Questions and Replies

30 July 2018 - NW1920

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment that were reported to the human resources offices of entities reporting to him in (i) 2016 and (ii) 2017 and (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

Entity

(1)(a)

(b)

(2)

National Health Laboratory Service

(i) 2016

1

The case involves a male supervisor who gave a lift to one of the junior female staff members after they had completed their shift. The supervisor was alleged to have made inappropriate comments to the lady colleague and also wanted to touch her inappropriately. The matter was reported and the supervisor was subsequently charged and dismissed. He then referred his matter to the CCMA for adjudication. The CCMA ruled in his favour and the NHLS applied to the Labour Court to have the matter reviewed and set aside.

After the matter was reported there was an investigation conducted which led to the conclusion that there was a case to be answered hence the supervisor was charged and dismissed from the NHLS.

 

(ii) 2017

1

The case involves a senior manager who is alleged to have shown two junior staff members an inappropriate explicit picture of a pornographic nature. The manager concerned was charged and subjected to a disciplinary enquiry and the matter is still ongoing.

The Matter was investigated and also referred to a disciplinary enquiry as a result of the recommendation from the investigation. This was after prima facie evidence was unearthed.

Council Medical Schemes

(i) 2016

None

None

None

 

(ii) 2017

None

None

None

Office of Health Standards Compliance

(i) 2016

None

None

None

 

(ii) 2017

None

None

None

South African Medical Research Council

(i) 2016

None

None

None

 

(ii) 2017

None

None

None

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1225

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the reply to question 2434 on 13 November 2017, whether his department has received the information; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the information be available; if so, (i) what number of kings is currently recognised by the Government as traditional leaders, what is the name of (i) each king and (iii) over which tribe does each specified senior traditional leader rules; (2) what amount has each specified tribal chief received in remuneration in each year since 1 January 2012; (3) (a) what (i) movable and (ii) immovable benefits each specified senior traditional leader received in each specified year and (b) what was the costs amount to in each case; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is requested to note that the Department has not received the said information from provinces. However, a reminder to submit the outstanding information on movable and immovable benefits with the associated costs that each senior traditional leader and king received was forwarded to the Kwa-Zulu Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga Provinces. The information will be provided to the Honourable Member as soon as it becomes available.

30 July 2018 - NW1452

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Labour

With reference to her reply to question 2167 on 31 October 2016, (a) what was the outcome of the inspection at the Edleen Primary School in Kempton Park, Gauteng, that was scheduled to take place on 30 November 2016 and (b) what defects had been

Reply:

a) Leaking roof, which was subsequently repaired.

 

30 July 2018 - NW993

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Works

How much land does (a) his department and (b) the entities reporting to him (i) own, (ii) have exclusive rights to and/or (iii) lease from the State to (aa) use and/or (bb) occupy?

Reply:

(a) (i) and (ii)

The National Department of Public Works (NDPW) has got 29 322 land parcels in its custodianship as at 31 March 2017 (as per the number of immovable assets disclosed for the 2016/17 financial year, in terms of the State Land Disposal Act, 1961 (Act No. 48 of 1961) and the Government Immovable Asset Management Act of, 2007 (Act No. 19 of 2007)).This implies that NDPW has exclusive rights over these land parcels.

(iii) (aa) and (bb)

In terms of the protocol applied by the NDPW, all property that is not owned by the Department is occupied by virtue of a lease agreement with a third party that owns the property. In this regard, the NDPW leases a total of 215 properties from other State organs in the various spheres of Government, as listed below:

  1. Government departments (both national and provincial): 18
  2. District and Local Municipalities: 159
  3. Metropolitan Municipalities: 38

All the properties are occupied and used by various client departments of the NDPW.

(b)

IN RESPECT OF THE ENTITIES REPORTING TO THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS:

Entity Name

Own

(ii)

have exclusive rights to

(iii)

lease from the State

(aa)

(iii)(bb)

Agrément South Africa (ASA)

None

Lease agreement with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), lease the whole second floor of Building 17B, CSIR Campus, two offices on the ground floor of Building 17B, CSIR Campus, and the test site.

Lease agreement with the CSIR, to lease the whole second floor of Building 17B, CSIR Campus, including two offices on the ground floor of Building 17B, CSIR Campus, and the test site.

Agrément South Africa as per the signed lease agreement on 21 February 2018, with the CSIR, lease the whole second floor of Building 17B, CSIR Campus, two offices on the ground floor of Building 17B, CSIR Campus, and the test site. Plans and lease agreements are available on request.

Council for the Built Environment (CBE)

None

None

None

None

Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB)

None

None

Lease their Head Office and Gauteng Provincial Office from the South African Bureau of Standards, an entity of the Department of Trade and Industry.

Occupy premises provided by the Provincial Department Public Works in each province (Mpumalanga/ Nelspruit, Limpopo/ Polokwane, North West/ Mahikeng, Free State/ Bloemfontein, KwaZulu-Natal/ Durban, Eastern Cape/ Bhisho, Western Cape/ Cape Town and Northern Cape/ Kimberley).

Independent Development Trust (IDT)

Head office Pretoria

6000 sqm Building

None

None

None

 

30 July 2018 - NW1460

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the President, Mr C M Ramaphosa, to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on 22 February 2018 to implement lifestyle audits, (a) she, (b) senior management service members in her department and/or (c) any of the heads of entities reporting to her have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years; if not, have any plans been put in place to perform such audits; if so, in each case, what are the details of the (i) date of the lifestyle audit, (ii) name of the person undergoing the audit, (iii) name of the auditing firm conducting the audit and (iv) outcome of the audit; (2) whether she will furnish Ms E R Wilson with copies of the lifestyle audit reports?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (i) (ii) (ii) and (iv) The Department has taken note following the State of the Nation Address to conduct an audit or implement lifestyle audit starting at Minister and Senior Management level. The Department will engage and work with the law enforcement agency to assist in the lifestyle audit as the Department alone will not have access to review personal information of officials like bank accounts. The fraud risk assessment will be utilised to identify other areas of potential fraud and corruption for the entire Department.

(c) (i) (ii) (ii) and (iv)

SACE RESPONSE:

1.C. No – For the past three financial years, the Council did not conduct lifestyle Audits for its Head or Chief Executive Officer.

  1. N/A
  2. N/A
  3. N/A
  4. N/A

2. The Council will adhere to the directives and guidance of the Accounting authority in this regard.

UMALUSI RESPONSE:

1. (c) The Chief Executive officer of Umalusi has not undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years. Currently there is no plan in place to perform such an audit in the current financial year.

2. Once the lifestyle audit is conducted and finalised the Minister will determine its circulation.

30 July 2018 - NW1545

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

What is the total number of firearms that (a) are currently registered in the Central Firearm Register (CFR) and (b) were registered on the CFR as at (i) 31 December 1994, (ii) 31 December 1996, (iii) 31 December 1998, (iv) 31 December 2000, (v) 31 December 2002, (vi) 31 December 2004 and (vii) 31 December 2006?

Reply:

(a) The total number of firearms that are currently registered in the Central Firearm Register (CFR), is 5 567 706.

(b)(i) to (v) The requested data is not available for the period, 1994 to 2002. Prior to 1994, South Africa was divided into different states, namely South Africa, Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei. All these territories had their own separate firearm registration systems. In South Africa, the firearm licencing process was the responsibility of the Department of Home Affairs (DHA), up until 1994.

After the assumption of the firearm licencing process, by the South African Police Service (SAPS), in 1994, a new system called the Firearm Register System, was introduced. However, information received from the DHA was in a form of a spreadsheet, called a "data dump" and there was no application linked to a specific firearm. Therefore, the current Enhanced Firearm Register System (EFRS), does not contain records for the period, 1994 to 2002.

(b)(vi) The total number of firearms that were registered in the CFR, as at 31 December 2004, was 3 237 987.

(b)(vii) The total number of firearms that were registered in the CFR, as at 31 December 2006, was 3 352 728.

Reply to question 1545 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date:

Reply to question 1545 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date: 27/07/2018

30 July 2018 - NW1789

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the North West department of health has ever spent any Comprehensive HIV and AIDS Conditional Grant funds on the procurement of ambulance services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why, (b) in which financial year(s) was the conditional grant used to procure ambulance services, (c) which ambulance services were procured, (d) at what costs to the provincial department and (e) what are the terms of the contract in each case; (2) whether the provincial department paid the invoices of Buthelezi Emergency Medical Services in full even though it has been found that the service has been overcharging and that the invoices were not in line with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) Money was spent from the Conditional Grant for the Inter Facility Transfer of patients in the province.

(b) In the 2016/17 and the 2017/18 financial years.

(c) The service procured was for inter facility transfers, that is the moving of patients between health facilities.

(d) The ambulance services procured were for inter-facility transfer of patient and for the financial years mentioned above the costs were as 2016/17 - R45,188,078 and 2017/18 - R207,531,593-50 by March 2018 with other invoices submitted by the service provider for payment amounting to R174,064,224-21, however subject to verification. The contract was for the movement of patient from one health facility to the next so that the patient could get a better level of care. This is for the movement of Priority One, two and three patients.

(e) It is an order based contract.

(2) Some of the invoices were paid in full. When invoices were verified it was noted that some were overcharged. An investigation is underway to try to recover the costs.

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1790

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the Free State department of health has embarked on a tender process to outsource ambulance services to private ambulance service providers; if so, (a)(i) why has the provincial department done so and (ii) has he found that the tender is not in contravention of national policy and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The Free State Department of Health embarked on a tender process to procure services for Inter Facility ambulance services in order to augment the current Provincial EMS inter facility services within the Province.

The Province took the decision because of shortage of Intermediate and Advance life support staff within the Province that could be deployed on obstetric and critical ambulance inter-facility services.

Since the whole private ambulance matter in the Free State and North West is under investigation by National Treasury, we will have to wait for the findings of the investigation, to arrive at a well informed conclusion.

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1819

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether (a) his spouse and/or (b) an adult family member accompanied him on any official international trip (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) is the name of the person(s), (bb) was the (aaa) purpose and (bbb) destination of the trip and (cc) was the (aaa) total cost and (bbb) detailed breakdown of the costs of the accompanying person(s) to his department; (2) whether each of the specified trips were approved by the President in terms of the provisions of Section 1, Annexure A of the Ministerial Handbook; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) I took a total of 49 international trips in the past five financial years.

a) I travelled with my spouse, Mrs TD Motsoaledi on four of the 49 trips mentioned above. One of these four trips was a fully sponsored trip by the host.

b) None

The table below presents a summary of the trips on which I was accompanied by my spouse.

Purpose of trip

Destination

Total Cost to Dept

Breakdown of cost

     

Air ticket

Daily allowance

2013 International Symposium for Design and Health

Doha, State of Qatar

None, the trip was fully paid for by the hosts who invited me to to attend the Symposium

R63 381-00

R6 352-00

Celebration of Diplomatic relations between China and SA

World Economic Forum Annual meeting of the New Champions 2014

Tiajin, People's Republic of China

R57 340-47

R51 496-00

R5 844-47

4th meeting of the BRICS Health Ministers

Brasilia, Brazil

R74 038-20

R69 537-39

R4 500-81

Stop TB Partnership Board retreat, meeting and other activities

Paris, France

R71 758-58

R64 996-72

R6 761-86

TOTAL

 

R203,137.25

   

(2) Yes, each of the specified trips were approved by the President in terms of the provisions of Section1, Annexure A of the Ministerial Handbook.

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1546

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

What is the total number of private firearm owners that were registered in the Central Firearm Register in each specified year (details furnished)?

Reply:

Specified period

Number of private firearm owners

31 December 2004

903 481

31 December 2006

925 285

31 December 2008

969 560

31 December 2010

1 069 077

31 December 2012

1337280

31 December 2014

1425822

31 December 2016

1 586 279


Reply to question 1546 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date:23-07-2018

Reply to question 1546 approved


MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date: 27/07/2018

30 July 2018 - NW2049

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Health

What number of paramedics employed by his department are stationed in each district municipality in Mpumalanga?

Reply:

The table below is the list of operational Emergency Care personnel that are employed in the Health Districts of Mpumalanga Province. The number of Paramedics per district is highlighted in bold.

MPUMALANGA

BASIC AMBULANCE ASSISTANT

AMBULANCE EMERGENCY ASSISTANT

PARAMEDIC

EMERGENCY CARE TECHNICIAN

EMERGENCY CARE PRACTITIONER

TOTAL

Nkangala

208

58

9

7

0

282

Ehlanzeni

240

44

2

4

2

292

Gert Sibande

240

63

3

5

0

311

TOTAL

688

165

14

16

2

885

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1949

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Health

What number of paramedics employed by his department are stationed in each district municipality in the North West?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard, according to the North West Provincial Department of Health

       

Filled Post – Paramedics (April 2018)

 

BASIC LIFE UPPORT

INTERMEDIATE LIFE SUPPORT

EMERGENCY CARE TECHNICIAN

PARAMEDICS

Grand Total

North West

360

105

97

1

563

Dr. Kenneth Kaunda

77

26

27

0

130

Ngaka Modiri Molema

88

20

38

0

146

Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

88

18

14

1

121

Bojanala

107

41

18

0

166

Grand Total

360

105

97

1

563

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1620

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the name of each (i) clinic, (ii) hospital and (iii) community health centre in each province that is earmarked for refurbishment and/or revitalisation in the 2018-21 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework, (b) are the details of any new medical equipment that will be procured and (c) are the relevant details of the upgrades in each case?

Reply:

The attached Annexure 1 reflects the details in this regard.

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1223

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr PJ

Groenewald, Mr PJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the reply to question 2436 on 13 November 2017, whether his department has received the information; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the information be available; if so, what number of senior traditional leaders is currently recognised by Government as senior traditional leaders; (2) what amount has each senior traditional leader received in remuneration in each year since 1 January 2012; (3) (a) what (i) movable and (ii) immovable benefits did each senior traditional leader receive in each specified year and (b) what did the costs amount to in each case; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is requested to note that the Department has not received the said information from provinces. However, a reminder to submit the outstanding information on movable and immovable benefits with the associated costs that each senior traditional leader and king received was forwarded to the Kwa-Zulu Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga Provinces. The information will be provided to the Honourable Member as soon as it becomes available.

30 July 2018 - NW1474

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether , with reference to the reply of the President, Mr CM Ramaphosa ,to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on the 22 February 2018 to implement lifestyle audits, (a) she, (b) senior management service members in her department and /or (c) any of the heads of entities reporting to her have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years; if not , have any plans been put in place to perform such audits; if so, in each case, what are the details of the (i) of the lifestyle audit, (ii) name of the person undergoing the audit, (iii) auditing firm conducting the audit and (iv) outcome of the audit ; (2) (whether she will furnish Adv. HC Schmidt with copies of the lifestyle audit reports?

Reply:

Government Policy prohibits Government Officials from doing business with the Government.

The Public Service Commission is responsible to investigate whether that is happening. Therefore the Honourable Member should refer the matter accordingly.

30 July 2018 - NW2019

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the details of the (a) number of accidents that vehicles owned by his department were involved (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) cost for repairs in each case and (c)(i) number of and (ii) reasons for vehicles being written off in each case; (2) whether all vehicles owned by his department have tracking devices installed?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) Please note that the following details pertain to fleet vehicles rented by the Department, i.e they are not wholly owned by the Department. The Department only pays for excess fee in the event of accidents and damages.

  • One hundred and ten (110) accident damages occurred involving departmental rented vehicles for the financial year 2015/16;
  • Eighty-nine (89) accident damages occurred involving departmental rented vehicles for the financial year 2016/17;
  • One hundred and thirty (130) accident damages occurred involving departmental rented vehicles for the financial year 2018/18.

(ii) No accidents occurred involving departmental rented vehicles since 1 April 2018.

(b) - Insurance excess fee for the financial year 2015/16: R147,518.35

- Insurance excess fee for the financial year 2016/17: R139,897.96

- Insurance excess fee for the financial year 2017/18: R217,455.25

- Insurance excess fee for the period since 1 April 2018: R36,346.96

(c) (i) The details are as follows:

  • One (1) accident occurred involving rented departmental vehicle for the financial year 2015/16;
  • Two (2) accidents occurred involving rented departmental vehicle for the financial year 2016/17;
  • One (1) accident occurred involving rented departmental vehicle for the financial year 2017/18;
  • Twenty-four (24) accidents occurred involving rented departmental vehicle since 1 April 2018.

(ii) Supposedly beyond economical repair for the financial years: 2015/16; 2016/17 and 2017/18. No vehicles were written-off since 1 April 2018.

2. Yes, all rented departmental vehicles are fitted with tracking devices.

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1931

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What (a) is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment that were reported to the human resources offices of (i) the National Treasury and (ii) entities reporting to him in (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2017 and (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigation in each case?

Reply:


NATIONAL TREASURY

1. (a) (i) (aa) (bb) Nil

(b) Not applicable

(2) Not applicable.

ASB

No incidents of sexual harassment were reported to the human resources officer in the Accounting Standards Board during 2016 or 2017.

CBDA

CBDA did not have any incidents of sexual harassment reported to the human resources offices.

DBSA

(1) (a) (b) None

(2) N/A

FIC

(1)(a)(ii)(aa)(bb)(b) The Financial Intelligence Centre confirms that there were no reports of

sexual harassment made to its Human Resources business unit.

(2) Not applicable.

FSCA

(1) 1 case.

(2) There was one case of sexual harassment reported during the month of October / November in 2017. An independent Chairperson was appointed to adjudicate the case. It was found that the employee made unsubstantiated allegations against the accused. She referred the matter to the CCMA but subsequently withdrew the case.

GEPF

There has been no incidents of sexual harassment reported.

 

GPAA

Question 1 : In 2016/2017, The following incidents were reported;

1. A female employee at level 6 lodged a grievance against a team leader at level 8.

2. Incident reported on 2/10/2017, where a junior employee at level 6 lodged a grievance against a senior employee acting at level 14.

3. A female employee at level 6 lodged a grievance against a fellow employee at level 5.

Reply to Question 2;

2.1 With regards the first incident, an investigation was conducted, the complainant subsequently withdrew her complain

2.2 Regarding the second incident, an investigation was conducted, the allegations were ruled to be unfounded.

2.3 An investigation was lodged and is still ongoing.

SUMMARY:

  • The total number of reported cases is 3 (Three);
  • All three reported cases were investigated.
  • One (1) case withdrawn by the employee;
  • One (1) case ruled allegations as unfounded;
  • One (1) case, investigation is ongoing.

IRBA

The IRBA hereby declares that no incidents of secual harassment were reported to the human resources office in (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2017.

LAND BANK

There were no incidents of sexual harassment that was reported to the human resources office in 2016 and 2017 at the Land Bank.

FAIS OMBUD

  1. Zero (0)
  2. Not applicable

PFA

No incident of sexual harassment was reported to the human resources office of the OPFA.

PIC

  1. No incedents of sexual harassment were reported at the PIC for 2016 and 2017.
  2. Falls away.

SAA

  1. & (2)

Total number of sexual harassment incidents report to HR in:

2016 = 1

2017 = 4

Details are as follows:

Year

Personnel Area

Matter was investigated

Status

2016

 In-Flight Services

Offender was found guilty of sexual harassment

Offender was dismissed following a disciplinary hearing

2017

Airport Operations

Offender was found guilty of sexual harassment

Offender was dismissed following a disciplinary hearing

2017

Cargo

Alleged offender found not guilty due to inconclusive evidence

Matter closed

2017

In-Flight Services

Offender was found guilty of sexual harassment

Offender was dismissed following a disciplinary hearing

2017

Legal

Alleged offender found not guilty due to inconclusive evidence

Matter closed

SARS

Over the period 2015 to 2017 there have been 3 Sexual Harassment cases reported to the Employer under the auspices of a Grievance process and 6 cases that resulted in a formal disciplinary process.

The tables below contain the list of these cases which includes the details as well as if the matter was investigated and the outcome of these formal cases.

Year

Type

Nature of Case

Details of Incident

Investigated Y/N

Outcome

2016

Grievance

Sexual harassment

1. Defamation of character

2. Emotional abuse

3. Sexual harassment/abuse

Yes

Through the grievance process, the aggrieved employee and the accused managed to resolve the matter on amicable terms.

2016

Grievance

Sexual harassment

Employee alleges that the Executive made advances of a sexual nature towards the aggrieved.

No

The complainant resigned and then lodged a Grievance during her notice period in which the alleged sexual harassment. After serving her notice period she referred the matter to the CCMA as Constructive Dismissal based on Sexual Harassment and Unfair Discrimination. The Award was not in favour of the Complainant.

2016

Grievance

Sexual harassment

Inappropriate comments

Yes

A Grievance Hearing held and the complainant accepted an apology. They agreed to have a respectful working relationship going forward.

Year

Type

Nature of Case

Details of Incident

Investigated Y/N

Outcome / Sanction

2015

Formal Disciplinary Hearing

Sexual harassment

A complainant, being a non-SARS employee, alleged that the SARS employee sexually assaulted the complainant.

Yes

The Presiding Officer found the employee “Not Guilty”

2015

Formal Disciplinary Hearing

Sexual harassment

It was alleged that the employee behaved in an inappropriate sexual manner towards a colleague.

Yes

Dismissal

2015

Formal Disciplinary Hearing

Sexual harassment

It was alleged that the employee behaved and made inappropriate and unwelcomed comments to a subordinate.

Yes

Final Written Warning plus

Suspension Without Pay: 10 Days as an alternative to dismissal

2017

Formal Disciplinary Hearing

Sexual harassment

Employee allegedly committed Sexual Harassment

Yes

The suspension was uplifted and the employee was not charged as the investigation failed to substantiate the allegation of sexual harassment and the credibility of the complainant.

2017

Formal Disciplinary Hearing

Sexual harassment

Making inappropriate sexual comments towards 3 colleagues

Yes

The main complainant requested that SARS resort to the informal disciplinary process as a means of resolving her complaint and that she was not comfortable to give evidence in a disciplinary hearing. Due consideration was given regarding the weight of the totality of the evidence of the main complainant and her colleagues; there were slim possibilities of a guilty finding against the employee. An informal process is currently underway.

2017

Informal Disciplinary Hearing

Sexual harassment

Inappropriate Behavior - Sexual Harassment

Yes

Final Written Warning and a formal referral to Wellness.

SASRIA

Sasria has not had incidents of sexual harassment reported to Human Resources (Human Capital), for the financial years of 2016 and 2017 respectively.

TAX OMBUD

1. (a) Only one incident was reported to the human resources office

(aa) there were no incidents reported in 2016

(bb) Only one incident was reported to the human resources office in 2017

(b) Allegations of sexual harassment were made by a female employee against her male manager. The complaint related to comments allegedly made by the manager to the complainant.

2. The allegations were investigated and a decision was taken to charge the manager. Disciplinary proceedings are in progress.

30 July 2018 - NW1748

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Health

(1)In the aftermath of his department’s response to the listeriosis outbreak, (a) what kind of regulatory measures is his department considering in order to ensure food health and safety, (b) what sort of consultations has his department had with the various industries in relation to the listeriosis outbreak and (c)(i) who was consulted and (ii) what information was obtained during these consultations; (2) (a) when will proposed guidelines on levels of Listeria monocytogenes be published to serve as minimum standard for the industry and (b) will the standards apply only to the meat processing industry or will they be applicable across all food categories and their related value chains; (3) whether any interim guidelines or an interim protocol for the food sector on Listeria levels will be published so that industry is clear on what basis they can operate; if not, will the industry continue to operate on 100 cfus per gram in a 25 g sample, as is currently the practice; (4) what are the acceptable levels of Listeria monocytogenes that he has considered; (5) (a) what is his policy position on the establishment of an independent food health and safety agency to align all areas of food handling and manufacturing regulation and (b) what action will he take to support the existence of such an agency?

Reply:

1. (a) The confirmed source of the Listeriosis outbreak, immediately triggered Regulation 4(b) in the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System (HACC) Regulations (R908 of 2003) which requires the mandatory application of the Hazard analysis and Critical Control Point system, audited by the South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) accredited certifying bodies.

The review of the National Health Act, 2003 as well as the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 is underway to allow for the incorporation of reporting requirements for food testing.

(b) The South African Meat Processors Association (SAMPA) was consulted through official correspondence as well as a formal meeting.

(c) (i) SAMPA;

(ii) The industry association indicated that as they represent more than 60% of the Ready To Eat (RTE) processing industry, they have no objection that the sector be required to implement the mandatory Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system. Levels for Listeria Monocytogenes for the products that they manufactured were clarified in relation to the levels adopted by teh Codex Alimentaius, the joint World Health Organisation and Food and Agricultural Organisation, food standards setting body for protecting consumers and facilitating trade.

2. (a) The guideline levels will be published following extensive consultation with the industry as well as other important stakeholders such as academics, epidemiologists and consumers.

(b) The regulated levels will cover all food categories that are considered as ready to eat.

3. Owing to the risk that these ready to eat meat products pose, a zero tolerance is observed until the outbreak has been contained.

According to the internationally accepted Codex Alimentarius, the current industry practice of 10 cfm/gram in a 25g sample is only applicable for foodstuffs that do not promote the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Ready to eat processed products implicated in the outbreak promote the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and the internationally agreed level is absent when tested according to the sampling plan.

4. The international guidance has been considered. Consultation referred to in (2)(a) above will need to explore whether a zero tolerance needs to be considered owing to the new scientific research regarding the emerging nature and virulence of Listeria monocytogenes and the current health status of the South African population.

5. (a) The relevant authorities (Department of Health; Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries; Department of Trade and Industry with its two entities (National Consumer Commission and National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications) have been tasked to review the existing food control system, including legislation and recommend the best way to regulate food safety in the country.

(b) Once the review has been finalised by all parties involved, it will then be taken to the relevant stakeholders for the requisite consultation and comment.

END.

30 July 2018 - NW1622

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a)(i) are the details of the methodology used by his department to assess the 3 400 public healthcare facilities to determine their functionality, (ii) is the total number of assessors who were involved, (b) criteria were used to identify each facility and (c) are the details of the outcome of the assessment; (2) whether any consultants were used to conduct the assessment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The functionality of the 3480 public health facilities are assessed using the Ideal Clinic Realisation and Maintenance Tool developed by the department of health as part of the Operation Phakisa Ideal Clinic Laboratory. In preparation for the introduction of National Health Insurance (NHI), the Ideal Clinic programme is setting in place a systematic approach to transform all PHC facilities to meet national standards when inspected by the Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC). The National Health Amendment Act (12 of 2013) mandates the OHSC to protect and promote the health and safety of health service users through monitoring and enforcing compliance with prescribed norms and standards[1]. The Ideal Clinic programme is the NDoH’s internal mechanism for ensuring PHC facilities’ compliance with these norms and standards in order to satisfy the needs of South African communities.

A dashboard, using the standard traffic-light colours, was developed. The figure below depicts the arrangement of 32 sub-components under 10 components. The 32 sub-components are further subdivided into 206 elements. The number of elements change on an annual basis as the national team receive feedback from clinical staff and managers on clinic and district level about how to improve the framework. Elements are assigned a green colour when they are fully functional, an orange colour if they are partially functional and corrective actions are under way, and a red colour if the element is absent or non-functional.

 

The elements are assigned a vital, essential or important weight in line with the definitions below.

The table below indicates the scores required per element weight.

Weights

Silver

Gold

Platinum

Vital

(10 elements)

90%

100%

100%

Essential

(86 elements)

70%

80%

90%

Important

(110 elements)

68%

78%

89%

AVERAGE

70%-79%

80%-89%

90%-100%

The Ideal Clinic Realisation and Maintenance (ICRM) Programme follows the PLAN, DO STUDY, Act (PDSA) cycle. The first large scale planning took place in October and November 2014. This in-depth planning in a laboratory setting called “Operation Phakisa Ideal Clinic Lab” resulted in a comprehensive implementation plan. The cycle starts with status determinations by PHC facility managers(April to June) and a re-planning session in May. This is followed by the correction of weaknesses (turning red and orange elements green during July to October). In November district peer reviews are done.

Peer review results are immediately captured on the web based ICRM monitoring software tool for the purpose of result analyses (Study). District scale-up teams then assist clinic managers and staff to turn the remaining orange and red elements to green (December to February). In March peer review updates are done to determine achievement for the financial year. The NDoH receives continuous feedback from managers and staff at provincial, district and facility level about changes required to guidelines, standard operating procedures and systems processes that currently cause bottlenecks. The results are used to plan the implementation for the next year. Planning for the following year includes amendments to the framework resulting in a subsequent version.