Questions and Replies

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28 May 2021 - NW1114

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether he amended the Z83 application for employment form, as published in notice 627 of 2020 in the Government Gazette of 6 November 2020, to include a new racial category called Other to be listed alongside the existing categories of African, White, Coloured and Indian; if so, (2) what is the legal definition (a) of the category called Other which does not exist in the Employment Equity Act, Act 55 of 1998, and (b) used by his department for the categories of (i) African, (ii) White, (iii) Coloured and (iv) Indian; (3) Whether a person classified as other qualifies as a member of a designated group for the purposes of the Employment Equity Act, Act 58 of 1998, and broad-based black economic empowerment?

Reply:

(1) The Z83 application for employment form was amended extensive public consultations to address, among others, the issue of employees trying to escape disciplinary procedures and accountability by resigning when charges are proffered against them. The revisions empower the Public Service to give effect to section 16B (4) and (5) of the Public Service Act, 1994 which allows for employees to be disciplined for misconduct allegedly committed in their former department, when they are appointed in a new department. In addition other amendments included the race categorisation for ‘other’’.

(2) There is no legal definition accorded to the category of “other”. Under note 3 attached to the information of race as reflected in the Z83 form, it is indicated that the information is to enable the department to comply with the employment Equity Act, 1998. The information provided in respect of the race of applicants is therefore utilised to implement any affirmative action measures that a department may have.

In terms of the Employment Equity Act, “designated groups” is defined to include South Africa citizens who are black people, women and people with disabilities. In the same Act, “black people” is defined to mean Africans, Coloured and Indians. In addition it is also recognised that there are applicants, such as foreign nationals, who do not fall within these definitions provided for in the Employment Equity Act and therefore the category of “other” was introduced.

(3) The Z83 form is for purposes of employment in the public service and does not address broad-based black economic empowerment prescripts. The intention of the Z83 form is to allow the ease of categorisation of persons for employment taking into account the Employment Equity Act. Therefore an applicant who reflects himself or herself within the category of “other” indicates that the applicants does not fall within the other categorisations as contemplated in the Employment Equity Act.

28 May 2021 - NW1115

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What happens if an applicant refuses to indicate their race in section B of the Z83 application for employment form; (2) Whether his department classifies the race of an applicant who refuses to indicate their race; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what basis does his department classify a person as (i) Black, (ii) White, (c) Coloured, (iv) Indian and/or (v) Other; (3) What physical characteristics does his department take into account when classifying an applicant as Black, White, Coloured, Indian and/or Other?

Reply:

1. The Z83 application form is a prescribed form. An applicant is required to fill in all sections of this form completely, accurately and legibly. In addition, the declaration at the end of the form requires the applicant to confirm that all the information provided (including any attachments) is complete and correct to the best of his/her knowledge. Therefore it is incumbent on an applicant to complete the form in full. In the event that this information or any other information is not indicated, the application will not be compliant and may result in disqualification.

2. There is no requirement for any department to attempt to classify applicants into racial groups. The information provided on the Z83 form by the applicant is relied upon as correct and true based on the declaration as mentioned above.

3. As neither the DPSA nor any other department is required to determine the categorisation of the race of an applicant, there are no physical characteristics taken into account.

27 May 2021 - NW1232

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools are considered (a) rural and (b) township schools; (2) what (a)(i) total number of learners between Grade 9 and 12 are enrolled in each specified school and (ii) is the location of each school and (b) are the relevant details of enrolment by each grade

Reply:

1 (a)(b)

Province

NOT CLASSIFIED

RURAL

URBAN

EC

 

 2 846

 2 680

FS

 

  163

  986

GT

 

  180

 2 936

KZN

 

 4 315

 1 789

LP

 

 3 436

  484

MP

 1 804

 

 

NC

 

  308

  288

NW

 

  40

 1 525

WC

 

  561

 1 298

Grand Total

 1 804

 11 849

 11 986

Note: Schools were classified into Rural and Urban. Due to not having a formal definition of Rural, Mpumalanga schools were not classified. The detailed list of above is included as Annexure A, with physical addresses of each school for further identification of township schools.

 

2 (a)(i) (ii) and (b)

Refer Annexure B

27 May 2021 - NW936

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to his reply to Question 122 on 16 February 2021 regarding updating the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming, where he stated at the outset that the guidelines have not been updated, but later states that the technical committees of the National Road Safety Steering Committee have updated the National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps as a priority; he will furnish clarity regarding the seemingly contradictory information in the reply; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

It is correct that the National Guidelines for traffic calming have not been updated since 1998, however, it is worth noting that in the process of reviewing the guidelines through the National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC), the committee found no major changes to the present 1998 guidelines. It is for that reason that the NRSSC looked at it as these guidelines will effectively remain unchanged.

 

27 May 2021 - NW738

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that one of the biggest hindrances to the Special Investigating Unit carrying out their mandate with regard to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) was the lack of paperwork and records which have disappeared and cannot be traced, including many of the contracts that were signed between Prasa and service providers, what steps will he be taking to (a) ensure the recovery of paperwork and records of such contracts and (b) investigate how (i) the records went missing in the first place and (ii) payments on contracts were honoured if no records of such contracts exist? NW860E

Reply:

a) PRASA will request all service providers that are currently rendering services where physical contract documentation could not be traced to submit copies of the signed contract agreements with PRASA.

b) (i) PRASA has signed a Secondment Agreement with SIU to investigate all contracts that were identified in the Public Protector Derailed report and flagged also by AGSA as irregular. Such investigation would shed light on how contract documents went missing in the first place and what corrective measures should be taken against responsible individuals. The SIU report would be finalised during March 2021.

(ii) The process to pay for services where contract documentation is missing requires end-user departments to compile the necessary submissions with relevant source documents and confirmation of receipt of goods or services for approval by the GCEO and Finance prior to processing of any payment, especially for goods and services of a critical nature that PRASA cannot afford to operate without. In instances where payments have been processed without the necessary documents, based on the SIU investigation, appropriate corrective action will be taken against responsible individuals.

 

25 May 2021 - NW1134

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

What action was taken against (a) the security guards who allegedly assaulted and manhandled persons at the White River Police Station, on 28 March 2021 (details furnished), (b) their employer and (c) the police officials on duty who failed to protect the complainants who fled to the police station for safety?

Reply:

  1. The persons that were allegedly invol\led in the assault are not security officers but self-employed businessmen. The following cases were opened and are being investigated:
    • White River, CAS 214/03/2021, common assault, pointing of a firearm and malicious damage to property. This case was opened by Mr Byliefeldt against Mr Maroga, Mr Nkadimeng and others.
    • White River, CAS 196/03/2021, malicious damage to property and crimen injuria. This case was opened by Mr Maroga against Mr Byliefeldt.
    • White River, CAS 74/04/2021, crimen injuria. This case was opened by Mr Masuku against Mr Byliefeldt.
  1. The businessmen, referred to above, are also the complainants in criminal cases, involving the alleged victim of the assault, at White River. Multiple cases are, therefore, being investigated, all of which are still pending.
  1. The misconduct investigation against the members in question, in terms of the SAPS Disciplinary Regulations, 2016, was instituted and finalised. It has been referred to the Office of the Provincial Commissioner, for the implementation of further departmental steps and possible sanctions.

Reply to question 1134 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date:2021-05-19

Reply to question 1134 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 24-05-2021

25 May 2021 - NW1231

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Police

In view of the finding in the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) report into the water canon spray in BellVille earlier this year, that the SA Police Service could not find any wrongdoing in their actions, how does he justify the actions of the police officers against vulnerable and ill persons;

Reply:

 

  • IPID investigate cases in terms of its mandate as per section 28 of IPID Act 1 of 2011. This matter was referred to IPID by MEC Fritz of the Western Cape Provincial Government in terms of section 28 (1)(h) of IPID Act 1 of 2011.
  • Based on the investigation of incident in question where IPID found no offence or misconduct was committed by members of SAPS.
  • IPID confirmed that SAPS acted within the law, as they were called for intervention to assist in the crowd management and enforcement of the Disaster Management Act at the SASSA Bellville offices.
  • SAPS intervened upon request by SASSA to assist in crowd management and in execution of their duties ensure the use of non-lethal intervention, managing the crowd; being the grant recipients, in implementing the Disaster Management Act to maintain social distancing and Crowd Control Management.
  • IPID therefore did not recommend any action to be taken against the members as they were acting within confines of the law and no misconduct was committed in terms of SAPS regulations.

 

(2) Whether the IPID report is the final report on this matter; if not, will there be further investigation; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply from IPID:

A. The IPID report is final, there is no further investigation to be conducted on the above complaint herein by IPID.

 

APPROVED

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MS DJ NTLATSENG EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: IPID DATE:

 

Recommend/ Not Recommended/Comments

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

MRCCMATHALE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF POLICE
DATE
:  21-05-2021

 

Approved/ Not Approved

 

 

 
 

 

 

GEN, BH CELE, MP

MINISTER OF POLICE DATE:  24-05-2021

 

 

24 May 2021 - NW1077

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 31 for oral reply on 3 March 2021, regarding the R118 million irregular expenditure on the New York Pilot Project and her admission that her department had nothing to show for the R118 million spent, and in view of the fact that this is now an international embarrassment, he will (a) recall Ambassador Jerry Matjila, who was the Director-General of the specified department during the initiation of the highly controversial project and (b) suspend Minister Nkoana-Mashabane, who failed to exercise her executive oversight as the then Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, resulting in damaging South Africa’s international image; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation that in her Oral Reply to the question posed by the Honourable Member on this matter, she indicated that the Department had brought a review application in 2018 to have the tender award reviewed and set aside, and to request the recovery of the money that had been paid to the service provider. As the Minister also indicated in her Oral Reply, the judgement is still awaited.

Ambassador Jerry Matjila, who was the Director-General of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, is no longer an official of the Department, as the Employer-Employee relationship was terminated on 15 January 2021.

There is no intention to suspend Minister Nkoana-Mashabane.

21 May 2021 - NW1171

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).In light of the alleged mismanagement of the funding from the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme by the National Art Council (NAC), (a) what steps is he taking regarding the mismanagement of funds at National Arts Council and (b) who will be accountable; (2) whether his department has taken any legal steps against persons who are involved in the mismanagement of funding at the NAC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the NAC paid close to R600 000 to foot the legal bills relating to the internal disciplinary hearing of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO); if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the reasons that the NAC paid the legal bills of the CEO, (b) what total amount did the NAC pay in this regard; (4) on what date is it envisaged that the (a) suspension and (b) disciplinary action relating to the (i) CEO and (ii) Chief Financial Officer will be finalised?

Reply:

1. (a). A forensic investigation into the handling of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme (PESP) is being instituted by the Council of NAC. The findings of the report will be analysed and implemented in line with the governing legislation. If there is/are individual/s that may have transgressed in the management of the PESP rollout, consequence management will apply.

(b). The recommendations coming out of the Forensic investigation will determine further steps to be taken.

2. The Department has not taken any steps against any individual as the findings of Forensic investigation will determine the scale of the problem and what steps to take; and this will be done by the Council. My duty will be to play an oversight in ensuring that recommendations coming out of the Report are implemented and consequence management where applicable. However; also note that a legal opinion was sought on the matter of alleged conflict of interest by some Council members; to which it stated that there was no conflict of interest as adjudication was done under the previous Council.

3. The NAC did pay the legal bill relating to the internal disciplinary hearing of the Chief Executive Officer.

a) This was the re-imbursement paid to the CEO as she won the disciplinary hearing and Council agreed to settle her legal costs.

b) The amount paid was R594 500. The NAC Council approved the payment in 2020.

4. The National Arts Council has since instituted a Forensic investigation into the handling of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme (PESP) by management. Once that process is finalised the Council will work with speed to adequately and swiftly act on the implementation of the recommendations of the Forensic Report including disciplinary hearing if that is part of the recommendations.

21 May 2021 - NW1242

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, given current challenges with energy supply and in light of current controversies and allegations of impropriety in the procurement of emergency energy supply through foreign floating power ships, he has alternative plans to ensure an uninterrupted and reliable supply of electricity to support post COVID-19 economic recovery; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Departments response to the current energy supply challenges consist of a number of interventions including procurement under the RIMPPPP (commonly known as emergency power). The interventions by the Department are follows:

  • We have amended regulations to enable municipalities to build or procure power from IPPs.
  • We have amended of Schedule 2 of ERA and therefore making exempting certain categories of generation for own use from the requirements to hold apply for a license.
  • We are working with IPPs and Eskom to ensure that projects signed under bid-window of renewable energy are completed as soon as possible. 1 200 megawatts of the 2 200 megawatts has already been connected to the grid. The remaining capacity is expected to be connected to the grid by not later than December 2021
  • We are procuring power from existing private generators through short-term contracts. Eskom is finalising the procurement of 128 megawatts and the Department is finalising an offer to purchase additional power from existing renewable energy IPPs.
  • We are proceeding with the procurement of 1 995 megawatts of power under the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (RMIPPPP). Preferred bidders have been given until end of July 2020 to reach financial close. The Department is planning to conclude the signing of Power Purchase Agreements shortly after that.
  • We have issued Request for Proposal to procure 2 600 megawatts from renewable energy (Bid window 5)
  • We will be issuing additional Requests for Proposal for 9 213 megawatts from renewables, coal, gas, and battery storage. These will be done between now and March 2022.

 

21 May 2021 - NW1071

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of students who are National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) beneficiaries (i) registered and (ii) completed their studies at institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years, (b) was the dropout rate of NSFAS-funded students in each of the specified academic years and (c) has he found to be the average dropout rate of NSFAS-funded students since the inception of the NSFAS?

Reply:

The NSFAS cohort study considers any student who received NSFAS funding at any point in time during their studies. The database of students who had received NSFAS funding in all previous years of study is mapped to the Higher Education Management Information System dataset. The NSFAS cohort study published in March 2020 considered all cohorts that entered the public higher education sector, i.e. universities, for the first time from the 2000 to 2017 academic years. The study found that the dropout rate for the 2009 NSFAS cohort was 22.2%, which is 9% lower than the national cohort average of 31.3%.

It should be noted that in order to determine how students, including NSFAS students, are performing, at least 4 years of data is required for a 3-year qualification and 5 years of data for 4-year qualification. The Department is currently in the process of updating the cohort report for this year.

21 May 2021 - NW1063

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) How has he found the Auditor-General (AG) to have invoked the Public Audit Amendment Act, Act 5 of 2018, which gives the AG power to crack down on irregular and fraudulent expenditure, when auditing the entities which report to him, (b) what more than recommendations did the AG propose, who mentioned various times in his reports that consequence management does not take place in the entities and (c) if consequence management does not take place, (i) what is the next step and (ii) how is it enforced?

Reply:

ENTITY

AG ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS

CONSEQUENCE MANAGEMENT APPLIED

IF IT DID NOT TAKE PLACE, HOW IS IT ENFORCED

AFRIKAANSE TAALMUSEUM

The AG identified irregular expenditure during the audit as well as requested proof that an investigation was done regarding the previous irregular expenditure.

Although the AG has been asking for reports, letters and minutes relating to how the ATM handled identified irregular expenditure, in its recommendations, the AG did not mention any corrective steps it will be considering from their side against the Council or Management. This may be due to the nature of the irregular expenditure and the fact that it was due to administrative matters. Value for money was still achieved by the ATM.

Corrective steps have been taken against officials.

 

NATIONAL MUSEUM

No findings applicable

N/A

N/A

WAR MUSEUM

no irregular or fraudulent expenditure incurred

N/A

N/A

UMSUNDUZI

Supply Chain Management

The UMsunduzi and Ncome Museum in order to remedy and to prevent the recurrent of this finding has appointed a Supply Chain Management Officer. With this appointment, the office of the CFO will be capacitated to deal with supply chain issues. To avoid further irregular payments and consequence management will be enforced.

 

FREEDOM PARK

 

Freedom Park has since constituted the Loss control committee to address the Irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure identified. The committee refer the investigated matters to Human Resources department for disciplinary process. Freedom Park has also concluded the forensic investigations to closure the raised irregular expenditures

Freedom Park has committed to continuously trained all the officials in SCM department and those officials who are responsible for the processing payments in Finance department. The SCM manager also conduct SCM policies and procures awareness on quarterly basis. Those who are charge with the responsibility of implementing consequence management will be accountable to the Executive Authority.

NELSON MANDELA MUSEUM

Nelson Mandela Museum has had no adverse findings with regards to its SCM processes and continues strengthening controls and processes to mitigate the risk flouting the PPPFA regulations.

N/A

N/A

PLAYHOUSE COMPANY

The Playhouse Company did not incur any irregular and fraudulent expenditure and the auditor general did not raise any findings in this regard. As such, no consequence management has been recommended.

N/A

N/A

SOUTH AFRICAN LIBRARY FOR THE BLIND

Please note that there has been no irregular expenditure or fraud at the SALB. Internal policies are aligned to National Treasury guidelines around this aspect and consequence management will be applied if these come to light.

N/A

N/A

ROBBEN ISLAND MUSEUM

The invocation of the Public Audit Amendment Act by the Auditor General, has not impacted Robben Island Museum on any issues currently.

N/A

N/A

SOUTH AFRICAN STATE THEATRE

Fraud was discovered in the prior years

Management immediately reported the matter to the relevant authorities, Council, the Minister of Arts and Culture, the SAPS (Directorate of Priority Crimes Investigation), and the South African Revenue Services. The SAST instituted a forensic investigation, which was undertaken by an external and independent company, and the Auditor General was also informed. The AG supported the action taken and management will report back in the next audit to ensure that the consequence management taken is reflected in the audit report. The two employees that were involved in the fraud are no longer working at the SAST, one resigned while the other one was dismissed. Their provident fund payments have been attached and further criminal and civil proceedings are underway.

 

MARKET THEATRE FOUNDATION

History of irregular expenditure at MTF:

2019: R2,1 mil

2020: R35 887

2021: R201 775

Written warnings

Written warnings were issued for all incidences of irregular expenditure

incurred in 2019 and 2020. The expenditure incurred in 2021 was approved

by the Council of the MTF.

Consequence management did take place iro all irregular expenditure in

the past 3 years. No staff member has had repeat transgressions.

Fruitless and wasteful expenditure of R16 370 was incurred in 2020 and the

full amount was recovered from the staff members responsible.

No fraudulent expenditure was incurred in the 3 years.

 

IZIKO MUSEUMS OF SOUTH AFRICA

The recommendations of the AG, as contained in the Management Report, are followed. However, no recommendations have been made with respect to consequence management of material irregularities

N/A

N/A

NATIONAL FILM AND VIDEO FOUNDATION

The audit report has given management clear recommendation on implementing consequence management and also requested management to have timelines that must be followed. It further advise management to implement internal controls that will prevent non-compliance that lead to irregular expenditure or fruadlent one, though they clearly state in the report that their audit approach is not meant to detect fraud.

A forensic investigation was done in the past, in 2018/ 2019, when the irregular expenditure was incurred and also when there was suspicion of fraud and that resulted in the a number of executive leaving the NFVF. The NFVF continues to monitor irregular expenditure and investigate the SCM noncompliance that leads to irregular expenditure. If there is suspicion of fraud, the Council does take action to verify if indeed the fraud has taken place.

N/A

PAN SOUTH AFRICAN LANGUAGE BOARD

The AG has recommended that an investigation related to the identified irregular expenditure should be conducted and based on the result of the investigations, disciplinary steps to be taken against anyone to have the irregular expenditure or fail to comply with Treasury regulations.

The AG further stated that in terms of section 225 of the IESBA code, they have a responsibility to consider reporting identified and suspected non-compliance with laws and regulations to an appropriate authority and they have escalated the matter to the Board for them to ensure that appropriate steps are taken to address the non-compliance.

 

The AG proposed that Accounting Officer should urgently develop, review and approve policies. Implement controls to avoid Irregular, Fruitless and Wasteful Expenditure; The appointment of a permanent committee to deal with all the irregular, fruitless, Wasteful and unauthorized expenditure will assist the AO to enforce the consequence management with recommendations.

BOXING SOUTH AFRICA

The AG has not suggested or provided guidance other than the recommendation as stated in the Management Report.

BSA has in the past not adequately addressed matters of consequence management

The entity report to the Board and sub-committee of the Board including the Audit & Risk Management Committee any non-compliant matters that may lead to or constitute Irregular Expenditure on a quarterly basis.

2. The Internal Auditor report quarterly the outcome of any investigations to the Audit and Risk Management Committee .

3. The recommendations of the investigations shall be implemented and reported by Management to the Board and the Audit and Risk Management Committee on a quarterly basis.

4. All officials implicated by the outcome of the investigation shall be subjected to BSA internal disciplinary process , whilst monies owed to BSA will be recovered in terms of the Debtors Policy

PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE OF THE FREE STATE

Nothing more than recommendations was proposed

N/A

N/A

NATIONAL ARTS COUNCIL

The AG advised that officials should be kept abreast and informed of SCM and other relevant regulations to mitigate the risk irregular and fraudulent expenditure.

b) In prior years consequence management was not possible due to implicated officials leaving the employ of the NAC.

The NAC is taking a proactive approach in ensuring officials are trained on SCM and other relevant legislation. This will ensure due-diligence and compliance in relation to SCM, funding approvals and other relevant regulations.

i) Ensuring consequence management in cases of non-compliance will is added to the performance contract of Unit Heads.

ii) It is enforced through following procedures outlined in the NACs internal disciplinary policy.

SAIDS

The AGSA has recommended that Irregular expenditure be investigated to identify the root

cause and the necessary steps to remedy the root causes be taken or measure be put in

place to prevent similar incidents from taking occurring again.

The irregular expenditure was investigated, and it was found that there was no fraudulent and criminal conduct relating to the Irregular expenditure. The entity did NOT incur any financial losses as a result thereof. Training will be provided to the employees of the entity to improve their understanding and application of the PFMA and Treasury Regulations in relation to Supply Chain Management and Procurement.

N/A

DITSONG MUSEUMS OF SOUTH AFRICA

DMSA has a Financial Misconduct Disciplinary Committee which deals with all incidences of

irregular and fruitless and wasteful expenditure and the recommendations are tabled at both Audit

and Risk Committee (ARIC) and Council. However, this Committee was established before the

revisions to the PAA came into effect.

Consequence management does take place and the actions taken are reported at both the Audit and Risk Committee, Council and a report is included in the Annual Financial Statements.

(i) Action is taken against any staff member who has transgressed the PFMA and Treasury Regulations regarding irregular expenditure and fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

(ii) Through verbal or written warnings and recovery of funds lost.

N/A

ARTSCAPE

The AG has identified cases of irregular expenditure and one case of fraud. This was brought to the attention of management and Council. It was recommended that the entity must attend to these cases through the Irregular Expenditure Framework. Artscape has disclosed such cases in the Annual Financial Statements and has submitted request for condonation to the National Treasury.

In one case where fraud was identified, the incumbent was charged, found guilty and was dismissed. Financial loss was also recovered from the said employee.

N/A

21 May 2021 - NW1064

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

In view of the Auditor-General (AG) report, wherein the AG states that supply chain management in his department is regressing, what steps will be taken against management who do not have the correct understanding and incorrectly interpreted the requirements of Treasury regulations and preferential procurement policy

Reply:

The Department is in a process of arranging training with the National School of Government for all senior managers and the induction workshop on Supply Chain Management (SCM) processes will be presented to all staff.

21 May 2021 - NW1036

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Following the projections by the Executive Director of the SA Institute of Professional Accountants at the beginning of the year, that the Republic may be more reliant on imports for fuel and fuel products as a result of various challenges including that all six South African refineries are under review, what steps has his department taken to intervene and ensure that the ordinary South African does not feel the consequences of such a move, in particular an unprecedented fuel hike? NW1219E

Reply:

One of the Petroleum refining companies has decided to close its refinery and convert is into an import terminal.

The Department believes that the refineries should remain operational not just used as storage, because this approach compromises the country with respect to numerous benefits such as employment creation, skills, enterprise development and other benefits that come with local manufacturing.

With respect to the pricing issue, the planned closure of the refinery will not affect pricing because the Basic Fuel Price (BFP) assumes that the product is being imported not produced locally.

21 May 2021 - NW949

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2569 on 27 November 2020, any progress has been made on the investigation of each of the six children who died in three borrow pits in the Moretele Local Municipality, North West; if not, why not; if so, what (a) indications are there that there was negligence, (b) indications are there that stricter compliance and regulations are required, (c) measures will be put in place as a result and (d) support and assistance will be given to the families of the six children?

Reply:

The root causes could not be determined, this matter is not within the competency of the DMRE. Following the investigations that were undertaken by the Department’s Regional Office, it is evident that the incident took place on an area that was not authorised by the Department. It is alleged that the contractor who opened the borrow pit was contracted by the Department of Public Works for purpose of using the materials for road construction. Furthermore, the Department also learnt that upon completion of their activities, the contractor apparently had an intention to rehabilitate the area, it is alleged that the community did not support the issue of rehabilitation on the basis that the borrow pit will serve as water storage for their animals (cattles). Following the delisting of these activities In terms of the EIA Regulations, 2017 as amended and the associated Listing Notices, read also with section 106 of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development, Act 28 of 2002, the Department of Public Works is now no longer required to apply for both the Environmental Authorisations/Mining Authorisations from this Department. Given this exemption, this Department is not a competent authority to deal with this matter.

(b) Considering that there were no Environmental Authorisations issued by the Department, the onus lies with the Department that appoints the contractor to ensure that the area is rehabilitated in a safe manner.

(c) See the previous remarks

(d) The Department is not an appropriate institution to determine this issue but the relevant Department can furnish clarity in this regard.

21 May 2021 - NW962

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, considering the ineffectiveness of the current SA Mineral Resources Administration (SAMRAD) system in providing up to date information on South Africa’s mining and prospecting rights, his department has ever considered discontinuing the SAMRAD system and replacing it with a Cadastre system; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1129E

Reply:

The Department acknowledges that the current SAMRAD system has had some challenges and requires an overhaul. We have begun a process of procuring a Mining Cadastral System to ensure that there is a complete effective system in place.

21 May 2021 - NW623

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, taking into consideration the global shift towards cleaner fuel and energy consumption in an attempt to curb the global carbon footprint, his department has any plans in place to ensure that PetroSA starts producing cleaner fuel; if not, what are the reasons that no plans are in place; if so, what are the relevant details, including the (a) status of the specified project and (b) date by which implementation can be expected?

Reply:

PetroSA has plans in place that are targeting a new imported Liquefied Natural Gas supply to replace the depleting indigenous gas produced from its offshore gas fields for the last 30 years. Gas imports for the production of synthetic fuels are planned to start in 2022. The potential for longer term gas supply from newly discovered offshore gas fields is also being considered.

PetroSA is reviewing the potential to convert the Mossel Bay site to a ‘carbon free’ blue hydrogen production facility which will be explored in more detail when operation on imported Liquefied Natural Gas is completed. Operation on Liquefied Natural Gas will also enable PetroSA to recommission the Methcap renewable power facility installed to produce power from biogas which was in operation from 2004/5 until November 2020 (i.e. green electricity).

PetroSA fuel produced from processing of gas meets most of the CF2 specifications. However, capital investment will be required to meet the anticipated South African Clean Fuels 2 specifications.

PetroSA’s depleted offshore gasfields are also identified as the most promising carbon dioxide storage opportunity in South Africa to facilitate a lower carbon footprint. The ‘Atlas on geological storage of carbon dioxide in South Africa’ was completed together with the Council for Geoscience and major industry players highlights PetroSA’s existing infrastructure potential in this regard.

21 May 2021 - NW1189

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has provided farmers who are leasing state-owned land with assurance that their leases will be renewed; if not, why not; if so, what mechanisms has she put to prevent arbitrary refusal to renew such leases?

Reply:

Yes. According to the provisions of the State land Lease and Disposal Policy as well as the Lease Contract, a lessee is eligible for a renewal of the lease agreement on state-owned land.

21 May 2021 - NW1150

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department is involved in any court cases against the Mthonjaneni Community Trust; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the total number of cases that her department is involved in and (b) are the relevant details of the dispute in each case?

Reply:

Yes.

a) One.

b) Pursuant to a claim by three communities in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act, 22 of 1994, a consent order was granted by the Land Claims Court that the state acquire 10 properties in the Mthonjaneni area pending the resolution of a dispute regarding the properties between the Mthonjaneni Community and the Toggkry Community. The properties were duly acquired by the department and are managed in terms of the State Land Lease and Disposal Policy. The South African Farmers Development Association (SAFDA) was appointed as caretaker of the properties, with the view to later appoint it as lessee pending the resolution of the above-mentioned dispute. The caretakership agreement with SAFDA was an interim measure to safeguard the properties and to ensure that farming operations continued on the properties. The Mthonjaneni Community Trust subsequently brought an application against the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development & 2 others (Case No LCC201/2013) seeking the following orders:

  • That the Minister and the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights (the Commission) (the second respondent) immediately cease to harvest all crops on the relevant properties;
  • That a joint committee between the Mthonjaneni Community Trust and the department be established to determine various service providers to undertake the harvest of the timber;
  • That the Minister and the Commission ensure that an interest-bearing account is ringfenced for all funds generated by the lease or the farming operations; and
  • In the alternative, that the Minister and the Commission are directed to ensure that all funds that are generated from the farming operations as at date of transfer must be held in an interest-bearing account.

The department successfully defended the application in the Land Claims Court and the judge dismissed the application of the Mthonjaneni Community Trust with each party to pay their own costs. The transfer of the properties from the state to the beneficiaries is currently in progress and a further consent order with time frames are being negotiated with Cox and Partners Attorneys.

21 May 2021 - NW1016

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 404 on 1 March 2021, he can confirm if Additiv Solutions had met all the requirements for appointment for the Photonics Prototyping Facility Programme; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether Additiv Solutions in fact completed its project by 31 March 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) confirms that Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd met all the requirements for support from the Photonics Prototyping Facility that is hosted by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s (CSIR) National Laser Centre. As set out in the reply to question 404 in March 2021, the proposal was evaluated by the PPF Investment Committee, which includes industry experts and the DSI, and which evaluates and recommends proposals to be supported to the CSIR. Proposals are evaluated against the following criteria:

(a) Relevance and Impact (commercial relevance; feasibility; and significance of impact to the Photonics industry);

(b) Technical merit (clarity of objectives/motivation to use the PPF; novelty of technology; maturity of technology);

(c) Budget (alignment to tasks; and feasibility with existing infrastructure); and

(d) Management Plan (feasibility and efficiency of plan; and track record and team)

The proposal from Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd was evaluated by the PPF Investment Committee on 9 December 2019. The committee agreed that there was a clear need for lower cost 3D metal additive manufacturing machines, that the proposal met the requirements of technical merits, budget and the management plan. The proposal also met the requirements with respect to relevance and impact, but the committee did recognize that significant effort would be required with respect to market development and marketing, and that the prototype to be developed in this project would assist in this regard. The Committee agreed that the proposal from Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd therefore met the requirements for support from the PPF, and recommended it for approval.

2. The project was initially scheduled to be completed by 31 March 2021. However, there were delays with the procurement processes at the CSIR, which delayed the initial setup phase of the project. These delays were due to challenges with suppliers of hardware to the CSIR. The hardware necessary for this phase was delivered to the CSIR in December 2020 and February 2021 and this work is now completed. In the project scope, a prototype system had to be characterised, and then three subsequent "Beta" machines have to be characterised for Additiv Solutions. The prototype setup and characterisation is completed; the Beta 1 system is being characterised. This makes up the bulk of the work in the project and will completed by 31 May 2021. Additiv Solutions is also required to deliver 2 additional machines (Beta machines 2 and 3) to the PPF team for them to characterise the optical setup and complete all activities planned. This stage is dependent on Additiv Solutions and is expected to be completed by 30 June 2021. The project is on track, there are no remaining technical challenges.

3. This question relates to particular project at the CSIR. The Minister does not usually make statements on particular projects, and is not planning to do so in relation to the CSIR’s support to Additiv Solutions.

21 May 2021 - NW1234

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether his department in collaboration with the Department of Health has proposed plans to vaccinate university students; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether there is (a) training and (b) an awareness drive to educate students on the vaccine options in future; if not, why not; if so, how soon can the students expect such options?

Reply:

(1) All higher education institutions will be included in the countrywide government phased plan to vaccinate all South African citizens. Higher Health, as the entity that supports the post-school sector in this area, will liaise with the Department of Health, and ensure regular communication with the sector on all matters relating to COVID-19 and vaccination. Higher Health, in collaboration with the Department of Health, Department of Higher Education and Training, and post-school institutions will ensure that all relevant plans and communication relating to vaccination are put in place effectively across the sector.

(2) Higher Health works with all post-school public institutions to support the training of institutional staff and peer mentors on many aspects of work, including COVID-19. This has included the distribution of information on the current phase of the vaccination programme and will include awareness raising at the appropriate times during the phased vaccination programme of government.

21 May 2021 - NW1212

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, in light of the outrage regarding the tracksuits worn by Team SA at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, his department intervened to ensure that a similar mistake does not occur at the upcoming Olympics; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. The Department did not intervene, as this is an administrative matter the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee is empowered to deal with.

Notwithstanding the latter, SASCOC indicated that they have secured a sponsorship from Mr Price Sport, with regards to the kit for the Tokyo Games. As part of the process the athletes have joined the Mr Price Sport design team to finalise the design of the kit. The kit design will therefore have full input from the Athletes who will be wearing it. SASCOC also indicated that the EThekwini Municipality has also provided professional designers to join the Mr Price Sport Team to design the opening ceremony outfits.

21 May 2021 - NW1069

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What are the reasons and explanation of how over-enrolments occurred in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021?

Reply:

(a)  The audited data for 2019 indicates that 1 074 912 headcount students were enrolled, representing an under-enrolment of -6 178 headcounts in relation to the projected target of 1 081 090 set for 2019. This represents a -0.57% deviation from the 2019 target. Universities are permitted to move within a 2% band of their planned targets.

(b)  The Department has not yet received the 2020 final audited data from universities. This is only due at the end of July 2021 once they have finalised their graduate numbers and their external auditors have undertaken the audit of the data to be submitted to the Department. Thereafter the Department can undertake the comparison between the 2020 enrolment planning targets and the actual 2020 enrolments. However, UNISA did signal to the Department last year that they had over-enrolled in 2020. The Department has had a number of discussions with UNISA on over-enrolments both in 2018 and in 2020. 

(c)  The Department has not yet received data for the 2021 academic year, as universities will still enroll students in the second semester. The 2021 audited data will only be received at the end of July 2022.

21 May 2021 - NW1065

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether he has found that all the museums (a) under his department and (b) in the provinces have qualified curators; if not, what are the (i) names of the museums that do not and (ii) reasons for this; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(a). All Entities under the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture have qualified Curators.

(i) n/a

(ii) n/a

 

 

21 May 2021 - NW1109

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to her reply to question 1486 on 18 August 2020, (a) what is the current status of the 13 buildings which her department was to hand over to the Minister of Social Development for the purpose of victim empowerment shelters to assist women, (b) which of the seven buildings that have been completely renovated are currently operational, (c) who is the appointed operational service provider for each building, (d) what are the reasons that completed shelters are not currently operational and (e) by what date will the specified shelters be operational; (2) by what date(s) does she envisage that the renovations of the remaining six buildings will (a) commence and (b) be completed in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. (a) I have been informed by the Department that the total number of buildings which have been renovated and ready for use by Department of Social Development (DSD) is twelve (12) instead of thirteen (13). The Department has renovated all 12 buildings for use by DSD. Currently seven (7) buildings have been handed over to provincial and national Departments of Social Development and are in operation.

(b) The list of the seven (7) buildings, which have been completely renovated and are operational, is provided on table A below:

Table A

No.

PROVINCE

PROPERTY ADDRESS

STATUS

       

1.

Western Cape

Albertina: 8 Aalwyn Street, Cape Town

Operational

2.

Western Cape

Laingsburg: 39 Voortrekker Road, Cape Town

Operational

3.

Western Cape

Aurora: 44 Long Street, Cape Town

Operational

4.

Western Cape

Aurora: 42 Long Street, Cape Town

Operational

5.

Western Cape

Mooreesburg: 16 Tuin Street St, Cape Town

Operational

6.

Western Cape

Heidelberg: 92 Van Riebeek Street, Cape Town

Operational

7.

Gauteng

Salvokop, Pretoria

Operational

(c) The Department has handed over the buildings to the Western Cape Provincial Department of Social Development and National Department of Social Development (Salvokop) for operationalization. The Department, therefore, does not have information of service providers which have been appointed by DSD to operationalise the facilities.

(d) and (e) The Department is awaiting a signed Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Social Development and the Provincial Department of Infrastructure Development. This will inform the timelines for occupation and use.

2 (a) and (b) The renovations of the remaining five (5) buildings in Gauteng commenced during the 2020/2021 Financial Year and have since been completed.

 

21 May 2021 - NW1181

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether his department has been informed of the open mine shaft directly south of the Zamampilo informal settlement at Riverlea, Johannesburg; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will his department (a) inspect and (b) close the shaft; 2) Whether his department has plans in the interim to erect warnings and/or barriers around the shaft to prevent persons falling into it pending closure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. Yes, the Department has been informed of the open mine shaft directly south of the Zamampilo informal settlement at Riverlea, Johannesburg. Subsequently a site visit was conducted on a joint operation with South African Police Services because of the prevalence of illegal miners operating with the area. It was observed during the site visit that the said open mine shaft that was opened, is the same shaft that was rehabilitated, sealed off and fenced off by concrete palisade fencing. The resealing of the said shaft is being prioritised and will be completed within the current financial year.

2. Yes, the Department is putting interim measures in place including erecting warnings and conducting public awareness.

 

21 May 2021 - NW1253

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

a) What is the position of the Government regarding the procurement of nuclear energy; b) What quantity of nuclear power is targeted for purchase; c) From whom will the nuclear energy be purchased; and d) By what date will it be procured? NW1444E

Reply:

a)  The Integrated Resource Plan 2019 (IPR2019), Decision 8: directed the Government to commence with the preparations for a nuclear build programme to the extent of 2500 MW, at a pace and scale that the country can afford because it is a no-regret option in the long term. To implement this decision, in June 2020 the Department commenced with the preparations, including issuing a non-binding Request for Information (RFI), to test the market’s appetite for the 2500MW nuclear new build programme.

In terms of the Electricity Regulations Act, 2006 (Act No. 4 of 2006), the Department has submitted the Ministerial Section 34 determination to request the concurrence of the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) for the procurement of additional 2500MW from nuclear energy. The Department is awaiting NERSA’s decision on the Ministerial section 34 determination. Subject to the Regulator’s approval, the Department will issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) for the procurement of 2500MW nuclear new build programme, at a pace and the scale that the country can afford.

b) As indicated in the IRP2019 Decision 8, the Department targets to procure the 2500MW from nuclear energy.

c) The decision from whom to procure the 2500MW nuclear energy will only be known once the procurement process has been concluded and successful bidder(s) appointed. This decision has not been made at this stage because procurement has not started. The Department is still awaiting NERSA’s verdict on Ministerial section 34 determination.

d) To ensure security of energy supply and in line with the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2019-2024, the Department plans to complete the procurement of the 2500MW nuclear new build programme by 2024.

21 May 2021 - NW1135

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What measures is her department taking with regard to the outbreak of locust that is affecting crops in the Northern Cape and other parts of the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) implemented the commando system which includes training and appointing locust contractors to control the locust outbreak. DALRRD provides these contractors with pesticides, protective clothing and spraying pumps for effective control of the locust outbreak before they reach the crop lands. In addition, DALRRD further appoints the aerial locust spraying contractors to assist within areas where the outbreak is out of control and un-accessible.

21 May 2021 - NW1087

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With the rapid expansion of the tertiary system that was not followed by the implementation of financial support for such an expansion from 1994 to date, (a) what are the reasons that the financial support was not implemented and (b) who made that decision; (2) whether there is a funding model that was ever created and/or revised to cater for the expansion; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The assumption that the rapid expansion of the tertiary system was not followed by the implementation of financial support is not a true reflection of the interventions that the Department has put in place to try to meet the system expansion. Government’s expenditure goal is to spend 1% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product on university education. Given the trajectory seen over the past ten years, this target was achieved during the 2018/19 financial year. However, it is not clear if it will continue to be achieved.

(b)  Funding for the university sector is part of the budgetary processes of government and therefore competes with other government priorities such as health, social welfare, etc.

(2) The Department is aware of the systematic challenges and remains committed to being responsive to the constantly changing landscape within the post-school education and training system. The funding model or regulations are updated when the need arises. Post 1994, the Department revised the funding framework (Annexure A) and is in the process to develop a policy framework on fee regulation to manage the funding model accordingly to ensure it remains relevant. A policy review on student funding is also underway as requested by Cabinet.

21 May 2021 - NW1349

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) With regard to the successful bidders in the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme, what is the (a) duration of the agreement with the Independent Power Producers, (b) amount of electricity each bidder will provide to the grid, (c) cost to the Republic per kilowatt of electricity generated and (d) earliest anticipated date that each Independent Power Producer will be able to supply electricity to the national grid; 2) Whether any exemptions were granted by either (a) the Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries, (b) the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition and/or (c) the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy; if not, why not; if so, what are the details in each case; 3) Whether public participation was conducted in connection with each successful bidder’s (a) environmental impact, (b) economic impact and (c) social impact; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the details in each case? NW1545E

Reply:

a) the proposed tenure for the Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) is 20 years.

b)

Project Name

Contracted Capacity (MW)

Evaluation Price

(ZAR/kwh)*

Oya Energy Hybrid Facility

128

1.55

Umoyilanga Energy

75

1.72

ACWA Power Project DAO

150

1.46

Karpowership SA Coega

450

1.49

Karpowership SA Richards Bay

450

1.50

Karpowership SA Saldanha

320

1.70

Mulilo Total Coega

198

1.89

Mulilo Total Hydra Storage

75

1.52

*the evaluation price is rounded off to the nearest ten

A further three (3) eligible bidders will only be announced after further value for money propositions have been successfully concluded.

c) See response table above

d) The projects are expected to connect to the grid between June 2022 and December 2022.

2. a) The Department is not aware of any exemptions granted by the Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries.

b) The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition granted exemption from certain designated local content requirements.

c) See response to question (b) above.

3. a) Regarding to environmental compliance, bidders were only were only required to submit a scoping report as part of their response to the Request for Proposal.

b) No public participation was conducted regarding economic impact of successful bids, but bidders have committed to prescribed minimum economic development requirements in line with the PPPFA and the RFP.

c) See response to question (b) above.

21 May 2021 - NW1351

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether any plans are in place to include sign language as one of the official South African languages; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of the plans and (b) total budget has been allocated in this regard? NW1547

Reply:

(a) Yes, after the Constitutional Review Committee of Parliament had recommended that section 6(1) and (5)(a) of the Constitution be amended to include South African Sign Language (SASL) as the 12th South African official language, the Department of Justice and Correctional Services (DoJ) took the necessary steps to kick-start the Constitutional amendment process. The first working session for all national departments to make contributions to the draft 19th Constitutional Amendment Bill was held in March 2021. DSAC and PanSALB as the key implementers of section 6 of the Constitution were working closely with DoJ. A follow-up working session was facilitated by DSAC in April 2021 where all affected stakeholders mainly the deaf community gave input into the draft Bill.

DSAC is also planning to conduct further consultative meetings with all relevant structures of the Deaf Community as users of the South African Sign Language (SASL) to understand their specific needs that will inform the draft implementation plan to give effect to section 6 of the Constitution when it is amended.

In the meantime, PanSALB is workshopping stakeholders on the SASL Charter, which sets out key obligations to improve access to quality services and effective protection of the linguistic rights of deaf people.

(b) There is no budget yet allocated for the SASL as the constitutional amendment process is still ongoing. When SASL is finally adopted as the 12th official language of the Republic of South Africa, DSAC will include it in its plans with cost implications.

21 May 2021 - NW1101

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)(a) What is the total number of technical and vocational education and training colleges that have a functional Employee Assistance Programme and (b) in each case, is there a funded position on the organogram to deal with the Employee Assistance Programme; (2) for those colleges that do not have Employee Assistance Programmes, what are the reasons that they do not have one in place; (3) whether the programme will be established; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (4) (a) what services does the Employee Assistance Programme provide to employees and (b) if no Employee Assistance Programme exists, what measures have been put in place to support employees who would ordinarily have used the programme?

Reply:

(1) The Department has developed a standardised organisational structure and Post Provision Norms (PPN) model for TVET colleges, which makes provision for a unit and funded post for Employee Health and Wellness (EHW) services within each TVET college. This model and standardised organisational structure is currently being implemented at a college level over 3 years in line with the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework budget. 

(2) The EHW unit at Head Office has been capacitating colleges whilst the PPN model was being developed and supporting the implementation of programmes in colleges.

Colleges were capacitated with 3-day EHW capacity-building workshops. There were 86 psychosocial interventions in TVET colleges. Processes of employee health and wellness were followed, which were agreed upon by labour structures within the Department.

During the COVID-19 pandemic and currently, the EHW unit has trauma counselled, tracked and traced 70 officials, and equipped colleges with various protocols in ensuring adherence to the prescripts of the Department of Public Service and Administration.

(3) The support functions and implementation of the EHW programmes does not depend on the establishment of an EHW unit, as it is the right of all members within the public service to be provided with health care services based on the Bill of Rights section 24 (a) and section 27 (i), as per the directive from the Minister of Public Service and Administration in Circular 1 of 2017 on Employee Health and Wellness.

(4) (a) The EHW programmes are based on the National Strategic Framework of Employee Health and Wellness of 2008. The programmes are as follows:

  • HIV, AIDS, TB & STI programmes.
  • The Health and Productivity Management programme focuses on the return on investment and other psychological, biological, medical and environmental challenges that impede officials to perform in the workplace. Implementation of this programme is done in tandem with leave determination policies, job access strategies, reasonable accommodation, employment equity and the Policy on the Implementation of Incapacity in the public service.
  • The Safety Health Environment Risk and Quality (SHERQ) programme is directed by Regulation 53 of the Public Service Regulation that heads of departments must establish and maintain a safe and healthy work environment for employees of the department and a safe and healthy service delivery environment for members of the public. This programme does not operate in isolation but is implemented with the COVID-19 master plan and protocols, and reasonable accommodation and buildings, e.g. maintenance schedules of lifts and equipment by facilities management and the Departmental SHERQ policy.
  • The Wellness Management Physical programme includes a sports policy whereby members of the Department can participate in healthy lifestyle programmes. Wellness Sporting Committees exist in colleges where a healthy lifestyle is promoted and ensuring that officials achieve a work-life balance. Daily body-mass-index screening is done as part of this programme.
  • The Financial Wellness programme comprises of National Treasury workshops for Departmental officials, including colleges, on savings and managing finances.
  • The Wellness Management Psychosocial programme cuts across all EHW interventions, implemented in conjunction with other Departmental programmes and customised for officials. Scheduled 8 of the Labour Relation Act is invoked in cases that need ill-health retirement.
  • The Organisational Wellness programme incorporates SHERQ as the environment can incapacitate a person; hence, reasonable accommodation is implemented in various ways and can lead to officials being re-allocated to other work or work terrain appropriate for wheelchair-bound officials.

(b)   The EHW programmes are being utilised and programmes are in place within the EHW work plans.

21 May 2021 - NW1172

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With regard to the phase 1 and 2 COVID-19 sport relief funding allocation, what is the list of all those who have been paid, including the amount that each has been paid; (2) whether phase 1 is now completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) who was paid and (b) what amount in each case; (3) (a) what is the full list of those who are contracted on phase 2, including the names of those who were served with letters and those who have not yet been served, (b) what is the full list of all sport recipients, (c) on what date will payments be finalised for all sport beneficiaries, (d) on what date will payments be finalised for all those still waiting payment, (e) on what date will payments and letters be finalised for all those still under review to date, (f) on what date will those who have been rejected be notified and (g) what total amount was paid to all sport beneficiaries in phase 1 and phase 2?

Reply:

(1). The lists of beneficiaries for Phase 1 and 2 COVID-19 Relief are attached. For Phase 1 each applicant was paid an amount of R20,000.00 and for Phase 2 each applicant was paid an amount of R6,600.00.

(2). Yes Phase 1 was completed, (a). the list is provided as per (1) above, (b) each successful applicant was paid R20,000.00.

(3) Clarity is required in terms of this question to determine what the question is referring to regarding those who were contracted in Phase 2. No one was contracted in Phase 2.

21 May 2021 - NW1088

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the projected cost for a student at a university and/or technical and vocational education and training college for one year?

Reply:

The projected 2021 average full cost of study as reported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is R59 508.00 per annum for public universities. It should be noted that this includes both distance and contact students. It also includes students on the DHET Grant (capped funding) and the DHET Bursary (fully subsidised) funding. 

The projected cost for a student at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college is R62 000.00 per annum which covers tuition and allowances. It is important to note that all TVET college students are provided with textbooks, consumables, and safety gear irrespective of whether or not a student is a NSFAS recipient.

21 May 2021 - NW1355

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Reply:

  1. The list of paid beneficiaries of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme that is being rolled out by the National Film and Video, inclusive of the amount is attached as requested.
  2. PESP Phase 1 of the National Film and Video Foundation is not yet completed and it is envisaged that it will be concluded by the end of June 2021. The list of beneficiaries paid is the same as the one provided in question 1 above.
  3. PESP phase 2 has not started. No approval for implementation has been granted yet by the National Treasury.

Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme

           
                 

Split

Allocation

Paid to date

Balance available

Jobs proposed

Jobs projected

Jobs outstanding

   

Stream 1

84 534 772,00

58 764 484,00

25 770 288,00

6 375

5 838

537

   

Stream 2

22 513 038,00

22 263 038,00

250 000,00

1 200

1 187

13

   

Stream 3

12 950 000,00

12 950 000,00

-

705

705

-

   

Stream 4

13 002 190,00

10 502 190,24

2 499 999,76

675

480

195

   

Admin

7 000 000,00

4 531 324,12

2 468 675,88

 

 

 

   

Total

133 000 000,00

104 479 712,24

28 520 287,76

8 955,00

8 210,00

745,00

   
                 

21 May 2021 - NW1179

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether he has found that a certain mining company (name furnished), which conducted mining activities south of the TC Esterhuysen Primary School, in Riverlea, Johannesburg, contravened mining regulations during its tenure; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what specific actions did his department take in this regard, (b) on what date was action taken and (c) what is the status of the mining licence granted for the specified area; 2) Whether his department is involved in the rehabilitation of the site; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 3) Were contractors appointed to rehabilitate the site; if not, who will rehabilitate the site; if so, what are the relevant details; 4) (a) on what date will the rehabilitation operations on the site (i) commence and (ii) be completed and (b) what is the (i) source of rehabilitation funds and (ii) projected total cost of the rehabilitation process? NW1369E

Reply:

1. A company by the name of Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd had a mining right, dealt with under reference GP 30/5/1/2/2 (140) MR, issued in terms of the provisions of the MPRDA on 11 November 2008. The mining license expired/ lapsed in 2017. Prior to the lapsing of the validity of the mining license, Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd applied for a renewal of their licence, in terms of the provisions of the MPRDA. The Department refused to renew the mining licence. Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd then lodged an appeal against the Department’s decision to refuse to renew their licence.

a) Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd went into liquidation during the appeal process by the Department. The final decision on the appeal has not been finalised since the appellant went into liquidation and/ or business abandonment.

b) The Department issued several orders, instruction and notices in terms of the provisions of the MPRDA and NEMA, to Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd when the company was still in operation and when the company still existed.

c) Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd went under liquidation in 2018. The Department was not able to finalise the appeal since the appellant was liquidated.

(2) Yes, a rehabilitation programme was submitted by a company called Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd, wherein it proposed to rehabilitate many parts of the mining area of Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd, namely,

a) Backfilling of the open pit (which lies behind T.C Esterhuysen Primary School and George Harrison Park on R41 Main Reef Road).

b) Backfilling of the open pit (which lies south of the cement plant at approximately 300m from the CRG Plant area).

c) Levelling and cleaning of the CRG Plant Area.

(3) A company called Amatshe (Pty) Ltd provided a rehabilitation plan to backfill and rehabilitate areas that were left by Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd. On 03 December 2021, a directive was issued to Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd by this Department, in terms of section 28 of the NEMA, to rehabilitate the areas that were left in a degraded and unsafe state by the mining operation of Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd.

(4) (a) (i) Rehabilitation are anticipated to resume by June 2021 when all necessary access negotiations between the applicant and Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd have been completed.

(ii) The rehabilitation project will proceed for a period of at least 10 months. Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd.

(b) (i) Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd is rehabilitating for the account of the surface owner and the relevant costs of rehabilitation should be borne by the land owner or whoever the landowner deems fit and appropriate to help. In the case at hand, the costs are to be borne by Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd.

(ii) The rehabilitation programme submitted by Amatshe Mining (Pty) Ltd projected the cost of their rehabilitation project to be R10 400 000.00. In addition, the Department has about R44 774 902.01 held as financial provision provided by Central Rand Gold (Pty) Ltd which could still be used for rehabilitation purposes.

21 May 2021 - NW1192

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) With reference to the budget cuts for all government departments in the 2020 21 financial year, including the Department of Higher Education and Training, what is the long-term plan of his department regarding (a) students’ historic debt and (b) safeguarding the integrity and financial sustainability of universities, given the billions owed to the institutions by students and the ongoing cuts on research and funding for universities experienced recently; (2) whether he is undertaking any consultations with other stakeholders and affected students regarding his department’s processes of addressing the plight of university students falling into the missing middle; if not, why not; if so, who is being consulted in making a holistic decision in addressing this issue?

Reply:

(1) In March 2021, the Department requested universities to complete a student debt survey template with the aim of providing the best possible data on the total student debt as at 30 December 2020. This work will feed into the review requested by Cabinet on government policy in relation to student financial aid, including the “missing middle” and the sustainability of institutional funding (block grants, earmarked and infrastructure funding). 

(2) The Minister will appoint a task team to review the sustainability of and options for the post-school education and training student financial aid system. The focus of the review will be on the sustainable modelling of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), as well as to explore a different public-private sector mechanism to enable better support for the “missing middle” income bracket. Once concluded this will be tabled for Cabinet’s consideration.

21 May 2021 - NW1250

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether the Government intends to assist indigent former students who owe universities for fees incurred after the National Student Financial Aid Scheme discontinued their funding; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government has contributed R1.7 billion to NSFAS as a result of the due diligence exercise that was undertaken in 2018 towards the historic debt owed to universities by continuing or returning NSFAS qualifying students, registered in 2018.  This allocation specifically targets students who were subject to the R122 000 family income threshold and the NSFAS funding cap, and also covers students registered in 2019, 2020 and 2021.  In many cases, the amount of funding provided was insufficient to cover the actual fees and costs of the study, where the cost of the study was higher than the NSFAS cap. These students (referred to as capped students) therefore accrued debt with their institutions.

Students, including former qualifying NSFAS students, had to meet the academic progression criteria for the years being claimed for and had to sign an acknowledgment of debt with their institutions. Students (including former NSFAS students) who did not meet the NSFAS academic criteria do not qualify for continued funding.

This project is work in progress as it is subject to an audit process required by NSFAS and has not yet been finalised.

20 May 2021 - NW827

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, in light of the rising budget deficit of the Republic which has been made worse by the economic impact of COVID-19, necessitating a need for the rationalisation of Government expenditure through, among other considerations, a rationalisation of the public service headcount, his department has introduced a rationalisation process of the staff complement in the public service; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by what date is the rationalisation envisaged to be completed?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration has not introduced rationalisation of the Public Service headcount. Headcount increases have not been the main driver of the wage bill. Rationalisation of the Public Service headcount may adversely affect service delivery to citizens in critical sectors such health, education and policing amongst others. The 2021 Budget Review, has indicated that the government wage bill must be managed within the Fiscal Framework which assumes that compensation budget ceilings will be maintained.

Not applicable in terms of the response in (a).

End

20 May 2021 - NW1259

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What measures have been taken to develop the pricing structures and systems for (i) local and (ii) international tourists, (b) at what stage is the process at present, (c) what has been achieved to date, (d) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines of the process and (e) how is the process (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

The setting of prices falls within the ambit of the private sector. South African Tourism does engage the sector to consider special offers as part of the promotion activities they conduct i.e. Sho’t Left programme. Furthermore, The Minister of Tourism called for the sector to consider two-tier pricing model i.e one for Domestic tourist and one for International tourist. It has been encouraging to see a growing number of business responding to this call. For long term purposes, the policy review policy panel is also considering wether there is a need for a policy pronouncement on pricing.

(a) – (e) Not applicable

20 May 2021 - NW1260

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What measures have been taken to make the rating system compulsory and free, (b) at what stage is the process at present, (c) what has been achieved to date, (d) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines of the process and (e) how is the process (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

No measures have been taken to make the grading system free and compulsory. The Minister has appointed a Policy Review process which will review all the areas of work by the department and this will include Grading.

(b) – (e) Not applicable

20 May 2021 - NW1258

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What measures have been taken to maximise the communication and relationships with the Department of International Relations and Cooperation in order to grow tourism, (b) how is the communication and relationships with the specified department (i) monitored and/or (ii) measured and (c) what have been the (i) successes and/or (ii) failures (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

a) Measures to maximize communication with DIRCO

Communication between the Department of Tourism and the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) is institutionalised and effective. The department works with DIRCO on matters pertaining to the implementation of tourism Bilateral and Multilateral Relations and Cooperation. The department working with South Africa Tourism and DIRCO provides support to South Africa’s missions to support tourism growth in pursuit of economic diplomacy.

b) (i) and (ii) How is communication monitored and measured?

Through management reporting.

c) (i) an ( ii) Success and failures of the (aa) past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021

(aa) Since the establishment of the standalone Department of Tourism the two departments work well together resulting in, amongst others, the identification of Tourism as a pillar of Economic Diplomacy.

(bb) Since the onset of COVID-19 both departments adjusted well to working remotely and have kept constant virtual contact.

20 May 2021 - NW1321

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, considering that the tourism sector is still in dire financial straits, her department intends to extend the Temporary Employment Relief Scheme (TERS) payments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has engaged with the Minister of Finance to extend TERS payments; if not, why not; if so, on what date will an answer be communicated on whether TERS payments will be extended or not?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not have the mandate on measures such as the Temporary Employer Relief Scheme (TERS). However, the Department of Employment and Labour have been engaging social partners at Nedlac and the tourism sector is also represented in those discussions. It is suggested that the Honourable member refers her question to the Minister of Employment and Labour.

  1. – (2) Not applicable

20 May 2021 - NW825

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress grant (SRD), his department took any disciplinary and/or legal steps against the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether any steps have been taken to recover the monies from the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether any measures have been put in place to ensure that no government employee will be able to fraudulently and/or unlawfully apply for and/or receive the SRD grant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No employees of the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has been implicated, therefore the Department did not take any disciplinary and/or legal steps. Discipline management is a decentralised function and therefore the responsibility of each department to enforce the disciplinary code and take the necessary legal steps to recover public funds. The DPSA is only mandated to take action against its own employees when found guilty of wrongdoing through a disciplinary process.

2. The DPSA did not recover monies from the implicated public service employees. Before monies can be recovered from employees, an investigation must be finalised with sufficient evidence of criminality collected and recommending for monies to be recovered. The recovery of monies will then be effected through a court order. The mandate to investigate fraud, corruption and crime belongs solely to the South African Police Service, or under special circumstances to the Special Investigative Unit (SIU). The DPSA, including the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU), does not have a mandate to investigate crime or to recover monies from employees.

3. The DPSA established that all cases regarding government employees receiving Social Relief of Distress grants (SRD) were referred to the Fusion Centre, with a process embarked upon to analyse the data and to refer established cases to investigators. The Fusion Centre is an Anti-Corruption Task Team initiative, where resources of law enforcement agencies are pooled and coordinated to investigate and prosecute priority corruption cases. The DPSA has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Financial Intelligence Centre (who are involved in the Fusion Centre) in terms of which the DPSA will assist any investigations by identifying Public Service employees in corruption cases. In this regard, the DPSA will assist with the identification of Public Service employees from the SRD Grant cases, and after investigations established criminal conduct involving public service employees, the PAEIDTAU will monitor if national and provincial departments are taking disciplinary steps against the identified employees. The Department of Social Development will have to implement measures on their systems to prevent government employees to be able to fraudulently and/or unlawfully apply for and/or receive the SRD grants, as those systems are not managed or maintained by the DPSA.

End

19 May 2021 - NW1047

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the complaints line of her department, (a) what is the total number of complaints received by her department in each month in the past three financial years, (b) what are the main categories of the specified complaints, (c) how were the complaints handled and/or resolved and (d) how would this be (i) measured and/or (ii) monitored?

Reply:

a) Total number of complaints received by the department in each month in the past three financial years.

Period/ Month

TOTAL NUMBER OF TOURIST COMPLAINTS MANAGED

 

2018/ 2019

2019/2020

2020/21

April

8

9

34

May

4

6

25

June

2

5

40

July

4

7

20

Aug

6

4

33

September

2

3

42

October

14

12

54

November

2

3

30

December

2

2

6

January

9

15

28

February

11

25

24

March

1

33

40

Total

65

124

376

(b) Refunds, rescheduling of reservations, service levels, alleged non-compliance with COVID19 protocols and acts of discrimination.

c) The Tourism Act, 2014 (Act No. 3 of 2014) makes provision for the Department of Tourism to put systems in place for dealing with complaints lodged by tourists in respect of tourism services, products or facilities. The Regulation on the Prescribed Manner and Procedure for Lodging and Dealing with Tourism Complaints outlines the process to be followed when managing tourism complaints.

The main focus is on mediation and amicable resolution of tourist complaints and that has proved to be effective. In cases where mediation fails, complaints are referred to other relevant structures for further intervention where applicable.

d) (i) and (ii) Database and records of all complaints received, managed and referred are kept and updated.

19 May 2021 - NW1226

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What preparations has she made to protect both (a) teachers and (b) learners in schools against the third wave of the coronavirus?

Reply:

(a) and (b). The Minister and Department of Health have advised the country that the implementation of the Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs) is the most effective way of preventing the spread of COVID-19. To that end, the Department of Basic Education has developed the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the Management and Containment of COVID-19, which are used in the basic education sector.  Learners, teachers and non-teaching staff are provided orientation on the SOP.  Schools ensure that the SOP is adhered to, and that the COVID-19 cleaning and sanitising resources are available.  The wearing of face masks is mandatory in schools.  Screening is conducted for learners, staff and visitors.  All these measures continue to be emphasised so that schools remain a much safer environment for all.   

19 May 2021 - NW1045

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the finalisation of the document on the repositioning of the Travel Indaba, what (a) are the next immediate steps of the specified process, (b) are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) are the changes in the form and content of (i) Africa’s Travel Indaba, (ii) Meetings Africa and (iii) the Welcome Campaign and (d) are the contents of the Partnership Strategy that has been developed?

Reply:

a) What are the next immediate steps of the specified process.

SA Tourism conducted a study to determine the readiness of trade (supply side) to participate in future shows and buyers (demand side) to place business in the market (demand side).

Further studies were conduced to determine the viability of a Hybrid model which comprises of virtual & physical format of the trade shows. The outcome indicates that tangible ROI from meeting engagements needs to be derived for exhibitors and buyers.

The team is currenly finalising the proposed approach and dates for both Africa’s Travel Indaba and Meetings Africa to be hosted in 2021.

b) What are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines in this regard.

Given the current situation due to the global pandemic, physical participation, vaccine roll-out and travel restrictions, this is an ongoing evaluation to determine when the trade show can be hosted. No date has yet been established for the hosting of the show.

c) Changes in the form and content of:

(i) Africa’s Travel Indaba and (ii) Meetings Africa

The proposed approach is a Hybrid model which comprises the hosting of the platform in a combination of physical and virtual formats. Details will be communicated once finalized

(ii) The Welcome Programme

The Welcome Program seeks to inspire and educate South African tourism role players and ordinary South Africans to deliver exceptional visitor experience. This is done through authentic interactions and the delivery of great customer service.

As an extension of the Welcome Program is the “Make Someone’s Day” initiative, which is positioned to showcase and highlight the importance of trade in the tourism value chain. We create and sustain partnerships with the trade through information sharing, toolkit developments, training and fact sharing, including implementing key ports of entry activations.

d) Contents of the Partnership Policy that has been developed.

SA Tourism recognises the important role of strategic Partnerships in furthering the discharge of its legislative mandate by broadly leveraging opportunities, spend, reach and influence beyond traditional tourism source markets with a direct measurable correlation with tourism destination choice (destination brand strength), travel decision and transactions (arrivals) and in-market spend (GDP contribution).

The aim of this Policy is accordingly to regulate the participation of SA Tourism in any Partnerships by providing clear governing principles relating thereto in order to ensure that such Partnerships further entity’s legislative mandate, are aligned to its strategic objectives, add value and are conducted in a consistent and fair manner. The Partnership Policy focuses on five categories:

  • National Imperative Marketing Partnerships
  • Tourism Targets and Brand Strength Driver Partnerships
  • Market Development Driver Partnership
  • Bid Support Partnerships
  • Trade Partnerships

19 May 2021 - NW1196

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With regard to the Inter-Ministerial Committee co-chaired by him and the Minister of Home Affairs established in 2020, what measures have been put in place to effectively deal with issues of migration and labour since the inception of the committee?

Reply:

As the two Co-chairpersons, we have had a series of meetings with both the Technical Team and the IMC members to put together a discussion document and Action plan on policy intervention areas, short term, medium and long term measures.

We have submitted to Cabinet, policy areas that some of the IMC member department and intervention that we will be focusing on.

As for the Department of Employment and Labour, we committed to:

  • participate in the joint inspections that were to be conducted in the various sectors of our economy where we received or continue to receive high presence of undocumented foreign nationals.
  • Coordination of the Trucking and Road Freight Industries stand-off and ensuring the participation of the various stakeholders in the established Bargaining Council to resolve their disputes.
  • To develop and present a Draft National Labour Migration Policy as a sub-theme of the broader National Employment Policy that we have been tasked to develop.
  • To present Draft legislative provisions to realise proposals outlined in the Draft Policy.

We have done our part and I have instructed the Director General of the Department to convene a Technical Task Team meeting of the IMC to gather progress report from each of the member departments. We will be approaching the IMC to secure a sign-off on the second progress report that we are going to table to Cabinet somewhere in June 2021.

19 May 2021 - NW1210

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Finance

Given the recent publication of the annual report of the SA Post Office’s financial results for 2019-20 financial year, which shows that the Post Office is technically insolvent, what is the National Treasury’s plan to return the Post Office to solvency?

Reply:

In terms section 51(1) of the Public Finance Management Act, the responsibility to, amongst others, manage revenue, expenditure, assets and liabilities lie with the accounting authority. The executive authority of the South African Post Office is the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies, who has the responsibility to oversee any plans to return the Post Office to solvency. The National Treasury cannot take over the functions of the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies, and the accounting authority, who is the board of the Post Office.

19 May 2021 - NW1130

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)With reference to page 16 of the latest Annual Performance Plan of the Compensation Fund where it flags the Protection of Personal Information Act, Act 4 of 2013, as a threat within the legal environment, what has he found are the reasons that the Compensation Fund deems the specified Act a threat; (2) whether the Compensation Fund has found that the Act has proven to be an important safeguard against abuse of personal information; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The nature of operations of the Fund is such that it collects and processes large volumes of personal information of its clients (beneficiaries, and Medical Service Providers). The threat in the Annual Performance Plan was highlighted in the context of the risk of potential breach of personal information. In the event that such personal information is not adequately and safely managed/stored, it might fall into wrong hands and with the potential of being abused/misused.

2. Yes. The Act has proven to be an important safeguard against abuse of personal information. The Fund has developed and is implementing a compliance plan.