Questions and Replies

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23 May 2022 - NW1400

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What plans have been put in place to relocate persons living in hostels to a decent residential area in order to restore their dignity and discontinue the legacy of apartheid which placed black persons in crowded inhumane environments?

Reply:

The Department has a programme called the Community Residential Units (CRU) which provides grant funding to provinces and municipalities for the upgrading, conversion, or complete redevelopment of existing government owned rental stock, including hostels. It is a 100% subsidy funded programme that targets low income persons and households earning below R3 500 per month who are unable to access existing formal private rental options. The CRU programme provides family oriented accommodation typologies which usually comprises of separate bedrooms and living areas as opposed to previous hostels which were designed with the intention of housing single sex migrant labourers. The programme is available to all provinces and municipalities with hostels that are publicly owned.

23 May 2022 - NW145

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the process regarding the appointment of the next Chief Justice of the Republic, he received any correspondence and/or input, in any format whatsoever, from the deployment committee of any interested party regarding the specified deployment committee or party’s preferred candidate(s) for appointment to the specified position; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

No. I did not receive any correspondence in any format whatsoever.

END.

23 May 2022 - NW1398

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to the weak structures which were highlighted by the recent floods on Kwazulu-Natal, what measures have been put in place to ensure that people are not made to live in weak, dangerous structures called homes?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements ensures quality control by insisting that all housing projects be enrolled with the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) which is a regulatory body of home building industry that was established in 1998 in accordance with the provisions of the Housing Consumers Protection Measures Act, 1998 (Act No. 95 of 1998). Its mandate is to protect the interests of housing consumers and to ensure that builders comply with the prescribed building industry standards. This enrolment protects housing consumers from any unscrupulous home builders who deliver substandard houses, shoddy workmanship and poor quality products.

It should also be noted that floods in the Province not only affected Breaking New Ground homes but also other forms of homes and houses including high-income residential units and general infrastructure as a consequence of prolonged high rainfall.

23 May 2022 - NW1394

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has any plans to support local fertiliser production companies especially those that produce mono-ammonium phosphate; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) amongst others; regulates the manufacturing, distribution, importation, sale and use of fertilizers in terms of Fertilizers, Farm Feeds, Agricultural Remedies and Stock Remedies Act, 1947 (Act No. 36 of 1947).

To be able to manufacture, import, sell and export; the mono-ammonium phosphate fertilizer must be registered in terms of the said Act. Thus, DALRRD provides support to local fertiliser production companies by ensuring that the mono-ammonium phosphate fertilizers they produce are registered in terms of the said Act to enable them to sell and export the products.

23 May 2022 - NW784

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will provide Mr N P Masipa with the details of the communal areas in (a) Northwest and (b) Northern Cape in terms of the (i) number of dipping tanks for sheep and cattle, (ii) districts and/or areas where they are located, (iii) distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities, (iv) details of the dipping committees and (v) frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) North West Province (pages 2-4)

(i) 23 dipping tanks for cattle. There are no dipping tanks for sheep.

(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Please refer to Table 1 below.

(ii) Northern Cape Province (pages 4-11)

(i) 96 dipping tanks for sheep and 1 dipping tank for cattle.

(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Please refer to Table 2 below.

TABLE 1: NORTH WEST PROVINCE

Categories

No. of Dipping Tanks

  1. Districts

Local

Village

(iii) Distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities

(iv) Details of the dipping committees

(v) Frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years.

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Ditloung

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Mayaiyane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Seatlhane1

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Seatlhane2

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Manthe

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Tlapeng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Matsheng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Longaneng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Morokweng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Dikhwiting

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Molelema

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Graspan

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Khudutlou

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Mothanthanyaneng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Kokomeng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Ga-modisenyane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Tlakgameng Tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing

Mofufutso2

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Mofufutso tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing

Middleton B

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Middleton B tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Mogosane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Mogosane tibal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Makhubung

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Makhubung tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Tsetse

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Bakwena tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Setlhwatlhwe

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong bo Ratlou tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Madibogo

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong bo Ratlou tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

TABLE 2: NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

Categories

(i)No. of Dipping Tanks

(ii)Districts

Local

Village

(iii)Distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities

(iv)Details of the dipping committees

(v)Frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Ditshoswaneng

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Mapoteng

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Seoding

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

2

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Batlharos x 2

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Maruping

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Witputs

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Legobate

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Galotlhare

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Gadiboe

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Ezperanza

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Gantatelang

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Lophalaphala

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Tshukudung

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Vergenoeg

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Permonkie

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Kamden

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bushbuck

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bailybriths

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Itireleng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Kikahela

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Motlhoeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bothetheletsa

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Matlhabanelong

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Zaneen

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Tamros 1

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Dikhing

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Colston

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Pietersham

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Zero

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Tokolaan

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 1

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 4

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 3

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 5

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 7

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 8

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 9

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk2

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Deerward

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Heuningvlei

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Greenwich

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Halifax

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Hove

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Conway

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Tauton

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Deal

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Harrow

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Makhubung

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Shalaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Tsiloane

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Leeds (

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Perth

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Glyde (Sesipi)

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Berwick

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Madibeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Abbey

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Eiffel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Klein Eiffel (Avon)

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Argyle

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Tay

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Sark

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Cahar

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Deurward

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Magwagwe

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Slough

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Padstow

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Laxey

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Rooipomp

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Garapoana

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Gamokatedi

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Gapitia

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Cattle

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Occidental Range

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Deurham

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Bendel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Battlemount

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Gamorona

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Magobing

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Shipton

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Ellendale

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Fairfield

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Mathanthanyan

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Maketlele

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Kokfontein

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Radiatsongwa

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Cardington

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Logaganeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Metswetsaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Molapotlase

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Kgabetlwane

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Dithakong

     

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Segwaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Cassel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Danoon

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Gahuwe

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Glenred

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Bothithong

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

23 May 2022 - NW264

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether invigilators have been paid their salaries for the December 2021 examinations period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All Provincial Education Departments have paid their invigilators, except for two PEDs, where there are outstanding payments. In the case of the Western Cape, 22 of the 2007 invigilators that were appointed have not been paid. The 22 outstanding payments emanate from administrative issues relating to incorrect banking details, awaiting deceased estate details, and individuals blocked on Persal due to different reasons. In the Eastern Cape, 594 of the 1192 invigilators have not been paid, due to incomplete or late submission of documents by the invigilators. However, this has now been finalised and the outstanding payments were made.   

23 May 2022 - NW1367

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date does she envisage that her Department will provide housing to the community of ward 8 in Kagisano-Molopo Local municipality, following empty promises that were made to the residents by the specified municipality in 2016?

Reply:

The Department including the North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements, is not aware of such a commitment made by the municipality. However, the Department will engage communities, and municipalities in order to undertake the necessary pre-planning and detailed planning processes, construct houses and thereafter allocate to qualifying beneficiaries.

23 May 2022 - NW163

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he and/or his department ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

  1. No
  2. (b) and (c), Falls away

END

20 May 2022 - NW1671

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the outreach events of the SILAPHA Wellness Intervention Programme in May and/or June 2021, wherein SILAPHA was planning two awareness campaigns but had cancelled the events due to heightened COVID-19 restrictions, (a) where were events scheduled to take place and (b) what alternative interventions did SILAPHA put into place, given that this was also a heightened period of crisis in which artists were finding themselves?

Reply:

a) The two events were scheduled to take place in KwaZulu Natal and the Eastern Cape

b) A call centre has been established to assist creatives and athletes around the clock as they require assistance with the services provided by the Silapha Wellness programme. Different social media platforms have been provided where artists and athletes are able to interact with experts in the area of mental health; financial management etc.

Interventions were also made through the Silapha Ambassadors who use their social media platforms to engage the creatives and athletes on the work done by Silapha and for them to ask questions and get direct response/assistance from Silapha counsellors.

20 May 2022 - NW1797

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has put measures in place to protect vulnerable farm workers in Ward 02 Blinkwater in the Emakhazeni Local Municipality and Ward 05 SIS Farming Group areas in the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

  • Inspections were conducted on employers mentioned above Blinkwater and SIS Farming group on the 18 August 2021 and 26 April 2022 respectively.
  • Inspections were conducted on Basic Condition of Employment Act guided by Standard Operating Procedure of the Department of Employment and Labour
  • Employers will again be inspected after 12 months to monitor compliance, as guided by Standard Operating Procedure of the Department of Employment and Labour
  • However re-active inspection can be conducted on request

20 May 2022 - NW1553

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date will a bridge be built in Valdezia, Makhado, Limpopo, where the community is left stranded when it rains, as the bridge is the only entrance to Mphombo Block in Valdezia?

Reply:

Makhado Local Municipality (MLM) is currently constructing the culvert bridge and the progress on the 3rd of May 2022 is as per pictures below. According to MLM, the completion date is the 31st of May 2022.

A group of people working on a construction site

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceA picture containing ground, outdoor, sky, stone

Description automatically generated A picture containing ground, outdoor, dirt

Description automatically generated

20 May 2022 - NW1191

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she intends to intervene to implement relief measures for the residents of BelaBela in Limpopo, who have had to deal with stinking, brown, dirty water for a period of over two weeks without any intervention from the municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the intervention?

Reply:

Water Service Authorities (WSAs) are required to monitor the quality of drinking water as per the South African National Standard 241 (SANS 241). The SANS 241 is a drinking water specification that provides the minimum requirements for potable water to be considered safe for human consumption. These requirements include microbiological, chemical and physical properties of water.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) monitors the management of drinking water quality compliance by WSAs and further engages the WSAs where non-compliance is detected. WSAs are required to register for the monitoring programme on the DWS’s Integrated Regulatory Information System (IRIS). The monitoring program indicates the sampling point, frequency of monitoring and what determinants are monitored. All the drinking water quality results must be uploaded on the IRIS as required.

According to DWS, DWS has resuscitated the Blue Drop Certification Programme which aims to address the challenges associated with the provision of water. This programme seeks to implement a proactive drinking water quality risk management approach to ensure that quality failures are minimised, but when and where it inevitably occurs that acceptable responses are implemented to safeguard affected communities.

In the event of non-compliance to provide access to potable water, section 63 of the Water Services Act, No. 108 of 1997 provides, among other things, as follows:

“(1) If a water services authority has not effectively performed any function imposed on it by or under this Act, the Minister (Minister of Water and Sanitation) may, in consultation with the Minister for Provincial Affairs and Constitutional Development (then), request the relevant Province to intervene in terms of section 139 of the Constitution.

(2) If, within a reasonable time after the request, the Province—

(a) has unjustifiably failed to intervene; or

(b) has intervened but has failed to do so effectively, the Minister (Minister of Water and Sanitation) may assume responsibility for that function to the extent necessary—

      1. to maintain essential national standards;
      2. to meet established minimum standards for providing services…”

In light of the above, it is suggested that this parliamentary question be redirected to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS).

 

20 May 2022 - NW1497

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

In light of the fact that despite the commitments by the Government and Eskom to fix the electricity supply and the fact that the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research statistics show that loadshedding and/or power outages in the Republic have steadily worsened over the past 14 years; what are the (a) reasons that the stability of the Republic's electricity supply worsened instead of improving over the past 14 years and (b) details of Eskom’s plan for reversing the trend of increasing hours and energy outages?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) Eskom’s Generation fleet is unreliable and unpredictable because its plants have been run for over 10 years at exceptionally high utilisation factors, with less than adequate maintenance. there has been insufficient investment in maintenance as a result of inadequate ENERGY capacity and years of tariffs that were not reflective of prudent and efficient costs. Together with inadequate capacity on the system, this unreliability and unpredictability has led to load shedding and this also means that the risk of load shedding remains if there are more breakdowns than predicted in the base planning scenarios.

b) A reduction in the risk of load shedding depends on two factors. Firstly, an additional 6 000MW is required to be commissioned. This is being driven by the DMRE. Secondly, Eskom needs to improve the reliability and predictability of the coal fleet. This requires adequate financial resources and “space” on the system to execute the required additional reliability maintenance. To achieve this, Eskom is driving the Generation Turnaround Programme that includes focussing on the Seven Strategic Initiatives that include the 2035 Strategy, the 9-Point Plan and the Reliability Maintenance Recovery Programme.

In addition, special programs to deploy experienced personnel to assist power station managers, and a mentoring and training program is also being put in place to improve operational efficiency.

the negative impact of criminality, corruption, sabotage and fraud must also be taken into account. urgent law enforcement measures must be put in place to combat this.

please be assured that the management is very aware that agility, accountability and responsiveness is critical to the more efficient operation of plant.

20 May 2022 - NW1741

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of persons have died due to suicide in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021 (i) in total and (ii) broken down in terms of (aa) gender and (bb) age; (2) what plans, programmes and/or awareness training has his department put in place to address the issue of suicide and mental health?

Reply:

1. According to the time periods stated by the question, the information is currently not available because it being handled by various bodies such as those that are responsible for population register and as such the department does not keep this information. Stats-SA which is the health entity supporting us in this area of work, has the report on the official statistics as regards to intentional self-harm (suicide) by gender and age up to 2018. This means that the report for 2019,2020 and 2021 is not yet available.

2. The Department is implementing a number of interventions in collaboration with other stakeholders to address factors that increase the risks for suicide including prevention, education and early intervention. Among others these include:

  • The Department has established a training programme for professional nurses and medical doctors on clinical mental health since 2018/19 to enhance early detection, diagnosis, treatment, referral and rehabilitation of mental disorders at Primary Health Care.
  • Screening for mental health has been included as part of health care package of services at primary health care to bolster early identification and intervention services
  • The Department is continually educating the public on mental health issues using various platforms with special emphasis in July on mental illness and October on mental health, on annual basis to increase public awareness on mental health issues that can contribute to suicide as well as where the public can access mental health services.
  • Mental health has been integrated into Integrated School Health Programmes to ensure early identification through screening and referral of learners that need further assessment and management.
  • Mental health is being included in the package of services that are rendered by Community Health Care Workers to ensure integration of education, early identification and referral at community level
  • The Department is funding the South African Federation for Mental Health to provide mental health advocacy and health promotion interventions. Since COVID-19 the organisation has utilised the funding to run a mental health information and support desk to strengthen access to information on mental health including how and where to access mental health services
  • The Department if working closely with the Higher Education and Training sector through providing support to Higher Health organisation to strengthen mental health interventions among students in higher education institutions.

END.

20 May 2022 - NW1560

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date will mass lights be installed in Ward 6 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality?

Reply:

Moses Kotane Local Municipality (MKLM) provided for installation of high mast lights in Ward 6 in its current 3-year capital budget plan and 2021/22 Integrated Development Plan. According to MMKLM, MKLM installed high mast lights in Motlhabe village in Ward 6 this financial year and has planned to install high mast lights in Mapaputle and Molorwe villages in Ward 6 in the 2022/23 financial year by the 30th of June 2023.

20 May 2022 - NW1633

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What (a) number of officials in his department (i) are currently subjected to disciplinary action, (ii) have been suspended, (b) is the job title of each specified official, (c) are the reasons for disciplinary action and/or suspensions being instituted against each official and (d) are the reasons that none of the aforementioned cases have been finalised; (2) for how long have the specified officials been suspended; (3) whether the specified persons have been receiving a salary; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the total Rand value of the salaries paid to the specified officials? [NW1959E]

Reply:

I am advised by the Department as follows:

(1) There are 3 (three) officials who are undergoing disciplinary action and 1 (one) official who was suspended.

No

(a)(i)

Disciplinary action

(a)(ii)

Suspension

(b)

Job Title

(c)

Reason for disciplinary action and/or suspension

(d)

Reasons for non-finalisation

1

Yes

No

Deputy Director

Failure to fully disclose financial interest

The audi alteram partem letter was issued and the official’s representation is pending.

2

Yes

No

Chief Director

Alleged fraud

The notice still to be served. The identified witnesses were not cooperating to prepare for the hearing. The Department of Agriculture is being requested to release the witnesses.

3

Yes

No

Director

Incompatibility/ Insubordination

The matter was postponed by the Chairperson and could not be set down expeditiously until the Promotion of Access to Information Act application was finalised. The appointed external Chairperson could not continue with the matter and a new Chairperson had to be appointed. The matter is scheduled for 25 and 26 May 2022.

4

No

Yes

Cashier: Financial Accounting

Alleged fraud

The matter is under investigation. However, the official resigned on 4 March 2022, with his last working day on
31 March 2022. The new employer was informed and the outcome is pending the findings.

2. The official was suspended for four (4) working days with effect from 25 March 2022, he resigned on 4 March 2022 and his last day with the Department was 31 March 2022.

2. Yes, the official was suspended with full pay and received R3,712.51 as part of his monthly remuneration during the period of his suspension.

-END-

20 May 2022 - NW1185

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What is the outcome of the investigation conducted at Tswelopele Correctional Centre in Kimberley, following an incident which led to the injury of correctional officials, death of two offenders and suspension of 17 officials; (2) whether trauma management has been provided to officials who face daily acts of terrorism from offenders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Indeed, there was a security incident at Tswelopele Correctional Centre on 05 March 2022, wherein one (01) official was injured and two (02) offenders died. It can be confirmed that eight (08) and not seventeen (17) officials were immediately placed on precautionary suspension pending outcome of the investigation. The investigation has been finalised and consequence management is to be applied following departmental protocols including the review of suspensions.

2. Trauma management is provided to the officials who are exposed to acts of violence from offenders. Trauma counselling is provided by the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) officers of the Department.

END

20 May 2022 - NW1328

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to (a) CAS 551/04/2018, (b) CAS 220/11/2019, (c) CAS 150/8/2019, (d) CAS 133-10-2015 and (e) CAS 40/10/2019, (i) what are the reasons that (aa) the prosecution process has taken so long and (bb) some of the specified cases were withdrawn without informing the complainants and (ii) on what date(s) is it envisaged that some of the cases will be on the court roll?

Reply:

In response to the questions above, the National Prosecuting Authority has informed me as follows:

1. Orlando CAS 150/08/19

It was declined to prosecute the matter, as the case docket contained very scant evidence. Mr Tshepo Mhlongo, provided a very cryptic statement where he mentioned that he is the lawful owner of a certain property and alleged that Sibusiso Duma and his two brothers are collecting rent. The accused denies this allegation. The decision to decline a prosecution was made on 11 December 2019. The Investigating Officer was informed that he may re-submit the case docket once further admissible evidence that objectively supports the allegation made by Mr Mhlongo is obtained. Up to date, no such evidence has been obtained.

2. Orlando CAS 220/11/2019

The matter is on the court roll as prosecution was instituted. This matter is partly heard and Mr T Mhlongo is again the complainant herein. The State of Disaster that existed, the non-availability of Legal Aid South Africa, the absence of accused on more than one occasion, the non-availability of the docket and the non-functioning of the court recording machine are cited as reasons for the number of remands. The matter was remanded to 22 April 2022 for continuation of the trial. The Presiding Magistrate came from another court to attend to the partly heard matter, but unfortunately the matter could again not proceed due to a faulty recording machine. The case was subsequently remanded to 21 June 2022 to court “A” for hearing further evidence. The State’s case is not closed yet as the Investigating Officer still needs to testify.

3. Orlando CAS 551/04/2018

This matter involves the brother of Mr T Mhlongo who is called Lincoln Mhlongo. This matter was finalised on the 29 August 2019 wherein the accused was found guilty of assault and sentenced to twelve (12) months imprisonment which was wholly suspended for five (5) years.

4. Orlando CAS 133/10/2015 (with Orlando CAS 513/04/2019)

These matters are being dealt with at the Office of the Deputy Public Prosecutor (DPP) under DPP ref 10/2/4/3-306/19 and as per the latest correspondence to the South African Police Service (SAPS) Provincial Head, Gauteng Detectives dated 30 March 2022, it is clear that there are still investigations outstanding and a return date of 14 April 2022 is stated for an update from SAPS side. SAPS is supposed to advise the DPP’s office on the appointment of an expert who will do a voice comparison.

5. Orlando CAS 40/10/2019

The complainant is also Mr T Mhlongo. This case is also on the court roll after prosecution was instituted. On 07 May 2021, warrants of arrest were authorised against the two (2) accused. As warrants of arrest were issued, it is unclear when the warrants will be executed as this function falls within the ambit of SAPS.

6. None of the cases mentioned above were withdrawn.

20 May 2022 - NW1646

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total amount of her department’s budget has been spent on (i) infrastructure development and (ii) maintenance in the past five financial years, (b) percentage of the specified budget was spent on dealing with the COVID-19 virus, (c) total amount has been spent on drainage and flood alleviation measures and (d) total amount (i) of the infrastructure grants has eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality received in the past five financial years and (ii) has been returned to the National Treasury in each specified year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) is administered by the Department of Cooperative Governance with the aim of developing infrastructure to provide poor households with at least a basic level of service. Municipalities have been allocated R15,6 billion in 2021/22 that is aligned to the municipal financial year that will end on 30 June 2022.

Municipalities have reported expenditure on the MIG over the last 5 years 2016/17 - 2020/21) as follows:

Financial year

Transferred

Spent by receiving municipalities

% spent against transferred

2016/17

14,914,028

13,784,509

92.40%

2017/18

15,891,252

14,545,025

91.50%

2018/19

15,287,685

13,831,893

90.48%

2019/20

14,816,103

11,720,688

79.11%

2020/21

14,491,065

13,226,723

91.28%

Total

75,400,133

67,108,838

89.00%

Disaster Grant contribution to Infrastructure Development (NDMC):

Funding allocations have been done from the Disaster Grants within the NDMC to augment resources of affected organs of state regarding infrastructure development: The funds were allocated from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant, Provincial Disaster Relief Grant and Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant mainly in addressing the drought conditions in affected provinces and municipalities. The allocations were as follows:

Financial years

Type of grants

Amounts transferred

Purpose of allocation

2017/2018

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R341 373 000

Drought interventions: Infrastructure

 

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R78 000 000

 

2018/2019

Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant

R 1 025 484 000

 

2019/2020

No disaster grant allocations

 

2020/2021

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R138 489 000

 

2021/2022

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R 173 132 000

 
 

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R48 100 000

 

Total (infrastructure development)

R1 804 578 000

 

(ii) According to the MIG Framework, which stipulates the conditions under which the funds allocated to municipalities must be used, indicates that funds for the maintenance of roads must be in line with the maintenance priorities identified through the Rural Roads Asset Management System (RRAMS) administered by the Department of Transport. Although this provision has been made within the MIG no maintenance on roads maintenance has been funded form the MIG within the last 5 years.

(b) MIG receiving municipalities reported that:

- In 2019/20 MIG allocations were reprioritised in April 2020 to address Covid-19 related areas. The expenditure reported on projects was R204 million.
- In 2020/21 (period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2022) MIG receiving municipalities reported expenditure of R609 million.

Disaster Grant allocation to Covid-19 response measures

Financial years

Type of grants

Amounts transferred

Purpose of allocation

2019/2020

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R 466 392 000

Covid-19 response measures

2020/2021

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R150 970 000

 

Total (Covid-19)

 R617 362 000

 

(c)

Financial years

Type of grant

Amounts transferred

Purpose of allocation

2016/2017

No disaster grant allocations

 

2017/2018

Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant

R26 147 000

Interventions to sinkhole formation conditions

   

R16 304 000

Interventions to storm damages

 

2018/2019

 

R200 654 000

 

2019/2020

No disaster grant allocations

 

2020/2021

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R157 137 000

 

Total (flood and storm damage interventions)

R400 242 000

 

(d) (i) The total amount of R14,7 billion was transferred to the eThekwini over the last 5 years and (ii) R909 million had to be returned to the National Fiscus.

The eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality has received various grants (conditional and unconditional) from the national fiscus over the last five years to assist with infrastructure development. They are:

  • Municipal Emergency Housing Grant
  • Neighbourhood Development Partnership Grant
  • Integrated National Electrification Programme (Municipal) Grant
  • Energy Efficiency and Demand Side Management Grant
  • Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant
  • Public Transport Network Grant
  • Urban Settlements Development Grant
  • Integrated City Development Grant

Financial tear

Grants received

 

Actual Expenditure reported

 

Total unspent

Approved Rollover

Amount to be returned

2016/17

2,976,972

2,948,818

28,154

28,154

2017/18

3,036,370

2,700,090

336,280

554

335,726

2018/19

2,984,325

2,482,135

502,190

2,662

499,528

2019/20

3,189,069

3,120,680

68,389

32,449

35,940

2020/21

2,515,345

2,497,398

17,947

8,528

9,419

Total

14,702,081

13,749,121

952,960

44,193

908,767

National Treasury

(ii) The total amount of R908.7 million was recorded as unspent conditional grants by the National Treasury (this amount has since returned to the NRF). This amount excludes the grants allocated for operational purposes, unconditional grants, indirect grants and the rollover approved amount of R44.2 million. 

20 May 2022 - NW1765

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What number of doctors have not been paid by his department of health in each province, (b) for what period have they not been paid and (c) in what province has this occurred; (2) whether doctors have been paid overtime; if not, (a) in what provinces are overtime payments outstanding and (b) for how long have overtime payments been outstanding; if so, in what provinces doctors have been paid overtime?

Reply:

Honourable Member, this information is not readily available at the National Department of Health but is with the provinces. The National Department of Health is therefore consulting with all the Provincial Departments of Health to source the full details on this matter. The Minister will provide the Honourable Member and Parliament with the response as soon as the details have been received from the Provinces.

END.

20 May 2022 - NW1465

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Which organisations benefitted from the (a) R50 million directed to the Solidarity Fund, (b) R10 million set aside for food and hygiene hampers and (c) R150 million Relief Fund to assist struggling non-profit organisations to keep afloat; (2) Whether any of these beneficiaries were pro-actively funded; if not, why not; if so; what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The funding made available to the Solidarity Fund, like that of all donors, are not ring-fenced to individual projects. The reports of the Solidarity Fund, setting out its work is obtainable from its website at https://solidarityfund.co.za/

In respect of the National Lotteries Commission (NLC), the following information has been provided:

  • the NLC approved micro pro-active funding of R 10 Million for basic and essential hygiene goods, food parcels and cooked meals to assist the most vulnerable groups. To ensure that the approved funds reach affected citizen, the funds were allocated to fifty-four (54) organisations across the country. The above intervention assisted in providing immediate relief programme to affected communities.
  • The NLC concluded that many Non-Profit Entities (NPEs) were at a brink of collapse because of the nation-wide lockdown. The NLC approved further funding of R 150 Million to assist NPEs to stay afloat. The fund targeted mainly the operational cost of the organisations. In order to ensure that the approved funds yield the envisaged return, the funding was divided into two categories:

(1) R 100 Million will fund operational cost for the qualifying NPOs and

(2) R 50 Million will be for macro projects that will assist in cross-functional relief programme nationally.

(b) The list of organisations that received R10 million for food and hygiene hampers is attached as Annexure A.

(c) The list of organisations that received R150 million for relief fund to assist struggling non-profit organisations to keep afloat and cross functional relief programmes is attached as Annexure B.

In terms of the Covid Fund Relief, R145 799 864 was allocated from the R150 million. There was a saving of R4 200 136 from the amount that was approved. Details of the beneficiaries and different categories have been attached in Annexure B.

-END-

20 May 2022 - NW1728

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) length of tenure to date and (b)(i) annual remuneration and/or (ii) cost to company of the current Board of Directors at Transnet in each year?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

The information as requested is reflected in the table below. The cost in terms of question (b)(i) and (b)(ii) is the same and therefore depicted as (b)(i) in the table.

Member

Date of entry

Tenure

(a)

Annual remuneration FY2018/19
R 000

(b)(i)

Annual remuneration FY2019/20
R 000

(b)(i)

Annual remuneration FY2020/21
R 000

(b)(i)

PS Molefe (Chairperson)

May 2018

4 years

1 078

1 278

1 278

LL Von Zeuner

May 2018

4 years

647

777

840

DC Matshoga

May 2018

4 years

566

671

575

UN Fikelepi

May 2018

4 years

485

675

671

GT Ramphaka

May 2018

4 years

472

656

671

FS Mufamadi

May 2018

4 years

550

671

671

AP Ramabulana

May 2018

4 years

472

575

575

ME Letlape

May 2018

4 years

517

671

834

FY2021/22 annual remuneration figures will be issued following finalization of the audit and other governance approvals.

20 May 2022 - NW1536

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What remedial action has been taken by her department to assist local and provincial governments to strengthen the (a) Provincial Disaster Management Plan and (b) District Disaster Management Plan in order to better respond to the changing climate?

Reply:

(a) Provincial Disaster Management Plan (s)

It is encouraging to note that all provinces submitted their disaster management plans to the NDMC. Following submission of the plans by these organs of state, the NDMC assesses them to check amongst others the following:

  • Level of compliance with the Disaster Management Act of 2002, other relevant legislative frameworks, policies and bylaws.
  • Alignment with the guidelines on “development and structure of a disaster management plan”.
  • Whether these plans incorporate disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation measures for inclusion into sector programmes and projects as required for by the priorities and targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030).

The NDMC further provides written feedback as well as hold engagement sessions on this feedback with provinces through Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs) as the custodians of these plans.

(b) District Disaster Management Plan (s) 

It is encouraging to note that 38 District Municipalities and 7 Metropolitan Municipalities submitted their disaster management plans to the NDMC. Following submission of the plans by these organs of state, the NDMC develops the “municipal support schedule” in line with the APP project to “provide support to a number of municipalities in priority disaster areas to prevent, prepare and mitigate disaster risks through implementation of applicable disaster management plans”. In line with the developed Support Schedule, the NDMC assesses these identified disaster management plans to check amongst others the following:

  • Level of compliance with the Disaster Management Act of 2002, other relevant legislative frameworks, policies and bylaws.
  • Alignment with the guidelines on “development and structure of a disaster management plan”.
  • Whether these plans incorporate disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation measures for inclusion into sector programmes and projects as required for by the priorities and targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030). 

The NDMC further provides written feedback as well as hold engagement sessions with municipalities and PDMCs in the provinces within which municipalities whose disaster management plans were assessed belong. The NDMC further developed the “Support Plan” to assist and guide municipalities to address identified challenges prohibiting them to develop fit-for-purpose disaster management plans. Also, the NDMC developed “Guidelines on the integration of DRR, IDPs and DDM-One Plans of each District and Metropolitan Municipalities”. Both (Guidelines and the Support Plan) will be rolled out in all the provinces through the Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMC) for the duration of the current financial year. The  DG of DCOG regularly writes letters to Accounting Officers within provinces and municipalities for non-submission of, as well as a reminder to update and review their plans that were previously developed and are outdated.

To complement all NDMC efforts in (a) and (b) above, the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) supported all district municipalities to develop the district climate change adaptation plans. Furthermore, all provinces have been supported to develop their provincial climate change adaptation strategies. DFFE further provided capacity building programmes on climate change to all district municipalities with the view to facilitate mainstreaming of climate change considerations into the municipal planning system. This was done with the development of various tools such as Greenbook and Let-respond Toolkit which are aimed at offering municipalities with tools that could be used for climate change response planning. All the inter-institutional support complements the current and planned work of the NDMC on disaster management planning and Impact Based Early Warning training that the NDMC does with the South African Weather Service. In the 2022/23 financial year, the NDMC and SAWS will conduct Impact Based training for all districts in KZN. Both will continue to issue weekly Impact Based Early Warnings for the approaching severe weather systems, especially in the eastern coastal area. The NDMC Autumn and Winter seasonal plans highlighting hazard prone areas will also be distributed to all disaster management stakeholders in the province of KZN for the medium-term planning.

20 May 2022 - NW1424

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

On what date will Alexkor’s 2021 integrated report be available?

Reply:

According to the information received from Alexkor

The audit process has taken longer than expected. In this regard, the Company requested a concession for late submission of their integrated report. The new interim board is working as expeditiously as possible to finalise the integrated report.

Accordingly, the approval of integrated report and publication of the same will be concluded at the annual general meeting (AGM), to be held in a fortnight at the latest.

20 May 2022 - NW1383

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy Affairs

On what date will his department provide basic services, such as electricity, to the community of Ward 26 in Madibeng in the North West province?

Reply:

Ward 26 falls under the Eskom Licenced Area of Supply which is the Wonderkop area. Ward 26 is situated on private land and Eskom has since asked landowners for consent to electrify the area. No response has been received and the local municipality (Madibeng) has been asked to assist with the process. Electrification of the area can therefore only resume as soon as all the above issues are resolved.

20 May 2022 - NW1711

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date will her department allocate houses to the community of Ward 33 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality which has been waiting for their subsidised houses since 2018?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that it is currently seized with the installation of engineering services. Once completed, housing construction will commence and thereafter qualifying beneficiaries will be allocated houses as soon as construction is completed.

20 May 2022 - NW1685

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) Which financial institutions borrowed government (i) long-term loans and (ii) short-term loans and (b) what are the relevant details of the (i)(aa) market participants and (bb) their clients, (ii) interest rate, (iii) term of the loan and the (iv) total amount borrowed?

Reply:

Treasury Bills (T-bills) are held by every commercial bank in the country that holds a banking license since they form part of the High-Quality Liquid Assets (HQLA) which are required by the Prudential Authority. These assets allow banks to meet their short-term liquidity requirements and can be used as collateral for central bank operations, as well as benchmarking for pricing financial assets. The same banks may hold both T-bills and bonds on behalf of clients in their stockbroking or wealth management units. For the latter reason, it would be impossible for the National Treasury (NT) to determine what rate investors bought the bonds at and who the clients are.

Long term loans are bought by the 9 primary dealers in the primary market on behalf of insurers, asset managers, hedge funds and others on a weekly basis. These bonds are then traded in the secondary market where they are bought and sold by different entities. The 9 primary dealers are:

  1. ABSA
  2. HSBC
  3. NEDBANK
  4. CITIBANK
  5. STANDARD BANK
  6. INVESTEC BANK
  7. DEUTSCHE BANK
  8. RMB
  9. JP MORGAN

To qualify as a primary dealer, applying banks are required to comply with capital adequacy requirements as well as additional NT requirements. These banks would buy these bonds at different rates on a weekly basis and distribute these bonds in the secondary markets both on exchange and over the counter which also impacts the rates at which the bonds trade. The interest rates and amounts at which the bonds are auctioned in the primary market are available on the NT website on a weekly basis. The amount that each bank buys in the auction are not public information since this information is sensitive for the ongoing auction process. There are no terms associated with each bond purchase except the obligation to pay the interest rate and principal when it is due on NT’s part.

The ultimate holders of the bonds can categorized as follows:

1. Monetary Institutions

a) Banks

b) SARB

2. Insurers

a) Long Term Insurers

b) Short Term Insurers

3. Pension Funds

a) PIC

b) Private self-administered pension funds

c) Official Pension Funds

4. Other Financial Institutions

a) Unit Trusts

b) Participation Mortgage bond schemes

c) Financial Public enterprises

The details of the ultimate holders are not recorded by NT. It is in the secondary market where these bonds bought and sold by various institutions. The JSE, STRATE and the institutions themselves would be best placed to provide details in terms of the quantity of bonds they hold. Market data systems like Bloomberg and Reuters would also provide details for the reported market.

It is worth remembering is that these institutions would themselves be holding these bonds on behalf of individual investors or policy holders who cannot be legally disclosed as per FICA and POPIA act. The holdings change regularly owing to the needs of each category of holder. It is therefore impractical for NT to quantify how much each institutional holder owns at a point in time or what interest rate they are receiving.

Retail bonds are held by individual investors whose names cannot be disclosed. Retail bond interest rates are available on the retail bonds website along with the terms and conditions of each retail bond.

The National Treasury publishes monthly detailed information on outstanding bonds, redemption dates, redemption amounts, and coupon rates, which can be found on the National Treasury's investor website.

Table 7.5 of the 2022 Budget Review reflects the international financing institution borrowings. The table provides information on the institution, disbursement date, interest rate, terms (years), grace period (years), and amount (billion). From the table, the borrowing has only been long-term in nature, with no short-term loans being entered into.

20 May 2022 - NW1683

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Who are the current board members for (a) Alexkor and (b) the Richtersveld Mining Company, known as the Pooling and Sharing Joint Venture?

Reply:

Below are the names of the INTERIM board members appointed by the Department:

Alexkor Board (Company Secretary) Mr Lopang Peacock

Dr Patricia (Trish) Elizabeth Hanekom

Non- Executive Director

CHAIRPERSON

Female

White

Ms May Hermanus

Non- Executive Director

Female

Coloured

Mr Alan Aubrey Roberts

Non- Executive Director

Male

Indian

Ms Hilary Alana Swartbooi

Non- Executive Director

Female

Coloured

Ms Dineo Peta

Non- Executive Director

Female

African

Ms Karabo Mbele

Non- Executive Director

Female

African

PSJV board (Company Secretary) Mr Lopang Peacock

Dr Patricia (Trish) Elizabeth Hanekom

Non- Executive Director

CHAIRPERSON

Female

White

Ms Dineo Peta

Non- Executive Director

Female

African

Ms Karabo Mbele

Non- Executive Director

Female

African

Mr Brain Grobbelaar

Non- Executive Director

Male

African

Ms Adelaide Ranape

Non- Executive Director

Female

African

Mr Raymond Maboe

Non- Executive Director

Female

African

20 May 2022 - NW1149

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Following the disastrous hacking and ransomware attack on the information and communications technology infrastructure of his department in 2021, what (a)(i) steps have been taken and (ii) preventative measures have been put in place to ensure that this does not happen again; (2) What measures have been put in place to ensure that the systems of the (a) Office of the Master of the High Court and (b) High Court function independently?

Reply:

1. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) has implemented a wide range of security measures within its information processing environment, intended to prevent any unauthorized access to and/or use of sensitive information and ensure that the confidentiality, integrity and availability of personal information remain protected. These security measures are categorized into two (2) groups as follows:

a) Managerial controls, including a set of approved, published and implemented information security policies, standards, procedures and guidelines. Awareness of the existing information security policies and cybersecurity risks within our information processing environment is proactively and regularly being promoted amongst DoJ&CD’s users to ensure positive security behaviors and adherence to prescribed rules.

b) Technical Controls – In addition to the native security features provided by our systems and platforms, we have deployed a set of automated security tools and processes to improve our defensive capabilities and safeguard our ICT infrastructure and systems. These technical tools enable us to effectively restrict and control access to our ICT systems, applications and services, manage vulnerabilities, proactively monitor, protect and respond to security threats and incidents. We have also deployed disaster recovery capabilities to ensure continued availability of business-critical information in case of any adverse event impacting DoJ&CD’s services. Technologies that are currently implemented include:

  1. Antivirus – Endpoint (PCs) Antivirus Software. All endpoint devices were equipped with Antivirus software which offers advanced automated threat detection and response against an ever-growing variety of threats and malware.
  2. Advanced Threat Protection – A limited number of critical servers have protection against attacks, advanced threats and ransomware, giving the Departments the power to detect, analyze and respond today’s stealthy attaches in real time.
  3. Network Discovery and Analysis – A limited number of critical services have advanced tools installed that provides 360 degrees of visibility by monitoring and reporting on all network ports network traffic. This detects targeted attacks designed to evade standard security solutions.
  4. Mail Security Gateway – providing Integrated-tiered spam prevention and anti-phishing spyware. The appliance provides a comprehensive gateway email security.
  5. Web Security Gateway – Provide a proactive web traffic detection and blocking services based on reputation services.
  6. Firewalls – Network security appliance that monitors and controls incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules. This device typically establishes a barrier between a trusted network and untrusted networks such as the internet. The firewall provides protection against outside cyber-attackers by shielding the Department’s computers or network from malicious or unnecessary network traffic.
  7. MIMECAST – Provides the Department with email security services. It is used to protect the Department’s email system, ensure access and simplify the tasks of managing emails system.
  8. Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) – A Software solution that aggregates and analyzes activity from many different resources across your entire IT Infrastructure. SIEM collects security data from network devices, servers, domain controllers, and may more log sources. SIEM provides real-time analysis of security alerts generated by applications and network hardware.
  9. Proxies This solution offers the Department reverse proxy services. A reverse proxy ultimately forwards user/web browser requests to the web servers. However, the reverse proxy server protects the web server’s identity. It helps increase performance, security and reliability.
  10. Vulnerability Scan Tools These tools were deployed in the environment to scan and report on a quarterly basis the vulnerability levels of the Department in terms of missing patches.
  11. Virtual Private Network Technology – This tool grants complete access to the Department’s Local Area Network to authorized users via encrypted secure tunnels.
  12. User awareness and training tools – These tools allow the Department to provide target security awareness messages to end users. It also allows for simulated attacks and end user training in the event where awareness is lacking. Post the breach, this tool was deployed to 2000 users in the Headquarters, with plans to roll it out to all users in this financial year.

a) In addition to the already implemented security tools, the Department has, post the ransomware, enabled the following additional security measures:

(i) Zero Trust Network Tool – The Zero Trust Network Access Tool will help the Department to provide secure remote user access to applications and services based on defined access control policies, the tool defaults to deny, providing only the access to services the users has been explicitly granted. With this Zero Trust Network Tool, access is established after the user has been authenticated to the tool first. The tool then provisions access to the application on the user’s behalf through a secure, encrypted tunnel. This provides an added layer of protection for the Department’s applications and services by shielding otherwise publicly visible Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. With this solution, users will only see applications that they have access to. This tool is to replace the current VPN tools which grant complete access to all applications.

(ii) The Department also implemented a tiered administrative model on the active directory and that will help the Department to better secure its ICT environments. The model defines three (3) tiers that create buffer zones to separate administration of high-risk PCs and valuable assets like domain controllers.

(iii) We have also reviewed and/or enhanced our security policies on all our security appliances to safeguard against future security attacks.

b) Going forward, the following technologies are to be implemented to further enhance the security of the ICT environment:

(i) Cyber Security Operations Centre (CSOC) will be implemented in the 2022/23 financial year.

CSOC is a centralize function within an organization employing people, processes and technology to continuously monitor and improve an organization’s security posture while preventing, detecting, analyzing and responding to cybersecurity incidents. CSOC will act like the hub or central command post, taking in telemetry from across the Department’s IT infrastructure, including its networks, devices, appliances, and information stores wherever those assets reside. The proliferation of an advanced threat places a premium on collecting content from diverse sources. Essentially, the CSOC will be the correlation point for event logged within the Department. This will be implemented by way of a hybrid model using existing tools aggregated on the one platform.

(ii) External Penetration Testing.

Discussions and planning had already commenced with some of the industry partners in terms of providing a comprehensive external penetration testing, with the aim of identifying any gaps in our security environment. This process is expected to be finalized by the middle of the year, and be completed annually going forward.

2. Where the Master of the High Court and the High Court share the same building, each operates independently as the Master’s Office falls within the ambit of the DoJ&CD and runs on the DoJ&CD Virtual Private Network (VPN), whereas the High Court falls under the ambit of the Office of the Chief Justice (OCJ) and runs on the OCJ VPN.

20 May 2022 - NW1730

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) length of tenure to date and (b) (i) annual remuneration and/or (ii) cost to company of each member of the current Board of Directors at Eskom in each year?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

In accordance with the Eskom Memorandum of Incorporation, the directors serving on the Board of Eskom are appointed on a three-year term, which is reviewed annually by the Shareholder. The directors may serve up to three terms with the approval of the Shareholder.

The period served by the current directors on the Eskom Board is as set out in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Tenure of Eskom Directors

Name of Director

Date appointed

Length of term to date

Non -executive directors

Dr Pulane Elsie Molokwane

15 December 2017

4 years,4 months

Dr Banothile Charity Events Makhubela

15 December 2017

4 years,4 months

Prof Malegapuru William Makgoba

15 December 2017

4 years,4 months

Prof Tshepo Herbert Mongalo

20 January 2018

4 years,3 months

Ms Busisiwe Mavuso

20 January 2018

4 years,3 months

Dr Roderick de Brissac Crompton

20 January 2018

4 years,3 months

Executive Directors

Mr André de Ruyter

December 2019

2 years ,4 months

Mr Calib Cassim

28 July 2017

4 years, 10 months

The annual remuneration for each of the past five years for the current Non-Executive and Executive Directors is set out in the Table 2 below.

Table 2: Annual Remuneration of Eskom Directors

Name of Director

2017/2018

(R)

2018/2019

(R)

2019/2020

(R)

2020/2021

(R)

2021/2022

(R)

Director Fees of Non-Executive Directors

Ms Busisiwe Mavuso

112 000,00

593 000,00

593,000.00

711,000.00

592 889,40

Dr Banothile Charity Events Makhubela

543 000,00

489 000,00

497,000.00

593,000.00

682 164.60

Dr Pulane Elsie Molokwane

640 000,00

578 000,00

618,000.00

717,000.00

710 530,56

Prof Tshepo Herbert Mongalo

196 000,00

593 000,00

543,000.00

717,000.00

716 766,36

Prof Malegapuru William Makgoba

233 000,00

717 000,00

952,000.00

1,687,000.00

1 598 571.96

Dr Roderick de Brissac Crompton

101 000,00

524 000,00

540,000.00

717 000,00

716 766,36

Cost to Company of Executive Directors

Mr André de Ruyter

-

-

1,654,000.00

(3 months)

7,040,010.00

7,040,010.00

Mr Calib Cassim

1 649 000,00

3 130 000,00

4,900,020.00

4,900,020.00

4,900,020.00

20 May 2022 - NW1729

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) length of tenure to date and (b) (i) annual remuneration and/or (ii) cost to company of the current Board of Directors at Denel in each year?

Reply:

According to the information received from Denel

The following are the names of the current Board, their tenure and Remuneration:

Name

Tenure

Remuneration

Gloria Serobe

9 April 2018 (appointment date) 2018/19

R616 000

 

2019/2020

R389 000

 

2020/2021

R240 151

 

2021/2022

R1 042 340

Mandla Mnisi

9 April 2018 (appointment date) 2018/19

R385 000

 

2019/2020

R269 000

 

2020/2021

R161 259

 

2021/2022

R217 775

Thami Magazi

9 April 2018 (appointment date) 2018/19

R693 000

 

2019/2020

R751 000

 

2020/2021

R325 882

 

2021/2022

R275 994

Temba Matanzima

9 April 2018 (appointment date) 2018/19

R112 000

 

2019/2020

R326 000

 

2020/2021

R105 216

 

2021/2022

R231 390

Tshidi Mokgabudi

25 June 2021 (appointment date)

2021/2022

R 12 873

Tryphosa Ramano

23 February 2022 (appointment date)

2021/2022

R21 337

20 May 2022 - NW1498

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) (a) What process led to the appointment of a certain person (name furnished) as Chief Executive Officer (CEO)of the Pooling and Sharing Joint Venture (PSJV), (b) how long will the specified person be in this position and (c) what are the reasons that a certain other person (name furnished) has been removed from his duties at the PSJV? (2) Whether the specified person who has been removed from the performance of his duties will continue to receive a salary; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how much? NW1743E

Reply:

According to the information received from Alexkor

1. (a) Ms Leilani Swartbooi was never appointed as CEO or Acting CEO of the PSJV.

(b) Ms Swartbooi was appointed to act in the position of Mr Bowers, the General Mine Manager, for the period 8 February 2022 to 14 February 2022 while Mr Bowers was on leave.

(c) Mr Bowers is still the General Mine Manager of the PSJV. He was never removed from this position.

(2) Mr Bowers has not been removed from the performance of his duties and there has been no change to his remuneration package.

20 May 2022 - NW1830

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In light of the recent floods that destroyed infrastructure in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, what (a) number of workers have been affected due to (i) them not being able to go to work and/or (ii) their work place infrastructure being destroyed and (b) intervention measures will he put in place to avoid permanent job losses?

Reply:

The number of workers that have been affected by the floods is still being established. Once lodging of claims gets to its logical conclusion, certain things will become clearer, including the stats that Hon. Member is looking for.

Currently, the Unemployment Insurance Fund is engaged in discussions with a number of stakeholders (including NEDLAC) in terms of how best to respond to the disaster in KwaZulu Natal and the ripple effect (of the floods) downstream.

The Provincial Offices of the Department of Employment and Labour in Gauteng, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu Natal have been tasked with handling the claims related to recent floods in those provinces.

These claims have been given priority by the provinces. Affected employees are able to claim for Reduced Work Time and the unemployment benefit claim in line with the Unemployment Insurance Act and the Unemployment Insurance Contributions Act. Employers are also able to apply for the Reduced Work Time and the unemployment benefit claims directly with the provincial offices on behalf of their employees.

Unemployment Insurance Fund through its Labour Activation Programme has (the normal) Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme which provides support to distressed companies that seek to retain their employees. Under the scheme, the UIF funds 75% of an employee’s basic salary up to a maximum amount of R17 119,44 per month, for a maximum period of twelve months. Eligible companies affected by the flood can apply for this relief scheme through the CCMA.

Furthermore, the UIF also has another Labour Activation Programme called the Business Turnaround and Recovery Programme which provides support to enterprises facing economic distress and initiatives aimed at preventing job losses. Eligible companies affected by the flood can apply for this support scheme through Productivity South Africa.

20 May 2022 - NW1582

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract , what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

a) The Department has not concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

b) None of the Human Settlement Entities have concluded commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or any entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

20 May 2022 - NW1544

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What measures have been put in place by her department to ensure that funds allocated by her department to assist families affected by the devastating floods will not be embezzled in the same way COVID-19 funds were?

Reply:

The public finances are governed by legislative prescripts and regulatory frameworks that stipulate the conditions including the roles and responsibilities of all relevant stakeholders. It is therefore important that the accounting officers of organs of state and stakeholders ensure that funds are utilised in accordance with the applicable regulatory frameworks. For the response and recovery measures of the recent flooding, government through relevant organs of state has strengthened the monitoring systems through the following key measures:

  1. Tracking of expenditure by National Treasury where changes to the fund and project segment have been implemented in the Basic Accounting System (BAS),
  2. Tracking procurement where all institutions affected by the flood disaster must report to National Treasury all procurement transactions related to flood interventions,
  3. Real time auditing by the Office of the Auditor-General focussing on the following areas:

Prevention – testing the implementation of the preventative controls and the remaining risks will be reported to the accounting officer/authority, 

Detection - high-risk transactions will be subjected to an audit and key observations reported to the accounting officer/authority; and

Reporting on work done by the AGSA, the outcome thereof and the responses by accounting officers and authorities to any weaknesses identified are reported in a special report. The audits are meant to provide independent assurance on whether public funds have been appropriately accounted for and were used for its intended purpose.

20 May 2022 - NW1600

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What progress has been made regarding developing a policy on integrity testing for personnel and contractors working in the (a) Alexkor mine and (b) mining industry?

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the relevant mine(s).

 

20 May 2022 - NW1464

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with the final list of the beneficiaries of the R210 million COVID-19 Relief Fund; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been advised by the IDC and NEF as follows:

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

The IDC set aside a R800 million fund that gave financial support to companies providing essential supplies to address the COVID-19 Pandemic. This fund includes R300 million from the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition’s Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP). The table below provides details of the companies supported by the COVID Essential Supplies Fund.

Applicant Name

MCEP Finance

IDC Finance

Total Approved

Total Disbursed

Supra Healthcare

30,000,000

100,000,000

130,000,000

130,000,000

Alternative Living and Technical Solutions for Africa (Pty) Ltd

-

27,000,000

27,000,000

25,639,250

Amka Products (Pty) Ltd

30,000,000

120,000,000

150,000,000

150,000,000

Pharmapac (Pty) Ltd

16,000,000

4,000,000

20,000,000

19,993,500

Blend Tech (Pty) Ltd

30,000,000

27,000,000

57,000,000

56,875,793

Starrate (Pty) Ltd

-

5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

Maba Africa (Pty) Ltd

1,400,000

3,600,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

Isondo Investments (Pty) Ltd

1,200,000

300,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

Crystal Pier 148 (Pty) Ltd

12,000,000

14,000,000

26,000,000

10,728,407

Starrate (Pty) Ltd

 

13,000,000

13,000,000

13,000,000

GQ Tissue Products (Pty) Ltd

13,000,000

7,200,000

20,200,000

20,200,000

Grand Total

137,000,000

398,531,730

535,531,730

437,936,950

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The NEF set aside R200 million to provide financial assistance to companies that manufacture and supply essential products for Covid-19. A total of R211 million support was approved to the following beneficiaries:

-END-

20 May 2022 - NW1574

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department has no commercial contracts with the government of the Russian Federation

20 May 2022 - NW1718

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the extent of the damage assessed by his department caused by the break-ins at Opkoms Clinic in Mangaung in the past few months and (b) are the reasons that his department has placed no security at the specified clinic despite the numerous break-ins?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the National Department of Health is consulting with the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Health to source the full details of this matter. The Minister will provide the Honourable Member and Parliament with the response as soon as the details have been received from the Province.

END.

20 May 2022 - NW1588

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic? NW1924E

Reply:

DPE Response

The Department has not concluded any commercial contracts with the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017

According to the information received from Alexkor

There is no contract with the Russian Federation and / or any other entity based in the Russian Federation recorded in the Alexkor SOC Limited contract register since 1 April 2017.

According to the information received from Denel

(i) No (ii) Yes (aa) Ohotnik v Sheremetievo Ltd. (bb) R4,525,815.33 (cc) 2017 to 2018 (dd) Commercial ammunition (ee) Sales

According to the information received from Eskom

(b)(i) and (ii)

Eskom has not concluded any commercial contracts with the government of the Russian Federation, or any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

However, Eskom had a commercial contract with a Russian entity that commenced in 2010 and ended in 2017.

(aa)

The contract was with Tenex, a Russian Joint Stock Company owned by the Russian state- owned company Rosatom, to supply the Koeberg Nuclear Power Plant with Enriched Uranium Product (EUP).

The sourced EUP is delivered to the Eskom nuclear fuel suppliers abroad where it is processed into small pellets, which are loaded into the metallic fuel rods that make up a nuclear fuel assembly.

(bb)

The value of the contract was $411 121 667,50.

 

(cc)

The contract commenced on 9 March 2010 and ended on 31 December 2017.

(dd)

The contract was for the supply of EUP.

(ee)

The reason EUP is not procured within the Republic is due to the unavailability of enrichment and/or conversion facilities in South Africa.

According to the information received from SAFCOL

(b) According to records at our disposal SAFCOL had never concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entities based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017. SAFCOL procures its goods and services within the boundaries of the Republic of South Africa, there are and were never intentions to contract any commercial contracts with the Russian Federation.

According to the information received from SAA

SAA has no commercial contracts with the Russian Federation nor any entity based in the Russian Federation to supply goods and services.

According to the information received from Transnet

(b)

On 05 March 2018, Transnet SOC Limited (Transnet) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Joint Stock Company Russian Railways. This MOU is for 5 years, and it is valid until 2023. However, Transnet has not concluded any commercial agreements to date. The objective of this MoU was to collaborate on the following areas:

  • Implementation of railway infrastructure projects.
  • Provision of consulting services in the field of development of passenger and freight traffic solutions.
  • Cooperation in the field of innovation, scientific Research & Development and experience exchange.
  • Integration of railway and port infrastructure.
  • Staff training.
  • Interaction with the BRICS New Development Bank.

To date none, of the above projects has been implemented because Transnet could not find an appropriate procurement mechanism to procure the necessary services from Russian Railways.

 

 

20 May 2022 - NW1527

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) By what date will the 2019-20 Auditor-General Report for the Gauteng Printing Works be released and (b) what is the reason that there has been a delay in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The Auditor General signed off on the 2019/20 audit report on 18 December 2020, and the 2019/20 Annual Report was sent to Parliament for tabling on 30 September 2021.

(b) The main reason for the delay was the interactions between Management and the Auditor-General and the disputes that arose from the Auditor-General’s findings that ultimately led to a disclaimer opinion being issued.

END

20 May 2022 - NW1631

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(a) What are the reasons that it has taken more than a year for a permanent Director-General to be appointed in his department and (b) how far is his department with the recruitment process of a new Director-General?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Following the retirement of the former Director-General, the Department advertised the position in July 2021. At the same time, a process to consider a reconfiguration of the Department commenced, which process was put on hold to enable staff to focus on the work required to support firms and workers affected by the July unrest last year. A Transition Team of three senior staff was put in place, with two Deputy Directors General and the Chief Financial Officer. The approach also provided leadership stability during this key period leading up to the conclusion of the Annual Performance Plan and the Budget of the Department. This affected the timelines on the recruitment processes. The recruitment process is now recommencing following the completion of the Department’s Annual Performance Plan.

-END-

20 May 2022 - NW1451

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 134 on 11 March 2022, wherein she claims that Erf 9270 was boarded up but this is not the case as the house is still standing open to the elements with no doors, no roof and no windows, thus allowing free access and ongoing damage, (a) this will be rectified and (b) her department will take responsibility for managing the property as it is a hot spot for vandalism and anti-social behaviour in the area; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) what (a)(i) approvals and (ii) relevant authorities are still outstanding, (b) is the timeline for this process, (c) is the status of the subdivision application and (d) is the proposed timeline?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)

(a) I have been informed by the Department that the entrances to the property were previously boarded up. However, vandals have since removed the boards at the entrances and regained access. Subsequently, on 1 May 2022 the Department’s Security Division conducted a site visit, during which it was established that is not feasible to brick up / board up the openings of the buildings due to the extent of the damages to the building. A decision has been taken to deploy a security company to monitor the remains of the building as well as to prevent further vandalism and any illicit activities from taking place. The security company will be appointed by June, so as to allow the SCM processes for the appointment to unfold.

(b) The Department will deploy a security company to monitor the property. Subsequent to our previous response, the Client Department, South African Police Service, has expressed interest in the property for official accommodation purposes.

A Technical team has visited the site to conduct a Technical Condition Assessment of the facility to quantify the extent of the damage as well as costing. The Assessment Report will be finalized by the end of May 2022. The outcome will determine whether the nature of the work to be done is of a capital nature or it is work that can be done by our in-house team.

(2)

(a)

(i) Approvals: Depending on the outcome of the Technical Condition Assessment on the extent and cost of the damage, a formal process of registering a project for budget allocation purposes will be followed during the budget process of the 2022/23 financial year.

(ii) Authorities: Currently not applicable.

b) Timeline: A Project Execution Plan will be developed and available once the Assessment Report has been finalized by the Technical Team.

c) Status of the subdivision – This is no longer required.

d) Proposed timeline – Not applicable as the subdivision of the property is no longer required.

20 May 2022 - NW1686

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What process was followed by his department to set up a team to deal with the report of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State and (b)(i) what are the names of the external lawyers who were appointed to form part of the project team, (ii) on what basis were they appointed and (iii) what is the (aa) term and (bb) total monetary value of each specified contract?

Reply:

(a) The appointment of the legal team was handled by the Office of the State Attorney according to its procurement processes.

(b)(i) Advocate R Schorn, Advocate SJ Coetzee SC and Advocate P Nonyane.

(ii) They were appointed to advise the Department on the actions to be taken by the department or the specific entity based on the findings and recommendations of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture particularly those that relate to the State-Owned Enterprises within the Department’s portfolio.

(iii)(aa) The appointment is product-based. Once the advice has been provided, the instruction will automatically terminate.

(bb) There is no monetary value set for each contract. Counsels are paid on the submission of an invoice submitted to the Office of the State Attorney for the work done.

20 May 2022 - NW1599

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the status of his department’s 20% stake in West Coast Resources?

Reply:

The department remains the custodian of the State’s 20% stake in West Coast Resources (WCR). WCR is currently under business rescue. A 7-year business rescue plan was approved in July 2020. The shareholding is held through a special purpose vehicle created by De Beers called Mainstreet( Pty) Ltd. The Department is currently working on a process to have the shareholding held in the name of the State directly or through one of the State-Owned Entities.

20 May 2022 - NW1425

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the status of tender 0412021/2022 of his department?

Reply:

Bid number DPE07-2021-2022 relating to the Appointment of Service Provider to assist with determining the Optimal Operating Model for the State’s Diamond Assets

Status: It was cancelled due to the changed of circumstances, there is no longer a need for the services requested.

20 May 2022 - NW1416

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the devastating floods in KwaZulu-Natal where, according to the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, approximately 40 000 people were displaced and thousands of people now find themselves without identity documents (IDs), what (a) are the full details of how his department intends to (i) assist the eputy Ministerpersons who have lost their IDs and (ii) fast-track their applications and (b) measures will be put in place to avoid possible fraud?

Reply:

(a)(i) People who have lost their IDs are already being helped. The Provincial Manager of Home Affairs in KZN has attended meetings of the Disaster Management Center since its inception. The Center provided him with a list of affected people/families. The Deputy Minister of Home Affairs led a campaign to trace such people, offer them identity documents and these are in two forms, (a) Temporary Identity Certificate (TIC) )which they get same time on the scene. (b) An application for a smart card which is issued after a week. All these are provided free of charge.

(ii) Yes their applications are fast tracked, because this is a special project.

(b) The people who have lost their documentation are already in the system, i.e the National Population Register (NPR), hence this whole exercise is a replacement exercise, where there is no chance of fraud.

END

 

 

20 May 2022 - NW1490

Profile picture: Magaxa, Mr K

Magaxa, Mr K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Given that the Government is working to improve the business environment for companies of all sizes through a dedicated capacity to reduce red tape, what does his department intend to do to access land for planting for SA Forestry Company Limited to expand production, revenue generation, job creation and downstream industrialisation?

Reply:

Currently, SAFCOL has a total of 189 747 hectares with plantable area of 120 644 hectares. As a result, only 116 695 hectares is planted and 3 949 hectares is “Temporary Unplanted” (TUP). This is approximately 3% of the total ,which was maintained for the past 5 years, is in line with annual industry targets.

The Department of Public Enterprises has since requested SAFCOL to consider assisting the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) in reducing its TUP which is currently above 30%, either by leasing or managing plantations near its operations in Mpumalanga, Limpopo and KZN. This will not only reduce unlimited risks DFFE is currently exposed to but also increase rural employment and sawlog availability for supply of raw material to small and medium business in response to sector transformation and addressing the Commercial Forestry Masterplan objectives.

Furthermore, DPE has encouraged SAFCOL to ensure that it remains a preferred partner post the land settlement process as currently 57% of SAFCOL land under operation is under land claim. This is in collaboration with DFFE and the Department of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform.

 

20 May 2022 - NW1194

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Noting how a number of fire managers do not hold legal fire diplomas in accordance with the South African Qualifications Authority Act, Act 58 of 1995, but are made to run the emergency services of the public whereas qualified managers hold junior positions, what (a) action has she taken to hold municipalities accountable for such irregularities and (b) oversight mechanisms has her department implemented to monitor the redress of the situation?

Reply:

It is important to note that the Fire Brigade Services Act, 1987 (Act 99 of 1987) is the primary legislation regulating the provision of fire services. Section 5 (1)  a controlling authority shall appoint a person who possesses the prescribed qualifications and experience, as chief fire officer to be in charge of its service. In response to the above questions:

a) What  action has she taken to hold municipalities accountable for such irregularities?

The Directorate facilitated the process of developing Fire Service career path as part of Municipal Staff Regulations which will come into effect from 1 July 2022.

b) What oversight mechanisms has her Department implemented to monitor the redress of the situation?                                                

The Department is in the process of developing an oversight mechanism for Municipal Fire Services career path once the Regulations is effective. The Directorate will monitor and support the implementation of the Municipal Staff Regulations.

The link to the Municipal Staff Regulations is below

https://www.gov.za/sites/default/files/gcis_document/202109/45181gon891.pdf

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

20 May 2022 - NW1543

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Noting how the floods in KwaZulu-Natal claimed the lives of more than 400 persons, what measures is her department putting in place with municipalities in order to better deal with the impact of severe weather conditions in future?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) will be strengthening the support to municipalities in the following:

  • The development and implementation of disaster management plans as per Sections 38, 39, 52 and 53 of the Disaster Management Act 57 of 2002;
  • The assessment of submitted disaster management plans to check amongst others the level of compliance with the Disaster Management Act as well as the alignment with the guidelines on “development and structure of a disaster management plan”.
  • Whether these plans incorporate disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation measures for inclusion into municipal programmes and projects as required for by the priorities and targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030).
  • Engagement sessions with municipalities and Provincial Disaster Management Centres within respective provinces to discuss the respective assessment feedbacks. 

DCOG will continue to collaborate with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) in supporting the district municipalities to develop the district climate change adaptation plans as well as providing capacity building programmes to the district municipalities on climate change with the view to facilitate mainstreaming of climate consideration into the municipal planning system. This will be done with the development of various tools such as Greenbook and Let-respond Toolkit which are aimed at offering the municipality with tools that could be used in planning for climate change response.

The above-mentioned inter-institutional support complements the current and planned work of the NDMC on disaster management planning and Impact Based Early Warning training with the South African Weather Service. The NDMC and the South African Weather Service will conduct Impact Based training for all districts in KZN for the 2022/23 financial year. The South African Weather Service and the NDMC will continue issuing of weekly Impact Based Early Warnings for approaching severe weather systems, especially in eastern coastal area. The NDMC will continue to distribute seasonal plans to all disaster management stakeholders highlighting hazard prone areas for medium term planning. and informed decision-making.