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22 March 2019 - NW401

Profile picture: Mthethwa, Mr EM

Mthethwa, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to municipalities that were identified as being dysfunctional and had professionals deployed to them by his department in 2018, what progress has been made in respect of the performance of the specified municipalities?

Reply:

At the beginning of 2018/19 financial year CoGTA identified 87 dysfunctional municipalities that required urgent support. In August 2018 MISA deployed district support teams comprising more than 80 engineers and town planners in 55 out of the 87 identified dysfunctional municipalities. These 55 municipalities were targeted for technical support due to severe challenges in relation to the delivery of municipal infrastructure for basic services. Specifically, they were selected on the basis of the following:

  • 17 Municipalities had their MIG transfers stopped at least three times in the past 5 years, including 2017/18;
  • 18 Municipalities had their MIG transfers stopped at least twice in the past 5 years, including 2017/18; and
  • 20 Municipalities were experiencing different forms of service delivery challenges.

Each district support team deployed in these municipalities is constituted by engineers, construction and project managers, financial accountants, and town and regional planners. The focus of these teams is to build capacity of these municipalities to plan, deliver, operate and maintain infrastructure. A range of support initiatives are being implemented through these teams to enable these municipalities to improve. The support by these teams broadly covers the following areas, among others:

  • Technical support on the upgrading of infrastructure;
  • Project / contract management support;
  • Town Planning / Spatial & Development Planning Support;
  • Assistance in the compilation of ‘sector plans’ (master plans, water conservation and demand management, etc.);
  • Operations and maintenance support;
  • Revenue enhancement strategies; and
  • Policy and by-law reviews, Review and assessment of IDP’s and relevance to service delivery.

1. Progress Made in the 55 Municipalities To Date

Our active interventions and support has led to some progress. There are some distressed municipalities that have improved and which in our view deserve to be removed from the list of 55 dysfunctional municipalities. A total of 24 municipalities have significantly improved in terms of performance since deployment of district support teams. The table below provides a list of municipalities that have achieved significant improvements in performance.

Province

Number of Municipalities in the List of 55

No of Improved Municipalities

List of Improved Municipalities

Eastern Cape

11

6

Mnquma, Sakhisizwe, Matatiele, Mbizana, OR Tambo

Free State

4

2

Masilonyana, Maluti-a-Phofung

Gauteng

3

2

Lesedi, Rand West City

Kwazulu-Natal

10

7

Mpofana, uMgungundlovu DM, uMvoti, Ndwedwe, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, Jozini, Inkosi Langalibalele

Limpopo

7

1

Molemole,

Mpumalanga

3

3

Lekwa, Govan Mbeki, Nkangala

Northern Cape

7

1

Kareeberg

North West

6

2

Ditsobotla, Ngaka Modiri Molema

Western Cape

4

1

Laingsburg

Totals

55

24

 

Summary of progress made with regard to performance in the 55 municilalities is demonstrated in the following:

  • Improvement with the monitoring and in spending of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant allocations;
  • Filling of critical technical positions;
  • Support with applications for grant funding;
  • Improvements in revenue collection through introduction of revenue enhancement strategies, e.g. development and implementation of water conservation and demand management plans for Matatiele, Kou Kama, Mose Kotane, Mafube, Letsemeng, uMzinyathi, Ugu, and Abaqulusi;
  • Improved planning and delivery of infrastructure as a result of support provided by the district support teams, e.g. Matjhabeng municipality is being supported with condition assessment of wastewater infrastructure. Ten other municipalities are supported with the development of sector plans, e.g electricity master planning in Madibeng and Spatial Development Framework for Makana;
  • Basic service delivery backlogs assessments are being conducted in five district municipalities, namely West Rand, uThukela, King Cetshwayo, uMgungundlovu, and Capricorn.
  • Framework contracts are being introduced to improve efficiencies in the procurement of goods and services in municipalities;
  • Reduction of adverse audit findings.

A table containing a list of all 55 municipalities highlighting support provided to each one and progress on performance to date is attached as an annexure to the reply.

Ends...

22 March 2019 - NW465

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governanceand Traditional Affairs

Whether he intends to introduce amending legislation in the National Assembly to ensure openness and transparency in local government in respect of provisions that permit an executive committee and mayoral committee to close any or all of its meetings to the public and media; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

1. No, the Minister will not be introducing any amendment to legislation in respect of provisions that permits an executive committee and mayoral committee to close any or all of councils meeting and its committees. This is already provided for in Chapter 4, section 20 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000. Section 20 (1) provides that meetings of municipal councils and those of its committees are open to the public, including the media and the council or such a committee may not exclude the public including the media from a meeting, except when:

a) It is reasonable to do so having regard to the nature of the business being transacted; and

b) A by-law or a resolution of the council specifying the circumstances in which the council or such committee may close a meeting.

2. Furthermore, section 20 (2) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000. provides that a municipal council, or a committee of the council, may not exclude the public, including the media, when considering or voting on any of the following matters:

a) A draft by-law tabled in the council;

b) A budget tabled in the council;

c) The municipality’s draft integrated Development Plan on any amendments to the plan;

d) A municipality’s draft performance management systems; or any amendment to the system; and

e) The decision to enter into a service delivery agreement.

3. Section 20 (4)(b) of the Municipal Systems Act, 2000 further provides for a municipal council to take reasonable steps to regulate public access to and public conduct at meeting of councils and its committees often referred to as Standing Rules and Orders for the Meeting of Councils and its Committees (see attached).

Chapter 7, section 152 (e) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 provides for the objects of local government which includes the encouragement of the involvement of communities and community organisations in the matters of local government.

Further to that, Chapter 4 section 16 (1) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 requires of municipalities to develop a culture of community participation that complements formal representative government with a system of participatory governance and must for this purpose-

a) Encourage, and create conditions for, the local community to participate in the affairs of the municipality, including in—

(i) the preparation implementation and review of its integrated development plan in terms of Chapter 5;

(ii) the establishment, implementation and review of its performance management system in terms of Chapter 6:

(iii) the monitoring and review of its performance, including the outcomes and impact of such performance,

(iv) the preparation of its budget; and

(v) strategic decisions relating to the provision of municipal services.

Section 20(1) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 makes provision for the admission of the public in meeting of council and its committees. Section 20 (4)(b) further provides that a municipal council take reasonable steps to regulate public access to and public conduct at meeting of council and its committees often referred to as Standing Rules and Orders for the Meeting of Councils and its Committees (see attached).

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW83

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What are the details of the (a) qualification(s) and (b) relevant experience of each (i) municipal manager, (ii) chief financial officer, (iii) technical manager, (iv) planning manager and (v) electrical engineer at the (aa) Ba-Phalaborwa, (bb) Letaba, (cc) Maruleng and (dd) Tzaneen Local Municipalities in Limpopo?

Reply:

Municipality

Designation

Qualification

Experience

Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Bachelor Degree of Administration

10 years

 

Chief Financial Officer

Bachelor of Commerce Degree

5 years

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Science Degree

5 years

 

Planning Manager

Bachelor Honours Degree in Spatial Planning

5 years

 

Electrical Engineer

Baccalaureus in Ingenieurswese

44 years

Letaba Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Master of Public Administration

5 years

 

Chief Financial Officer

Bachelor of Commerce

10 years

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Technology in Civil Engineering

15 years

 

Planning Manager

Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning

10 years

 

Electrical Engineer

National N6 Diploma in Electrical Engineering

7 years

Maruleng Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Vacant

Not applicable

 

Chief Financial Officer

Vacant

Not applicable

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Technology in Engineering: Civil: Urban Engineering

5 years

 

Planning Manager

Vacant

Not applicable

 

Electrical Engineer

N6 National Certificate in Engineering Studies

4 years

Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Bachelor of Technology in Public Management

7 years

 

Chief Financial Officer

Bachelor Accounting Sciences Honours

9 years

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Technology Engineering: Civil (Urban Engineering)

11 years

 

Planning Manager

Master of Development

7 years

 

Electrical Engineer

Bachelor of Technology in Engineering

18 years

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO. 2019/83 WRITTEN REPLY: NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

1. BACKGROUND

1.1  A Parliamentary question was received regarding the details of the qualification(s) and relevant experience of each municipal manager, chief financial officer, technical manager, planning manager and electrical engineer at the Ba-Phalaborwa, Letaba, Maruleng and Tzaneen Local Municipalities in Limpopo.

1.2  The Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000) provides a legal framework for local public administration, makes a provision for the Minister to regulate the setting of uniform standards for municipal staff systems and procedures, and empowers municipalities to adopt policies and procedures that are consistent with uniform standards set by the Minister.

1.3  The Local Government: Regulations on Appointment and Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers (“the Regulations”) promulgated in terms of sections 72 read with 120 of the Systems Act issued under GN No. 21 and published in Government Gazette No. 37245 of 17 January 2014, set out the criteria for appointment/ minimum competency requirements for senior managers in fulfilment of the Minister’s regulatory powers cited above.

1.4  In the main, the Regulations prescribe a Bachelor’s degree in the relevant field, experience and successful completion of a competent competency rating as the entry requirements for appointment to a vacant senior manager position.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW601

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the fire on 26 August 2018 at a house in Sycamore Street, Cresslawn, Kempton Park, what (a) are the reasons that emergency services did not answer the first several calls made at around 01:00am, (b) is the time recorded that a call was made to the emergency services notifying them of the fire and (c) time did the fire fighters arrive at the scene; 2) What are the reasons that (a) there was no water in the fire engine tanks, (b) the hose connection did not fit the nearest fire hydrant and (c) the fire fighters only started dousing the flames at 02.50am; 3) What actions have been taken with regard to a missing laptop and the safe being tampered with; 4) Whether he will initiate a full inquiry to investigate all of the above? NW724E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member was obtained by the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) from the City of Ekurhuleni (CoE). The response to the question and its sub-components by the CoE is as outlined below.

1)

a) Ekurhuleni Disaster and Emergency Management Services (DEMS) confirms that the well alight house in Sycamore Street Kempton Park was serviced on the 26th of August 2018 by firefighting crews from Kempton Park Fire station, which is the primary firefighting station in the area. It is important to note that the emergency call centre receives a high volume of calls on its emergency lines from community members reporting emergencies, hence the result in overloading of the emergency lines and delays in answering all the calls. The primary role and objective of Emergency Services is to render quality service delivery to the entire community and take preventative measures to save lives and properties from fires. Thus, at all times, Fire Engines and Ambulances are always ready to respond to all emergencies that the City of Ekurhuleni is legally expected to respond to. The city also has capabilities to respond and support other cities beyond its borders.

b) DEMS would like to highlight that the first call received was at 01:27 in the morning and the firefighting crew from the Kempton Park fire station as primary responders, rapidly responded accordingly to the address given, 11 Sycamore road Kempton Park. It took firefighting crews only eight minutes to arrive on the scene after pulling out of the station to the address.

c) Firefighters arrived on the scene of fire eight minutes after leaving the Kempton Park Fire Station.

2) On arrival of fire engines from Kempton Park fire station i.e. (i) Major Industrial Pumper, (ii) Hydraulic Platform (HP) and (iii) Grass Unit, part of the house`s roof had already collapsed. Immediate intervention was initiated to extinguish the blaze. Water from the first arriving Major Pumper was used prior to connection from the water tanker which responded from Tembisa. The first Major pumper that arrived on scene had 3 400 litres of water in the tank, which can be emptied within minutes depending on the number of discharge hoses in use and the diameter thereof. On arrival of the water tanker which had 12 000 litres capacity tank, relay pumping was initiated to complement water from the first pump. HP is a fire engine without a water tank as per specifications. It consists of a hydraulically operated extension ladder which has water way leading to the tip of the same ladder. Its main purpose is to rescue people from high rise buildings and it gets its water supply from other pumpers, water tankers and water sources such as hydrants. In this case, it was not utilised because the structure was a single-storey building. The CoE, for illustrative purposes has attached pictures of the hydraulic platform and the water tanker that was utilised on this incident as outlined below:

Picture 1: Hydraulic Platform based in Kempton Park

Picture 2: Type of water tanker used

  1. With regard to water hydrant connections, there are two main types of connections that are used within the Fire Brigade services and these are bayonet type or screw type standpipes. Both types of connection stand-pipes are part of the basic equipment readily available in the fire engines. Bayonet standpipe fits on a bayonet water hydrant outlet and the screw type standpipe is compatible with a screw type system water hydrant. It is important to note that these connections are not marked hence a Firefighter must open the lid and inspect before connecting the correct stand pipe. The correct standpipe was used on the day to sustain relay water supply to the fire through the pumps. Laying out of attack lines was done swiftly because firehoses are pre-packed. Thus, firefighting was initiated immediately on arrival. The CoE, for illustrative purposes has attached pictures of the different types of standpipes as outlined below: