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15 April 2021 - NW284

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a)(i) full names and (ii) details of the position of the National Procurement Officer according to the Government Gazette No 464 that was published on 15 April 2020 and (b) details of the (i) recruitment and (ii) selection process followed in the appointment process of the National Procurement Officer; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the said Regulations do not make provision for a National Procurement Officer.

Rand Water was appointed to provide programme management for the provision of water tanks, water tankers and augmentation of water resources such as the equipping of boreholes as part of the COVID-19 intervention. Rand Water utilised its internal staff for the procurement of all goods and services for the implementation of the COVID-19 Intervention Project on behalf of the Department of Water and Sanitation. Further, Rand Water’s emergency procurement processes were applied for the procurement of goods as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 and the Water and Sanitation Emergency Procurement Covid-19 Disaster Response Directions issued in terms of Regulation 10(8) of the Regulations issued under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). The Government Gazette containing the Directions referred to is attached as Annexure A.

15 April 2021 - NW285

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) specifications of the Travel With Flair tender, (b) date on which the tender was awarded, (c) total value of the tender, (d) total costs spent against the tender from commencement of the contract to date, (e) notice of any deviations processed in order to procure personal protective equipment from Travel with Flair, (f) legislative prescripts upon which the deviation relied, (g) notice of approval of the deviation and (h) contract value of the deviation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) The tender specification of Travel With Flair (TWF) is attached as Annexure A.

(b) The tender was awarded to Travel with Flair on 16 October 2017.

(c) & (d) From the commencement date of the tender until to date the department paid R401 113 751.00. This is a total amount spent inclusive of local accommodation provided, international accommodation provided, local air transport, international air transport, local land transport, community events management, conferences, seminars, departmental functions, information sessions, training sessions, departmental management meetings (away from department’s offices and usually with other spheres of government), travel agency service fees, travel agency back office processing fees and travel agency conference and events management fees.

(e) to (h) There were no deviations processed. The personal protective equipment paid for were part of the costs of community events the company coordinated or managed on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with requirements of the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and SAPS as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs,

 

15 April 2021 - NW705

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)When last did his department conduct oversight of the (a) academic programmes offered to and (b) living conditions of students studying in the Republic of Cuba as part of the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme; (2) whether his department made any changes to the programme over the past five academic years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what number of (a) students enrolled in the programme in every academic year since its inception and (b) the specified students graduated with a medical degree after completion of the programme?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW660

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the annual amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) and (b) will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (i) contractors involved in the production of the television, (ii) the terms of agreement and (iii) any contractual documents between the SABC and the specified department with regard to the screening of the BNG television show?

Reply:

a) The amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcast Corporation (SABC) was R11 417 699.00 for the 2020/21 financial year.

No

Description

Amount (Rands)

 

SABC 2 Airtime through GCIS

7,335 199.00

 

BNG TV Production through GCIS

4,082 500.00

 

TOTAL

11, 417 699.00

(b) Tsalena Media was appointed through the Government Communication Information System (GCIS). The terms of the agreement can be obtained from GCIS.

15 April 2021 - NW787

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the full list of health facilities that do not have the full capacity for anti-retroviral treatment for HIV/Aids in the Republic, (b)(i) what total number of patients are affected nationally by the lack of capacity to provide anti-retroviral treatment and (ii) in which facilities is this the case and (c) for what period did the specified patients not have access to prescribed medication?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health in the country –

(a) Most (4,601 including hospitals, clinics, mobiles and correctional centres report to DHIS) facilities have full capacity for ART treatment for HIV/AIDS in the Republic. All primary health care facilities and hospitals have full capacity for anti-retroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS in the Republic. However, small facilities often do not have more than 1 person trained to provide anti-retroviral treatment. Mobile health facilities do not have the full capacity for ART.

The table below indicate the number of Mobile health facilities per province.

Province

Number of mobile health facilities

Eastern Cape

177

Free State

135

Gauteng

106

KwaZulu-Natal

193

Limpopo

144

Mpumalanga

114

Northern Cape

54

North West

54

Western Cape

174

TOTAL

1,151

Where, mobile clinic facilities are not providing service, clients are referred to the nearest facility that provides for this service.

(b) (i) No patients were turned away from health care facilities without ARV treatment.

(ii) No facilities were affected in the country.

(c) All patients who visited health facilities received ART.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW828

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the provision of water for the residents of the Driefontein Complex in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal by way of the Driefontein Complex Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme, what are the details of the plans for the long-term provision of bulk potable water supplies, including (a) total costs, (b) funding allocations, (c) source of funding for the construction of a bulk raw water pipeline, (d) proposed period of construction, (e) completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline, (f) the source of raw water and (g) proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water; (2) what are the details of the expenditure on water distribution infrastructure for this project from its inception up to 31 January 2021; (3) what are the details of the current sources of bulk water for the water distribution infrastructure already constructed in the Driefontein Complex; (4) what are the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year?

Reply:

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

1. Phase 1 of the Driefontein Scheme was implemented by uThukela District Municipality and is now complete, whilePhase 2 is in progress. Phase 3 (i.e. Spioenkop-Ladysmith Scheme) consists of both economic and social components and requires contributions from beneficiaries of the project who are able to pay for services. As the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) does not cover costs pertaining to the economic component, the municipality had to come up with about R1 billion co-funding.

The municipality entered into negotiations with Umgeni Water with the aim to secure assistance with co-funding and the implementation of the project. After conducting due diligence, Umgeni Water decided to conduct further detailed feasibility studies on the project. To this end, Umgeni Water has appointed a professional service provider to undertake the pre-feasibility study. The detailed feasibility study of the uThukela DM Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme (uTDM RBWSS) will include:

  • Water resource modelling for the Upper uThukela Catchment,
  • A pre-feasibility analysis to identify options for supply
  • A detailed Feasibility Study of the most appropriate option for future bulk water supply to uThukela District Municipality.

(a) The total costs for the project can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded because the information required to calculate costs will be obtained from the outcomes of the study.

 

(b-c) The funding allocations and the source of funding will be determined from information generated during the implementation readiness study. The implementation readiness study is dependent on conclusion of the detailed feasibility study will be determined once the total costs have been determined.

(d-g) The information on the proposed period of construction, including completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline and the source of raw water and proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded.

(2) The expenditure on water distribution infrastructure from inception up to 31 January 2021 is R102 400 021.

(3) The sources for the bulk distribution network are nine (9) production boreholes. The boreholes are being used as an interim source until long-term sustainable bulk water resource has been developed.

 

(4) The Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year are as follows:

Financial year

Allocations

2010/11

R 11 470 200

2011/12

R 22 302 100

2012/13

R 16 308 355

2013/14

R 56 726 749

2014/15

R 80 977 114

2015/16

R 20 801 030

2016/17

R 64 000 000

2017/18

R 28 000 000

2018/19

R 45 000 000

2019/20

R 10 000 000

2020/21

R 39 399 000

Total

R394 984 548

15 April 2021 - NW630

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What steps has he taken in response to the Interim Report into Allegations of Racial Discrimination by Medical Schemes, released on 17 January 2021, that was undertaken by the section 59 Investigation Panel which was launched by the Council for Medical Schemes in 2019?

Reply:

The findings outlined in the Interim Report into Allegations of Racial Discrimination by Medical Schemes are very disconcerting. As part of the processes to better understand the findings, the recommendations emanating from these and also to determine the most appropriate actions required to ensure that the findings do not occur again, we had a briefing session with the Section 59 Panel on the 22nd December 2020. Given the nature of the findings and that the report is interim, there are no immediate actions being implemented. However, once all stakeholders have made their inputs and comments on the report and it is then finalised by the Panel, it is expected that the Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) will submit the final report to the Department.

One of the proposed interventions identified in the Interim Report is that the Department has to ensure that the CMS and the Boards of the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) determine the action plans they would be considering, particularly in relation to the Panel’s recommendations as to the two regulatory authorities and their areas of lack of oversight and guidance on matters pertaining to Fraud, Waste and Abuse. Additionally, it is expected that the CMS would investigate the provisions of Section 59 of the Medical Schemes Act, and where necessary propose legislative amendments (including supporting regulations) pertaining to schemes and administrators. This includes providing clear and consistent guidance to their regulated entities on current procedures followed by schemes to enforce their rights in terms of section 59 of the Act. I will also be requesting the CMS Board to provide me with regular updates on all actions taken to address the findings and progress on interventions implemented.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW820

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to the report of the joint oversight visit of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans to Kinshasa and Goma in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) from 25 to 29 March 2018, consideration was given to the concerns raised by the soldiers of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) as reported by the Portfolio Committee regarding the very poor quality of (a) combat boots and (b) uniforms; if not, why not; if so, what measures were taken to significantly improve the quality and suitability of both combat boots and uniforms; (2) whether (a) she, (b) her department and (c) a certain company (name furnished) have considered the recommendations for local procurement of certain items within the regulations of the Mission Area, based on the direct feedback on the ground in the DRC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the recommendations that have been implemented?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)

Yes consideration was given to concerns raised not only by the Portfolio Committee but previously by the Minister and the Defence Force Service Commission.

Combat Boots

The SA Army engaged the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) on the improvement projects of uniform and combat boots. The boot project of Special Forces was revived and improved as it was found to be suited for use by the SA Army. Development of the proposed boot for the SA Army with wearer trials of the new combat boot commenced on 01 December 2020.

The new boot roll-out will commence from 01 July 2021 to all SA Army members within the SANDF with priority given to operationally deployed Units and Individuals, replacing the current combat boot. This roll-out is pending the availability of funding to support and implement this project.

(1) (b): Camouflage Uniform

The improvement of the textile used for the cut, manufacture and trim of camouflage uniform is also being done in collaboration with the CSIR.

The first concept uniform designs will be presented to the SA Army Council by 30 March 2021 for approval.

Wearer trials for the new uniform design will commence from end June 2021 and a phased full roll-out is scheduled from December 2021 pending the availability of funding for this project.

A well-deserved funding injection of the budgetary allocation to the SA Army will aid in addressing the replacement of the current combat dress system with the quality available within the market through collaboration with the CSIR.

15 April 2021 - NW783

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the Mokgareng Clinic in Taung in the North West that has been without generic medications for a while now and does not even have a glucometer to assist diabetic patients, by what date does he intend to deliver basic resources and equipment to the specified clinic?

Reply:

According to the North West Provincial Department of Health, Mokgareng Clinic has never been without medicines.

The Clinic has enough glucometers to assist diabetic patients. There may be times when one glucometer may be without batteries and because there is enough of them, the staff is able to continue with the work while the dead batteries of one glucometer are being replaced. The National Department of Health, working with the Provincial Department and the District will continue to monitor medicine as well as equipment availability in all facilities including for Mokgareng Clinic.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW631

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the repeated statements by the Council for Medical Schemes that their failure to successfully regulate and execute their duty in relation to the private sector is prompted by the fact that they have a limited workforce of just above 120 employees, what steps will he take to resolve the crisis, noting that there are heaps of grievances from patients and consumers and that these are the same medical schemes being considered for facilitating the National Health Insurance?

Reply:

The functions and operations of the Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) are provided for in the provisions of the Medical Schemes Act (131 of 1998). The primary function of the CMS is to provide regulatory oversight over the medical schemes industry. The CMS’ annual performance plan, including the targets outlined in this plan, are developed and finalised by the CMS’ executive team in full consultation with the Board. These plans are intended to address the challenges that the industry is facing, especially beneficiaries. The budget for the CMS is determined through an analysis of the previous year’s expenditure including any emergent projects – this budget is based on the provisions of the CMS Levies Act (58 of 2000). The CMS budget is based on the quantum of the levy that they can raise based on the number of principal members registered with medical schemes; and the number of medical schemes members is causally linked to the level of economic growth and performance.

The resource constraints plaguing the CMS are multifaceted and include a funding model that is heavily reliant on levies, regulatory tariffs that have not kept pace with consumer price index increases over time and the overall poor performance of the economy in recent years. To assist the CMS in addressing their budgetary constraints, the National Department of Health has been engaging with CMS to develop a new funding model that is more sustainable and reduces reliance on the fiscus, innovatively minimises reliance on medical scheme member levies and progressively increases the quantum of the budget that comes from regulatory tariffs (i.e. fees charged for accreditation of administrators, managed care organisations and registration of schemes and rules). Other innovative revenue generation considerations include raising additional revenues from Board of Trustee and Principal Officer training sessions as well as from webinars and conferences.

 

Finally, I would like to take this opportunity to correct the impression that Government is considering medical schemes for facilitating National Health Insurance (NHI). The administration of National Health Insurance (NHI) is not going to be outsourced. There is no contemplation of subcontracting any administrator/s or schemes to manage the affairs of the NHI Fund.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW704

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of students from each province currently participate in the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme; (2) what are the details of the (a) current budget allocated to each student to complete their medical studies in full, (b)(i) full amount and (ii) breakdown of the full amount each student received for study fees, accommodation fees, living expenses, travel expenses, stipends and any other expense covered by the programme (aa) in each of the past five academic years and (bb) since 1 January 2021 and (c) total cost of completing a medical degree in this programme for each student in each of the specified academic years; (3) who or what entity in the Republic of Cuba (a) receives the funding from our Government to be disbursed to the students and (b) is responsible for disbursing the funding to the students?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW788

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Notwithstanding his reply to question 27 on 25 February 2021 that COVID-19 related deaths are updated daily and that late reports and/or delays are updated subsequently upon collection of data, the excess deaths reported by the SA Medical Research Council (SAMRC) to have been COVID-19 related have not yet been added to the daily updates shared by him on public platforms and/or the information shared in relation to the report provided by the SAMRC (details furnished), (a) what are the reasons that he has not updated the daily statistics of COVID-19 deaths and (b) by what date will the specified reporting be done to truthfully reflect the death toll of COVID-19 related deaths?

Reply:

This question was previously responded to during a Portfolio Committee meeting. Nevertheless let us repeat our previous explanation as it suggests there is a lack of understanding of scientific terminology.

Excess deaths are typically defined as the difference between the total number of deaths reported in a specific time period and “expected” number of deaths in the same time periods.

The total number of deaths refers to the total number of people that died during a defined period of natural causes. The expected number of natural deaths is an estimate derived through modelling data, so it is not based on any confirmation of the actual cause of death. The model basically assumes that the trend in the number of deaths due to natural causes is similar to pre-COVID. Hence the excess deaths is an estimate as the difference between the total number of natural deaths and the estimated number of natural deaths. This exercise is useful for the purposes of assessing trends in mortality but cannot be used as an official statistics since it is based on an estimate. In the excess deaths estimate we cannot identify actual persons that may have died due to COVID.

(a) The Minister cannot update the official COVID death statistics based on an estimate of deaths. The official statistics is based on deaths of persons that are confirmed to have died due to COVID. This statistics is not an estimate.

(b) The official statistics of deaths due to COVID is an accurate representation of deaths in the country as each death reported is linked to the identity of a specific individual that died due to COVID. The excess deaths report from the MRC is an estimate that cannot be linked to the identity of a specific individual hence cannot form part of the official statistics.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW711

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Noting that the Ndlambe Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape is suffering from a debilitating drought and that several communities are totally without water for days at a time, what action is her department taking to assist the municipality to resolve its bulk water supply issues; (2) what actions are being taken by the Amathole Water Board to provide alternative sources of water supply to the communities of (a) Bathurst, (b) Alexandria and (c) Port Alfred; (3) whether there has been any investigation into sourcing water from the Fish River; if not, why not; if so, what is the status of such investigation; (4) whether she has found that these alternative sources would be a viable option to provide water to the municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what would be the (a) cost and (b) timelines for such a project

Reply:

1. Honourable Member, as you have correctly indicated, the challenges in the Ndlambe Local Municipality (LM) are as a result of a debilitating drought in that area of the Eastern Cape. The Department of Water Sanitation (DWS) is engaged in ongoing efforts to assist the municipality with challenges relating to the provision of water. To this end, there are ongoing bilaterals with the municipality through a Joint Operations Committee (JOC) and Project Steering Committee (PSC).

The DWS has provided financial support of R80 million to the municipality to alleviate the impact of the drought for the following projects which are expected to be completed by June 2021:

  • Construction of a 2Ml/day Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO)
  • Construction of a 3Ml/day Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant next to the current Waste Water Treatment Works in Port Alfred.

Further, the DWS has allocated R5.19 million for the supply and delivery of standby generators at strategic points to lessen water interruptions when there are power failures in the area. The funds will be utilised for:

    • Retrofitting and plumbing at households to try and minimize the water losses
    • installation of zonal water meters
    • installation of valves and pressure regulating valves that are to do water balances and pressure regulation which will also lessen water losses
    • Construction of a 4.4km pipeline WTW emergency water supply scheme for Bathurst

A further amount of R30 million has also been allocated to finish the work on the Brackish Water Reverse Osmosis (BWRO) plant in Port Alfred which was designed to purify the brackish water from the Sarel Hayward Dam as well as to complete the work on the pipelines from Cannon Rocks to Alexandria which will assist in pumping more water to Alexandria.

It is important to note that in addition to funding received from the DWS, the Ndlambe LM also receives funding through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG). The municipality is implementing a separate project to refurbish Alexandria’s current well field resources and to construct a BWRO plant at Cannon Rocks which will augment Alexandria’s water by 1Ml/day.

2. Amatola Water was appointed as an Implementing Agent by the Ndlambe LM to construct and complete the BWRO plant, and the pipelines from Cannon Rocks to Alexandria. The Water Board has not been appointed to do augmentation of water resources and they are not doing any work on Bathurst. The entity is providing water to Bushmans River and Kenton on Sea by means of well fields and a Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO) plant located at the Bushmans River.

The Amatola Water Board has approached the DWS to initiate a feasibility study for water augmentation throughout the Ndlambe LM area of jurisdiction, which is still under consideration. The Water Board is also implementing a Rapid Response Project in Alexandria utilising drought funding allocated by the DWS. The aim of the project is to find additional ground water for Alexandria and to connect it to the water distribution system.

3. An investigation was done in 2004, which considered sourcing water from the Fish River as part of a holistic study, the Albany Coast Situation Assessment. The recommended option was for the Glen Melville (Fish River) to be considered as a last resort, and only in the long term when local resources have been fully exploited, and also only if sea water desalination is not economical at that stage. Therefore, the current plan is to consider other alternative possible water sources for Ndlambe Local Municipality.

4. As indicated above, the DWS is currently funding the construction of the Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) and Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant to augment water supply to Port Alfred and Bathurst.

The construction of the WWR plant is a pilot project for future water resources for the rest of the province of the Eastern Cape. At least two thirds of the water augmented by a municipality should reach the Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW’s) and be reclaimed, and be purified to acceptable quality for domestic use. The cost of reclamation and purification of waste water is far less than the cost of purification of sea water. If this pilot project proves to be successful it may be implemented at all the towns within the Ndlambe Local Municipality.

(a) A Waste Water Reclamation plant costs about R7 per 1ml/day and the running cost is in the order of R7/m³. Therefore, the total cost depends on the size plant needed.

(b) The design and tender processes may take up to 6 months and the construction time estimation is 4 to 6 months, depending on the size of the plant and where it is situated; which would add up to an estimated 12 months for the whole process.

15 April 2021 - NW483

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans on 8 July 2020, wherein it was revealed that the Department of Defence paid costs of R8,000,000 and R22,000,000 related to the COVID-19 pandemic for the flights and accommodation of Cuban health specialists, why was it required of her department to pay such costs while it was reported that the Department of Health and the respective beneficiary provinces will carry the costs related to the Cuban health specialists; (2) whether her department has made any efforts to recover the costs from the (a) Department of International Relations and Cooperation and (b) Department of Health; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Commander in Chief requested medical support from the Republic of Cuba to assist in curving the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. In response to the Commander in Chief’s request, the Cuban Government offered a team that consisted of a Medical Health Care Brigade. The Department of Defence (DOD) was allocated with military health care professionals. The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) chattered an aircraft to transport the Cuban medical practitioners, who arrived in South Africa on 27 April 2020.

In adherence to the World Health Organisation COVID-19 regulations, the DOD established a quarantine centre for personnel entering the borders of the Republic of South Africa (RSA). The Cuban Medical Health Brigade was quarantined at the identified centre. On completion of the quarantine, there was a delay in securing accommodation in the different Provinces due to the Level 5 national lockdown.

Consequently both military and the civilian Medical Health Brigade from Cuba were transported in the SANDF chattered aircraft at the cost of R8, 227, 060. 00, and on arrival they were accommodated and quarantined at the identified quarantine centre at the cost of R22, 000, 000.

2. The DOD chattered an aircraft to transport the Cuban Medical Brigade in order to assist with the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic within the SANDF. Therefore with the pandemic having affected the whole country, the department carried the cost. In the interest of the national objective to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, the DOD paid for accommodation, chattering and quarantine.

15 April 2021 - NW492

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the (i) name, (ii) telephone number and (iii) email address of the Chief Information Officer for the Housing Development Agency, (b) are the reasons that the Promotion of Access to Information Requests directed to the Housing Development Agency are not responded to and (c) remedial action will she take in this regard to ensure the entity complies with the prescripts of the relevant legislation?

Reply:

I have been informed that the Housing Development Agency responded to a request for information by the Honourable Member on 9 April 2021.

 

15 April 2021 - NW671

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Health

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

The following tables reflect the details in this regard.

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (NDOH)

NAME OF COMPANY

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT

RRA TRADING

Security Guarding

R13 366 618.60

36 Months - All Forensic laboratories and MBOD/CCOD

(01 April 2020 – 31 March 2023)

12 Months - Civitas Building

( 01 April 2020 – 31 July 2021)

NATIONAL HEALTH LABOTORY SERVICE (NHLS)

NAME OF COMPANY

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT

Eldna Security Services

Not Applicable

(NHLS insourced the security from February and March 2018)

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

OFFICE OF HEALTH STANDARDS COMPLIANCE (OHSC)

NAME OF COMPANY

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT

Eldna Security Services

Security Guarding

R2 765 088.00

36 Months

(10 October 2020 – 10 October 2023)

SOUTH AFRICAN HEALTH PRODUCTS REGULATORY AUTHORITY (SAHPRA)

NAME OF COMPANY

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT

Tyeks Security Services

Security Guarding

In a process of procuring security service for 2021/2022 financial year

Not Applicable

SOUTH AFRICAN MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

NAME OF COMPANY

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT

Fidelity Services Group

Security Guarding

R 32 000 000.00

36 Months

(01 June 2019 – 31 May 2022)

END.

15 April 2021 - NW627

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) By what date does she intend to appoint permanent board members for all the water boards in the Republic and (b) what is delaying her from making the specified appointments?

Reply:

(a) There are permanent boards for the Amatola Water, Bloem Water, Mhlathuze Water, Overberg Water and Rand Water. The terms of these Water Boards are indicated in the table below:

Water Board

Term of office of the Board

Amatola Water

Appointed in 1 March 2021 with term ending at the end February 2025

Bloem Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Mhlathuze Water

Appointed in December 2018 with term ending at the end of November 2022

Overberg Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Rand Water

Appointed in October 2018 with term ending in September 2022

(b) The selection processes of members of permanent Boards for Lepelle Northern Water, Magalies Water, Sedibeng Water and Umgeni Water are underway. It is envisaged that the appointment processes will be finalised by the end of June 2021, should Cabinet concur with the recommendations tabled before it. The current status of the interim boards and selection processes of permanent boards is indicated below:

Water Board

Current Leadership Status

Measures in place to appoint permanent Boards

Lepelle Northern Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Magalies Water

Interim Board was appointed in July 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Sedibeng Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Umgeni Water

Interim Board was appointed in August 2020.

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

15 April 2021 - NW578

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What criteria were used to identify the 700 000 ha of state land that is currently available for lease, (b) who were responsible to draw up the final list and (c) what communication was sent out to farmers currently on some of the land parcels?

Reply:

a) There was an elaborate process that culminated in a narrow criterion, determining whether the property was vacant or underutilised (partially vacant). The process involved a desktop spatial analysis; physical verification; desktop agricultural potential analysis; verification of land restitution claims; and final verification utilising local departmental knowledge. Each one of these steps contain detailed activities that can be outlined should that be considered necessary. The focus, for purposes of this question, will be restricted to the desktop spatial analysis.

The desktop spatial analysis included the identification and sourcing of data sets; definition of the terms vacant and partially vacant (underutilised); defining the parameters to identify vacant and partially vacant agricultural state land; mapping agricultural state land; and performing a desktop Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis on the data.

Identification and Sourcing of Data

The datasets listed below were identified and obtained from the identified data custodians:

  • Cadastral data from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development;
  • Deeds Registration data from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development;
  • Land parcels identified as vacant by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure;
  • National Land Cover for the year 2017 from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development;
  • South African Protected Areas Database for the year 2018 from Environment, Forestry and Fisheries;
  • Indigenous Forests Inventory from Environment, Forestry and Fisheries;
  • Land Capability (Terrain Capability) from Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development; and
  • Traditional community boundaries from Traditional Affairs.

Definition of Terms and Parameters for determining Vacant Land

  • The term vacant refers to a piece of land that is not occupied or not being used for any specific purpose whilst the term partially vacant refers to a property when only parts of it have been classified as vacant.
  • The 2017 Land Cover dataset, which was used, is a national land cover classification generated using multispectral satellite imagery with a multi-temporal analysis technique, produced by National Geospatial Information within Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development.
  • The table below shows the selected land cover classes from the national land cover data which were utilised to identify agricultural land as vacant or not vacant.

Selected Land Cover Classes, 2017

No

Land Cover Class

Classification

1

Natural wooded

Vacant

2

Shrubland

Vacant

3

Grassland

Vacant

4

Waterbodies

Not vacant (depending on coverage)

5

Wetlands

Not vacant (depending on coverage)

6

Barren land

Vacant

7

Cultivated

Not vacant

8

Built-up

Not vacant

9

Mines and quarry

Not vacant

10

Planted Forest

Not vacant

  • Indigenous forest dataset was used to classify properties located in indigenous forest as not vacant.
  • The Protected Areas Database was used to classify properties located within these areas as not vacant.
  • Although terrain capability is one of three building blocks (soil, climate and terrain) for land capability, only terrain capability was used in this analysis. Terrain capability includes aspects such as slope gradient, slope direction, slope shape, ground roughness, altitude and streams (drainage network). Land with a terrain capability value between “Very Low and Low to Moderate” was subtracted from vacant and partially vacant land.
  • Land that is located within traditional community boundaries was regarded as not vacant.
  • State land acquired in terms of the Pro-active Land Acquisition Strategy (PLAS) and by the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights, was regarded as not available for redistribution.
  • Land that is claimed in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act was regarded as not available for redistribution, depending on the phase of the claim and options selected by the claimants.

Criteria Used

  • In view of what has been explained above, the ultimate criteria that was determined is that:
          • The land cover class is either grassland, barren land, shrubland or natural wooded;
          • the property is located on suitable terrain capability;
          • the property is less than 10% within an indigenous forest;
          • the property is less than 10% within a protected area;
          • the property is not located in an area which is likely being used for communal grazing;
          • the property is not part of Pro-active Land Acquisition Strategy (PLAS) land or State land acquired by the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights for settlement of claims;
          • the land parcel is not un-registered;
          • the aggregated vacant or partially vacant land available per property is bigger than 50 hectares; and
          • The property is not claimed in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act.

b) The final list was a product of collaboration amongst various business units of the Department in the manner outlined in the table below:

Desktop Spatial Analysis:

Chief Directorate: Property Management and Advisory Services

Desktop Agricultural Potential Analysis:

Directorate: Land Use and Soil
Management

Verification of Land Restitution Claims:

Commission on Restitution of Land Rights

Final Verification utilising local departmental knowledge

Provincial Shared Services Centres

c) No personal communication was sent out to farmers, however there were media briefings that were generally accessible to the public.

15 April 2021 - NW433

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the full package of assistance that her department has provided to farmers since the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 in 2020 and (b)(i) what total number of black farmers have benefited from the specified assistance and (ii) for what total amount did they benefit?

Reply:

a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development supplied 400 000 disposable masks, 200 000 reusable masks and 400 000 bars of soap for farmworkers.

(b)(i) The total number of black farmers who benefitted is unknown as the masks and bars of soap were mainly given to Organised Agricultural formations to distribute to farming operations irrespective of the race of farmers involved.

(ii) The expenditure was as follows: R13 700 000.00 – Masks.

R4 052 000.00 – Bars of soap.

15 April 2021 - NW184

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)   (a) Why and (b) for how long has the electricity been turned off at the Reygersdal Post Office in Atlantis; (2) What steps are being taken to ensure power is restored? (3) What steps are being taken to ensure a backup power system is put in place?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SAPO as follows:

1. (a) The Reygersdal branch’s electricity was disconnected due to cable theft in the area.

(b) The electricity was disconnected in mid-January 2021.

2. The electricity has since been restored.

3. The disconnection of electricity due to cable theft can not be predicted and planned for due to its nature. However, in instances where cable theft unexpectedly occurs, the Municipality is contacted to ensure urgent restorative maintanance to avoid prolonged disruption of services.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

15 April 2021 - NW849

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a comprehensive plan for the actual rollout of vaccines broken down into (i) time frames and the (ii) number of vaccines to be administered on each day and (b) what is being done to address the challenges with Emergency Medical Services in each province?

Reply:

a) The vaccination programme is aims reduce the morbidity and mortality of Covid-19. Fundamentally, it is to ensure community survival and manage economic survival. It will do through two main objectives. In the short term it is to manage severity of disease and reduce mortality by vaccinating the most vulnerable (health care workers, elderly and those with co-morbilidies); and in the medium term to build herd immunity by vaccinating everyone else.

(i) Phase 1 of the programme is targeting health care workers. This phase will be completed by end April 2021. Phase 2 of the Programme will be completed by the end of quarter 2 of the 2021/22 financial year. Phase 3 of the Programme will be completed by the end of the 2021/22 financial year.

(ii) We are estimating that on average we would vaccinate 50,000 persons per day in quarter 1; progressively increasing to on average vaccinating 135,000 persons per day in quarter 4.

b) The National Department of Health promulgated the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Regulations in December 2017. These regulations make provision for a licensing and inspectorate processes and also stipulate the minimum requirements to become an EMS provider for both the public and private sectors. The process of accreditation of EMS providers in compliance with the EMS Regulations is ongoing at provincial level. Only those EMS providers and ambulance units that meet the requirements are issued license token and allowed to operate within the respective health districts.

In addition, the National Department of Health (NDOH) together with the Office of Health Standards and Compliance (OHSC), in consultation with the National Committee for EMS (Provincial EMS Managers) developed the draft Regulations relating to Standards for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to facilitate standardization and equitable services in the provision of public and private EMS countrywide by all accredited EMS providers – now published for public comment. The proposed regulation will not only maintain a standard of service delivery but will also improve the quality of service as well as maintaining a minimum standard of service delivery. It will enhance the EMS Regulation, by detailing the standards required in the provision of a high quality EMS. It will also assist in refining the licensing and inspection process of the EMS Regulations by the respective provincial Licensing and Inspectorate Authorities.

A 5 year quality improvement plan is embedded in the assessment tool – the Ideal EMS Framework – with systems in place for district, provincial and national monitoring which includes the Office of Health Standards Compliance when these regulations are promulgated.

EMS will also form an integral part of the Quality Learning Centres (QLCs) envisaged in the Presidential National Quality Improvement Plan to create centres of excellence in each province. These QLCs are the spearhead for improving service delivery in preparation for NHI.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW535

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, in light of the dismissal of a certain person (name and details furnished), for illegally appointing his mistress to the position of Chief Director: Professional Ethics, he intends to institute a review of the fitness to hold office of all people appointed by the specified person; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As it stands all appointments made by this person were performed in line with the law and delegations and therefore they are all valid until declared invalid by a court of law. In addition, each appointment made creates a contract of employment and rights for employees in terms of the Labour Relations Act of 1995 and other labour legislation. The individual employees’ rights cannot be diminished by just one incident that has no bearing on their employment.

The dismissal of the person is regarded as a deterrent to all employees to act within the prescribed legislative framework and the organisation cannot conduct a witch-hunt where no allegation or evidence of wrong-doing exist. Such an approach will have a destabilising effect on the organisation. In this regard, it should be kept in mind that the recruitment and selection process is not undertaken by a single person, but by a Selection Committee comprising of at least three members and is guided by the Public Service Regulations, 2016, as amended, and the Departmental Policy on Recruitment and Selection. When the allegations came to the attention of the Executive Authority, the former employee was removed from all recruitment and selection processes within the organisation.

Since the dismissal of the former employee, the organisation has been at pains to institute additional controls in the human resources management environment to overcome the challenges identified in the recruitment and selection process, this includes but is not limited to a comprehensive legislative and policy framework checklist that accompanies each recruitment and selection process, as well as the review of human resources management policies.

Whistle-blowing Guidelines are in place to encourage and enable employees to raise serious concerns about fraud and corruption within the organisation or with the independent Audit Committee. All complaints are handled professionally and in line with the prevailing prescripts.

15 April 2021 - NW625

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the Johnson & Johnson vaccine that is being used to vaccinate persons is still part of a study; if not, is it a roll-out of an approved vaccine; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine that is currently being used to vaccinate healthcare workers is still part of a study.

The vaccine was used in a large international Phase 3 study which enrolled nearly 40,000 participants. The study showed that, in South Africa where we have the 501Y.V2 variant, the vaccine reduced severe disease by 81.7% and moderate disease by 64%. The Phase 3a study provided evidence of efficacy and safety of the vaccine. Because there is often a time lapse between a Phase 3 study being successfully completed, and the registration of a product for use outside of a clinical trial, an open label study is often used to bridge this gap. Phase 3b studies, the context in which this vaccine is being used, allows for early access to the vaccine and also enables the collection of additional data on safety, efficacy and how to introduce a new product. In a phase 3b study, although evidence of safety and efficacy is confirmed, informed consent must be obtained. In a phase 3b study, placebo is not used in the study and does not involve experimentation with any unproven vaccines.

A medicine is registered based on the evidence of safety and efficacy obtained from Phase 3 studies. The use of a registered medicine does not require informed consent, although as with any medicine, patients must understand what the vaccine is for, whether there are any specific side effects, and they must be willing to take it.

A phase 3b study and a vaccine roll-out both involve wide-scale implementation of Covid-19 vaccines, they differ only insofar as the type of regulatory approval required as well as the informed consent and information collected from those being vaccinated

END.

15 April 2021 - NW396

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that early in January 2021 a total number of 202 communities in KwaZulu-Natal served by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality had no water for nearly a week, and in view of the fact that although water has been restored, there are reports of civil action to be taken against the specified municipality, what immediate action will be taken to rehabilitate ageing water infrastructure considering the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic and the urgent need for water security?

Reply:

I have been informed by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality that the main cause of the water outages in eThekwini in early January 2021 was the lack of capacity within the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality to deal with mechanical and electrical failures. There was a delay in the awarding of the maintenance contracts which are now in the final stages of procurement and should be awarded within the next month.

I am further informed that electricity outages result in a shortage of supply when there is load shedding. Therefore, the unit that deals with electricity issues in the municipality has been approached to find a way of excluding Wiggins and Durban Heights Waterworks from load shedding. I have been advised that it has now been agreed that the two works will be excluded from load shedding when ESKOM imposes levels below Level 3 load shedding.  

15 April 2021 - NW848

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the percentage of posts currently vacant in State hospitals and (b) is the current recovery rate of COVID-19 patients with comorbidities in each province?

Reply:

(a)​  The overall percentage (%) rate for vacant posts in State Hospitals is 13%. The table below indicates the (%) rate of vacant posts in State Hospitals per Province as at end February 2021.

Province

% Vacant posts in Hospitals

Eastern Cape

13%

Free State

21%

Gauteng

11%

KwaZulu Natal

14%

Limpopo Province

7%

Mpumalanga

12%

North West

14%

Northern Cape

17%

Western Cape

15%

Overall Total

13%

(b) The recovery rate of COVID-19 patients without comorbidities reported as at 14 April 2021 is as below, please note that the comorbidities indicator is not covered as the current reporting classification does not include it:

 

PROVINCE

TOTAL RECOVERIES

 

14 April 2021

Eastern Cape

184,064

Free State

79,579

Gauteng

405,110

KwaZulu-Natal

319,830

Limpopo

60,970

Mpumalanga

74,225

North West

61,631

Northern Cape

33,215

Western Cape

268,249

Total

1,486,873

END

15 April 2021 - NW818

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. with reference to the Arts Organisation Support Funding, he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a list of all applications for projects funding in terms of the (a) names of applicants, (b) amounts approved and (c) date on which funding of each project (i) started and (ii) expired from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2020; 2. What (a) number of applications are still active and (b) is the name of each applicant; 3. Whether any of the applicants had successfully reapplied in 2020, but still have active projects, if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, (a) what is the (i) name of each applicant and (ii) amount of funding allocated and (b) has any payment been made? NW977E

Reply:

1. The following are the projects financially supported in the year under review.

LIST OF CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT PROJECTS FUNDED DURING 2020/21

   

#

Name & surname

Date of Approval

Budget

Duration of the Project

Active/Non Active

1

Mr Barney Mokgatle

18/05/2020

R300.000

Not yet started

Non-Active

2

Mr Molaodi Sekake

18/05/2020

R100.000

18/03/2021 – 30/09/2021

Active

3

Ms Rosemary Gray

18/05/2020

R100 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

4

Mr Barney Mokgatle

18/05/2020

R300 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

5

Mr Mandlakayise Dube

18/05/2020

R350 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

6

Ms Fikile Hlatshwayo

18/05/2020

R300 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

7

Mr Mothobi Mutloatse

18/05/2020

R380 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

8

Mr Reedwaan Vally / New Africa Books

18/05/2020

R1,100 000

20/09/2020 – 31/03/2021

Active

9

Congress Mahlangu and Andre Marais / Reading Incubator SOECA

18/05/2020

R1 000 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

10

South African Book Development Council (SABDC)

18/05/2020

Has received annual funding for the period under review

R 2 500 000

20/12/2020 – 25/02/2021

Active

11

Nonhlanhla Matshazi / Londilox

18/05/2020

R2 000 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

12

South African Literary Awards (Raks Seakhoa)

13/03/2020

Has received annual funding for the period under review

R1 500 000

20/12/2020 – 31/03/2021

Active

13

Roshnie Moonsammy (Afro Arts SA) / African Women Writers Network project

13/03/2020

Has received funding in the period under review

R750 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

14

UKZN Time of the Writer Festival

13/03/2020

R800 000

01/07/2020 – 31/12/2020

Active

15

KZN Music Imbizo

24/08/2020

R1060,000

31/03/2021

Completed

16

Crown Gospel Awards

22/08/2020

R2000,000

31/03/2021

Active

17

Africa Rising International Film Festival (Streamed)

25/06/2019

R1,200,000

03/2019 – 05/2021 (2 yrs)

Active

18

Fashion Industry Awards (online launch)

01/09/2020

R500,000

15/02/2021

Active

19

Groovafest

17/12/2020

R1 000 000

31/03/2021

Active

20

Fashion Heritage Social Entrepreneur capacity building (online program)

01/09/2020

R1000 000

31/03/2021

Active

21

Content Creation/Innovative Hubs (Animation)

 

R 3 000 000

Not Started

Non Active

23

Emerging Creatives capacity building program (virtual & steamed)

22/09/2020

R1190 000

31/03/2021

Active

24

Dr Wally Serote Reading Incubator

 

R 1 000 000

 

Active

25

BOM Music Development Incubator Programme

 

R1 000 00

 

Completed

26

Playhouse company Incubator

 

R1 000 000

 

Active

27

Arts in Motion Incubator Programme

 

R1 000 000

 

Completed

28

Arts Cape Incubator

 

R1 000 000

Not started

Non Active

29

Reading Incubator & Athlone Hub

 

R 700 000

 

Active

30

Training program (Amambazo Mobile Academy)

16/07/2018

R12 million

30/06/2021

Non Active

31

INDONI SA

 

R10 milliom

Not Strated

Non Active

32

Covid Book and Women Network

-

R840 000

Not sarted

Non Active

33

South African Roadies Association (SARA) International Relations

21/12/2020

R1,265,000

31/03/2023

Active

34

CCIFSA

08/05/2020

R2.5millin

31/03/2021

Active

36

Northern Cape Provincial CADP

 

0.00

 

Active

37

Eastern Cape Provincial CADP

26/02/2020

450,000

31/03/2021

Active

38

Western Cape CADP

09/03/2021

450,000

31.04/2021

Active

39

Limpopo Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Active

41

North West CADP

08/03/2020

300,000

30/04/2021

Active

42

Gauteng Provincial CADP

10/03/2020

300,000

31/03/2021

Active

43

Mpumalanga Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Active

44

Free State Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Acrive

45

KZN Provincial CADP

26/02/2021

450,000

31/03/2021

Active

47

National Arts Festival

 

R3,5 million

 

Completed

48

Mai Mai

17/11/2020

R2. million

31/03/2021

Active

49

South African National Book Development Policy Consultative Session (s)

-

R1 300 000

Not started

Non Active

50

Downtown Studios

15/06/2020

R6 million

31/03/2020

Active

51

District Six

-

R3 million

Not started

Non Active

52

African Book Design Fair

-

R300 000

Not Started

Non Active

53

Spoken Word Youth Performance Poetry ( Hear my Voice)

 

R500 000

 

Active

54

Public Art project in Tembisa, Gauteng

30/06/2020

R250,000

31/03/2020

Active

55

Public Art project at Emakhazeni, Mpumalanga

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2020

Active

56

SAMIC Conference

-

R604 000

Not Started

Non Active

57

Public Art project at Salt River, Western Cape

30/06/2020

R400,000

31/03/2021

Active

58

Public Art project at Eluthuthu, Eastern Cape

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2021

Active

59

Gateways Public Art at Several Municipalities

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2021

Active

60

KZN_ Wushini

 

R400 000

Not started

Non Active

61

LP_TLZ Development Projects

 

R400 000

Not stared

Non Active

62

MPUMALANGA_ Emthojeni

   

Not started

Non Active

65

Writers Guild of South Africa

October 19

R700 000

2019 -2021

Active

66

Siters Working in Film and TV

0ctober 2019

R246 000

2019 -2021

Active

67

South African Guild of Actors

19/07/2019

R300 000

31/03/2021

Active

68

South African Screen Federation (SASFED

19/07/2-19

R1 000 000

31/03/2021

Active

69

Independent Black Filmmakers Collective (IBFC)

1+9/07/2019

R964 750

31/03/2021

Active

70

South African Arts & Culture Youth Forum (SAACYF)

03=09=2019

R1,7 million

31/03/2020

Completed

71

Open Design Afrika

02/09/2020

R300 000

31/03/2021

Completed

72

The Village Knockout Foundation

22/11/2021

R516 850

31/03/2021

Active

73.

Marang Youth Development

22/11/2021

R600 000

31/03/2021

Active

74.

Somelezi Development & Project

22/11/2021

R638 000

31/03/2021

Active

75.

The Filed Band Foundation

22/11/2021

R700 000

31/03/2021

Active

76

Sizovelela Community Development

22/11/2021

R572 000

31/03/2021

Active

77.

Make It Happen (NPO)

22/11/2021

R500 000

31/03/2021

Active

78.

Unity and Cultural Diversity Council (NPO)

22/11/2021

R554 000

31/03/2021

Active

79.

Steelpan and Marimba Youth Development

03/02/2021

R590 000

31/03/2021

completed

80.

Ndwanenhle Rural Development

15/12/2020

R583 150

31/03/2021

Completed

2 . (a) 44 applications / projects are still active and the (b) names are reflected in the table above

13 April 2021 - NW658

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the burglary and theft of weapons at the TEK Base in Thaba Tswane, which was reported in December 2019, what is the total number of non-SA National Defence Force staff members who were charged; (2) whether the specified members have appeared in a court of law; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Mr Mooketsi an employee of the Department of Education, Gauteng who was out on bail for an unrelated armed robbery case was arrested  in Springs in possession of an R4 Assault Rifle and 3 x empty R4 magazines. 

2. Mr Mooketsi was charged and appeared at the Springs Magistrate Court on February and April 2020 respectively.  He was remanded in custody pending his next court appearance on 04 May 2020.  The case was then postponed to 20 August 2020 for trial.  The accused was found guilty and sentence to 6 years imprisonment.”

13 April 2021 - NW875

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of learners who (a) are registered with her department do not have birth certificates and (b) do not have birth certificates have parents who are (i) South African citizens and (ii) foreign nationals in each province?

Reply:

(a)(b) (i)(ii) Refer Annexure A

12 April 2021 - NW209

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, with reference to the expansion of the State’s capacity to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, which gave cause for the Level 5 lockdown under the regulations, will her Office furnish Mr J J McGluwa with the full details of all state funded initiatives for the expansion of the response capacity to the COVID-19 pandemic in each province and the costs thereof since 25 March 2020; if not, why not; if so, (a) who has a final say in respect of the contents of the COVID-19 regulations, (b) what methodology is employed to decide on the contents of the regulations, (c) what is the nature of the evidence that is considered to formulate the regulations, (d) how is the credibility and scientific or other expert evidence determined and (e) what quality control measures have been put in place; (2) what measures are in place to ensure (a) transparency in execution of the functions mentioned above and (b) that citizens are able to exercise their rights as provided for terms of section 34 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) allocated funding from existing grants within the department in support of service delivery programmes as well as to augment the resources made available by affected organs of state from their own resources on the efforts to combat the spread of covid-19 pandemic. The details of the disaster management funded initiatives for the augmentation of the response capacity to the COVID-19 pandemic in each province and the costs thereof since 25 March 2021 are as follows:

An amount of R466 392 000 (R466.4 million) from the Provincial Disaster Relief Grant was transferred in March 2020 to the Departments of Health in all provinces primarily for the procurement of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Ventilators.

Table 1: funding allocation to Provincial Departments of Health for Covid-19 response measures: Provincial Disaster Relief Grant- 2019/2020 FY

No.

Province

Amounts allocated to Provincial Departments of Health

 

Eastern Cape

R 44 551 000

 

Free State

R 12 429 000

 

Gauteng

R115 996 000

 

KwaZulu-Natal

R138 918 000

 

Limpopo

R 42 449 000

 

Mpumalanga

R 33 993 000

 

Northern Cape

R 6 224 000

 

North West

R 18 540 000

 

Western Cape

R 53 292 000

 

Total

R466 392 000

An amount of R150 970 000 (R151 million) from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant was transferred in May 2020 to 246 municipalities in all provinces primarily for Covid-19 response measures. The priority areas for allocated funding were (i) Sanitation, (ii) Waste Management, (iii) Decontamination of specific selected public spaces, (iv) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and (v) Hygiene packs.

Table 2: funding allocation to 246 municipalities in all provinces for Covid-19 response measures: Municipal Disaster Relief Grant- 2020/2021 FY

No.

Province

No. of municipalities funded

Amounts allocated to local municipalities within respective provinces

 

Eastern Cape

37

R42 787 000

 

Free State

22

R 8 610 000

 

Gauteng

8

R 5 276 000

 

KwaZulu-Natal

53

R47 499 000

 

Mpumalanga

17

R 9 596 000

 

Limpopo

27

R14 579 000

 

Northern Cape

31

R 3 137 000

 

North West

22

R11 559 000

 

Western Cape

29

R 7 927 000

 

Total

246

R150 970 000

In May 2020, The National Treasury has given the Department of Cooperative Governance approval for municipalities to reprioritise their 2019/20 Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) allocations, for urgent repairs to water and sanitation infrastructure, to improve their functionality in reliable delivery of basic services. A total of 335 projects were reprioritised to the value of R1.6 billion, with 187 projects under construction and 51 completed to date (See attached document for provincial details).

The reprioritisation by municipalities in 2020/21 financial year has been very low, with only 109 projects registered for implementation. The approval granted by the National Treasury in July 2020 indicated that of municipal MIG allocations can be reprioritised for urgent repairs to water and sanitation infrastructure to improve functionality of infrastructure, and a further 10% for sanitisation of public transport facilities, which includes repairs to municipal owned quarantine sites. The total value of these projects, as per municipal

applications, is R474, 595,236. A total of 50 projects are currently under implementation and 9 are completed to date (See table below for provincial details).

 

 

In terms of sub-question:

a) Cabinet.

b) The National Corona-Virus Command Council (NCCC) receives reports from the NATJOINTS and the Ministerial Advisory Committee (MACs). It considers the reports and deliberates on the required regulations and formulates a recommendation to Cabinet.

c) The following factors, amongst others, play a key role in the determination of the regulations:

(i) the extent of the rate of infection (e.g. number of active cases per 100 000 population, rate of increase / decrease of active cases etc).

(ii) the readiness of the health system to cope with the number of infections (e.g. availability of hospital beds, number of health care workers infected etc.);

(iii) the advice and analysis of the Minster of Health’s Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAC), made up of a wide range of science and health experts and the NATJOINTS, made up of the Directors-General of the respective national sector departments.

d) The scientific evidence is quality assured by the MAC against peer reviewed publications of research conducted, where such publication is available.

e) The decisions of Cabinet on the content of the regulations are drafted in the correct layout by legislative drafters, which are legally vetted by the Office of the Chief State Law Adviser, before it is signed by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs for publication in the Gazette to give it the force of law.

(2)(a) All approved regulations are published in the Government Gazette. Before the publication in the Gazette, where major changes to regulations are to come into effect, often the President addresses the nation on those changes. After the publication in the Gazette, the Minister of COGTA leads media briefings involving other relevant ministers on the contents of Regulations.

(b) Section 34 of the Constitution guarantees the right of access to courts. The courts have remained operational during the declaration of the national state of disaster. To manage the spread of the virus, directions were issued by the

Minister of Justice and Correctional services and directives were issues by Heads of Courts.

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW915

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What total number of (i) Directors-General and (ii) provincial Heads of Department have signed their performance contracts and (b) how does he intend to hold the specified officials to account should they fail to meet the agreed upon performance standards?

Reply:

a) All the DGs and HoDs who were required to sign performance agreements for the 2020/2021 performance cycle have submitted.

(i) Out of the 54 national departments and Offices of the Premier, 39 DGs were required to and signed performance agreements. The remainder of the DGs comprises of 13 acting DGs and two (2) newly appointed. These officials only have to sign performance contracts three months after assumption of duties.

(ii) The 68 HoDs who were required to sign performance agreements have submitted it. At the provincial level, 24 were acting HoDs, three (3) newly appointed, one (1) on special leave and one (1) on precautionary suspension.

b) In terms of section 7(b) of the Public Service Act 103 of 1994, each individual Executing Authority has all the necessary powers to manage performance in their respective departments.

End

12 April 2021 - NW519

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) Whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. a) No employee of the Department of Public Service and Administration performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to their work in the past five financial years.

b) The functions and performance of all employees are governed by their Job Descriptions, Employment Contracts, Performance Agreements and regular Performance Assessments as per applicable Directives, laws and policies.

b. (i) Zero (0);

(ii) Not applicable.

2. No such requests nor approvals were made by any employee as the Department does not have such a policy.

a) The Department does not have a policy that requires employees to perform work outside of normal working hours additional to their responsibilities as this would be irregular and violates the principles of fair labour practice.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

End

12 April 2021 - NW225

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the reasons that The Presidency has not fired a certain person (name and details furnished) for failure to submit financial disclosures and embarrassing The Presidency through the person’s involvement in the contract (details furnished), given the President’s stated mission to fight corruption?

Reply:

In the course of the investigation into the affairs of the Gauteng Department of Health concerning irregularities in the appointment of a service provider to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) informed The Presidency that a senior Presidency official may have committed misconduct in violation of the Public Service Act, 1994.

The SIU consequently recommended the instituting of disciplinary proceedings against the official. In terms of possible misconduct identified by the SIU, the official has been placed on precautionary suspension in accordance with paragraph 2.7 (2), Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook, pending an internal investigation into the official’s alleged misconduct. The outcome of the internal investigation will determine the cause of action to be taken by The Presidency in compliance with the law.

Thank You.

12 April 2021 - NW210

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McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)With reference to the Government’s formulation of the risk adjusted strategy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, (a) what measures are in place to ensure that the regulations meet the requirements of section 36 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, in particular the effect of the regulations that suspend and/or limit any of the fundamental rights in Chapter 2 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and (b)(i) where and (ii) how can the resources upon which the contents of the regulations have been premised be accessed by members of the public; (2) whether minutes and/or any other resolutions passed that gave effect to the regulations are kept by the secretariat of the COVID-19 Command Council; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) on what date will the minutes and/or resolutions be made public?

Reply:

1. (a) National Corona Virus Command Council (NCCC), amongst its responsibilities, ensures that the regulations required to address, prevent

and combat the spread of COVID-19 are reasonable and justifiable. In addition, the measures introduced were necessary to save lives.

(b) (i) The records of the NCCC meetings are kept by the Cabinet Secretariat;

(ii) The records, by virtue of it being a Cabinet structure, is secret and is not as accessible to members of the public.

2. The records of the NCCC meetings are kept by the Cabinet Secretariat

a) The records are kept electronically;

b) The records, by virtue of it being a Cabinet structure, is secret and is not as accessible to members of the public.

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW224

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What total number of (a) staff members and (b) political appointees in (i) senior management and (ii) middle management in (aa) The Presidency and (bb) his Office have submitted their financial disclosures by 21 January 2021; (2) what (a) total number of employees including their (i) names and (ii) positions failed to submit their disclosures and (b) actions has been taken in respect of each individual who failed to submit financial disclosures by 21 January 2021?

Reply:

The 2019/20 Financial Disclosure Period:

1. By 31 August 2020, The Presidency had a [1]100 % compliance level in terms of all staff members submitting their financial disclosures.

The Breakdown is per financial disclosure category:

a) Members of the Senior Management Service - All 58 submitted their financial disclosures by 30 May 2020.

b) Members in the Middle Management category (MMS12) – all [2]27 submitted their financial disclosures by 31 July 2020.

c) Members in the Middle Management category (MMS11) – all 51 submitted their financial disclosures by [3]30 August 2020.

d) Members in the OSD12/Higher category – All 12 submitted their financial disclosures by 31 July 2020.

2. All designated employees submitted their financial disclosures. Please note that the report is on employees’ compliance to the timelines of the Financial Disclosure Framework and not the content/Financial information that was disclosed.

Thank you.

  1. The 100% compliance level pertains to all employees who were employed by The Presidency during the official disclosure period and not employees who joined The Presidency after the disclosure period. All employees who submitted their financial disclosures are employed in terms of the Public Service Act, thus, in all categories there is no definition of a ‘political appointee’.

  2. A member who joined The Presidency in July 2020, submitted his disclosure in August 2020. So in total all 28 MMS12 members submitted their financial disclosures.

  3. Please Note that the Financial Disclosure Framework indicates that a newly appointed designated employee should disclose his/her financial interest 30 days after assumption of duty. An employee became part of MMS11 in October 2020, meaning that currently The Presidency has 52 MMS11 members. The Ethics Office could not register the employee on the Financial Disclosure System in 2020 due to intermittent problems with the system and not due to failure by the employee to disclose his financial interest.

12 April 2021 - NW307

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether he has been informed of reports that certain public sector unions are demanding wage increases of up to 10% during the upcoming round of wage negotiations (details furnished); (2) (a) what are the full details of all the various demands that have so far been tabled by public sector unions in relation to the upcoming round of wage negotiations and (b) will he furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a list consisting of the (i) name of each labour union and (ii) demands they have tabled; (3) Whether it is the position of his department that a wage increase of 10% is considered a reasonable demand; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) can only respond to formal demands tabled by labour in the Public Service Coordinating Council (PSCBC). At the time of this reply, the unions to the PSCBC had not formally tabled their demands as per Council processes. Therefore the MPSA has not been informed of any wage increase demand of up to 10% during the upcoming round of wage negotiations.

(2)(a) The union parties to the PSCBC tabled their demands in relation to the upcoming round of wage negotiations on first March 2021 and they are attached as annexure to this reply.

(2(b)(i)(ii) The information requested is not available for the reasons indicated above.

(3) The process of engagement between parties in the PSCBC on wage negotiations occurs under the purview of the PSCBC. The employer will negotiate on the basis of fairness, equity, sustainability and affordability.

End

12 April 2021 - NW970

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What total amount was spent on public service announcements at (a) eNCA, (b) SABC 2, (c) SABC 3 and (d)(i) print and (ii) digital media platforms for COVID-19 awareness campaigns in the period 1 March 2020 and 1 March 2021?

Reply:

The GCIS did not spend any funds for the flighting of PSA’s. The Public Service Announcements were flighted by all major media houses free of charge both on TV and on Radio.

a) ENCA flighted 11 spots and the total value of the PSA’s was R125 250.00

b) SABC 1, 2 & 3 flighted a total of 14 spots and the value of the PSA’s was R300 750.00. The cost breakdown per station is not available.

c) Same as above.

d) (i) No PSA’s were placed

(ii) Digital media platforms

The GCIS received ad grants from Facebook, Twitter as well as Google for use in COVID-19 awareness campaigns. This was a global campaign from the platform owners to assist Governments across the world in sharing COVID-19 information

Facebook: 4 ad grants totalling US$ 88 031 or roughly R1,3 million to use on GovernmentZA page. Spent to date: R680 000

Twitter: received ad grants from Twitter totalling R381 000 - Spent to date: R381 000

Google: Initial grant for the search campaign totalled US$5,5 million that was set to expire on 31 December 2020. This was extended until 31 December 2021. An addition grant of US$2,5 million was received in March 2021. Total grant: US$7,5 million or roughly R115 million. Spent to date: R77 000 000

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW489

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What number of public servants have taken early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at (i) national and (ii) provincial level and (b) will he furnish Dr M M Gondwe with the breakdown of the relevant number in each government department and (c) what number of these public servants were (i) teachers and (ii) nurses?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) The number of public servants who took early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at national level was 2 879.

(1) (a) (ii) The number of public servants who took early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at provincial level was 2 005.

(1) (b) The breakdown of the relevant number of early retirements in each government department is depicted in the table below:

 

Number of Public Servants that retired early by department from 27 March 2020

National/Provincial department

Total

Total

4,884

Eastern Cape

Total

322

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

8

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

2

 

Education

215

 

Health

54

 

Office of the Premier

3

 

Provincial Treasury

4

 

Roads and Public works

6

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

20

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

2

 

Transport

8

Free State

Total

135

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

3

 

Education

105

 

Health

10

 

Police, Roads and Transport

7

 

Social Development

10

Gauteng

Total

207

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

1

 

Economic Development

4

 

Education

87

 

Health

107

 

Human Settlements

6

 

Social Development

2

KwaZulu-Natal

Total

502

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

15

 

Arts and Culture

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2

 

Education

368

 

Health

101

 

Office of the Premier

2

 

Public Works

2

 

Social Development

3

 

Transport

8

Limpopo

Total

360

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

5

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

5

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

1

 

Education

283

 

Health

48

 

Office of the Premier

1

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

11

 

Social Development

3

 

Transport and Community Safety

3

Mpumalanga

Total

139

 

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

5

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

1

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

2

 

Education

93

 

Health

28

 

Provincial Treasury

2

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

7

National

Total

2,879

 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

30

 

Basic Education

4

 

Correctional Services

382

 

Employment and Labour

7

 

Energy

2

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

1

 

Government Communication and Information System

2

 

Health

2

 

Higher Education and Training

110

 

Home Affairs

36

 

Human Settlements

2

 

International Relations and Cooperation

8

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

45

 

Military Veterans

2

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

4

 

National Treasury

9

 

Office of the Chief Justice

9

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

2

 

Police

2,127

 

Public Service and Administration

2

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

44

 

Social Development

1

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

4

 

Statistics South Africa

3

 

Water and Sanitation

41

North West

Total

106

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

1

 

Arts, Culture, Sports and Recreation

3

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

4

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

1

 

Education

69

 

Health

20

 

Provincial Treasury

1

 

Public Works and Roads

5

Northern Cape

Total

34

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

1

 

Education

26

 

Health

4

 

Roads and Public Works

1

 

Social Development

1

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

1

Western Cape

Total

200

 

Agriculture

1

 

Community Safety

1

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

1

 

Education

119

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

2

 

Health

60

 

Provincial Treasury

7

 

Social Development

6

 

The Premier

3

(1) (c) (i) The number of teachers who took early retirement during this period was 1 274

(1) (c) (ii) The number of nurses who took early retirement during this period was 214

The information indicated above was obtained from PERSAL as on 1 March 2021.

End

12 April 2021 - NW574

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What are the reasons that the court order in Case No 22232/2017, Clark v Director-General of Home Affairs and Others in the Western Cape Division of the High Court on 12 March 2018, has not been complied with fully and (b) by what date will the court order be fully complied with?

Reply:

The Department, through the Acting Chief Director: Legal Services, is in constant communication with Mr Tjad Clark to obtain certain information related to the application required in order to implement the judgment. Thus far progress has been made and the relevant section is tracing the application as per clarification received from Mr CLark.

END

12 April 2021 - NW223

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What is the duration of the suspension of a certain person (name and details furnished); (2) whether the specified person has been transferred and/or seconded to another position in The Presidency; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the position which the person currently holds and (b) for how long will the person be in the specified position; (3) whether the person has retained all the previously allocated privileges and benefits such as salary, security detail, electronic equipment such as a cell phone and a laptop; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons for this and (b) total amount has the person been paid in salaries since the suspension?

Reply:

(1)  Ms Khusela Sangoni has been placed on precautionary suspension with effect from 02 February 2021 pending an investigation. The investigation is mandated to be completed within 60 days from date of inception.
 
(2) As stated in 1 above, Ms Khusela Sangoni has been placed on precautionary suspension until the finalisation of the investigation. She has not been transferred or seconded to any other department.
 
(3) Ms Khusela Sangoni has retained all her allocated privileges since the precautionary suspension

a) Her suspension is in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 2.7(2) of Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook, with full pay. The precautionary suspension does not constitute a punishment.

b) She receives her salary at the end of the month, where she will be paid her salary in full.

Thank you.

09 April 2021 - NW948

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)How often does his department verify the data on the Persal system in an effort to ensure (a) its accuracy and (b) that there are no ghost employees on the system; (2) what are the reasons that some government departments are still making use of manual pay slips as opposed to electronic pay slips despite the fact that electronic pay slips contribute towards the reduction of printing costs and root out ghost employees in the public service; (3) by what date is it envisaged that the Government will phase out the manual submission and formally introduce electronic submission of leave forms for Public Service employees as part of modernising the public service?

Reply:

1. Each department is required to verify the payroll reports on a monthly basis to ensure that every employee receiving payment from the department is eligible for such payment.

a) The capturing, maintenance and verification of data on PERSAL is a decentralised responsibility of each relevant Head of Department. Therefore it is the responsibility of each Head of Department to assign a designated employee as a PERSAL controller to manage data accuracy. PERSAL controllers in every department are accountable for institutionalizing, maintaining and communicating procedures to ensure continuous control over access, security and maintenance of data records within their departments.

b) Treasury Regulations prescribe the verification of payroll reports to ensure that only legitimately employed persons receive payment. According to Treasury Regulation 8.3.4:

For all employees, the person in charge at the respective pay-points must certify on the date of payment that all persons listed on the payroll report are entitled to payment. Employees paid by cheque must sign the payroll report when collecting their cheques.” Regulation 8.3.4 further specifies “These payroll reports must then be returned to the Chief Financial Officer of the department within 10 days and the accounting officer must ensure that all pay-point certificates have been received on a monthly basis.”

2. There is no specific set date for the complete phasing out of manual submission as the relevant technology platform is currently not capable of on-boarding all government departments at the same time. The introduction of electronic payslips is therefore, being rolled out in a phased approach. The migrating of departmental users to an electronic payslip platform requires a close partnership between the PERSAL controllers at National Treasury, department specific HRM employees working on PERSAL, Government Information Technology Officer (GITO) per department, the account management team at SITA as well as their mainframe team. This process impacts the on-boarding process as it depends on the readiness of specific departments to move to an electronic payslip platform at different times depending on the time departments receive the proposal from SITA, process it and verify employees and their respective email addresses to ensure the correct payslip goes to the correct employee. It has also been indicated by some departments that not all employees have access to emails which impacts on their ability to access electronic payslips.

3. The automation of leave is part of the functionality to be provided by the Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS). National Treasury, which is the lead department in the IFMS Programme, is currently in the process of appointing a service provider to design the system to meet the requirements of the Public Service. Once this has been completed and the IFMS implemented, the system will address, amongst others, the automation of leave.

In view of the above, it is not possible to indicate at this stage on which date manual leave forms will be phased out and replaced with an electronic system.

End

09 April 2021 - NW999

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What is the total number of students who (a) owe money to institutions, whose National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) payments have been delayed and (b)(i) are funded by NSFAS have failed the final exam of the 2020 academic year and (ii) what is the financial cost of the failure; (2) what is the total over enrolment (a) maximum limit and (b) above maximum limit accepted by institutions to NSFAS for 2020; (3) what are the reasons for not implementing the recommendations of the Heher Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education and Training on the viability of tertiary education funding; (4) whether his department will continue with fee-free higher education considering the challenges facing NSFAS; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) A detailed template was sent to all institutions to gain an understanding of the current levels of student debt and the categories of students that carry debt, including NSFAS students. This information was due on 26 March 2021. It should be noted that eligible NSFAS qualifying continuing and returning students with debt are allowed to register and will receive their allowances in the first week of April 2021, dependent on academic results and registration data received from institutions.  No eligible NSFAS applicants and NSFAS returning students in TVET colleges are required to pay registration fees. The first payment of allowances for 2021 was made from 05 March 2021, upon receipt of registration data, for colleges that disburse allowances to students. However, in respect of the rest of the institutions, payments were made on 19 March 2021 upon receipt of their registration data.

(b)   This information will be available from NSFAS on 31 March 2021 as NSFAS is still awaiting academic results from some institutions to conclude 2021 funding decisions for returning and continuing qualifying NSFAS students. Funding for NSFAS returning students is dependent on academic progression. The Department has established that about 10% of TVET college student debt is recoverable and 90% is unrecoverable. However, in an effort to avert exclusion of students due to an inability to afford fees, TVET colleges writes off 90% of the student debt which is not recoverable.   

2. (a) The table below reflects the 2020 Ministerial approved enrolment planning targets for First Time Entering Undergraduates (FTEN) and total undergraduate enrolments.

 

TVET College

Continuing Student

New Applicant

Total

Boland

2 138

2 729

4 867

Buffalo City

1 602

2 076

3 678

Capricorn

4 441

4 514

8 955

Central Johannesburg

1 780

3 329

5 109

Coastal KZN

3 425

5 392

8 817

College of Cape Town

2 348

2 821

5 169

Eastcape Midlands

1 834

2 700

4 534

Ehlanzeni

2 180

3 694

5 874

Ekurhuleni East

2 061

4 966

7 027

Ekurhuleni West

4 209

5 320

9 529

Elangeni

3 261

3 311

6 572

Esayidi

3 163

3 306

6 469

False Bay

1 695

1 951

3 646

Flavius Mareka

1 184

2 937

4 121

Gert Sibande

3 474

4 271

7 745

Goldfields

872

1 843

2 715

Ikhala

1 750

2 096

3 846

Ingwe

2 375

2 558

4 933

King Hintsa

943

1 429

2 372

King Sabata Dalindyebo

2 363

3 043

5 406

Lephalale

1 077

1 287

2 364

Letaba

1 846

1 860

3 706

Lovedale

1 385

1 477

2 862

Majuba

5 397

5 773

11 170

Maluti

2 158

3 303

5 461

Mnambithi

1 335

1 805

3 140

Mopani South East

2 226

2 936

5 162

Motheo

1 770

5 175

6 945

Mthashana

1 706

1 783

3 489

Nkangala

3 401

3 362

6 763

Northern Cape Rural

688

2 119

2 807

Northern Cape Urban

1 405

2 288

3 693

Northlink

4 129

4 298

8 427

Orbit

2 222

2 307

4 529

Port Elizabeth

1 631

2 412

4 043

Sedibeng

3 480

4 759

8 239

Sekhukhune

1 523

2 197

3 720

South Cape

1 417

2 877

4 294

South West Gauteng

4 066

5 330

9 396

Taletso

1 094

2 300

3 394

Thekwini

1 845

2 592

4 437

Tshwane North

2 920

4 230

7 150

Tshwane South

2 131

3 177

5 308

Umfolozi

3 034

3 606

6 640

Umgungundlovu

1 883

2 226

4 109

Vhembe

5 150

6 167

11 317

Vuselela

1 524

2 586

4 110

Waterberg

1 598

1 836

3 434

West Coast

1 625

3 421

5 046

Western

2 702

3 447

6 149

Total

115 466

157 222

272 688

 

(b) It should be noted that the Department has only received preliminary data from universities on their 2020 enrolments and this is therefore subject to change. There may have been institutions that have over-enrolled slightly on their enrolment plans and the impact on NSFAS is not yet known.  More reliable data on enrolments will be received from universities at the end of April 2021. Once they have identified all their graduates, the Department will receive the final audited data at the end of July 2021. Preliminary data indicates that UNISA is the only institution that has exceeded its FTEN 2020 enrolment plan target. The approved enrolment target for FTEN students for UNISA was 57 703. According to UNISA’s first submission of HEMIS data, the University has enrolled 77 840 FTEN students. According to data received from NSFAS on 23 March 2021, the entity has funded 74 427 FTEN students in 2020. 

(3) The Commission completed its report and handed it to the former President on 31 August 2017. Government considered the report through an Inter-Ministerial Task Team and agreed with many of the recommendations, some of which are either currently being planned or implemented. Four recommendations made by the Commission were not accepted:

- Community Education and Training only concerns itself with adult basic education;

- A universal model of Income Contingent Deferred Loans underwritten by government;

- Funding (loans) should be extended to cover students studying at private higher education institutions; and

- University students should not pay application fees nor registration fees.

(4) Government’s policy remains the provision of fully subsidised free higher education and training for poor and working-class South Africans. Cabinet has requested an urgent review of government policy on student financial aid, which must be completed within the next three months. The focus will be on sustainable modelling of NSFAS as well as to explore a different public-private sector mechanism to enable better support for the “missing middle” income bracket.

09 April 2021 - NW786

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Given that the community of Moloto village in the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality in Mpumalanga have been hard hit by a water crisis that has forced the residents to buy water from persons who have drilled boreholes, by what date will she ensure that the specified municipality will provide water to the residents of Moloto village?

Reply:

The information was obtained from the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), Mpumalanga Province.

The municipality has been implementing a project for the development of groundwater supply scheme for Moloto with the aim of addressing the chronic water shortage faced by the above-mentioned village. The details of the project are as follows:

Name of Project: Moloto Village Ground Water Supply Scheme

Project scope: The project scope is as follows:

  • Drilling and equipping of 10 boreholes (estimated yield 4.5Ml/day)
  • Equipping of existing boreholes with electrical pumps
  • Construction of Water Treatment Package Plant
  • Construction of two (2) high lift pump stations.
  • Construction of two (2) bulk water supply lines to the existing 5.0Ml concrete reservoir.
  • Construction of a pump house, near the existing concrete reservoir.
  • Eskom connection.
  • Installation of automatic pump control units.
  • Installation of pipe line appurtenances.
  • Perimeter fencing.
  • Water Use Licence (WUL) application.

Project Budget: The total budget for the full scope of works is R 28 579 251.05.

Project Start Date: 28 February 2019

Project completion Date: The project is projected to be completed as soon as Eskom completes the re-installation of the vandalised Eskom Kiosk.

Number of planned beneficiaries: The project is envisaged to serve a population of 20 966 persons

Project funding source: The project is funded through the Water Services infrastructure Grant (WSIG)

Currently, the project progress is at 90% with the outstanding works of ESKOM connection, testing and commissioning. The ESKOM connection was done last year but the connection equipment and a transformer were subsequently stolen just after installation while Eskom was in the process of completing the installation.

Following a number of meetings between ESKOM and the municipality, a consensus was reached to put security measures to protect the infrastructure before ESKOM can replace the stolen items, of which the municipality did in October 2020. Therefore, it was then expected that ESKOM will replace all the stolen items and energise the boreholes however to this end, this has not been done even after numerous letters, and telephonic conversations to follow-up on the matter.

The recent report from ESKOM is that they are still in a process of procuring the stolen items. Once installation is completed in June 2021, the community of Moloto will have sustainable water supply.

In addition, the Municipality has completed the construction of a 5Ml reservoir to augment the water storage capacity and has also started with the implementation of the Moloto Water Infrastructure (Water reticulation) project of which the inception meeting was held on 04th March 2021. The project is under construction and will be implemented in 3 phases. Phase one is projected to be completed by 30 March 2022. A total of 4 770 households expected to benefit from the project.

Based on the above the municipality has a plan to address the water challenges faced by the residents of the Moloto village.

 

09 April 2021 - NW385

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether each national department employs an accounting officer; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what total number of accounting officers are employed in an acting capacity and (b) does each specified officer have the necessary qualifications required for the position; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) In terms of Section 36 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 with respect to Accounting Officers; every department and every constitutional institution must have an accounting officer and the head of a department must be the accounting officer for the department.

(2) In terms of Section 37 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, deals with acting accounting officers and stipulates when an accounting officer is absent or otherwise unable to perform the functions of accounting officer, or during a vacancy, the functions of accounting officer must be performed by the official acting in the place of that accounting officer.

(a) Nationally: There are nine (9) acting Accounting Officers (In the Presidency the acting DG is also the formally appointed accounting officer).

Provincially: There are twenty seven (27) acting Accounting Officers.

(b) In terms of the regulatory framework, Regulation 63 (2) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 states that, “an employee directed to act in another post in terms of section 32 (2) should have the necessary competency for the post to which he or she is appointed to act”. As defined in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, Competency means the combination of knowledge, skills, behaviour and aptitude that a person can apply in the work environment, which indicates a person's ability to meet the requirements of a specific post. For purposes of business continuity meeting qualifications for a post for purposes of acting is not a requirements however, noting the definition, competency to perform the duties are.

End

09 April 2021 - NW438

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What engagements has she had with the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality in Limpopo to ensure that the villages in the specified municipality that do not have water are provided with water services?

Reply:

We have not scheduled a DDM visit to the Sekhukhune District yet and therefore have not had engagement with the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality.

However the Provincial Department of COGTA, working with the Sekhukhune District Municipality has engaged the municipality to discuss service delivery issues. In villages that do not have any water infrastructure, the Municipality supplies them with water through water tankers as per Ward councillor’s request.

Some of the projects that are currently being implemented in the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality are:

No.

Project Name

Targeted Village/s

Current Status

1

Mogorwane Water Supply Scheme

Mogorwane

Planned for completion and commissioning before end of May 2021

2

Mashabela Water Supply Scheme

Mashabela

Partially functional

3

Glencowie, GaMoloi, Cabrief, New Stand and Pelepele Park Water Reticulation

Glencowie, GaMoloi, Cabrief, New Stand and Pelepele Park Water

Functional

4

Makgeru Schoonoord Bulk Water Supply Scheme.

The total project cost is R210 396 563.42

Different villages within Makgeru and Schoonoord areas

The project is 90% complete. It is scheduled for completion on 15 September 2021.

To date, expenditure on local empowerment is as follows:

  • A total of R8 131 729.58 was spent on 25 Local contractors / suppliers.
  • A total of R55million has been spent on local labourers;
  • R1 839 000 has been spent on providing accredited training to about 400 local people.

5

Construction of water reticulation pipelines in GaMogashoa (Senkgapudi) and Manamane

The total budget is R144 467 205.32

GaMogashoa (Sekgapudi) and Manamage

The projects are at 74% complete. Scheduled completion dates are 24 June 2021 and 28 May 2021.

To date, expenditure on local empowerment is as follows:

  1. GaMogashoa (Sekngapudi) – R3 688 900 has been spent on 10 local companies and R1 326 000 has also been spent on 34 local labourers.
  1. Manamane – R2 627 925.83 has been spent on 13 local companies and R871 050 has been spent on 32 local companies.

09 April 2021 - NW935

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with phase one of the vaccine rollout process targeting frontline healthcare workers, his department has devised a vaccine rollout strategy for public service workers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) forms part of the National Vaccine Rollout Committee led by the Department of Health. The Committee acts as a coordination mechanism that oversees the vaccine rollout in both the public and private sectors as government implements the National Vaccine Rollout Strategy, which was presented to Parliament.

In preparation for the Phase Two of the Rollout strategy, the DPSA has developed and presented the Project Plan to the Workplace Vaccination Work Stream of the rollout Committee, which outlines the rollout strategy for essential workers in the public service. This Project Plan is being consulted on with critical stakeholders for finalisation. The relevant details will therefore be made public and shared with Parliament once the plan has been finalised following the consultations.

End

09 April 2021 - NW334

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of (i) directors-general and (ii) acting directors-general of government departments received performance bonuses in respect of the 2018-19 financial year and (b) was the total quantum of such bonuses paid out and (c) number of the relevant departments achieved outputs in excess of 80% of their targets as set out in their annual performance plans?

Reply:

In terms of section 7(7) of the Public Service Act, 1994, only the head of national departments and Offices of the Premier may bear the designation of Director-General. The information presented is therefore limited to Directors-General as contained in Schedule 1 of the Public Service Act, 1994.

(a) According to the information from the PERSAL system for the 2018/2019 performance cycle (i) four (4) Directors-General were paid performance bonuses (ii) no acting Directors-General were paid performance bonuses. (b) A total amount of R614 935,11 was paid out to Directors-General for performance bonuses. (c) All of the relevant departments have achieved outputs in excess of 80% of their targets as set out in their annual performance plans (APP). The table below provides the details of the departments who paid performance bonuses.

No

Name of Departments

Performance bonus paid

Achievement of APP targets

Directors-General

 

1

Higher Education and Training

R155,942.16

95%

2

The Presidency

R90,369.00

80%

3

Northern Cape: Office of the Premier

R248,131,95*

99%

4

Western Cape: Office of the Premier

R120,492.00

92%

GRAND TOTAL

R614 935,11

 

*The amount is for two payments of performance bonuses for two performance cycles paid in the 2018/2019 financial year. .

End

09 April 2021 - NW770

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What steps are being taken by her department to address the negative impact of widespread political infighting at local government level on service delivery to local communities?

Reply:

The political and administrative levels in municipalities must work together to improve on service delivery. Instability at any of the levels is has a negative impact on the ability of the municipality to perform its functions. All councillors are obliged to abide by the Councillor Code of Conduct (Schedule 1 of the Municipal Systems Act, 2000). The following clauses are pertinent:

2. A councillor must:

a) perform the functions of office in good faith, honestly and a transparent manner; and

b) at all times act in the best interest of the municipality and in such a way that the credibility and integrity of the municipality are not compromised.

11. A councillor may not, except as provided by law

a) interfere in the management or administration of any department of the municipal council unless mandated by council;

b) give or purport to give any instruction to any employee of the council except when authorised to do so;

c) obstruct or attempt to obstruct the implementation of any decision of the council or a committee by an employee of the council; or

d) encourage or participate in any conduct which would cause or contribute to maladministration in the council.

When the Code is breached, the recourse lies with the Municipal Council and the provincial MEC for Local Government.

1) The municipal council may

a) investigate and make a finding on any alleged breach of a provision of this Code; or

b) establish a special committee. to investigate and make a finding on any alleged breach of this Code; and ii. to make appropriate recommendations to the council.

2) If the council or a special committee finds that a councillor has breached a provision of this Code, the council may

a) issue a formal warning to the councillor;

b) reprimand the councillor;

c) request the MEC for local government in the province to suspend the councillor for a period; d. fine the councillor; and e. request the MEC to remove the councillor from office

3) The MEC for local government may appoint a person or a committee to investigate any alleged breach of a provision of this Code and to make a recommendation on whether the councillor should be suspended or removed from office.

4) If the MEC is of the opinion that the councillor has breached a provision of this Code, and that such contravention warrants a suspension or removal from office, the MEC maya. suspend the councillor for a period and on conditions determined by the MEC; or b. remove the councillor from office.

In terms of the amendments to the Municipal Structures Act, an MEC for local government will be able to remove a councillor from office for a breach of the Code and that councillor will not be eligible to become a councillor for a period of two years.

Political infighting requires all politicians and the intervention of their political parties to resolve their issues. All political office bearers have the responsibility to ensure communities are served effectively, efficiently, and respectfully.

09 April 2021 - NW953

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) is an employee of (a) his department, (b) a departmental agency and/or (c) any state-owned entity reporting to him in any capacity whatsoever; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) No, the said person is not an employee in the Department of Public Service and Administration.

b) N/A

c) N/A

End

09 April 2021 - NW534

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)In light of the recent ruling by the Labour Appeal Court that the 2018 wage agreement, namely Resolution 1 of 2018, was deemed unlawful and in contravention of Regulations 78 and 79 of the Public Service Regulations because the State agreed to wage increases despite not having the requisite written commitment or approval from National Treasury, what are the reasons that his department ignored the letter from the Minister of Finance on 14 February 2018, which explicitly indicated that no additional funding can be made available to fund the wage negotiations outcome and advised his department to instead table an alternative offer that would not exceed the existing funding envelope; (2) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with (a) a list of the full names of (i) all government officials and (ii) Cabinet Ministers who formed part of the Committee of Ministers and/or who participated at any point in the negotiation of the 2018 wage agreement between the State and trade unions, (b) a full list of names of Cabinet Ministers and officials who formally approved and/or signed off on the 2018 agreement on behalf of the State, (c) a copy of the Cabinet Minutes from the Cabinet meeting that approved the draft wage agreement of 26 January 2018 and (d) a copy of the Cabinet Minutes from the Cabinet meeting that approved the final wage agreement of 8 June 2018?

Reply:

The labour unions involved in this matter have made an application for leave to appeal the Labour Appeal Court judgement. The matter is therefore still before the courts. Under the circumstances, it is advised that at this stage the Minister for the Public Service and Administration is unable to respond to the questions posed.

End

09 April 2021 - NW837

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the vacancy rate for all types of nurses in the Republic, (b) is the breakdown of the number of posts that have remained vacant in each province and (c) are the details of the vacancy rate in the years (i) 2016, (ii) 2017, (iii) 2018, (iv) 2019 and (v) 2020?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training has no jurisdiction over the appointment of healthcare professionals or nurses. This is the responsibility of Provincial health Departments and this question should be re-directed to the National Department of Health.