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04 June 2021 - NW1291

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the aircraft of the SA Civil Aviation Authority that crashed near George on 23 January 2020, (a) what (i) are the details of the aircraft that must replace the crashed aircraft, (ii) amount has been budgeted for the replacement and (iii) are the details of the specifications for the replacement aircraft and (b) on what date will the replacement aircraft be put into operation; (2) what are the details of any entity that is currently carrying out the legally required calibrations of airfield approach aids at airfields and/or airports around the Republic?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) – The details of the Aircraft that must replace the crashed aircraft are as per the tender specifications advertised on public platforms including the SACAA website on 20 November 2020. These specifications are public knowledge and can be accessed on www.caa.co.za

(a) (ii) – The amount budgeted for the replacement of the Aircraft as well as the Calibration equipment is R164 million.

(a) (iii) – The details of the specifications for the replacement aircraft are as per the tender – copy of tender specifications are attached herewith.

(b) Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and the impact that this has had on SACAA’s financial position, the SACAA management supported by the Board took a decision to place the acquisition of the aircraft on hold for another year until the financial position of the SACAA improves.

(2) The current service provider performing the calibration work is Tamifield (Pty) Ltd. The successful service provider was disclosed as required and published on the SACAA website.

04 June 2021 - NW1271

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What (a) amount was spent on consultants in each entity reporting to him; and (b) plans does his department have in place to reduce its reliance on professional service providers?

Reply:

(a). The amount spent on consultants by each Entity reporting to my department are responded to on the attached spreadsheet for your further attention.

(b). The Department is encouraging public entities to utilise in-house available expertise for the services required. Where consultants are utilised, the Department encourages entities to use a cost effective means to source services in line with the National Treasury cost curtailment measures.

04 June 2021 - NW1213

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether (a) the President, (b) the Deputy President, (c) any of the Cabinet Ministers, (d) any of the Deputy Ministers and/or their (e) spouses, (f) partners and (g) children have been vaccinated against COVID-19; if so, (i) on what dates in each case and (ii) where did the vaccinations take place in each case?

Reply:

Leaders including politicians who are eligible to be vaccinated based on the prevailing eligibility criteria have been encouraged to vaccinate in order to publicise the vaccine roll-out, and to build confidence in the programme amongst vaccine-hesitant citizens.

President Cyril Ramaphosa and Minister of Health, were vaccinated in public on 17th February 2021 at the Khayelitsha District Hospital in the Western Cape at the start of the Sisonke Early Access programme.

However, vaccination status of individuals remains confidential, and the National Department of Health is therefore not in a position to divulge the vaccination status of the other persons identified in the above question.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1215

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) are the qualifications of a certain person (name furnished), (b) subject does the person lecture at the University of Pretoria and (c) was the person paid to develop the Analytical Methods for testing in the Forensic Laboratory Services; (2) whether the specified person is recognised as a Forensic Specialist in other laboratories; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the number of court cases in which the person presented evidence as a Forensic Specialist on behalf of the Forensic Laboratory Services?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the University of Pretoria, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the University of Pretoria.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1333

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)(a) What are the names of all the approved service providers, including those responsible for events, catering, and marketing, for the National Lottery Board and (b) on what date was each service provider appointed. (2)what (a) payments were made to each service provider in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years and (b) services were rendered with regard to each payment?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

“(1)(a)(b) The panel for service providers relating to the promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Brand Positioning, Grant Funding and Regulated matters. Catering for the organisation was procured in line with relevant PFMA, Treasury Regulations and National Treasury guidelines as follows:

OPERATIONAL COSTS PURSUANT TO SECTION 2(5) OF THE LOTTERIES ACT, NO 57 OF 1997

2016/17 Financial Year

2017/18 Financial Year

2018/19 Financial Year

2019/20 Financial Year

Name of Service Provider

Contract Start Date

Tsalena Media

15-Jul-14

No panel appointed.

Name of Service Provider

Contract Start Date

Anzomode

1-Oct-18

Tau Ya Phoka (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Roadshow Marketing

1-Oct-18

Cheniwell

1-Oct-18

Khanya PR and Media (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Chilo Group

1-Oct-18

Be- Sure Events Solutions (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Black Moon Advertising and Research (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Name of Service Provider

Contract Start Date

Anzomode

1-Oct-18

Tau Ya Phoka (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Roadshow Marketing

1-Oct-18

Cheniwell

1-Oct-18

Khanya PR and Media (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Chilo Group

1-Oct-18

Be- Sure Events Solutions (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

Black Moon Advertising and Research (Pty) Ltd

1-Oct-18

(2) (a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) and (b)

OPERATIONAL COSTS PURSUANT TO SECTION 2(5) OF THE LOTTERIES ACT, NO 57 OF 1997

It is noteworthy to mention that the following suppliers provided education and awareness as it relates to Education and Awareness publication costs as per PQ466, and it is our understanding that the current PQ seeks to gather information relating to Education and Awareness workshop and conferencing costs.

  • Anzomode
  • Tau ya Phoka (Pty) Ltd
  • Roadshow Marketing
  • Chilo Group (Pty) Ltd
  • Cheniwell
  • Be-Sure Events Solutions (Pty) Ltd
  • Blackmoon Advertising and Research (Pty) Ltd.”

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1306

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1) On what date was the internal report into corruption in the National Lotteries Commission by Sekela Xabiso audit firm due to be completed; (2) (a) what are the reasons that the report has not yet been presented to the Portfolio Committee on Trade, Industry and Competition and (b) on what date will the report be presented to the specified committee; (3) what amount has been paid to the specified audit firm thus far; (4) whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed breakdown of the R36,5 million budgeted for the investigation in question; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) did not appoint Sekela Xabiso to conduct an investigation. The company was appointed by the NLC and attached herewith is the response from the NLC regarding the matter. Below is the reply to the question, submitted by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

1. “The Board of the NLC initiated the investigation by offering members of the public an unrestricted platform to report any acts of wrongdoing, corruption or fraud through the appointed independent audit firm and to provide all evidence, notwithstanding those matters previously independently investigated and concluded. The investigation was expected to be concluded by end of May 2020; however, the due date fell within the period of the Level 5 hard lockdown. Thus due to COVID-19 restrictions, the inability to travel to conduct site visits and/or verification of infrastructure projects, the voluminous matters to be investigated and many other factors that led to a delay in the work of the audit firm gaining momentum the initial conclusion date was not met as anticipated.

2. The investigation process is underway and final outcomes of the investigation pending. The Board will make available the final outcomes of the investigation upon conclusion and adoption by the Board, as previously undertaken to the Portfolio Committee.

3. The total cost of the investigation to date is R9,657,867.10.

4. In responding to the question, extract of NLC’s response provided on PQ 695 bears reference.

Extract of PQ 695

The National Lotteries Commission is required to fulfil its mandate and ensure that the Commission performs its functions efficiently and effectively in compliance with the Lotteries Act and any other applicable law. The budget spend over the past three financial years to ensure that the NLC provides guidance and support to the Board whilst applying the principles of openness and transparency to advise the Minister on the efficacy of legislation pertaining to lotteries and ancillary matters, exercise its power to institute legal proceedings in order to properly discharge its functions and responsibilities and approach any court for any order the board deems appropriate for effective regulation and enforcement of the Lotteries Act is detailed below. The rapid increase of the Legal and Investigations budget over the past three years is attributed to independent investigations as a result of increased media exposure and enforcement of the Third National Lotteries Licence, pursuant to ensuring that the National Lottery and Sport Pools are conducted with all due propriety and strictly in accordance with the Constitution, the Act, all other applicable law.

The total budget allocated for Legal & Investigations Division was R36 500 000.00, being 2% of its National Lotteries Commission’s total expenditure including Grant Allocations.”

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1243

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What financial strategies has his department adopted to sustain employment and support productivity between now and the end of the year and (b) how does he intend to ensure that companies do not shed employees once the Republic has emerged out of COVID-19?

Reply:

(a) The Department is working on a single source funding model for Productivity SA in line with the provisions of section 12 of the Employment Services, where funding will flow from the appropriation as well as the UIF in terms of section 5 (d) of the UI Amendment Act.

(b) The Department has made provision for (i) the Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) which is the outcome of the Presidential Jobs Summit Framework Agreement to assist companies facing economic distress (financial and operational difficulties) and contemplating retrenching workers. A Joint Adjudication Committee is established, and the CCMA, UIF and Productivity SA collaborate to assist the companies as provided for in the LRA and section 7 of the Employment Services Act.

Further interventions are through Productivity SA whereby the entity implement turn-around strategies and plans to restructure and improve the productivity and operational efficiency of companies facing distress to be sustainable, competitive and create conditions conducive for job retention and creation. Funds have been made available in this regard and for the 2020/21 financial year over R104m was allocated to Productivity SA.

04 June 2021 - NW1303

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of children were born in the Republic (a) in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2020 (b) in each year in the specified period; (2) what total number of children were born in each province (a) in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2020 (b) in each year in the specified period?

Reply:

1. (a) The total number of children born in the Republic in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2020 was 9, 609, 814.

(b) The total number of children born in the Republic in each year in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2020 was as follows:

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

947,912

962,705

957,798

961,036

926,723

891,482

924,898

970,698

1,010,853

1,055,709

Source: DHIS

2. (a) The total number of children born in each province in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2020 was as follows:

Province

Year 2011 to 2020

Eastern Cape Province

1,124,581

Free State Province

471,875

Gauteng Province

2,178,280

KwaZulu-Natal Province

1,964,786

Limpopo Province

1,283,147

Mpumalanga Province

795,754

Northern Cape Province

220,051

North West Province

592,056

Western Cape Province

979,284

Total

9,609,814

Source: DHIS

b) The total number of children born in each province in the period 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2020 was as follows:

Province

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

EC

119,7

121,606

118,302

120,048

113,52

103,988

101,902

106,139

108,034

111,342

FS

48,55

49,439

47,377

46,432

44,992

41,625

45,769

48,394

49,598

49,699

GP

207,963

211,389

212,873

211,247

209,181

206,18

218,149

224,414

231,927

244,957

KZN

195,541

196,27

194,074

193,032

182,634

177,795

184,828

202,388

218,535

219,689

LIMP

129,695

129,807

129,952

130,059

122,813

119,09

121,728

125,612

131,004

143,387

MPU

75,891

78,53

78,146

79,472

75,654

72,928

77,239

81,482

83,698

92,714

NC

21,473

22,643

22,24

22,973

22,318

20,549

20,918

22,079

22,313

22,545

NW

59,004

59,695

58,999

58,304

57,55

56,309

57,362

59,8

61,591

63,442

WC

90,095

93,326

95,835

99,469

98,061

93,018

97,003

100,39

104,153

107,934

Total

947,912

962,705

957,798

961,036

926,723

891,482

924,898

970,698

1010,853

1055,709

Source: DHIS

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1092

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, in light of the Department of Labour issuing a notice with regard to the amendments that had to be made to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993, at the Forensic Laboratories at 271 Visagie Street, Pretoria, in October 2018, the amendments have been made; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date did the amendments begin according to the notification; (2) what are the reasons that (a) the amendments have not been completed and (b) it has taken three years to act on the notification which advised that such improvements had to be made in 60 days; (3) on what date will the amendments in terms of the notification be completed?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour issued an improvement and contravention notice to the Forensic Chemistry Laboratory at 271 Visagie Street, Pretoria on 8 October 2018. The laboratory began immediately with the compliance requirement in the improvement notice under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993. Copies of all relevant Acts and Regulations have been made available at the laboratory. Posters are also visible on the walls of the corridors of the laboratory. All DB boards in the laboratory have warning signs attached to them. This was done by the laboratory in October 2018.

2. The risk assessments and medical surveillance program of employees were part of a tender awarded to a service provider in 2019 to cover the National Department of Health and its decentralised units including the Forensic Chemistry Laboratories. The service provider was due to start the risk assessments and medical surveillance of employees in March 2020. Owing to the Covid-19 pandemic response the service provider undertook risk assessments related to Covid-19 only and not general health and safety assessments. In addition, many employees were not at work or undergoing rotational shifts in line with DPSA guidelines and thus the medical surveillance programme was placed on hold. It is envisaged that the risk assessments will be conducted in the third quarter of the 2021/22 financial year. Medical surveillance will be undertaken in the fourth quarter of the 2021/22 financial year after the risk assessments in order to link risk assessments to medical surveillance of individual employees.

Afrox was not able to assist the laboratory with the Certificate of Compliance for gases. The laboratory is following up with Afrox to take responsibility and provide a Certificate of Compliance.

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure was contacted on the 23 October 2018 and to date despite follow up by the laboratory manager on multiple occasions has not responded on the contravention notice covering infrastructure, electrical and mechanical requirements under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993.

3. The laboratory does not have any details or specific dates on when to expect the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to attend to the request. The Director-General will write to the Director-General of Public Works and Infrastructure later this month requesting feedback and intervention.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1123

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(a) With reference to his reply to question 139 on 1 March 2021, who was awarded the tender out of the 19 bidders and (b) will he furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a copy of the (i) inception report, (ii) literature review and stakeholder mapping, (iii) data collection, (iv) desktop research stakeholder engagement and interviews and (v) draft report? [

Reply:

I have submitted the question to the National Lotteries Commission for a reply.

In a letter dated 14 May 2021, NLC Commissioner, Ms T Mampane advised me that “The report is a confidential disclosure to Parliament in terms of Regulation 8 of the Lotteries Act, No. 57 of 1997, as amended. This document is intended for the internal use of NLC only and may not be distributed externally or reproduced for external distribution in any form without express written permission of the NLC and the service provider”.

The Department will be securing advice on the approach of the NLC on the Parliamentary Question.

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1257

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister if Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)(a) What amount has been spent in preparation for the 2021 Tokyo Olympics and (b) how is the budget in the 2020-21 financial year different from previous budgets given the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economy of the Republic; (2) Whether he, in collaboration with relevant associations involved in the 2021 Tokyo Olympics, has made contingent measures in the event where the Olympics are either postponed or cancelled; if not, why not; if so, what (a) amount is the expected loss in revenue and (b) are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a). The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee indicated that subsequent to the postponement of the Games, funds were only spent on PR and Media in relation to the Marketing of the Games e.g. 100 days to Olympic Games. The amount spent is R349, 351, 17.

Funding amounting to $60.000 has also been provided to participating National Federations that have a potential to qualify for the Games and these funds were an allocation from ANOCA in relation to athlete’s preparation. It must be noted that the procured sponsorship such as Mr Price Sport has taken care of some costs within the projected budget such as Team SA Clothing and others as SASCOC continue to procure more sponsorships. Noting measures put in place by the IOC/ IPC, Tokyo 2020 and the Japan Government towards ensuring safe Games, SASCOC has an obligation to appoint a Covid-19 Liaison Officer in the lead up to the games as per the guidelines from the Playbook. Costs have been spent in this regard.

(b). SASCOC further indicated that there has been no impact on the operational budget of the organization. However, from a games delivery perspective, particularly for Tokyo, the budget is different as follows:-

  1. Additional provisions need to be made to comply with all Covid-19 protocols prescribed by the IOC/IPC. These include staggered arrival of athletes to the Village, extended camps due to quarantine requirements and the appointment of a Covid-19 Liaison Officer in the lead up to the games
  2. Cost of flights may increase due to the shortest possible lay over being a priority rather than cost effectiveness.
  3. Flights may be more costly than previously with some airlines not yet flying and therefore there is very little pricing competition.
  4. There will be limited interaction and stay by the athletes as they will arrive just before their event and leave immediately after. The cost of maintaining the athletes at the games will therefore be reduced.
  5. There has been savings on competition tickets and NOC guest’s costs due to no foreign spectators being allowed entry into Tokyo

(2). SASCOC indicated that the organization follows the directive from the IOC and IPC. The IOC and IPC are not considering a cancelation nor have they addressed contingencies for a cancellation. The Games are going ahead, albeit managed and staged differently in light of Covid-19.

(a)(b). should the games be cancelled there would be no loses as no payments have as yet been made towards the team delivery to the games. It will be a huge loss for all the sponsors and mainly the clothing ones as they commenced with design and producing clothing for Team South Africa

04 June 2021 - NW1292

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the aircraft of the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) that crashed near George on 23 January 2020, what are details of all airfield approach aids that have been decommissioned due to the expiry of the relevant calibrations; (2) whether any airfield approach aids that have been decommissioned due to the expiry of the relevant calibrations will be re-commissioned; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date in each case and (b) what are the further relevant details; (3) what are the amounts of bonuses that have been paid to each senior manager of the SACAA in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(1) None of the Navigational Aids has been decommissioned as a result of the SACAA aircraft crash of 23 January 2020. Only Bhisho and Mafikeng were decommissioned by the owners of the facilities approximately 10 years back.

(2) N/A (a) N/A (b) N/A.

(3) Set out below is the bonuses paid to senior managers in the past five years.

Notes

  • The 2018/19 numbers include the Performance and Retention bonuses. Retention bonuses are paid after 3 years of uninterrupted service in line with the retention policy for Executives who are on fixed term contracts.
  • Performance bonuses for 2020/2021 were not paid due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and its financial impact on the SACAA.

04 June 2021 - NW1137

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the (a) extent of the commonage land in Gauteng and (b) current usage of the commonage land; (2) whether the commonage land has water rights to allow farming to take place; if not, what steps will her department take to ensure that there are water rights; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there are farming activities taking place on the commonage land; if not, why not; if so, what farming activities are taking place on the pieces of land; (4) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with the relevant information regarding (a) land that has been invaded and (b) the action(s) that were taken regarding the situation; if not, why not; if so, by what date? NW1324E

Reply:

The issues relating to the commonage land and farming activities are managed and administered by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. The Honourable member is advised to direct this question to the said department.

04 June 2021 - NW1340

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister if Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) Who were the auditors of the SA Sports Trust for each financial year since its inception, (b)(i) what amount of COVID-19 funds did the SA Sports Trust receive and (ii) how was it spent and (c) what are the reasons that the 2019-20 Annual Report has not been uploaded onto the SA Sport Trust website?

Reply:

a) The auditors of The Sports Trust since its inception until end financial year 2018 was KPMG. From 2019 to date SizweNtsalubaGobodo-Grant Thornton Inc. has been the auditors as appointed.

b) {i} Covid-19 funds received R10,281,000.00

{ii} The spend has been as per the directive of DSAC to pay the beneficiaries as selected by DSAC through the Department’s governance processes.

c) Delays with the audit completion of the 2019-20 Annual Report was partially due to Covid-19 and the sudden death of the late Financial Consultant, Mr. Lawrence Van Heerden in September, which impacted on their auditioning cycle. The Sports Trust was required to secure a replacement to manage and lead the audit process together with the Executive Director and the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee. The audit was completed in March 2021 and presented to the Board for approval.  Thereafter the finalization process of the Annual Report was completed and then circulated to the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee for review, and then final review by the Board. The Annual Report is earmarked for Website upload by 31st May 2021.

04 June 2021 - NW1173

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she will furnish Mr S Ngcobo with a list indicating (a) the total number of non-governmental organisations (NGO) that (i) are registered in the disability sector and (ii) are funded by her department in each province and (b) the total amount of funding allocated for each specified NGO; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) (i) The total number of non-governmental organisations (NGO) that are registered in the disability sector is 3 765; as below:

Province

Count of NPOs by Province

Eastern Cape

337

Free State

226

Gauteng

975

Kwa-Zulu Natal

605

Limpopo

526

Mpumalanga

375

North West

230

Northern Cape

107

Western Cape

384

Grand Total

  1. 765
  1.  

(ii) the number of NGOs funded by the department in each province as follows:

Province

Number of NPOs funded by the Province

Eastern Cape

86

Free State

97

Gauteng

111

Kwa-Zulu Natal

180

Limpopo

87

Mpumalanga

141

North West

47

Northern Cape

27

Western Cape

154

Grand Total

930

(b) the total amount of funding allocated for each specified NGO, detailed as per attached Annexures:

Annexure A - Eastern Cape

Annexure B - Free State

Annexure C - Gauteng

Annexure D - Kwa Zulu Natal

Annexure E - Limpopo

Annexure F - Mpumalanga

Annexure G - Northern Cape

Annexure H - North West

Annexure I - Western Cape

 

04 June 2021 - NW1281

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With respect to the commitment of Government to address the scourge of gender-based violence, what (a) number of Thuthuzela Centres are located in each province, (b) number of hospitals do not have rape kits in each province and (c) are the reasons that the specified hospitals do not have rape kits; (2) whether there is a prescribed number of rape kits required in each hospital; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what number is prescribed; (3) whether hospital staff in emergency wards are trained in processing a rape victim; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether hospitals are precluded from processing a rape victim if that person has not given a statement at a police station first; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

First and foremost, on the matter of handling of alleged rape cases, it must be borne in mind that the process of investigating the alleged rape must follow a specific and prescribed chain of evidence to ensure that medico-legally there is no compromise to the quality of evidence collected, thus protecting the victim when the evidence is before a court of law. Bearing this in mind, the response to this question is as follows:

(a) The total number of Thuthuzela care centres (TCCs) in the country is 55.

Eastern Cape: 9

Free State: 4

Gauteng: 7

KwaZulu Natal: 8

Limpopo: 7

Mpumalanga: 5

Northern Cape: 4

North West: 5

Western Cape: 6

a) Hospitals are not obligated to have rape kits as the Department of Health is not involved in the procurement and delivery of rape kits as procurement and delivery is the responsibility of the South African Police Service (SAPS). The SAPS brings these kits along to the Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) as and when there is a sexual assault reported. Therefore the issue of keeping rape kits at health facilities only emanates where there is a discussion between the health facility and the SAPS station responsible.

b) Not applicable based on the response in 1(b). 

2. There is no prescribed number of rape kits required in each hospital. The provision of rape kits is a competency of the SAPS. However as Department of Health we take Gender based violence very seriously and it is our duty to ensure that these rape kits are available at all times to execute evidence collection at our health facilities.

We are therefore working closely together with SAPS to ensure that rape kits are always available. These kits are then delivered to the health facilities by the SAPS, for collection of evidence by health professionals, during physical examination of the survivors of sexual violence. The evidence collected by health professional using these rape kits, is then taken by SAPS to the Police Forensic Laboratory for DNA analysis.

(3) Yes, hospital staff in emergency wards is trained in processing a rape victim.

The Department of health provides service at all hospitals to manage and process survivors of rape. This is done through:

  • qualified clinical forensic nurses and doctors
  • Ten (10) to more days training using the manual developed by the South African Medical Research Council, the content of which is highlighted below. if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 

Health professionals provide the following services to survivors of rape:

  • physical examination,
  • Collection of forensic evidence using J88 form. Medico-legal evidence comprises both documentation on the examination done and DNA evidence collected during the examination.
  • in children, laboratory evidence of particular sexually transmitted infections can also be used as evidence.
  • reporting child abuse, neglect and exploitation to Department of Social Development and SAPS where necessary.
  • registration of women and children seen for sexual assaults at health facilities
  • providing HIV testing and counselling, which includes providing post exposure prophylaxis
  • provision of Prophylaxis (PEP) medication to survivors of rape; which should be available 24 hours a day and patients should be prioritised irrespective of the nature of physical injuries among others.
  • provision of ccomfort packs for rape victims;
  • referral of women and children to Department of Social Development in the instance their safety is at risk to ensure that they are provided a safe environment such as shelters.
  • referral to Psychiatrists and Psychologist to manage emotional and psychological trauma.

(4) No, hospitals are not precluded from processing a rape survivor if that person has not given a statement at a police station first. Survivors of rape have a choice of which authority they wish to access first. We however have noted that majority of rape survivors access the health facility first before they report the matter to a police station and are not dismissed at all.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1228

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has been furnished with any reason that travel restrictions are not necessary to be imposed on persons who have travelled to India, in order to prevent the spread of the specific coronavirus variant, such as the B.1.617, from the specified country; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. There were no reasons furnished to the minister that travel restrictions are not necessary to be imposed on persons who have travelled to India, in order to prevent the spread of the specific coronavirus variant, such as the B.1.617. This is because there are no direct flights from India to South Africa.

The Department of Health has made general recommendations on the additional travel control measures that should be applied to travellers from all “Countries of Concern” and not necessarily from India only, which is part of these countries. The proposed intervention is for travellers who have travelled from or transited through any “Country of Concern” within 14 days of arriving in South Africa to be subjected to antigen testing at the point of entry on arrival.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1230

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, taking into account the slow pace of COVID-19 vaccination, he has revised his vaccination targets for the nation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the new dates by which he intends to have vaccinated enough persons to protect the nation against the spread of the virus?

Reply:

The targets for the vaccine roll-out as follows:

Phase

Time period

Number of vaccinations

1

February – May 2021

1.2 million

2

May – October 2021

16.6 million

3

November 2021 – February 2022

22.6 million

The targets remain as previously announced. The targets are linked to the vaccine supply pipeline, and may need to be revised if vaccine manufacturers do not supply vaccines according to the agreed timelines.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1270

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister if Sport, Arts and Culture

1(a).What was the initial budget allocation for the (i) building, (ii) infrastructure projects and (iii) work of his department that are still incomplete as a result of problems with the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and (b) what amount has been spent on each project; (2). whether it was necessary to increase the budget for the specified projects; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) by what amount and (b) what were the reasons for the increase in each (3). whether there was any fruitless and wasteful expenditure incurred by his department on (a) overcharged and (b) substandard work; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) where and (ii) at what cost; (4). what (a) amount was lost due to fraud and loss in his (i) department and (ii) each entity reporting to him and (b) steps were taken? NW1462E

Reply:

On Sarah Baartman Centre of Remembrance

1(a). The initial budget for the project was R164 386 247.29 and thus far R 221 338 422.72 has been spent since April 2014.

(2)(a).Yes it was necessary for the Department to increase the initial budget based on offers received which were higher than initial budget estimates, and (a) the total amount of R182 418 492.80 was approved as the initial contract amount, and this amount also increased over time increased due to delays, hence expenditure to date is at R 221 338 422.72

(b) Reasons for escalation of the project amount include approval of Variation Orders for treatment of Asphalt, borehole and pump in response to drought conditions in the area of Hankey, where project is implemented. Additionally, other increases include Professional Fees due to Extensions of Time, Contract Price Adjustment Provision (CPAP) and Preliminaries and General (P&G) costs, and approvals of these items were between April 2019 and December 2020 to the total amount of R 35 958 918.

3. Regarding Fruitless and Wasteful expenditure

(a) The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture did not pay any invoices to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure until it was assured that the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure did not incur any fruitless and wasteful expenditure. The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture expressly requested the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to provide the Department with a signed letter from the Acting Director-General indicating that it did not pay the current contractor for work already undertaken by the first contractor. This particular matter was raised because the current contractor was doing remedial work on the construction work undertaken by the first contractor. The letter from the Acting Director-General of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure indicating that it did not pay the second contractor for work originally done by the first contractor was received in December 2020.

(b) There has been a payment made by DPWI to the first contractor, whom part of his work was discovered as defective and needed to remedy by the current contractor and this claim is part of the dispute that is under mediation process. DSAC has sought assurance, through a letter, from DPWI that no claims will be paid through its budget allocation for the remedial work done by the second contractor, as payments for the defective work done by first contractor and his retention were already made by DPWI, and DSAC cannot pay double for the same service. No substandard work has been paid under the second contractor, but since project is behind schedule, there may be a possibility of penalties, which may be settled, in the final account.

(4)(a) No amount reported to have been lost due to fraud and loss in the SBCR project.

   

On National Archives (HVAC Project)

(1)(a). The initial budget allocated for this infrastructure project R 92 853 000 and (b). the total amount spent to date is R 106 564 132.

(2)(a). It was necessary to increase the initial budget allocation with additional R 91 518 673 to the total of R184 371 673 which became the actual initial contract amount. (b) The increase of the amount was a result of an increase of scope. The initial scope for phase1 of the project was only the fire suppression system and HVAC, but during advertisement of a tender, DPWI consolidated phase both 1 and phase 2 of the project. The scope of the added phase 2 included Mobile shelving in the 49 strong rooms; Mobile Archival Facilities and undercover control system.

(3)(a). No fruitless and wasteful expenditure has been declared so far, including due to overcharges and/or (b) substandard work.

(4)(a). There is no amount reported lost due to fraud and loss (i) in the department, (ii) but only with PACOFS as one of the department’s entity

(b) The following steps were taken

  • In 2015, the Department placed a moratorium on the implementation of the infrastructure projects after discovering the maladministration of the Infrastructure budget.
  • In 2016, the Department then requested National Treasury to conduct forensic investigation into the entity’s infrastructure programme, and National Treasury appointed Nkonki Inc. to conduct phase 1 forensic investigation.
  • The cost of the investigation was carried by the Office of National Treasury, under the budget of the Specialised Audit Services.
  • The recommendations of the forensic outcome were implemented by PACOFS council.
  • The CEO and the CFO were dismissed, and there was a settlement with the service providers which were implicated.
  • The settlement agreement was drafted by the State Attorney and was made an Order of the court in March 2018.
  • In 2019, the National Treasury instituted phase 2 forensic investigation, which is still underway.

04 June 2021 - NW1083

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the reasons that 72 interns with 20 years of laboratory experience were (a) put on a forensic toxicology training programme under a certain person (name furnished) in Pretoria with a certain person (name also furnished) for a year in 2012 and (b) accommodated in a hotel for a year despite many of them coming from Pretoria; (2) (a) what number of days in a week did the interns attend lectures at the hotel and (b) at what time did the lectures take place; (3) what (a) is the name of the hotel where the interns were accommodated and (b) was the total cost of the accommodation for the interns, including meals, refreshments, phones and other relevant details; (4) where were the interns placed after they completed the training presented by the specified person?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the University of Pretoria, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the University of Pretoria.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1335

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister if Sport, Arts and Culture

With regard to his reply to question 328 on 19 March 2021, what (a) total number of (i) board members and (ii) guests will the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee be taking to Tokyo Olympics, (b) are the names and positions in each case and (c) will the total cost be to send each specified board member and guest, including (i) flight costs, (ii) accommodation costs and (iii) any other specified costs?

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee indicated that;

a) (i) Apart from the President, who leads and represents the our National Olympic and Paralympic Committee (SASCOC), no other board member will be taken to the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics.

(ii) No guests will be taken to the Tokyo Olympic.

(b) Mr Barry Hendricks as President of SASCOC

(c) (i) (ii) (iii) SASCOC did not specify costs for sending the President to the Olympics and Paralympics

04 June 2021 - NW1084

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) With which sector education and training authority was the training registered that was conducted by a certain person (name furnished) for the Forensic Pathology Services under a certain person (name furnished), with regard to a year-long Forensic Toxicology Training programme of 72 interns in 2012, (b) on what date was it registered, (c) did the specified training have a National Qualifications Framework level qualification and (d) what was the (i) period over which remuneration was paid and (ii) remuneration that was paid to the specified person; (2) what (a) was the number of years during which a certain person served as the mentor of a certain person at the University of Pretoria, (b) other contracts have been entered into by the Forensic Laboratory with the specified person and (c) was the total cost of each contract?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the University of Pretoria, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the University of Pretoria.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1269

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister if Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). Which building and/or infrastructure projects and work of his9a) department are still incomplete as a result of problems with the department of public works and infrastructure, (b) on what date (i) did each project commence and (ii) was each project supposed to be completed and (c) what are the problems that were experienced?

Reply:

(a). The incomplete projects implemented through DPWI include both the Sarah Bartmann Centre of Remembrance (SBCR) and the installation of Heating Ventilation and Air- Conditioning (HVAC) at the National Archive Building.

On SBCR (Sarah Bartman Centre of Remembrance)

(i) Site was handed over to the contractor to commenced on 14 April 2014.

(ii) Project was supposed to be completed on 14 October 2016.

(a). The first contractor experienced cash flow problems early in the project. The quality of work was, on many occasions, not up to standard and therefore works had to be redone which caused delays in the construction programme.

Three strikes occurred in July, September and October 2014.These strikes related to Hankey workers requesting to be subcontracted to the project.

Unfortunately, many of the SMME’s and workers who wanted to be subcontracted did not have paperwork in place, did not want to submit quotations for the work; as well as a misunderstanding between the salaries paid to workers on building vs civil works.

In early 2015, the contractor applied for a revision of the practical date of completion. Strikes were experienced in 2017 due to the fact that the workers had not been paid their August and a portion of their September 2017 salaries. After assigning of the contract to the second contractor, work progressed. However, delays in the approval of Extension of Time applications and other Variations by DPWI contributed to further delays under a new contractor. A dispute also arose between DPWI and assigned contractor over defective work, which the latter remedied, because that defective work was only discovered after a site was handed over.

Additionally, the dispute also includes overpayment to the first contractor, and these are now being recovered or subtracted from the current contractor claims. The due date for completion has moved every year since 2014.

On HVAC project

(i) Site was handed over to the contractor to commence on the 16 January 2013.

(ii) Project was supposed to have been completed on the 17 July 2014.

a) The delays experienced were as a result of:

  • Cash flow problems experienced by the contractor and this delayed progress on the project, and in 2019, main contractor decided to assign the contract to a sub-contractor subject to approval by DPWI. Unfortunately, this approval from DPWI is still outstanding since 2019, and this delay have implication on the validity of the contract, and related transaction that have to be processed. This includes payment of outstanding invoices, as such transactions must have contractual basis.
  • The last Extension of Time approved was in Mach 2018, and this is also another matter that has a negative bearing to payment of some invoices, and affects cash flow and seamless implementation of the project
  • The sub-contractor appointed to provide shelving was liquidated, and this led to significant delays in delivery and installation shelving facilities required for archiving. The new main contractor could not find a suitable replacement sub-contractor in the country and resorted to importation of the shelves from China.
  • No budget for handling/removal of material that require specialized services.

These materials are not removed in some storerooms because approved budget was spent in full and approval of additional budget is subject to finalization of the assignment.

04 June 2021 - NW1245

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether his department has taken any formal steps to secure international co-operation on access to patents and technology for the Republic on the production of COVID-19 vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details, (b) inroads have been made and (c) are the challenges?

Reply:

Yes, the Department has taken formal steps to secure international cooperation on access to patents and technology for the Republic on the production of Covid-19 vaccines. In October 2020 South Africa and India tabled a proposal at the WTO calling for a temporary waiver of intellectual property rights of certain provisions of the TRIPS Agreement. Work has been done with both DIRCO and with the Department of Science and Innovation. President Ramaphosa has engaged with Heads of State to take forward the proposal for the Waiver.

Equitable vaccine rollout across the world is urgent, necessary and in the interest of people across the world. Reportedly about 75% of the vaccines administered were done in just 10 countries and many countries have not yet received a single dose.

On Wednesday, 14 April 2021, on behalf of the SA Government, I addressed the World Trade Organisation (WTO) on the importance of vaccine equity in the face of the most severe health and economic crisis of our generation. The discussion, which included the trade ministers of India, the European Union and United States, as well the heads of the WTO (Dr Okonjo-Iweala) and World Health Organisation (Dr Adhanom) provided a platform for South Africa to lay out its argument for temporary waiver of key areas of the WTO agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS).

We pointed out that the world faces a dramatic supply-constraint. At current levels of vaccine production, it may take the world a number of years to bring the virus under control. The gap in availability of supplies will give time for the virus to spread, and to mutate into more deadly or contagious strains. Vaccine nationalism, the race to purchase vaccines by those who can afford them and vaccine hoarding are not a solution to the global supply-constraint. They are pernicious examples of beggar-thy-neighbour policies.

We made the case for stepping up production on-scale. This means using all available capacity and repurposing capacity where this can be done safely and by adhering to necessary standards.

The constraints to scaling up production include technical challenges, inadequate investment to repurpose existing production facilities and the current intellectual property rights regime.

In this context, we called for a ‘Covid New Deal’ to significantly and rapidly increase supply of vaccines and related medical goods and promote more equitable access to such essential goods.

Until the pandemic is brought under control, support for the Waiver will continue to grow.

Voluntary arrangements as provided for in the WTO’s TRIPS Agreement in many cases are simply contract production on a ‘fill and finish’ basis that do not address backward integration and distribution rights; whilst compulsory licensing procedures are onerous and cumbersome.

Negotiations with suppliers are hampered by information and bargaining asymmetries that can result in inequitable outcomes and untenable conditions attached to their procurement.

TRIPS flexibilities were simply not designed to meet the scale of the challenge we now confront.

Based on this, we proposed that the Covid package or New Deal be pursued on parallel and mutually reinforcing tracks, done pragmatically and covering five areas.

First, to scale-up production, in partnership with pharmaceutical companies, that can cover investment and funding to enhance supply capacity in different and additional parts of the world. This necessitates effective transfer of technology, sharing of know-how, backward integration of the raw materials and distribution rights. It must unlock productive capacity not just fill and finish.

Second, a timebound and targeted TRIPS waiver covering only essential diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics and supplies.

Third, protocols covering transparency of contracts and price stability undertakings.

Fourth, commitment to avoid resort to vaccine nationalism; and

Finally, a TRIPS provision dealing specifically with future pandemics, that provides automatic rights of use and obviates the need for special arrangements and waivers.

Considerable progress has been made to put together a broad coalition of countries in support of the Waiver proposal. Sixty-three WTO Members have co-sponsored the Waiver Proposal and another 50 have indicated their support. There is support across the developing world, and from members of the US Congress, among EU Parliamentarians and from civil society globally. The United States and New Zealand became the first developed countries to support the Waiver. However, not all European countries have as yet supported the proposal for the Waiver put forward by South Africa and India. However, it does seem that all countries are in agreement that the status quo is inadequate and that the WTO will need to find a solution to enable rapid scaling-up of production of vaccines. Discussions are now continuing and South Africa and India together with the other co-sponsors, are engaging more countries to build further support for the proposal for a Waiver.

We have a responsibility imposed by circumstances; and need to build a common approach to act with boldness to save lives.

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1248

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has a strategy in place to ensure self-reliance of the supply of the COVID-19 vaccine in future; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for increased vaccine security and therefore, self-reliance. However, the development of local vaccine manufacturing is a complex process that has high risk associated with it. To ensure the quality and consistency of vaccine manufacturing, hundreds of process steps need to be followed and there are thousands of check points for testing. The transfer of intellectual property rights as well knowledge transfer on vaccine manufacturing should be coupled with massive investment in manufacturing capacity. Currently there is an unprecedented level of support across African governments, African and Global Public Health (GPH) institutions, and the private sector, which is driven by the need for increased vaccine security and self-reliance highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

As part of the African Union we have embarked upon a project to understand the strengths to leverage and challenges that could be faced develop a framework on vaccine manufacturing on the continent including opportunities for collaboration with a range of public and private sector stakeholders. This work is ongoing and is aimed at future pandemic preparedness.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1336

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister if Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 988 on 14 April 2021, wherein he stated that (a) a total of R 19 813 800 was spent on infrastructure during 2016, yet the 2016-17 annual report on the webpage of the SA Sports Trust states the R 129 724 372 million was spent on infrastructure and (b) for 2017 a total of R 8 860 520 was spent on infrastructure, yet the 2017-18 annual report state that R96 505 140 was spent, he will furnish Mr D J Stubbe with a clear explanation of the huge discrepancies; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Sports Trust indicated that their review has uncovered an unfortunate oversight (error) which led to the confusion. Noting that they used the same reporting template and accounting framework for the financial years in question. The indication is that the amounts as mentioned are correctly reflected in the Audited Financial Statements; the error was the incorrect reference to these line items under question but the amounts remain the same.

The discrepancies in question for the periods stated are as follows

a) For the 2016 financial period an amount of R19,813,800 was reported as Infrastructure Spend the error occurred during this period of the 2016 – 2017 annual report where the web page 18 reflected an amount of R129,724,372 for the same line item. The amount of R129, 724,372 is the total amount for Projects Spend, which comprises of the elements of Infrastructure Spend of (R19, 813,800) and the balance of the total amount is made up of Programmes, and Equipment and Kit Spend.

The Infrastructure Spend line item is incorrectly referenced with the total amount of R129, 724,372; it should be Projects Spend as reflected on Page 19 of the Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income. Please refer to the second line from the bottom of the page as attached.

b) For 2017 an amount of R8,860,520 was reported as Infrastructure Spend; the error occurred during this period of 2017 – 2018 Annual Report where the web page reflected an amount of R86,171,816 for the same line item. The amount of R86, 171,816 is the total amount for Projects Spend, which comprises of the elements of Infrastructure Spend of (R8, 860,520) and the balance for the total amount compromises of the following items in the form of Programmes, and Equipment and Kit Spend.

The Infrastructure Spend line item is incorrectly referenced with this amount of R86,171,816; it and should be Projects Spend as reflected on Page 19 of the Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income.  Please refer to the second line from the bottom of the page as attached.

The amount of R96, 505,140 reflects the Total Income raised that comprises of the Projects Spend (R86, 171,816), Fundraising, and Operational Expenses (R9, 401,488).

In both instances the amounts mentioned under Infrastructure Spend and Project Spend are the same amounts but incorrectly referenced.

04 June 2021 - NW1274

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether he will furnish Mr M Bagraim with a list of all transactions entered into from 1 January 2018 to 31 December 2019 between the registered bank accounts of a certain company (name furnished) and a certain person (name and details furnished), including (a) dates and (b) amounts; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) whether he will furnish Mr M Bagraim with the (a) full names, (b) positions held and (c) detailed reasons for the dismissals of all persons fired from their jobs due to allegations of bribery; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) whether he will furnish Mr M Bagraim with the names of the three companies mentioned in the email from the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration that must be held accountable for fraud and corruption; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

On 14 April 2021, the CCMA directed correspondence to Advance Call, the CCMA’s anonymous whistle – blower fraud hotline. The purpose of the correspondence was to request Advance Call to facilitate engagement with the whistleblower for them to furnish further details regarding the complainant, for purposes of initiating an investigation.

Advance Call attempted to contact the Whistle-blower and sent a letter via email to obtain more information, however, no response has been received by Advance Call, and consequently, neither the CCMA.

Investigation into this matter cannot take place without further information from the Whistle-blower. It is for this reason that the CCMA does not have reliable and verified information regarding the financial transactions nor has disciplinary action been taken against the alleged Commissioner.

As per the letter to the Honourable Member dated 15 April 2021 on same, once the CCMA has received trusted advice of Advance Call on developments herein and legitimate reason to launch an investigation, an investigation shall be duly initiated and a report be furnished to the Honourable Member.

 

04 June 2021 - NW1356

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture

(1). With regard to the unfinished stadium in the Emalahleni Local Municipality in Indwe, near Nomzamo Township, not far from Khowa formerly known as Elliot, in the Eastern Cape, (a) on what date was the tender advertised and at which newspaper, (b) which company received the tender and (c) what was the turnaround time to build the stadium; (2). whether an occupation certificate was issued; if not, why not; if so, on what date (a) was the certificate issued and (b) is it envisaged the stadium will be completed; (3). whether R11 million was budgeted for the rehabilitation of the stadium; if not, what amount was budgeted; if so, what total amount has been spent to date to rehabilitate the stadium; (4)(a). on what date will the Emalahleni Local Municipality recover the money and (b). what is the municipality’s plan to fix the stadium?

Reply:

The Municipality concern has not responded yet.

04 June 2021 - NW1131

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) has been the breakdown of the costs of corruption within his department in the past five financial years, (b) number of tenders have been cancelled as a result of irregularities and/or corruption in each province in the past five years, (c) is the total amount of irregular expenditure in each province in the past five years, (d) is the percentage of tenders that have been put on the e-Tender portal in each province in the past five years, (e) is the percentage of tenders that have been uploaded on e-portal sites in each province and (f) is the (i) national and (ii) provincial percentage of tender processes that are paper based?

Reply:

According to the information provided by the Provincial Health Departments the reply is as follows:

EASTERN CAPE

a) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

PERIOD

CATEGORY

TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES

CASES ABOVE R100,0000

 

FRAUD

CORRUPTION

   

2017/2018

7

11

18

2

2018/2019

7

13

20

2

2019/2020

2

8

10

-

2020/2021

2

3

5

-

TOTAL

18

35

53

4

b) No tenders have been cancelled as a result of irregularities or corruption.

c) The bulk of irregular expenditure as per the table below comprises of extension of contracts above the 15% NT threshold. The 2020/21 figure not yet final.

d) All bids above R500k are advertised on the e-Tender portal other than deviations due to sole source or emergency procurement.

e) All bids above R500k are advertised on the e-Tender portal other than deviations due to sole source or emergency procurement.

f) (ii) The Eastern Cape Department of Health is currently using manual systems which are paper based. The plans to digitise procurement processes have been included on the departmental strategic plan and processes are underway to engage SITA for assistance.

FREE STATE

a) Free State Psychiatric Complex – Fraudulent payment to various transactions to suppliers at FSPC. Double payment were made to various suppliers on same order numbers by means of LOGIS and Sundry Payments (BAS System). Cost involved R7,821,587.62.

b) None, tenders were not cancelled due to irregularities or allegations of corruptions.

c) The total amount registered for Free State Department of Health is: R1,605,678,521.22.

d) 100% all tenders were published on e-Tender portal.

e) 100% tenders were uploaded on e-Tender portal and published on the Provincial Tender Bulleting.

f) (ii) 80% processes are paper based.

GAUTENG

a) 

Year

No of Cases of Corruption

Costs

2020-21

None

R0

2019-20

6

R12 600 944.78

2018-19

1

R2 773 209.60

2017-18

7

R2 875 716.49

2016-17

1

R987 032.00

b) There are two tender that have been cancelled, are as follows;

  • GT/GDH/118/119/120/121/2016) Supply of Physical Security Services
  • (GT/GDH/123/2013)-ICT Infrastructure Refresh – the provision of V-Blocks to Head Office, Zola, New, Natalspruit, Steve Biko and Charlotte Maxeke Hospitals.

Year

Amount

2017

2 050 841 000

2018

1 703 205 000

2019

2 862 156 000

2020

2 318 994 000

2021

3 549 745 000

TOTAL

12 484 941 000

d) 100%- Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin.

e) 100% Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin.

f) (ii) All tenders are advertised through National Tender Bulletin and can be downloaded from respective provincial e-tender portal by prospective bidders.

KWAZULU-NATAL

FY 2016/2017 R 16 918 744,00

FY 2017/2018 R 8 505 932,68

FY 2018/2019 R 118 169 545,62

FY 2019/2020 R 474 767,75

FY 2020/2021 R 110 000,00

b) No tenders have been cancelled in the province in the past 5 years due to irregularities and/or corruption in KZN.

c) 

 

‘000

‘000

‘000

ROOO

ROOO

Period

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Totals

R1,257,484

R1,325,084

R1,464,342

R1,541,732

R1,433,975

d) 100%. All tenders in the province have been advertised on the e-Tender portal.

e) 100%

f) (ii) 100%

LIMPOPO

a) None.

b) None.

c) No irregular expenditure as a result of corruption within the department.

f) 100% of tenders were put on the e-Tender portal in the past five years.

e) 100% of tenders were uploaded on e-Tender portal site of the department.

f) (ii) 100% of tender process are paper based in the department

MPUMALANGA

a) The Department does not have known cases of corruption reported

b) The Department has cancelled contracts for appointed service provider for supply of perishable and non-perishable food due to non-compliance with UIF

c) 

Financial year

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/2020

Amount

1 552 623 000

309 920 000

138 899 000

122 157 000

d) Not applicable – Provincial Treasury competency

e) Not applicable – Provincial Treasury competency

f) (ii) Not applicable

NORTHERN CAPE

a) No cost of corruption incurred in the past five financial years

b) No contract was cancelled as a result of irregularities and/or corruption in the past five years.

c) 

2016/17: R574,183,000

2018/19: R714,939,000

2019/20: R497,829,000

2020/21: R492,748,000 (Preliminary)

Total: R2,692,078,000

d) 

2016/17: No tenders issued

2017/18: 60% (3 out of 5)

2018/19: 0%

2019/20: 0%

2020/21: 0%

e) No tenders were ever uploaded on the e-Portal site.

f) (ii)

2016/17: No tenders issued

2017/18: 40% (2 out of 5)

2018/19: 100%

2019/20: 100%

2020/21: 100%

NORTH WEST

a) No cost of corruption incurred in the past five financial years

b) NWDOH 40/2021, Supply of Physical Security Services

c) 

Year

Amount

2016/2017

721 445 000

2017/2018

809 267 000

2019

1 333 654 000

2020

1 189 467 000

2021

682 000 000

TOTAL

4 735 833 000

d) Irregular expenditure for the past 5 years = R4 728 202 000.

e) 100%- Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin

f) 100%- Tenders are advertised by E-Gove as well as Government Tender Bulletin

g) (ii) All tenders are advertised through National Tender Bulletin and can be downloaded from respective provincial e-tender portal by prospective bidders

WESTERN CAPE

a) None.

b) None based.

c) 

(R’000)

2020/21:               2,452 (unaudited)

2019/20:               6,472

2018/19:             13,260

2017/18:             23,553

2016/17:             11,459

2015/16:               7,284

d) Indeterminable. E-portal is a NT app and has been off-line for a few months. NT unable to provide date as to when it will become available.

e) Indeterminable. E-portal is a NT app and has been off-line for a few months. NT unable to provide date as to when it will become available.

f) (ii) BSC, BEC, BAC processes were paper based up to March 2020. Since March 2020, documents had to be worked on electronically, meetings had to be held electronically and declarations of interest and confidentiality of meetings had to be declared at each virtual meeting.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1354

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 2194 on October 2020, regarding the name changes in the Eastern Cape that have taken place (a) what total costs have been incurred to date for (i) advertising (ii) venues of local consultation meetings (iii) honoraria paid to Provincial Geographical names committee and (iv) honoraria to the South African Geographical names council for sittings and (b) on which dates were name change applications received for (i) King Williamstown and (ii) East London.

Reply:

(a) Costs incurred to date for:

  1. Advertisements on newspapers is R42 209 19
  2. Venues for local consultations were provided by the Buffalo City Municipality free of charge
  3. Honoraria paid to the Eastern Cape Provincial Geographical Names Committee is R 23 998.19
  4. Honoraria paid to the South African Geographical Names Council for its sitting is R147 986.00.

(b). Applications for name changes were received as follows: application for the name change of King Williamstown to Qonce was received on the 15th of October 2014 and the application for the name change of East London to Gompo was received on the 13th of October 2014.

04 June 2021 - NW1183

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

Whether postponing the elections forms part of the contingency plans that the Government has in place, given the uncertainty about the trajectory of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details of the plans?

Reply:

The preparations for the Local Government Elections are underway to be held on 27 October 2021, as announced by the Honourable President.

The Electoral Commission has indicated that it will be ready to deliver the elections within the constitutionally prescribed timeframes. With regard to the COVID-19 induced climate in which the elections will take place, the required health and safety protocols will be put in place to ensure that the elections are conducted in a manner that does not place any person at risk.

Given the uncertainty of the trajectory of the pandemic, the situation will be continuously monitored and assessed to ensure that the relevant interventions are made. Should circumstances require that the elections be postponed for outside the constitutionally defined period, then the required interventions will be pursued, which will include approaching Parliament and the Constitutional Court.

04 June 2021 - NW1277

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the relevant details of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine trials in the Republic with regard to the (i) number of Johnson and Johnson trials that have been conducted in the Republic, (ii) relevant details and results of such trials, (iii)(aa) number of participants in each ensemble and (bb) their relevant details, outcomes and results and (iv) breakdown of the results for each trial test; 2) (a) where were the specified trials conducted and (b) what are the details of the administering bodies, hospitals and/or clinics?

Reply:

1. (i) There were three Johnson&Johnson trials conducted in South Africa, the ENSEMBLE 1 trial which was a Phase 3 single dose study, ENSEMBLE 2 which is a phase 3 two dose study (which is still ongoing), and the SISONKE study which was an open label phase 3b trial. 

(ii) The SISONKE trial ended recently (on 17 May 2021) and the analysis is only just starting. 

The ENSEMBLE trial was published in the New England Journal of Medicine, main author GJ Sadoff: Safety and Efficacy of Single-Dose Ad26.COV2.S Vaccine against Covid-19. A summary of the results: “A single dose of vaccine protected against symptomatic Covid-19 and asymptomatic COVID-19 infection and was effective against severe-critical disease, including hospitalisation and death. Safety appeared to be similar to that in other phase 3 trials of Covid-19 vaccines. 

(iii)-(iv) (aa) SISONKE: the trial ended on 17 May and the analysis on the data is starting now. 

ENSEMBLE: a total of 44 325 participants underwent randomisation of which 43 783 received either placebo or vaccine. The per-protocol population included 39 321 participants, 19630 of which received vaccine and 19630 received placebo. 

(bb) SISONKE: the trial ended on 17 May and the analysis on the data is starting now. 

ENSEMBLE participants 

Median age: 52 years

Gender: female 45% male 54.9% other <0.1%

Ethnicity: American Indian/Alaskan native <1%; South American 9%; Asian 3%; Black 19%; Pacific Islander <1%; White 58%; Multiracial 6%; unknown 3%.

Country: Latin America 40.9%; South Africa 15%; USA 44.1%

> coexisting condition: 40.8%

Outcomes & Results: Vaccine efficacy after 28 days administration

Moderate to severe-critical COVID-19: 66.1% (95% confidence interval 55.0 – 74.8%)

Symptomatic COVID-19 of any severity: 66.5% (55.5-75.1)

No differences in vaccine efficacy were observed among subgroups (sex, race or ethnic group). Only a marginal decrease in vaccine efficacy noted in participants > 60 with comorbidities after 28 days after administration. Vaccine efficacy against hospitalisation was 100% 28 days after administration. Of the South Africa population, 95% of participants had the 501Y.V2 variant, but the vaccine efficacy remained high. 

 

(2) (a) ENSEMBLE was conducted in South Africa, Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru) and the USA.

SISONKE was conducted in the following 17 institutions, from all 9 provinces:

EC: Frere, Livingstone, Nelson Mandela Academic, Netcare Greenacres hospitals

FS: Bongani, Fezi Ngumbentombi, Life Rosepark, Pelonomi, Universitas hospitals

GP: Ahmed Kathrada, Charlotte Maxeke, Chris Hani Baragwanath, Dr George Mukhari, Netcare Milpark, Steve Biko Academic hospitals

KZN: General Justice Gizenga Mpanza, Edendale, Madadeni, Netcare St Augustines, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial hospitals

LP: Tshilidzini, Donald Fraser, Malamulele, Mediclinic Polokwane, Netcare Pholoso, St Ritas hospitals

MP: Ermelo, Life Cosmos, Mediclinic Nelspruit, Mapulaneng, Rob Ferreira hospitals

NC: Mediclinic Upington, Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe hospitals

NW: Job Shimankana Tabane, Klerksdorp-Tshephong Tertiary, Life Peglarae, Mahikeng Provincial, Moses Kotane hospitals

WC: Groote Schuur, Tygerberg, Gatesville, George, Karl Bremer, Khayelitsha District, Paarl, Worcester hospitals.

(b) ENSEMBLE was a multi-national study funded by Janssen Research and Development and others. 

Vaccines for SISONKE were secured by the Department of Health and were administered by teams of researchers and vaccinators. Research staff from the South African Medical Research Council where responsible for ensuring the cold chain and drawing up the correct amount of vaccine. Vaccinators where responsible for complete assessment checks, administering the vaccine and monitoring the participants for a few minutes after administration. END.

04 June 2021 - NW1275

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a full report on the Ivermectin controlled-access programme and (b) how long is it envisaged that the review programme for the applications of patients will take before Ivermectin will be allowed to be used?

Reply:

a) Ivermectin Authorisation Status 25/05/2021

 
           
 

Approved

Rejected

Pending

Duplicate

 

Tier 3: Section 22C(1)(b) - licence holder

8

3

0

0

 

Tier 2: Healthcare Facility Stock

134

40

0

4

 

Tier 1: Named-patient

112

15

0

2

 

TOTAL

254

58

0

6

318

b) The use of Ivermectin in the treatment and prevention of COVID-19 infections received avid interest recently due to the antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. Available data to date, mostly from small under-powered studies, show a trend towards some benefit in the management of COVID-19. National and international bodies have reviewed the data; and have concluded that there is unclear evidence of both benefit and harm, in the treatment and prevention of COVID-19. After consideration of the impact of the second wave as well as the clinical equipoise that was presented through the various studies reviewed, SAHPRA implemented an Ivermectin Controlled Compassionate Use Programme for approved unregistered ivermectin products to be accessed via a three-tier programme for Section 22C(1)(b) permit holders, healthcare facilities, and named-patient applications. On 16 March 2021,SAHPRA registered Soolantra 10mg/g cream formulation, which contains ivermectin. Soolantra Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of moderate to severe inflammatory lesions of papulopustular rosacea in adult patients and is not for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The registration of this product enabled the compounding of ivermectin on a prescription basis for specific patients as well as off label use of ivermectin under the section 21 Controlled Compassionate Use Programme.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1145

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 466 on 19 March 2021, he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed breakdown of the R31 356 005, 33 expenditure relating to a certain company (name furnished) in (a) 2015, (b) 2016 and (c) 2017; if not, why not; if so, by what date? [

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

NO.

FINANCIAL YEAR

DESCRIPTION

COSTS (R)

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

 

2016/17

Educating the public by explaining the process, requirements and qualifications relating to the application for grants in terms section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Call for Applications

R446 092.65

External

 

2016/17

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations : Brand Positioning

R250 000.00

External

 

2016/17

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations :Regulatory Mandate

R1,901 904.00

External

 

2016/17

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Grant Funding Mandate

R45,291.06

External

TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 2016/17

R2,643,287.71

NO.

FINANCIAL YEAR

DESCRIPTION

COSTS (R)

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Supply Chain Management

R179 533.82

External

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Grant Funding Mandate

R10 147 553.06

External

 

2015/16

Educating the public by explaining the process, requirements and qualifications relating to the application for grants in terms section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Call for Applications

R6,469,486.94

External

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act – Operations :Regulatory Mandate

R1 460 009.36

External

 

2015/16

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act – Stakeholder Relations, Marketing and Communication

433 105.38

External

TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 2015/16

R18 689 688.56

NO.

FINANCIAL YEAR

DESCRIPTION

COSTS (R)

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: National Lotteries Commission: Operational Changes

R2,368,544.70

External

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Grant Funding Mandate

R5 849 966,38

External

 

2014/15

Educating the public by explaining the process, requirements and qualifications relating to the application for grants in terms section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Call for Applications

R1,567,772.57

External

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act - Operations: Supply Chain Management

R3,820.96

External

 

2014/15

Promotion of public knowledge and awareness by, amongst others developing and implementing educational and informational measures to educate the public of the Lotteries about the lotteries and provisions pursuant to section 2(5)(a)(i) of the Lotteries Act Operations :Regulatory Mandate

R232,924.45

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 2014/15

R10 023 029,06

04 June 2021 - NW1240

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of a media briefing by the Chairperson of the Road Accident Fund (RAF), Ms Thembelihle Msibi, a few weeks ago when commenting on the RAF’s financial affairs (details furnished) and given that the RAF has begun a turnaround strategy whose implementation began on 1 April 2020, he is in any position to detail the list of service providers found to have been connected to the cases, including the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council for mismanagement of their trust accounts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

Of the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council (LPC) for mismanagement of their trust accounts, only 42 firms (listed below) have as yet not repaid the duplicate payments they received from Road Accident Fund (RAF).

As part of its recovery procedures the RAF withheld further payment to law firms identified as having received duplicate payments. However, a full bench of the North Guateng High Court, Pretoria, delivered judgment on 9 April 2021, in the matter of Road Accident Fund v Legal Practice Council and Others (58145/2020) [2021] ZAGPPHC 173, ordering the suspending of certain categories of writs of execution and warrants of attachment against the RAF, and in its judgment states that it does not believe that the RAF should withhold payments from successful claimants because of a dispute between the RAF and the law firms acting for the claimants. The court indicated that the RAF must instead approach the court on a case-by-case basis.

Consequently, the RAF has brought an Application in the North Guateng High Court, Pretoria, citing the 42 legal firms; the LPC; the Sheriff, Pretoria Central; the Sheriff, Pretoria East; the Sheriff, Centurion East the Sheriff, Johannesburg Central; the Sheriff, Johannesburg North; and, ABSA Bank Ltd. The details of the 42 law firms cited in the Application are as follows:

 

1. Phefadu AP Attorneys with its business address at Suite 407-408, Savelkouls Building, Cnr Paul Kruger & Pretorius Street.

2. CN Phukubje Attorneys with its business address at 83 Albertina Sisulu Street Corner Von Brandis Street Bradlows Building, Works @ Market 4th Floor Offices 405-407.

3. Feke-Myeko Attorneys with its business address at 380 Bosman Street Pretoria.

4. Frans Rabie Attorneys with its business address at 110A Themba Shozi Street, Balfour, Mpumalanga, 2410.

5. Gura Tlaletsi & Partners with its business address at 38 Carrington Street Mafikeng Industrial Mafikeng, North West.

6. KG Mashigo Attorneys with its business address at 58 Marshall Street Marshall Street Marshalltown Johannesburg.

7. Lekopane Khumalo Attorneys with its business address at Office 1, Grongo’s Centre, 40 Mouton Street, Hendrina, Mpumalanga.

8. Letheba Makgato & Associates with its business address at 81 Ampthill Avenue, Suite 2, @nd Floor, Central House Building, Benoni.

9. Mahlangu SV with its business address at 507 Spuy Street, Sunnyside, Pretoria, Gauteng.

10. Makhurupetzi Attorneys with its business address at Suite 106 and 107, First Floor, Olivetti House, Cnr Pretorius and Sophie De Bruyne Streets.

11. Makokga Sebei Inc with its business address at Tudor Chambers Office No 0240 229 Helen Joseph Street Pretoria.

12. Malange Attorneys with its business address at 28 Helen Joseph Street, Suite 107 Church Square Building, Pretoria.

13. Malose Matsaung Attorneys with its business address at 238 Paul Kruger Street, Standard Bank Chambers, Pretoria Central, Pretoria.

14. Maluleka Tlhasi Inc with its business address at 754 Stanza Bopape Street, Eastcliff, Pretoria.

15. Mammile A M Attorneys with its business address at Mammile Law Chambers, 130 Highveld Road, Kempton Park.

16. Matodzi Neluheni Attorneys with its business address at 70 Sutherland Street, Newcastle Central, Newcastle.

17. Mphahlele MR Attorneys with its business address at 17B Biccard Street, Polokwane Central, Polokwane, 0699.

18. Mpho Mashiloane Attorneys with its business address at 38 Marloth Street, Mbombela,1201/ Tarentaal Shopping Center, corner Ou Kaapschenhoop & N4 Nelspruit Office No TA 03

19. Muleya Attorneys with its business address at G06, 1064 Arcadia Street, Hatfield, Pretoria 0083.

20. Musa Baloyi Attorneys with its business address at Mageza Road, Giyani-E, Giyani 0826.

21. Mzamo Attorneys with its business address at Suite 2, 3rd Floor, West Wing Suites, 132 Fox Street, Johannesburg.

22. N.T Ntshele Attorneys with its business address at Suite 325, Bank Towers, 190 Thabo Sehume Street, Pretoria, 001.

23. Ndambakuwa Attorneys with its business address at 200 Pretorius Street, Pretoria Central, Pretoria.

24. Ndlovu Attorneys with its business address at 15A Park Street, Kempton Park Central, Kempton Park, 1620.

25. Nomvula Meyiwa Incorporated / Meyiwa Inc with its business address at 525 Mendelson Street, Cnr Garsfontein & Isie-Smuts Street, Constantia Park, Glenstantia, Pretoria.

26. Nxumalo and Radebe Inc with its business address at Stand Number 265 Elukwatini Crossing, Elukwatini-A, Elukwatini.

27. PM Mositsa Inc with its business address at Lapa Building,380 Bosman Street, Pretoria. 28. PP Milazi Attorneys with its business address at 212 Rahima Moosa Street, Johannesburg 2001.

29. Raleswinga Attorneys with its business address at 523 Stanza Bopape Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, 0007.

30. Ramaselela MC Attorneys with its business address at 100 Pretorius Street, Suite 106 Olivetti House, Pretoria.

31. S Twala Attorneys with its business address at 2nd floor, Mathomo House, 132 Fox Street, Cnr Kruis Street.

32. Shabangu & Beauchamp (Pretoria) with its business address at Shop 15, Bothongo Plaza West, Francis Baard Street, Pretoria Central, Pretoria,0001.

33. Simpsons Attorneys Incorporated with its business address at 77 Troon Road, Greenside, Randburg.

34. T A Matshanda Trust with its business address at Suite 1309 - 1310, 13th Floor, His Majesty Building Cnr Commissioner & Joubert Street, Johannesburg.

35. T Khumalo Attorneys with its business address at Office 6, 17th Floor, Marble Towers, 201 Rahima Moosa Street, Johannesburg.

36. Taute Bouwer & Cilliers Incorporated with its business address at 827 25th Avenue, Rietfontein, Pretoria.

37. TC Rampatla Incorporated with its business address at Absa Building, Suite 208, 250 Pretorius Street, Pretoria Central.

38. K Malao Attorneys with its business address at 3710 Amberfield Valley Capensis Avenue Rooihuiskraal North Ext 24 Centurion.

39. Mouton & Williams Attorneys with its business address at 263,297 Ontdekkers Road, Carenvale, Roodeport,1724.

40. Modibedi Sebele Phethoe Attorneys with its business address at 44 Rooihuiskraal Road, The Reeds Centurion.

41. HC Madike Attorneys with its business address at 13 Jan Kemp Street Pongola Kwazulu Natal and at 235 Helen Joseph Street Suite 303, 3rd Floor Burlington House, Pretoria.

42. Erasmus ELS Inc t/a Erasmus Scheepers with its business address at 172 Bronkhorst Street Nieuw Muckleneuk Pretoria.

The names of the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council (LPC) for mismanagement of their trust accounts, are as follows:

  1. ABRAM PHUTIANE PHEFADU
  2. BALOYI ATTORNEYS
  3. CHUEU ATTORNEYS INC
  4. CN PHUKUBJE ATTORNEYS
  5. ERASMUS ELS INC T/A ERASMUS SCHEEPE
  6. ERWEE ATTORNEYS (MUSINA)
  7. FEKE-MYEKO ATTORNEYS
  8. FRANS RABIE ATTORNEYS
  9. GUMBO & CO
  10. GUR TLALETSI & PARTNERS
  11. HANLIE BRUWER ATTORNEYS
  12. HLUNGWANI TG ATTORNEYS
  13. JACOBS AND MAKWAKWA ATTORNEYS
  14. JD SKHOSANA ATTORNEYS
  15. K MALAO INC
  16. KG MASHIGO ATTORNEYS
  17. KHOROMMBI MABULI INCORPORATION
  18. KOMANE ATTORNEY
  19. LEKOPANE KHUMALO ATTORNEYS
  20. LETHABO MOKOENA ATTORNEYS
  21. LETHEBA MAKGATO & ASSOCIATES
  22. LM MAILA INCORPORATED
  23. M RAMOGOTSWA INC ATTORNEYS
  24. MA MOTHAPO ATTORNEYS
  25. MA MPHOLOANE INC
  26. MADIKE HC ATTORNEYS
  27. MAHLANGU SV
  28. MAHOLOBELA INC ATTORNEYS
  29. MAJA MATSIMELA ATTORNEYS
  30. MAKAU PHEFADU & PARTNERS
  31. MAKHURUPETZI ATTORNEYS
  32. MAKOKGA SEBEI INC
  33. MALAN M ATTORNEYS
  34. MALANGE ATTORNEYS
  35. MALATJI ATTORNEYS
  36. MALATJI MOLOSH & POOE
  37. MALOSE MATSAUNG ATTORNEYS
  38. MALULEKA TLHASI INC
  39. MAMMILE A M ATTORNEYS
  40. MAMOKGALAKE CHUENE ATTORNEYS
  41. MANTON J J S
  42. MASHAPA
  43. MASHEGO P PROKEREURS INC
  44. MASWENENG ATTORNEYS
  45. MATHEKGA ATTORNEYS
  46. MATODZI NELUHENI
  47. MBOWENI MALULEKE INCORPORATED ATTOR
  48. MG MALI ATTORNEYS
  49. MJ MOSIKARI
  50. MMELA MTSWENI
  51. MODIBEDI SEBELE PHETOE ATTORNEYS
  52. MOGAU SETSHOANE
  53. MOHULATSI ATTORNEYS INC
  54. MOKGATLE LESOLE ATTORNEYS
  55. MOKHABUKHI ATTORNEYS
  56. MOLEPO INCORPORATED ATTORNEYS(PTY)
  57. MOLOSI
  58. MOUTON & WILLIAMS ATTORNEYS
  59. MP MNGOMEZULU INCORPORATED
  60. MPHAHLELE MR ATTORNEYS
  61. MPHO MASHILOANE
  62. MT MAKWELA ATTORNEYS
  63. MTSHWENI INC ATTORNEYS
  64. MTSWENI INC ATTORNEYS
  65. MULEYA ATTORNEYS
  66. MUNRO FLOWERS & VERMAAK
  67. MUSA BALOYI ATTORNEYS
  68. MZAMO ATTORNEYS
  69. N.T NTSHELE ATTORNEYS
  70. NDALA ATTORNEYS
  71. NDAMBAKUWA
  72. NDHLOVU BORNVENTURE ATTORNEYS
  73. NDLOVU ATTORNEYS
  74. NDOBELA AND LAMOLA ATTORNEYS
  75. NOMVULA MEYIWA INCORPORATED
  76. NTLOEDIBE ATTORNEYS
  77. NTSHANGASE SS ATTORNEYS
  78. NXUMALO AND RADEBE INC
  79. PJ FAURIE ATTORNEYS
  80. PM MOSITSA INC
  81. PN HLATSWAYO ATTORNEYS
  82. PP MILAZI ATTORNEYS
  83. RALESWINGA ATT
  84. RAMASELELA MC ATTORNEYS
  85. RATSHIVHOMBELA ATTORNEYS
  86. RENE FOUCHE INCORPORATED
  87. ROME ANTHONY IAN
  88. S TWALA ATTORNEYS
  89. SANCHEZ SKOSANA INCORPORATED
  90. SELAMOLELA INC
  91. SELOLO TLOU INCORPORATED
  92. SHABANGU & BEAUCHAMP (PRETORIA)
  93. SIMPSONS ATTORNEYS INCORPORATED
  94. SPRUYT INC
  95. T A MATSHANDA TRUST
  96. T KHUMALO ATTORNEYS
  97. TAUTE BOUWER & CILLIERS INC
  98. TC RAMPATLA INCORPORATED
  99. THINDISA ATTORNEYS
  100. TL KEKANA ATTORNEYS
  101. VAN VELDEN DUFFEY
  102. VAN WYK ATTORNEYS (MARSHALLTOWN)

04 June 2021 - NW1204

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Health

What is the total number of babies who were born to undocumented foreign nationals and/or illegal migrants in government health facilities in each year in the past five years?

Reply:

The Department of Health strives to take reasonable legislative and other measures to achieve the progressive realisation of the right to have access to health care services including reproductive health care in terms of its Constitutional obligations. Section 27 (1) (a) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa states that everyone has the right to have access to health care services, including reproductive health care. Section 27 (3) further states that no one may be refused emergency medical treatment.

The statistics on the total number of babies who were born to undocumented foreign nationals and/or illegal migrants in government health facilities in each year in the past five years is not available as our health facilities do not keep statistics on foreign nationals.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1110

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to Eskom suspending stage two load shedding between 10:00 and 14:00, in order for the nation to mourn the passing of the King on 18 March during the memorial service of King Goodwill Zwelithini, (a) How did Eskom arrive at the decision to suspend load shedding for the memorial service, (b) What criteria were used to arrive at the decision, (c) By whose instruction was the suspension agreed to and (d) What total amount did Eskom spend on diesel fuel to provide uninterrupted electricity supply during the period?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

On 17 March 2021, Government requested Eskom to suspend load shedding for the duration of King Goodwill Zwelithini’s memorial service on 18 March 2021 from 10:00 to 14:00. The System Operator evaluated the request and concluded that this was technically possible without putting the power system at risk and would not result in a higher stage of load shedding either before or after the memorial service.

The following was taken onto account:

  • The stage of load shedding before and after the memorial service would not be increased from Stage 2 load shedding that was being implemented at the time.
  • The load shedding that was being implemented was necessary to ration the remaining fuel at the pumped storage and OCGT power stations, as these resources were running low on diesel and water in the top reservoirs.  The suspension of load shedding would require additional generators at these power stations to be dispatched utilising some additional fuel.
  • The duration of the suspension of load shedding was only four hours.
  • Load curtailment of industrial customers would not be suspended.
  • The suspension of load shedding would take place during the late morning and early afternoon when there was a reduction in demand.
  • The event was considered to be in the national interest and is allowed by NRS048-9, the standard that governs load shedding in South Africa.
  • A number of generating units were expected to return to service that afternoon and early evening.

In order to supply the additional demand due to the suspension of load shedding, the System Operator dispatched four additional OCGTs from 09:42 until 14:10.  These OCGTs supplied 2 404 MWh (approximately R8.5 million) during this period with a maximum output reaching 610 MW.  Furthermore, pumped storage generation was dispatched and supplied an estimated additional 2 240 MWh with a maximum additional capacity of 626 MW dispatched.  Between 12:00 and 14:00, four coal-fired generators returned to service adding 1 935 MW of capacity to the system, although it takes many hours to ramp these generators to their maximum capacity.

Eskom has the technical capacity and expertise to evaluate each situation and make a sound, technical decision.

I trust that the Honourable Member is not opposed to efforts such as these being made, when appropriate and technically possible?

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi Pravin Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

04 June 2021 - NW1182

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Following the recent fire that broke out at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital which saw operations being halted, what is the extent of the (a) damage and (b) disruption caused in the services provided to patients at the hospital; (2) were there any lives lost as a direct result of the fire; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still awaiting information from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, to enable the Minister to respond to this question. The response will be provided to Parliament as soon as information has been received from the Provincial Department of Health.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1256

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What strategies, financially and otherwise, is the Government implementing to ensure that companies retain workers as the country prepares to emerge from COVID-19, given the interruption brought by the COVID-19 pandemic in the employment and labour sector?

Reply:

With the outbreak of the COVID-19, There is now a sense of URGENCY to accelerate implementation of the Employment Services Act, No. 4 of 2014; the UI Amendment Act, No. 10 of 2016, specifically section 5 (d) which provides for the financing of the retention of contributors in employment and the re-entry of contributors into the labour market; the Presidential Jobs Summit Framework Agreement, 2018 with a focus on: (i) protecting jobs, (ii) informal sector support, and (iii) inclusive growth interventions. The COVID-19 pandemic coupled with the advancement in technology presents us as a country with an opportunity to place productivity at the centre of the country’s long-term competitiveness and economic activity and recovery.

The pandemic, which has devastating effects on our socio-economic systems and the labour market is also creating an important opportunity for leadership in government to create an enabling environment and partner with leaders in business and labour to take decisive and urgent action to turn things around.

Over the next ten (10) years (2021 to 2030), Productivity SA strategic objectives and plans will be focused on vigorously unlocking South Africa’s productivity and potential for sustained competitiveness and economic growth as part of our interventions to implement the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, particularly priority areas 2: Industrialisation and Growing the productive economy; and priority area 5: Macro-economic interventions and enablers for economic growth. During this period, our Enterprise Development and Support Programmes will be focused on supporting an Integrated Enterprise Development and Support Ecosystem (government-wide programme in collaboration and partnership with social partners) to create a coherent platform to enhance access and coordination of SMME support to preserve existing job and create productive and decent employment.

The Department has allocated over R104m to Productivity SA whereby the entity implements turn-around strategies and plans to restructure and improve the productivity and operational efficiency of companies facing distress to be sustainable, competitive and create conditions conducive for job retention and creation. Funds have been made available in this regard and for the 2020/21 financial year over R104m was allocated to Productivity SA. Part of the interventions include establishing Workplace /Future forums (committee comprising on management and workers), training and capacitating their members on productivity improvement solutions.

Productivity SA also have a productivity and Competitiveness Improvement Programme which is designed to improve the competitiveness and sustainability of enterprises, targeting small enterprises and cooperatives in the productive sectors of the economy in line with the Sector Master Plans. Overall, 2796 companies were supported through the programme in the 2020/21 financial year, which included emerging entrepreneurs and cooperatives.

There are also targeted interventions through the Workplace Challenge Programme (WPC), with 109 companies mostly in the Special Economic Zones and Industrial Parks assisted and 3 industrial clusters were established in the Forestry, Footwear and Leather, and the Creative sector.

04 June 2021 - NW1334

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 327 on 19 March 2021, wherein he stated that the budget is being reworked based on sponsors being signed and other potential funders and that a cost per team member should be available mid-March 2021, he has now received the updated budget; if not, why not; if so, on what date is it envisaged that he will make the full budget public?

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) indicated that the budget has been updated to provide for only those costs that are essential for the delivery of Team SA to the Tokyo Games. Sponsors have been signed up and more sponsors are being engaged.

Additional costs due to the Covid-19 protocols with regards to the team travel, camp and medical services as prescribed in the Play Books published by the IOC and IPC Book has been considered and factored into the budget.

The original projected budget was R45, 000.000 but with the sponsorships, funding received and revisit to adjust for only those line items that are critical for games delivery, the budget is now well under R20, 000,000.

04 June 2021 - NW1276

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with the (a) full details of the person(s) and/or company that provide funding to the SA Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority and (b) breakdown of the total amounts provided by each funder?

Reply:

The (a) full details of the person(s) and/or companies that provide funding to the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) and (b) breakdown of the total amounts provided by each funder are indicated in the table below:

Full details of the person(s) and/or company that provide funding to the SAHPRA

Breakdown of the total amounts provided by each funder

Clinton Health Access Initiative

R 1 441 170 (Direct donation)

Centers for Disease Control

R 16 739 056 (Direct donation through NDOH)

Public Health Enhancement Fund

R 2 580 000 (Services in kind)

Right to Care

R 94 204 (Services in kind – Office accommodation)

Bill and Mellinda Gates Foundation

R 73 000 000 (Services in kind)

National Treasury

R60 000 000 (Conditional Grant)

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1097

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to his replies to questions 196, 197 and 198 on 5 March 2021, he has now received the information from the National Lottery Commission; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

I have been furnished information of the 3 replies. Below are the supplementary replies received by the Commissioner of the NLC, Ms Mampane:

PQ 196 - Reply from the National Lotteries Commission:

“1 (a) The NLC can fully account for the R13 332 300 that was granted to the beneficiary. With reference to Parliamentary Question 2803, the NLC responded to the direct questions posed by honourable member wherein he enquired specifically around the accountability for funding for workshops and infrastructure.

  • The NLC responded that the amount that was utilised for workshops was R801 000 accounted for as detailed in PQ 2803.
  • In terms of infrastructure, it was confirmed that no infrastructure was funded under this project number.

With respect to PQ 196, the NLC responds as follows:

  • The remaining amount of R12 531 300 was for project activities related to the Cape Minstrels Carnival.
  • The NLC funded the following project activities amongst others Sound and Stage, Transportation, Apparel, Security, Catering and Administration.

(b) The NLC received a progress report from the beneficiary and it was found to be satisfactory and all requirements pertaining to the grant that was made to the organisation have been fulfilled and the project was subsequently closed. The funds were accounted for inline with what was reported in paragraph 1(a) above, therefore no missing funds identified.

(c) There was no funding for infrastructure.

2 (a) Reporting requirements for beneficiaries are contained in the signed Grant Agreement. The NLC received and reviewed the interim and final progress report in line with the signed Grant Agreement. The amounts were spent as indicated in paragraph 1(a) above.

(b) The NLC does not audit the finances of beneficiaries however conduct reviews as stipulated in the Grant Agreement in relation to the funded project. The NLC reviewed all interim reports and final report that were submitted by the beneficiary on the following dates:

  • 13 January 2013
  • 29 April 2013
  • 4 June 2013
  • 24 June 2013
  • 8 August 2013

(c) The NLC found that all reporting requirements pertaining to the NLC grant were fulfilled. This is supported by the letter from NLC to the beneficiary.”

PQ 197 – Reply from the National Lotteries Commission:

“(1)(a) With reference to answer provided to Parliamentary Question 2802, the NLC indicated that an amount of R 5 000 000 was allocated for the building of Carnival Heritage Museum out of a grant of R 27 320 758, 64. The R 22 320 758 was accounted for as the allocation included amongst others the following: Minstrel Carnival Planning; Minstrel Carnival Rehearsal; Minstrel Carnival; and Minstrel Carnival New Year.

(b)(i) R1 700 000.00

(ii) R1 700 000.00

(c) The Cape Town Minstrel Carnival Association.

(2) a) The spending for the project was for the following main line items: Minstrel Carnival Planning; Minstrel Carnival Rehearsal; Minstrel Carnival; and Minstrel Carnival New Year. The total spending was R 27 320 758, 64.

(b) Information on the current rental being paid is not available as the project currently closed and a closeout report was issued.”

PQ 198 – Reply from the National Lotteries Commission:

“(1)(a) The National Lotteries Commission does not audit the financial statements of the funded organisation. It conducts monitoring and evaluations on funded projects and assess the progress reports submitted to ascertain whether the project yielded the envisaged return on that investment. Three (3) reports were submitted by the organisation in question on the following dates:

  • 5 May 2014;
  • 25 June 2014; and
  • 24 August 2015

In terms of the report submitted, a total amount of about R 8 290 000.00 was spent on the magazine. The amount includes amongst others the procurement of transport equipment, marketing costs, printer costs, cost of operational equipment, design and publishing, distribution and logistics.

(1)(b) The report submitted does not provide the number of publication and only quantifies the costs associated with the publishing of magazines

(1)(c) The report submitted does not provide the number of copies printed and only quantifies the costs associated with printing of the magazine

(2) a) The report submitted did not have the copies of each magazine and project. After receipt of a satisfactory progress report, the project was subsequently closed.

(2)(b) The National Lotteries Commission does not audit the financial statements of the funded organisation. It conducts monitoring and evaluations on funded projects and assess the progress reports submitted to ascertain whether the project yielded the envisaged return on that investment. In terms of the report submitted, indicated that a total of about R 5 460 000.00 was spent in conducting the socioeconomic cohesion symposium. The amount is inclusive of all operational costs and personnel costs for the project.”

-END-

04 June 2021 - NW1358

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether, with regard to the preparations of the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) for the coverage of the upcoming 2021 local government elections, and with reference to the mandate and obligations of the SABC as the national public broadcaster to educate and inform the public, the SABC will be broadcasting any practical and specific public education content related to municipal governance, especially with reference to sections 151 to 164 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, as well as its Schedules 4 and 5; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SABC as follows:

Yes, public education has historically formed part of the SABC’s standard elections coverage mandate and will continue to do so during this current election cycle. The SABC News will drive this process from an editorial perspective as has always been the case post democracy with covering and contextualizing the elections, Constitution and functioning of municipalities.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2021 - NW1089

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her department’s presentation on its Third Quarter performance to the Portfolio Committee on Social Development on 17 March 2021, what (a) are the root causes for the 14% performance decline in the Third Quarter compared to the Second Quarter and (b) corrective measures have been implemented to address the 14% decline?

Reply:

National Assembly Written Reply: 1089 of 2021

a) The following are performance areas which contributed to the decline in performance during the third quarter. There has been significant progress made in meeting some of the targets that could not be met at the end of the third quarter:

  • Entity Oversight: At the time of reporting, The Entity Governance and Oversight Framework could not be presented at governance structures as anticipated. DSD Management decided that the framework be finalized using internal expertise. As a result, DSD has since finalized the Framework and it was approved before end of March 2021. The implementation of the Framework will continue in the new financial year.
  • Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E): The Analysis of existing M&E tools within Social Sector Programmes was not achieved at the time of reporting. More substantial work has since been concluded including the draft “as-is report” on all existing M&E tools in the Sector as well as a draft M&E Framework with indicators for 5 priority programmes within DSD.
  • Human Capital Management: The Sector Human Resources Plan was to be presented in the relevant Departmental management structures. The Plan did not serve on time as planned because critical inputs were being incorporated and the targets were also to be presented in the 4th quarter. To date, the Sector Human Resource Plan (SHRP) has been finalised and has been approved by Departmental Management Committee and a forum of all Heads of Social Development on 9 March 2021.
  • Social Assistance: The target of Monthly transfers of funds to SASSA was not achieved, since the DSD does not “transfer’ the funds, but the funds are provided in monthly allocations to SASSA to pay social grants. The Auditor-General has advised that the use of the word “transfer” is inaccurate, which means the target will never be achieved. The DSD has revised the indicator in its 2021/22 APP to address the ambiguity.
  • Social Security: The Regulations to the Social Assistance Amendment Act were not approved for public comment until early January 2021. The Regulations were subsequently published for public comments with the closing date of 24 February 2021. The Regulations were revised and completed based on public comments. The Regulations will be finalised during the first quarter of 2021/22 financial year.
  • Early Childhood Development (ECD): The target to employ 36 111 compliance monitors to monitor the norms and standards and COVID-19 compliance in DSD managed and supported facilities was not achieved. This was due to funds being allocated towards the ECD Stimulus Relief Fund instead of appointment of compliance monitors. However, many ECDs will be supported through the allocated R496 million for the ECD Presidential Employment Stimulus Relief Fund, which seeks to provide employment protection for an additional 80 000 employees in the ECD sector.
  • Families: The Framework for review of the White Paper on Families was not completed due to misalignment between the third quarter APP target and the set process to achieve the annual target. To date, consultations have been completed and the review of the White Paper has been completed.
  • Professional Social Services: The Draft Social Service Practitioners Bill could not be submitted to the Office of Chief State Law Advisor (OCSLA) for precertification due to lack of capacity to support the drafting process at the National office. Provincial departments have assisted with the redrafting of the Bill and the Bill has been submitted to the office of Chief State Law Advisor for Pre-Certification.
  • Population and Development: The annual target of Research report on Youth perception survey on Socio-economic, health, & gender on Impact of COVID19 was not achieved. The appointment of a Research Institution to conduct this study required approval from National Treasury, which was only granted in October 2020. Other procurement and contract management processes had to follow after receipt of National Treasury approval. The remaining time was not sufficient to complete the final study reports as planned. The timelines of the study have been adjusted to ensure that the study is completed in the new financial year.

b) The Department held intensive Programme Performance Review meetings in February 2021 to interrogate the root causes of decline in performance. During these Review Meetings, Management committed to implement various corrective actions to ensure improvement in performance for all areas where targets were not achieved in the third quarter. Preliminary analysis of the year-end performance of the Department shows improvement in achievement of set targets as compared to the third quarter. This improved performance may be attributed to the intensive Branch Performance Review Sessions and corrective actions which were implemented during the last quarter of the financial year.

04 June 2021 - NW1152

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with regard to the Republic’s COVID-19 vaccine procurement that has lagged behind compared to most other emerging countries, his department has made an effort to leverage the Republic’s bilateral cooperation agreements with vaccine producing countries to procure more vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The two major vaccine manufacturing countries are China and Russia. Vaccines require regulatory approval from SAHPRA. Countries cannot be the applicant and have to work through commercial entities to obtain approval. We have been in discussion with a number of companies having obtained marketing approval from the Gamaleya Institute of Russia for the Sputnik vaccine and with Numolux for the Sinovac vaccine. When all regulatory mattera have been attended to, the negotiations will progress further.

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1249

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Given the reality brought to us by the COVID-19 pandemic about the importance of investing in scientific research capacity for pharmaceutical production, what strategies has the Government adopted to boost local research capacity in pharmaceuticals; (2) whether the Government intends to intervene in the pharmaceutical sector to ensure self-reliance in pharmaceuticals; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details of the strategy and (b) is the projected timeline?

Reply:

1. The SAMRC has a variety of grant programs (both internal and through strategic partnerships) that are supporting drug discovery research and development in key health priority areas. These projects are leading to novel drug targets and candidate molecules and include plant-based medicines as well as biologicals such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies.

The Technology Innovation Agency, with funding from the Department of Science and Innovation has established an API Cluster aimed at increasing the capacity of the country to develop the processes and manufacturing capability for the manufacture of active pharmaceutical ingredients. This cluster links innovators at the universities and science councils with industry, including development partners and pilot production facilities. This provides a mechanism to advance new drugs in development by local innovators towards testing and approval. One of the objectives is to synthesise molecules that may have efficacy against Covid to ensure continuity of supply. We are in discussions with international partners round this.

Government, through the Department of Science and Innovation, is a shareholder in The Biovac Institute, which has embarked on an ambitious journey to bring manufacture of vaccine APIs to the country. Biovac has been pursuing a backward integration strategy and has undertaken technology transfers with major pharmaceutical companies to establish the capacity for formulation, fill and finish of vaccines. It is raising funding to expand this capacity and to add a production suite for antigens/immunogens/biologicals. The same applies for Afrigen Biologics. Biovac and Afrigen are, further, developing its own vaccine candidates. Government has also been supporting the CSIR’s efforts to establish GMP manufacture of biologicals using plant production systems. The team are actively working on a concerted strategy to leverage off South Africa’s scientific investments to see if these can translate into products.

There are a number of pockets of excellence in drug discovery and vaccine development research in South Africa, situated predominantly at the universities and science councils. A key bottleneck, however, is the pilot scale manufacture of these under GMP conditions for clinical trials and later commercial manufacture at scale. This is where further investment is required to ensure that the full pharmaceutical and vaccine development value chain is in place in the country.

2. On 2 October 2020, India and South Africa proposed the TRIPS Waiver”, a proposal to suspend intellectual property protections for products and technologies needed for the fight against COVID-19, including vaccines, for the duration of the pandemic. This would involve a temporary suspension of certain rules set out in the Trips agreement, the intellectual property treaty of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The waiver proposal by India and South Africa presents an important opportunity for all governments to unite and stand up for public health, global solidarity, and equitable access through a concrete step at the international level that can provide an automatic and expedited solution to address IP and technology challenges collectively.   The TRIPS Waiver proposal is now gaining support from major drug manufacturing countries.

The Department of Science and Innovation, and Trade, Industry and Competition are developing strategies for the local production of pharmaceuticals, especially the production of the active pharmaceutical ingredients.

Inter-Ministerial Committee on Covid-19 vaccines has a DPME lead Technical Working Group tasked with mobilizing local capacity to deliver the dosages required and building a long-term capability step by step using current capacity from upstream to downstream to prepare for the next pandemic. They are starting by looking at the vaccines already developed and approved and those in the pipeline to determine what they can do locally in ensuring dosages by using a fill/finish strategy and then move to how to build capabilities to enable future pandemic response.

The following are key milestones that have been achieved to date:

  1. Several partnerships established with current and under development Covid-19 vaccines developers (Biological E partnership; ImmunityBio; Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology of Cuba; Greenlight BioScience for technology transfer of mRNA technology; Kentucky Bio-Products; and J&J – already manufacturing locally through Aspen)
  2. South Africa have the following competitive advantages which can be used to build permanent State Infrastructure to enable future pandemic response

      a) South Africa has experienced principal investigators who are employees of universities and Science Councils which is an advantage.

       b) Bioanalytical laboratories e.g. North-West University/DSI – Preclinical Drug Development Platform facility has been developed for this purpose

       c) Ethics related expertise including individuals for the data safety and management board

       d) Existing capabilities locally: CAPRISA, SAMRC, AURUM, DESMOND TUTU, WITS HEALTH, AHRI, and others on the clinical research side

END.

04 June 2021 - NW1185

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

In light of the announcement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, of 27 October 2021 as the date for the local government elections, what are the details of the measures that she intends to put in place to balance COVID-19 restrictions with the opening of political spaces for campaigning?

Reply:

We are carefully monitoring developments with regards to the COVID-19 pandemic. Government has gazetted a number of regulations to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Adjusted levels 1 and 2 of the regulations have opened more space for political activity. While these Regulations are in place, preparations made for the recent by-elections and the upcoming local government elections by stakeholders such as the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), political parties, government, communities etc, must be done in accordance with the provisions set out in the Regulations.

Working closely with the IEC, we have put processes in place in response to challenges that come with a global pandemic. The IEC has recently appointed Justcie Dikgang Moseneke to lead the inquiry into ensuring free and fair local government elections during Covid-19. The salient features of the terms of enquiry for the inquiry are to:

  • Enquire into, make findings and report on, and make recommendations concerning the likelihood that the Electoral Commission would be able to ensure that the forthcoming 2021 general local government elections will be free and fair, in view of –
  1. challenges posed by the COVID 19 pandemic; and
  2. measures promulgated by the government to curb the continued spread of the pandemic; and
  • Indicate additional measures that the Electoral Commission may be required to implement in order to realise free and fair elections within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The IEC is also considering the introduction of an on-line platform to enable the registration of eligible voters.

The regulations may change going forward, depending on the Covid-19 situation, and advice from the Minister of Health and the National Coronavirus Command Council.

04 June 2021 - NW1184

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What has she found to be the ramifications of her publication of a notice in the Government Gazette extending the national state of disaster to 15 May 2021 on preparations for the local government elections

Reply:

The extension of the national state of disaster to 15 May 2021 by implication also extends the Regulations (GN R 480 as published in Government Gazette 43258 as amended) made in terms of Section 27(2) of the Disaster Managent Act, 2002.

The regulations are designed to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and whilst these regulations are in force, preparations made for the local government elections by stakeholders such as the Independent Electoral Commission, political parties, government, communities etc, must be done in accordance with the provisions set out in the regulations.

04 June 2021 - NW1079

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total (a) amount paid by the SA Social Security Agency to recipients who did not qualify for all types of grants in 2020 and (b) value of double dipping where recipients are being paid for more than one grant, essentially taking advantage of the system?

Reply:

a) Normal practice is that SASSA does not pay people who do not qualify for the different type of grants. SASSA only pays recipients who are deemed to have met the qualification criteria for the different types of grants. However, SASSA may under exceptional circumstances end up paying people who do not qualify, where there is misrepresentation from the grant applicant.

During 2020 SASSA detected possible fraud involving the following:

(i) 1 768 SAPO employees who were receiving social grants. The grants were suspended saving SASSA approximately R1.5 million per month.

(ii) 4 726 grant beneficiaries who transacted outside South Africa during the lockdown period when the international borders were closed. The grants were suspended saving SASSA approximately R7 million per month.

(iii) 105 active Correctional Services inmates who were receiving social grants. These grants were cancelled saving SASSA approximately R196 000 per month.

b) The Social Pensions System is configured in such a way that double dipping between different social grants can be detected and prevented. Thus there have been no incidents of double dipping that have been detected within the social grants system administered within SASSA.

The Auditor General of South Africa has identified incidents of double dipping involving the applicants of the special COVID 19 SRD grant who also applied for other COVID 19 relief measures administered by other government entities. While AGSA identified a total of 80 117 cases in the first 3 months of this grant, on confirming information, 25 088 people were identified with a value of R8 780 800 as having received the R350 grant to which they were not entitled. Debts are being raised for these citizens. It should also be noted that, as soon as the anomalies were identified by AGSA, payment of the special relief grant to these clients was stopped, thus limiting the loss to the state.

National Assembly Written Reply: 1079 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

04 June 2021 - NW1118

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) On what date was the last SA Social Security Agency system update to accommodate all grants to be automated, (b) what types of grants need to be captured manually and (c) what is the total number of applications that need to be recaptured manually?

Reply:

(a) SASSA Online Grants application system has been progressively implemented as of 14 September 2020. The system is used by applicants for the older persons grant, child support grant and foster child grant. The system is continuously updated based on feedback that is received from members of the public and system users.

(b) All applications for all social grant types are captured directly on the SOCPEN system during in person applications. However, the online application system does not currently interface directly with SOCPEN and applications submitted online have to be captured manually on the SOCPEN system. The integration between the Socpen system and the online application system is development which is being attended to. The future vision is to ensure that the information provided through the online system is automatically updated to Socpen as it is submitted, for staff only to quality assure the information provided.

(c) A total of 23 732 online grant applications were received since September, of which 21 401 have been captured and processed on Socpen system. The balance are in process.

National Assembly Written Reply: 1118 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….