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23 November 2023 - NW3017

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, in light of the statement by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) at a recent Bloomberg event that private sector investment in the form of private-public partnerships is necessary for the Republic to break out of the negative trend in economic growth caused by poorly performing state-owned enterprises (SOEs) (details furnished), while the IMF research suggests that growth for 2023 is down to 0,3%, and that the Gross Domestic Product is down 3,2 points, which is directly attributable to loadshedding and rail transport problems, he intends to remain resolute in the face of opposition from all fronts and encourage public-private partnerships at all SOEs; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Both the government and Transnet are promoting private sector participation and the introduction of private capital in various projects.

According to the information received from Transnet

Regarding recent statements by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Transnet acknowledges that it has encountered several challenges that have led to a decline in the operational efficacy of the railways and adversely impacted economic growth. The organisation is implementing targeted interventions aimed at resolving the challenges, and as part of this process, aims to improve collaboration with the private sector. Transnet believes that private sector partnerships (PSPs) are critical to our future and will provide the organisation with access to the additional skills, human resources, and capital required to reposition it. Furthermore, the active engagement and participation of various Transnet stakeholders across the work streams of the multi-stakeholder National Logistics Crisis Committee (NLCC), which includes the private sector and industry experts, exemplifies the nascent improvement in collaboration.

Going forward, Transnet' strategy (Reinvention for Growth) identifies private sector collaboration as one of its key levers for enhancing immediate performance and positioning the organisation for medium-term growth. As an essential component of the strategy, the private sector partners will play a crucial role in enhancing Transnet's capacity to execute quality services, develop and/or expand infrastructure, and unlock growth in industries such as mining, manufacturing and agriculture that contribute to job creation and GDP growth.

The rail reform process and the introduction of private train operating companies (TOC) on the freight network are essential components of the improved collaboration between Transnet and the private sector. This liberalisation process will enable the private sector to invest in rolling stock and establish freight railroads, which will have a significant impact on the market structure as TFR will no longer be the sole provider of freight rail services and will face competition from the private sector. In April 2024, the process of integrating private TOC will be formally initiated by inviting interested parties to acquire available slot capacity on the network. In addition, the reform will result in the establishment of a separate rail infrastructure manager, Transnet Rail Infrastructure Manager (TRIM), to oversee the network's management and ensure the equitable allocation of capacity to prospective TOCs. The establishment of TRIM is progressing well, and there is an expectation that the new OD will be established by the end of October 2023.

While most PSPs are long-term initiatives with benefits expected in the next 3 to 5 years, significant progress has been made in the development of these initiatives.

The recent announcement of a partnership between Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) and International Container Terminal Services (ICTSI) demonstrates the organisation's dedication to implementing this crucial lever. Several other initiatives are already in the partner selection process (request for qualification or request for proposal stages), and these include the Container Corridor Operating Lease; the Transnet Engineering Rolling Stock Leasing Company (TE Lease Co); the Ngqura Manganese Export Terminal (NMET) technical solution for the appointment of an EPC turnkey service provider; and Boegoebaai Port and Rail Development.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3617

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether he will furnish Mr G K Y Cachalia with an update on the progress of the deal between Takatso Consortium and SA Airways (SAA) and the projected profit for the 2022-23 financial year, with reference to the R3 billion; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether he has found that no further monies will be allocated by the National Treasury for SAA; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether monies owed to Mango are being utilised in the expansion drive by the SAA; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) On what date will the audited annual financial statements of the SAA be available?

Reply:

1. The progress in the transaction between Takatso Consortium and SAA is as follows:

a) On 25 July 2023, the Competition Tribunal approved the 51% disposal of SAA Government Shares to Takatso with conditions of minority shareholders divesting from Takatso Aviation and SAA not to retrench within 2 years of approval.

B) The subsequent steps are;

  • 1. Aviation Regulatory Process: Apply to relevant aviation regulators for licensing approvals;
  1. Repeal of the SAA Act, 2007: The process has started. The Department is in the process of seeking Cabinet approval for introducing bill in Parliament;
  2. Fulfilment or Waiver of Conditions Precedent: Prior to the transfer of shares, ensure all conditions precedent are either fulfilled or appropriately waived to maintain the legality and integrity of the transaction;
  3. Valuation of SAA: New valuation of SAA is being undertaken considering the lapse of time since the last valuation;
  4. Revision of Transaction Structure: Considering the above valuation exercise, Parties are reviewing the structure of the transaction;
  5. Transfer of Shares: Execute the legal transfer of shares from current shareholder to new strategic equity partner with all necessary documentation;
  6. Establishment of New Governance Structures: Set up new governance structures for effective management and decision-making under the Strategic Equity Partner (SEP). This may involve forming a new board of directors and executive leadership; and
  7. Implementation of Agreed-upon Strategies: Collaborate to develop and implement strategies for the national carrier's growth and development, focusing on areas such as operational efficiency, market expansion, and customer service improvements.

2. The allocation of funds to SAA, similar to other government funding needs has to go through a budgeting process based on Government priorities.

3. The funds of R85 million that was not transferred to Mango, are still with SAA until the Mango business rescue has been concluded. It is not being utilized by SAA for expansion purposes.

4. The audited annual financial statements for SAA for 2018/19 to 2021/22 financial years are currently going through the Board approval processes. They will be tabled in Parliament soon after the Annual General Meeting, scheduled in November 2023.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3797

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Considering that despite the commitment of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that all instruments of the State would be used in the fight against corruption, the National Prosecuting Authority has been forced to go cap in hand to him and the Minister of Finance to ask for more money, what has he found to be the reasons that the criminal justice system is perennially underfunded?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development receives its funding from National Treasury, through a budgetary appropriation process which get voted by Parliament. For the past three financial years (2021/2022, 2022/23 and 2023/24), the NPA received a budget allocation of R4.446 billion, R4.910 billion and R5.407 billion respectively. The above-mentioned allocation includes additional budget amounting to R200 million and R690 million which NPA received in the financial year 2022/23 and 2023/24 respectively, to fund for the Investigative Directorate, contracted specialist prosecution services to assist with complex corruption matters, amongst others. The reasons for inadequate funding for the criminal justice system can be attributed to the country’s limited fiscal resources.

23 November 2023 - NW3309

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

In light of the alleged conflicting views between Members of the Executive, what are the details of the position of the Government on the decommissioning of the ageing coal-fired power stations by Eskom, in favour of incorporating more renewable energy sources in order to claim additional benefits and international funding in the Republic’s Just Energy Transition?

Reply:

The decommissioning of power stations is informed by the age of power stations which have a lifespan of 50 years. In addition, the IRP outlines the decommissioning dates of power stations. The repurposing of the power stations was driven by the fact that, power stations to be decommissioned can be repurposed to integrate renewable energy given that infrastructure is already in place. However, the energy crisis necessitated the review of the decommissioning of the power plants. The review is to enable a just energy transition wherein the power plants will be decommissioned and repurposed once new capacity has been added to the grid. The delays in the decommissioning of the power plants is part of the measures to minimise the impact of the power crisis.

Eskom is expanding the grid to enable connection of renewable capacity that has been approved under respective bid windows in the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme (REIPPP).

Since the outbreak of various conflicts in the North, many countries have indicated that (as SA has) their commitment to the NDC stands. However, each country’s domestic circumstances will dictate the path to decarbonization. This remains SA’s position.

The issue of funding for developing countries transitions, access to renewable technology, and the concrete plans to ensure the transition is/must still require further efforts.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3194

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the exact total monetary value of the security contract awarded to a certain company (name furnished); (2) Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) is on suspension pending an investigation into the involvement of the specified person in the awarding of the security contract and the subsequent embezzlement of funds related to it; what is the position in this regard; if so, which other (a) current and (b) former Eskom executives are under investigation for awarding the security contract?

Reply:

According to information received from Eskom

  1. The emergency transition that led to the appointment of the certain company in July 2022 was allocated a budget of R500 million. The total actual spend was, however, R304 669 040.00 (including VAT).
  2. The certain person was placed on precautionary suspension pending finalisation of Eskom’s internal investigation into the transaction. The scope of the investigation includes all the individuals who took part in the transaction. The investigation is close to being finalised.

.

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3303

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Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he intends to place a temporary moratorium in his department on the recruitment regulation of the Public Service, including the broad-based black economic empowerment requirements, to enable Transnet to recruit skilled personnel, in light of the contribution that poor leadership, crime and a skills shortage had on the current operational crises at Transnet; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

The Cost Containment measures issued by National Treasury on August 31, 2023, to assist National Departments, Public Entities, and Provinces do not apply to Transnet. Nevertheless, Transnet is aware of fiscal challenges and is implementing prudent measures in this regard. There is no moratorium on the recruitment of critical skills in Transnet.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW2810

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What (a) are the relevant details of the (i) sale of the SA Airways (SAA) fleet to FlySafair and (ii) subsequent leasing of the fleet to SAA and (b) total amount was (i) received for the sale of all aircraft and (ii) paid for leasing the aircraft. (2) Whether any assessment was done on the state of the aircraft; if not, why not; if so, who did the assessment and concluded to sell the aircraft?

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA

(1)(a) The record shows that during Coleman Andrew’s tenure as CEO, the Board on 14 April 2000, considered the sale and leaseback of B737-200 aircraft and approved:

  1. The sale of 13 B737-200 ADV aircraft (11 passenger and 2 freighters) to SafAir, or a party nominated by SafAir acceptable to SAA.
  2. That SAA enters a 5 and half year leaseback in respect of each aircraft.

(1)(b) The total amount as per board resolution was.

  1. Each aircraft sold for USD5.5 million.
  2. Lease costs were R686 425 per aircraft per month, subject to changes in interest rates and foreign exchange rates.

2. With regards to the assessment of the state of the aircraft, SAA does not have records for answers to this question. Whilst the airline has the resolutions relating to that period (some 20 years ago) the requirement for record retention is limited to 7 years.

 

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3291

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Phiri, Ms CM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) is the progress to date regarding the sale of the minority shareholders’ stake in the Takatso Consortium and (b) are the reasons that the specified stake in SAA is valued at 10,2% whilst the Takatso Consortium had not made any investment in the national airline?

Reply:

a) Takatso is currently managing the process. Unfortunately, the Department does not have access to information regarding the negotiations with the minority shareholder. However, once the process is completed, Harith, as the majority partner of Takatso, will inform the Department accordingly. 

Furthermore, if the Competition Tribunal approves the divestiture, the public will be informed of the outcome.

b) The stake by the minority shareholder is valued at 10.2% as that was the agreed shareholding by the parties in the Takatso consortium. The investment in the national airline will be made at the close of the strategic equity partner transaction.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacy Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3196

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether reference to Eskom’s plans to update more that 6,6 million prepaid electricity meters before they expire in November 2024 (details furnished), what measures has Eskom put in place to ensure that all electricity meters will be updated by the date of their expiry? (2) Considering that numbers punched into the electricity meters to top up electricity will no longer register after the expiry date of the electricity meters, but will instead lock the device and render it inactive for a certain period, and in view of the fact that Eskom has thus far only managed to update 5 800 of the electricity meters, 0,087% of the total number of electricity meters in the Republic, how does Eskom plan to assist users who are unable to update electricity meters by themselves?

Reply:

According to Information Received from Eskom:

1. As at end September 2023, Eskom had over 6,6 million meters that required recoding with a new Key Revision Number (KRN). A strategy was developed with the following deployment components:

  • The do-it-yourself (DIY) approach which ensures that customers are (i) issued with a pair of KRN key change tokens at the time when the customer purchases their normal top-up electricity or (ii) collects free basic electricity via any of the Eskom-approved vending channels and outlets.
  • Customer support through a comprehensive communication campaign using regional radio live reads, community print and radio notices, radio interviews, newspaper and radio articles, leaflets, posters, Facebook, X posts, YouTube videos, community forums, customer communiques and the Eskom chatbot.

2. The 5 800 meters that were rolled out were part of a pilot programme for Eskom to gather information and insights on how to best implement the project. Following the pilot, Eskom developed, the automatic update process and prepared for project implementation. As a result, Eskom recently completed the first phase of deployment which ran from August 2023 to September 2023 to clear all the initial teething issues. Based on the results of this roll-out phase, Eskom is confident that the project will be successfully implemented. Key change tokens issued during the first phase are 671 653, and this is additional to the 5 800 that were issued during the pilot phase.

Eskom has developed pamphlets on how to recode (step-by-step- guides) the meter in all official languages and also posted step-by-step guides on social media platforms. Furthermore, Eskom personnel are deployed in areas where the roll-out is taking place to assist with queries, and a dedicated queue has been created to direct customers with KRN-related queries at the contact centre. The number to be used is 0860 037 566. Frequently asked questions have been loaded on the Eskom Alfred Chatbot. In addition, Eskom has ensured that additional personnel are trained to assist customers with queries.

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3019

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, in light of the fact that the Transnet Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Ms Portia Derby, allegedly voiced her concerns at a recent Bloomberg event regarding the potential of loss of thousands of jobs in the trucking industry should freight be successfully transferred from the roads to rail (details furnished), he will fire the CEO for the remarks which are arguably tantamount to a gross dereliction of the CEO’s mandate to effect proper rail logistics that enable the flow of commodities to our ports; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

Ms Derby’s comments, which were in response to a question from the floor, related to the huge growth in trucking in SA as result of the poor performance of rail and boom in global coal demand, have been taken out of context. The issue raised was what would happen to the trucking industry when rail returned to full operability. (Please refer to the statement issued by the Chairperson of the Board of Directors in this regard, as attached.)

Ms. Portia Derby has since resigned.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3326

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the reasons that he has failed or has been unable to fill the six outstanding Board vacancies as Transnet has six Board members instead of 12, and it is a concern that a depopulated Board hampers the ability of Transnet to address the serious issues faced by the entity?

Reply:

Transnet has a full complement of Board Members, save for the vacancy resulting from the recent resignation of Mr. P Molefe for personal reasons.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not approved

Melanchton Makobe PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3305

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he has found that the management of the railways, ports and pipelines in the Republic by the unified corporate structure in Transnet, which acts as both infrastructure provider and retailer, is the best business practice; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

There are some countries and regions where the management of the railways and logistics interfaces such as ports falls under one authority, this integrated approach can help improve the efficiency of transportation and logistics. One notable example is China, where state-owned companies like China Railway Corporation (CRC) oversee both railway and port operations. Other countries have varying degrees of integration between rail and port management, depending on their specific transportation and economic needs. These varying degrees of integration could be classified into several models, each with different levels of coordination and shared management, ranging from Full Integration models to Public-Private Partnerships models, or models based on geographical proximity (ports and rail situated closely) and models based on the country-specific regulatory frameworks. Another model is that of independent Operations, i.e. where railways, ports and pipelines remain entirely independent of each other with minimal coordination. While the latter may not optimize transportation efficiency, it could be the result of historical structures, regulatory hurdles, or a lack of incentives for integration.

Examples:

  1. Full Integration: China Railway Corporation (CRC) – high level of integration.
  2. PPP: United Kingdom (e.g., London Gateway Port involves a partnership between DP World and the UK government).
  3. Geographic Proximity: Netherlands
  4. Regulatory Framework: Singapore
  5. Independent Operations: Russia, has a vast geography (historical and logistical reasons for separation).

In terms of Rail

The separation of the infrastructure manager is currently taking place. This will ensure that equal treatment and access are provided to all operators. The objective of the rail reform white paper is to ensure that the infrastructure manager has no bias towards TFR. Transnet is in the process of setting up an Infrastructure Manager outside Transnet freight Rail which is in line with the rail reform process. Private sector operators will therefore be guaranteed unbiased access to the network.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3304

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Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he has found that the National Logistics Crisis Committee that was appointed by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in April 2023, has (a) assisted Transnet to address operational challenges and (b) addressed the concerns of exporters; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Yes,

According to the information received from Transnet

Question

Response

a) How NLCC assisted Transnet in addressing operational challenges.

Transnet Operating Divisions (TFR, TNPA, and TPT) together with Business 4 South Africa (B4SA) technical experts, the private sector, and customers, have formulated Corridor Recovery Teams (CRT) to address Transnet operational challenges.

The operational teams are progressing in implementing governance structures that will assist in the execution of the NLCC’s plans. This has assisted in the development of the Transnet turnaround strategy, which has identified deliverables for each corridor (Coal, Chrome and Magnetite, Iron Ore, and Manganese).

 

In addition to the rail and ports operations, work-stream 1, the following supporting work-streams have been established so far:

Work-stream 5, which focuses on addressing challenges in the procurement system, including local content requirements as well as legislative changes/exemptions to improve efficiency in the freight and logistics procurement process.

  1. Work-stream 7, which deals with securing railway infrastructure, including addressing cable theft and vandalism on the container corridor, the coal line, the ore line, and pipelines.
  1. Work-stream 8, which focuses on communicating the NLCC/Transnet Strategy to the public in a coherent and effective manner, including regular progress updates.
  1. Work-streams 4 & 6 are on the structural rail reform of the freight and logistics system and financing and are yet to have their inaugural meetings.

The workstreams are at an early stage and it is anticipated that significant results in operations will be achieved in 2024.

b) How NLCC has addressed the concerns of exporters

The Corridor Recovery Teams will cover both importers and exporters, and their concerns will be addressed in the Transnet turnaround strategy.

This is still work in progress and further detailed reports will be made public in the next few months.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3631

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Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)       Considering that the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State recommended the appointment of a standing and oversight committee that would host transparent appointment criteria and processes, including independent public nominations, for appointing boards and executives for stateowned enterprises (SOEs) in order to improve governance at SOEs and address the scourge of cadre deployment, what is the reason that the Government has failed to establish the committee in line with the recommendations of the Commission; (2) Whether the Government has any plans to establish such a committee to expedite the appointment of meritorious individuals in SOEs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

13 On 13 September 2023, Cabinet approved the publication of the National State Enterprises Bill in the Government Gazette for public comments. The Bill was published for public comments on 15 September 2023.

In response to the valuable feedback received from public comments, the Department is diligently engaged in the refinement process for the National State Enterprises Bill. The ongoing refinement efforts are specifically aimed at integrating the insightful public comments into the fabric of the legislation. Central to this endeavour is the Department's commitment to crafting a revised Bill that not only addresses the concerns raised during the public commentary period but also establishes a comprehensive and inclusive framework for the appointment of boards within State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs).

The envisaged revisions seek to go beyond a mere legal framework. The Department aspires to codify a board appointment process that embodies the principles of transparency, equity, and fairness. By emphasizing these core values, the Department aims to instil a robust and accountable mechanism that stands as a testament to the commitment to good governance and stakeholder inclusivity.

(2) The envisaged processes for appointing board members to SOEs are expected to be comprehensive, designed to uphold transparency, fairness, and meritocracy. This will necessitate a thorough evaluation of candidates based on qualifications, experience, and alignment with the strategic objectives of the relevant SOEs. The government remains steadfast in its commitment to ensuring that appointments adhere to established legislative frameworks, including the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 (PFMA), Companies Act 71 of 2008, and other pertinent statutes governing SOEs.

The government maintains vigilance in refining and improving existing processes to address challenges and enhance efficiency. Continuous efforts are made to draw lessons from experiences, both domestic and international, adapting best practices in governance.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3776

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

Whether his trip to the 2023 Rugby World Cup in Paris was funded with taxpayers’ money; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) from which budget line item was the money sourced and (b) what is the breakdown of the total costs in terms of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation, (iii) rugby match tickets and (iv) any other specified travel-related costs incidental to the trip?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

23 November 2023 - NW3758

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) was his role at the 2023 Rugby World Cup and (b) were the total costs to the SA Police Service for his (i) accommodation, (ii) travel and (iii) other related expenses?

Reply:

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23 November 2023 - NW3340

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What are the (a) relevant details of the progress that has been made on the (i) establishment of a state-owned holding company to house strategic state-owned entities (SOEs) and (ii) recommendations to retain, consolidate and/or dispose of SOEs and (b) time frames in terms of the establishment and implementation of the recommendations; (2) whether the evidence-based criteria for the restructuring of SOEs have been published; if not, on what date will the criteria be published; if so, (3) whether he will furnish Ms S J Graham with the specified evidence-based criteria; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4460E

Reply:

(1)(i) The Department obtained Cabinet approval to publish the National State Enterprises Bill in the Government Gazette for public comments. The Bill was published for public comment on 15 September 2023 until 14 October 2023. The Bill incorporates Presidential SOE Council (PSEC)'s recommendation that South Africa adopts a centralized shareholder model to improve the management and oversight of South African State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs). This includes establishing a Holding Company (HoldCo) for strategic SOEs.

HoldCo will be established through the National State Enterprises Bill.

(ii) PSEC has reviewed and assessed 37 entities. Furthermore, the business and turnaround plans for 21 entities and 8 Water Boards were reviewed. PSEC has not yet finalised its work.

(b) PSEC is finalizing its report on recommendations of which SOEs to retain, consolidate and/or dispose.

2. PSEC has developed an evidence-based criteria for which SOEs to retain, consolidate and/or dispose.

3. The criteria will be made available when PSEC has finalised its work on which SOEs to retain, consolidate and/or dispose.

4. PSEC will present its report to the President as soon as it is completed. The President will determine when and how the report will be made public.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

23 November 2023 - NW3347

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What value of electricity discounts has been granted to aluminium producer, South32, in each financial year since the 2007/2008 financial year?

Reply:

According to information received from Eskom:

1. Eskom cannot disclose the electricity pricing arrangements, as these are customer confidential and commercially sensitive information. The electricity pricing arrangements for the South32 aluminium smelter were approved by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA). A new tariff structure was approved by NERSA in 2021 and complies with all the provisions of the Interim Long-Term Negotiated Pricing Arrangement Framework issued by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE).

A globally competitive tariff that considered the sustainability of the smelter and Eskom’s cost of supply was structured, as it was recognised that closure would have a negative impact on the South African economy and continue the trend of deindustrialisation and unemployment with which the country continues to grapple with. The tariff approximates the higher end of energy prices that aluminium smelters are paying and covers all applicable variable costs, with an additional contribution made to fixed costs.

In the absence of the smelter, contributions made by it to fixed costs would have to be borne by other consumers, resulting in an increase in other consumer prices. Several of the technical and financial benefits result from the large smelter baseload consumption and the interruptibility made available to the national System Operator that reduces the severity of load shedding.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved/Comments

Adv. Melanchton Makobe PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

22 November 2023 - NW3879

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In the wake of the stabbing of a female student from the Cape Peninsula University of Technology by a male student from the University of Cape Town, what (a) urgent steps have been taken to bring the perpetrator to account and (b) measures have been put in place to solve the issue of the lack of security in tertiary institutions?

Reply:

a) The perpetrator was apprehended until campus security took him away and he was arrested, meanwhile, the victim was rushed to hospital and had emergency surgery and is currently recovering. The accused appeared in court on attempted murder charges and remains behind bars as he awaits a bail application date.

b) University security heads were invited to workshops, wherein gaps in their security protocols were discussed and further insights shared with researchers, USAF, SAPS and CAMPROSA. It was agreed that a security blueprint will be developed for the universities. In addition, it was agreed that security policies to support staff, students and management must be developed and approved by the Councils of all the universities by the end of the financial year.

22 November 2023 - NW3678

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What are the reasons that his department has been failing to meet the target for student enrollment at community education and training colleges since the 2019-20 financial year?

Reply:

The main reasons for low student enrollment at Community Education and Training (CET) Colleges are associated with lack of physical infrastructure including Information and Communication Technology, and inadequate funding. 95% of Community Learning Centres of the Community Colleges operate in Basic Education infrastructure which leaves a very low number of those that operate on their own site.

To resolve this challenge of inadequate infrastructure, the Department has started with the process of acquiring physical infrastructure for colleges. In addition to funding set aside for new buildings, discussions are underway with the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to identify underutilised public buildings for the sole use of CET colleges.

The current funding for CET colleges is R2.8 billion, for which R2.6 billion caters for compensation of employees and R211.6 million for operations of colleges (subsidy). The CET sector is allocated 2% of the total PSET budget. The current allocation is thus unable to cater for the proposed needs of the CET sector.

22 November 2023 - NW3819

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any funds were allocated towards the assurance of readiness of municipalities in handling natural disasters in each province; if not, why not; if so, what is the (a) allocated budget and (b) actual expenditure; (2) what actual work has been done in 2023 to ensure that municipalities are able to handle natural disasters? NW5038E

Reply:

1. No. Preparedness measures are funded by organs of state from their own resources. The NDMC provide support and guidance to organs of state on preparedness measures. (a) Not applicable. (b) Not applicable

2. The actual work that has been done or being done in 2023 to ensure that municipalities are able to handle natural disasters include amongst others the following:

  • Since the beginning of 2023, 8 district municipalities in priority disaster areas have been assessed on the implementation of their disaster management plans and strategies to prevent, prepare for and mitigate disaster risks in terms of the Disaster Management Act. By the end of 2023, a total of 12 district municipalities in priority disaster areas would have been assessed on the implementation of their disaster management plans and strategies to prevent, prepare for and mitigate disaster risks in terms of the Disaster Management Act.
  • From an NDMC’s early warning perspective, support to local municipalities includes the preparation of quarterly seasonal outlooks (issued at the quarterly National Advisory Forum) that provide a forwarding looking prediction of hazards combined with future weather scenarios. This enables short- and medium-term planning to take place at local level. The issuing of monthly drought monitoring updates to provide 6,12 and 36 monthly drought spatial maps allows municipalities to manage the drought hazard with their local geographies.
  • Support to organs of state on the development of response procedures aligned to the South African Weather Service Impact Based Early Warning Table (Level 1-10) This support takes the form of a series of national workshops are being conducted by the NDMC to develop response procedure and decision-making procedures aligned to the 10 levels of the Impact Based Early warning systems for severe weather.
  • Enhancement of collaborative efforts with the South African Weather Service to incorporate other new products and data to improve the disaster management function. This enhancement takes the form of a renewed MoU with the SA Weather service that brings a series of new data and services to understand climate change indicators, better mapping of past incidents of severe weather and improving predictability of hazards based on historical analysis.
  • The continuation of disseminating impact based early warnings weather warning and advisories that informs decision making, response activations and preparedness by local disaster management structure and relevant by stakeholders including communities.

End.

22 November 2023 - NW3820

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details pertaining to the total number of (a) applications received and (b) successful land claims since the establishment of the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights under her department?

Reply:

a) The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights received over 80 000 claims by the 31st December 1998.

b) A total of 83 067 land claims have been settled since inception until 30 June 2023. The higher number of settlement is due to the counting of rights lost per claim as opposed to the number of claim forms lodged.

END

22 November 2023 - NW3679

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What measures has his department taken to address the lack of adequate infrastructure for teaching and learning in community education and training colleges?

Reply:

The Department has started a process of building Community Education and Training (CET) Colleges infrastructure to address the challenges of infrastructure in the sector. One billion rand has been allocated to the Community Colleges for infrastructure over the 2023 MTEF period. The initial plan seeks to build Community Colleges and Community Learning Centres in nine (9) provinces: one in each province. The construction is currently in planning phase with consultants having started with the concept designs. The actual construction is targeted to commence in March 2024.

The Department is also working with Provincial Departments for Basic Education to identify properties that are underutilised so that they can be repurposed for Community Learning Centres.

Furthermore, the Department has developed Intergovernmental Protocols on the use of public school facilities of Provincial Education Departments by Community Learning Centres of the Community Colleges under the Department of Higher Education and Training. The Protocols are meant to manage the current relationship between schools and Centres.

22 November 2023 - NW3764

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1195 on 4 May 2023 relating to the settlement of the Lower Zingcuka Land Restitution claim in terms of which she committed that the land claim will be settled by the third quarter of the 2023-24 financial year, the claim has been settled yet; if not, what is the current status of the claim; (2) whether she still maintains that the land claim will be settled during the current financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date does she envisage to settle the specified claims?

Reply:

1. The processing of the Lower Zingcuka land claim is underway as per the commitment of May 2023. The settlement memorandum was supported by the Departments Quality Control Committee on 12/10/2023 and currently being processed for consideration by the relevant delegated authority.

2. Yes, we remain confident that the claim will be settled during the third quarter of the current financial year.

22 November 2023 - NW3651

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What was the (a) water supply reliability for 2020 and (b) estimated water supply reliability for (i) 2030 and (ii) 2050 for each local municipality, measured against (aa) the population and (bb) megalitre on each day (ML/day); 2. what is the (a) current water treatment capacity and (b) water shortfall per ML/day?

Reply:

The information requested by honourable member is monitored in the national monitoring system as well as the national information system provided for by the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998) and the Water Services Act, 1997 (Act No. 108 of 1997) respectively. DWS is responsible for these national systems as mandated by both pieces of legislation highlighted in the background above.

It is therefore recommended that the honourable member redirect the question to Ministry of Water and Sanitation for the DWS to respond accordingly.

End.

22 November 2023 - NW3639

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With regard to safety at the sites of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) in the Western Cape, what total number of the (a) overhead bridges and (b) underground passenger tunnels on the PRASA rail network were (i) inspected and (ii) deemed unsafe in 2022; (2) what is the estimated cost of repairing all (a) overhead bridges and (b) underground passenger tunnels on the PRASA rail network that are currently in need of repair in order to be deemed safe?

Reply:

1. (a) In the Western Cape, PRASA has a total of 61 Overhead Bridges (excluding the Central Line, which is currently being recovered).

  1. 61 bridges were inspected in 2022,
  2. 6 bridges where recommended the rehabilitation due to their poor condition.

(b) In the Western Cape, PRASA has a total of 38 underground passenger tunnels.

(i) 38 underground passenger tunnels have been inspected,

(ii) 4 underground tunnels are not functional and deemed unsafe.

(2) The estimated cost of:

(a) rehabilitating 6 bridges is R59 million,

(b) repairing underground tunnels is R75,000 per tunnel and R300,000 for the four (4) underground tunnels that are currently non-functional. In the 2023/24 financial year, to date, PRASA has occurred costs of R500,000 in repairing underground tunnels. Vandalism of underground tunnels generally lasts about three to four months and then needs to be repaired again. Each month, there are two to three underground tunnels that PRASA has to repair due to repeated vandalism.

22 November 2023 - NW3259

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date does she envisage that asbestos roofs will be removed in areas such as Heidedal in Bloemfontein, where budgets were allocated to repair the specified houses, yet to date such roofing still exist and pose a health risk to residents?

Reply:

The Free State Department of Human Settlements has already appointed the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) as an implementing agent to undertake the revitalization of asbestos roofs for all asbestos roofed units that were identified during a survey that was conducted in 2015. A total of ten (10) Professional Service Providers (PSPs) have been appointed. The removal and replacement of roofs commenced in August 2023, and all the appointed PSPs have already been assigned work and will be able to cover the entire province. The process is scheduled as a multiyear project. Bloemfontein is also covered in the scope of work.

22 November 2023 - NW3711

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Mkhatshwa, Ms NT to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What are the relevant details of the challenges impacting the University of South Africa?

Reply:

The challenges are explained in detail in two reports that have assessed the affairs of the University, namely the Report of the Ministerial Task Team (MTT) on the Strategic Review of the University of South Africa (2021) and the Report of the Independent Assessor (2022). Some of the key challenges are as follows:

  • Failure by the University to make adequate provision for dramatic change in the profile of the student body, implementing enrolment targets which were unrealistic and, in some cases, even irresponsible, considering the lack of the institution’s teaching capacity.
  • Failure to provide appropriate strategic guidance and direction to a modern Open Distance e-Learning (OdeL) institution in the 21st Century.
  • Failure to address the weaknesses that have frustrated the implementation of its strategic priorities. The weaknesses include dysfunctional and outdated ICT infrastructure which compromised the health of the academic enterprise; collapsed basic assurance services and functions necessary to ensure effective governance; ineffective risk management and control processes; retention of a deeply-embedded culture of non-compliance and impunity; chronic management failures in many of the key support systems such as supply chain management, human resource management, compliance and finance and a gross neglect of consequence management.
  • Failure to establish an enabling and ethical culture, and has allowed an all-pervasive culture of corruption, conflict, fear and intimidation to prevail.
  • Dysfunctionality of the Office of the Registrar, particularly as it relates to student administration, leaving students frustrated. This is compounded exploitation of students by fraudulent tutors because of poor protection of student’s personal information.
  • Lack of appreciation of good governance, as demonstrated by outdated statute, policies and adherence to governance instruments. For instance, the Management knowingly took irregular financial decisions that have had far-reaching consequences for the University, namely the selective salary adjustments to academic staff and some portion of the support staff, the laptop scheme, etc. These were condoned by the Council.
  • For a long time, Council had reduced the delegation of authority (DoA) of management, and in doing so interfered in matters that ordinarily fell within the purview of Management.

22 November 2023 - NW3712

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Sibiya, Ms DP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Considering that funding requirements that align with community education and training colleges (CETs) have been one of the progressive factors concerning the higher education sector, what are the relevant details of the sustainable funding model that has been developed for CETs?

Reply:

In the 2022/23 financial year, the Department developed the sustainable funding model for Community Education and Training (CET) Colleges. The model was implemented with effect from the 2023/24 financial year. The intended outcome of the model is to equitably distribute available funding to Community Colleges taking into account a number of variables including a minimum allocation for basic college operations, enrolment numbers, programmes and qualifications mix, duration of programmes, etc. The model does not provide for any additional funding, it distributes the available budget equitably.

The model estimates that the CET college sector requires R876 million for annual operational activities (subsidy), and this amount excludes employee salary costs. This translates into a 76% funding gap when compared to the allocated subsidy of R211.641 million for the 2023/24 financial year.

22 November 2023 - NW3723

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Police

What are the reasons that the Wesselsbron Police Station remain closed, as it was last open and functioning in 2020, resulting in residents having to walk 7,5 km to the next police station for assistance?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

22 November 2023 - NW3801

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether his department has the relevant details of the total number of students who (a) registered and (b) graduated in (i) Criminal Justice and/or Law and (ii) Forensic Investigations in the (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2023 academic years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aaa) what total number of such graduates in each case have been hired by the Government in each province and (bbb) in what positions were they hired?

Reply:

The head count enrolment of students in academic years 2016–2022 is displayed in Table 1 below, while graduates for the same period are shown in Table 2. The data relates to students who are enrolled in or have graduated from programmes in criminal justice and related programmes.

The numbers for academic year 2022 in both tables are regarded as preliminary.

We are unable to provide information about the work status of the graduates at this moment, but may be able to do so once further tracer studies are conducted.

Table 1:

Field of Specialisation

Criminal Justice and Corrections

Year

Total

2016

13778

2017

15251

2018

15564

2019

17790

2020

23964

2021

23511

2022

29429

Table 2:

Field of Specialisation

Criminal Justice and Corrections

Year

Total

2016

2752

2017

2809

2018

2994

2019

2773

2020

4486

2021

4406

2022

4799

22 November 2023 - NW3713

Profile picture: Yabo, Mr BS

Yabo, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the adoption rate of his department’s digital application that monitors and reports potholes on roads, which is also part of the research and development and innovation interventions of his department to accelerate road maintenance projects of the Government?

Reply:

The PotholeFix application (app) was developed as part of a contractual agreement between the CSIR and the Gauteng Provincial Government. This initiative is a component of a broader strategy to restore road network asset management system in the province, with a focus on optimising maintenance scheduling. Specifically, the app aims to streamline the reporting of incidents and their subsequent status updates. Collaboration between the provincial government and municipalities is crucial for addressing reported potholes promptly.

What makes the app unique is its alignment with the national road maintenance guidelines, providing first respondents with clear insights into the nature and severity of reported pothole. The app’s location-tracking feature ensures that reports are directed to the appropriate road authority. While the potential for nationwide implementation in partnership with other provinces exists, the app is currently operational exclusively in Gauteng. Its reception has been positive, with varying levels of adoption across municipalities. To date, the app has garnered over 12 000 downloads on Android and iOS platforms, contributing to the reporting of more than 9 000 potholes through this platform.

22 November 2023 - NW3935

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) she, (b) the Deputy Ministers and (c) any other official in her department attended the Rugby World Cup final in France in October 2023; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the relevant details of each person in her department who attended the Rugby World Cup, (ii) is the total number of such persons and (iii) were the total costs of (aa) travel, (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other related costs that were incurred by her department as a result of the trip(s)?

Reply:

According to the records of the department: Myself, the Deputy Ministers and any employee of the department did not attend Rugby World Cup in France in 2023, in official capacity.

Nothing prohibited officials to attend Rugby World final in France as it would have been done in their own expenses.

End.

 

22 November 2023 - NW3375

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the relevant details pertaining to the (a) budget allocated for and (b) actual expenditure with regard to (i) travel and (ii) accommodation of employees of her department during visits to accident scenes in the period 1 January 2020 to 1 April 2023?

Reply:

Roads Branch

In terms of the SCOA (Standard Charts of Accounts) guideline from National Treasury, Travel and subsistence includes items such as car rental, air transport, own transport, transport provided, food and beverages, incidental cost as well as special daily allowance cannot be excluded from this item because the official don’t only utilize their own transport as sometimes they would use air transport and then there would be transport provided for them at the airport.

(b) The budget and actual expenditure for the directorate on travel and accommodation for the financial year 2020/21, 2021/22 to 2022/2023 financial year is as per the tables below.

 

2020/21

Item

Budget

Expenditure

 

R'000

R'000

Travel and Subsistence

180

176

Accommodation

78

78

Total

258

254

     

2021/22

Item

Budget

Expenditure

 

R'000

R'000

Travel and Subsistence

585

413

Accommodation

320

83

Total

905

496

     
     

2022/23

Item

Budget

Expenditure

 

R'000

R'000

Travel and Subsistence

625

744

Accommodation

300

231

Total

925

975

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

a) The budget allocation for the financial year(s) 2019 – 2023 is detailed as follows:

2019 – 2020 = R4 435 000.00

2020 – 2021 = R3 990 000.00

2021 – 2022 = R5 833 000.00

2022 – 2023 = R5 681 000.00

2023 – 2024 = R5 695 000.00

b) The actual expenditure with regards to travel and accommodation is broken down as follows:

 

Item Descriptions (Per Sub-Programme / Directorate in that particular FY)

An allocated funds per annum

T&S DOM: Accommodation

R 90 000

T&S DOM: Special Daily Allowance

R20 000

T&S DOM: Food & Beverages

R5 000

T&S DOM: Incidental Cost

R12 000

T&S DOM: Car Rental

R22 000

T&S DOM: Km All (Own Transport)

R17 000

T&S DOM: Km Allowance SMS

R68 000

T&S DOM: Air Transport

R250 000

T&S DOM: Road Transport

R50 000

T&S Foreign: Accommodation

R 70 000

T&S Foreign: Daily Allowance

R25 000

T&S Foreign: Food & Beverages

R20 000

T&S Foreign: Incidental Cost

R15 000

T&S Foreign: Air Transport

R120 000

The above budget allocation details expenditure per item(s). However, the (budget) allocations also cover items such as the Car rental, Incidental cost, Daily allowance, Foreign transport etc. Air transport usually devours the chunk of the money because ninety percent of maritime business is in the coastal provinces.

Be that as it may, when an accident happens, the Maritime Transport Branch /Department of Transport (DoT) refer South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) to the accident scene for investigation. SAMSA is a South African government agency established on 1 April 1998 as a result of the 1998 South African Maritime Safety Authority Act 5. It is in effect the governing authority and as such is required to investigate maritime accidents/incidents & to provide various marine related services both on behalf of Government as well as to Government.

SAMSA would compile a report of the findings that explains in details the cause of the accident and submit it to the DoT. The Executive Authority will then appoint a Court of Marine Enquiry (CoME) in terms of Section 267(1) of the Merchant Shipping Act. The CoME shall consist of the Presiding Officer, Panel Members (a knowledgeable legal committee) and the Clerks of the CoME to further investigate the circumstances that caused the accident.

There is an approved budget allocation for the CoME every financial year to take care of such unfortunate occurrences. The current budget allocation is R924 000.00. This budget is earmarked for the payment of the allowances (remuneration) of the Presiding Officer and other Panel Members in terms of Treasury Regulations 20.2.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACCA)

Local Travel

  1. Budget: R 43 7401.56
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 73 332.40

International travel

  1. Budget: R 251 062.80
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 219 591.71

The number of reported accidents was 98.

FY 2020/21

  1. Budget: R 23,742.26 (budget reduction due to COVID-19)
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 125,947.29

International travel

  1. Budget: Nil
  2. Actual Expenditure: Nil

The number of reported accidents was 97.

FY 2021/22

Local Travel

  1. Budget: R 397 274.04
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 161 080.04

International travel

  1. Budget: R 118 718.40
  2. Actual Expenditure: Nil

The number of reported accidents was 165 (including RPAS accidents)

FY 2022/23

Local Travel

  1. Budget: R 552 360.24
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 195 939.18

International travel

  1. Budget: R 106 088.76
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 62 819.00

The number of reported accidents was 141 (including RPAS accidents)

FY 2023/24

Local Travel

  1. Budget: R 264 970,00
  2. Actual Expenditure (YTD): R 77 221, 58

International travel

  1. Budget: R 110 400,00
  2. Actual Expenditure: R 73 600,00

The number of reported accidents is 75.

Notes and Variables:

These costs cover bookings for flights (economy class), accommodation (3-star rating), car hire and subsistence allowance.

Please note upon receipt of an accident notification, AIID will categorize the accident and at that point make a decision to dispatch or not dispatch investigators to the scene. AIID at times undertakes desktop investigations.

The scope, complexity and location of the investigation determines:

  • The number of employees to be dispatched,
  • The number of days on-site and
  • The need for a follow-up investigation.

Rail Branch

There was no (i) travel or (ii) accommodation expenditure incurred by employees from the Rail Transport Branch.

There were no train accidents that needed officials from the Rail Transport Branch to attend from 1 January 2020 to 1 April 2023.

The country entered Covid-19 lockdown in March 2020, with no train services provided, and to date, with limited services provided, no rail accidents occurred.

Public Transport Branch

Official for the Public Transport branch don’t conduct accident scene visits and therefore the branch not incur any expenditure in this regard

22 November 2023 - NW3800

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether his department has any records of audit outcomes of private institutions of higher learning in the Republic to assess their efficiency and/or compliance with the relevant legislations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reporting by private higher education institutions (PHEIs) and the assessment thereof forms part of the monitoring of the higher education system by the Department of Higher Education and Training (“the Department”). Every year, the Directorate: Registration of Private Higher Education Institutions (“the Directorate”) requests PHEIs to submit annual reports to enable the Department to assess and monitor the level of compliance by PHEIs with respect to their obligations and responsibilities as defined in Chapter 6 of the Regulations for the Registration of Private Higher Education Institutions, 2016 (the Regulations) and Section 57 of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No. 101 of 1997, as amended) (the Act). PHEIS are required to submit their annual reporting information by 30 April each year.

The annual report also includes student data and a ‘snapshot’ of programmes offered as well as student enrolments in the PHE sector. After assessing the annual reports, the Directorate complies a consolidated report titled “Annual Report on the Compliance of Private Higher Education Institutions with the Regulations” and presents this report to the sector and stakeholders in the Post School Education and Training (PSET) sector.

In cases where institutions are non-compliant, the Directorate enters the next stage of supporting the institution to become fully compliant by providing additional guidance and time. If, after exhausting all possibilities for rehabilitation, the institution fails to be complaint, then its registration is cancelled after due legal process is followed. The period and duration for rehabilitation can take anything from 3 to 6 years.

22 November 2023 - NW3435

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the process of drafting the proposed new Animal Welfare Act (AWA), has been put out to public tender; if not, who is drafting the new AWA; if so, (a) what progress has been made with the specified tender, (b) at what stage is the drafting of the new AWA and (c) what timeline does she envisage for the completion of the AWA, including the (i) completion of the drafting, (ii) public participation hearings, (iii) request for submissions thereon and (iv) submission to Cabinet; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. No. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has recently added additional internal capacity in the form of 3 state veterinarians, who are currently handling the animal welfare portfolio; DALRRD will therefore not proceed with tenders for the drafting of the Animal Welfare Bill. The first draft is expected to be completed by March 2024 and the Bill will follow the normal legislation-making process including processing through the relevant Directors General Cluster System; conducting a Socio-Economic Impact Assessment; constitutional certification by the Office of the Chief State Law Advisor; obtaining Cabinet approval to gazette for public comments etc. Thereafter, once Cabinet approval is obtained for the submission of the Bill to Parliament, the Bill will be introduced, and the parliamentary process will apply, including further public participation to be conducted in accordance with the Rules of Parliament.

2.No.

22 November 2023 - NW3808

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department has any measures in place to assess the preparedness of municipalities to handle natural disasters; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the specified measures for each municipality in the Republic, (b) how often are assessments of the measures conducted, (c) when last were the assessments conducted in each municipality and (d) what has been the expenditure for each assessment exercise in each municipality during the past five financial years?

Reply:

Yes, the department has measures in place to assess disaster management plans in their entirety, and this process include the assessment of preparedness measures of municipalities to handle natural disasters.

a) The assessment measures (tools) include the guideline on the “Development and structure of a disaster management plan” that the NDMC developed and published in 2017 (Annexure A). Within this guideline, there is a “Disaster Management Plan Checklist” that is followed during assessments to verify if all aspects of a disaster management plan are addressed in the plan. These measures are uniform and standard measures used when disaster management plans of respective municipalities are assessed. There are no individual or specified measures for each municipality in the Republic, other than the once referred to.

b) Number of assessments determined in the APP Annual Targets are undertaken/conducted on a quarterly basis. These include continuous engagements with municipalities whose disaster management plans / preparedness measures are assessed to address gaps identified during the assessments.

c) The last assessments were undertaken during quarter 2, July – September 2023.

d) There is no expenditure incurred as the assessments are undertaken inhouse by the NDMC officials.

End.

22 November 2023 - NW3666

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he has instituted an investigation and/or project management audit during the tenure of a certain person (details furnished) of the Services Sector Education and Training Authority; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation is empowered by the Skills Development Act (Act No.97 of 1998) (Act) to perform certain functions, such as Section 14(A) to issue a written instruction if :

(a) the SETA is not performing any of its functions or not complying with its service level agreement;

(b) the SETA is not managing its finances in accordance with this Act;

(c) the SETA’s membership is not representative of the constituencies contemplated in section 11; or

(d) the SETA has not prepared and implemented an employment equity plan as contemplated in section 20 of the Employment Equity Act, 1998 (Act No. 55 of 1998).

Another empowering provision is section 15 of the Act, to take over the administration of SETA after consultation with the National Skills Authority and the SETA in question, direct the Director-General to appoint an administrator to take over the administration of a SETA or to perform the functions of a SETA if :

(a) the SETA fails to perform its functions;

(b) there is mismanagement of its finances;

(c) its membership no longer substantially represents the composition contemplated in section 11;

(d) the SETA has failed to comply with its service level agreement, or (e) the SETA has failed to comply with an instruction issued by the Minister in terms of section 14A.

Since the appointment of the Accounting Authority in 2020, the Minister of Higher Education, Science, and Innovation has not invoked these provisions in respect of the Services Sector Education and Training Authority.

22 November 2023 - NW3734

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Police

Whether a police station will be opened in Wonderkop, North West, in light of the high crime rate in Marikana; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date will the police station open and (b) what are the details of the time frames that have been put in place in this regard?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

21 November 2023 - NW3446

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the Thusong Service Centre (TSC) Programme, which was established by Cabinet in 1999, what are the reasons that there are only 121 fully functional TSCs out of the 197 TSCs in the Republic; (2) (a) by what date(s) will the 72 TSCs that are currently non-functional, be fully functional, (b) in which provinces are the specified TSCs located and (c) what total number of persons were depending on the services provided by the TSCs; (3) what are the reasons that currently there is no national department co-ordinating and leading the TSC Programme; (4) what are the reasons that the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs has not assumed the role of the national department leading and co-ordinating the TSC Programme as per the recommendations of a report by the Department of Public Service and Administration; (5) (a) by what date will or has her Office been designated to lead and co-ordinate the TSC Programme and (b) what will be the role of her Office?

Reply:

The 2006- 2014 Business Plan set out the operationalization guidelines which sought to assist provinces in a decision to delist Centres if they do not meet the set functionality criteria. These include amongst others:

i) A Centre that does not have any anchor department(s) present or services points (e.g., Home Affairs, SASSA) within 1km radius.

ii) A Centre’s infrastructure conditions are in a bad state and pose a health hazard or in state of collapse and might endanger people lives in contravention of the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

iii) Lack of ICT connectivity in the area as a permanent challenge.

iv) A Centre has been vandalised or destroyed during community protests.

(2) (a) By what date(s) will the 72 TSCs that are currently non-functional, be fully functional.

REPLY:

The Provincial Intersectoral Steering Committee (PISSC) to undertake extensive consultation process prior to a decision to re-list a Centre back to functionality. Furthermore, coordinating departments are required to prepare provincial business plans to guide the roll -out and management of the Thusong Service Centre Programme in their respective Provinces as guided by District and Municipal Plans.

(b) in which provinces are the specified TSCs located.

REPLY:

In terms of the GCIS database, the delisted Thusong Service Centres due to non-functionality are spread across the nine (9) provinces.

(c) what total number of persons were depending on the services provided by the TSCs.

REPLY:

Currently, there is no data in response to the total number of persons who are dependent on the services provided by the TSCs.

(3) What are the reasons that currently there is no national department co-ordinating and leading the TSC Programme:

REPLY:

The Thusong Service Centre Programme is still being coordinated by the GCIS since the inception of the Programme as Multi-Purpose Community Centres (MPCC) in 1999.

(4) What are the reasons that the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs has not assumed the role of the national department leading and co-ordinating the Programme as per the recommendations of a report by the Department of Public Service and Administration:

REPLY:

The Steering Committee which comprised of the DPSA, GCIS, DCoG, DPWI and National Treasury developed a Situational Analysis Report. The Report recommended that the Programme would be best situated at DCoG, due to its footprint in the Local Government Sphere. However, DCoG advised that they do not have the capacity to assume the role of leading Thusong Service Centre’s.

(5) (a) By what date will or has her Office been designated to lead and co-ordinate the TSC Programme and (b) What will be the role of her Office?

REPLY:

Currently there is no date that has been determined to ensure the lead and co-ordination of the Thusong Service Centre Programme by a designated lead department. NW4578E

END

21 November 2023 - NW3855

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Tobias, Ms TV to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What are the details of the other institutional capabilities required in her Office to enhance its implementation, planning, monitoring and evaluation, and research capacity? [

Reply:

In keeping with the mandate of DPME, additional capacity is required to improve the country’s development planning system and implementation towards improving the country’s development outcomes. This includes modernising the planning system through improving capacity in areas of planning innovation, including macro-economic modelling, complex adaptive systems modelling, foresighting, scenario planning and futures thinking as well as using new technology such as Artificial Intelligence. Improving the planning system further requires experts in sector planning, including in new and emerging areas such as climate change, as well as the relevant policy analysts and researchers.

Additional institutional capacity will ensure that medium-term and short-term planning instruments address current weakness and gaps in the national planning system. This includes ensuring that planning instruments are inter-governmental in nature and are able to combine a sustained programmatic and predictable approach with a more flexible and agile approach, particularly in response to shocks and shifts in the environment and enhance the effectiveness of achieving developmental goals.

Additional professionals are also required to ensure the implementation of the National Spatial Development Framework (NSDF), to improve the spatialization of planning across spheres of government and state-owned enterprises and integrate of spatial planning in the overall planning system. This capacity will be essential in underpinning more effective spatial transformation in South Africa.

21 November 2023 - NW3847

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

With regard to the role of her Office to monitor the implementation of the District Development Model (DDM), what (a) internal organisational restructuring has her Office undertaken in order to provide support for the DDM in line with its mandate and (b) additional costs have been incurred that can be directly attributed to the DDM function in her Office? [

Reply:

(a) The DPME did not perform any internal organisational restructuring to support the DDM but we did however allocate the support functions to existing posts. The reduction of the Compensation of Employees budget in the last few years due to re-prioritisation in 2019 and this financial year also did not provide scope to restructure the DPME.

(b) No additional costs were incurred as the functions were performed within the existing budget.

21 November 2023 - NW3854

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Mothapo, Adv MR to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What mechanisms are in place to ensure that private sector business players contribute to the planning phase of government programmes to ensure mutually reinforcing investments for job creation and economic growth? [

Reply:

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP) was developed in consultation with the business sector and other social partners in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC). Government has continued to collaborate with business in developing Industrial Master Plans in different sectors and in addressing pressing challenges such as the availability of electricity, improving logistics networks and addressing crime and corruption, including economic crimes.

The development of the Draft Medium-Term Development Plan (MTDP) for 2024-2029 involves the whole of government, experts, think tanks and non-state sectors, including the business sector, to ensure that it addresses the current socio-economic challenges. The institutional arrangements for the development of the MTDP include an Inter-Governmental Steering Committee and a Reference Group. The Reference Group consists of non-state sectors, including academia, business, labour and civil society as well as development partners. The key objectives of the Reference Group are to provide expertise, representation, feedback, and facilitate consensus building throughout the process of developing the draft MTDP. By doing so, the Reference Group will enhance the quality of policy decisions, promote inclusivity, and foster effective and sustainable governance. These representatives will actively contribute the perspectives and concerns of their respective stakeholders, including business and the private sector, ensuring a comprehensive and well-rounded approach in shaping the draft MTDP.

Apart from the Reference Group, further consultations with business will be held on the MTDP.

21 November 2023 - NW3020

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether the National Treasury has approved funding for the Special Intervention Programme on Overcrowding in Schools (SIPOS) programme; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what is the projected cost of the SIPOS programme?

Reply:

1. Treasury has not yet provided funding for the programme and there hasn't been progress thus far.

2. The submitted cost then was based on 13 465 required additional classes at the cost of R4 914,725.000.00

21 November 2023 - NW3700

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Mbinqo-Gigaba, Ms BP to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How did her department solicit inputs from the ordinary members of the public regarding the Early Childhood Development delivery model and (b) on what date does her department envisage the implementation of the model?

Reply:

1. The Department has done quite substantive consultations on the new Service Delivery Model both through internal and external structures. The Inter-Sectoral Forum, which is co-chaired by the Department as well as by civil society is the formal structure through which the Department engages with civil society on matters related to ECD. The Inter-Sectoral Forum is also replicated at a provincial level, which allows provinces to further engage with stakeholders at a local level. The ECD Service Delivery Model was thoroughly engaged through these structures. Similarly, the Service Delivery model was also consulted through the National Inter-Departmental Committee. The Department has now developed its 2030 Strategy, and various communication activities are being planned to enable rigorous engagement in the Strategy. This will entail holding an online dialogue in collaboration with the National Education Collaboration Trust, as well as partnering with the National ECD Alliance, SA Congress and Resource and Training Organisations to support an initiative called “The Big Conversation”. This will entail all our implementing partners having conversations on the ECD strategy with ECD practitioners and ECD programmes to solicit their input on the Strategy.

21 November 2023 - NW3837

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1)In light of the dismal performance of the National Development Plan (NDP), what is the rationale for continuing to use the NDP as a guiding framework for national development; (2) whether there are any plans to revise and/or adapt the NDP to better meet the changing needs and/or circumstances of the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? [NO5059E]

Reply:

1. The NDP provides a long-term perspective on the attainment of the democratic, non-racial, non-sexist and prosperous society anticipated in our Constitution and, as such, will remain our lodestar.

The NDP laid down a broad roadmap for South Africa to address and deal with the broad objectives of eliminating poverty, reducing unemployment, and reducing inequality by 2030. As these objectives, as identified in the NDP, remain relevant and applicable, we will continue to apply the development approach of the NDP, which is rooted in good governance, economic transformation, social cohesion, a just transition to more sustainable development pathways, and a bias in favour of the poor. You will concede, I trust, that these are objectives that every nation addresses to some degree and as a nation that has the added responsibility of undoing centuries of inequality, we recognise that the rationale remains

(2) As the basic rationale for maintaining the NDP as our lodestar remains, there is no plan to rewrite it. It is not the NDP that is the problem, it is the fact that it has not been sufficiently implemented. Now is the time to reinvigorate the implementation of the NDP so that it is effective. We need to include and involve the rest of the social partners more deliberately and work at forging a renewed consensus for NDP implementation. This will require all of us to focus on what is in the best interests of our country.

21 November 2023 - NW3701

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Moroatshehla, Mr PR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Noting that inclusive learning, training and availability of sufficient teachers with specialised capabilities for inclusive education are critical to support learners with various conditions, (a) how are the Funza Lushaka recipients encouraged to take subjects on inclusive education in their initial training and (b) what total number of teachers are produced for inclusive education through the Funza Lushaka bursary support?

Reply:

Noting that inclusive learning, training, and the availability of sufficient teachers with specialised capabilities for inclusive education are critical to supporting learners with various conditions, (a) how are the Funza Lushaka recipients encouraged to take subjects on inclusive education in their initial training, and (b) what total number of teachers are produced for inclusive education through the Funza Lushaka bursary support? 

RESPONSE: 

Teachers with specialised capabilities for inclusive education are teachers who possess the skills, knowledge, and mindset to effectively address the diverse needs of all students in their classrooms. Inclusive education aims to embrace and accommodate learners with varying abilities, backgrounds, and learning styles.

Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree programmes can vary among different Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), however, all institutions know the importance of preparing future teachers to work in diverse classrooms and therefore include elements of inclusive education and training in the programme content.  Covering topics such as understanding diverse learning needs, creating inclusive classrooms, and implementing strategies to support students with varying abilities.   Modules or courses relating to special education introduce future teachers to the basics of working with students who have disabilities.

  • The Funza Lushaka bursary recipients are encouraged to take inclusive education subjects through the prioritisation of subjects such as Braille, SASL and other Neurodevelopmental Needs such as Autistic Disorder, Severe and mild intellectual disorders, etc.
  • To continue to encourage the students, through the Funza Lushaka Bursary, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has reserved an amount of R100 000 per student to encourage students with disabilities to acquire assistive devices in accordance with their disabilities.
  • On the other hand, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) is working with HEIs to encourage them to introduce inclusive education subjects, as most HEIs do not have them in their curricula, so when DBE encourages the intake of those subjects, student teachers should find them in those institutions.

(b) Through Funza Lushaka, we offer three inclusive education specialisations 1. SASL, 2. Braille, 3. Neurodevelopmental Needs. But only 16 students registered for SASL.  The other subjects had zero enrolments.

21 November 2023 - NW3619

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What number of public servants were found to be doing business with the state in the (a) 2020-21; (b) 2021-22 and (c) 2022-23 financial years and (d) what was the value of the business in respect of each public servant doing business with the State; (2) which government departments are the specified public servants employed in; (3) what action has been taken against the public servants?

Reply:

(1)(a) Number of public servants who were found to be doing business with the state in 2020-21 financial year is 484. Out of this number 8 officials were appointed in the state entities in an official capacity.

(b) Number of public servants who were found to be doing business with the state in 2021-22 financial year is 181.

(c) Number of public servants who were found to be doing business with the state in 2022-23 financial year is 366.

(b) The value of the business in respect of each public servant conducting business with the State can only be determined after finalization of a court process where the court will pronounce on losses.

(2) The following are the government departments in which the specified public servants are employed:

National Departments

Provincial Departments

1. Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2. Basic Education

3. Correctional Services

4. Employment and Labour

5. Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

6. Health

7. Higher Education and Training

8. Human Settlements

9. International Relations and Cooperation

10. Justice and Constitutional Development

11. Military Veterans

12. Mineral Resources and Energy

13. National Treasury

14. Office of the Chief Justice

15.Office of the Public Service Commission

16.South African Police Service

17. Statistics South Africa

18. Social Development

19. Tourism

20. Traditional Affairs

21. Water and Sanitation

KwaZulu-Natal

1. Community Safety and Liaison

2. Education

3. Health

4. Office of the Premier

5. Transport

Gauteng

1. Community Safety

2. Education

3. Health

4. Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

North West

1. Community Safety and Transport Management

2. Education and Sports Development

3. Health

4. Office of the Premier

5. Public Works and Roads

Eastern Cape

1. Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2. Health

3. Office of the Premier

4. Provincial Treasury

4. Social Development

5. Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

6. Transport

Limpopo

1. Education

2. Health

Mpumalanga

1. Education

2. Health

3. Public Works, Roads, and Transport

Free State

1. Education

2. Health

3. Police, Roads, and Transport

4. Social Development

5. Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

Northern Cape

1. Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2. Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

3. Education

4. Economic Development and Tourism

5. Health

6 Social Development

Western Cape

1. Education

2. Health

3. Provincial Treasury

(3) The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) monitors the implementation of the prohibition on public servants who are conducting business with the State through the Central Supplier Database (CSD). Upon receipt of the report from the CSD, the DPSA forwards a list of identified public servants to the departments in which they are employed. These departments are required to provide the DPSA with progress made on implementing the prohibition, including on action taken against those public servants who were found guilty of conducting business with the state.

Based on the reports received, the following varied action were reported to have been taken against public servants:

  • Final written warnings.
  • Contract were terminated.
  • Dismissal
  • Some public servants were appointed after the transactions for which payments made had already occurred, as a result no sanctions were imposed against them.
  • Other public servants resigned from their departments before their hearing could commence.
  • Most of the cases are still under investigation and the DPSA constantly make follow ups on the progress from the affected departments.

The DPSA formed a Task Team with the South African Police Service and National Prosecuting Authority to assist departments to act against employees conducting business with the State. Seven (7) public service employees employed by SAPS were charged and convicted of conducting business with the State under Section 8 of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014. These employees were dismissed from SAPS.

END

20 November 2023 - NW3810

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What are the relevant details of how his department contributed to the (a) creation of youth employment and (b) support of youth entrepreneurship to curb rising poverty rates in the past three financial years?

Reply:

The Department registers more than1 million work seekers, provides career counselling to more than 300000 work seekers, and has placed about 60000 work seekers into employment, annually. For the period ending September 2023, 69% (32 816) of work seekers placed are young people aged 15-35 years and 31% (14 687) aged 36 years and above.

Through job creation investments the COIDA has created 1,325 additional jobs. The CCMA also assisted with the prevention of job losses. Between April 2023 and October 2023 more than 6000 jobs were saved.

Productivity SA’s Competitiveness Improvement Services (CIS) programme enhances the appropriate capacities of SMMEs and Co-operatives, targeting those in the productive or priority economic sectors to adopt world-class productivity enhancement best practices, focusing on products, processes and people. In Quarter 1 of 2023/24, CIS supported 420 enterprises within 20 districts contributing to 3500 jobs. Trained a total of 667 Entrepreneurs, managers and workers, and capacitated 247 Productivity Champions.

The UIF through Labour Activation Employment Programmes has placed 8 523 beneficiaries into employment opportunities and over 5 723 are youth and people belonging to vulnerable groups.

Labour Activation Programme is continuously placing beneficiaries in pursuit of the UIF annual target of 75 000 job opportunities for the 2023/24 financial year.

The Department also co-ordinates the Pathway management network, and contributes more than R 372 million annually to this process.   Through the Pathway management network, more than 108,061, earning opportunities have been secured by youth, during the first quarter of 2023. Through the Youth Employment Service, which is a private sector initiative, more than 10695 youth secured workplace experience opportunities, through the revitalised youth service, more than 47000 youth gained insight into different fields of work. In collaboration with the Department of Higher Education and Training the Pathway Management Network has placed more than 16437 TVET graduates in opportunities.

Activities relating youth entrepreneurship, is also provided by the Department of Small Business Development and the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA).

20 November 2023 - NW3725

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, in light of the Constitutional Court ruling between Constance Mogale and Others v Speaker of the National Assembly and Others, her department had taken any steps in the North West to make way for the reconstitution of the traditional councils; if not, why not; if so, (a) what steps and (b) by what date does she envisage the elections of traditional councils will be held?

Reply:

Yes, the Department has taken steps to make way for the reconstitution of traditional councils which have recognised traditional leaders.

a) In February 2022, the COGTA Ministry published the formula for determining the number of members of Traditional Councils (TCs) as required by the Act. However, in January 2023, traditional leaders requested that the published formula be reviewed which led to provinces not being able to finalise the constitution and therefore not meeting the legislated timeframe of 31 March 2023. To address traditional leaders’ concerns, and as empowered by the Act, section 63(4)(c) Intervention Plan was developed to ensure that the TCs can be constituted and the implementation of the plan has commenced. As part of implementation of the Intervention Plan, on 12 May 2023, I convened a meeting of all Houses of Traditional and Khoi-San Leaders as well as the MECs to address traditional leaders’ concerns on the current formula.

At this meeting it was resolved that the National House of Traditional and Khoi-San should consult all houses of traditional and khoi-san leaders to make proposals on the formular. The Chairperson of the National House called a Xivijo meeting from 23-24 October 2023 to discuss among others, the formula options and for traditional leaders to make their recommendations in this regard. Arising from the recommendations made at the Xivijo, I have now formally written to all MEC’s and Provincial Houses to consult them on the formula options that have been proposed.

b) Our intention is to gazette the new formula by the end of this calendar year. We envisage the elections of traditional councils to start being held in January 2024.

End.