and unregistered ECD programmes that are located in poor communities and serve children from poor households

b) Funding has been repurposed from the existing conditional grant allocation and each provincial Department of Social Development will source from their local cooperatives and Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) for the procurement of PPEs

c) The procurement process will take 4-6 weeks and already started the process on 29 June 2020. Expected delivery is mid-August 2020.

31 July 2020 - NW626

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Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) number of permits did her department issue to parents who are co-parenting and need to travel as co-parents living separately and (b) measures did her department put in place to ensure that parents who receive permits to travel as co-parents living separately do not abuse the permits issued?

Reply:

(a)(b) I would like to inform the honourable member that the Department of Social Development does not issue permits. The Departments of Home Affairs is responsible for this permits.

National Assembly written Reply: 626 of 2020

31 July 2020 - NW1092

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of State Security

What (a) number of persons are currently employed in an (i) administrative and (ii) operational capacity in the State Security Agenc’s (aa) domestic and (bb) foreign intelligence Divisions, (b) number of the specified persons have criminal records in each case and (c) are the relevant details of the (i) offence(s) each person was convicted of and (ii) date on which each conviction was made; (2) Why are the persons with criminal records employed in each of the specified Intelligence Divisions?

Reply:

1 (a)

1. (aa) (i) Operational Capacity is: 1501 and

(ii) Administrative Capacity is: 147

1. (bb) (i) Operational Capacity is: 291 and

(ii) Administrative Capacity is: 22

1. (b) None

1. (c) (i) & (ii) Not applicable given 1(b).

2. Not applicable given 1(b).

31 July 2020 - NW1196

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department conducted any feasibility study in respect of the employment of 1 809 Social Work graduates on a three-month contract; if not, why not; if so, (a) what was found to be the impact of the employment of the graduates in each province, (b)(i) on what date will the graduates commence employment in each province and (ii) where in each province will the graduates physically report for work on a daily basis and (c) who will be responsible for the screening and vetting of the graduates before they commence employment; ) whether all the 1 809 graduates have been trained in psychosocial support; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what (a) tools of trade will the graduates be provided with to perform their daily functions and (b) will be the duration of the training and induction process for the graduates once they report for duty; (4) what (a) is the current ratio of social work supervisor and social work manager to social worker in each province and (b) measurement tool will be used to measure the impact of the 1 809 graduates once their contract has ended?

Reply:

(1)(a) No, the Department did not conduct a formal feasibility study in respect of the employment of 1,809 Social Work graduates in view of the urgency to appoint and short duration of the contracts. The allocation of Social Work graduates was informed by the possible risk of the spread of the virus, the vastness and geographical spread of provinces, the population size and density of the province. It is too early to measure the impact.

(1)(b)(i) 1 June and 1 July 2020.

(1)(b)(ii) The Social Work graduates are reporting physically for work at respective district offices on a daily basis.

(1)(c) Social Work graduates have been employed on contract for 3 months additional to the post establishment of the Department. The screening and vetting is not conducted for short term contract appointments.

(2) Training in psychosocial support forms part of the studies towards obtaining the Social Work degree. Included in the study is the compulsory practical experience required to obtain the social work qualification.

(3)(a) The provinces are responsible for providing these social workers with tools of trade.

(3)(b) The induction will include amongst others the expectations, reporting lines and logistical arrangements. This would be done on the first day of assuming duty and would take approximately 2 to 3 hours.

(4)(a) Ratio of Social Work Supervisor to Social Workers

Province

Supervisor / SW Ratio

Eastern Cape

1: 14

Free State

1:9 & 1: 10

Gauteng

1:6 & 1: 10

Limpopo

1:8

Mpumalanga

1: 14

Northern Cape

1: 10

North West

1:13

KwaZulu-Natal

1:8

Western Cape

1 :6

(4)(b) The generic assessment tools available in government would be used.

31 July 2020 - NW1382

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to the recent High Court ruling that extended the Social Relief of Distress Grant to asylum seekers and special permit holders, her department has made any additional resources and/or funding available to assist with the growing number of applicants for the grant; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) additional (i) funding and (ii) other resources are available and (b) is the total amount paid out to beneficiaries to date; (2) whether her department has made amendments to the criteria on which applicants are approved; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department keeps statistics on approved beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, (4) whether she will provide Ms T Breedt witha breakdown on approved beneficiaries relating to (a) nationality, (b) racial demographic and (c) age; (5) whether her department gives preference to applicants based on certain criteria; if not, what are the reasons for declining applicants; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The initial allocation for the special relief grant of R350 per month from May to October 2020 was R3 457 696 700. Motivation was done to National treasury to indicate that this would not be sufficient. In the special adjustment budget of 24 June 2020, an additional amount of approximately R6 billion was provided for this relief grant.

(a)(i) An additional amount of approximately R6 billion was made available in the special adjustment budget for this grant. However, this is intended to cater for all who qualify, not only the asylum seekers and special permit holders.

(ii) No additional resources other than the current internal resources being used to implement the special relief grant have been made available.

(b) A total of R949 537 750 has been paid out to approved beneficiaries as at 30 June 2020

2. The Department of Social Development has amended the Directions to accommodate asylum seekers and special permit holders from Angola, Lesotho and Zimbabwe, as directed by the court, and the revised Directions were published on 2 July 2020.

3. Yes, SASSA maintains statistics on all applications received, approved and declined.

4. Statistics are not maintained on racial demographics. The table below indicates the approved applications according to citizenship and age.

Age

SA Citizens

Permanent Residents

Refugees

Total

18

182 193

3 438

38

185 669

19

220 690

4 443

90

225 223

20

210 845

4 521

94

215 460

21

218 868

5 450

76

224 394

22

197 327

5 490

80

202 897

23

173 240

5 334

78

178 652

24

145 010

4 758

66

149 834

25

120 722

3 728

55

124 505

26

104 268

3 225

40

107 533

27

89 123

2 595

54

91 772

28

84 157

2 268

40

86 465

29

78 136

2 097

44

80 277

30

74 184

1 988

59

76 231

31

68 719

1 710

57

70 486

32

66 001

1 630

63

67 694

33

63 756

1 500

54

65 310

34

62 572

1 518

60

64 150

35

60 163

1 456

62

61 681

36

57 831

1 388

67

59 286

37

57 910

1 424

69

59 403

38

53 068

1 420

60

54 548

39

49 799

1 259

74

51 132

40

50 840

1 240

88

52 168

41

46 036

1 228

64

47 328

42

45 052

1 181

67

46 300

43

45 651

1 299

68

47 018

44

48 094

1 312

56

49 462

45

47 682

1 360

53

49 095

46

45 889

1 365

47

47 301

47

47 956

1 460

51

49 467

48

46 402

1 377

32

47 811

49

43 844

1 361

25

45 230

50

50 692

1 466

30

52 188

51

49 167

1 437

24

50 628

52

48 707

1 528

25

50 260

53

46 515

1 465

15

47 995

54

50 230

1 534

15

51 779

55

51 778

1 611

17

53 406

56

53 629

1 547

9

55 185

57

54 309

1 646

14

55 969

58

49 561

1 492

8

51 061

59

44 576

1 364

5

45 945

60

2 958

86

 

3 044

Grand Total

3 408 150

90 999

2 093

3 501 242

5. The qualification criteria for applicants to qualify for the Special Covid-19 Social Relief of Distress Grant is applied to all applicants. The gazetted criteria, including the recent amendment on 2 July 2020 is as follows:

A special COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress of R350 per month may be provided for the period indicated herein to distressed individuals who are:

  • South African Citizens, Permanent Residents or Refugees registered on the Home Affairs database,and holders of special permits under the Special Angolan Dispensation, the Lesotho Exemption Permit dispensation and the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit Dispensation, and asylum seekers whose section 22 permits or visas are valid or were valid on 15 March 2020;
  • Residing within the borders of the Republic of South Africa;
  • Above the age of 18;
  • Unemployed;
  • Not receiving any social grant;
  • Not receiving unemployment insurance benefit and does not qualify to receive unemployment insurance benefit;
  • Not receiving a stipend from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme;
  • Not in receipt of any other government COVID-19 response support; and
  • Not a resident in a government funded or subsidised institution.

Applicants are declined if they do not meet any of the above criteria.

31 July 2020 - NW1450

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What total number (a) of nonprofit organisations have commenced their Expanded Public Works Programme Non-State Sector activities through the Independent Development Trust for the current financial year, (b) of programmes are still waiting to commence and (c) have received their personal protective equipment (PPE) for this financial year; (2) whether she will furnish Ms S J Graham with a list of (a) those activities that have not commenced, including the reasons for the delay in commencement and (b) the reasons for the delay for those that are awaiting PPE; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has informed me that a total 189 NPOswhich were compliant to the central supplier database (CSD) requirements,were contracted by way of an addendum in this current financial year to implement the COVID-19 response project in support of the Department of Healthfor a period of 3 months. Of the 189 NPOs, 143 NPOs have commenced with the COVID-19 Response.

(b) Of the 189 appointed NPOs, 46have delayed implementation due to various challenges at a local level such as (i) late or non-confirmation of deployment sites due to limited capacity to utilise the participants(ii) change of scope of work by someprovincial Departments of Health, (iii) provinces and district municipalities querying participants’ recruitment strategiesand therefore not accepting placement, (iv)district municipalities and provinces not having the required tools for participants to deliver the Public Health Hygiene Strategy interventions at the implementation sites.

(c) So far 171 NPOs have received their personal protective equipment (PPE). The PPEs include hand sanitisers, masks and gloves. Eighteen (18) NPOs (1 in Mpumalanga and 17 in KZN) will receive their PPEsonce the sites have been identified,by municipalities and the provincial Departments of Health, for the deployment of the participants.

2. (a)In terms of the 46 NPOs awaiting commencement, this question is addressed inresponse 1 (b) above.

(b)This is addressed in response 1(c).

31 July 2020 - NW1159

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)With reference to her reply to question 934 on 8 June 2020, what was the amount of each transaction with each company mentioned in her reply; (2) whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (3) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the further relevant details in each case; (4) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

 

1. In theresponse to Parliamentary Question 934 on 8 June 2020, items, suppliers and amounts were tabulated and repeated below:

Hence to answer Parliamentary Question 1159 that asks about specifically companies and total amounts, transactions with Inhlanhla Ga Tshwarelo amounted to R61 700.00, those with Bidvest Steiner to R431 560.00, those with Lechoba Medical Technology to R477 369.80, and those with Ubuntu Technologies to R66 122.70.

(2) Regarding the purchasing of goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic;

(a) goods and/or services were purchased from Ga Tshwarelo, Bidvest Steiner, Lechoba Medical Technology, and Ubuntu Technologies as indicated above.

(b) the transaction amounts are those mentioned in answer (1).

(c) Ga Tshwarelo supplied masks, gloves and disposable masks; Bidvest Steiner provided sanitisers and surface wipes; Lechoba Medical Technology supplied filtering masks, sanitisers and infrared thermometers, and Ubuntu Technologies supplied anti-virus software and licences to ensure secure, remote communication.

(3) SSA followed a deviation process

(a) to provide a Secure Video Conferencing Solution for Government on an urgent basis to allow work to continue while minimising the health risks posed by infectious Covid-19.

(b) The financial details are reflected in the table above.

(4) Goods and/or services were purchased/acquired adhering to National Treasury instructions 2020/2021 in relation to the Emergency Procedures in response to the National State of Disaster. Companies were selected that met National Treasury’s requirements and/or were among those identified and proposed by it.

The reason for choosing the said Information Technology supplier is that the Agency already had contracts with the two companies Nanoteq and TrueConf that provided infrastructure to the SSA on secure communications and video conferencing solutions respectively. Consequently, the SSA approached the two companies to increase the number of licences they were already providing to the SSA so that the need that came from Government could be satisfied.

(5) Whether the Minister makes a statement on the matter remains her prerogative.

30 July 2020 - NW1539

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) Whether the solution employed in 2015 by soldiers of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) protecting the border between Mozambique and South Africa in the Ndumo area of placing boulders at various breach points in the fence for about 30 kms, which served to reduce the number of vehicles being illegally transported across the border, is still being employed in the area; if not, (a) on what date did the SANDF stop using the rocks and (b) why did they stop; if so, (i) what amount of maintenance is required and (ii) what was the impact of this solution in terms of the reduction of numbers of illegal border breaches; (2) whether she has found that this (a) can be a solution to fence security in areas of vehicular breaches on our borders and (b) will be a viable addition to the materials mix for border fencing; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what other alternative mechanisms and materials is her department considering for augmenting the border fences?

Reply:

The solution employed in 2015 is still in use as one of the tactical measures to assist in border safeguarding especially in prevention of illegal cross-border movement and vehicle theft.

(1)(a) The SANDF has not stopped using the concept.

(1)(b) The effort has not been stopped.

(1)(i) No maintenance required as it is a temporary measure.

(1)(ii) The effort has, and is still making a very good impactin reducing the number of stolen vehicles illegally crossing the borderline.

(2)(a) It is not a solution but a military tactic of war, where soldiers create or put obstacles to stop movement or limit the speed of movement where required. The idea or concept can be adopted accordingly to address the porousness of our borders.

(2)(b) Yes, the concept can be a solution to fence security in areas of vehicular breaches on our borders. Evidence to this is that the KZN Provincial government adopted this operational concept and established a project to construct Modified Jersey Barriers to be installed on the borderline to replace the boulders and railway sleepers that the soldiers had put up. The Modified Jersey Barriers are 1.5 meters high and are much more stable and a long term infrastructure to prevent vehicular or wheeled movement across the borderline.

(3) The DOD has identified the use of security technology as one of the solutions that will make a huge and significant improvement in enhancing the borderline security and as such contribute to maintaining the territorial integrity of the RSA.

30 July 2020 - NW1402

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) On what date did the MojaPay system crash and (b) which provinces have been affected by the crash of the MojaPay system; (2) what number of child maintenance beneficiaries have not received their funds since 1 March 2020; (3) whether the database of maintenance beneficiaries on the MojaPay system is accurate; if not, why not; (4) by what date does he envisage the MojaPay system will be completely operational?

Reply:

1 (a) The MojaPay system crashed on the evening of 4 May 2020. It unfortunately crashed during the Alert Level 4 lockdown, and as a result, several maintenance beneficiaries did not receive their maintenance benefits.

(b) All provinces were affected by the crash. However, the Eastern Cape (EC) and KwaZulu Natal (KZN) provinces were severely affected by the crash as the disruption was further exacerbated by the migration from the old payment system known as Justice Department of Accounting System (JDAS) to the new MojaPay system.

2. Approximately 1 500 beneficiaries were affected from 1 April 2020, and this resulted in several maintenance beneficiaries not receiving their monthly payments. The reasons for non-receipt of payments are two-fold:

(a) The closure of legacy JDAS system on 31 March 2020 interrupted the processing of payments for some courts primarily in the EC and KZN. In EC, the crash affected 622 maintenance beneficiaries, whereas in KZN only 47 beneficiaries were affected as at the end of June 2020. The closure of the JDAS system was due to the decision taken by the Department that all the beneficiaries who are not on Direct Payment, will have been migrated to MojaPay by 31 March 2020. However, it transpired that there were some courts that had not been able to migrate the beneficiaries’ data to MojaPay by 31 March 2020. The old JDAS system was closed in respect of the EC and KZN despite the fact that not all courts in the two (2) provinces had been successfully migrated to the MojaPay system.

(b) However, it must be noted that beneficiaries are still being migrated from the legacy system JDAS to MojaPay on daily basis. The total number of beneficiaries still to be migrated is approximately 6 500, mainly Eastern Cape and Western Cape compared to 245 000 beneficiaries migrated when the new system (MojaPay) started.

3. Yes, the database on MojaPay is accurate insofar as it reflects the data captured by end users as part of migration to the new system.

4. The MojaPay application has been restored incrementally from 12 May 2020 and is fully functional from 28 May 2020.

In conclusion, it is important to note that the migration from the old JDAS to the new MojaPay system is part of the Department’s endeavour to prevent possible duplicated payments and potential risks to the department’s financial accountability. The decision to nonetheless close the old system has severely affected the livelihoods of the maintenance beneficiaries. It is for this reason that I have directed the Acting Director-General to investigate this matter further. The investigation will include the cause of the crash and its wider impact, besides the maintenance payments. The investigation is with a view of ensuring that an appropriate corrective action is taken to avoid recurrence in the future.

 

30 July 2020 - NW1632

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

(1). On what date (a) did the term of the Free State Provincial Arts and Culture Council end and (b) was the new council appointed; (2). whether the positions were advertised; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on which platform was the advertisement published, (b) what total number of applications were received and (c) on what date(s) were the interviews conducted; (3). whether all procedures were followed to adhere to legislation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Kindly note that unfortunately, I will not be in a position to respond to this question as the term of the Free State Provincial Arts and Culture Council is the competency of the Provincial Department and not the National Department.

30 July 2020 - NW1617

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the co-ordinated response of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to the insurgency in Mozambique will include the use of private military contractors; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what is the nature of the coordinated SADC regional political and military approach that has been recommended in response to the insurgency, (b) which countries were involved in the formulation and articulation of the approach and (c)(i) on what date will the plans for the approach be (i) finalised and (ii) made public?

Reply:

(1)  The coordinated response of SADC to the insurgency in Mozambique is a matter involving the member state and the Regional body. The details of that response can best be articulated by the Chair or the Secretariat of SADC.

2. (a) The nature of the coordinated SADC regional political and military approach in response to the insurgency is informed by the decisions of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Affairs.

     (b)  The organ is the determinant of the countries to be involved in such activities. 

(c)     The organ will also prescribe the time lines for the finalization and announcement of such plans to the public. 

30 July 2020 - NW1626

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the total (i) number and (ii) amount of all disbursements made available to each province by (aa) her department and (bb) the SA National Defence Force in response to the Covid-19 pandemic?

Reply:

1. The Department of Defence (SANDF) is a national department that is centrally managed therefore does not disburse funds to provinces. The SANDF’s funds as allocated by the National Treasury (NT) are centralised within the Services and Divisions, therefore no funding is allocated separately to any province. All expenditure with respect to the COVID-19 pandemic management is processed and approved centrally in terms of ordered commitments and appreciated requirements.

30 July 2020 - NW1494

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What is the current status of the investigation by the Special Investigating Unit in terms of Proclamation R 7 of 2014, published in the Government Gazette No 37346 on 14 February 2014, and (b) by what date is it envisaged that the specified investigation will be concluded?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) that Proclamation R7 of 2014 published in the Government Gazette No. 37346 on 14 February 2014, was amended by Proclamation R599 of 2015 published in the Government Gazette No. 38985 on 10 July 2015 and again amended by Proclamation R32 of 2017 published in the Government Gazette No. 41165 on 6 October 2017.

Proclamation R7 of 2014 and certain amendments of Proclamation R599 of 2015 investigated matters: (1) at the Bloemfontein, Cape Town and Pretoria Registrar of Deeds Offices; and also investigated (2) irregularities by the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform in relation to the e-Cadastre Project (Gijima).

The investigations into matters (1) and (2) above have been concluded and the final

reports were submitted to the Presidency on 26 March 2020.

Proclamation R599 of 2015 mandated the SIU to investigate matters at the Johannesburg Registrar of Deeds. Proclamation R32 of 2017 mandated the SIU to investigate matters at the Vryburg Registrar of Deeds. Both investigations are still ongoing and they are expected to be completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year.

30 July 2020 - NW1011

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1301 on 21 November 2019, her department issued any directives to a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with copies of all directives issued to the specified company; (2) whether, in light of the follow-up visit to the specified mine on Portion 24 and 31 of farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS on 11 February 2020, her department has since received an application for a water use licence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any law enforcement actions were executed against this mining company as her department confirmed that the company was not allowed to mine on the farm; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date(s) did the enforcement actions take place and (b) what were the results?

Reply:

(1) The department of Water and Sanitation issued a Directive to the company referred to by the Honourable Member on 6 March 2020. The Directive, amongst others, outlined transgressions by the company and requested a remedial action plan. Further, the Directive instructed the company to:

  • Appoint an independent environmental consultant to compile and submit a rehabilitation plan for addressing remediation of overflowing manholes and possible groundwater contamination remediation plan and all areas affected by the activity, to the Department within 14 days upon receipt of the directive.
  • Implement all the recommendations contained in the rehabilitation plan and remedy the areas affected by the water use activities within thirty (30) working days of Departmental approval of the rehabilitation plan.

(2) In the aftermath of the follow up inspection on 10 February 2020 and 18 May 2020, it was observed that there were no mining activities that were taking place. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has no records of the company’s application for water use authorisation on the Eelectronic Water Use Licence Authorisation Application System (e-WULAAS).

(3) (a) Further administrative enforcement action was taken by issuing another directive dated 11 March 2020 following the notice of intention to issue a directive. After the issuance of the directive, the mine requested a meeting with the department but due to lock down the meeting was postponed.

(b) The letter of appointment of the Environmental Consultant was received after the issuance of the directive dated 11 March 2020 indicating that the Environmental Consultant will compile the rehabilitation plan for the affected areas as per the directive. Based on the follow up inspection of 18 May 2020 there have been no mining activities taking place.

30 July 2020 - NW1274

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What was the total number of bucket toilets in use at households in each municipality in the Free State at the end of the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2019-2020 financial years?

Reply:

The total number of bucket toilets in use in formal households in the Free State at the end of the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2019-2020 financial years is indicated in the table below:

Municipality

2016/2017

2017/2018

2019/2020

1. Matjhabeng

1623

654

-

2. Setsoto

6615

6032

6032

3. Phumelela

373

-

-

4. Mafube

3546

-

-

5. Ngwathe

1647

1336

-

6. Tokologo

2543

2543

1279

7. Nketoana

3711

3711

2891

8. Kopanong

276

276

-

TOTAL

17791

11847

10202

The Free State currently remains with seven (7) projects with a backlog of 10 202 buckets to eradicate. These projects are in the process of constructing bulk services such as outfall sewer line (linking the settlement to the Waste Water Treatment Works) as well as pump stations.

29 July 2020 - NW410

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) is the total number of (i)(aa) male and (bb) female persons, who were sentenced to life imprisonment since 10 May 1994, and (ii) persons whose death sentences were converted to life imprisonment and (b) number of the specified persons (i) have died in prison while serving sentence, (ii) have been released due to successful appeals against convictions and/or sentences, (iii) have been released on parole, (iv) have had life sentences converted to correctional supervision and released from prison and (v) are currently still serving sentences of life imprisonment?

Reply:

Question

Total Number

(a)(i)(aa) since 10 May 1994 total male

(The 16 active + 13 inactive male = Total 29, death sentence converted to life is already included in this number)

20 167

(a)(i)(bb) since 10 May 1994total female

(The 2 inactive female death sentence converted to life is already included in this number)

254

Grand Total

(The 16 active males + 13 inactive male (29) + 2 inactive female =

(Total 31), death sentence converted to life is already included in this number)

20 421

(a)(ii)

total death converted to life

(Total death converted to life imprisonment is calculated as follows;

(16) Active + (15) Inactive = Total 31

31

Stand alone

Active Death sentences converted to life

(The16 active death sentence converted to life is already include within the Grand Total of life sentenced after 10 May 1994 it is therefore NOT counted again)

16

Not counted again

Inactive Death sentences converted to life

(The 15 inactive death sentence converted to life are no longer forming part of the remaining number of those who are still serving life imprisonment and is therefore SUBTRACTED from the Grand Total)

15

Minus from grand total

(b)(i) since 10 May 1994

total died whilst serving sentence

1 268

Minus from grand total

(b)(ii) since 10 May 1994

released due to successful appeals against sentence or conviction

0

(b)(iii) since 10 May 1994

released on parole

1 174

Minus from grand total

(b)(iv) since 10 May 1994

life sentences converted to correctional supervision and released from prison

0

(b)(v) since 10 May 1994

currently still serving sentences of life imprisonment

16 798

Take note: 1166 offenders are reflected as ‘other’, because their statuses fall outside the questions asked. It is however necessary to reflect the number as to ensure the alignment with the current number of offenders who are still serving sentences of life imprisonment.

Other

(Inactive, not returned from court, bail pending appeal etc.)

1 166

Minus from grand total

END

29 July 2020 - NW1614

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether any consultants take a percentage from the National Lottery money before the remainder is sent to (a) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the SA Sports Trust and (c) any national federation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what is the name of each consultant, (ii)(aa) on what date was the money paid by the National Lottery and (bb) what was the total amount, (iii) what was the amount of commission in each case and (iv) what sports entity was the National Lottery donation allocated to?

Reply:

a) nThe South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC has not been able to access information due to national lockdown restrictions.

b) The Sport Trust provided the following response;

c) As a non-profit organisation, The Sports Trust does not employ or make use of the services of consultants to assist with the procurement of National Lottery Funding. The Trust has never employed a consultant to help with securing of funding to keep the operations going. This will reduce the funds which are earmarked for projects and initiatives, which are already under pressure. The in-house, full time employees approach funders as part of our normal and daily operations. This is despite the challenges and the budget cuts, which are prevalent in the market, currently.

d) No information has been received from the National Federations

29 July 2020 - NW1472

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

In light of the recent judgment of the Supreme Court of Appeal reinstating Afrikaans as a language of instruction at the University of South Africa, what are the details of engagements that he has had with universities to ensure that language does not continue to be used as a tool of exclusion for many university students?

Reply:

The Department is aware of the recent judgement by the Supreme Court of Appeal reinstating Afrikaans as the medium of instruction at the University of South Africa, alongside the current medium of instruction, which is English. The Department has been closely following many other judgements, notably by the Constitutional Court, rightfully upholding decisions by university Councils at a number of universities, to move away from the use of Afrikaans as a barrier of access to non-Afrikaans language speakers. The Department has welcomed these decisions as they advance government’s transformation agenda and are part of the national effort to create inclusive institutional cultures at institutions of higher learning.

The Department’s approach to languages at universities is a systemic one and it does not convene a meeting with universities every time there is a court judgement in favour of, or setting aside, a particular university Council’s decision on their language plan or strategy. The Department has a generic language policy framework that serves to guide institutional language policies and plans.

The language policy framework has recently been revised and strengthens the previous higher education language policy framework of 2002. At the core of this policy is the affirmation of all official languages as spelled out in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Values of inclusivity, parity of esteem between all our languages and the promotion of multilingualism are central to this policy framework and it is encouraging that a number of universities are already moving in this direction. As indicated previously on a number of occasions, in the post 1994 South Africa, none of our higher education institutions, whether public or private, will exclude any South African on the basis of language as such practices belong to the past.

29 July 2020 - NW1531

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What is the (a) name of each athlete in the Operational Excellence Courses Programme of his department and (b) average monthly amount paid to an athlete for participating in the specified programme?

Reply:

The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC has not been able to access information due to national lockdown restrictions.

29 July 2020 - NW1613

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether (a) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the SA Sports Trust and (c) any national federation pays any amounts to sponsorship consultants; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the names of the consultants, (ii) total amount is paid to each specified consultant each month, (iii) is the total amount paid to the consultant by each specified entity and (iv) is the monetary value of the sponsorship that each consultant has secured since their appointment(s)?

Reply:

a) The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC has not been able to access information due to national lockdown restrictions.

b) The Sport Trust provided the following response;

As a non-profit organisation, The Sports Trust does not employ or make use of the services of sponsorship agents /consultants to assist with the procurement of sponsorship properties. The Trust has never employed an agent or consultant to help with securing of sponsorships or funding to keep the operations going. This will reduce the funds which are earmarked for projects and initiatives, which are already under pressure. The in-house, full time employees approach corporates ongoing as part of our normal and daily operations. This is despite the challenges and the budget cuts, which are prevalent in the market, currently.

c) No information has been received from the National Federations

29 July 2020 - NW1473

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

What (a) is the number of statues of (i) colonial and (ii) apartheid figures in the Republic, (b) is the exact location of each statue, (c) amount did it cost his department to (aa) maintain and (bb) safeguard the statues in each of the past five financial years and (d) are the formal requirements for removing statues?.

Reply:

There is currently (a) no complete consolidated number of statues of (i) colonial and (ii) apartheid figures in the Republic. The management of monuments, memorials and statues is the responsibility of Provincial Heritage Resources Authorities (PHRAs).

Only when the inventory of these resources is submitted to SAHRA by the PHRAs as heritage registers do they get incorporated into the heritage resources inventory on the South African Heritage Resources Information System (SAHRIS).

The table attached as annexure A provides the list of 24 heritage resources that are currently classified as monuments or memorials and listed on SAHRIS. This list is incomplete as PHRAs must still audit and do an inventory of statues in provinces and submit to SAHRA for incorporation into the national inventory.

(d) The formal requirements to remove or relocate a statue or monument are:

  • Completion of a permit application form for submission to the Provincial Heritage Resources Authority;
  • The Heritage Impact Assessment Report prepared by a qualified heritage practitioner or consultant must be attached as supporting documentation.
  • Such report should be based on solid research principles, including an assessment of the impact of the proposed removal/relocation, and if necessary, proposed mitigation measures.
  • A public consultation process of at least 30-days that may include, but is not limited to, the following:
  • Public Notices and advertisements that must be placed in National as well as local newspapers, indicating:
  1. the intention to move or remove the statue/monument; and
  2. contacting and inviting comments from interested and affected parties.
  3. preparation of a Conservation Management Plan
  4. presentation to the PHRA heritage permit committee meeting as may be required.

The committee then makes its findings based on the presentation of the processes above and may require further investigations. In the event that the applicant is not satisfied with the decision of the permit committee, they can appeal to the PHRA Council. Similarly, in the event that they are not satisfied with the decision of the PHRA Council, they can appeal to the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) in terms of Section 49 of the National Heritage resources Act, Act No. 25 of 1999. The MEC is by law required to appoint an Independent Tribunal comprising of experts to consider the matter and give a final recommendation.

The cost of this process is all borne by the applicant.

29 July 2020 - NW1548

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) What (a) what are the total number of statues that have been erected in the Republic since 1994, (b) is the exact location of each specified statue, (c) was the initial cost to erect each statue and did it cost his department to maintain and safeguard the statues in each of the past 5 financial years; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a). There is no central record of the total number of statues that have been erected in the Republic since 1994 because statues have been developed and installed by different national government departments, provincial, district and local governments, government entities and agencies, Trusts and Foundations. Statues the Department have developed directly, through its entities such as SAHRA and through grant funding for 63 statutes, including the development of 58 statues as part of the Long March to Freedom developed by the National Heritage Project Company,

(b). The Nelson Mandela Statue is installed at the apex between the right and left wings of the Union Buildings in Pretoria, Gauteng; the statue of Nkosi Albert Luthuli is at the Municipal offices of the KwaDukuza Local Municipality, KwaDukuza, KwaZulu-Natal; the Nelson Mandela statue is installed at the United Nations (UN) Headquarters building in New York, United States of America; NkosiBhambatha statue is in uMvoti Local Municipality Office in Greytown, KwaZulu-Natal, the statue of Robert Sobukwe is in GraafReinette and the statues of the Long March to Freedom names are attached as Annexure A and is currently installed at Century City in Cape Town;

(c). The Nelson Mandela Statue at the Union Buildings cost R8 million to build and is being maintained by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure. The construction of the Nkosi Albert Luthuli statue amounted to R700 000and is part of the Luthuli Museum maintenance costs. The construction of the Nelson Mandela statue costed R1,1 million and is being maintained by the UN. The Bhambatha statue cost R890 000 to develop and is being maintained by the local municipality. The statue of Robert Sobukwe costed R1.8 million. The statues of the Long March to Freedom were funded with R28 million in 2013/2014, R15 million in 2015/2016, and R7 612 850, 00 was paid to the NHMC in 2018.

2. I will make a statement on the matter.

ANNEXURE A

LIST OF BRONZE STATUES WHICH FORM PART OF THE “LONG MARCH TO FREEDOM:

Abdullah Abdurahman

Chief Langalibalele

John Langalibalele Dube

CissieGool

ClemantsKadale

Josie Palmer (Mpama)

King Adam Kok III

King Dalasile

Kgamanyane

Alfred Mangena

King DinganekaSenzangakhona Zulu

King Faku

Anna Silinga

King Dinizulu

King Hintsa

Anton Lembede

Chief Doman

King Makhado

Chief BambatakaMancinzaZondi

Dr Walter Benson Rubusana

King Malaboho (Malaboch)

Bishop W.J Colenso

HadjiOjer Ally

King MgolombaneSandileNgqika

King CetswayokaMpande

Harriet Colenso

King Moshoeshoe

Charlotte ManyeMaxeke

Ida Mntwana

King Nyabella

Chief David Stuurman

Johannes van der Kemp

King Sekukhuni

King Shaka

PixleykaIsakaSeme

Solomon TshekishoPlaatje

Chief KlaasStuurman

Queen LabotsibeniMdluli

Thomas MtobiMapikela

Louis van Mauritius

Ray Alexander

YusafDadoo

King Mzilikazi

Saul Msane

Professor ZK Matthews

Chief Nxele (Makanda)

SefakoMakgatho

 

Olive Schreiner

SelopeThema

 

29 July 2020 - NW1553

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

What is the department of Arts and Culture doing to safeguard unsuspecting rural families being exploited by television productions companies like the ISIBAYA telenovela producing company, which took pictures of the NDLOVU family house in MSINGA and gave the now deceased lady of the house R500 and use them to promote their television show? Are there any measures in place to protect these families? If not, why not?NW1929E

Reply:

There are many individual contracts between private parties that are not necessarily brought to the attention of the Department. However, government is currently in the process of changing the existing legislative regime to fight the exploitation of the creatives; and levelling the playing field.

These two pieces of legislation that are currently being reviewed are the Copyright Amendment Bill(CAB) and the Performers Protection Amendment Bill (PPAB). The Department of Sports, Arts and Culture is working with the Department of Communication and Digital Technologies; and the Department of Trade Industry in addressing this. The President has sent back these two pieces of legislation to Parliament for review. The DSAC is engaging the Department of Trade and Industry with the view to develop a joint approach moving forward, and the outcomes of the engagement will be announced very soon.

29 July 2020 - NW1530

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What was the total amount spent on the 2022 Commonwealth Bid; (2) (a) which specified entities contributed to the costs of the Bid and (b) what amount did each entity contribute? NW1901E

Reply:

The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC has not been able to access information due to national lockdown restrictions.

29 July 2020 - NW1554

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he instructed the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) to payIndependent Music Performance Rights Association (IMPRA) monies to the amount of R10 million that were for legitimate needletime rights for musicians, as if the specified amount was for the Covid-19 relief fund; if not, (a) who ordered the SABC to pay IMPRA monies and (b) why?

Reply:

We have neither instructed the SABC nor any collecting societies, we have no legal authority to do as such.

You will understand that under normal circumstances royalties are being paid on a periodic basis. The decision by the SABC to provide an advance was therefore a positive response to close the gap for rights owners (this include record companies and performers) to get advance income. A public statement was issued onFriday, 08 May 2020by the three parties thus the SABC, SAMPRA and IMPRA regarding this matter. The statement is available on the SABC website and it provides full details.

Section A and B can best be responded to by SABC.

29 July 2020 - NW1631

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

1. With reference to his reply to question 1272 on 20 July 2020, (a) on what date did the investigation take place, (b) what were the findings of the specified investigation and (c) on what date is it envisaged that action will be taken with regard to the findings; 2. whether the appointment process will be reversed, if not, why not; if so, why; 3. whether the person appointed according to the flawed process will be eligible to apply and be considered for appointment when in a new process of employment for the post; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 4. (a) for what period was the specified person appointed in the position and (b) will the specified person be subject to punitive costs when the appointment is reversed?

Reply:

1. (a).The NLSA’s Board of Directors met on 13 July 2020 and resolved that the matter be referred to the Human Resources and Remuneration Committee (HR&REMCo). HR&REMCo will conduct an investigation and put forward recommendations to the Board for approval.

(b). No findings can be reported at this stage.

(c). The report with recommendations from HR&REMCo to the Board will guide the Board’s actions with regards to the implementation of the recommendations.

2. The Board will be guided by the outcome and recommendations of the investigation on the remedial action to be taken

3. Any candidate that meets the requirements of the post is eligible to apply.

The requirements of the post will be in-line with the approved job description.

4. (a). The specified person is appointed on a three-year fixed-term contract.

(b). At this point it is premature to pre-empt the outcome of the investigation.

28 July 2020 - NW1510

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the tender for the appointment of a panel of South African registered suppliers to supply and/or supply and install locally produced 32 inch Integrated Digital Television sets for the 2020 indigent matriculants by the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa, (a) what criteria were used to identify the recipient learners, (b) what total number of matriculants were approved in each province, (c) by what date will the televisions be installed and handed over to each matriculant ready to be used, d) how would this assist matriculants who (i) are already back at school and (ii) will soon write final exams and leave school, (e) what are the reasons that matriculants were not provided with computers and sim cards, free internet and Wi-Fi hotspots and (f) what was the exact involvement of her department in this project?

Reply:

This Tender was not processed by the Department of Basic Education (DBE) so DBE does not have a comment on this. The question should be directed to the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies(DCDT) for an accurate response. USASSA is an entity reporting to DCDT.

28 July 2020 - NW1621

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total amount has been cut from the 2020-21 budget for basic education in each province?

Reply:

The overall Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) budget reduction in the 2020/21 financial year due to Special Supplementary Budget to address the Covid-19 is in excess of R1.6 billion. This total excludes Western Cape as no data was available by the time of this response.

Details are attached as Annexure A.

28 July 2020 - NW1411

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) On what date was the first Council of Traditional Leaders established, (b) what number of leaders serve on the council, (c) what are the criteria for the traditional groups and/or leaders represented on the council, (d) on what date was the last election held, (e) what is the term of the council and (f) on what date will the next election take place; (2) whether it is necessary to restructure the council due to the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, Act 3 of 2019, signed by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in December 2019? NW1782E

Reply:

(1)(a) The first Council of Traditional Leaders was established on 18 April 1997 in terms of the Council of Traditional Leaders Act, 1997 (Act 10 of 1997) which was repealed by the National House of Traditional Leaders Act, 2009 (Act 22 of 2009)(the Act).

(b) Twenty three (23) Senior Traditional Leaders serve in the National House of Traditional Leaders.

(c) Section 3 of the National House of Traditional Leaders Act, 2009 (Act 22 of 2009) provides for the composition of the House. Each of the seven (7) provincial Houses of Traditional Leaders (North West, Limpopo, Free State, Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga and Northern Cape with the exception of the Western Cape Province since currently there are no recognised traditional leaders in that province) elect three 3 members to the National House of Traditional Leaders. The only two (2) officially recognised Senior Traditional Leaders in the Gauteng province represent the province in the National House. This is because section 3(2)(b) of the Act provides that “where there is no provincial house of traditional leaders but there are three or a lesser number of traditional councils performing the functions of a local house, the chairpersons of such traditional councils must be ex-officio members of the House”.

(d) The last election of members to the House was conducted during 2017 in terms of section 4 of the National House of Traditional Leaders Act, 2009 (Act 22 of 2009) which provides for each provincial House to elect three (3) members to the National House. Members elected by the seven (7) provincial Houses of Traditional Leaders and two (2) Senior Traditional Leaders from the Gauteng province were sworn into office on 09 November 2017 in Pretoria for a period of five years.

(e) The term of the National House of Traditional Leaders is five (5) years as provided by section 2 (2) of the Act.

(f) The next election of members to the National House of Traditional Leaders will take place after the expiry of the term of the current members on 30 June 2022 in terms of section 27(2) of the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, 2019 (Act No 3 of 2020) (TKLA).

(2)​ Yes, it is important, and it is a legal mandate that is informed by the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, Act 3 of 2019, to restructure the National House of Traditional Leaders to include a number of recognised senior leaders of the Khoi-San. This will result in the National House of Traditional Leaders to be renamed the National House of Traditional and Khoi-San Leaders in terms of Sections 26, 27, 28 and 29 of the TKLA.

End.

28 July 2020 - NW1237

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether she can intervene in the concerns of a community of Schauderville in Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape on the complaints of health hazards caused by sewerage water emanating from a vandalised swimming pool at a certain site (name furnished) close to the Frank Joubert Primary School exposing children to the dangers of the health hazard and criminal activities over the past 20 years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department monitors provincial governments when they appoint the services of local qualified and competent contractors from the communities to fix or replace sewerage lines and stormwater lines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she has been informed that the soil at the specified site contains items of relics dating back to the 1800s; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1603E

Reply:

(1) Yes. The sewage spillage was not coming from the abandoned swimming pool, but from a leaking bulk sewer line located in the valley nearby. The bulk sewer line has since beenfixed and the spillage cleared.

(2) No. In this regard, provincial governments are not responsible for fixing or replacing sewerage lines and stormwater lines. In this case, sewer blockages are cleared by the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, utilizing internal staff. Where external support is required, services are procuredfrom service providers in terms of relevant supply chain management policies.  

(3) No. The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is also not aware of any old relics items at the specified site. However, it would be appreciated if more information could be provided in this regard for further investigation by the relevant department.

End.

28 July 2020 - NW1647

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What curriculum adjustments will be introduced in the 2021 school year to assist schools to catch up with lost teaching time as a result of Covid-19?

Reply:

The approach that the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has adopted in the Curriculum Trimming and Reorganisation, in response to the lost teaching and learning time during 2020 academic year has included a process of identifying fundamental and core content per subject per grade to ensure that learners are adequately prepared for the next grades for 2021, and that curriculum that would not be covered in 2020 is distributed across 2021 and 2022 respectively. 

28 July 2020 - NW1458

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, in light of the petition and position of 100 school principals on the Cape Flats, including the principal of Athlone High School (name and details furnished), she will delay returning learners in Grades (a) 1, (b) 2, (c) 3, (d) 4, (e) 5, (f) 8 and (g) 9 back to school until the next school year; (2) by what date will she respond to each concern raised by the principals (details furnished)?

Reply:

The following response was received from Western Cape Education Department: 

  1. No. The Western Cape has no plans to delay the return of learners to schools. We also do not have the list of schools mentioned in the petition. 
  2. The National Minister has at various platforms spoken broadly to each of the concerns raised by Mr Hendricks. Some of the concerns require Provincial engagement. Neither the office of the Provincial Head of Department, nor the office of Ministry, in the Western Cape, has received any communication from Mr Hendricks to discuss these concerns. 

28 July 2020 - NW1333

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total number of cases of illegal invasion of land owned by her department was recorded by her department in each (i) province and (ii) of the past five financial years, (b) is the current status of occupation, (c) total number of persons are currently occupying the land and (d) steps has her department taken to remedy the situation in each specified case?

Reply:

a) The Department of Cooperative Governance does not own land

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

d) Not applicable

End.

28 July 2020 - NW1466

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

While 3 800 schools in mainly rural areas still rely on pit latrines, over 3500 schools are without adequate infrastructure, no personal protective equipment and without sufficient water, resulting in many of these schools failing to meet her deadline of 8 June 2020 to reopen the schools, (a) by what date will her department ensure that not a single school is without these basic necessities and (b) what is her position with regard to schools that have no access to the specified necessities at this time?

Reply:

It is true that several schools have challenges related to water supply and sanitation.  The Department of Basic Education is working with the various Provincial Departments of Education, Rand Water and the water boards to address such challenges.

The Provincial Departments identified about 3 500 schools had water supply challenges.  The Department of Basic Education contracted Rand Water to implement an Emergency Water Supply programme.  The adopted solution was water delivery to on-site storage tanks at these schools.  Some schools had existing on-site storage tanks, while 2 274 schools required such tanks.  On 17 July 2020, Rand Water reported that on-site storage tanks have now been installed at these schools that required tanks.  Provincial Departments of Education reported on 17 July 2020 that all schools identified with water challenges now have water.  The planning and implementation of permanent solutions are part of the ongoing capital programmes of the Provincial Departments of Education.  The date for the implementation of the permanent solutions is dependent on the availability of funding. 

It is also correct that the Provincial Departments of Education identified more than 3 800 schools that rely on basic pit toilets.  Again, the Department of Basic Education is working with the various Provincial Departments of Education to address such challenges.  Sanitation solutions have been implemented at 68 of these schools under the ASIDI programme.  The Provincial Departments of Education have addressed the needs at a further 834 schools.  Several partnerships contributed to solve the challenge at another 103 schools.  The Department of Basic Education appointed 4 different implementing agents to address a further 1 121 schools.  These implementing agents are in varying stages of completion of the sanitation solutions. The current plan is to eradicate the basic pit toilets by March 2022.  This is however dependent on the availability of funding for this purpose. 

27 July 2020 - NW1040

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) mechanism does her department use to gauge and/or assess the impact of its various programmes on the lives of ordinary South Africans and (b) progress has her department made in implementing the National Drug Master Plan?

Reply:

(a) Apart from monitoring statistical trends such as the changes to poverty produced by STATSSA, the department also conducts periodical impact evaluations

The social development sector has institutionalised the results-based management approach in contributing to the desired developmental state as outlined in the National Development Plan vision 2030. The department has been committed to the use of evidence from evaluations to inform decision making by managers, improve policy formulation and programme performance.

The department has conducted a number of evaluation studies to measure the effectiveness, outcomes, sustainability and impacts of the services delivered to communities and especially poor and vulnerable households, as well as gather an understanding of the lessons to be learnt. A brief outline of the evaluations that have been conducted in the last five years is as follows:

  • Implementation evaluation of the Older Persons Act (OPA) to understand how the Older Persons Act 13 of 2006 is implemented (or how it is working) and how it can be strengthened. Evaluation report and the improvement plan have been completed and are in the process of Cabinet approval through the Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation. Some of the findings were used in the review of the Older Persons Act.
  • Evaluation of You Only Live Once (YOLO) Programme to assess the effectiveness, efficiency, relevance and sustainability of the YOLO programme targeting 15-24 year olds and to determine the improvements to be made. The intention is to determine the immediate outcomes of the programme with regard to the extent to which YOLO contributes to increased knowledge, reduced negative attitudes and norms, reduction in risk behaviors’, and increased testing and adherence, all of which contribute to reducing HIV transmission. Evaluation report and the improvement plan has been completed. The findings were used to strengthen the programme.
  • Evaluation of NPO regulatory system to assess how effective the system of NPO delivery is and how it can be strengthened. Evaluation report and the improvement plan have been completed. Some of the findings of the evaluation will be used for the review of the NPO Act Evaluation report and the improvement plan have been approved by Cabinet. The Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation has been monitoring the progress on the implantation of the improvement plan.
  • Evaluation of Household Food and Nutrition programme to assess the appropriateness of the design and implementation of the national integrated food security strategy during the first year and to understand whether the strategy is addressing the issues of hunger in South Africa. An improvement plan was developed to ensure that findings and recommendations are used to strengthen the programme.

(b) The National Drug Master Plan provides a multisectoral blueprint for South Africa’s response to substance abuse. It is aimed at improving efficiency and effectiveness and interventions in preventing substance abuse by providing a clear national policy statement, leadership and coordination of activities related to countering the substance abuse problem in South Africa. The implementation of the NDMP 2013 – 2017, ensured that South Africa reaffirmed its commitment to effectively addressing and countering the world drug problem in partnership with every local, national and international stakeholders. NDMP 2013 – 2017 was fully implemented. The implementation evaluation of NDMP 2013 – 2017 was conducted in order to understand whether, and how it has been implemented and how likely it is to facilitate efficient and effective service delivery across different institutions and programmes for reducing substance abuse. Amongst the recommendations provided from the implementation evaluation report were the following: The NDMP needs to be reviewed and harmonise its approaches; the Provincial Substance Abuse Forums and the Local Drug Action Committees be strengthened and it should have an Implementation Plan. The NDMP 2013 – 2017 was reviewed and NDMP 2019 – 2024. The NDMP 2019-2024 was approved by Cabinet in October 2019. Government Departments are currently being capacitated to implement the NDMP guided by the Implementation Plan

27 July 2020 - NW1279

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she will commit to date by when the (a) new Central Drug Authority board (CDA) will be appointed and (b) outstanding CDA Annual Report for the (i) 2018 – 2019 and (ii) 2019 – 2020 financial years will be published; if not, what interventions is she undertaking to ensure the specified outstanding items are submitted to (aa) Parliament and (bb) the substance abuse fraternity in the Republic; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) No, the Minister of Social Development cannot commit on the date on which she will appoint the members of the new board of the Central Drug Authority (CDA).The Minister will appoint the new members of the CDA board once the Parliamentary Committees: Social Portfolio Committee on Social Development and the Select Committee on Social Services have short-listed, interviewed and recommended the suitable candidates for the new CDA board. Based on the relevant Parliamentary Committees’ recommendations, the Minister will appoint new members of the CDA board. At present, the Minister is awaiting the recommendations from the Portfolio Committee on Social Development and the Select Committee on Social Services.

(b) Yes, the Minister of Social Development commits to submit the outstanding CDA Annual Report for :

(i) 2018 – 2019 financial year in September 2020. Prior developing the CDA Annual Report, the members of the CDA board have to receive the reports from the relevant stake holders outlining their achievements and challenges in implementing the National Drug Master Plan. Normally the commencement of developing the CDA Annual Report starts in April of each year, as it entails reporting the previous year efforts and initiatives relating to combating substance abuse. The delay in the submission of the report was caused by the late submission of stakeholders’ (Government Departments, Provinces and Non- Governmental Organisations) reports. The CDA does not have an electronic system to ensure the submission of reports on time; and

(ii) The 2019 – 2020 financial year in

December 2020. CDA Annual Report is still awaiting reports from Provincial Substance Abuse Forums and the National Departments. The delay in the submission of the reports is caused by competing mandates. Some stakeholders do not see the issue of addressing the scourge of substance abuse as part of their priorities. The current legislation, the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act (Act 70 of 2008) does not have consequences for late and non-reporting by stakeholders

(aa) the Department of Social Development has reviewed The Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act 70 of 2008 to address the policy gaps including consequence management. The Draft Policy has been developed and currently being consulted with cluster departments. The Department is also in the process of developing system to ensure timeous reporting to parliament and

(bb) the Substance Abuse Fraternity

 

24 July 2020 - NW1433

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total amount did his department allocate to the National School of Government (NSG) (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2020; (2) whether his department investigated the possibility of entering into partnerships with public universities to provide the training instead of the NSG; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether all of the courses and modules presented by the NSG are accredited with the relevant higher education qualifications authorities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether the NSG has been presenting modules virtually since 26 March 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total allocated to the National School of Government was:

a) 2015/16 – R 140.4 million of which R47.8 million was transferred to the Trading Account. The trading Account then raised R 68.4 million of its own revenue.

2016/17 – R 88.6 million there was no allocation for the Trading Account. The Trading Account generated its own revenue of R137 million.

2017/18 – R 153.9 million of which R63.6 million was transferred to the Trading Account. The Trading Account generated its own revenue of R 115 million.

2018/19 – R 168.9 million of which R 72.8 million was transferred to the Trading Account. The Trading Account generated its own revenue of R 151.7 million.

2019/20 – R 187.9 million of which R84.8 million was transferred to the Trading Account. The Trading account generated its own revenue of R154.2 million

(b) from 1 April 2020 – R 190.6 million of which R93.7 million will be transferred to the Trading Account. The Trading Account budgeted revenue target has been revised downwards to R 75.2 million due to COVID-19 pandemic lockdown.

 

2. In repositioning for the future, the NSG is expanding its mandate in three spheres of government, state owned entities and organs of state and support the outcomes of priority 1 of MTSF (professionalising public administration). In doing so, it is critical for the NSG to intervene DIRECTLY by providing or facilitate ETD programmes; INFLUENCE (content creation of public administration, quality of ETD); and REFER (where the NSG cannot offer ETD interventions, we refer public servants to other recognised training providers esp. HEIs). The five year strategy programmes places emphasis on the quality of our ETD interventions and of those who deliver on behalf of the NSG; as well as to embrace partnerships and collaborations with public and private institutions to support ETD interventions to achieve depth and scale. In this regard, we are co-branding programmes we deliver in partnership with HEIs to grow our visibility, impact and brand value. The NSG has concluded partnerships with the following HEIs:

The NSG Programme

HEI, Geographical Allocation and Programme Recognition

EDP

Contract period:

Oct 2019 – Oct 2022

University of the Free State (UFS): National

Participants who hold a relevant Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent qualification) may apply for admission to the Post-Graduate Diploma (Public Administration and Management) and may receive exemption for one of the six modules.

EMDP and AMDP

Contract period:

1 April 2020 – 31 March 2023

North West University (NWU): N.West, Mpumalanga & Limpopo

EDP: Advanced standing (exemption) in relation to some 1st year modules of the BA Public Governance

AMDP: Advanced standing (exemption) in relation to all 1st year modules of the BA Public Governance

 

University of the Free State (UFS): Free State & KZN

EDP: Exemption from 2 modules of the Higher Cert in Management Development

AMDP: Exemption from 4 modules of the Higher Cert in Management Development

 

University of Forte Hare through Fort Hare Solutions (FHS): E. Cape

EDP: 81 credits toward the Higher Cert in Public Admin

AMDP: 85 credits toward the Advanced Cert in Public Admin

 

University of the Western Cape (UWC): W.Cape & N.Cape

EDP: Exemption from one 1st year module of the B Admin degree

AMDP: Exemption from one 3rd year module of the B Admin degree

 

Tshwane University of Technology (TUT): National Departments & GP

EDP: Exemption from 1st year Nat Diploma Public Management (to become Diploma in Public Affairs)

AMDP: Exemption from 1 module of the BTech Public Management (to become Advanced Diploma in Public Affairs)

The National School of Government (the NSG) has been working in partnerships with public universities for more than 10 years for the delivery of training programmes such as Integrated Management Development Programme (IMDP) and for the Legislature programmes. The Universities we have partnered with previously on the IMDP programmes include the University of Stellenbosch, Nelson Mandela University, Vaal University of Technology, University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, University of Pretoria, University of Limpopo, North West University (NWU), University of Forte Hare through Fort Hare Solutions (FHS), University of the Western Cape (UWC) and Tshwane University of Technology (TUT). On the Legislature programmes we have worked with WITS and University of Johannesburg.

The process of partnering with public universities is done through a tender process. New programmes are being explored with public universities and should bear fruits within two years – these will focus on economic governance, leadership in times of crisis (like Covid-19) and on a variety of 4iR programmes including Cyber Security and data analytics for policy making.

Over the last ten years, the training programmes in partnerships between NSG and Parliament have achieved the following based on successful participation by participants:

  1. Certificate in Governance and Leadership - offered by the NSG in partnership with UNISA: Approximately 182 participants successfully completed the Certificate in Governance and Leadership; and
  2. Graduate Certificate in Advanced Governance and Public Leadership - offered in partnership with the Wits University School of Governance as a short learning programme. The Graduate Certificate links to further qualification i.e. as determined by partnerships with HEIs and as determined by HEI admission requirements (PGDip in Governance and Public Leadership; MM in Governance and Public Leadership). Approximately 289 participants successfully completed the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Governance and Public Leadership.
  3. Over the period of the last ten years 178 participants enrolled for the PGDIP in Governance and Public Leadership through WITS. Through the University of Johannesburg 41 participants enrolled in a Continuing Education Programme and 73 participants enrolled to complete a PGDiP at the University of Johannesburg.

3. The majority of facilitated courses offered by the NSG are accredited with a relevant quality assurance authority. These include:

  • Higher Education Institutions
  • Education and Training Quality Assurance bodies within the relevant Sector Education and Training Authorities, for example the Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA); and
  • Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)

The School also offers non-credit bearing courses. The value of these courses lies in the agile development and up-skilling of public servants by developing knowledge, improving competency and enhancing practice. All courses offered by the School are approved through internal quality assurance processes. The NSG has 129 accredited and non-accredited courses/programmes of which 99 are accredited and 30 non-accredited. The details are as follows:

HEI approved

21

ETQA accredited

69

QCTO accredited

9

Total number of accredited courses/programmes (ETQA & QCTO):

99

Number of non-accredited courses/programmes

30

Grand total number of courses/programmes

129

The curriculum will be reviewed to align to the ETD needs for all salary levels (i.e. entry to exit). The NSG will also undertake the curriculum review using a peer review mechanism. The School is also building internal capacity for quality assurance and accreditation management. Furthermore, there is a process underway of establishing a Curriculum Review and Quality Assurance Committee which will also bring experts as part of continuing improvement of our curriculum and course delivery.

4. The NSG offered 9 self-paced open eLearning courses during the national lock down. Officials are able to self-register and enrol in the course or courses of their choice, which include:

  1. Ethics for Internal Auditors
  2. Ethics in the Public Service (Compulsory course)
  3. Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP)
  4. Introduction to Financial Management and Budgeting
  5. Introduction to Leading Change
  6. Introduction to Strategic Planning and Management
  7. Know and live our Constitution
  8. Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and Ill-Health Retirement (PILIR)
  9. Writing for Government: Basic writing skills for Executive Support

The implementation of the SMS Pre-entry Programme (Nyukela) continued during lockdown. Since the national lock down and up to the end of June 2020 there was a total of 9 156 enrolments on the NSG eLearning platform, 2166 of which were in the SMS Pre-entry Programme (Nyukela). Officials who are new to eLearning are able to self-enrol in Getting Started with eLearning, which prepares them for online learning.

The NSG in partnership with University of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (UCASS) will deliver a two weeks online Seminar on Building Governance Capacity for South Africa through the ZOOM platform starting from the 13th July 2020.

The National School of Government (NSG), in partnership with the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD) will be launching in August 2020 a five-day gender course Leading Change by Championing Gender Equality. The course will be on the online platform and will cover the Mainstreaming of Gender, Gender Based Violence and Gender Responsive Planning and Budgeting.

The NSG is in the process of entering into a MOA with TIPS to develop online courses on COVID-19 and the South African Economy and South Africa’s Industrial policy and action plan. The courses will be rolled out in quarter 3 of 2020/21 financial year.

24 July 2020 - NW1405

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of water usage licences were issued in the period 1 April to 24 June 2020; (2) what number of officials does her department employ who are authorised to issue water usage licenses

Reply:

(1) A total of thirteen (13) water usage licences were issued in the period 1 April to 24 June 2020.

(2) The only authority to issue water usage licenses within the Department of Water and Sanitation lies with the Director-General.

24 July 2020 - NW1469

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has conducted any investigations into the sale of RDP houses by officials of her department to persons who do not qualify for the specified houses; if not, why not; if so, (2) what (a) number of officials have been arrested for selling RDP houses in the past two years and (b) measures has she put in place to prevent this from happening?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Human Settlements is not aware, nor has it received reports of any of its officials that engage in the selling of BNG houses to persons who do not qualify or meet the housing subsidy criteria.

(2) (a) Falls away.

(b) Section 10A of the Housing Act 107 of 1997 contains a specific clause referred to as the Restriction on voluntary sale of state-subsidised housing which restricts beneficiaries of subsidised or RDP houses from selling or alienating their dwellings or serviced sites for a period of eight (8) years. In a case where a beneficiary is relocating to another provinces, they may surrender the property to the relevant Provincial Department of Human Settlements who shall take ownership thereof and the previous owner will be allowed to reapply for a new subsidised housing opportunity on arrival at the preferred province.

In addition, the Department of Human Settlements has a dedicated Special Investigations Directorate that works with law enforcement agencies and other government departments to deal with all matters related to fraud and corruption. It is therefore suggested that the Honourable Member provides me with the information for further investigation.