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27 June 2022 - NW1422

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has conducted a damage assessment on tourism in KwaZulu-Natal after the recent floods; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has produced a sector specific plan on how to rebuild the pillars that drive tourism in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what incentives does her department offer or intends to offer to the youth in particular to assist in rebuilding the pillars in the tourism sector of KwaZulu-Natal?

Reply:

The Minister has been briefed of the impact of the floods on tourism infrastructure. This was done during the recent site inspections by a team from the Department of Tourism; EDTEA; TKZN; Ezemvelo and the KZN Sharks Board: - (19 April 2022), to the following sites: -

  • Two World Heritage Sites - iSimangaliso Wetland Park and uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Park focusing on Didima Nature Reserve
  • Big 5 Game Reserve - Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park
  • Coastal & Marine Tourism and Coastal Belt - Dakota Beach in Isipingo, Margate, Salt Rock Beach Front, Ballito, St. Lucia)
  • Midlands Tourism Route – Mandela Capture Site, Howick Falls, Midmar Game Reserve, etc.

The intention was to undertake assessments of sites that have relatively high impact on the value-chain to drive local tourism development and recovery post the pandemic, thus having socio-economic bearing on affected neighboring communities.

Findings

The damage wreaked by the floods is in various categories, viz:-

  • Damage at beaches include debris, damage to dunes as well as damage to safety nets etc;
  • Infrastructure and services, including water and electricity, roads and bridges;
  • Structural damage to buildings, including roofs and walls.
  • While King Shaka International Airport experienced water damage in parts of the terminal, there was no disturbance to operations and flights are operating as scheduled (not part of the inspections by the team).

Based on the latest available information from these areas, the total estimated damage thus far is about, R131 445 000,00. KZN has indicated that cases for immediate attention amount to about R89 595 000, while the balance can be undertaken over the medium term.

Fortunately, the overall impact is that tourism will not face long term negative impact. Arrangements were made by the Province and local authorities to clean up the beaches by removing the debris and other objects that affect access thereto. Relevant Provincial and municipal Departments and entities have commenced work in restoring/repairing infrastructure and services crucial to communities and business, e.g. raids, bridges etc. In some of the areas e.g. Isipingo, local communities have been closely involved in the cleanup of the beaches and we are grateful to them for lending a hand. At the moment access to beaches in some areas is possible and normal beach activities can take place.

(2) The reconstruction of the infrastructure is being assessed by the relevant lead departments. Progress is being communicated to the public in the normal course. As a department, we will contribute to the extent required where possible once the Province has concluded associated processes regarding the nature of support. This is also to ensure that there is no duplication of resources.

As regards the specific tourism infrastructure, the owners have during engagement indicated that some have insurance to cover some of the damage and mainly want speedy reconstruction of the affected bulk infrastructure. The Department working with the Provincial Authorities will ascertain the extent to which tourism specific support may be required and if necessary look into reprioritisation of resources. Again, this is based on the understanding that there should not be a duplication of resources.

The overall assessment is that there has not been fundamental disruption of the province’s tourism offerings. Based on the assessment, the department has no separate initiatives for the floods but is working with the province to assist in recovery of the affected site.

27 June 2022 - NW1624

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What measurable successes have arisen from the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan (TSRP); (2) whether she has engaged with any other department(s) and/or Minister(s) with regard to assisting and/or collaborating in the recovery of the tourism sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she and/or her department engaged with any local government structures and entities and/or the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the role of community tourism organisations in the recovery of the tourism sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

10 The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan (TSRP) has been under implementation since April 2021 and progress towards achieving the Plan’s seven Strategic Interventions has been achieved as follows:

a) Norms and Standards

  • Norms and Standards in respect of COVID-19 were gazetted by the Department in December 2021, providing a uniform framework for safe tourism operations for the sector. Integration of the norms and standards into various training programmes, namely, Food Safety Quality Assurers; Chefs; Wine Service Training and Hospitality Youth Programmes is in progress.

b) Infrastructure Maintenance and Enhancement

  • Infrastructure maintenance work continued in 19 National Parks and 800 participants were employed as at the end of quarter three;
  • Five (5) Nature Reserves identified in Limpopo for the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme aimed at enhancing and maintaining state-owned attractions;
  • Five (5) community-owned tourism projects to enhance visitor experience supported in Limpopo; and
  • Nine state as well as community owned projects supported by the KwaZulu Natal (KZN) Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs (DEDTEA) to enhance their physical state and sustainability.

c) Other achievements

  • Three sessions were held to encourage hosting of major events in Villages, Townships and Small Dorpies (VTSDs).
  • The implementation of the recovery efforts has also seen the return to full operation for food and beverage facilities.
  • Improvements has also been noticed in the accommodation sector with regards to occupancies.
  • Furthermore, the country has also witnessed the return of the various tourism trade shows such as Meetings Africa and Africa Travel Indaba in person and many other business meetings that the country is now hosting with more secured going forward.

d) Enablers

  • The Global Advocacy Programme aimed at re-igniting the South African Brand was launched;
  • The Tourism Monitors Programme was launched in collaboration with the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) on 15 November 2021 at the OR Tambo and Cape Town International Airports;
  • Integration of Tourism Safety Tips into MYSAPS App was completed and the development of a coding system by the South African Police Services to help encode cases reported by tourists is underway;
  • The Department of Home Affairs (DHA)’s e-visa application system is now open. Eligible countries include:
  • Kenya and Cameroon;
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo, Philippines and Rwanda;
  • Ethiopia, Iran and Egypt;
  • India, Uganda and Mexico;
  • Pakistan and Nigeria; and
  • China and Saudi Arabia.
  • The e-visa link https://ehome.dha.gov.za/epermit/home creates a four-step process where applicants can create their profile associated with passport details; submit online application form; upload documentation; and confirm secure payment;
  • Biometric Movement Control System rolled-out at OR Tambo International Airport; and Immigration e-Gates implemented at three (3) major international airports.
  • In respect of re-establishing South Africa’s airlift capacity, various airline operators resumed operations to and within South Africa.
  • The challenge remains the vaccination uptake.
  • Government consumption when it comes to utilization of commercial venues has also supported the recovery of the sector.

2. The Department engaged with the Departments of Home Affairs, Health, SAPS and Transport during the development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan and they endorsed actions that are within their respective mandates. The plan was approved at Cabinet level and reporting against its implementation is part of the reporting against Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP).

3. The Department coordinates the Local Government Peer Learning Sessions in conjunction with Provinces and Local Government to constantly address matters relating to tourism development and promotion including tourism recovery. Thus, the Department’s point of entry to community tourism organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate.

24 June 2022 - NW2285

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to the reply by the Minister of Social Development, Ms L D Zulu, to question 1454 on 16 May 2022 (details furnished), what are the (a) physical addresses of the four new sites, (b) names of the construction and/or building companies that were awarded the tenders, (c) details of the expenditure costs of the four projects and (d) timelines for completion of the four projects?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

As per the reply by Minister Lindiwe Zulu in question 1454, of the four lease bids advertised, only one in Khayelitsha was awarded; the rest was non-responsive. Therefore, the answers to the questions should be about only one bid that has been awarded.

a) The physical address for the one site is erf 809, Phakamani Road, Khayelitsha.

b) The bid for the Khayelitsha 1 was awarded to Kwa Ace Cc.

c) The building costs are to be borne by the bidder. Therefore, the Department is not involved in this regard and only awaits the delivery of the building.

d) The bid was awarded on 24 November 2021; the process is in the planning phase, drawing and submitting the plans to the Municipality for approval. After the approval of the plans, the timeline for the completion of actual construction is 12 months.

As for the other three sites that are to be advertised again, the Bid Specification Committee met on 23 June 2022 to develop the procurement strategy; the procurement strategy will be submitted to the Bid Adjudication Committee for consideration on 05 July 2022.

24 June 2022 - NW2290

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What is the status of the parliamentary village board of (a) Acacia Park, (b) Laboria Park and (c) Pelican Park; (2) whether each of the boards comprises the requisite number of members; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the respective boards have met the threshold of (a) board meetings and (b) residents’ meetings in each year since 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2707E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. In terms of the Parliamentary Villages Management Board, there is only one board for the three Parliamentary Villages consisting of board members from the three villages.

The Parliamentary Villages Management Board was elected and appointed by the Minister on 26 November 2021.

a) The following members were appointed:

  • Hon H April, MP
  • Hon B Tshwete, MP
  • Hon T Letsie, MP
  • Mr G Koko, Sessional Official

b) The following members were appointed;

  • Hon D Nkosi, MP
  • Hon R Semenya, MP
  • Hon N Gantsho, MP
  • Mr M Ndara, Sessional Officials

c) The following members were appointed;

  • Hon N Mvana. MP
  • Hon P Mahlo, MP
  • Hon N Lesoma, MP

2. The Acacia and Laboria Park Parliamentary Villages Residents Committees are fully constituted. However, the Pelican Park Parliamentary Village Residents Committee requires one sessional official to be added to their Residence committee.

3. The current board was appointed on the 26 November 2021, and the first board meeting was scheduled for the 29 April 2022 and was postponed

(b) Laboria Park Residents committee meeting was last held on 20 May 2022.

Residents Committee meetings for Acacia and Pelican Park were held in September 2021.

24 June 2022 - NW2289

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What (a) amount has been spent on the Hout Bay Harbour as part of the Small Harbours Unit initiative and (b) are the details of the expenditure; (2) whether there are any plans in place for the further development of the harbour; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the plans; (3) what (a) total number of tenants are currently occupying the premises and (b)(i) number of the tenants are on month-to-month leases and (ii) is the remaining term of each of the other leases?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total amount spent in Hout Bay as part of the Small Harbours Unit repair and maintenance initiative was R89.87 million.

(b) Details of the expenditure are as follows:

(i) The marine infrastructure upgrades included removal of sunken vessels, dredging of harbour basins, repairs to slipways, shore crane replacements and electrical kiosks to jetties and quays, equated to R57.88 million.

(ii) The land infrastructure upgrades included fencing of the harbour precinct, new harbour masters office, new compliance building, new ablution facilities, upgraded fish flecking area, new guard houses, entrance control and internal fencing, CCTV and security apparatus equated to R31.99 million

(2) Yes, plans are in place for the further development of Hout Bay Harbour in line with the Department’s Spatial & Socio-Economic Development Frameworks (SEDFs).

The SEDF allows for the phased development of Hout Bay Harbour with the works mentioned above completed under question 1 comprising of Phase 0 and a portion of Phase 1 of the SEDF. The outer phases, i.e. Phase 1-3, comprise of the further development of Hout Bay Harbour by developing economic-specific precincts in the harbour and include new multi-use buildings, marine support services, reconfiguring and adding of marine infrastructure, small-scale fishing facilities, harbour administration facilities and bulk infrastructure upgrades.

(3) (a) There are 34 tenants currently occupying premises within Hout Bay Harbour.

(b) (i) There are 30 tenants currently on month-to-month leases.

(ii) There are 4 leases with remaining terms as per the below table:

No.

Property description

Contract lease start date

Contract Lease end date

Lease period

Remaining term

1

Lot 82

1 November 2001

31 October 2026

25 years

4 years and 4 months.

2

Lot 30A

1 July 1993

31 May 2030

26 years and 11 months.

7 years and 11 months.

3

Lot 13A

1 July 2004

30 June 2024

20 years

2 years.

4

Lot 66A

1 December 2021

30 November 2026

5 years

4 years and 5 months

24 June 2022 - NW2309

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department has a record of any cases of non-compliance with basic conditions of employment and other labour practices by bus operators; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the total number of such cases and (b) are the circumstances surrounding each case; whether his department works closely with the SA Road Passenger Bargaining Council (SARPBC), the enforcement agency for non-compliance with labour laws in the bus sector; if not, why not; if so, what (a) cases have been addressed by the SARPBC in the past year and (b) resolutions were reached in each case?

Reply:

(1) The Department has no jurisdiction in the sector due to the fact that there is a Bargaining Council in place.

(2) The Department collaborates with Bargaining Councils on a needs basis. There has not been any meeting between the SARPBC.

24 June 2022 - NW2252

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of psychiatric (a) patients are currently in need of care and (b) beds are currently available in the (i) public and (ii) private sector; (2) what (a) total number of psychiatric specialists are in the public sector and (b) is the vacancy rate for such specialists; (3) what is the (a) total number of psychiatric specialists, (b) breakdown of the specified number of psychiatric specialists in each province, (c) vacancy rate in each province and (d) current ratio of psychiatric specialists to the population?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the following details provide the responses to the above questions:

1. (a) Based on the prevalence of mental disorders in South Africa, it is estimated that 6 566 703 persons need care for common mental disorders and 1 292 991 of those aged 15 years and older need care for severe psychiatric conditions.

(b) (i) There are 14060 beds in the public sector and (ii) 5692 in the private sector.

(2)-(3) The table below indicate the breakdown of psychiatric specialist in each province (Public Sector) with the vacancy rate:

PSYCHOLOGIST PUBLIC SECTOR

Province

Filled

Vacant

Total

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

2

10

12

83.33

Free State

4

4

8

50.00

Kwazulu-Natal

35

14

49

28.57

Limpopo

6

29

35

82.86

Mpumalanga

3

12

15

80.00

Northern Cape

2

4

6

66.67

North-West

41

6

47

12.77

Western cape

99

1

100

1.00

Grand Total

451

187

638

29.31

The current ration of psychiatric specialist to the population breakdown per provinces reflected below:

POPULATION PER PROVINCE (PUBLIC SECTOR RATIO)

Province

Population

Total Psychologists

Ratio to population

Eastern Cape

6,676,590

2

1: 3338295

Free State

2,932,441

4

1: 733110

Kwazulu-Natal

11,513,575

35

1: 328959

Limpopo

5,926,724

11

1: 538793

Mpumalanga

4,743,584

3

1: 1581194

Northern Cape

1,303,047

2

1: 651523

North-West

4,122,854

41

1: 100557

Western cape

7,113,776

99

1: 71856

Grand Total

60,142,979

 

 

       

STATSSA:

https://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/P0302/P03022021.pdf

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2271

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) amount has been paid by his department for the purchase of (i) office furniture, (ii) beds, (iii) medication, (iv) bed linen and blankets and (v) pillows and pillow cases in the (aa) past three financial years and (bb) since 1 January 2022 by the South Rand Hospital in Johannesburg, (b) is the value of each item in each financial year and (c) informs the decision to purchase the specified items in each financial year?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health to finalise this information and the Minister will provide a full response as soon as the required information is received from the Province.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2288

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to the Council for the Built Environment and its six built environment professional councils, what (a) was the total membership of each council in the past five years, (b) number of (i) voluntary associations are registered with each of the councils, (ii) parallel professional structures exist in competition to the various councils and (iii) voluntary associations are registered with the additional structures and (c) is the estimated membership of each structure?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

a) Table 1: Total membership of each council

Name of the Council

2018

2019

2020

2021

Engineering Council of South Africa

49334

57867

55730

61799

South African Council for the Architectural Profession

9988

10982

11859

11790

South African Council for the Landscape Architectural Profession

282

330

374

403

South African Council for the Quantity Surveying Profession

4098

4422

4130

4454

SA Council for the Property Valuers Profession

5122

2075

1886

1894

South African Council for Project and Construction Management Professions

3207

6843

7367

11422

Total

72031

82519

81346

91762

(b) Voluntary Associations

In South Africa, a Voluntary Association (VA) is any association recognised by the Councils for the Built Environment Professions (CBEP). An association is broadly defined as an institute, institution, association, society or federation established by Built Environment practitioners to promote their collective professional and/or business interests. Their initial and continuing recognition is dependent on their adherence to the policy prescripts of the associated council for the profession on VAs as set out in the respective CBEP Act.

VAs are an important constituent of the Built Environment professional milieu as a repository of profession-specific technical knowledge. They are highly involved in Continuous Professional Development (CPD) activities and the development of qualifications. Their recognition is essential and should be encouraged since they play the following critical roles:

  1. Provide a pool of practitioners to serve on professional councils’ committees;
  2. Play the role of competency assessment (assessors) in the registration process;
  3. Provide a pool of mentors for candidates; and
  4. Serve as members of evaluation committees for programme accreditation at higher education institutions which offer Built Environment qualifications.

Table 2: Number of Voluntary Associations Recognised by the CBEP

CBEP

Number of VAs Recognised

Number of VAs Not Recognised

SACAP

13

0

SACLAP

3

0

ECSA

51

0

SACPVP

3

0

SACPCMP

13

3

SACQSP

1

1

(Source: CBEP Fourth Quarter Report 2020/21)

Reasons for Non - Recognition of Voluntary Associations

  • Do not meet the minimum requirements of the guidelines
  • CBEP awaits full compliance with requirements for recognition

(ii) parallel professional structures exist in competition with the various councils

Reply:

There are no parallel professional structures in competition with the six Councils.

(iii) voluntary associations are registered with the additional structures, and (c) is the estimated membership of each structure?

Reply:

No. None are known of to DPWI. Therefore (c) falls away.

24 June 2022 - NW2144

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of incidents of (i) rape, (ii) sexual assault and (iii) physical assault have been reported by medical staff in (aa) private and (bb) public health facilities in the past three financial years, (b) is the breakdown of the incidents in each province, (c) is the total number of allegations that have resulted in (i) dismissal and/or (ii) non-dismissal in the specified period and (d) what were the outcomes of all investigations that were reported?

Reply:

In accordance with information received from Provincial Departments of Health (excluding Gauteng and Northern Cape), the table below outlines the number of cases reported in the Public Health Sector. Unfortunately, information as received from Provinces does not provide details of each case and progress made on investigations. Therefore, letters have since been written to Provincial Departments of Health to provide such information where possible, without jeopardising investigations and the individuals concerned:

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 EASTERN CAPE

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

 DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

0

0

N/A

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 FREE STATE

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

1

0

N/A

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 MPUMALANGA

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

 

2019/20

0

0

0

DISMISSAL

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 NORTH WEST

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

1

0

N/A

2020/21

0

1

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 WESTERN CAPE

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

0

0

N/A

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

8

2

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2420

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will issue a statement on the improvement of the (a) 89 unqualified municipal audits, (b) 66 qualified, (c) 6 adverse audits and (d) 12 disclaimers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Subsequent to the release of the 2020/21 Local Government Audit Outcomes by the Auditor General of South Africa, we issued a media release on 15 June 2022. We noted the improvements in the number of municipalities with unqualified audit outcomes. In addition we outlined the department’s position and interventions in place to assist under-performing municipalities.

The media release is attached herewith as annexure A.

24 June 2022 - NW2324

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of medico-legal cases were lodged against his department in the past two financial years and (b) is the total cost to his department for such cases?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the following details provide responses to these questions:

(a)-(b) The following tables reflect the details in this regard

2020/21 FINANCIAL YEAR

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEDICO-LEGAL CASES LODGED AGAINST THE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL COST TO THE DEPARTMENT, POTENTIALLY

Eastern Cape

361 Cases

R4 095 828 952.00

Free State

72 Cases

R 744 220 990.29

Gauteng

80 Cases

R 958 735 433,55

Kwazulu- Natal

256 Cases

R2 652 163 923.10

Limpopo

215 Cases

R1 709 116 099.00

Mpumalanga

117 Cases

R1 117 605 000.00

Northern Cape

15 Cases

R 531 716 811.04

North West

61 Cases

R 325 119 700.00

Western Cape

62 Cases

R 527 000 000.00

TOTALS

878 Cases

R8,591,051,276.41

2021/22 FINANCIAL YEAR

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEDICO-LEGAL CASES LODGED AGAINST THE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL COST TO THE DEPARTMENT, POTENTIALLY

Eastern Cape

379 cases

R4 542 556.761.00

Free State

52 cases

R 446 981 920.00

Gauteng

107 cases

R 974 802 814.21

Kwazulu- Natal

204 cases

R1 885 019 875.00

Limpopo

277 cases

R2 452 118 059.00

Mpumalanga

142 cases

R 1 427 477 670.00

Northern Cape

20 cases

R 326 816 465.00

North West

64 Cases

R 379 378 957.00

Western Cape

77 cases

R 806 000 000.00

TOTALS

866 Cases

R13,241,152,521.21

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2248

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to the statement released on 2 June 2022, entitled Presidency responds to claims by Mr Arthur Fraser, what was the total amount that was stored on his farm; (2) whether the specified amount of $4 to $8 million equalled the entire proceeds from the sale of the game auction that was held on his farm; if so, (a) who bought the game at the auction on his farm and (b) on what date; if not, (3) whether there was additional money that was not from the proceeds of the sale of the game auction that came from elsewhere; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, where did the additional money, that was stored on his farm, come from; (4) whether he had (a) made any disclosure of the total amount of money stored on his farm in terms of the Executive Ethics Code and (b) alerted the SA Revenue Service of the specified amount; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant reasons in each case; (5) (a) what are the reasons that he did not report a case of theft on his farm at a police station, but instead reported the theft to the Head of the Presidential Protection Unit and (b) will he open a criminal case with the SA Police Service at a police station about the burglary and theft at his farm?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed. I have made every declaration required of me since my first election to public office in 2014 and will continue to fulfil those obligations.

24 June 2022 - NW2155

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) are the backlogs in terms of postmortems in each province, (b) are the causes of the specified backlogs and (c) steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs; (2) how long does it take to compile a report for a postmortem; (3) how long does it take to complete a general postmortem; (4) (a) what total number of reports are outstanding at the forensic chemistry laboratories in terms of postmortem requirements, (b) for how long have such reports been outstanding and (c) what is the cause of the delay?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with Provincial Departments of Health to finalise this information and the Minister will provide a full response as soon as the required information is received from the provinces.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2241

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to media reports that a former employee of the Eastern Cape Department of Health allegedly forged her matric certificate to secure a job as a senior data capturer and that the specified person is currently facing charges of fraud in the Mthatha Specialised Crimes Court, he will furnish Ms M D Hlengwa with the details on the steps undertaken by his department, in collaboration with the provincial department of health, to confirm the authenticity of prospective employees’ qualifications; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The allegation of submission of fraudulent matric certificate by an employee at Cofimvaba Hospital in the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health as investigated by the Fraud Management Unit is confirmed. However, the employee concerned has since resigned and the matter reported to South African Police Services (SAPS) for further handling.

The employee has since been arrested and the case has been reminded to the month of August 2022 in the Mthatha Specialized Crimes Court.

In order to avert such mishaps in the future, The Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health has since issued a Departmental Operations Manual that emphasises that Managers must confirm the authenticity of prospective employees’ qualifications prior to their employment.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2320

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has undertaken a study to ascertain if there are still retailers who pay their workers less than R3 500 per month; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how widespread is the exploitative practice and (b) what are the names of the retailers?

Reply:

I think it’s important to explain firstly that the legislated national minimum wage (NMW) is not R3500 per month but R23.19 per hour payable for the numbers of ordinary hours worked.

The NMW Act requires the NMW Commission to review the NMW annually and to make recommendations to me on any adjustment of the NMW. In undertaking this function, the Commission is expected to annually undertake a research in order to gain insights on changes to working hours, employment, wages and non-compliance as a result of changes in the NMW.

The latest quantitative research shows that the average level of NMW non-compliance in 2020Q1, before the NMW was adjusted, was 35.8, meaning that approximately 36% of all workers were paid below the NMW. A year later, in 2021Q1, this number remained much the same, at 36.2. In 2020, the NMW was adjusted by 3.8%, and wages appeared to have risen by roughly this amount for those who remained employed in 2021Q1, meaning that the overall rate of non-compliance remained stable. However, the researchers found that the depth of violation did fall over the period, suggesting that for those workers earning below the NMW, wages increased in real terms, but not all the way up to the NMW.

The research report further shows that across industry categories there was a substantial variation in rates of NMW violation. Agriculture had the largest proportion of sub-NMW earners, and this appears to have increased over the period. Construction, Wholesale and Retail Trade, and Domestic Work, all had rates of violation close to 45%, and these remained relatively unchanged. Levels of violation appeared to have also risen in Finance, and Transport.

It is important to indicate however that the quantitative research looks at changes to working hours, employment, wages and non-compliance as a result of changes in the NMW across different sectors and not on individual companies.

END

24 June 2022 - NW2151

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Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the (a) reasons that the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill is taking so long to be tabled in Parliament and (b) projected timelines for its introduction?

Reply:

a) Required consultation processes in government regarding bills of this nature contributed to the delay on submission of the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill for tabling in Parliament.

b) The consultation processes are at advanced stages of finalisation. It is anticipated that the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB) will be submitted to Parliament in September 2022.

A roadmap outlining timelines on processes for introduction of GILAB to Parliament was presented to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) during its oversight visit to State Security Agency Head Quarters in April 2022.

24 June 2022 - NW2075

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has been informed that cybercrime has recently become increasingly popular in the Republic, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what preventative measures have been put in place by the State Security Agency to curb cybercrime?

Reply:

Yes. The threat landscape of cybercriume is evolving rapidly and is increasingly becoming a national security concern. Cyberthreats have grown at an alarming rate over the past two years. This is partly due to an increase in remote working due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Against this backdrop, it is imperative to ensure the protection of state information and improve the cybersecurity posture.

The State Security Agency (SSA) is therefore currently putting measures in place to enhance cybersecurity, whilst striving to ensure territorial integrity, sovereignty and constitutional order. Furthermore, the SSA is strengthening the provisioning of ICT Security Solutions and Services capabilities to organs of state for protection and securing National Critical Information Infrastructure (NCII) and related systems.

Implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework (NCPF) strategic objectives is underway, which amongst others include the following:

  • building capability and capacity to address cybercrime and to promote cybersecurity;
  • building the integrated cyber capacity and capability;
  • finalising the Cybersecurity Bill and draft regulations with relevant provisions on NCII;
  • finalising the National Cybersecurity Strategy;
  • developing and implementing cybersecurity awareness programmes; and
  • collaborating and cooperating with regional and international strategic partners to respond to cybercrime and cybersecurity incidents.

24 June 2022 - NW2156

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What total (i) amount was spent on the Gauteng field intensive care hospitals and (ii) number of the specified hospitals were built and (b) at what cost was each hospital built; (2) what (a) total number of the hospitals were not completed, (b) are the reasons for their incompletion and (c) number of the specified hospitals are currently operational; (3) what are the names of the companies that submitted a tender for the building of each hospital; (4) (a) what consequence management has been implemented as a result of incomplete projects and (b) who has been fired and/or received disciplinary hearings as a result of unfinished hospitals?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health to finalise this information and the Minister will provide a full response as soon as the required information is received from the Province.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2275

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether he used his official position as the President of the Republic to seek assistance from President H G Geingob of Namibia, with regard to the suspects who fled to Namibia following the break-in and theft at his Phala Phala farm; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the assistance he requested from President Geingob; (2) whether he requested Major-General W Rhoode, the Head of the SA Police Service’s Presidential Protection Unit, to conduct the investigations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) did Major-General Rhoode travel to Namibia, (b) under what authority did he act and (c) who travelled with him to Namibia; (3) whether the SA taxpayer footed any part of the bill for the remuneration, flights, accommodation and/or incidentals of the investigators’ travel to Namibia; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the costs associated with the trip; (4) whether the stolen money was brought back into the Republic from Namibia and returned to him; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (5) whether the repatriation and return of the money to him followed the exchange control and the SA Revenue Service regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed.

24 June 2022 - NW2314

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What immediate measures have been put in place to provide assistance to the Life Chatsmed Garden Hospital in Durban, which caught fire on 5 June 2022?

Reply:

The Life Chatsmed Garden Hospital is a private hospital in Durban. We are informed by the management of the Hospital that there were no patients transferred to any of our Public health facilities following the fire incident. Instead injured patients were transferred to other private facilities.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2355

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, given that consecutive infrastructure report cards by the SA Institute of Civil Engineering have repeatedly shown that the Republic’s key infrastructure – including transport, electricity, water supply, education and health is at risk of failing, her department has ever conducted a nationwide infrastructure audit to determine the full extent of infrastructure resilience in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

The first phase of the cabinet-approved National Infrastructure Plan 2050 refers to the state of infrastructure in the identified sectors without necessarily providing a blow-by-blow account of the condition assessment of specific components of infrastructure under examination. The NIP 2050 proposes, amongst others, the 3-year intervention and the more long-term interventions to remedy the deteriorating infrastructure; it proposes areas of intervention, including green design elements and financing.  

In addition, ISA has entered into a collaboration agreement with the South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) to support them with collating information on the condition assessment of infrastructure within the respective provinces. This will augment the accuracy of the SAICE Infrastructure Report Card.

ISA is currently embarking on a project entitled the Infrastructure Barometer of South Africa that not only focuses on the information contained in the Infrastructure Report Card but also considers other reference material such as the World Bank and infrastructure information from project sponsors. The Infrastructure Barometer of South Africa report will be published in March 2023. The broad aim of the Infrastructure Barometer is to:

  • report on the condition assessment and subsequent trends of infrastructure asset condition in South Africa by sector;
  • report on the level of access to infrastructure and subsequent services by sector;
  • develop specific Infrastructure Indices; and
  • identify critical infrastructure interventions required.

Infrastructure South Africa is conducting research on infrastructure scenarios for 2050. The scenario analysis aims to describe the implications of three different levels of acceptance of infrastructure governance and delivery of smart infrastructure by the year 2050. This report will be published by November 2022.

24 June 2022 - NW2127

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has obtained a top secret security clearance yet; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date is it envisaged that he will obtain a top secret security clearance; if so, on what date was the top security clearance obtained?

Reply:

a) No. Chapter 5 of the Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS), specially section 1.5 stipulate that political appointees are not required to be vetted unless requested to do so by the President.

b) Falls away.

24 June 2022 - NW2274

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether, with regard to the allegations against him in the affidavit by the former Director-General of the State Security Agency who was also the former National Commissioner of the Department of Correctional Services, Mr AJP Fraser, surrounding the break-in and theft of around $4 million from his Phala Phala farm on or around 9 February 2020, he reported the theft to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, also known as the Hawks within the SA Police Services, as the law obliges him to do; if not, why not; if so, what is the case number; (2) whether he had been informed that during the course of Major-General Rhoode’s investigation, that the suspects were (a) caught, (b) kidnapped and/or (c) interrogated by the Presidential Protection Unit; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he had been informed that the Presidential Protection Unit facilitated the alleged paying off of the suspects, including his domestic worker after the offenders had been traced and apprehended, in order not to reveal the incidents surrounding the break-in and theft of money to anyone; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed.

24 June 2022 - NW33

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the State Security Agency is aware of any operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The State Security Agency is aware of operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed. The operations relate to unlawful and fraudulent manufacturing and distribution of fraudulent identification documents. These operations are attributed to the organised crime syndicates, which involve some Home Affairs officials.

As part of its counterintelligence mandate, the State Security Agency monitors risks relating to the integrity of the Department of Home Affairs documents and shares relevant information with the department of Home Affairs and also with the Security Cluster, of which the Department of Home Affairs is a member.

24 June 2022 - NW1405

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) led to the collapse of the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality where section 139 of the Constitution of the Republic, 1996, was evoked, (b) are the names of the persons who were responsible for the dysfunction of the municipality and (c) consequence management has been applied to the specified persons?

Reply:

a) The Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality (MMM) was officially placed under section 139(5)(a) and (c) intervention by the Free State Provincial Executive Council on 19 December 2019, due to a financial and service delivery crisis in the municipality.  However, no significant progress has been made to implement the Financial Recovery Plan developed by National Treasury as a result of significant political interference in the administrative functioning of the Metro.  Cabinet received a formal request from the Provincial Executive for a national intervention.

b) Cabinet approved a national intervention in terms of Section 139(7) of the Constitution on 6 April 2022 to create stability and improve service delivery in Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality.  A National Cabinet Representative supported by a multi-disciplinary team of experts are being deployed with responsibilities that will amongst others ensure and oversee the execution by the Accounting Officer of the functions referred to in Section 67(1)(h) and Schedule 2 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000), read with any other relevant legislative provisions dealing with disciplinary matters, including criminal, disciplinary and civil action.

24 June 2022 - NW2393

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the fixed property situated on the banks of the Thukela River at Ezakeni in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal on which the UThukela District Municipality pump station and water purification works is located, what are the details of the (a) owners of the fixed property on which the pump station and water works are built, (b) legally enforceable contract for the use of the property by the UThukela District Municipality and (c) rentals payable to the owners of the property; (2) whether the pump station and water purification works are national key points; if not why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reply below was provided by UThukela District Municipality:

1. The Ownership of Zakheni Water Treatment 

     (a) Ownership of specified property

     The plant is owned and operated by uThukela District Municipality (WSA)

               

(b)  Legal Contract for the use of the property

By virtue, the plant was transferred from Local Municipality to the (WSA) and therefore the property belong to the DIstrict hence this no no contract obligation.

                  

(c) Rental Payable to the owner of the property

None - the District owns the Property.

 

(2)      National Key Point Status

The Ezakheni plant supply only 9 wards out of 37 ward in Alfred Duma Local Municipality therefore it currently not a National key Point. The District will therefore need to be guided in terms of the National Key Point Act 102 of 1980 South African Government. 

24 June 2022 - NW2417

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Noting that the National Health Insurance (NHI) does not have an arrangement that will focus on improving and/or developing infrastructure of health facilities in the Republic, (a) what plans and/or measures has he put in place to ensure that infrastructure of public facilities is improved and/or developed prior and/or during the NHI and (b) how will improving infrastructure of public facilities be planned, catered and paid for under the NHI?

Reply:

The NHI Bill (and the Fund that it seeks to establish) will not replace the National Health Act of 2003 although it will amend several sections as listed in the first Schedule. The reforms do not replace the budget process nor the public works and other infrastructure mandates.

Therefore, the NHI does not have any specific arrangement that will focus on improving and/or developing infrastructure since that is catered for in other laws.

a) Public health sector infrastructure is subject to the Government Immoveable Asset Management Act (GIAMA) and construction of infrastructure in public health facilities is managed in terms of Treasury and Public Works prescripts. The national and provincial health departments will remain responsible for infrastructure of public health facilities. In keeping with the purchaser/provider split the NHI Fund will not be a provider of health services and therefore will not maintain and build infrastructure. That is a provider function. The NHI Fund will purchase services of a quality that it determines and in so doing will ensure that infrastructure is improved and/or developed.

b) Improving infrastructure of public health facilities will be planned by the National Department of Health with provincial departments. Maintenance of infrastructure must be paid for and managed by the providers (including the provinces as the provider in the public sector). Under the reformed health system major refurbishment, extensions and new infrastructure will be paid for through infrastructure allocations, such as is done through the present conditional grants, preferably from a centralised national health infrastructure fund.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2150

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Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) steps does the State Security Agency (SSA) intend to take regarding the implementation of recommendations made in the Report of the High-Level Review Panel into the SSA, (b) What are the reasons that the implementation has taken so long and (c) What are the timelines for such implementation?

Reply:

(a) In order to expedite the implementation of the High Level Review Panel (HLRP) Report Recommendations, coordination of work on the implementation of the Recommendations has now been relocated to the Office of the Director-General in the State Security Agency (SSA).

(b) The reasons include required consultation process on General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB).

(c) Consultation on revised timeline by the State Security Agency is at an advance stages. The revised timeline will be communicated after approval by the Minister. The revised timeline prioritises passing of GILAB into law.

24 June 2022 - NW2249

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether he will take the public into his confidence by providing the evidence that the money that he stored at his farm was the proceeds of the game auction; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what was the currency in which the money was stored on his farm; (3) whether he ever received a huge monetary amount as a gift during his State and/or official visits as the (a) Deputy President and (b) President of the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) whether he ordinarily stores large amounts of money at his properties, other than his Phala Phala farm; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details with regard to (a) each specified property and (b) amount he keeps at each specified property?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed. I have furthermore declared every gift provided me during the course of tenure as Deputy President and President as required by law.

24 June 2022 - NW2332

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will indicate (a) what the current status of availability is of (i) resources and (ii) the capacity to roll out the proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) and (b) if state hospitals and clinics, with their current challenges of shortages of doctors, nurses, medicine, equipment and infrastructure challenges, can indeed be seen as a favourable environment for the implementation of the NHI; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

It is important to recognise that reforms of the magnitude anticipated in the NHI Bill need to be phased in over time. For that reason, the transitional arrangements in section 57 of the Bill state:

57(1) (b) National Health Insurance must be gradually phased in using a progressive and programmatic approach based on financial resource availability.

And subsection (2) elaborates that Phase 1 will:

  1. continue with the implementation of health system strengthening initiatives, including alignment of human resources with that which may be required by users of the Fund;
  2. include the development of National Health Insurance legislation and amendments to other legislation;
  3. include the undertaking of initiatives which are aimed at establishing institutions that must be the foundation for a fully functional Fund; and
  4. include the purchasing of personal health care services for vulnerable groups such as children, women, people with disabilities and the elderly;

The NHI Bill (and the Fund that it seeks to establish) will not replace the National Health Act of 2003 although it will amend several sections as listed in the first Schedule.

1. Bearing the context in mind it must be noted that the current status and availability of resources and capacity are only a starting point.

a) (i) The resources available for the establishment of the reformed health system where providers are paid by the Fund are the current resources of the entire public and private health sectors. This includes all health establishments, personnel and technologies currently in use.

(ii) The capacity to roll out the reforms described in the NHI Bill starts with the commitment and stewardship of Parliament to improving the health system for all. The leadership will be provided by the National Department of Health. To this end the Minister of Public Service and Administration has approved a special transitional NHI Branch in the NDOH to serve as the incubator for the Schedule 3A entity. The five clusters, and the nucleus of 44 new posts to be added to the existing 40 posts, are funded through earmarked funding from National Treasury. The reorganisation of the Branch and the preparations for the advertisement of the new posts have commenced.

The remaining Branches in the National Department of Health are all focussed on providing leadership and direction on the anticipated reforms.

In addition to this is provincial management lead by the nine provincial HoDs for Health plus renewed support from many donor partners.

There are many private sector providers that engage with the department and [provide support to various committees and structures involved in the reform.

b) The state of public hospitals and clinics varies widely from immaculate to extremely poor. The department maintains an infrastructure condition assessment and all provinces submit User Asset Management Plans (UAMPS) annually as required by the Government Immoveable Asset Management Act (GIAMA). There is a quality improvement programme in nineteen locations covering over 100 establishments as we have reported to the house in the recent past. Private establishments also vary in their condition.

The health system suffers from shortages of professional personnel in all categories as we have reported to this house. The biggest challenge is the inequitable distribution of personnel but there are nominal shortages. The public sector budgets allocated for Conditions of Employment are fully committed so there is extremely limited room for recruitment of additional personnel. It is for this reason that the NHI envisages a ‘universal’ system for everyone in the country where the NHI Fund purchases services from both public and private providers.

2. Yes, The Minister is prepared to make a statement.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2276

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to the affidavit of Mr AJP Fraser, which alleges serious criminal misconduct against him and casts a dark cloud over the Office of the Presidency, how does he reconcile these serious allegations with his sworn obligation to uphold the Constitution and all other laws of the Republic; (2) what are the reasons that he has not yet taken the nation into his confidence and given clear answers to the many questions that have arisen from the matter; (3) whether he has found that his implication in the circumstances surrounding the break-in and theft of foreign currency from his farm, may amount to a violation of his oath of office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am and will remain committed to the fulfilment of my oath of office. I do not intend to address these matters in a piece-meal fashion and will ensure the investigations currently under way have my full cooperation. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed.

23 June 2022 - NW2135

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the announcement by the Minister in The Presidency, Mr Mondli Gungubele, that Cabinet approved the R22 million flag project in February 2022, (a) what was Cabinet’s justification for spending public money on the non-essential project when millions of South Africans are going hungry, (b) how did Cabinet process the public outrage toward the project and (c) what other non-essential projects have been approved by Cabinet for the 2022-23 financial year?

Reply:

The promotion of national symbols and the construction of monuments are important for building a common identity and advancing national unity.

The flag project, as with all programmes of government departments, is informed by the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), which is itself based on the electoral mandate of this administration. These programmes are reflected in departmental budget votes, which are extensively debated in Parliament.

In view of the current fiscal pressures and public concern, the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture directed his department to review the flag project.

Government will continue to work to ensure that its programmes and associated expenditure are informed by the priorities of the MTSF and the broader interests of the country.

23 June 2022 - NW2059

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Pertaining to the failure of the Eastern Cape Department of Education failure to spend a total of R205 million of the education budget while there exist infrastructure problems with specific reference to mud schools and pit toilets in the specified province, how does her department intend to supervise the province to avoid such mistakes from happening?

Reply:

The DBE has intensified its monitoring activities of  the Eastern Cape DoE Infrastructure Programme.  Meetings with the provincial team are held twice every month. Monitoring addresses planning, budgeting, expenditure, procurement and project management. These are interrogated and a sample of projects are visited. Based on the findings from these visits, remedial actions are devised with the province and monitored by the DBE. Monitoring deals with both programme and project issues. 

1.  Programme matters include - 

- The pattern of overall expenditure being achieved;

-Comparisons of expenditure to projected cash flows;

- Progress being made with key groups of projects [eg. Water, sanitation, libraries, laboratories, Grade R]; and

- Management of the portfolio of projects [ie evidence that the programme of projects is being managed effectively through the project cycle].

2.  At the Project level the focus is on ensuring -

-that PSP appointments are being made;

- that planning and design processes are progressing;

- that the tender process for the appointment of contractors is progressing, that construction is progressing satisfactorily, [i.e. on programme, on budget, at acceptable quality…]; and

- that projects are being handed over and closed out and that final accounts are being wrapped up.

23 June 2022 - NW2318

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1705 on 23 May 2022, what are the reasons that (a) KwaZulu-Natal, (b) Mpumalanga, (c) North West and (d) Northern Cape did not have placements in hotspots and all cases referred to district co-ordinators, something which might hinder the process of assisting learners who are in dire need of social intervention and psychological intervention?

Reply:

While the DBE responded to the initial question about the work we do with the Department of Social Development around provision of the psychosocial support to learners and educators with the intention of building resilience, minimizing mental health problems and ensuring continuity of teaching and learning in schools; the current question needs specifics about the three provinces which is the responsibility of the Members of the Executive Councils (MECs) of those provinces and not the Minister. 

23 June 2022 - NW2098

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 479 on 16 May 2022, he has found that the Government’s rejection of the Centre for Development and Enterprises report entitled The Siren Song of Localisation undermines the Government’s commitment to an evidence-based policymaking approach as envisioned by the National Policy Development Framework; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government is committed to the implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, which is a series of measures to accelerate economic recovery and create employment. The plan was developed with important contributions from social partners and expert advisers through bodies like the Presidential Economic Advisory Council.

Localisation is one of several tools in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan to improve the dynamism of the economy, promote investment, develop new markets, transform the economy, promote equitable spatial development and contribute to the development of a capable state.

Localisation is pivotal in stimulating growth and transformation. It is about creating an enabling environment for inclusive growth, deepening the country’s industrialisation base and creating targeted transformation measures. It seeks to expand the economy to include more participants and to ensure that more parts of the population, including women, young people, black South Africans and the rural poor, can contribute to and benefit from growth.

The government’s approach is to make use of the entire policy toolkit including industrial policy, trade policy, localisation policy and social policy to drive growth.

We have already seen some of the results of this approach. In agro-processing, we have seen an investment of R1.7 billion by the SA Poultry Association as part of the Poultry Master Plan. In the automotive sector, we have seen a R3 billion investment by Ford Motor Company of South Africa and a R10 billion investment by Mercedes Benz to expand plants in Port Elizabeth and East London. In primary minerals processing, Komatsu SA has made a R300 million investment in an engine remanufacturing plant.

We have seen significant success in the textile industry where government has implemented 100% designation, requiring entities such as the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to purchase all of its uniforms from local producers.

While the evidence suggests that our localisation efforts are on the right path, the challenge of growth and employment is nevertheless challenging and complex. Contributions to the public discourse on how we improve our efforts, including those by the Centre for Development and Enterprise, should be encouraged and welcomed.

23 June 2022 - NW1151

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the educational requirements for early childhood development (ECD) workers and (b) is the (i) total number of ECD workers in the Republic and (ii) is the breakdown of the total for each province?

Reply:

What are the educational requirements for early childhood development (ECD) workers?

  • The Department of Basic Education is training the ECD practitioners on the National Curriculum Framework (NCF) from birth to four years on NQF level 4, which is the minimum qualification for ECD practitioners.

What is the total number of ECD workers in the Republic and the provincial breakdown?

  • The Department released the ECD Census Summary Report on 01 April 2022, which tells us that there is a total of 198,361 staff employed in ECD Programmes. The information on the provincial breakdown will however be available when the full report of the ECD Census is finalised and released. 

23 June 2022 - NW2189

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

. (1) What (a) is the total number of girls who gave birth in 2021 in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years and (b) monetary and/or otherwise support do the specified (i) learners and (ii) their children receive from her department; (2) what steps are being taken by her department to educate the learners with regard to the (a) long-term career implications, (b) monetary costs of raising a child and (c) implications of falling pregnant at a young age without finishing school?

Reply:

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 03/06/2022

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/2022

2189. Mrs D van der Walt (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education: to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

. (1) What (a) is the total number of girls who gave birth in 2021 in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years and (b) monetary and/or otherwise support do the specified (i) learners and (ii) their children receive from her department; (2) what steps are being taken by her department to educate the learners with regard to the (a) long-term career implications, (b) monetary costs of raising a child and (c) implications of falling pregnant at a young age without finishing school?

Response

1. (a) According to data from the Department of Health, the total number of girls who gave birth in the 2021 financial year in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years are provided below,  and

Province

Number of deliveries to girls aged 10-19 years (April 2021 - March 2022)

EC

12 582

FS

4 444

GT

13 814

KZN

24 230

LIM

11 287

MPU

8 840

NC

2 662

NW

5 635

WC

6 543

RSA

90 037

 

1. (b) Schools are required to provide an environment where all pregnant learners can access professional information advice, referrals, treatment, care, counselling and support. Therefore, other departments also have a role to play in ensuring that the pregnant learners are linked to services such as antenatal and postnatal care provided by the Health Department; and the Department of Social Development and SASSA for access to the Child Support Grant and other social support, amongst others. The department protects the rights of learners to education including continuation of schooling through accommodating reasonable absence due to pregnancy and provision of continuous educational support post-delivery while facilitating earliest return to school. Furthermore, through partners such as Global Fund, learners are given Early Childhood Development  (ECD) Vouchers so that they can leave their children in ECD Centres while the learner is continuing with schooling.

 2.  (a) The Comprehensive Sexuality Education that is offered through Life Skills and Life Orientation, educates all learners about goal setting and how they can reach their full potential. Furthermore, the department also holds Career Jamborees and Future Choice where learners get to see different career paths that they can choose.

 2. (b) and (c) The Career Jamborees and Future Choice campaigns are held with other government departments, including health. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services are provided, which includes content on the consequences of early and unintended pregnancy. 

23 June 2022 - NW2229

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

On what date is it envisaged that pit toilets will be eradicated in all schools in the North West?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the North West Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

23 June 2022 - NW2327

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her department’s assertion that, of the 125 000 pupils eligible for scholar transport in the Eastern Cape, only 10 000 can be accommodated due to budget constraints (details furnished), what mechanism will her department together with the Department of Transport use to ensure that 115 000 bicycles are delivered within a year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education is not aware of assertions made that of the 125 000 pupils eligible for scholar transport in the Eastern Cape, only 10 000 will be accommodated due to budget constraints.

However, Information received from the Eastern Cape Department of Transport who implement the Learner Transport Programme in the province indicates that for the 2021/2022 Financial Year, there were 111 127 learners who were eligible for Learner Transport Programme and of these, 125 423 learners were transported which was 112% more than the total need.

For the 2022/2023 Financial Year, there are 127 455 learners who are eligible for Learner Transport Programme and of these, 102 998 learners are targeted to be transported which is 81% of the total need. This leaves out 24 457 who are in need and qualify for learner transport due to Budget constraints

The Shova Kalula National Bicycle Project is an initiative of the National Department of Transport which was introduced as a pilot project in 2001. The project is an intervention to improve mobility and access to basic needs. The project aims to alleviate transport pressure on poor households and ensure access to public transport and schools.

The Department of Basic Education is not fully privy of the project schedule and thus request the Honorable Member to redirect the question to the Department of Transport as the custodians of the project. 

23 June 2022 - NW2134

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, in light of the fact that Saturday 21 May 2022 marked 100 days since his State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022, wherein he promised to finalise a social compact to create jobs, build the economy and fight hunger, the social compact has been finalised; if not, what (a) progress has been made and (b) is the reason for the delay; if so, (i) what (aa) is the exact nature of the social compact, (bb) impact does he expect it to produce, (ii)(aa)which persons and/or organisations have been consulted and (bb) on what date(s) were they consulted and (iii) who has been leading the negotiations for the social compact?

Reply:

As I indicated in my address during the Presidency Budget Vote, we are working in earnest to conclude our negotiations on a social compact.

The engagements are taking place within the context of NEDLAC, which is a statutory forum for social dialogue.

We set ourselves the ambitious target of 100 working days to signal the urgency with which we need to find common ground on difficult issues that have wide-ranging implications for our economy. While all social partners share the same goals of inclusive growth and employment, there are differing views on how to achieve those goals.

 

We are determined that the social compact should be substantial and meaningful and make a real difference to the trajectory of our economy. We are therefore pushing ahead to achieve an agreement that is inclusive and lasting.

22 June 2022 - NW794

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What progress has been made to find alternative accommodation for the staff of his department housed at the Al Fallah Towers on the corner of Govan Mbeki and Crawford Avenue in North End, Gqeberha, which houses the Department of Correctional Services on three floors; (2) what action has been taken currently to secure the vehicles of the staff from (a) theft and (b) vandalism; (3) what action has his department of Correctional Services taken to remedy some of the problems identified to them by the Department of Employment and Labour which fall within the day-to-day maintenance function of the Department of Correctional Services; (4) whether there is a deadline for finalising the move from the specified building to new premises for the staff; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

1. The request for procurement of alternative accommodation for Gqeberha Community Corrections offices was forwarded to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) on 19 April 2019. The request was resubmitted to the DPWI on 10 October 2021, after which the DPWI reported that the tender for procurement of alternative accommodation for Gqeberha Community Corrections will be advertised during the month of April 2022.

(2)(a) & (b) The alternative accommodation to be procured will have adequate parking facilities to secure the vehicles from theft and vandalism.

3. The landlord was placed in mora in terms of clause 11of the lease agreement, which resulted in minor refurbishments by the landlord, although full compliance was not achieved. Various engagements were undertaken with DPWI regarding poor condition of the facility and there has been little success in this regard; hence the request for alternative accommodation was submitted.

4. DPWI indicated that the procurement for the alternative office accommodation will be finalised by 30 October 2022, thereafter the relocation will commence. It is anticipated that the relocation will be finalised by 30 January 2023.

END

22 June 2022 - NW1969

Profile picture: Engelbrecht, Mr J

Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Service

What (a) are the minimum professional requirements of members serving on parole boards and (b) specific reports must be considered by parole boards in determining whether parole should be granted or not?

Reply:

(a) The minimum requirements for the position of parole board Chairperson is a recognised and appropriate NQF level 07 qualification in any Criminal Justice field, Social Sciences or related. Five (05) years of experience in management or decision making position. He/She is required to have demonstrable experience of and ability to conduct effective evidence-based decision making, weighing facts and evidence, analysing and critically evaluating large volumes of complex information and identifying key issues, within tight deadlines and working on own initiative.

Demonstrable independence of mind and sound judgment, with the ability to make evidence based decisions that are accurately documented. Excellent interpersonal skills, the ability to gain respect and maintain rapport through effective communication and influencing skills with the confidence to challenge opinions where necessary, work collegiately and resolve differences to reach sound decisions.

The member should uphold corporate and personal integrity standards and conduct, such as a strong commitment to fairness, time management skills, organisational and administrative skills, strong personal motivation and commitment to professional self-development. Traceable experience of any aspect of the criminal justice system and understanding of the importance of the victim’s perspective.

The Vice-Chairperson is required to possess a recognised and appropriate NQF level 07 qualification in any Criminal Justice field, Social Sciences or related. Proven three (03) years supervisory role or community leadership experience as well as active involvement in community-based structures. Commitment to a corruption free administration. Good standing with the community with extensive life experience. Proven special interest in the Criminal Justice System as well as understanding of the importance of the victim’s perspective.

The Community Member is required to possess a NQF level 6 qualification in one of the following fields: Criminal Justice, Community Development, Social Science, Policing or Human Rights related field. Five (05) years’ experience in community development work and/or Criminal Justice. Previous experience in a decision making capacity is advantageous.

(b) In line with Section 42 (2)(d) of Correctional Services Act 111 of 1998, the Case Management Committee (CMC) is required to submit a report, together with the relevant documents, to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board regarding the offence for which the offender is sentenced including the judgement. The report referred to should contain the previous criminal record of such offender including the record of conduct, disciplinary, adaptation, training, aptitude, industry, physical and mental state of such offender.

The likelihood of a relapse into crime and the risk posed to the community including the manner in which this risk can be reduced and assessment results with the progress in relation to the correctional sentence plan are also required as part of the report.

A report on the possible placement of an offender under correctional supervision in terms of a sentence is provided for in section 276 (1) (i) or 287 (4) (a) of the Criminal Procedure Act (CPA), or in terms of the conversion of such offender’s sentence into correctional supervision under section 276A (3) (e) (ii) or 287 (4) (b) of the said Act, and the conditions for such placement: the possible placement of such sentenced offender on day parole, parole or medical parole, and the conditions for such placement.

A certified copy of the offender’s identity document and, in the case of a foreign national, a report from the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) on the residential status of such offender are a requirement.

END.

22 June 2022 - NW292

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) is the current state of overcrowding in correctional centres and (b) are the relevant details of overcrowding in each prison?

Reply:

a) The state of overcrowding in correctional centres as at 01 February 2022 was 27.41% above the approved bed space.

The table below reflects the level of overcrowding per region:

NATIONAL INMATE POPULATION

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

REGION

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

EASTERN CAPE

12583

19986

158.83%

58.83%

GAUTENG

23632

31989

135.36%

35.36%

KWAZULU-NATAL

18759

21743

115.91%

15.91%

LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA & NORTH WEST

18643

21821

117.05%

17.05%

FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE

19202

19005

98.97%

-1.03%

WESTERN CAPE

18017

26677

148.07%

48.07%

NATIONAL

110836

141221

127.41%

27.41%

(b) The tables below reflect the relevant details of overcrowding in each prison:

REGION: EASTERN CAPE (EC)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

FORT BEAUFORT

153

40

26.14%

-73.86%

GRAHAMSTOWN

281

508

180.78%

80.78%

KING WILLIAM's TOWN

275

797

289.82%

189.82%

MIDDLEDRIFT

590

1096

185.76%

85.76%

STUTTERHEIM

44

58

131.82%

31.82%

EAST LONDON MED. A

780

1330

170.51%

70.51%

EAST LONDON MED. B

480

1008

210.00%

110.00%

EAST LONDON MED. C

342

232

67.84%

-32.16%

MDANTSANE

697

1296

185.94%

85.94%

GRAAFF-REINET

70

143

204.29%

104.29%

JANSENVILLE

34

24

70.59%

-29.41%

KIRKWOOD

712

766

107.58%

7.58%

SOMERSET-EAST

122

156

127.87%

27.87%

BIZANA

48

158

329.17%

229.17%

ELLIOTDALE

50

26

52.00%

-48.00%

FLAGSTAFF

54

132

244.44%

144.44%

LUSIKISIKI

122

352

288.52%

188.52%

MOUNT AYLIFF

72

137

190.28%

90.28%

MOUNT FLETCHER

118

196

166.10%

66.10%

MOUNT FRERE

52

106

203.85%

103.85%

MQANDULI

70

110

157.14%

57.14%

NQGELENI

85

137

161.18%

61.18%

TABANKULU

51

32

62.75%

-37.25%

MTHATHA REMAND

607

1121

184.68%

84.68%

MTHATHA MEDIUM

672

1518

225.89%

125.89%

BARKLY-EAST

69

100

144.93%

44.93%

BURGERSDORP

220

476

216.36%

116.36%

BUTTERWORTH

130

336

258.46%

158.46%

COFIMVABA

99

28

28.28%

-71.72%

CRADOCK

319

352

110.34%

10.34%

DODRECHT

114

130

114.04%

14.04%

ENGCOBO

75

145

193.33%

93.33%

IDUTYWA

82

154

187.80%

87.80%

LADY FRERE

51

69

135.29%

35.29%

MIDDELBURG

351

493

140.46%

40.46%

NQAMAKWE

53

69

130.19%

30.19%

QUEENSTOWN

129

343

265.89%

165.89%

SADA

318

424

133.33%

33.33%

STERKSPRUIT

64

74

115.63%

15.63%

WILLOWVALE

44

92

209.09%

109.09%

ST ALBANS MAX.

1322

1962

148.41%

48.41%

ST ALBANS MED.A

686

1234

179.88%

79.88%

ST ALBANS MED.B

861

1243

144.37%

44.37%

PATENSIE

425

344

80.94%

-19.06%

PORT ELIZABETH

590

439

74.41%

-25.59%

REGION: GAUTENG (GP)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

BAVIAANSPOORT MAX

360

554

153.89%

53.89%

BAVIAANSPOORT MED

649

829

127.73%

27.73%

EMTHONJENI

192

172

89.58%

-10.42%

BOKSBURG MED A

2062

2433

117.99%

17.99%

BOKSBURG JUVENILES

271

318

117.34%

17.34%

HEIDELBERG MALE

517

642

124.18%

24.18%

JOHANNESBURG MED A

2468

5234

212.07%

112.07%

JOHANNESBURG MED B

1499

2216

147.83%

47.83%

JOHANNESBURG MED C

307

401

130.62%

30.62%

JOHANNESBURG FEMALE

711

866

121.80%

21.80%

KRUGERSDORP

1466

2180

148.70%

48.70%

LEEUWKOP MAX

688

1069

155.38%

55.38%

LEEUWKOP MED A

954

810

84.91%

-15.09%

LEEUWKOP MED B JUVENILE

673

640

95.10%

-4.90%

LEEUWKOP MED C

601

868

144.43%

44.43%

MODDERBEE

2309

3305

143.14%

43.14%

DEVON

347

188

54.18%

-45.82%

NIGEL

310

365

117.74%

17.74%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II MAX

294

277

94.22%

-5.78%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II LOCAL

2306

2944

127.67%

27.67%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II CENTRAL

1514

2010

132.76%

32.76%

KGOŠI MAMPURU II FEMALE

132

184

139.39%

39.39%

ODI

861

977

113.47%

13.47%

ATTERIDGEVILLE

546

532

97.44%

-2.56%

ZONDERWATER MED A

825

1062

128.73%

28.73%

ZONDERWATER MED B

770

913

118.57%

18.57%

REGION: KWAZULU NATAL (KZN)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

DBN MED A

2202

2900

131.70%

31.70%

DBN MED B

1936

3067

158.42%

58.42%

DBN MED C

552

814

147.46%

47.46%

DBN FEMALE

230

320

139.13%

39.13%

DBN YOUTH

732

273

37.30%

-62.70%

UMZINTO

378

197

52.12%

-47.88%

INGWAVUMA

71

50

70.42%

-29.58%

MTUNZINI

84

100

119.05%

19.05%

STANGER

81

72

88.89%

-11.11%

MAPHUMULO

44

47

106.82%

6.82%

ESHOWE

459

586

127.67%

27.67%

EMPANGENI

276

260

94.20%

-5.80%

QALAKABUSHA

1638

1713

104.58%

4.58%

GLENCOE

497

478

96.18%

-3.82%

DUNDEE

82

104

126.83%

26.83%

POMEROY

78

21

26.92%

-73.08%

LADYSMITH

307

599

195.11%

95.11%

BERGVILLE

24

25

104.17%

4.17%

GREYTOWN

57

76

133.33%

33.33%

ESTCOURT

513

503

98.05%

-1.95%

KRANSKOP

59

120

203.39%

103.39%

EBONGWENI

1536

518

33.72%

-66.28%

PORT SHEPSTONE

180

155

86.11%

-13.89%

KOKSTAD MED

345

426

123.48%

23.48%

MATATIELE

70

78

111.43%

11.43%

UMZIMKULU

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

NONGOMA

46

47

102.17%

2.17%

NCOME MED A

534

770

144.19%

44.19%

NCOME MED B

724

851

117.54%

17.54%

MELMOTH

44

52

118.18%

18.18%

VRYHEID

244

342

140.16%

40.16%

NKANDLA

36

36

100.00%

0.00%

PMB MED A

1493

3087

206.76%

106.76%

PMB MED B

328

364

110.98%

10.98%

SEVONTEIN

823

844

102.55%

2.55%

NEW HANOVER

110

147

133.64%

33.64%

IXOPO

79

96

121.52%

21.52%

WATERVAL MED A

608

661

108.72%

8.72%

WATERVAL MED B

359

470

130.92%

30.92%

UTHRECT

38

35

92.11%

-7.89%

NEWCASTLE

254

395

155.51%

55.51%

EKUSENI

608

44

7.24%

-92.76%

REGION: LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA AND NORTH WEST (LMN)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

BARBERTON MAX

795

1263

158.87%

58.87%

BARBERTON MED A

154

0

0.00%

-100.00%

BARBERTON MED B

655

928

141.68%

41.68%

BARBERTON TOWN

334

301

90.12%

-9.88%

LYDENBURG

82

82

100.00%

0.00%

NELSPRUIT

757

1086

143.46%

43.46%

BETHAL

765

936

122.35%

22.35%

GELUK

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

VOLKRUST

198

242

122.22%

22.22%

PIET RETIEF

245

351

143.27%

43.27%

ERMELO

499

622

124.65%

24.65%

STANDERTON

1462

718

49.11%

-50.89%

KLERKSDORP

1136

1314

115.67%

15.67%

POTCHEFSTROOM

636

721

113.36%

13.36%

CHRISTIANA

112

107

95.54%

-4.46%

WOLMARANSTAD

101

125

123.76%

23.76%

POLOKWANE

480

856

178.33%

78.33%

MODOMOLLE

315

526

166.98%

66.98%

TZANEEN

501

426

85.03%

-14.97%

ROOIGROND MED A

645

884

137.05%

37.05%

ROOIGROND MED B

249

367

147.39%

47.39%

MAFIKENG

100

64

64.00%

-36.00%

LICHTENBURG

264

262

99.24%

-0.76%

ZEERUST

140

160

114.29%

14.29%

BRITS

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

LOSPERFONTEIN

792

756

95.45%

-4.55%

MOGWASE

396

555

140.15%

40.15%

RUSTENBURG MED A

555

519

93.51%

-6.49%

RUSTENBURG MED B

152

97

63.82%

-36.18%

THOHOYANDOU MED A

685

955

139.42%

39.42%

THOHOYANDOU MED B

217

709

326.73%

226.73%

FEMALE & YOUTH

124

212

170.97%

70.97%

MAKHADO

303

626

206.60%

106.60%

KUTAMA SINTHUMULE

3024

3024

100.00%

0.00%

BELFAST

54

50

92.59%

-7.41%

CAROLINA

109

81

74.31%

-25.69%

MIDDLEBURG

287

344

119.86%

19.86%

WITBANK

1320

1552

117.58%

17.58%

REGION: FREE STATE AND NORTHERN CAPE (FSNC)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

COLESBERG

153

214

139.87%

39.87%

DE AAR MALE

265

244

92.08%

-7.92%

HOPETOWN

40

57

142.50%

42.50%

RICHMOND

39

41

105.13%

5.13%

VICTORIA WEST

81

100

123.46%

23.46%

GOEDEMOED A

769

368

47.85%

-52.15%

GOEDEMOED B

566

254

44.88%

-55.12%

BETHULIE

42

66

157.14%

57.14%

EDENBURG

92

44

47.83%

-52.17%

FAURESMITH

28

20

71.43%

-28.57%

ZASTRON

59

8

13.56%

-86.44%

GROENPUNT MAX

1531

1836

119.92%

19.92%

GROENPUNT MED

687

528

76.86%

-23.14%

GROENPUNT YOUTH

227

134

59.03%

-40.97%

FRANKFORT

61

93

152.46%

52.46%

HEILBRON

51

68

133.33%

33.33%

PARYS

68

85

125.00%

25.00%

SASOLBURG

310

390

125.81%

25.81%

VEREENIGING

739

1069

144.65%

44.65%

GROOTVLEI A

806

1693

210.05%

110.05%

GROOTVLEI B

237

242

102.11%

2.11%

BRANDFORT

146

19

13.01%

-86.99%

BOSHOF

56

47

83.93%

-16.07%

LADYBRAND

43

40

93.02%

-6.98%

WEPENER

113

93

82.30%

-17.70%

WINBURG

158

105

66.46%

-33.54%

MANGAUNG

2928

2928

100.00%

0.00%

KIMBERLEY

750

784

104.53%

4.53%

TSWELOPELE

2930

1659

56.62%

-43.38%

BARKLEY WEST

58

38

65.52%

-34.48%

DOUGLAS

279

223

79.93%

-20.07%

BIZZA MAKHATE A

974

998

102.46%

2.46%

BIZZA MAKHATE B

534

674

126.22%

26.22%

BIZZA MAKHATE C

210

319

151.90%

51.90%

BIZZA MAKHATE D

53

0

0.00%

0.00%

BETHLEHEM

201

297

147.76%

47.76%

FICKSBURG

70

56

80.00%

-20.00%

HARRISMITH

215

397

184.65%

84.65%

HENNENMAN

230

183

79.57%

-20.43%

HOOPSTAD

102

38

37.25%

-62.75%

LINDLEY

42

34

80.95%

-19.05%

ODENDAALSRUS

367

633

172.48%

72.48%

SENEKAL

106

127

119.81%

19.81%

VENTERBURG

229

136

59.39%

-40.61%

VIRGINIA

378

317

83.86%

-16.14%

UPINGTON

772

805

104.27%

4.27%

KURUMAN

338

364

107.69%

7.69%

SPRINGBOK

69

137

198.55%

98.55%

REGION: WESTERN CAPE (WC)

INMATE POPULATION: 01 FEBRUARY 2022

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

APPROVED BED SPACE

GRAND TOTAL (INMATE POPULATION)

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

OVERCROWDING LEVELS

ALLANDALE

292

826

282.88%

182.88%

HAWEQUA

201

158

78.61%

-21.39%

OBIQUA

235

321

136.60%

36.60%

STAART VAN PAARDEBERG

222

325

146.40%

46.40%

BRANDVLEI MEDIUM C

289

492

170.24%

70.24%

BRANDVLEI YOUTH

300

191

63.67%

-36.33%

BRANDVLEI MAXIMUM (MEDIUM)

981

787

80.22%

-19.78%

BRANDVLEI MAXIMUM

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

DRAKENSTEIN MEDIUM A

501

731

145.91%

45.91%

DRAKENSTEIN MEDIUM B

497

477

95.98%

-4.02%

DRAKENSTEIN MAXIMUM

375

546

145.60%

45.60%

STELLENBOSCH

54

113

209.26%

109.26%

BEAUFORT-WEST

75

165

220.00%

120.00%

GEORGE

517

1163

224.95%

124.95%

KNYSNA

167

378

226.35%

126.35%

LADISMITH

48

72

150.00%

50.00%

MOSSELBAAI

313

627

200.32%

100.32%

OUDTSHOORN MEDIUM A

273

573

209.89%

109.89%

OUDTSHOORN MEDIUM B

63

102

161.90%

61.90%

PRINCE ALBERT

38

76

200.00%

100.00%

UNIONDALE

39

66

169.23%

69.23%

GOODWOOD

1713

2625

153.24%

53.24%

BUFFELJAGSRIVIER

215

430

200.00%

100.00%

CALEDON RDF

192

389

202.60%

102.60%

HELDERSTROOM MED A

615

1000

162.60%

62.60%

HELDERSTROOM MAX

534

809

151.50%

51.50%

SWELLENDAM

0

0

0.00%

0.00%

MALMESBURY MEDIUM A

1105

1519

137.47%

37.47%

MALMESBURY RDF

158

278

175.95%

75.95%

RIEBEEK-WEST

185

149

80.54%

-19.46%

POLLSMOOR RDF

1423

2894

203.37%

103.37%

POLLSMOOR MEDIUM A

1028

1406

136.77%

36.77%

POLLSMOOR MEDIUM B

512

1135

221.68%

121.68%

POLLSMOOR MEDIUM C

520

360

69.23%

-30.77%

POLLSMOOR FEMALES

408

599

146.81%

46.81%

CALVINIA

29

46

158.62%

58.62%

VANRHYNSDORP

552

606

109.78%

9.78%

VOORBERG MEDIUM A

461

444

96.31%

-3.69%

VOORBERG MEDIUM B

1433

1464

102.16%

2.16%

DWARSRIVIER

179

325

181.56%

81.56%

ROBERTSON

203

369

181.77%

81.77%

WARMBOKKEVELD

554

476

85.92%

-14.08%

WORCESTER MALES

406

941

231.77%

131.77%

WORCESTER FEMALES

112

224

200.00%

100.00%

It should be mentioned that Barberton Medium A and Bizzah Makhate Medium D are designated COVID-19 sites. A total of three facilities were closed down due to dilapidation namely Swellendam, Brandvlei Maximum and Geluk Correctional Centres.

Brits and UMzimkulu centres are temporarily closed for upgrades, the latter has resulted in the facility not being occupied.

END.

22 June 2022 - NW2260

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Given that it was revealed in the AfriForum court case against the Government that the grand total of the donation to the Republic of Cuba was actually to be R350 million and not just R50 million, and noting that this was revealed after the civil rights organisation’s legal team requested the court record as part of its review application, and taking into account that, according to the record, the Government has agreed to a contract with the government of the Republic of Cuba, in terms of which the R50 million will only be the first payment in the more than a quarter billion rand donation, what (a) are the reasons that this information was withheld from Parliament and the public and (b) is the total number of other (i) deals and (ii) donations that are in the pipeline with the Republic of Cuba that are being withheld from Parliament and the public?

Reply:

With regard to a reply to question 2260 on 24 May 2022, it can be stated that there is no link between what is currently before the courts, namely the donation of humanitarian aid by the South African Government to the amount of R50 million to the Republic of Cuba, and the Agreement that was signed in 2012 to make available an Economic Assistance Package (EAP) of R350 million to the Republic Cuba that consisted of grants and a loan facility, to be repaid, with interest, by Cuba.

a) The information regarding the Economic Assistance Package of R 350 million was shared with Parliament in response to Parliamentary Question 1665 from the Leader of the Opposition (DA) about Government expenditure on Cuba since 15 February 2018. Updates on the implementation of the Economic Assistance Package were also provided to the Parlaimantary Portfolio Committee on International Relations an Cooperation.

b) (i) All relevant information about the R 350 million EAP and R 50 Million humanatrian assistance have been disclosed to Parliament.

(ii) No information regarding donations to the Republic of Cuba has been withheld from Parliament and the public

 

 

21 June 2022 - NW2220

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What time frames have been put in place for addressing the findings of the Auditor General with regard to the Small Enterprise Development Agency?

Reply:

The following are time frames to address for each finding:

1. Review of the Performance Information

The new reporting system for Performance Information was procured. It is in the final stages of design and will be available for use from 01 August 2022.

2. Two Irregular expenditures were reported

Lease of office space in the KZN for R182 358 was condoned. The second expenditure of R84 281 was reported to National Treasury and there was additional information required by National Treasury. Management is busy with the National Treasury request and will resubmit to National Treasury, the process is anticipated to be completed by 31 July 2022.

3. Vacancies of Executives

Effective from June 2020, a moratorium was implemented on the recruitment and selection process due to the incorporation process between the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda), the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), and the Co-operative Banks Development Agency (CBDA) that is underway and critical vacant positions were advertised for 12 months fixed term contract. The Executive Managers positions are re-advertised as the most suitable candidates could not be sourced. On 19 May 2022 the Minister uplifted the moratorium on filling of vacancies with immediate effect, but the fixed term contract should not exceed twenty-four (24) months to ensure that there are no duplicate positions post the integration of sefa and CBDA into Seda. All vacant Executive Manager positions were re-advertised on 03 June 2022.

4. Provision for Bonus error on the notes to AFS

Resolved during the audit.

5. Revenue not collected

The amounts totaling to R151 000 was written off in line with internal policies and procedures. Debts older than a year are provided for as bad debts and the process to recover them continues. The finding is resolved.

6. ICT Controls and Cyber attack

The organisation has sourced services of Sizwe IT to implement ICT security solutions in all Seda estate and the monitoring of the estate. An awareness across the whole of Seda staff regarding their roles and responsibilities and security awareness is underway through the ICT Governance project that resumed in July 2021. The finding is resolved.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

21 June 2022 - NW2323

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of (a) agricultural extension officers (i) have been employed in (aa) Limpopo and Mpumalanga (bb) the Eastern Cape and Northern Cape, (cc) KwaZulu-Natal and (dd) North West in the past two financial years and (ii) qualified through government-funded bursary schemes in each province and (b) black emerging farmers were (i) provided with extension officers in the past two financial years and (ii) assisted with funding in the past two financial years in each province?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii),(aa),(bb),(cc),(dd) Agricultural Extension Officers: Please refer to the table below.

(a)(i) employed in the past two years

(a)(ii) qualified through bursary schemes in each province

(aa) Limpopo: 0 and Mpumalanga: 53 Extension Officers were on contract and were permanently absorbed during 2021/22 financial year

DALRRD employed Extension Officers:

Limpopo: 6 and Mpumalanga: 4 on contract for 3 months

Limpopo: 0

Mpumalanga: 0

(bb) Eastern Cape: 21 and Northern Cape: 0

DALRRD employed 3 Extension Officers in

Eastern Cape and 6 in Northern Cape on contract for 3 months

Eastern Cape: 0

Northern Cape: 0

(cc) KwaZulu-Natal:71

DALRRD employed 4 Extension Officers in

KwaZulu-Natal on contract for 3 months

KwaZulu-Natal: 8

(dd) North West:46

DALRRD employed 6 Extension Officers in North West on contract for 3 months

North West: 0

(b)(i),(ii) Black emerging farmers: Please refer to the table below.

(b)(i) provided with extension officers in the past two years

(b)(ii) assisted with funding in the past two financial years

A total of 38 203 smallholder producers were supported over a period of 2020/21 and 2021/22. These are figures as reported by provinces on the Electronic Quarterly Report System (e-QPRS)

Province

2020/21 Smallholder producers supported as reported in eQPRS

Total

 

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

 

EC

0

240

3616

4169

8025

FS

0

0

58

228

286

GP

14

39

116

66

235

KZN

1797

1985

1205

1058

6045

LP

878

 

1927

1512

4317

MP

52

83

282

115

532

NC

0

12

711

298

1021

NW

0

110

95

160

365

WC

16

23

9

13

61

Total

 

 

 

 

20887

Province

2021/22 Smallholder producers supported as reported in eQPRS

Total

 

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

 

EC

753

917

479

3717

5866

FS

0

0

5

98

103

GP

73

37

90

46

246

KZN

0

1849

2259

1894

6002

LP

312

354

286

246

1198

MP

438

198

660

287

1583

NC

0

0

1237

795

2032

NW

0

0

61

182

243

WC

8

20

12

3

43

Total

 

 

 

 

17316

(aa)

Limpopo: 13 444, and

Mpumalanga: 5 100

 

(bb)

Eastern Cape: 18 351, and

Northern Cape: 3 075

 

(cc)

KwaZulu-Natal: 11 984

 

(dd)

North West: 14 356

 
   

21 June 2022 - NW2199

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

As at 30 April 2022, what (a) was the total number of permanently-appointed magistrates in the Republic, (b) number of the specified magistrates will reach retirement age within the next five years, (c) was the total number of funded posts for magistrates in the Republic and (d) number of these positions were filled by acting magistrates?

Reply:

a) As at 30 April 2022, the total number of permanently appointed magistrates, excluding temporary/acting magistrates and vacant posts, is as tabulated below:

Post Class

Number

Magistrate

1 257

Chief Magistrate

16

Regional Magistrate

326

Senior Magistrate

124

Regional Court President

8

Grand Total

1 731

b) In responding to this part of the question, it is important to draw the Honourable Member’s attention to section 13 of the Magistrates Act, 1990 (Act 90 of 1993), which provides that a magistrate shall vacate office when attaining the age of 65. This section was amended with effect from 1 December 2017, and a magistrate holding office may, before attaining the age of 65 years, in written notice to the Magistrates Commission, indicate his or her intention to continue to serve in such office for such further period specified in the written notice: Provided that a magistrate must vacate his or her office on attaining the age of 70 years.

The table below provides the number of magistrates who will reach retirement age within the next five (5) years (only permanently appointed magistrates):

(i) Per age group:

Row Labels

Count of Age

60

70

61

57

62

46

63

53

64

31

65

18

66

23

67

10

68

5

69

11

Grand Total

324

(ii) Per Post Class (permanently appointed magistrates between 60 and 69 years of age)

Post Class

Number

Magistrate

179

Chief Magistrate

10

Regional Magistrate

96

Senior Magistrate

35

Regional Court President

4

Grand Total

324

c) The latest information at our disposal in respect of funded posts for magistrates in the Republic is contained in the table below:

Post Class

Approved Posts

Special Grade Chief Magistrate

1

Chief Magistrate                                

21

Senior Magistrate                               

162

Magistrate                                       

1 456

Regional Court President                          

10

Regional Magistrate 

386

Grand Total

2 036

d) In terms of section 9(3) of the Magistrates’ Courts Act, 1944 (Act 32 of 1944), the Minister may appoint any appropriately qualified, fit and proper person as an acting magistrate after consultation with the Head of the Court concerned in any vacant Office of Magistrate. In practice, the Chief Magistrate or the Regional Court President will submit applications to the Deputy Minister, as the delegated authority by the Minister, for consideration of appointment of an acting Magistrate in the vacancies that still need to be filled. Acting magistrates are therefore appointed in all the vacant offices where applications are submitted by the Regional Court President or the Chief Magistrate in his or her area of jurisdiction. Acting Magistrates are also in posts where the incumbent Magistrate is acting in a higher position such as an acting Judge, acting Chief Magistrate or Senior Magistrate, etc, for appointment in posts where a Magistrate is on leave, for appointment where a Magistrate is suspended or in the funded case backlog courts. The acting appointments are generally made for a period of three (3) months at a time where-after the acting Magistrate may be re-appointed as the need exists. During the period of 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022, the Deputy Minister appointed 2 251 acting Magistrates for the reasons mentioned above.

21 June 2022 - NW2206

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 769 on 31 March 2022, (a) what progress has been made to date with the verification of beneficiaries of the land claim of the Lower Zingcuka in Keiskammahoek in the Eastern Cape and (b) on what date does she anticipate the conclusion of the verification process; (2) whether she has found that her department will meet its target of settling the land claim by the third quarter of the 2022-23 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.

a) The verification process was conducted on the 8th -14th May 2022 in Lower Zingcuka. Out of the original list of 160 households /ODIs that was submitted as the families that were affected by the dispossession, the Commission has verified 154 households that have submitted the necessary documents and 6 households have not been verified.

The outstanding 6 families have outstanding documents which have not been submitted to the Commission, it is however alleged that the list of ODIs is not comprehensive and the Commission will not entertain the allegations without comprehensive documentation submitted as evidence.

The Commission has scheduled a follow up visit for 22 July 2022 for the second phase to collect documents from the 6 families and receive any other information and records from any other party alleging that they are part of the claim.

b) It is anticipated that the verification process will be completed by 30 August 2022 barring any challenges that emanate from the community concerned.

2. The claim is projected to be settled in Quarter 3 of 2022/23 Financial Year, on condition that the Commission receives full co-operation from the community in submitting all the required documentation.

END

21 June 2022 - NW2187

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)(a) What number of law firms are contracted to the Ministry of Small Business Development, (b) for what period are the firms contracted and (c) what amount has been paid to each firm for the services rendered in the 2021-22 financial year; (2) whether the law firms are paid any retainer fees; if not, why not; if so, is there a pre-approved and agreed fee price schedule; (3) whether they are only paid for work conducted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Zero.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) Not applicable.

(2) Not applicable.

(3) Not applicable.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT