Questions and Replies

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21 August 2020 - NW522

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether all of the SA Airways Group Companies including (a) SA Airways SOC (Limited), (b) Mango Airlines SOC (Limited), (c) Air Chefs SOC (Limited), (d) SAA Technical SOC (Limited) and (e) SA Airways City Centre SOC (Limited), but not exclusively, are under business rescue; if not, why not?

Reply:

The only company in business rescue is South African Airways SOC Limited (SAA).

SA Airways City Centre SOC (Limited) has been placed in voluntary liquidation before the business rescue proceedings.

None of the other companies in the group are in business rescue as the boards have not placed the companies under voluntary business rescue, nor has any other process in terms of the Companies Act been given effect to.

21 August 2020 - NW1563

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What steps has he taken to regulate the price that is charged for Covid-19 testing; (2) what is the total (a) breakdown of the type of Covid-19 tests that the public healthcare sector has conducted since 5 March 2020 and (b) number of (i) positive and (ii) negative test results that have been reported to date?

Reply:

1. There are no regulations that allow for capping of prices in the private sector. Discussions have been held with the private laboratories to bring down their prices. The private laboratories were charging different prices, with some charging up to R1,400 per test. Following these discussions all private laboratories reduced their prices to R850 per test.

2. Free testing in the private sector will be difficult as private laboratories have to recover their costs. In the public sector patients do not pay if they are not on medical aid.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1555

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of Covid-19 vaccine trials are taking place in the Republic at the moment, (b) are the names of the companies conducting the specified vaccine trials and (c) safety measures are in place to ensure that the persons who are participating in the vaccine trials are protected?

Reply:

(a) There are currently two (2) ongoing COVID-19 vaccine trials in South Africa;

(b) The vaccine trials are conducted by the Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Wits Health Consortium (ChAdOx1 SARS-CoV-2 Trial) and TASK Applied Science (TASK-008 BCG- CORONA Trial); and

(c) In general, Regulation 30 of the Medicines Act (Act 101 of 1965, as amended) mandates the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) to regulate the conduct of all clinical trials in the Republic of South Africa. In carrying out this legislative mandate, SAHPRA is guided by relevant sections of the current South African Good Clinical Practice (SAGCP) Guidelines.

Specifically, sub-regulations 30(10)(b) and (c) empower SAHPRA to inspect clinical trial sites and/or withdraw authorization to conduct clinical trials, respectively. Withdrawal can be for reasons of compromised safety of trial participants, or changes in the original science behind the trial, or where the integrity of the data being generated becomes compromised. In addition, SAHPRA, in line with current SAGCP Guidelines, ensures that all protocols have had adequate oversight by registered ethics committees as part of its clinical trial protocol approval process.

All these regulatory measures taken by SAHPRA during protocol approval, and subsequent trial monitoring by both site inspections and safety monitoring reports, serve to ensure that persons participating in all clinical trials conducted in South Africa are protected from harmful and unethical medical conduct.

END.

21 August 2020 - NW1509

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What measures has her department put in place to attend to the dire need for professional staff such as nurses, psychologists and therapists in (a) ordinary schools and (b) schools for learners with special educational needs; (2) whether she intends to make use of students performing their community service year to assist the specified schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) The Department of Basic Education (DBE)  has developed the National draft Guidelines for Resourcing and Inclusive Education system. The proposed guidelines deal with resourcing as it relates to the inclusive education system as a whole. This system comprises Special Schools, Special Schools/Resource Centres, Full-service Schools, Ordinary Public Schools, and District-based Support Teams. It addresses barriers in two focal areas: 1) teaching and learning and 2) psycho-social and health support.

The document motivates for the development of an integrated and holistic approach which does not separate support provisioning of special and ordinary schools from that of districts and aims at strengthening support to all learners who experience barriers to learning in the system on a continuum from low to high intensity support.

The Guidelines must be seen as a key procedure to ensure the transformation of the education system towards an inclusive education system in line with the prescripts of Education White Paper 6 on Special Needs Education: Building an Inclusive Education and Training System (2001). Furthermore it calls for the appointment of healthcare professionals within the education system, in all educational institutions and offices so that learners are provided with a holistic intervention approach. The guidelines are being costed by provincial Education Departments PEDs), and a phased in strategy will be used to ensure that critical healthcare professional posts needed by provinces are filled.

(2) Community service students are required by government to complete their community service year in a clinical institution. This allows them to put into practice their clinical knowledge, so as to gain clinical experience. If the clinical institution (hospital/clinic) provides an outreach community programme, where the student can provide services to a an educational institution, the Department of Basic Education would by all means accept the services to be rendered by the community service individual. The department also encourages Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to allow students still obtaining their degree/diploma to do their clinical practicals in different education institutions so that the student has an all rounded experience and gains insight of the education system. An example of such an initiative will be the expose of student social workers who perform their practicals at schools and also have been appointed to provide services to schools in the community in which they are based in.

21 August 2020 - NW1529

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture to question 197 on 27 May 2020, (a) for what specified purpose did the National Lottery allocate R4 million to the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) and (b) on what date (i) did (SASCOC) apply for the money and (ii) was the money transferred to SASCOC?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by MsThabangMampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission, which is reproduced below.

Response from the National Lotteries Commission:

The South AfricanSports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) applied for funding relating to Commonwealth Games in Glasgow on the 14th July 2014. The application was adjudicated on the 28th May 2015 and an amount of R 4 000 000.00 was granted. The approved funds were paid directly to SASCOC.”

-END-

21 August 2020 - NW1544

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether he will disclose the recipient(s) of the R5 billion allegedly paid to an Eskom service provider by mistake; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What steps has he taken to: (a) Bring those persons responsible for the reckless conduct to book and (b) Retrieve the R5 billion?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. The R5.5 billion is the total value of Eskom’s claim against Tegeta Resources and Exploration, which is in business rescue.

Relevant details are as follows:

Tegeta is a company owned by Oakbay which is a Gupta related company. Tegeta owns the Optimum coal mine.

The Business rescue proceedings of the Optimum coal mine commenced in February 2018 when the Optimum Board of Directors resolved to place the company under voluntary business rescue and proceeded to file a notice of commencement of business rescue proceedings with the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission on 19 February 2018. The Optimum coal mine had been supplying coal to Hendrina Power Station.

Eskom has submitted a claim of approximately R5.5 billion against Optimum in these proceedings, composed of undelivered coal and poor quality of delivered coal:

A. pre - commencement (of business rescue) September 2016 to January, 2018 = R1,1 billion ( 1,1 million tons)

B. post – commencement (of business rescue process) February, 2018 to December, 2018

= R4.4 billion (3.8 million tons of Coal)

At a meeting of creditors convened on 10 December 2019, the quantum of Eskom’s claim was challenged and it was resolved to refer Eskom’s claim for determination by an independent expert. Creditors contended that Eskom’s claim is inflated and as such Eskom should not have been afforded voting rights on the contingent and disputed part of its claim in Optimum. Eskom’s disputed claim was determined by way of an expedited arbitration presided over by retired judge Fritz Brand, jointly appointed by the creditors.

At the arbitration hearing held in March 2020, the majority of creditors (excluding Oakbay – also a creditor in Optimum), Eskom and the BRPs reached an agreement regarding the quantum of Eskom’s claims. Eskom’s claim, both pre- and-post-business rescue, was determined to be the sum of R1 276 031 278.48 (one billion two hundred and seventy six million thirty one thousand two hundred and seventy eight rand and forty eight cents). Eskom’s voting share was determined at 24% to be exercised by Eskom in any manner it wishes to do.

Current Status of BR proceedings:

During the arbitration hearing in March it was also agreed that the revised business rescue plan would be published on or before the 2 April 2020. It was further agreed that the meeting of creditors, to vote on the preferred offer and adopt the business rescue plan, would be convened on or about 20 April 2020. The BRPs did not publish the plan in April due to the 2 remaining bidders, namely Lurco and IZM, failing to secure funding to acquire the mine.

In light of the above, in May 2020 the BRPs invited other prospective bidders to submit proposals to acquire the mine. Bids were submitted mid-June 2020 and the BRPs are currently reviewing the offers received from the 3 bidders. Eskom currently awaits the outcome of the review. Preferred bidders will be incorporated in the revised BR plan to be published in due course.

Towards the end of June 2020, the BRPs also received an alternative proposal to rescue the mine. The alternative offer was submitted by Centaur Ventures Ltd, one of the largest creditors of Optimum. According to the BRPs, the alternative plan, if supported by the BRPs and creditors, will also be incorporated in the revised business rescue plan and be triggered in the event that the preferred bidders fail to secure sufficient funding to acquire the assets. Eskom has not yet been furnished with the alternative proposal for consideration.

The BRPs have not committed to a specific date for publication of the revised business rescue plan. In the event that the revised plan is published end July, 2020 then the meeting of creditors for purposes of voting and adopting the plan would have to be convened early August i.e. within 10 days of the date of publication of the plan.

2. (a) Not applicable.

(b) As explained in (1) above, Eskom submitted a claim in the business rescue proceedings which are still underway.

21 August 2020 - NW1527

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What are the details of the events that led to Moody’s downgrading, from Ba1 to Ba 2, of the credit rating of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC); (2) What are the details of the action steps that his department intends to implement to restore the IDC’s credit rating by Moody’s to Ba1; (3) What are the implications of the credit rating downgrade for COVID-19 relief funding which according to his departmentis to be disbursed by the IDC?

Reply:

The Moody’s downgrade of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) to Ba2 from Ba1 appear to be based principally on concerns about the preparedness of Government to support public entities, and the timeliness of any decision to offer such support. This follows challenges with timely provision of funding for the Land and Agricultural Development Bank to make payments of maturing credit facilities and payments relating to SAA.

Moody’s recognised that the IDC “is still one of the stronger credits in the country, primarily reflecting the company's high capital buffers.”Moody’s further highlighted that the “IDC has strong capitalisation, with an equity-to-total assets ratio of 66% as of March 2019, which provides significant buffers to absorbunexpected losses and grow the business further.”

Moody’s assessment of the assumption of government support has been reduced from high to strong, and as a result the rating for the IDC to be downgraded. A similar rerating of the Development Bank of SouthernAfrica has been effected, for similar reasons.

As the principal factors relate to Moody’s assumptions on the sovereign, the IDC Board and Management will reinforce the point about the IDC’s capital buffers in engagement with Moody’s.

The IDC’s commitment to the COVID-19 relief funding remains i.e. the COVID-19 relief funding has not been affected by the credit downgradebecause IDC is managing prudently within its Liquidity Framework. The IDC continues to receive funding applications in this regard and perform the necessary credit assessments.

-END-

20 August 2020 - NO7

Profile picture: Mofokeng, Ms JM

Mofokeng, Ms JM to ask the Deputy President

With reference to the theme Silencing the Guns: Creating Conducive Conditions for Africa’s Development and upon the Republic’s assumption of the Chair of the African Union (AU), the Government committed to promote women’s economic inclusion and strengthening the fight against gender-based violence, which are challenges faced by women in Africa that have all been exacerbated by the novel coronavirus, what therefore are the details of his role in assisting the President in efforts towards building a better Africa as the Envoy to South Sudan in silencing the guns on the continent, with particular reference to (a) protecting women and children and (b) fighting gender- based violence?

Reply:

South Africa continues to be at the frontline of championing the implementation of the African Union theme for the year, of “Silencing the Guns: Creating Conducive Conditions for Africa’s Development”. The flagship initiative of Silencing the Guns is at the core of activities led by the African Union, towards ensuring that Africa is a more peaceful and stable continent.

Amidst various challenges encountered such as the unprecedented global COVID-19 pandemic, we are forging ahead with this work, towards laying a foundation for achieving the objectives linked to Agenda 2063. At the centre of this agenda, is prioritising mechanisms that promote a dialogue-centred approach to conflict prevention, mediation and resolution of conflicts to ensure that peace and a culture of tolerance is entrenched.

 

Alongside leading these African Union efforts, South Africa continues to play a role of assisting in the implementation of the Revitalised Agreement on the Resolution of Conflict in South Sudan. Our role is to ensure that the Revitalised Government of National Unity achieves all elements they have set out, to attain national reconciliation, national healing and that permanent and sustainable peace is restored to enable South Sudan to prosper and where its people realise their full human potential.

 

Evidence across all conflict spots, demonstrates that at the receiving end of conflict is always the ordinary people, mostly women and children who bear the brunt of immeasurable pain and disruption to their lives. In conflict, women and children often face the daunting task of keeping families together after displacement by providing food, clothing and shelter. With our humanitarian intervention in South Sudan, women are the majority of beneficiaries. The same is true for the Central African Republic, where the conflict of over the past two decades has had a dramatic impact on women and children.

 

To date, South Africa has been championing interventions in the region, which are focused on facilitating high level national dialogues, reconciliation support, offering high level advisory services and the necessary technical support required for building and strengthening the political and economic infrastructure required for sustainable democracy. We do this, for we believe that conflict is not good for our continent as it stunts growth and development. It breeds discontent and it is a recipe for disaster.

 

In our engagements with leaders on the continent, we have always advocated for international, regional and national strategies which are gender responsive, and focused on the advancement of the rights of women and girls.

This year the world also marks 25 years since the Beijing Declaration: Platform for Action that was adopted by the United Nations, which advocated strongly for the rights of women and gender equality to be prioritised. As we mark the historic Beijing Declaration, we also need to guard against regressing on the gains made in the global fight against all forms of violence against women and other forms of gender-based violence and femicide.

 

According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS for instance, nearly one in three women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner, non-partner sexual violence or both in their lifetime.

 

The United Nations Security Council Resolution 1820 further highlights that, sexual violence is “a tactic of war to humiliate, dominate, instil fear in, disperse and/or forcibly relocate civilian members of a community or an ethnic group.” In such instances, rape is used to demoralise and destabilise entire communities. Women and children are often the most vulnerable to this war tactic during times of conflict.

 

As we have said, these challenges have been exacerbated by the global COVID-19 pandemic, which is heavily affecting the livelihoods, socio-economic stability and security of many families and communities in Africa. This pandemic has shown that women and girls are disproportionally affected, often finding themselves at the forefront of fighting the disease.

 

We can all agree that more needs to be done at individual country level as well as globally to eradicate such violations. We have always advocated for strategies that would commit Member States of the African Union to ensure access to justice for victims and survivors of gender-based violence, protecting women and girls in humanitarian situations across Africa, and establishing of humanitarian corridors for accessing aid.

We are encouraged that the African Union recognises gender equality as a fundamental human right, and an integral part of regional integration, economic growth and social development. To this end, the African Union has developed a strategy for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment, to ensure the inclusion of women in Africa’s development agenda. This Gender Empowerment strategy is a timely intervention to address imbalances and gender inequities.

 

We are confident that all parties and stakeholders in South Sudan, will ensure that peace holds and that women are not hindered in playing a leading role in the rebuilding of the country and all its institutions.

 

South Africa shall continue to support such efforts, as we do with the capacity training programme that supports peace-building efforts. The training focuses on increasing existing mediation capacity of women.

 

The Capacity Training Programme in Conflict Resolution, Negotiation and Mediation attracts international women, the majority of which are from African Member States to the African Union. This programme has trained 26 women leaders, including those from the Republic of South Sudan in the current year.

 

In conclusion, we have always sought to ensure that our commitment to the promotion, protection and fulfilment of human rights is among the guiding principles that inform South Africa’s engagement with South Sudan, and the rest of Africa.

 

-En

20 August 2020 - NW1875

Profile picture: Shelembe, Mr ML

Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) total number of houses that were built for military veterans are currently illegally occupied and (b) steps has her department taken to address the issue?

Reply:

(a)

Military VeteransHousesillegally occupied

  1. Gauteng

Region

Name of project

No: of units

West Rand

Westonaria Borwa

21

Johannesburg

Lufhereng EXT 1

12

Sedibeng

Savannah city

27

 

Tshepong

20

 

Golden Gardens

5

Tshwane

Nellmapiusext 22

33

 

Rama City

15

TOTAL

133

2. Eastern Cape

Municipality

Name of project

N0: of units

Chris Hani

Lukhanji

26

TOTAL

26

3. Kwa-Zulu Natal

In Kwa-Zulu Natal there is no housing project for Military Veterans to date. The Military Veterans in the province illegally occupied the 40 sqm Breaking New Ground houses, normal RDP houses. Refer to the table hereunder;

Municipality

Name of project

N0: of units

Ethekwini

Cornubia

34

Ethekwini

Philani Valley

23

Ethekwini

Harmmonds Farm

7

Ethekwini

Kingsburgh West

33

Msunduzi

Aloe Ridge Social Housing

261

TOTAL

358

4. No houses have been invaded in the following Provinces;

a. Limpopo

b. North West

c. Free State

d. Mpumalanga

e. Western Cape

f. Northern Cape

(b)The Department of Military Veterans has agreed with role-players such as the Department of Human Settlements, the Housing Development Agency and Contractors to submit the approved allocation lists of Military Veteransso that the names should be linked to stand numbers before construction on housing projects commences.

20 August 2020 - NW1859

Profile picture: Mafanya, Mr WTI

Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department has done any assessment of the imminent danger that terrorist attacks may pose to the security of the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the imminent danger and the readiness of the SA National Defence Force to protect and defend the Republic against such attacks?

Reply:

1. Defence Intelligence regularly compiles regional assessments that outlines the security situation in the Southern African Development Community, including the developments in Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique.

2. The assessments are shared with the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) if and when required.

20 August 2020 - NW1263

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What progress has her department made in (a) compiling and (b) finalising a (i) reliable and (ii) accessible Immovable Assets Register?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) embarked on the Immovable Asset Register (IAR) Enhancement Programme to address management assertions in order to ensure that the IAR is complete and credible.

The historical context of the IAR and various sources of data is considered in addressing the completeness and accuracy of the register. This include the compliance with the Public Finance Management Act, Government Immovable Asset Management Act, and National Treasury guidelines including the National Treasury Immovable Asset Guide section 3.2 (b).

Reconciliation of the IAR is done considering the following:

  • Deeds records
  • Property Management Information System
  • DRDLR Vesting Data (LAW)
  • Devolved Properties - deemed provincial properties linked to the devolved budget for rates
  • Original title deeds - aktex records or copies of the title deed
  • Chief Surveyor General - CSG information on surveyed land parcels
  • User Asset Management Plans (U-AMPs)
  • Points of Interest and security clusters - police, prisons, courts & defence.
  • Other National or Provincial IARs

Given the above activities, it must be borne in mind that the IAR changes from time to time to take account of the numerous entries which occur as a result of the completed infrastructure projects, section 42 transfers in line with PFMA, disposal of properties, and the rectification of erroneously registered and vested properties.

AdetailedreconciliationofDPWIpropertiesagainsttheDeedsrecordsand IARsofotherNationalandProvincialcustodianswasconducted between 2011 and 2013.Thisexercisewas followed by physical verification and high level condition assessment of DPWI properties between 2014 and 2016.

In addition DPWI applied the deemed cost model on immovable assets in order to eliminate the historically recorded R1 values contained in the Immovable Asset Register. For example, the total value of immovable assets as at 31 March 2013 was only R3.5billion because most assets were recorded at R1 due to the lack of historical cost information/values. The total value of immovable assets is now more than R120billion since the 2016/17 financial year.

A detailed reconciliation of DPWI properties against the Deeds records and IARs of other National and Provincial custodians is conducted twice annually.

DPWI has also recruited young graduates, experienced project managers and other specialists on contract to maintain the IAR, but most importantly to reduce reliance on service providers in line with Auditor-General’s recommendation. Physical verification is being conducted by these contract specialists since June 2015 in order to comply with the relevant GRAP standards and Section 13 (d) of GIAMA.

Furthermore, the maintenance of data is managed by the DPWI specialists, GIS professionals, and accountants with articles, chartered accountants, data analysts, administrators, and property managers.

Significant progress has been made in addressing historical and legacy issues affectingnationalandprovincialcustodiansofimmovableassets.Landparcelsto bevested(confirmationofownershipintermsoftheConstitution)underDPWIhave been recorded in the IAR on the basis of substance overform.

(b)(i), (ii) DPWI is currently reviewing all its systems to finally move towards a more reliable and complete IAR.

20 August 2020 - NW1866

Profile picture: Legwase, Ms TI

Legwase, Ms TI to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the average age of the permanent infantry force of the SA National Defence Force?

Reply:

(1) The average age of the permanent infantry force of the SA National Defence Force is 38 years.

(a) South African Infantry Corp (SAIC) members are deemed to be members from the rank of Rifleman (Rfn) up to Lieutenant Colonel (Lt Col). Members above the rank of Lt Col are part of the SA Staff Corps (SA St C), and no longer part of the SAIC, although their original mustering may have been in the SAIC.

(b) Average ages of members of the SAIC by rank group are as follows:

  1. Rifleman - 34 years.
  2. Lance Corporal - 44 years.
  3. Corporal - 46 years.
  4. Sergeant - 48 years.
  5. Staff Sergeant - 51 years.
  6. Warrant Officer (Class 2) - 53 years
  7. Warrant Officer (Class 1) - 55 years
  8. Second Lieutenant - 33 years
  9. Lieutenant - 36 years
  10. Captain - 41 years
  11. Major - 46 years
  12. Lieutenant Colonel - 50 years

20 August 2020 - NW1795

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works andInfrastructure

Whether,with reference to there solution by the Cabinet in October 2019 that 14000 hectares could be released for human settlement development,her department has taken any steps to release any of the identified land; if not, why not; if so, (a) which exact pockets of land were transferred in each municipality and(b)what are the time frames for the release of all 14000 hectares?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has approved a total of 14 land parcels measuring 1004.0186 hectares to be released for human settlements purposes.

a) The land transfer is at various stages. Currently,no land transfers have taken place due to requirement of legislation that National Treasury endorsement must be obtained on properties that are transferred below market value. In this instance, two land parcels out of the fourteen land parcels arewiththeNationalTreasuryforconsiderationwhilstthe market valuation offive land parcels have been approved by the Land Affairs Board and will be submitted to National Treasury.

The DPWI has informed me that valuation of the seven parcels of land will be considered by the Land Affairs Board and submitted to National Treasury before the end of August.

b) The Department has prioritised the release of 47 land parcels measuring 1416.8195 hectares within this financial year. The remaining land parcels will be prioritised for release in 2021-22 financial year pending receiving formal requests with supporting documentation,includingdevelopmentplans,whichwillprovideanindicationofexact extent of land to be released. DPWI will process these requests subject toavailability of the identified properties and completion of feasibilityinvestigations.

The delay in transfers is caused by the requirement of National Treasury for market value. To speed up the process, DPWI has requested that National Treasury consider municipal value instead of market value. DPWI cannot skip these processes of the Land Affairs Board and the National Treasury as it is required by legislation.

20 August 2020 - NW1116

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the deployment of members of the Emergency Support Team (EST) from the Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North-West region to work at the KwaZulu-Natal regional head office of the Department of Correctional Services in Pietermaritzburg, (a) on what date did the deployment commence and (b) what has been the total costs related to (i) the deployment, (ii) travel and subsistence, (iii) accommodation and (iv) any additional payment to the relevant EST members?

Reply:

Emergency Support Team (EST) from the Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North-West Region were deployed to work at the KwaZulu-Natal Reginal office.

(a) The deployment commenced on 24 April 2020 and ended on 22 May 2020.

(b)(i - iv)

EXPENDITURE

AMOUNT

Subsistence & Travel (S&T)

R78 721.04

Fuel

R30 556.45

Overtime

R92 317.06

Toll gates

R2 912.89

Standby allowances

R40 698.00

Public holidays

R33 229.52

Total Sunday allowance

R20 762.37

Accommodation

R855 653.00

TOTAL DEPLOYMENT COST

R1 154 850.33

END

20 August 2020 - NW1561

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department is still issuing the food parcels that were distributed at the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus to indigent persons and those whose income was affected; if not, why not; if so, what number of persons does the programme reach in each month?

Reply:

Yes, The Department is still issuing the food parcels that were distributed at the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus to indigent persons and those whose income was affected;

From the beginning of Covid-19 response till the end of Quarter 1 (April - June), the programme has distributed a total of 800 968 food parcels to about 4 004 840persons.

The programme reach in each month is as follows:

March food parcel distribution to households per province

Province

Food parcels distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/household)

Eastern Cape

0

0

Free State

0

0

Gauteng

807

4 035

Kwa Zulu Natal

0

0

Limpopo

0

0

Mpumalanga

0

0

Northern Cape

0

0

North West

0

0

Western Cape

16 788

83 940

Total

17 595

87 975

April food parcel distribution to households per province

PROVINCE

Food Parcels Distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/Household)

Eastern Cape

8 054

40 270

Free State

14 732

73 660

Gauteng

58 944

294 720

Kwa Zulu Natal

20 156

100 780

Limpopo

36 772

183 860

Mpumalanga

27 817

139 085

Northern Cape

25 554

127 770

North West

18 396

91 980

Western Cape

44 518

222 590

Total

254 943

1 274 715

May food parcel distribution to households per province

Province

Food Parcels Distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/Household)

Eastern Cape

23 415

117 075

Free State

33 020

165100

Gauteng

106 598

532 990

Kwa Zulu Natal

12 120

60 600

Limpopo

52 692

263 460

Mpumalanga

56 212

281 060

Northern Cape

24 672

123 360

North West

7 638

38 190

Western Cape

22 780

113 900

Total

339 147

1 695 735

June food parcel distribution to households per province

Province

Food Parcels Distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/Household)

Eastern Cape

860

4 300

Free State

860

4 300

Gauteng

129 190

645 950

Kwa Zulu Natal

18 184

90 920

Limpopo

18 245

91 225

Mpumalanga

860

4 300

Northern Cape

860

4 300

North West

860

4 300

Western Cape

860

4 300

Total

170 779

853 895

20 August 2020 - NW1864

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Modise, Ms M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) Whether there are any soldiers of the SA National Defence Force who are currently patrolling on the ground during level 3 of the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus and (b) on which areas are the soldiers focusing?

Reply:

a) The Defence Force has deployed personnel in support of other Government Departments to mitigate against COVID-19 pandemic. The deployed forces include health care services, engineering capabilities and lockdown enforcement elements.

b) The focus is on support to the SAPS, Health and Humanitarian Assistance, health care and water purification.

20 August 2020 - NW1865

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Mmutle, Mr TN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What has been the progress of the investigations into the alleged heavy-handed conduct of some soldiers of the SA National Defence Force during their deployment to enforce the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus?

Reply:

Ser No

Area Office

CAS No

Offence

Status

01

Wynberg MP

09/04/2020

Common Assault, a journalist alleged that he was driving behind a Military Convoy in Masiphumelele Township in Cape Town where he observed an SANDF member assaulting a civilian with a wooden stick

A case docket was referred to LEGSATO Cape Town and was withdrawn on 03 June 2020

Other cases were reported to the South African Police Services and progress can only be obtained from SAPS.

20 August 2020 - NW1867

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Maake, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department has a spending plan for the funds allocated for the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the plan?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

i) The department of Defence has not been allocated an additional amount by National Treasury. Following the budget estimate of Rb4.5 estimate the department of defence was allocated Rb3.0 on the 24th of June 2020 for COVID-19 expenses.

ii) The breakdown of R3.0 billion is as follows;

(a) R763.4 million for Cost of Employment (CoE/personnel costs), and;

(b) R2.2 billion for goods and Services and Capital equipment.

(ii) As of the 31st of July 2020, personnel costs totalling R476 million have been paid to SANDF personnel, and orders of goods and services amounting of R1.5 billion have been placed of which R1.1 billion been delivered and paid. (R753 million for PPE and minor medical equipment)

(iv) Procurement of additional equipment for a field hospital (SAMHS) is in the process of being finalised.

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

Covid 19 Spending Plan:

The Department of Military Veterans (DMV), in response to the Covid 19 pandemic, developed a Covid 19 Response Plan. In order to execute the plan, the DMV prioritised funds, following the guidelines provided by National Treasury, 2020 Special Adjustment of Budget. An amount of R4.3 million has been set aside to spend on Covid 19 related items.

Details of the Plan:

In an attempt to remain compliant with matters related to Covid 19 pandemic, the plan includes amongst other things, the procurement of Masks, Gloves,

Goggles, Face Shields, Temperature Scanners, Sanitizers, various detergents and cleaning materials, amongst other things.

20 August 2020 - NO12

Profile picture: Luzipo, Mr S

Luzipo, Mr S to ask the Deputy President

In light of the current challenges of energy supply and efficiency as well as the Government’s commitment to an integrated energy mix, what capacity demands can other alternative sources of energy, such as independent power producers, provide to mitigate Eskom’s shortfall on electricity demand?

Reply:

South Africa is a country endowed with abundant energy resources. Coal, nuclear, solar power, and wind power all play a central role in the socio-economic development of our country, while simultaneously providing the necessary infrastructure and economic base for the country to become an attractive host for foreign investments in the energy sector. Successful and sustainable utilisation of all possible energy carriers in our country is vital for energy security, sustainable economic growth and development.

Cabinet approved the Integrated Resource Plan 2019 which is our blueprint, spelling out our energy mix objectives to meet electricity demand between now and the year 2030. Eskom generation capacity forms a significant part of our energy supply into the future and hence our attention to resolve its plant performance and financial challenges. As in all sectors of the economy, the state does not have sufficient resources to go it alone. The energy sector is therefore not an exception.

During the 2020 State of the Nation Address, President Cyril Ramaphosa committed to the following, amongst others:

  • A Section 34 Ministerial Determination will be issued to give effect to the Integrated Resource Plan 2019, enabling the development of additional grid capacity from renewable energy, natural gas, hydro power, battery storage and coal.
  • The procurement of emergency power from projects that can deliver electricity into the grid within 3 to 12 months from approval, will be initiated.
  • Measures to be introduced to enable municipalities in good financial standing to procure their own power from Independent Power Producers will be put in place.

    The Eskom Political Task Team was appointed and has been seized with ensuring that we accelerate processes to provide additional energy capacity through the implementation of the Emergency Energy Procurement Programme. Concurrence has been received from the National Energy Regulator of South Africa to the Section 34 determination by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy to procure an additional 2 000 MW as pronounced by President Ramaphosa. This will in total enable the development of additional 11 813MW of power from 2022 which is in addition to the 2000MW under emergency procurement. It will further be in addition to the Bid Window 4 contribution to the grid.

    We are concerned about the disruptive nature and negative impact power interruptions have on the economy. To mitigate against current load shedding and load reduction, Government has also initiated a number of initiatives that include:
  • Eskom procurement of power from private companies through short term power contracts under the Short Term Power Purchase Programme. It is expected that the final contract will be awarded by no later than the end of September 2020. Further, measures to expedite this process are being explored.
  • The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy procurement programme of 2000 MW with Eskom as the buyer.
  • The Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy enabling generation for own use through inclusion of distributed capacity in the IRP 2019, as well as amendments to Schedule 2 of the Electricity Act.
  • Financially sustainable municipalities being enabled to procure own power generation as off-takers from Independent Power Producers or through public, private partnerships.

Therefore, private power generation by consumers or Independent Power Producers will play a significant role in helping close the demand and supply role as a result of the lower than expected Eskom generation plant Energy Availability Factor.

In summary, a combination of generation for own use, municipal generation and Independent Power Producers can play a significant role in helping close the supply and demand gap due to Eskom plant challenges.

Partnership with Independent Power Producers is in alignment with the National Development Plan goals of job creation, skills development and improving the livelihoods of people. We are optimistic that this will provide the necessary capital investment in the sector and will further contribute to the diversification of both the supply and nature of energy production.

We remain optimistic that the Independent Power Producers, in partnership with Eskom will provide a sustainable and complementary solution to our electricity generation challenges.

As we continue to sharpen our resolve towards the realisation of the National Development Plan, we need to find innovative and affordable funding mechanisms for the participation of black entrepreneurs in the energy space, which will allow the development of black industrialists, as well as ensuring participation of black entrepreneurs in the main stream economy.

It is government’s position that South Africa cannot address inequality, poverty and unemployment without economic empowerment of historically disadvantaged groups such as black people, women, youth and people with disabilities without the support of the private sector. As we move forward, we need to accelerate the participation of youth and women in the energy sector in particular.

 

-End-

20 August 2020 - NW446

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What was the total number of parolees in the Republic as at 29 February 2020?

Reply:

The total number of parolees in the South African system as on 29 February 2020 is as follows:

Probationers

Parolees

Awaiting Trial Person (ATPs)

Total

7 371

45 914

1252

54537

END

20 August 2020 - NW1863

Profile picture: Modise, Ms M

Modise, Ms M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

In view of the fact that the Republic only has three military hospitals, what plans are put in place to ensure that health facilities are available to military veterans during the Covid-19 pandemic in provinces that do not have military hospitals as it is the obligation of her department to ensure that military veterans have access to health facilities that can be easily accessible in provinces?

Reply:

The Department of Military Veterans through its MoU with the South African Military Healthcare Services (SAMHS), provides for Military Veterans to be authorized for referral to the nearest Public or Private healthcare facility/hospital, where SAMHS does not have such facilities. This provision continues to be applicable during the Covid 19 pandemic.

20 August 2020 - NO11

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Deputy President

Whether, the 70% of government spend on established white owned businesses to the exclusion of black youth, particularly young black women who only get 30%, (a) is in line with the Government’s vision of stimulating and supporting rural and township economy through the implementation of empowerment models in building a capable State and (b) he has found that this lack of will to govern perpetuates this disparity which entrenches the existing inequality?

Reply:

Whereas it is not evident from where the statistics cited in the question is derived from, whenever we have responded to questions in Parliament on the revitalisation of rural and township economies, we have emphasised the objective of ensuring that we transform townships and villages from labour and consumption reserves into thriving productive investment hubs that contribute to broader economic transformation of previously marginalised communities.

To achieve this, government policy seeks to bring Historically Disadvantaged Individuals and their businesses into the main stream economy. According to the National Treasury, it is not correct that 70 percent of government spend is allocated to established white owned businesses. The opposite is in fact true, where government spend has been used to transform the economy by sourcing from black-owned enterprises.

Further details on procurement by the state from these enterprises can be sourced from the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer in the National Treasury.

Failure to adequately empower women and capacitate youth compromises efforts and campaigns dedicated towards social cohesion and nation-building. In our effort to empower women and the youth, government’s approach is centred on promoting and supporting local businesses, whilst we emphasise the involvement of local communities.

The National Treasury will release statistics on these categories of business in terms of Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA) Objectives at the end of September 2020 for the 2019/2020 financial year, and up to August 2020 for the current financial year. The National Treasury has commenced a process to modernise and automate public procurement system as part of strengthening the system.

This is to enhance oversight and reporting including addressing of fragmented procurement systems in the different spheres of government and entities running separate systems and insufficient standardised transactional data being centrally collected. It is intended that procurement will be better reported on including all spend across all of government by designated groups according to the PPPFA objectives frequently and regularly.

This will assist us in examining the spread of the procurement spend and categories of goods and services rendered and where possible, identify gaps and areas of the economy that requires further intervention. These interventions are critical if we are to promote inclusive economic growth and equitable employment opportunities.

This government remains steadfast in its commitment to implement legislation, policies, regulations and programmes which seek to redress the legacy of apartheid with a particular focus on black women and youth. Inequalities are indeed deeply entrenched and will require continued, purposeful action by all.

 

-End-

20 August 2020 - NW1666

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)What are the criteria for top secret security clearance that is required for a senior appointment in the State Security Agency; (2) whether Mr Robert McBride attained security clearance and complied with the specified criteria; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The criteria for Top Secret security clearance are multiple and include the successful completion of the vetting process that includes

1.1 Verification of the subject’s/applicant’s records as reflected in databases:

  • criminal records;
  • financial records;
  • personal information; or
  • any other information that is relevant to determine the security clearance of a person.
  •  

1.2 The positive outcome following a vetting fieldwork investigation. For a Top-Secret Security Clearance, the process entails the following:

  • Full record checks on databases (as mentioned above);
  • A subject/applicant interview;
  • Two (2) interviews with references;
  • One (1) work enquiry; and
  • A polygraph examination and evaluation.

(1.2.2) Regarding the later point, all resultant reports (subject/applicant and combined References’ Interview Report; Investigation Memorandum, and Investigation Diary and Polygraph report.) are then sent to the Evaluation division.

(1.2.2) In assessing the reports, the Evaluator will consider the following in his/her risk summary as per the Legislation:

  • Integrity;
  • Loyalty to the State and the relevant institution; and
  • Non-susceptibility to extortion and blackmail;
  • Non-amenability to bribes and non-susceptibility to being compromised due to his or her behaviour or vulnerabilities.

These qualities are critical criteria for employment in a position requiring Top Secret security clearance.

(1. 3) Based on the Evaluator’s recommendations – emergent from records, interviews and investigations – on whether to issue, degrade, withdraw or refuse to grant a security clearance, the State Security Agency’s (SSA’s) Director-General signs off on the vetting result.

2. Regarding Mr Mc Bride’s security clearance:

2.1 On 5 October 2018, the request for the vetting of Mr Mc Bride to the level of a Top Secret level was received from the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID).

2.2  His employment at the IPID was later terminated.

2.2 On 23 April 2020, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) requested the SSA to transfer his Top Secret clearance to them.

2.3 On 29 June 2020, the SSA Acting Director-General enquired about the progress on the vetting of the said subject.

2.4 On 30 June 2020, the SSA Human Resource Consultant enquired about the vetting of the said subject.

2.5 On 1 July 2020, the subject was contacted to avail himself for a personal interview and it followed all the steps outlined above.

2.6 As per the approved Standard Operating Procedure (VA01/2010) on Vetting Fieldwork Investigation, a Polygraph test for a Top-Secret Clearance is required. However, due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, a Polygraph examination could not be conducted, the specific reason being that the procedure would require the Polygraph Examiner to be in close proximity of the subject in a closed area for an extended period; thus exposing them (polygraph examiner/subject) to a possible transmission of the virus.

2.7 Nonetheless, given that all the other tests resulted in a positive outcome, the security clearance was issued on condition that as soon as the COVID-19 infection rate flattens, the Polygraph examination will be conducted.

2.8 Accordingly, a Top-Secret security clearance procedure was conducted on Mr Mc Bride and a Top-Secret security clearance was issued on the basis of the information currently available to the SSA.

2.9 A Top-Secret Clearance was issued on 14 July 2020.

3. Not at this stage.

20 August 2020 - NW1598

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)Whether she was asked in her official capacity as the Minister of State Security by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, to discuss the legal matter between a certain person (name furnished) and the Republic of Botswana while planning to meet with the President of the Republic of Botswana, Mr M E K Masisi, at the beginning of July 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) how did she respond to the specified request and (c) on what statutory or any other grounds did she rely to accept the President’s request to intervene in a private matter; (2) whether she has ever held any discussions in her official capacity as the Minister of State Security with President M E K Masisi regarding the allegations levelled against the specified person by the Republic of Botswana; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she has ever been asked in her official capacity as the Minister of State Security to intervene in the private matters of any of her colleagues; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) on what statutory and/or any other grounds did she rely in order to intervene in the private matters of any of her colleagues; (4) why did she cancel her planned visit to the Republic of Botswana at the beginning of July 2020; (5) whether she intends to travel to the Republic of Botswana in the remainder of 2020 to discuss matters surrounding the (a) Southern African Customs Union and/or (b) allegations levelled against the said person; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) The Minister has never been asked by the President to intervene on the matter in question.

Any legal matter between South Africa and any other country would be dealt with through the appropriate channels and instruments, such as mutual legal assistance. The Ministry responsible for the Civilian Intelligence structures is not one of such instruments.

(2) There has never been a discussion between the President of Botswana and the Minister on this matter.

(3) None.

(4) The visit was cancelled because of other commitments.

(5) Purpose for which the visit was intended remains valid, therefore, a visit in the near future cannot be rulled out.

20 August 2020 - NO9

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the Deputy President

Whether, in view of COVID-19 infections which are increasing at an alarming rate in the Republic, the Government and/or the National Coronavirus Command Council intends to investigate claims of a certain doctor (name and details furnished) of a 100 percent success rate in the treatment of all COVID-19 patients since March 2020, whose remedy had also drawn the attention of a United States senator and presidential advisors; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the specified investigation be launched?

Reply:

We note the very important question raised which relates to a doctor who is based in Texas, in the United States of America.

 

We are all focused on flattening the curve of coronavirus infections in our country, hence government has led a robust country response under the auspices of the National Coronavirus Command Council. Much progress has been made in this regard. We have substantively reduced the number of new infections and increased the number of recoveries now at 88.6 percent.

We also are looking forward to the development of potential treatments, and a vaccine for the COVID-19 pandemic, hence the Minister of Health has followed up on these claims in earnest. The President is working with other global leaders to ensure that once the vaccine is found, it is equitably accessible to all countries including South Africa.

 

The Department of Health has advised us that the drug in question has not been approved to treat people infected with the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. To this end, the Department of Health will continue to issue guidelines for the use of government approved drugs in all our health facilities for COVID-19 patients.

 

As a nation, we see value in participating in clinical trials that comply with the highest ethical standards. Our participation will ensure that we contribute to the body of knowledge, and secure our access to therapeutics when they are ready for clinical application.

 

We welcome all well-founded, and lawful scientific trials for the development of government approved drugs including vaccine trials that will assist our country to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. However, we must caution against rushing to embrace unproven, and unscrupulous claims of COVID-19 drugs, treatments and vaccines that may derail our government’s efforts to deal with this pandemic.

 

-End-

20 August 2020 - NO8

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Deputy President

With reference to the Moral Regeneration Movement’s fervent support for the Government’s Covid-19 pandemic lockdown (details furnished), what are the relevant details of its vision that (a) the nation’s moral fiber, which is an essential component of the social cohesion, needs to be authentically and wholesomely reconstructed and

Reply:

The Moral Regeneration Movement came into existence as a result of former President Nelson Mandela’s resolve, that while the new dispensation needed to meet tangible material needs of previously dehumanised black majority, it was also necessary that there be a commensurate programme that would focus on rekindling the very basic moral fibre of the South African society that had almost been destroyed by years of colonialism and apartheid oppression.

Colonialism, racialism and apartheid were at their very core immoral and extremely violent, and the negative impact they have made on communities is abysmal. Therefore, from the very beginning, it was envisaged that there would be a national programme on moral regeneration led by civil society and supported by government and other key sectors of society, including business and the religious fraternity.

 

In appreciating this historical context and the lived social reality of being an integral part of the continent, the moral regeneration vision draws sustenance from the African moral ethic of Ubuntu, which appeals to humanity’s interdependence and interconnectedness.

 

As this question relates to the statement issued by the Moral Regeneration Movement in April this year following the introduction of the Nationwide Lockdown, it is important to reiterate that the Moral Regeneration Movement is an independent civil society formation that takes its own position on a variety of issues, some of which we may agree with, while others we may not necessarily agree with.

 

It is to be noted that the very same statement makes reference to minimising corruption. Our position is contrary. As government of the African National Congress, we seek to eliminate corruption in all its forms and manifestations. That is why we have said on numerous occasions that where any acts of corruption are proven, we are determined to act without any fear or favour against those involved.

 

To this end, as Government, we have developed an overarching National Anti- Corruption Strategy which is aimed at:

 

  • Rejuvenating a national dialogue and direct energy towards practical mechanisms to reduce corruption and improve ethical practice across sectors and amongst citizens in South Africa.

 

  • Providing a robust conceptual framework and strategic pillars to guide anti- corruption approaches across relevant sectors in the country, and
  • Support coordination between government, business and civil society efforts to reduce corruption and improve accountability and ethical practice, while providing tools for monitoring progress towards a less corrupt society.

 

For us as a nation, in order to achieve these goals, we should all work together and appreciate that moral regeneration is a fundamental pillar of building a cohesive and caring society that is grounded on ethical values.

 

As a Patron of the Moral Regeneration Movement, we therefore support those programmes of the Moral Regeneration Movement that seek to build the nation and enhance social cohesion in line with the vision of a new society, as articulated in our National Development Plan – a society that is non-racial, non-sexist and democratic.

 

We wish to emphasise that the various programmes of the Moral Regeneration Movement must go deeper into interrogating the root causes of social ills that continue to plague our society. These programmes must also seek to address the deep inequalities that exist in our society. Such inequalities further manifest in acts of sexism, patriarchal tendencies and economic exclusion of women. Until these inequalities are addressed, we will not achieve our dream of a cohesive and united society.

 

The Moral Regeneration Movement seeks to address some of these challenges that are inherent to issues of inequality in our society. In its work and articulation of the vision for a better South Africa, the Moral Regeneration Movement advocates for the Charter of Positive Values as an expression and interpretation of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights from a perspective of ordinary people. This is the key tool it has adopted and advocates for, in order to rebuild South Africa’s moral fibre. At the heart of this programme are values of responsibility and accountability, honesty and integrity, equity and equality among others.

There have been some disturbing reports during the nationwide lockdown period that related to increased levels of gender based violence, human rights abuses, and the destruction of schools in certain areas. Government and many civil society formations strongly condemned these incidents which clearly sought to undermine the rule of law. Such incidents are manifestations of deep societal problems that need condemnation by all of us, and for stronger partnerships across society as a response as well as immediate action.

 

That is why the Movement is currently implementing an action plan that contains tangible strategic interventions in rekindling basic morality and ethics. It has for its part, continued sponsoring community dialogues on gender based violence and femicide as a way to engender positive behavioural change. These public engagements are currently being rolled out mainly through virtual platforms.

 

The Movement is also collaborating with the South African Local Government Association on the programme to promote ethical leadership. Through this initiative, Councillors are taken through orientation on the fundamentals of ethical leadership thus ensuring that we reduce the propensity or inclination for corrupt activities. This programme needs to be supported so that it reaches all other levels of leadership in society.

 

The violent service delivery protests and anarchy that we observe in some communities from time to time, and which undermine the rule of law, are in many instances as a result of lack of ethical leadership and corruption associated with service delivery.

 

Nation building is not an event, but a social engineering process that needs to fester across society over time. We are all called upon to act in ways that counter social attitudes and practices that are at odds with the society we seek to build, as envisioned in our Constitution.

 

-End-

19 August 2020 - NW1470

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What measures has her department put in place to guarantee bulk infrastructure that will transfer water to the people of Cinci in Ward 11 KwaMbonambi in the King Cetshwayo District in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) by what date will this infrastructure be in place to finally provide the community with access to water?

Reply:

Ward 11 of uMfolozi Municipality receives water from Nseleni Bulk Water Supply Pipeline through the Nseleni Pump Station, which receives its supply from the City of uMhlathuze. The existing Nseleni bulk water pipeline supplies water to Upper Nseleni, Khoza, Nseleni Town and KwaMbonambi areas. This pipeline is connected to the Mandlazini bulk reservoirs in Richards Bay with the Mzingazi Water Treatment Works (WTW) connected to the Mzingazi Lake as the source. The water supply from Nseleni is currently pumped for 18 - 24hrs/day into two reservoirs, the Shandu/Baqoge and Mawombe Reservoirs.

In addition, there are four operational boreholes within the aforementioned Ward. The Cinci borehole near Mawombe Stadium has one standpipe.

There are a number of illegal connections in the area that have a negative effect on the water supply to the Shandu/Baqoge and Mawombe Reservoirs. There is an area known as Mgababa located in-between the abovementioned reservoirs that does not have a reticulation system. The community in Mgababa has connected illegally on the rising main to Mawombe Reservoir resulting in the Mawombe reservoir receiving limited water.

The Councillor together with the strike committee members have been engaged to assist in dealing with the illegal connections. However, more illegal connections have been made to the pumping main, cutting water supply to the Mawombe reservoir. The situation is exacerbated by the limited water supply from the City of uMhlathuze because the area was affected by the drought.

The King Cetshwayo District Municipality is planning to augment bulk water supply to the Cinci area through the installation of an additional reservoir between the two existing reservoirs to service the Mgababa area thereby releasing water to the Mawombe Reservoir. This project will be implemented in 2021.

While the uMfolozi Municipality is attending to all water supply challenges within its area of jurisdiction, the priority is to address backlogs in areas where there is no water supply infrastructure services. These areas are currently being serviced through water tankers.

19 August 2020 - NW1579

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) are the details of the origin and development of the Social and Behaviour Change (SBC) programmes to be implemented by the social services professionals (SSPs), (b) are the details regarding the training of SSPs in this SBC programme, (c) is the implementation plan of the SBC programme in communities across the Republic, (d) time lines are attached to the implementation of the SBC programme in communities across the Republic and (e) is the budget attached to the development, training and implementation of the programme?

Reply:

The HIV pandemic has over the years taught us that biomedical approaches alone are not able to prevent and stem out the spread of new infections, hence a multi-sectoral approach is required to respond to the epidemic.

a) In 2008, UNAIDS noted that new HIV infections were not declining in most countries including South Africa, but continued to increase rapidly. This therefore prompted UNAIDS to call uponall countries to engage in a ‘know your epidemic, know your response’ exercise to allow governments to understand the drivers of the epidemic in order to base HIV prevention efforts on evidence and not on perceptions.The Human Science Research Council (HSRC) therefore conducted a study called Know Your Epidemic, Know Your Response in 2011 for South Africa. This study found that HIV is more than a health issue but a developmental issue because factors that fuel HIV&AIDS are due to human behaviour as well as social and structural in nature andtherefore a social approach was required in addressing these factors. This assisted South Africa to develop the National Strategic Plan on HIV, STIs and TB (NSP) 2012-2016 which mandated the Department of Social Development (DSD) to lead the goal on addressing social and structural drivers of HIV because DSD’s mandate and commitment is on social transformation and we focus mainly on facilitating human development and improving the quality of lives of people by addressing the social and structural barriers to this quality of life.

DSD therefore developed a Compendium of Social and Behaviour Change programmes using the social ecology approachwhich aims at addressing all levels of society, including the individual, interpersonal relationships, family, communities, and systems. The social ecology model has enabled DSD to develop (1) social and behaviour change programmes that seek to address risky behaviours with a view to motivate behaviour change within individuals and social units by use of a range of educational, counseling, motivational, peer-group, skills-building approaches, and community normative approaches which are delivered in small interactive groups; as well as (2) incorporate structural strategies that already exist in the Department (such as social grants, poverty alleviation programmes) which seek to change the context that contributes to individuals’ vulnerability and risk to HIV. The following are the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes which DSD has developed: YOLO, ChommY, Families Matter programme, Men Championing Change programme, Boys Championing Change programme, Community Capacity Enhancement programme and Traditional Leaders programme. These programmes are implemented alongside DSD’s existing programmes that target the structural drivers of the pandemic e.g. social grants and food security programmes. These programmes target different target groups within the social ecology model.

b) The Department partnered with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) since 2011. This partnership assisted the Department to establish a Government Capacity Building and Support Program (GCBS) which aims at strengthening the capacity of the Department of Social Development to respond to HIV&AIDS. The GCBS programme assisted in training Social Services Professionals (SSPs) on the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes in the country. A Train-the-Trainer approach was adopted for each programme and this has ensured that each province has a pool of SSPs that are able to cascade and roll-out the trainings in each district.To-date, a total number of 1 694 SSPs were trained on the social and behaviour change programmes since 2017. The Department also partnered with the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) to roll-out the training of Non Profit Organisations (NPOs) on the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes.SANAC has to-date trained 557 SSPs in all 9 provinces since 2016. The Department had planned to train a further 300 SSPs for this financial year 2020/21, however this has been reviewed to 100 SSPs due to the lockdown restrictions since the trainings are face-to-face with interactive exercises and role-modelling. These trainings will commence in November 2020. Each SSP will be trained on each of the seven (7) social and behaviour change programmes mentioned under (a) above. Each training comprises a minimum of 4 days. This means that each SSP requires a total number of 28 days to complete the entire Compendium of Social and Behaviour Change programmes.

c) These seven (7)social and behaviour change programmes, mentioned above under (a), are implemented together as a package within the same given community, in an integrated manner. Each programme has a Facilitator’s Manual and a Participant’s Manual. The implementation of these programmes is complemented by other DSD existing programmes such as the KeMoja programme. TheDepartment is currently funding 17 NPOs in the country, since 2016, to implement the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes in 30 Districts which have the highest rate of new HIV infections. The NPOs have appointed SSPs that implement the programmes using different approaches which include interactive group facilitated workshops for the different target groups, as well as facilitated community dialogues which include YOLO Jam Sessions, Community Capacity Enhancement sessions, Boys Assemblies, Men’s Lounges, National and District Men’s Parliaments.

d) Implementation of these social and behaviour change programmes commenced in 2016 and is still continuing in all 9 provinces in the 30 districts in the country. Due to budgetary constraints, the Department is not able to expand the implementation of the programmes to all 52 districts.

e) The entire budget for the training and implementation of the social and behaviour change programmes for the 2020/21 financial year is R93m. This budget is for all nine (9) provinces and it is not enough to cater for all 52 Districts.

19 August 2020 - NW1387

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 703 on 22 June 2020 regarding the value of the contracts awarded to service providers for the delivery and distribution of food parcels, what is the detailed breakdown of the products and services received according to each specified contract in each province?

Reply:

The content of the food parcels issued by SASSA in each province was standardised. The content of the food parcels is as follows:

Food item

Brand Name

Weight

Quantity

Maize Meal

Ace, white Star, Iwisa, Impala, Pitsana or equivalent in nutritional value.

12,5kg

1

Nutritional

Supplement

Movite Porridge or approved substitute with equivalent in nutritional value.

1 kg

2

Cooking Oil

Sunflower cooking oil or equivalent in nutritional value.

750 ml

2

Pilchards

Glendryck, Saldhana, Lucky Star or equivalent in nutritional value.

400 g tins

6

Soya Mince

Imana, Knorrox, Top Class, Vitamince, Mealtime, Trojan or equivalent in nutritional value.

1 kg

3

Sugar

Huletts, Illovo, Selati or equivalent in nutritional value.

2,5 kg

1

Sugar Beans

Econo, Imbo, Plaza, Olympic or equivalent in nutritional value.

2 kg

1

Bread Flour

Golden Cloud, Sasko, Snowflake or equivalent in nutritional value.

2,5 kg

1

Tea Bags

Five Roses, Glen, Teaspoon Tips, Joko, Trinco, Rooibos or equivalent in nutritional value.

100 tea bags

2

Yeast

NCP, Anchor, Super bake or equivalent in nutritional value.

10 g

2

Peanut Butter

Skippy, Black Cat, Yum Yum or equivalent nutritional value.

800g

1

Milk

Full cream powder milk (must be “Real Diary” OR

Full cream long life milk (1 box of 6 L).

1 kg

1 Box

1

6 L

Toothpaste

All brands acceptable (consider price).

100 g

2

Washing Soap(VI)

Sunlight Bar Soap or equivalent.

500g

2

Sanitary towels

All brands (consider price) 8 towels per pack.

Pack of 8

3

The services rendered by the contracted suppliers was to deliver food parcels on receipt of an order from SASSA.

The attached Annexure confirms the amount paid to each service provider for the provision of food parcels in the period of April and May. Payments made in June are not yet available, as the BAS system is not yet closed for the month of June.

19 August 2020 - NW1222

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What amount did her department set aside to roll-out the Social Relief of Distress Grant?

Reply:

The budget for the Social Relief of Distress Grant in the current financial year department initially received is R3.4 billion for the roll-out of the COVID-19 Special Social Relief of Distress Grant. Following the Supplementary Budget allocations, the available amount has been increased to R11 billion. No additional administrative budget was provided, and SASSA has re-prioritised within the existing budget to be able to fund the development of the system, the communication channels and other administrative costs associated with the roll out of this grant.

19 August 2020 - NW1562

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she has been informed that the Premier of Mpumalanga, Ms Refilwe Mtshweni allegedly divided the people of Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality in Nkangala by giving councillors of a certain organisation (name furnished) food parcels to distribute to only 14 of the 31 wards of the specified municipality at the beginning of May 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has she taken in this regard?

Reply:

The Department is not aware of this allegation. The Department did not issue any food parcels to the Premier for distribution to any community.

19 August 2020 - NW1659

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department records water lost due to water leaks; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total volume of water has the Republic lost due to water leaks since the beginning of 2019, (b) are the names of the top 10 municipalities that have lost more water than others and (c) plan has she put in place to prevent loss of water through water leakages?

Reply:

(a) Through the water balance information submitted by Water Service Authorities (WSAs), the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) makes determinations of water losses. The last comprehensive analysis on water losses and non-revenue water (NRW) was undertaken in 2016/17. The total volume of water lost as a result of leakages from pipes and reservoirs was estimated at 1150.079 million m3/annum at the time.

(b) The table below indicates the ten (10) WSAs that had the highest water losses:

No.

Name of the Water Service Authority

1.

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

2.

eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

3.

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

4.

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

5.

Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality

6.

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

7.

Emfuleni Local Municipality

8.

uThukela District Municipality

9.

Mopani District Municipality

10.

Mbombela Local Municipality

(c) The WSAs are mandated by the Water Services Act, Act 108 of 1997 to prevent and act on water losses within their distribution networks. The Department of Water and Sanitation provides support to municipalities through different programmes to manage the demand and reduce water losses. The various measures being implemented to support municipalities to prevent, reduce and manage water losses include: 

  • The No Drop programme which is a tool to regulate municipal performance against set Regulations and best management principles for water loss and demand management. 
  • The No Drop Guideline, which focuses on the key requirements (water resource balance diagram, water balance, Water Conservation and Water Demand Management (WCWDM) Strategy) that are building blocks to planning for implementation of WCWDM projects. Municipalities have been trained on the use of the No Drop.
  • There is also continuous capacity building programmes on WCWDM for municipalities. Training includes how to benchmark leakages, planning and implementation of WCWDM projects, International Water Association (IWA) water balance methods, etc.
  • The Reconciliation and All Towns strategies (intended to ensure the water resource balance) have WCWDM as one of the priority intervention programmes for all municipalities. The Departmental forums and engagements are used to stress the importance of WCWDM aligned to these strategies. In these forums, Municipalities are expected to report on their implementation of WCWDM efforts.
  • The Department is also evaluating and commenting on the Water Services Development Plans (WSDPs) and master plans of municipalities. These plans should indicate the actions and interventions designed to conserve water and enhance water demand management.
  • The DWS also has various projects that are funded either under Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) or Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG), that also address water losses in municipalities
  • The DWS through the cooperation with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has built the training centre/ facility for Non-Revenue Water and water losses management. A number of municipality officials have already attended this training.

The Department further monitors water losses within the 8 (eight) largest water supply systems on an annual basis. The 8 large Water Supply Systems (WSS) supply water to the 8 metropolitan municipalities and other major cities. These areas serve 33.9 million people, which is equivalent to 57 % of the country’s total population. The total input volume in these areas is about 2 662 661 000 m³/a compared with national 4 046 463 000 m³/a (65 % total urban water consumption). These are areas of economic significance with the total gross value added of between 20-40%. 

19 August 2020 - NW1242

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of social workers are currently employed by (a) the (i) State and (ii) private sector and (b) nongovernmental organisations?

Reply:

The number of social workers currently employed by

(a)(i) The State is 14 599.

(a)(ii) The department does not have statistics of social workers employed in the private sector.

(b) Non-governmental organisations is 1 970

19 August 2020 - NW1496

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, since the Minister of Finance, Mr T Mboweni, tabled the Special Adjustments Budget on 24 June 2020, she has found that the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) is confident that it will be able to pay all 3,2 million approved applicants, including qualifying asylum-seekers, from the new revised budget that was provided to her department; (2) what total number of (a) asylum-seekers and/or (b) foreign nationals will receive the R350 grant from SASSA?

Reply:

1. Yes, the funding is adequate for the 3,2 million beneficiaries referred to. However, it should be noted that the number of approved applications now stand at 4 424 720. The budget is adequate to cover these and the projected number of asylum seekers and special permit holders who are expected to apply. Should these numbers increase in line with projections done by SASSA, the funds allocated will not be sufficient.

2. It’s not possible to predict exactly how many foreign nationals will receive the grant. We do however know that in the country there are:

(a) 173 036 refugees, of which 2 288 have been approved as at 15 July 2020; and

(b) 188 296 asylum seekers,

(c) 178 615 Special Permit Holders from Zimbabwe,

(d) 25 382 Special Permit Holders from Lesotho,

(e) 1 686 Special Permit Holders from Angola;

who may qualify for the Special Covid SRD if they meet the other qualifying criteria.

In addition, the special relief grant has been approved for 115 670 permanent residents in South Africa (non- South African citizens who hold permanent residence status).

19 August 2020 - NW1319

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What number of (a) new and (b) renewed SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grant recipients are currently on waiting lists to see an assessment doctor in each province; (2) what is the prescribed duration in number of days and months that a grant recipient will need to wait to see an assessment doctor in each province; (3) what number of assessment doctors are currently assigned to each province; (4) how does her department and SASSA intend to address the growing backlog?

Reply:

1. All clients seeking to apply for disability related grants are booked at SASSA Local Offices using the Electronic Medical Assessment Statistical Template. Such clients are booked for an assessment at a particular assessment site on a particular date and there is no differentiation between new and existing beneficiaries. Thebooking is to assist the Agency to monitor service demands and monitor the time it takes for clients before they are assessed. As at 29 June 2020, status is as below:

Region

Assessments

Eastern Cape

835

Free State

309

Gauteng

2 553

KwaZulu-Natal

1 632

Limpopo

1 664

Mpumalanga

1 165

Northern Cape

359

North West

4 574

Western Cape

4 945

Total

19 053

2. SASSA strives to ensure that all clients booked are assessed within a month and clients waiting for more than a month are referred to as backlogs.Programme managers are required to come up with innovative measures to address backlogs and avoid the emergence of backlogs. The current numbers have been exacerbated as a result of the lockdown and closure of SASSA Local Offices under level 5; as well as the limited resources at local offices during levels 4 and 3.

3. SASSA implements a hybrid model for disability management, which relies on both contracted medical officers as well as medical officers from Department of Health. The numbers of doctors provided by Department of Health is not a fixed number – it depends on resources available within the various assessment sites.

The total number of doctors contracted directly by SASSA is 475 nationally. The number per province is indicated below:

Region

Contracted doctors

Eastern Cape

28

Free State

44

Gauteng

52

KwaZulu-Natal

134

Limpopo

72

Mpumalanga

27

Northern Cape

80

North West

28

Western Cape

10

Total

475

4. All requests for assessments are captured on the Electronic Medical Assessment Template (EMAST) which flags all clients waiting more than 30 days for an assessment from the date of booking. In such situations programme managers are expected to either add a resource in the form of a doctor, another assessment day within that week or recruit either doctor from other further areas and in certain instance ask for services of doctors from neighbouring provinces.

The backlog has been exacerbated as a result of the lockdown. Limited disability related services at Local Offices have resumed under Level 3 lockdown. A strategy has been developed to progressively resume with the assessment related activities as from 1 July 2020. The ability to provide these services does depend on the ability for assessments to be undertaken, as there is still limited access to health facilities.

The strategy prioritises the following categories of applicants in order of priority:

  • Those who were assessed prior to lockdown but who were unable to complete the application process;
  • Those who were booked for assessments but could not be seen as a result of the lockdown – these clients will be rebooked for assessments;
  • Urgent new applications, where the assessment is already done by the health facility and only the application needs to be done;
  • New applications in accordance with available capacity of assessing doctors.

The number of assessments booked per assessment schedule has been reduced to 20 from 40 to ensure compliance with the COVID-19 protocols related to sanitation, social distancing and hygiene.

A particular challenge exists in Western Cape, where the majority of the assessments are undertaken in health facilities. The ability of SASSA to accept new applicants for disability grants is there for seriously, negatively impacted by this. In order to address this, SASSA Western Cape has been granted authority to deviate from normal tender processes by National Treasury to appoint doctors in the George and Boland areas through a closed bidding process by approaching all doctors listed on the HPCSA database as a fairness measure.

19 August 2020 - NW1318

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)In view of her department’s Covid-19 lockdown directives which continue to keep early childhood development (ECD) centres closed under alert level 3 risk-adjusted lockdown, resulting in many ECD centres being under severe financial strain and/or facing permanent closure, what financial and/or other relief packages will her department provide to registered ECD centres to assist them to re-open once they are allowed to; (2) whether her department will procure and/or financially subsidise personal protective equipment for the learners and staff at the ECD centres?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Social Development is not in the financial position to provide any additional financial support to registered ECD centres that remain closed under the state of national disaster as there is no budget specifically allocated for this purpose. However,on 9 May 2020, the Minister of Social Development issued Directions that “The Department must continue to subsidize the early childhood development centres during the state of national disaster” (See Government Notice 517 published in Government Gazette No 43300 of 9 May 2020). This Direction immediately waived the requirement that early childhood development programmes that already receive subsidy need to submit a new application for funding for the 2020/2021 financial while the national state of disaster is in place. The collective amount being paid annually towards this funding is R3.1 billion, targeting early childhood development programmes in poor communities in particular. This funding continues to be paid out to early childhood development centres through the nine provincial departments of social development, which is a provincial competency as contemplated in section 93(1) of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005. This is a significant step that is intended to buffer the impact of the measures implemented during the national state of disaster risk-adjusted lockdown.

(2) The Department is currently in discussion with the National Treasury to repurpose the current ECD infrastructure conditional grant towards supporting early childhood development programmes with personal protective equipment for personnel and staff. If successful, priority will be given to those unfunded registered ECD programmes serving poor communities as required in terms of section 93(4)(a) of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005; and unregistered ECD programmes serving poor communities will also be considered. It should be noted that provision of ECD programmes is private and NPOdriven, government only regulates and subsidise these programmes.

18 August 2020 - NW1629

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What are the full details on the (a) exact terms of reference, (b) scope of work, (c) project timelines, including the commencement date, (d) anticipated completion date and (e) appointment of key role players to deliver the project for the (i) revamping of the Groote Schuur Estate, (ii) roads and parking at the Bryntirion Presidential Estate and (iii) facilities management at the Union Buildings and The Presidency offices?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) regarding work done at Groote Schuur Estate, Bryntirion Presidential Estate and the Union Buildings.

(i) The following response relates to Groote Schuur Estate Infrastructure project.

a) Terms of reference:

Upgrade of Infrastructure Services relating to the Civil Works (Stormwater, water reticulation; plumbing) and Electrical infrastructure

b) Scope of works:

Upgrade internal roads; Perimeter security and patrol paths; Fire reticulation network upgrade; Upgrade sewer reticulation networks; Upgrade storm-water systems; Electrical supply and upgrades; Upgrade Potable water reticulation network; Upgrade irrigation supply and storage and landscaping 

c) Project timelines:

Site was handed over 1 July 2020 with a 30 month construction period.

d) Anticipated completion date:

The anticipated project completion date is December 2022

e) Appointment of key role players:

Goega is the Implementing Agent acting as Project Manager.

Aurecon  acting as Principal Agent and responsible for Electrical & Civil Works.

FCHolm appointed Landscape Architect responsible for irrigation and landscaping. 

Martin & East is the appointed contractor

(ii) The following relates to Roads and Parking at the Bryntirion Presidential Estate

a) Terms of reference:

The terms of reference emantes from the conversion of government farm into Bryntirion estate which requires that we provide clean water, build roads and stromwater.

b) Scope of works:

The project comprises of the construction of roads, storm water, water reticulation and sewer on Western side and central area of the Bryntirion Estate.

c) Project timelines:

The project is anticipated to commence on the 19 October 2020

d) Anticipated completion date:

The anticipated project completion date is October 2023

e) Appointment of key role players:

A Service Provider has not been appointed yet. The implementation of the project will be supported by the following members of the Project Management Office;

Boleng Consulting Services – Project Management Professional Services

ChibweAfritectsSA – Architectural Professional Services

Elconsult CC – Quantity Surveying Professional Services

Weaveway Trade CC – Civil Engineering Professional Services

(iii) The following relates to the Facilities Management at the Union Buildings and The Presidency offices

a) Terms of reference:

Facilities Management Contract for PresitigeAccomodation in Pretoria(Tambo House, SM Makgatho Guest House, AFB Waterkloof Presidential Suites).

The Prestige Accommodation list of Facilities is made up of a portfolio of Buildings which are extremely old and are of immense National Heritage value. The current state of these facilities has reached various stages of decay, deterioration and disrepair which is attributed to a lack of efficient and effective maintenance.

b) Scope of works:

The security measure upgrade of the entire premises, upgrading of the HVAC system, roof repairs, maintenance of mechanical, building, electrical, plumbing and drainage infrastructure. As well as cleaning and horticulture services.

c) Project timelines:

Site was handed over 02 May 2019 with a 60 month construction period.

d) Anticipated completion date:

The anticipated project completion date is April 2024

e) Appointment of key role players:

The Contract is implemented by the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) with the support of the following members of the Project Management Office;

Nkonki& Associates – Project Management and Quantity Surveying Professional Services

Ikemeleng Architects – Architectural Professional Services

Rev2Light – Occupational Health and Safety Professional Services

Phatsimo Engineering – Electrical Engineering and Security Installations Professional Services

Tsekwane Investments – Civil and Structural Engineering Professional Services

ADI Engineering – Mechanical Engineering and Fire Installations Professional Services

Gauflora/Superfactor JV- Contractor

18 August 2020 - NW1486

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to the 13 buildings which her department is supposed to hand over to the Minister of Social Developmentfor the purpose of victim empowerment shelters to assist women, (a) which of the seven buildings that have completed building renovations are currently operational, (b) who is the appointed service provider for each building, (c) what are the reasons that completed shelters are not currently operational and (d) by what date will the specified shelters be operational; (2) by what dates does she envisage that the renovations of the remaining six buildings will (a) commence and (b) be completed in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) The following seven building renovations were completed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI):

Region

(a) Buildings were renovations completed

(a) Operational

Western Cape

Heidelberg

None of the 6 completed buildings are currently operational. The Department is finalising its administrative processes and contract arrangements with the province on letting of state owned property as per treasury regulations 16A7.4.

 

Albertina

 
 

Laingsburg

 
 

Aurora

 

Johannesburg

Observatory

 
 

Cyrildene

 

Pretoria

Salvokop

 

(b)

Region:

Building

Service Provider

Western Cape

Heidelberg

In-house Workshops

 

Albertina

In-house Workshops

 

Laingsburg

In-house Workshops

 

Aurora

In-house Workshops

Johannesburg

Observatory

Unified Plumbing Services

 

Cyrildene

Unified Plumbing Services

Pretoria

Salvokop

In-house Workshops

(c) The Department is finalising its administrative processes and contract arrangementswith the province on letting of state owned property as per treasury regulations 16A7.4. Approval by National Treasury will be sought as soon as Western Cape Province confirms the nominal rental it is amenable to.

DPWI wrote to National Treasury on 29 May 2020 to seek approval that the Department is following up with responses.

Gauteng province has visited its sites this week (21-24 July 2020) and was further provided with the draft agreement for its perusal and confirmation of its agreeableness to the terms of the contract.

(d) As soon as the contract arrangements that confirms that DPWI will recover refurbishment costs, user departments will be responsible for costs related to municipal services, maintenance and operation of the facilities have been agreed to and approval by National Treasury granted. The agreement will then be concluded and properties be available for occupation.

(2)

BUILDING

a) COMMENCEMENT DATE

b) COMPLETION DATE

Aurora, Western Cape

Work has commenced

20 July 2020

Aurora, Western Cape

Work has commenced

31 July 2020

Moorreesburg, Western Cape

Work has commenced

07 August 2020

Die Wilgers, Pretoria

Work has commenced through in-house Workshops

Completion date is yet to be determined due to change in scope and appointment of contractors to finalise additional work

Mountain view, Pretoria

   

Waterkloof Heights, Pretoria

   

18 August 2020 - NW1718

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

In terms of the 45 445 participants from the Expanded Public Works Programme who have been engaged to assist with cleaning and sanitising schools on behalf of the Department of Basic Education, (a) which entity in her department is managing the specified programme, (b) what total amount is being charged in management fees for the project, (c) will the same nonprofit organisations (NPOs) be utilised as those for the 25 000 young persons who have been engaged through the Independent Development Trust to assist with Covid-19 projects, (d) what number of (i) NPOs are being used, (ii) participants have already been engaged and (iii) schools are already benefiting from the programme and (e) what are the relevant details of the schools that have benefited from the programme?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) Neither the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) nor any of its entities are involved in the implementation of the Department of Basic Education (DBE) project for the cleaning and sanitising of schools. The decision for the non-involvement of the DPWI on this project is premised on the resolutions of the meeting held on the 27 May 2020 between the Directors-General of DPWI, DBE, and National Treasury (NT), where it was agreed that the cleaning of schools is a Provincial Department of Education function. It was further agreed that the funding for the screening and cleaning activities at schools must be through the respective Provincial Departments of Education budget. Due to the financial constraints of Provincial Department of Education,the DBE and NT agreed to fund this activity by reallocating funds from the DBE Infrastructure Grant. Around R4,4 billion was allocated to this activity during the Adjustment Budget presented by the Minister of Finance in July 2020.

b) No management fee is charged to the DPWI as it is not involved in the implementation of the project.

c) Since the DPWI and the IDT are not involved in the implementation of the programme, the DPWI is not in a position to ascertain which NPOs are involved in the DBE initiative.

d) Since the DPWI and the IDT are not involved in the implementation of the programme, the DPWI is:

(i) not in a position to ascertain the number of NPOs involved in the DBE initiative.

(ii) not in a position to ascertain, for now, the number of participants already engaged in the DBE initiative. However once the DBE reports the participants into the EPWP Reporting System, this information will be available.

(iii) notaware of the schools benefiting from the programme.

e) The DPWI is not possession of the relevant details of schools benefitting from the programme.

18 August 2020 - NW1448

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What was the percentage of budget and actual amount of money budgeted for maintenance of infrastructure owned by her department in the 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years and since 1 April 2020, (b) what percentage and actual amount of the budgeted amounts were spent in the 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years, (c) what were the reasons why the budget was either over- or underspent in each case and (d) which votes and/or line items were either increased and/or reduced as a result?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) percentage of budget and actual amount of money budgeted for maintenance of infrastructure in the 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years and since 1 April 2020 is outlined in table 1 below:

Table 1: Infrastructure maintenance budget

 

Line Item

 

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

April to June 2020

 

Budget

% of total Budget

 

Budget

% of total Budget

 

Budget

% of total Budget

 

Budget

% of total Budget

 

 

R'000

 

R'000

 

R'000

 

R'000

 

Scheduled and Unscheduled Maintenance

1 367 580

9%

1 570 448

10%

1 781 095

10%

1 437 861

7%

Repair

943 594

6%

1 087 519

7%

1 339 429

7%

1 451 024

7%

Refurbishment

1 034 464

7%

1 020 776

6%

1 233 776

7%

1 319 637

7%

Total

3 345 639

23%

3 678 743

22%

4 354 300

24%

4 208 522

22%

(b) The percentage and actual amount of the budgeted amounts were spent in the 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years are listed in Table 2 below

Table 2: Infrastructure maintenance expenditure

Line Item

 

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

April to June 2020

 

Exp

% Exp

 

Exp

% Exp

 

Exp

% Exp

 

Exp

% Exp

 

 

R'000

 

R'000

 

R'000

 

R'000 

 

Scheduled and Unscheduled Maintenance

1 316 633

96%

1 548 982

99%

1 781 095

100%

239 574

17%

Repair

952 025

101%

943 976

87%

1 057 534

79%

57 650

4%

Refurbishment

1 033 399

100%

926 515

91%

976 779

79%

57 650

4%

Total

3 302 057

99%

3 419 472

93%

3 815 408

88%

354 874

8%

(c) The scheduled and unscheduled maintenance budget for 2017/2018 was underspent by 4% and for 2018/19 the underspent was 1%, due to the portion of unscheduled maintenance, which cannot be predicted with certainty owing to breakdown of assets, equipment and conditions thereof.

In the mist of delivering infrastructure projects, DPWI encountered a number of challenges which include but not limited to the following:

  • Incapacity of some emerging contractors implementing our projects is adversely affecting timeous delivery of projects.
  • Clients requests for additional work and community protests and demands to be considered by service providers has financial implication on the preliminaries and generals costs of the projects;
  • Limited professional services positions for Sketch Plan approvals, which adds to delays for approval of sketch plans;
  • Extended tender adjudication and award dates;
  • Community protests and work stoppages;
  • Incapacity of some emerging contractors implementing DPWI projects is adversely affecting timeous delivery of projects.

(d) No Votes and/or line items were increased and/or reduced as a result of the under-expenditure.

18 August 2020 - NW1719

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What number of vacant properties owned by her department (a)(53)have been subjected to land invasions and (b)(i)(9)were successful in preventing land invasion, (ii)(32)were unsuccessful in preventing land invasion and are currently occupied and (iii)(12) has been the subject of legal processes for trespassing and/or eviction orders in 2019 and 2020?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure as follows:

(a) Number of vacant properties subjected to land invasions.

Bloemfontein =1 (One)

Cape Town = 4 (Four)

Durban = 8 (Eight)

Johannesburg = 0 (Nil)

Kimberley = 3 (Three)

Mmabatho = 3 (Three)

Nelspruit =9 (Nine)

Polokwane = 2 (two)

Port Elizabeth = 9 (Nine)

Pretoria = 0 (Nil)

Umthatha = 14 (Fourteen)

TOTAL = 53

No.

Regional Office

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

   

List of sites:successful in preventing land invasion

List of sites:

unsuccessful in preventing land invasion and are currently occupied

List of sites:

the subject of legal processes for trespassing and/or eviction orders in 2019 and 2020

1

Nelspruit Regional Office

 
  • Portion 2 of the Farm Dingwell 276 JT.
  • Farm Ingrid 591 JU
  • Farm Rooiduiker 591 JU
  • Farm Vaalribok 547 JU
  • Farm Langrand 457 JT
  • Farm Lindenau 303 JT
  • Portion 23 of the Farm Valschfontein 33 JS
  • Farm Masoyi Police Station 74 JU
  • Farm Mimosa 557 JU

2

Cape Town

  • Portion of Farm 421 Doring Bay
  • ERF 1117 Blaauwberg
  • Farm 295 Grabouw
  • Portion 65 of Farm 82 RoodeZand, Worcester (Known as Sandhills)

NONE

3

Kimberley

  • Erf 1 Danielskuil
  • Erf 6983 Kimberley, eviction process is underway
  • Erf 1 Danielskuil and Erf 6983 Kimberley

4

Mthatha

  • 3Erf 14040 at Police Camp in Mthatha
  • Erf 265 Sprigg Street in Mthatha
  • Erf 264 Main Street Port St Johns
  • Erf 85 Tsomo
  • Erf 200 Mthatha
  • Erf 7547 Ntusi Street, Mthatha
  • Erf 1950 in Mthatha
  • Erf 1952 in Mthatha
  • Erf 1963 in Mthatha
  • Erf 8711 in Mthatha
  • Erf 234 in Mthatha
  • Erf 8328 in Mthatha and
  • Erf 170 Port St Johns
  • Erf 920 in Mthatha

5

Durban

  • Remainder of Erf 77 Howick (17 Theed Street, Howick)
  • Rem of Portion 69 of the farm Reserve No. 7A No. 15826,
  • Rem of Portion 3 of the farm Veelgeluk No. 171
  • Portion 4 of the farm RietVallei No. 1043
  • Erf 500 La Lucia (1 Oakleigh Avenue, La Lucia)
  • Erf 387 Rose Hill (148 Manfred Drive, Park Hill, Durban North)
  • Erf 550 Scottburgh (43 Erskine Street, Scottburgh)
  • Erf 1878 Amanzimtoti (13 Dickens Road, Athlone Park, Amanzimtoti

6

Port Elizabeth

 
  • Farm 45, Draaibosch

Komga,

  • Farm 114, Kommetjiesleegte Outspan

East London,

  • Farm 356, Black Hill Outspan
  • East London,

Farm 866 PT 1,

East London RD,

  • Farm 871, Grey dell

East London,

  • Farm 871 PT 1, Grey dell

East London,

  • Farm 871 PT 3, Grey dell

East London,

  • Farm 276 PT 1, PlaasDonkerhoek,
  • AlbanyFarm 304, Nahoon Dam

East London,

7

Johannesburg

NONE

NONE

NONE

8

Bloemfontein

 
  • ERF 8225 Portion 1,Thabong, Welkom
 

9

Pretoria

NONE

NONE

NONE

10

Mmabatho

  • Portion 4 of the farm Zandpan 423 IP,
  • Portion 24 and 34 of Rustenburg town and Townlands 272 JQ,
  • Portion 1 of farm Wildebeestfontein 274 JQ
   

11

Polokwane

   
  • PT 13 of Farm Tempelhof 150 MS
  • Remainder of Farm Loskop North 12 JS
 

TOTAL

9

32

12

Closing statement:

The department managed to deploy various strategies on the prevention of land invasion and that includes the 9 vacant land, amongst the strategies to be deployed the department is planning to procure the services of the Security Companies to patrol the land and forge the relationship with various municipalities to collaborate and share intelligence on the land prevention strategies.

The department is also intending to collaborate with community leaders, civil activists and whistle blowers in order to receive information of potential threats on land invasion and act immediately upon receipt of such information to prevent further land invasions, also to report cases to South African Service to assist with the arrest of the trespassers and distraction of informal structures within 24 hours.

18 August 2020 - NW1717

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Public Works andInfrastructure

Whatarethefulldetailsofalldisbursementsthatherdepartmenthasmadeavailabletoeach province in response to theCovid-19pandemic?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has not made any disbursement to Provinces in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. This is for both the Main Vote and the PMTE. The Department paid directly for quarantine sites and for renovation work done for GBV facilities in Gauteng and the Western Cape.

 

18 August 2020 - NW1796

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works andInfrastructure

Whether, given the Covid-19 pandemic whereby the iThemba land in Cape Town has been earmarked as a transitional residential site where identified residents from informal settlements would be moved to a spart of there-blocking,she has given the Western Cape provincial government and/or the Housing Development Agency the power of attorney to commence with the various statutory processes; if not,wh ynot; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) anticipated time frames for the completion of the process?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Farm Eersteriv No. 981 Stellenbosch also known as iThemba land is a property under the custodianship of DPWI and is allocated and utilised by the South African Police Service (SAPS). In order to make available a portion of the property as requested by the DepartmentofHumanSettlements,SAPSwasrequestedtoconfirmifDPWImayproceed to release the required portion of FarmEersteriv.

The SAPS has indicated that the property is utilised as a shooting range with various Specialised Units such as Provincial training, Anti-Gang, Public Order Policing, Tactical Response as well as residential accommodation for SAPS officials. Further, the SAPS pointed out issues relating security concerns that would be brought about by the abutting housing development as the base is occupied by highly specialised operational units. The proximity of the shooting range to a housing development was sighted as a serious concern that would pose risks to members of thePublic.

 

18 August 2020 - NW1649

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total amount has her department spent on procuring protective personal equipment (PPE) for teachers and learners since the reopening of schools and (b) is the list of companies, which supplied the department with the PPE’s

Reply:

(a) R 38 750 000

(b) 1. Spot on Trading

    2. Nxekula General Trading

    3. Impofu Engineering Service

18 August 2020 - NW1658

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) criteria were used to identify the 191 non-profit organisations across the Republic to help with Covid-19 interventions, (b) are the names of the NPOs and (c) total number of the NPOs are black-owned?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) In 2019, a total of 339 NPOs were contracted by the Independent Development Trust (IDT) to implement the Non-State Sector (NSS) Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) programme over a period of 2 years from 2019/20 to 2020/21 financial years. The 339 NPOs contracted into the programme, were appointed based on the following criteria:

  • Proof of NPO registration with Department of Social Development (DSD);
  • Letter of good standing from the DSD;
  • Letter of good standing on Compensation for Occupational and Injuries and Disease Act (COIDA);
  • Proof of registration with the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF);
  • Printed copy for proof of registration with the Central Supplier Database (CSD) Registration;
  • Track record of existence of not less than 2 years; and
  • Willingness to participate in the EPWP COVID-19 response project.

For the EPWP COVID-19 response project, the same 339 NPOs were assessed for compliance with the CSD. From the assessed and contacted NPOs, some NPOs were not willing to participate in this intervention. Finally only 189 NPOs were appointed.

(b) The names of the contracted NPOs are attached herein as Annexure A.

(c) The table below demonstrates ownership status of the 189 NPOs contracted. Seventy seven percent (77%) of the NPOs contracted are 100% black owned.

Ownership Status

No. of NPOs

NPOs are 100% black owned

146

NPO is 100% White owned with 50% white women ownership

1

NPO is 21% Black owned with 9% Black women ownership and 79% White women ownership

1

NPO is 80% Black owned with 60% women ownership

1

NPO is 94% Black owned with 37% women ownership

1

No ownership details on CSD

39

TOTAL

189

ANNEXURE A

Province

Name of Non Profit Organisation

NPO Residential Address

EC

Aliwal Diocese Welfare & Development Committee

No 55 Carthcart Street, Aliwal North

EC

Dibashe Special Educare Inclusive

1431 N.U.10 Mdantsane, East London

EC

Empilisweni HIV/ Aids & Orphans Care Centre

1361 Gugulethu,Devana Location, King Williams Town

EC

Gwebindlala HIV/Aids

D206 N.U.9 Mdantsane, East London

EC

Iliso Care Society

Springrove, Queenstown

EC

Inqabayethu Youth Development

Mputhi A/A Baziya, Mthatha

EC

IxabisoLomntu Aids Awareness & Home Base Care

Magqabasini Location, Ndakeni A/A Flagstaff

EC

Lithemba Support Group

7406 NkewanaStreet,Kwazakhele, Port Elizabeth,6205

EC

ManguzelaThandanani Home Base Care

Dengwane Location, magadla A/A Mmatatiele

EC

Masizakhe Community Development Project

198 Nkonjane Street, Hostel Kwazakhele,Port Elizabeth,6205

EC

Mount Frere Paralegal Advice Centre

173 Main Street, Mt Frere

EC

NcedisizweHewu Home Base

ERF 2515 Ekuphumleni Rent Office Zone 2, Ekuphumleni Township, Whittlesea, 5360

EC

Peddie Development Centre

41 Sutton Road, Sidwell, Port Elizabeth,6001

EC

Port St Johns Community Legal Advice Centre

Erf 166 Church Street, Port St. John

EC

SakheSingamadoda Youth Programme

434 Ketse Street, KwaNomzamo

EC

Sinako Wellness & Development

136 A Langfield Road, Whittlesea

EC

Siphumelele Youth Organisation

No 1 African Lodge,African Square, Grahamstown

EC

Sizophila Community Child

Imizizi A/A Mchayi Location

EC

Sneeuwtjie Early Child

638 Hudson Street, Pienaarsig, New Bethersda

EC

Southern African Youth Movement

32 Swallow Drive, Westbank, King Williams Town, 5600

EC

UbabaloLusanele Skills Centre

Mkhonkotho Location, Holela A/A Centane

EC

Ubuhlebethu 1203 Organisation

21 Gordon Road Southernwood, East London

EC

UMzimkhulu Development Service

188 Garana, Roman Catholic Church , Mount Ayliff,4735

EC

Zanoncedo Empowerment Centre

Mpongo Location, Chalumna,East London,5200

FS

Bolokanang Churches

03 Boiketlo Street, Bolokanang ,Petrusburg, 9932

FS

ChildwelfareKgotsong

No 41 Greyling Street Bothaville, 9660

FS

Dihlabeng Initiative

2667 A Tsoella Street, Bohlokong, Bethlehem, 9701

FS

Itekeng Disabled Centre

5285 Zone 2 Ficsksburg, 9732

FS

Lesedi Hospice

251 Bammans street, Hertzogville, 9482

FS

Qhola - Qhwe

01 QholaQhweCreche, Witsiehoek, Phathaditjhaba, 9866

FS

Regeneration of the Lost Generation

888 Ramanamane Street, Rammulotsi Municipality Office Building, Viljoenskroon, 9520

FS

Southren Youth Movement

65 Ramakgari street, ThabaNchu, 9780

FS

Umzimkulu Development

Agricultural Centre, 92 Church Street Rouxville, 9958

GP

Angels Home Based Care

14808/28 CASWELL JAULA, KAGISO EXT 2

GP

Bakone Community Home Based Care

19178 LETHABONG STR, KAGISO EXT 14, MOGALE CITY

GP

EvangeliEncha Home Based Care

19178 LETHABONG STR, KAGISO EXT 14, MOGALE CITY

GP

Kgoro Organisation

PORTION 26, KROMDRAAI, KRUGERSDRORP

GP

KitsoLesedi Community Development

4538 Modisane Street Mogale City 1754

GP

Kopano Manyano God the Founder Center for Homeless

271 PRETORIUS STREET, BAREND VAN ERKOM BUILDING, 6TH FLOOR, ROOM 621, PRETORIA

GP

Legae La Bana HBC

2452 CNR JABULANI & CORANE STREET, MUNSIEVILLE, MOGALE CITY

GP

Linomtha Day and Aftercare Centre

12646 WALTER SISULU STR, EXTENTION 8, KAGISO

GP

Maximum Development Institute

No 83 WOBURN AVENUE, 1st FIRST FLOOR 101, BENONI

GP

Mo-AfrikaIthlokomele Educational Project

3623/7 MODJAJI &CNR MOHLOKA STR, ZONE 3, PIMVILLE

GP

National Institute Community Development & Management Trust (NICDAM)

89 Erasmus Avenue, Raslouw Estate, Wierda Park

GP

Nomncebo Community Development Project

2454 MAYFIELD EXT5 MINANAWE DAVEYTON

GP

Phaphamang Environmental Organisation

575014 ZONE 3,SEBOKENG, VERENIGING

GP

Rotanganedza Community Centre

PLOT 151, BADIRILE CLINIC, BADIRILE LOCATION, RANDFONTEIN

GP

ShomangSebenzani Development Initiative

LIMPRO PARK GARDEN SITES (PIKITUP 1 AND FILL SITE. MALBORO

GP

Siphumelele Youth Organisation

904 RALERATA STR,MOHLAKENG (MPCC) RANDFONTEIN

GP

Southern African Youth Movement (SAYM)

66 GLENWOOD ROAD LYNNWOOD PRETORIA

GP

TholaUlwazi Home Based Care & Training

6 SPENCER PLACE, LOMBARDY EAST

GP

Thought

56 BLOCK BB, SOSHANGUVE

GP

Tshwarisanang Environment Pro-ReActive Safety Mentors

6 SPENCER PLACE, LOMBARDY EAST

KZN

All Purpose Skills Development

D2290 EZIQHAZENI AREA NQUTHU 3135

KZN

Amajuba Community Development Project

Khambule stand, Madadeni, Newcastle

KZN

Asinqobe Youth Empowerment

D2284 Kwaluvisi area Nquthu 3135

KZN

Bakhiphe Community Development Organization

LOT 1033 SONKOMBO AREA MWOLOKOHLO NDWEDWE 4342

KZN

Buyisithemba Community Development

NGWADUMANE AREA, WARD11, MAPHUMULO 4470

KZN

Celukuthula Community And Counselling

UNION BLD EMPANGENI

KZN

Community Orphanage Centre And Shelter

MAFITLENG AREA NQUTHU 3135

KZN

EmbizeniCreche

D 999, KwaMbiza, Ntshongweni, 3700

KZN

EntokozweniCreche

98 OLD MAIN ROAD SHAKASKRAAL 3450

KZN

Esididini Community Project

BLOCK 11 MASSONDALE FARM MADADENI 2951

KZN

Ethekwini Young Entrepreneurs Network

22 GREEN FIELD ROAD CATO CREST MAYVILLE 4091

KZN

Hlanganani Youth Project

OGELELE

KZN

HlongwaCbo Network

D219 KWAHLONGWA THAFAMASI MAPHUMULO

KZN

IkhayaLethu Community Organization

Dendethu Area, Mandeni, 4491

KZN

Ikhayalethu Community Centre

Sithembile Area

KZN

Imbokodo Women Empowerment

Esidumbini Mission Nsuze Area P 712 Ndwedwe, 3242,

KZN

Inkanyezi Development Foundation

HLONGWA TRIBAL COUNCIL UMGUBO LOCATION UMZUMBE 4226

KZN

InkanyeziYokusa Development Organisation

Bhekuphiwa Area

KZN

Intungwa Development

1094 Qumbu Road Cato Crest

KZN

Lethukukhanya Crisis And Development Centre

KWADABEKA D PINETOWN

KZN

Majiya Community Projects

Magwetshana Reserve, Ntambanana

KZN

Makhuzeni Youth Development

Mphola Area, Ngandumbili, Nongoma.3950

KZN

Masibambisane

P 75 QoloqoloMthwalume 4200

KZN

Mawela Community Development

Emakhosini Reserve Ulundi

KZN

Mkhephi Project

Ward 09, Ngwebini Area, Nwutu

KZN

Mpilonhle

MTUBATUBA

KZN

Ndumiso Support Group

29 Mc Kenzie Street ,Dundee 3000

KZN

New Generation Community Organization

BHADANA LOCATION KWADUMISA 4200

KZN

New Philippian Church Of Southern Africa

2744 GOERGEDALE HAMMARSDALE 3700

KZN

Newcastle Arts Development Organization

Office Number 10 Kunene Shoping Complex 5376 Osizweni 2952

KZN

Nurses At A Go

16410 uBhaqa Road, Luganda Township, Marianhill 3609

KZN

PfuxaRixaxa Foundation

100463 Emgangeni Village, Amanzimtoti ,4125

KZN

Phembukuthula Community Care Organization

1162 Etholeni Area, Wasbank 2920

KZN

Inqabayethu Youth Development

01 Njengabathu Area Darlton 3236

KZN

Sakhisizwe Community Development Centre

CABAZINI LOCATION IXOPO

KZN

SakhisizweHiv/Aids Support Group Aids

Dube Village Groutville 4470

KZN

Sakhisizwe Youth Organization

Bhadane Location near Nqanula Combined Primary School

KZN

Sakhumnotho Development Services

51 Roy Campbell Drive, Napierville, Pietermaritzburg, 3201

KZN

Seconds Of Development

07 Minaar Street Utrecht

KZN

Simile Youth Project

KwaMdakane Area, Tribal Court, Dannhouser,3080

KZN

Simunye Youth Development

Egazini Reserve, KwaCeza,3866

KZN

Sinethemba Project

Mjunundu Road, Tribal Court, Vulamehlo

KZN

Siyakha Development Organisation

7305 Section 4 Madadeni 2951

KZN

Siyakhula Projects

72 BHOMELA AREA IZOTSHA PORTSHEPSTONE 4242

KZN

Siyakhula United Action For Development

72 Bhomela ,Portshepstone 4240

KZN

Siyanqoba Luncheon Club

10 a UNION STREET DUNDEE

KZN

Siyathuthuka Care Centre

NONGOMA

KZN

Siza Youth And Community Development

Crompton Street, Pinetown 3610

KZN

Sizzan Community Development

SIZZAN CENTRE KWADUKUZA 4450

KZN

Soul Prosper Home Based Care

Mondlo Vryheid

KZN

South African Food Security And Development Agency

45 CORNOR STREET ESCOURT 3310

KZN

South African Youth Movement

Kwavova Area Poulpietersburg 3180

KZN

Thembalihle Community Project

ESIBOZILE TOWNSHIP DUNDEE

KZN

Thought

EMATIMATOLO WARD 2 GREYTOWN

KZN

Ubuntu Crisis And Family Care Centre

181 WYEBANK ROAD KLOOF 3610

KZN

Umusawake Family Care And Crisis

D1063 EKUVUKENI TOWNSHIP 3389

KZN

Widowed Women Of South Africa

H1912 IHOBE STREET ESIKHAWINI

KZN

Youth Organization United

15 SAGITTARIUS ROAD COLITA

KZN

Ziphatheleni Community Development

LOT230 UMBUMBULU 4105

LP

Sakhumnotho Development Service

57 Woodhouse Rd Scottsville PMBurg 3201

LP

Intungwa Development

Amaoti Durban

LP

TiangMaatlaMultupurpose Centre

PO Box 4801 Solomondale 0964

LP

Tjiane drop in centre

Stand 20105 Tjiane Ga-Mphahlele 0745 next to Thelela shop

LP

Mo- AfrikaIthlokomele Educational Project

Shop NO 5 Shallas complex Senwabarwana

LP

Dzekula Development Organisation

Nwadzekudzeku village MadyisaStrret next to Zala

LP

HomuMinceka White Project

Stand no 661 Makosha Village Giyani

LP

Pfuxanani Early Learning Centre

PO Box 4903 Giyani 0826

LP

Ramotshinyadi HIV/AIDS Youth Guide

Stand no 1205 Ramotshinyadi village next to Pamotshinyadi clinic

LP

Are Ikemeng Young Womans Health Development organization

PO Box 4794 Mpudulle 1057

LP

IntuthukoYesizwe Community Organization

PO Box 1499 Groblersdal0470

LP

Life Orienttion Home Based Care

Stand no BA 85 Lekala section Boekenhoutkloof next to ikhutsheng primary school

LP

Mamokwale home based care

Mmakagatle A next to Hututu High school Stand no10035

LP

Mohaletse Disabled Group

MohlaletsiMaeba Next to taxi rank

LP

Phela o phedishe health and welfare care group

PO Box 3621 Lefalane 0741

LP

TafelkopeLesedi home based cate

PO Box 0474 Boleu 0474

LP

Elandskraal Home Based Care

Stand no 383 Elandskraal Block 2

LP

Far North Youth development Initiative

Office no 9 Managaomplex Thohoyandou

LP

Get Ready Information Services

521 Section A Hospital Road Malamulele

LP

Gundo Community Development

PO Box3116 Sibasa 0970

LP

Imvuselelo Development Agency

No 715 Mulila Street P West Thohoyandu

LP

Miehleketo Early Learning Centre

 

LP

Bangwanate Disabled Project

PO Box 4463 Mokopane 0600

LP

Bathuseng Community Center

PO Box1911 Mokopane 0600

LP

Ga Mokaba Reading Room

Ga-Mokaba Village MokopaneTown

MP

Amos/Kgaphamadi

Stand no:50154 EzakheniKwamhlanga

MP

Buhlebesizwe

323 Buhlebesizwe Community Centre Empumalanga

MP

Easthigh college

Orion Building 33 Bester Street Nelspriut

MP

Foster Care & Widowers HBC

Stand no:121 Newington C Ximhungwe

MP

Impilo community centre

Stand no;232 Vaalbank Ext Mbibane

MP

Isiphephelo

23146 Ext 21 EmbalenhleMhlambanyathi Street Embalenhle

MP

Ithembalomphakathi

No 1057 Phola Park Kwamhlanga 1022

MP

Ithuseng Pre-School

2547 Thamaga Street Kwaguqa Ext 4 Emalahleni

MP

Jeepes Reef HBC

Stand no:1219 Jeepes Reef ShongweMissoin

MP

KagoYabana

53 Wilkens street Rockysdrift

MP

Laapeng Foundation

Stand no: 1612 A Main Road Kabhokweni Old Complex

MP

Ntataise

150 Solomon Street Rocky's Drift White River

MP

Philisani Drop In Centre

Stand no 210 Mbangwane 1355

MP

Piet Retief Miracle Centre

5717 Phola Park Ethandukhanya Piet Retief

MP

SiphosethuDaycare Centre

Stand no:1045 Gembokspruit

MP

Thola-Ulwazi Home Based Care and Training

Stand no: 7028 MatselapataWaterval B Siyabuswa

MP

Thought

106 Kwachibikhulu Location Chrissiesmeer

MP

Tirhani

Stand no:339 Rolle Village Thulamahashe

MP

Tiyimiseleni HBC

Stand no:628 Lillydale B Main Road Ximhungwe

MP

Zimiseleni DOTS

Stand no:603 Driekoppies Trust Shongwe Mission

NC

Thought

1202 Matshidisho Street, Olifantshoek

NC

Woman of Wisdom

60 Queensway Hadison Park Kimberly 8301

NW

ARE DIRENG CARE GIVERS

1186, Blackrock Section

NW

BATSHA BA KOPANE

1810Goponyane Sec, MabekaskraalVill

NW

HOPE AND FAITH DROP IN CENTRE

294 Thuto Neo Primary School

NW

ICCSA

3768 B MAIYELA SECTION 2868

NW

ITIRELENG PROJECT

1793 Kafotlha Street , Reagile, Koster

NW

KATLO DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

560 BLOCK I EXT LETLHABILE

NW

KGOTHATSANANG ORGANISATION

2007B, Skampaneng, Ga-Motle Village

NW

KITSO KE LESEDI

14 MOLATLHEGI AVENUE
RUSTENBURG
0263

NW

KUTULLO DISABILITY CARE CENTRE

1406 Block F, Letlhabile

NW

LEANO LA BOPHELO AND SUPPORT GROUP

28007 ESXTENSION 24

NW

LOKGABENG DISABLED CENTRE

KLERKSDORP

NW

MAKAPANSTAD RURAL DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

2642 B MMEKWA SECTION

NW

OBAKENG DISABILITY CENTRE

969EA NearWalterLetsie High School

NW

PEELETSO SECHABENG DEVELOPMENT

3291 LERATO STREET TLHABANE

NW

PHILANI HEALTH CARE CENTRE

X583 MokhechaneStr, Jouberton, Klerksdorp

NW

REKOPANE OLD AGE AND DISABILITY

272 KGOSING SECTION MAIN ROAD , PELLA OD CLINIC

NW

RELEBOGILE CARE SUPPORT

0165 ZONE 5 NGOBI

NW

SAVF VentersdorpOuestehuis

47 Mark Street Ventersdorp

NW

SUNSHINE SELF HELP

301 BLOCK I MAUBANE

NW

THE GOOD SAMARITAN PROJECT

590 KAMEEL STREET LETSOPA LOCATION

NW

TSHEDIMOSETSO

20123 DIBATE VILLAGE

WC

DWDE (Disability workshop developent)

21 Cavendish Street Claremont

WC

Edu-Plett

1 Xiphula Street, kwanokuthula, Plett

WC

God Cares International

37 Lynx Pacalsdorp George

WC

Iliso Care Society

A648 Sunrise Street Site C Khayelitsha

WC

Masibambane Community Garden

G232 Mongise road, Khayelitsha

WC

Prince Albert Advice and Development Centre

3 Voorstreet, Prince Albert

WC

Siyakhathala

56-675 Oscar Mpetha road khayelitsha

WC

South African Youth Council

10A Old Dutch Square, Bill Bezuidenhoudt Avenue, Bellville

WC

Urban Rural Development

Langa Housing Department, Washington Street, Langa

18 August 2020 - NW1540

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whetherherdepartmenthaslaunchedaninternalinvestigationintothecurrent scam affecting her department regarding the calling for tenders; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps have been taken in thisregard; (2) whether every individual whose name appears on a fraudulent tender request has been investigated; if not, why not; ifso, (3) whether the matter has been reported to the SA Police Service (SAPS); if so, what progress has been made on the case; ifnot, (4) whether the matter will be reported to the SAPS; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (5) given the apparent authenticity of the documentation, what measures have been put in place to improve ICT security? NW1911E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

((1) At the emergence of the scam the Anti-Corruption Unit instituted investigations to determine amongst others whether there was evidence to suggest the involvement of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) officials in the scam. The assistance of the law enforcement agencies were also solicited in this respect, criminal referrals were made and investigations were initiated by SAPS whom the assigned investigators worked closely with, the Anti-Corruption Unit and provided regularupdates.InvestigationsbytheSAPSarestillongoing.Throughcoordination

of investigation efforts with the internal ICT division, it was also established that the emails containing DPWI officials’ credentials didn’t originate from the DPWI ICT infrastructurenetworkorsystems.Emanatingfromthefindingsoftheinvestigations alludedtoabove,itwasresolvedthatthroughtheChiefDirectorateCommunications and Marketing the Department should launch an awareness campaign in an endeavour to alert members of the public to validate requests for quotations purported to be issued by theDPWI.

SCM’s contribution to this is as follows; “In keeping with the departments zero tolerance approach to fraud and corruption, an on-going awareness campaign is undertaken and the departmental website warns all officials and service providers about fraudulent order scams. Any purchase order or quotation/tender purported to be from DPWI must first be verified prior to delivery. The Department has also availed specific contact names and numbers on the website for both the internal staff and the service providers to enquire and report such scams.

2. IninstancesbroughttotheattentionoftheAnti-CorruptionUnitwhereDepartmental officials’credentialsareusedintheperpetrationoftenderfraud,theAnti-Corruption Unit conducts preliminary assessments to determine whether there is a need to institute an investigation into the matter. Extensive investigations conducted as highlighted in Paragraph 1 above has thus far revealed no linkages between Departmental officials and the fraudsters perpetrating thescam.

3. As highlighted in Paragraph 1, referrals were made to the SAPS and the investigations are ongoing in this regard. It should be noted that not all enquiries attended to by the Department results in the Department lodging a criminalcase.

4. The Department was advised by the South African Police Services (SAPS) that DPWI cannot be the complainant since it has never suffered any loss in such instances. SAPS has recommended that the DPWI should rather advise the affected service providers to be the ones who open a CAS with SAPS. The Departmentisthusadvisingallaffectedserviceproviderstoreportthematterattheir

nearest police stations and once the CAS is opened, SAPS normally obtains the affidavits/statements from the Department.

5. The Department has for all eventualities an anti-virus email softwarewhereby:

  • the latest Anti-virus software for end point security firewalls isrun;
  • all the offices including Regional Offices and sites have firewalls - Virtual Private Network (VPN);
  • a Virtual Private Network that ensures all officials logging into the DPWI domain operate in a secureenvironment;

Further to this:

    • TheDepartmenthasamasterICTpolicythatisregularlyreviewedtoaddress all governance and security relatedissues;
    • Active Directory password authentication is designed according topolicy;
    • All systems have current Secure Socket Layer (SSL) certificate to enable encryption, privacy, authentication and dataprivacy.

18 August 2020 - NW1720

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether her department collaborates with the SA Heritage Resources Agency whenever national monuments are being renovated and/or refurbished; if not, what steps are being taken to ensure the integrity of national monuments; (2) whether, in view of client departments being responsible for day to day maintenance and repairs on national monuments, the user asset management plan requires that specialist heritage architects and contractors be appointed to do the work; if not, why is this principle not being implemented; if so, is there a database of heritage architects and contractors?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) With the promulgation of the National Heritage Resources Act, no 25, 1999, and with reference to Section 58 (11 )(a), all monuments declared as 'National Monuments' under the previous National Monuments Act, are now classified as "Provincial Heritage Sites" and are therefore subject to heritage management under the 'provincial heritage resource authorities' in their respective provinces. These 'Provincial Heritage Sites' are thus no longer subject to heritage management under the SAHRA.

Sites now declared to be of 'national significance', under the provisions of the National Heritage Resources Act, are declared 'National Heritage Sites', also termed, 'Grade 1 Heritage Sites'. This replaces the previous designation of 'National Monument' with 'National Heritage Site'. Furthermore, 'National Heritage Sites' are independently owned and only some fall under the title of Public Works and Infrastructure. These include the Union Buildings, 120 Plein Street in Cape Town, the Houses of Parliament, Tuynhuys, the Castle of Good Hope, Constitution Hill precinct and Freedom Park.

In this context, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, do engage with the SAHRA during the planning and execution phases of renovation projects on these sites. This ensures that intervention and restoration work is carried out in compliance with the National Heritage Resources Act and in line with each site's Conservation Management Plan. For example, planning for restoration work at the Union Buildings is underway and regular engagement occurs with the SAHRA in the obtaining of permit approvals to carry out the work.

(2) User Asset Management Plans (UAMPs) require compliance with all legislationincluding the National Heritage Resources Act. The South African Council for the Architectural Profession (SACAP), however, provides no separate classification for 'heritage architect'. Neither is there an official classification for 'heritage contractor'. Architects by virtue of their registration as a professional architect with SACAP, are deemed to possess the necessary competency to address heritage requirements for projects. It is therefore, not required that DPWI keep a database of 'heritage architects'.

The DPWI, when carrying out 'Planned Maintenance' and 'Repair & Renovation' projects on heritage buildings, irrespective of their cultural heritage significance, often appoint a 'heritage practitioner' as part of the project's professional consultant team. Required by the National Heritage Resources Act, all DPWl's projects on heritage buildings include the required heritage study and a permit application to the relevant provincial heritage authority - or the SAHRA, in the case of National Heritage Sites. DPWl's Heritage Advisory Services, provides input/advice to DPWI staff, client departments, consultants and contractors, to ensure that they are well informed.

Day-to-Day maintenance work, is the responsibility of each client department. This work is utilitarian in nature and carried out as and when needed; for example, the replacement of a tap washer. These types of services do not require heritage expertise. By default, an official appointed by a client department to manage day­to-day maintenance, should be suitably qualified to make correctjudgments, to know that, for example, should a section of an historic gable collapse, specialist input by an architect and heritage practitioner would be necessary and furthermore, that an experienced contractor would need to be appointed to effect the repair appropriately. Only in exceptional cases, is specialised restoration work needed, for example, a requirement for a stonemason. Such expertise is appointed through the standard supply chain processes of the Department. Tender requirements can include allowance for scoring for specialist heritage experience, to assist in procuring a suitably experienced contractor or artisan.

18 August 2020 - NW1449

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With regard to assessing what procurement is required for expenditure related to Covid-19 and which will require deviation from supply chain procedures through emergency procurement under the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, what (a) criteria are used to determine the qualifying items and/or projects and (b) mechanisms are in place to ensure that deviation is done strictly in line with the emergency procurement processes; (2) whether any projects that have been outstanding for a long time have been completed under the guise of Covid-19 projects; if not, what safeguards have been put in place to prevent such projects from being completed under the guise of Covid-19 projects; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1.(a) I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrasructure (DPWI) that the procurement of quarantine sites for Covid-19 is a deviation from supply chain processes and is done under “emergency” regulations.

The qualifying criteria for determination of this procurement is the notification received from the NatJoints Containment Work stream of all persons entering the country via the air, sea and land ports of entry and who require to be quarantined.The Beitbridge border fence was also procured through emergency from ordinary supply chain management processes.

(b) Emergency procurement is a delegated function which requires each delegated authority to consider the nature of the emergency request prior to approving the emergency. The emergency approval granted by the delegated authority is thereafter ratified by the relevant Bid Adjudication Committee.

(2) No requests were received via user clients or User Demand Management to complete projects under disguise of Covid-19.

18 August 2020 - NW1794

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, better known as ISIS, being active in the northern parts of Mozambique and reports of almost 210 000 Mozambican citizens displaced since April 2020 resulting in the potential for Mozambicans wanting to come into South Africa to avoid the conflict, her department has done any assessment, since 1 January 2020, of the state of the border between South Africa and Mozambique; if so, what were the findings; if not, (2) whether her department will be doing an assessment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will the assessment be done; (3) whether an additional budget will be sought to address any shortcomings in the border fence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, from where will additional funds for border fence infrastructure be sourced if required?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. Yes, in terms of initiating infrastructure planning, and obtaining high level cost estimates a town planning/ site clearance assessment on the ±554 km borderline fencing and patrol roads is currently under way.

The findings of the town planning assessment report will be presented to the Department of Defence and the newly established Border Management Agency (BMA), a public entity of the Department of Home Affairs for their joint consideration and incorporation into the development of National Border Security Strategic Plan.

2. As per 1 above.

3. The National Border Security Strategic Plan, will support the Strategic Infrastructure needs and submission to National Treasury to approve additional capital budget allocation for project implementation by DPWI.

18 August 2020 - NW1739

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a)What are the names of the (i) buildings and/or (ii) sites that are currently used as quarantine sites; (b) where is each specified property located; (c) what are the relevant details of each property; (d) is each property in private or public ownership; (e) what is the cost of each property; (f) what is the duration of the contract in each case and (g) who made the request in

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The response to questions (a) to (g) above are provided in tabular format and attached as

Annexure A titled, “Quarantine Sites Contracted by the Department of Public Works and

Infrastructure – Covid-19 Pandemic”.

ANNEXURE A

ANNEXURE A to NA PQ 1739

QUARANTINE SITES CONTRACTED BY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND INFRASTRUCTURE - COVID 19 PANDEMIC

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

1

Musina Hotel and Conference Facility

Limpopo

3 National Road, Musina

Private

R1050-00

Not applicable.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

No persons under investigation (PUI’s) checked-in for quarantine to date.

2

Tsogo Sun - Garden Court Eastgate

Gauteng

Ernest Oppenheimer Ave, Bruma, Johannesburg

Private

R1207-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

3

Tsogo Sun - Garden Court Newlands

Cape Town

7 Main Road, Newlands Cape Town

Private

R1380-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

4

Tsogo Sun - Stay Easy Eastgate

Gauteng

8 South Boulevard, Bruma, Johannesburg

Private

R1092-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

5

Tsogo Sun Stay Easy Emnotweni

Mpumulanga

Southern Sun Stay Easy Emnotweni

15 Government Boulevard

Riverside Park Ext 1

Nelspruit

1201

Private

R1092-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

6

Tsogo Sun Southern Sun Bloemfontein

Free State

Cnr Nelson Mandela and Meville Drive

Brandwag

Bloemfontein

9301

Private

R1380-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

7

Centurion Lake Hotel - Pretoria

Gauteng

1001 Lenchen Avenue North, Centurion, Gauteng, 0046

Private

R1050-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

8

City Lodge Grand West

Cape Town

Grand West Casino & Entertainment World, Off Vanguard Drive,, Goodwqood, Cape Town, Western Cape, 8001

Private

R1050-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

9

City Lodge V & A

Cape Town

Cnr Dock & Alfred Roads, V & A Waterfront, Cape Town, Western Cape, 8001

Private

R1050-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

10

City Lodge Durban Hotel

Durban

CnrSylvestor Road, KE Masinga Road, Durban

Private

R1207-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

11

City Lodge Umhlanga Ridge

Durban

2 Palm Boulevard, Umhlanga Ridge, Umhlanga, KwaZulu-Natal, 4321

Private

R1205-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

12

Capital on Park

Gauteng

101 Katherine street, Sandown, Sandton

Private

R1138-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

13

Capital Melrose

Gauteng

AthollOaklands road, Melrose North Johannesburg

Private

R1138-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

14

Capital Bath

Gauteng

72 Bath Avenue Rosebank, Johannesburg

Private

R1138-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

15

Capital Ivy Villa Hotel

Gauteng

160 Helen Road, Strathavon, Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng, 2196

Private

R1138-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

16

Capital on Empire

Gauteng

177 Empire Place, Sandhust, Sandton

Private

R1138-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

17

Capital Menlyn Maine - Pretoria

Gauteng

194 Bancor Avenue, Menlyn , Pretoria

Private

R1138-50

Not applicable.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

Discontinued use as this is a multi-tenant facility

18

Mercure Hotels South Africa - Midrand

Gauteng

Old Pretoria road, Halfway House, Midrand

Private

R1092-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

19

Mercure Hotels South Africa - Bedfordview

Gauteng

33 Bradford Road, Bedfordview, Johannesburg, Gauteng,

Private

R1207-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

20

Mercure Premier Hotel

Nelspruit

Mpumulanga

Mercure Hotel Nelspruit

Cnr N4 and Graniet Street

Nelspruit

1200

Private

R1208-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

21

Peermont Emperors Palace Metcourt Hotel – Kempton Park

Gauteng

Emperor's Palace, 64 Jones Road, Jet Park, Kempton Park, Gauteng, 1620

Private

R1200-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

22

Peermont Emperors Palace Mondior Hotel – Kempton park

Gauteng

Emperor's Palace, 64 Jones Road, Jet Park, Kempton Park, Gauteng, 1620

Private

R1380-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

23

Indaba Hotel and Spa - Sandton

Gauteng

Cnr William Nicol and Wenning Street, Fourways, Sandton, Johannesburg, Gauteng, 3032

Private

R1207-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

24

Mannah Guest House

Kempton Park

Gauteng

39 Pomona Road, Pomona, Kempton Park, Gauteng, 1620

Private

R1120-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

25

Protea Hotel Balalaika

Sandton

Gauteng

20 Maude Street, Sandown, Sandton, Gauteng, 2146

Private

R1200-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

26

Protea Hotel Durbanville

Cape Town

99 Jip de Jager Drive, Tygervalley, Bellvile, Cape Town, Western Cape, 7530

Private

R950-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

27

Radisson Blu - Gautrain

Gauteng

Rivonia Road, Sandton, Benmore

Private

R1000-00

Not applicable.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

Discontinued use as this is a multi-tenant facility

28

Radisson Blu Park Inn Newlands

Cape town

10 Hemlock Street, Newlands, Cape Town, Western Cape,7701

Private

R1200-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

29

Park Inn Radisson Foreshore

Cape Town

29 Heerengracht, Foreshore, cape town, Western Cape, 8000

Private

R1233-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

30

Radisson Blu

Port Elizabeth

Port Elizabeth

Marine Drive and Nineth Ave, Port Elizabeth

Private

R1233-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

31

Birchwood Hotel

Kempton Park

Gauteng

Viewpoint Road, Bardene, Bardene, Boksburg, Gauteng, 1462

Private

R1150-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

32

Centurion Legacy Hotel

Gauteng

1001 Lenchen Avenue North, Centurion, Gauteng, 0046

Private

R1130-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

33

Signature Lux Hotel Foreshore

Cape Town

7 Hans Strijdom Street

Private

R790-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

34

New Tulbagh Hotel

Cape Town

8 Hans Strijdom Avenue

Private

R950-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

35

First Million Development CC T/A Black Mountain Hotel – Free State

Free State

Black Mountain Hotel

Suite 215

Private bag X 01

Brandhof

9324

Private

R1150-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

36

First Million Development CC T/A Windmill Casino Hotel – Free State

Free State

96 Raymond Mhlaba Street

Navalsig

Bloemfontein

9301

Private

R1050-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

37

President Hotel - Bloemfontein

Free State

President Hotel Free State

1 Union Avenue

Navalsig

Bloemfontein

9301

Private

R1150-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

38

Farm House Lodge

Free State

Paul Kruger ave 229

Universitas

Bloemfontein

9300

Private

R850-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

39

Tuscany Lodge and Conference Centre

Free State

PO Box 12748

Brandhof

9324

Private

R850-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

40

Monte Bello Estate

Free State

Monte Bello Estate

PO Box 22 111

Exton Weg

Bloemfontein

9313

Private

R1150-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

41

Badplaas Forever Resorts

Mpumulanga

Badplaas Forever Resorts

R38 Main Road between Carolina and Barberton

Mpumalanga

1190

Private

R1207-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

42

Kings Tide Boutique Hotel

Port Elizabeth

16 10th avenue, Summerstrand, Port Elizabeth

Private

R1050-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

43

Coastlands West Street Hotel

Durban

Dr PixleyKaseme street, Durban Central

Private

R1000-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

44

Coastlands Umhlanga Hotel

Durban

329 UMHLANGA ROCKS DRIVE, UMHLANGA, DURBAN, KwaZulu-Natal, 4319

Private

R1000-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

45

aHa Bloemfontein Hotel

Free State

AHa Bloemfontein Hotel

Suite 109, Private Bag X01

Brandhof

 

Private

R1200-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

46

aHaKopanong Hotel

Kempton Park

Gauteng

243 Glen Gory Rad, Nortons Home Estates, Benoni

 

R1200-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

47

aHa Ivory Tree Game Lodge

North West

Bakgatla National Park

Pilanesburg Nature Reserve SP

North West

0318

Private

R1350-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

48

Saint Georges Hotel - Pretoria

Gauteng

58 Goede Hoop Ave, Doornkloof, Pretoria

Private

R1150-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

49

Ehrlick Park Lodge

Free State

Ehrlich Park Lodge

P.O. BOX 27130

Ward Number 19

Bloemfontein

9301

Private

R1000-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

50

MetsiMatso Lodge

Free State

Free State

Jwala-Boholo

Thaba-Bosiu

Maloti a Phofung

Qwaqwa

9601

Private

R1050-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

51

Bon Hotel Bloemfontein

Free State

Bon hotel Bloemfontein central

Bloem plaza

East burger street

Bloemfontein

9301

Private

R1200-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

52

Relekane Guest House

Free State

Relekane Guest House

P.O. BOX 27130

Ward Number 16

Bloemfontein

9301

Private

R1000-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 
                 

Serial No

Name of Buildings or Sites currently used as Quarantine Sites

a(i) and (ii)

Location of each property

(b)

Relevant details of each property

(c)

Ownership status - private or public

(d)

Cost of each property. Rate per room as per FEDHASA

(e)

Duration of the contract

(f)

Who made the request

(g)

Comments

53

Oasis Hotel

Upington

Northern Cape

Oasis Hotel

PO Box 198126 Schroder Street,Upington 8800

Private

R1100-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

54

River City Inn

Upington

Northern Cape

River City Inn

C/o Park and Scott Street

26 Scott street

Upington

8801

Private

R1170-00

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

55

Elangeni Lodge

Mpumulanga

Elangeni Lodge

P. O Box 313

Malelane

1320

Private

R1207-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

56

Khayalami Guest Lodge

Mpumulanga

Khayalami Lodge

29 Van Wijk Street

Sonheuwel

Nelspruit

1200

Private

R1092-50

National state of disaster period.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

 

57

aHa Casa Da Sol Hotel and Resort

Mpumulanga

Aha Casa Do Sol Hotel and Resort

11 Autumn Street

Rivonia

Johannesburg

2128

Private

R1350-00

Not applicable.

NATJOINTS Border Control Workstream and PORT HEALTH

No persons under investigation (PUI’s) checked-in for quarantine to date.