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21 June 2021 - NW1368

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps has she taken to (a) transform the property development and management sector since she took office and, specifically, (b) ensure that there are more black estate agents in the Republic?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the transformation of the property sector is well underway. I am proud that we amended the Estate Agency Affairs Act of 1976 and it will be replaced by the Property Practitioners Act, 2019, once it comes into operation. The 1976 Act was amended to ensure we have a healthy property market that restores the dignity of all South Africans through the basic constitutional right to ownership of an immovable property through security of tenure. 

The Property Practitioners Act seeks to transform the property market by ensuring that it reflects the SA demographics, and requires that:

  • The Authority should set aside a portion of the Fidelity Fund for purposes of implementing transformation programmes such as enterprise development of historically disadvantaged and consumer education and awareness;
  • Government across all levels is compelled to comply with BBBEE and employment equity legislation and the Authority should monitor transformation property market trends within government;
  • The Authority should establish a transformation fund to aggressively accelerate transformation within the sector;
  • The establishment of the Research Centre to conduct property market research

Further, in 2019, the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) issued Practice Note PDI01/2019. The purpose of the PDI01/2019 is to regulate the position of Previously Disadvantaged Individuals (PDIs) who were previously registered as estate agents by the EAAB, and issued with valid Fidelity Fund Certificates (FFCs). These registered estate agents are currently disqualified and are prevented from operating & being issued with FFCs due to non-compliance.

In terms of the Estate Agency Affairs Board Act (112 of 1976), it is required that every estate agent and estate agency firm must obtain a Fidelity Fund Certificate (FFC) from the (EAAB). It is illegal for Estate Agents to operate without a valid FFC (being issued by the EAAB) and/ or educational requirements that are prescribed by the Standard of Training of Estate Agents Regulations (2008).

There is an amnesty programme for PDI applicants who previously practised as estate agents and now need or require to re-enter the sector. The PDI applicants are given a special dispensation not to pay any monies due to EAAB relating to previous debt.

To date, two hundred and sixty-seven (267) applications have been received for this amnesty programme. Of these, one hundred and ninety (190) have been assessed by the Committee and one hundred and eighty (180) applications have been successful.

The EAAB has also advertised an invitation for PDIs to submit applications to be part of a Small Medium Micro Enterprises (SMME) incubation programme. The aim is to empower PDIs within the real estate sector.

In addition to the above, the EAAB is working on a programme in terms of which twenty-five (25) SMME’s will be awarded an amount of R500 000, of which 50% will be a loan and the balance will be converted into grant funding. This programme will also include a benefit in terms of which the beneficiary SMME’s will be assisted with marketing their businesses and be given access to properties (stock) that is earmarked for selling.

The EAAB has created and implemented the “One Learner - One Estate Agency” Empowerment Programme that focuses on the placement of youth, women and people with disabilities in the real estate sector. Through this programme, over two thousand (2 000) interns have been placed with the real estate industry host employers.

The EAAB has also created and implemented the Principalisation Programme to capacitate principal estate agents. A specific intervention of this programme is directed towards encouraging and capacitating black women to act as principal estate agents.

21 June 2021 - NW1367

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has made any COVID-19 rental relief grant available to beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total amount has been paid to beneficiaries to date and (b) are the names of the specified beneficiaries?

Reply:

Honourable Member, during the budget vote debate of the Department of Human Settlements (Vote 33) on 18 May 2021 I said;

“I wish to take this opportunity to restate what I said last year in this House about Social Housing and the Affordable Rental Relief Programme. I indicated in 2020 that this rental relief is solely aimed at assisting tenants in formal affordable rental housing to meet their monthly rent obligations. Of course, means testing will form part of necessary criteria to determine those who can be assisted. R600 million is allocated for this purpose”.

For those who might not be familiar with the language that we use, affordable rental housing is government subsidised rental housing, managed through the Social Housing Regulatory Authority. It cannot, as some has tried to interpret, mean the private rental space. So the category that we identified is the affordable rental sector. The private sector has no project for affordable rental housing and we have no jurisdiction over the private sector housing rental. When you hear the term affordable rental housing, it is our rental programme managed by the Social Housing Regulatory Authority. We did indeed request R600 million to assist those who find themselves in distress in our housing institutions. This we did in our 2020 budget.

However, the Minister of Finance, in his Adjustments Appropriation approved R300 million to SHRA and the remaining R300 million to the NHFC/ Housing Bank. These amounts have now been transferred to the two entities. Therefore, R300 million to assist those who rent from the State to offset the impediments caused by the pandemic. The policies and qualifications are available from SHRA.

Similarly, R300 million was allocated to the NHFC to offset the debt incurred by its own clients. The amounts were not allocated to these two institutions to use for rental relief in the private sector. I want to emphasis, we cannot and do not regulate rental for the private sector. We regulate that which is under our jurisdiction. Our people should not allow those who are ignorant to mislead them”.

21 June 2021 - NW1703

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) are the time frames for the completion of the Alliance Extension 9 Housing Project in Ward 71 in the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) number of beneficiaries have been approved for the specified project; (2) whether she will provide Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed list of the names of the beneficiaries who were approved for the project; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the relevant details; (3) what (a) number of residents were declined for the project, (b) were the reasons for them being declined and (c) alternatives are given by her department to assist residents who have been declined from benefiting from the project?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that the housing project referred to is Alliance Extension 1 and not Alliance Extension 9, and that the project will be completed by 30 June 2021.

(b) A total of 410 beneficiaries have been approved for the project to date.

(2)(a) The detailed beneficiary list of the project contain confidential information which cannot be made public. It includes the following information:

  • First names and surname of beneficiary
  • Housing Subsidy System Status
  • Date subsidy approved
  • Site number
  • Township – Alliance extension 1

(b) Approval dates of individual subsidy applications are reflected in the information which I had already indicated in (a) above that it is confidential.

(3)(a) The total number of beneficiaries declined is 98.

(b) The applicants were declined for the following reasons:

  • Some of the applicants did not declare their monthly income;
  • Some of the applicants did not declare their marital statuses;
  • Incorrect and missing information on subsidy applications (Beneficiaries are contacted to submit the correct and complete information), and
  • Applicants who have already previously benefitted from government housing subsidies
  • It was established that some of the applicants already own property.

(c) The applicants that were declined as a result of their monthly income being more than the maximum R3 501.00 were advised to apply for other interventions/ programs such as the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Programme (FLISP), Affordable Rental Housing and/or the Rapid Land Release Programme (RLRP).

21 June 2021 - NW1704

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) How will beneficiaries who qualify be allocated to their units in the Alliance Extension 9 Housing Project in Ward 71 in the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) by what date will the units be allocated; (2) what are the reasons that local sub-contractors and general workers have not been paid for a period of more than three months; (3) whether her department has any other projects in the pipeline for the Lindelani Informal Settlement in terms of providing electricity, water and sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements has advised that they are only aware of a housing project referred to as Alliance Extension 1 and not Extension 9.

Beneficiaries are verified against the Housing Subsidy System (HSS) and if approved, applicants will be linked to the stand numbers in the project. On completion of the construction of the houses, beneficiaries are notified to visit the site on a specific date set aside for housing allocations. Beneficiaries are informed to bring their original Identity Documents (IDs) as well as three copies for verification purposes. The beneficiaries are then requested to sign the consumer agreements with the City of Ekurhuleni (Finance Department), where after they are issued with allocation and “happy” letters. The three ID copies are attached to the 1. Consumer agreement 2. Allocation letter and 3. Happy letter and after that they are presented with the keys to their houses.

(b) I am have been informed that the allocation of the first 150 houses commenced on 8 June 2021, and that the next batch of completed houses will be allocated by the end of June 2021.

(2) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements has advised that the services of two contractors were terminated. Both contractors did not complete some milestones and their claims were thus rejected.

(3) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that the Lindelani Informal Settlement has been earmarked to benefit from the on-going Alliance Extension 1 project, the Helderwyk Mega Project and the proposed Dalpark Extension 25 project, all of which will have electricity, water and sanitation connections.

21 June 2021 - NW1186

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she has found that her department’s Debt Relief Finance Scheme for small, medium and micro-enterprise affected by the COVID-19 pandemic was executed transparently and effectively; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the measures that her department put in place to promote fairness?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development has designed and implemented the SMMEs Debt Relief Facility to assist small business that were impacted negatively by Covid-19 pandemic. This main aim of this intervention was to protect the investment already made in the businesses involved, save jobs and prevent business closure.

To ensure that the Facility is executed efficiently and in a transparent manner, numerous control measures were put in place. These measures include heightening awareness about the Facility by publishing information, including the funding criteria on the websites of the Department and its agencies, Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa); and issuing of press releases. Furthermore, the information on all funded beneficiaries was published on the DSBD website for the consumption of the members of the public.

The SMMEs Debt Relief Facility was also subjected to an audit process. The audit performed by the independent auditors (Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo) awarded the Facility an unqualified audit opinion. In light of the above, the Department can provide a reasonable assurance that the principle of transparency and fairness were upheld in rolling out the SMMEs Debt Relief Facility.

_________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

21 June 2021 - NW1702

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the Alliance Extension 9 Housing Project in Ward 71, City of Ekurhuleni, what (a) is the total number of units that have been completed of the 1629 units that were promised and (b) are the (i) reasons that the contracts of several contractors have been terminated and (ii) reasons for the termination of the contract in each case; (2) what (a) are the full names and details of the persons appointed as contractors at present, (b) is the (i) scope of their work and (ii) duration of their contracts and (c)(i) is the total cost of the project and (ii) amount of the assigned budget has been spent thus far?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that the housing project being referred to is Alliance Extension 1 and not Extension 9. To date 150 houses have been completed and the process of installing solar geysers stands at a 90% completion rate.

(b) The contracts of two contractors were terminated as a result of poor performance as they deviated from their construction programme due to cash flow challenges.

(2)(a)&(b) The newly appointed contractors have been appointed for the completion of 419 houses which are currently at various stages of completion. The contract period for both contractors is three months effective from 1 April 2021 and will end on 30 June 2021.

With regards to the request for name(s) of contractors involved in the housing project referred to in this question, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the name of the contractor. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(c) (i) The total cost of the project is R88 653 998.62

(ii) No invoices have been submitted thus far.

21 June 2021 - NW714

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) What are the details of the number of paid-for interviews the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) aired on community radio stations in each province since 1 January 2020; (2) what was the (a) date of the interview, (b) name of the community radio station the interview was aired, (c) name of the person(s) who appeared on the interview and (d) cost of airing the interview in each case; (3) whether the GCIS (a) paid for and/or (b) promoted interviews conducted with any person who is not an employee of any national, provincial or local government department or entity in the specified period; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. Community Radio remains one of the most effective mediums made use of by the GCIS Provincial and District offices for conveying messages and information, especially in very remote and deep rural areas. These platforms are enjoying a good listenership from their respective communities.

GCIS implemented 296 paid for radio interviews or talk shows during the period under review to unpack government communication and programmes and to create an awareness around government programmes.  The total expenditure for the interviews is R1 627 515.77. The table below provides a broad spread of the interview per province.

#

PROVINCE

RADIO INTERVIEWS

TOTAL COST

 

Free State

12 paid for Radio interview implemented

R60 000.00

 

Eastern Cape

24 paid for Radio interviews

R168 115.00

 

Northern Cape

07 paid for Radio interviews

R44 795.60

 

Gauteng

15 paid for Radio interviews

R119 215.75

 

North West

24 paid for Radio interviews implemented

R258 288.00

 

Mpumalanga

40 Radio programmes implemented. 30 were paid for radio interviews and 10 were done as valued add.

R110 300,00

 

Western Cape

59 paid for Radio interviews implemented.

R287 700.00

 

Limpopo

11 Radio programmes implemented through engagements with Community Radio Stations bearing no cost.

R0.00

 

KwaZulu-Natal

104 paid for Radio interviews implemented

R579 101.42

TOTAL

296 paid for radio interviews

R1 627 515.77

2. The GCIS uses councillors/ community-based leaders, mayors, traditional leaders, community-based leaders and government spokes persons or subject matters specialists at local or district level.

Thank You.

21 June 2021 - NW1193

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, with reference to the Digital Transformation Index 2020 report compiled by Dell Technologies that the COVID-19 pandemic has seen local organisations accelerate digital transformation in the Republic, and in order to take full advantage of the digital transformation that is underway, her department has a plan in place to supplement an enabling policy framework with swift infrastructure improvements to support small-, medium- and micro-enterprises; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

Government through the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies is in the process of developing the Digital Economy Master Plan, which will look into the entire digital ecosystem, including the digital core, infrastructure, technologies and services. Government is approaching digitisation in a holistic rather than on a piecemeal approach as suggested in this question. The Department of Small Business Development is part of the Team lead by DCDT on the Digital Economy Master Plan with a definitive focus on its impact on SMMEs and Co-operatives.

Furthermore, enhancing access requires affordable pricing mechanisms based on telecoms policies that reflect wide digital network and sound broad band strategies, specifically reaching remote areas such as townships, rural areas, and villages. Small enterprises based within the afore-mentioned areas may not necessarily have access to same digital environment. In this regard, the DSBD is in collaboration with the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies (DCDT) whose mandate is to ensure provision of inclusive communications services. The partnership with the Department of Communications and Digital Technology (DCDT) is positioning the SA Entrepreneurship Ecosystem for the digital change and transformation through the investment in needed infrastructure like broadband fibre connectivity to all support hubs (Incubators, Accelerators, Centres for Entrepreneurship Rapid Incubator [CFERIs], Township and Digital Hubs) and high end computing and Rapid Prototyping facilities (3D printers, scanners, CNC and Laser cutting equipment) as shared facilities in all our TVET and University based CFERIs and new Digital Hubs.

The Department is also finalising agreements and engaging various stakeholders in the technology sector for the provision of supporting technological services and offerings to innovate and transition SMMEs and Cooperatives into the Digital era.

On the ICT side, Seda supported 13 Tech base Incubators and Accelerators and established 22 youth based CFERIs in underserviced TVETs and Universities in the 2020/21 financial year to the drive that transformation and support to Tech Start-ups to help build local technology solutions to solve both Social and Industry challenges.

The 13 Tech Incubators have recorded the following performance results in 2020/21 FY:

  • 303 Tech Start-ups and SMMEs were supported.
  • R49 284 220.16 in revenue was generated by the start-ups and SMMEs in portfolio.
  • 441 of the total ICT related jobs in 2019/20 FY were sustained.
  • 676 new jobs were created.

As part of our vision for township and rural economies in the digital sector Seda has established four (4) township based hubs in Mabopane in Tshwane, Kraaifontein in the Western Cape, Mogwase in the North West, and Thembalethu in the George. The new hubs will focus on building start-ups in the Gaming, Animation, E-Sports, Coding and Data Science, 3-D Printing, Hard and Software development, robotics, and Electronics. The hubs have taken in their first start-up cohorts in the fourth quarter of the 2020/21 financial year.

These hubs will be supported by the 6 new Digital Hubs that are positioned to lead SA charge in the 4IR space. The new Digital Hubs will endeavour to create start-up and digital business that can compete in local, regional and international markets while remaining locally relevant. The hubs will render support to young Grassroots innovators and start-ups providing needed shared infrastructure, industry collaborations, Enterprise supplier linkage, access to funding at pre-seed, seed and series A and B funding, private sector investor linkage. Also, the hubs will build firm level teams, revenue or paths to revenue, high touch mentoring and coaching aimed at building strong leadership, disruptive, scalable and smart business models poised for Rapid growth in sectors like EdTech, Fintech, E-commerce, HealthTech, Water, Energy and Agri.

Seda is focusing its efforts and have also approved four (4) new University based CFERIs:

  • University of Johannesburg, Soweto - will focus on building young tech start-ups in Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain
  • Nelson Mandela Bay University - will focus on start-ups in new technologies in water, oceans economy and Electronic Vehicles and Battery technologies.
  • University of Venda - focusing on new Hardware, software, IOT and AgriTech start-ups.
  • Rhodes University – start-ups in the Creative Industry.

The new CFERIs will be fully established before the end of the current financial year (2021/22).

_________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

21 June 2021 - NW1161

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba on co-operation in the field of water resource management, which she signed on 7 February 2021, what (a) number of Cuban nationals are (i) currently employed and (ii) will be employed by her department, (b) specific work roles are envisaged for the Cuban nationals, (c) are the specific skills set of each of the Cuban nationals that are not possessed by South African nationals (i) currently employed and (ii) will be employed by her department, (d) are the details of the process followed to ensure that the same skills set was and/or is not available in the Republic and amongst South African citizens and (e) is the total cost of the (i) employment and/or (ii) prospective employment of such Cuban nationals?

Reply:

(a) In terms of the agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba on co-operation in the field of water resource management the details are as follows:

(i) 25 Cuban Nationals are currently deployed.

(ii) No decision has been made in this regard.

(b) The Cuban nationals are responsible for the following functions, among others;

  • Evaluation of Operations and Maintenance of water infrastructure within clusters and area offices in different provinces as follows:
    • Northern Cluster – Limpopo, Part of Gauteng, Mpumalanga and part of North West
    • Eastern Cluster – KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), Part of Eastern Cape and part of Free State
    • Central Operations – Parts of N Cape, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Free state
    • Southern Cluster – W Cape, part of Eastern Cape and part of Northern Cape
    • Eastern Cluster – KZN, part of Eastern Cape and part of Free State
    • Central Operations – parts of Northern Cape, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Free state
  • Evaluation of infrastructure assets of the department including dams, bulk water infrastructure, irrigation canals and pump stations
  • Evaluation and verification of quality control of maintenance as well as refurbishment of water infrastructure.
  • Scoping of waste water treatment systems.
  • Project management for grant funded infrastructure projects implemented by municipalities
  • Verification and analysis of bulk infrastructure applications and business plans from municipalities to the DWS.

(c) The areas of specialisation and skills possessed by Cuban Nationals include the following:

 

NO.

Qualification

Area of Specialization

 

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineer

 

Engineer Hydrologist

Surface Water Hydrology.

 

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

 

Geophysics Engineer & Master in Science Geophysics

Civil/ Hydrological/Geophysical

 

Civil Engineering

Design, Maintenance and Operation of Water Infrastructure

 

Hydraulic Engineering, Master of Science: Hydraulic Engineering

Water Treatment Plants

 

Hydraulics and Structural Engineering

Experience Civil/ Hydraulic Engineer

 

Engineering in Automatic Control

Engineer with specialization in Automatic Control

 

Technologist Engineer

Technologist Engineer in Hydraulics and Water Treatment

 

Agricultural Mechanization Engineering

Trained as Mechanical Engineer and works as Investment Manager

 

Irrigation and Drainage Engineering

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer with extensive experience in Planning and Design

 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering & Master Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing and Technology

(d) The deployment of Cuban nationals will not negatively affect jobs which could be offered to South Africans. There are job opportunities in the same fields which are still offered to suitably qualified South Africans, including through the Graduate Programme being implemented by the DWS.

(e) The total estimated cost of employment for financial year are as follows, this includes the operational budget which is based on estimates prior to the COVID-19 realities, meaning that a significant reduction in actual cost is anticipated;

 

ITEM

EXPENDITURE

Compensation of Employees

R34 031 413,00

Goods and Services (Operations Budget)

R30 591 587,00

TOTAL BUDGET

R64 623 000,00

 

 

21 June 2021 - NW1544

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) engagements has she had with small businesses in Cape Town townships in order to understand the full impact of the growing practice of gangs demanding protection fees from small businesses and (b) has she found is the full impact of the specified practice on small businesses?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD), through the District Development Model initiative, has held a series of discussion sessions across the Western Cape District Municipalities, engaging SMMEs and Co-operatives on various matters that have an impact on their businesses and also focusing on the interventions that the Department has to offer the small businesses with the view of assisting them financially and non-financially. The Deputy Minister of Small Business Development led some of these engagements, particularly in Cape Town.

The growing practice of gangs demanding protection fee, not only from small businesses but from businesses in general is a serious matter that Government as a whole is acutely aware of and is attending to it with the seriousness it deserves. The DSBD, through the Government Cluster system has supported for the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Cluster to look into developing a holistic strategy to address this phenomenon; and this is a process that is currently underway. This process will assist in determining the full impact of this specified practice on South African businesses, especially small businesses.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1556

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:”

What steps has his department taken to date regarding the slow progress of the Memorandum of Understanding on School Sport between Sport and Recreation South Africa and the Department of Basic Education?

Reply:

THE Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture has met with the Minister of Basic Education to review the MOU. Both Directors- General have been tasked with the review of the MOU.

The review process is underway. Consultations have taken place internally in the Department and with the colleagues at the Department of Basic Education.

A first draft that integrate all areas of the Department’s programmes that need or are executed in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education has been finalised. This is still work in progress towards further consultation within the two Departments Executive management, Provincial Departments and other stakeholders in the Sport, Arts and Culture and Education Sector.

17 June 2021 - NW1049

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the (a) tax invoices and (b) signed proof of delivery of items as procured by her department from certain service providers (names and details furnished) during the period 1 March to 1 October 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is well aware that the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly”, prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from providing names in parliamentary questions and responses to questions. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

I am therefore unable to provide the information requested by the Honourable Member as it contains company names and other confidential inform

17 June 2021 - NW1620

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his Budget Vote speech in Parliament on 13 May 2021, wherein he made reference to R10 million for the Debut Fund for emerging professionals, (a) what are the processes for administering the fund, (b) who adjudicates the applications and (c) what are the criteria for qualifying for the fund?

Reply:

(a). What are the processes for administering the fund?

Department administration:

The department administers the R10 million allocated to BASA for three years through a Memorandum of Agreement. R3 million was distributed in 2020/21, R5 million in 2021/22 and R2 million in 2022/23 with each amount distributed in tranches quarterly following submission of the progress report to the department. This administration is coupled with meetings with BASA and monitoring the process by the Project Manager.

As a requirement, BASA submits a detailed annual report with expenditure to the departments regarding the debut fund programme.

BASA’s administration:

  1. Participation in immersion workshops and activities including submission of tasks.
  2. Adjudication and selection of submissions by an external panel.
  3. Announcement and communication to participants.
  4. Mentorship and Participant support by Mentor/Facilitators and Provincial Liaisons (2 per province).
  5. A final list of recipients whose documents have all been submitted, as well as the relevant documents for each individual is sent to the BASA Accounts department.
  6. Accounts verifies that all documents have been submitted. These include: ID Copy, Proof of banking, SARS tax Registration and signed agreement.
  7. A payment schedule is drawn up for each province and sent to BASA’s Finance Manager (FM) for review.
  8. BASA’s FM verifies each recipient's banking details and ID numbers with the bank. Once details are verified, the payment schedule is sent to BASA’s Head of Programmes, CEO and a Board representative, usually the deputy chair or the chairperson. Each must review the schedules and sign for approval.
  9. Once they have all signed, payments are then loaded and released from the bank.
  10. All signed payment schedules and proof of payments are filed accordingly.

Key to note: Participants receive 70% of their grants at the beginning. They are required to participate in the activities of the next phase and to submit a report on the first tranche. Once this has been reviewed, they then receive the 30% balance. Report includes the narrative as well as the expenditure component.

(b) Who adjudicates the applications:

Participants’ applications and submissions are evaluated by an external adjudication panel. Below is a list of the diverse individuals who have assisted with applications and the submissions of tasks.

Name

Languages

Brief Profile

Tshepiso Shikwambane

Xitsonga,

IsiZulu, English

Actor, director, voiceover artist. Director and co-founder of Phandicraft

Active Drama

Aifheli Makhwanya

Tshivenda, Xitsonga,

Sepedi, Setswana,

Sesotho, English

Independent researcher and consultant for the cultural and creative industries. Managing Director of Dzanda Consulting & Events

Onthatile Ditshego

Setswana, Sepedi,

Sesotho, IsiXhosa,

IsiZulu, English,

Afrikaans, Siswati

Programme Manager at the

Trevor Noah Foundation

David April

Setswana, Sepedi,

Afrikaans, English

Director, teacher, choreographer, and lobbyist

Dimakatso Motholo

Sesotho, Setswana

IsiZulu

Stage manager, performing artist, researcher,

administrator, and project manager

(c) What is the criteria for qualifying for the fund?

Target Audience:

  • Emerging artists working in all disciplines, in all provinces
  • Between the ages of 18-35 years old
  • Individuals from Rural/Peri-urban communities are given first preference

Applicants submit WhatsApp videos of who they are and why they want to join the Programme.

Adjudicators first check against the key requirements as per the above, including whether:

  • The participant showed potential to develop further/alignment with programme objectives
  • Reason(s) for wanting to join the programme
  • Their ability to articulate their need for entrepreneurial /business skills and how they will utilise these skills

Access to funding within the programme:

For participants to make it to the next phase(s) of the Debut Programme and to receive funding they are required to complete all required tasks/activities in the relevant phase and then to submit a formal application for their business ideas or ventures, using the knowledge gained during the Workshops.

Criteria:

  • Viability: How viable participants’ business ideas/ventures were
  • Market Knowledge: How well the participant understands their market
  • Finance: How well the participant understands the financial aspects of their business idea/venture
  • Coherence: How coherent is the participant's overall submission?
  • Translation: How well did the participant outline their business idea onto the Lean Model Canvas?

NB: Participants are required to meet the deadline in time for the adjudication.

 

17 June 2021 - NW1722

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) is the total number of staff that is employed in the Office of the SA High Commission in London and (b) are the (i) names and (ii) designation of the persons employed in the specified office; (2) Whether the office is currently fully operational with all staff on duty full time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details, (3) What services are currently being provided by the office; (4) Whether any services are currently not being provided ; if so, (a) what services and (b) on what date will they resume;

Reply:

1 (a) 18 Transferred officials and 5 vacant posts.

(b) (i) Not Applicable

(ii) Designation

Position 1 - Deputy High Commissioner

Position 2 – Counsellor Bilateral

Position 3 – Counsellor Multilateral

Position 4 – State Security

Position 5 – Political Secretary

Position 6 - Political Secretary

Position 7 - Corporate Services Manger – Vacant since December 2019, waiting for a replacement

Position 8 – First Secretary Administration ( Acting Corporate Services Manager)

Position 9 – Third Secretary Administration

Position 10 – Third Secretary Administration

Position 11 – Counsellor ICT

Position 12 – First Secretary ICT

Position 13 - First Secretary ICT – Vacant since December 2020

 

Partner Departments:

Department of Home Affairs ( DHA)

Position 14 – Counsellor: Immigration and Civic Services

Position 15 – Second Secretary: Immigration and Civic Services

Position 16 - Secretary: Immigration and Civic Services

Position 17 - Second Secretary: Immigration and Civic Services – Vacant since December 2018 State Security:

Position 18 – Counsellor: Political

Position 19 - Political Secretary – Vacant since November 2019

 

Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)

Position 20 – Minister: DTI

 

Department of Transport

Position 21 – Minister Transport

South African Police Service ( SAPS)

Position 22 – Counsellor : SAPS

South Africa's National Defence Force

Position 23 - Defence & Air Advisor – Vacant since January 2020

Position 24 - Deputy Defence & Air Advisor – since August 2020

Position 25 - Defence Office Chief Clerk

(2) Yes, the Mission is fully operational.

(3) The services being provided by the office are Civic and Immigration services

which are rendered from 09h00 until 15h00 at Whitehall, SW1A 2DD.

All Consular services are rendered such as:

  • The processing of legal documents for members of the public for use in South Africa. (mainly buying and selling property and banking matters)
  • Support for the Department of Justice in matters relating to the UK. (Child maintenance, Service of Process, Extradition etc.)
  • Supporting South Africans in distress according to the Consular handbook in matters relating to the death of a family member. (Contacting police, hospital, coroner etc. and arranging quotes for repatriation of remains.

Dealing with the Department of Health to arrange permits).

  • Facilitating visas for diplomats travelling to South Africa.

(4) All services are currently being provided.

(a) and (b) Not applicable

17 June 2021 - NW1511

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has (a) made and/or (b) implemented any plans to assist small-, medium- and micro-enterprises to avert the cybersecurity risks they might be vulnerable to in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and the rise of cybercrimes; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?”

Reply:

The Department is well sensitised to the potential threats and risks posed to small enterprises. It is however important to note that the use of technology by small enterprises cannot be directly managed by the Department as this is an individual entity’s responsibility. Where the Department’s accountability lies is within the technology it exposes to small enterprises through its online platforms; and within this area, the Department has increased its own security measures and performs regular monitoring on potential breaches. Regular updates to the public via social media is maintained to inform of any risks or scams related to the Department.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER FOR SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1671

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)With reference to the Ministerial Advisory Team appointed by him and his response toquestion 967 on 15 April 2021 that the members of the team are being paid from the Mzansi Golden Economy Fund and in light of the fact that all grants due to artists from the Mzansi Golden Economy Fund were cancelled in 2020, how is the fund currently being utilised if artists could not benefit from it; (2) what (a) amount has (i) been set aside for the Ministerial Advisory Team and (ii) been paid to each member to date and (b) processes are being followed by the members of the team to consult with or report to the sector about their team work since they are representatives of the sector

Reply:

1. The Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAT) is not compensated from the MGE grant funding but the MGE Goods and Services budget. Last year’s funding was reprioritized for the Relief Funds precisely to benefit arts practitioners.

2 (a) (i) The total budget allocated to the established Ministerial Advisory Team (MAT) amounts to three million (R3 million)

(ii) To- date a total number of 28 meetings were held and a total amount of R 256,840.22 has been paid to the MAT.

b) The MAT has been in operation since end of February 2021, to date the engagements have primarily been strategizing and consulting with various stakeholders on areas of intervention that the Department will like to embark on.

To this end, a feedback session has been schedule for later in June 2021 to provide information on the developments thus far.

17 June 2021 - NW1557

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).   Whether his department has reviewed the mandate of loveLife since its inception; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the reasons that (a) his department continues to fund loveLife despite it has not having achieved its strategic objectives (details furnished) for over 10 years and (b) Love life is organising sport events given that sport is not its core mandate?

Reply:

(1).   loveLife responded to indicate that having consulted the then Department of Sport and Recreation SA, the mandate of loveLife was reviewed in 2010.

From 2011, the loveLife mandate included the assistance the department in encouraging recreation at community and school level (for the schools not part of the Schools Sport Programme) by having loveLife ground-BREAKERs (youth implementers) organise sport and recreational activities that encompass youth health messaging to foster behavioural change among young people to steer them away from risky behaviour like alcohol abuse, gangsterism, violence, etc. and also encourage physical activity as a way to combat non-communicable diseases that are made worse by inactivity.

(2)(a). The strategic objectives referred to were from the inception of the organisation in 1999 to the 2010. These objectives ended with the “love to be there” campaign that was run by loveLife to encourage young people to be part of the history-making 2010 World Cup that was hosted by South Africa. A study done in 2012 shows that loveLife did achieve their strategic objective in that period which was to respond to the number of youth contracting HIV by increasing knowledge as that was what loveLife’s mandate was based on, the increased knowledge among young people about HIV, and all Sexual and Reproductive and Health related information. (SRHR)

(2)(b). The NSRP strategic outcomes advocates for the department to take a lead with regard to the implementation of the Mass Participation related programmes. As an active nation pillar, this programme is implemented together with the Federations and other NGO’s whose mandate is aligned to the strategic objectives of the department. The partnership with loveLife and NGO has been revised to ensure that it aligns to the mandate of the department. Of critical importance to this partnership, is the fact that loveLife mainly targets the Youth in school and out-of-school, to address among others, lifeskills and health and behavioural aspects. To do this they have a programme groundBREAKERS, who are themselves, young people who help deliver the programme. These groundBREAKERS, are skilled both in lifeskills and coaching, with the aim of ensuring that they can use sport to communicate positive value to the youth.

This loveLife as a strategic partner of DSAC, forms part of the NGO’s that are able to work with the Sport Stakeholders to roll-out sport and recreation activities in their centres.

17 June 2021 - NW1485

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McGluwa, Mr H to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case;

Reply:

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

DUE TO PARLIAMENT: FRIDAY, 4 JUNE 2021

1485. Mr G G McGluwa (DA) to ask the Minister of Small Business Development:

(1) Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case;

(2) whether her department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard? NW1691E

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) did not have any work exchange programme with the Republic of Cuba and has not employed any Cuban Nationals. There are no plans in the pipeline in this regard.

  1. Not applicable.
  2. Not applicable.

_________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER FOR SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1418

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her funded/contributed to the supply and/or installation of the production line for the manufacture of protective masks at a certain factory (name and details furnished); if so, (a) to what value and (b) on what date; (2) whether her department has awarded any tenders for the supply of (a) masks or (b) shoes to the specified factory; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what is the (aa) value, (bb) extent and (cc) number of each tender and (ii) on what date was each tender awarded?” NW1615E

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD), nor its agencies – the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agencies (sefa), have not funded /contributed to the supply and/or installation of the production line for the manufacture of protective masks from the Dick Whittington Shoe Factory in Pietermaritzburg.

(2) The Department has not awarded any tender to any factory for the supply of masks. The masks procured in March 2020 were procured through a quotation process.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1653

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether the Mandela House has been closed down; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the reasons for the closure and (b) how will it be resolved?

Reply:

No, the Mandela House is operating.

(a). The Mandela House is operating under normal trading under the management of the liquidators.

(b). Not applicable as the museum is operating.

17 June 2021 - NW1673

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). Who are the beneficiaries of the R45 million that has been paid for professional services for the building of the Limpopo theatre, (b) what are the actual services that were rendered and (c) who, from the theatre sector, has been appointed as a professional consultant to the project to ensure that the theatre meets the needs of the sector?

Reply:

a) The Limpopo Creative Economy Practitioner and local services providers will be the beneficiaries as the National Department of Sport, Arts and Culture will be transferring R45 000 000.00 over a period of three financial years to the Provincial Department of Sport, Arts and Culture.

b) The professional services rendered so far by the Limpopo Creative Economy Practitioners, has been in terms of conceptualization, designing, implementation and professional management of the entire construction of the Limpopo Theatre. The construction of the Theatre is expected to commence in February 2022.

c) The Provincial Department as the custodian of the project has consulted with Practitioners in the sector on the concept, design and construction of the Limpopo Theatre.

17 June 2021 - NW1682

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) are the reasons that (i) no applications for tour guides have been processed since the implementation of the new computer system of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority and (ii) the system is (aa) hard copy and (bb) online driven and (b) is being done to fix the challenges in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i)   According to the CATHSSETA report, there were 778 tour guide learner applications from the legacy data, which was transferred into the new system. 1 230 New applications of tour guide learners were processed on the new system.

(ii)  Training providers were requested to upload documents to the system, as well as submit hard copies as a security measure during the implementation of the system.  At that stage, CATHSSETA needed to ensure that the system functioned properly in relation to the management of learner documents. 

(b) The SETA is considering the physical submission of documents to be optional and stakeholders will be advised accordingly.

17 June 2021 - NW1616

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which technical vocational education and training colleges breached the funding claims regulations in (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 and (b) what measures are in place to address this?

Reply:

(a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) pays allowances directly to students enrolled at 44 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges through the wallet system. Furthermore, NSFAS transfers funds for the allowances of qualifying students enrolled at six colleges that are responsible for making payments to their respective students. The following TVET colleges make allowance payments to their NSFAS students:

  • College of Cape Town;
  • Northlink;
  • False Bay;
  • Boland;
  • West Coast; and
  • South Cape.

The below responses are based on data obtained from NSFAS, as the Department is still in the process of obtaining the necessary information from the six colleges responsible for disbursing allowances.

(i) 2020

In terms of the NSFAS report, 12 colleges contravened the Bursary Rules and Guidelines by lodging student claims for tuition fees exceeding their respective tuition allocations. Furthermore, 26 colleges contravened the bursary policy by lodging claims for accommodation for more than 40% of its NSFAS recipients. Given the broad geographic footprint of TVET colleges with 265 campuses across the country, the Bursary Rules and Guidelines stipulates that colleges may lodge accommodation allowances to a maximum of 40% of its NSFAS recipients.

(ii)    2021

In terms of the latest NSFAS report, allowances have been paid to all qualifying students. The report indicates that 22 colleges are not complying with the requirement on claims for accommodation, as their claims exceeded 40% of their NSFAS recipients.

(b) The Department has introduced various measures to address these challenges and issued a communique in March 2021 compelling colleges to ensure that the awards for allowances are made within the available budget, as the funds earmarked for allowances have been fully allocated to colleges for 2021. The Department, together with NSFAS, convened a meeting on 13 May 2021, with colleges exceeding the stipulated percentage regarding student claims for accommodation. These colleges were urged to work on a strategy that will ensure their compliance with the Bursary Rules and Guidelines in respect of the awards for allowances. Some of these colleges have already shared the strategies they are putting in place to manage the excessive demand for accommodation allowances.

17 June 2021 - NW1618

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with regard to the National Arts Council Act, Act 56 of 1997, which requires public participation in the appointment of members to the governing council of the National Arts Council (NAC), and in light of the fact that his department did not publicise the names of the four new members appointed to the NAC and call for public comment which is irregular, he will follow the proper process and advertise the names of the persons for public comment, as the four new members may not operate as council members without their names having been published and a public participation process having unfolded; if not, why not; if so, on what date will he advertise?

Reply:

The members referred to were appointed to fill the vacancies that were created when other Council members resigned. The four Council members who were appointed to replace those that resigned were part of the process which was presided over by an independent panel. These members were interviewed in public, their names were published for public to comment, and no objections were received against them.

The names of Council members who replaced those that resigned are Ms Linda Mvanana, Ms Layla Swart, and Ms Marion Mbina-Mthembu. There is no additional legal requirement that these members’ names be published for public comments. The appointment of these members was made in terms of section 4 of the National Arts Council Act, as amended, and as such, they are not precluded from operating as Council members.

Due to the challenges of the National Arts Council and the fact that it is currently facing legal challenges, the Minister decided to appoint one additional Council member (Advocate Steve Kekana) who has legal expertise to join the Council of the National Arts Council to boost the legal capacity of Council.

17 June 2021 - NW1517

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) the Msunduzi Local Municipality, (b) the Kwa-Zulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and/or (c) her department have any plans to (i) formalise, (ii) undertake an upgrading of informal settlement programme and (iii) provide relief to the residents of Jika Joe Informal Settlement in Ward 33 of the Msunduzi Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(i) Honourable Member, the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and Msunduzi Local Municipality confirmed that plans are afoot to formalise the Jika Joe informal settlements.

(ii) I have been informed that the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements will undertake an upgrading of informal settlement programme within Msudunzi Local Municipality, which will include the Jika Joe informal settlement. The Municipality has identified Ethembeni and Signal Hill Housing Projects, which are at Planning Stage, for the potential beneficiaries who will not qualify to rent in the Community Residential Units.

(iii) The Kwazulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements provided relief for people whose shacks were destroyed by a fire. The 174 beneficiaries were given materials in 2020 to rebuild their dwellings. It must also be noted that more than 350 temporary structures were built from 2014 to cater for the people whose shacks were affected by fire and those who were on the flood line and under power lines.

17 June 2021 - NW1554

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether the residents of Jika Joe Informal Settlement will benefit from the council rental units (CRU) that are currently under construction in Ward 33, in Msunduzi, which will be known as Tathum Mews CRU’s; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) how will the allocation of the Tathum Mews CRU’s in Ward 33 be managed, (b) what are the rental costs for each CRU at Tathum Mews and (c) by what date will (i) such allocations and (ii) rental agreements be concluded; (3) whether the beneficiary list for persons qualifying for council rental assistance from the Msunduzi Local Municipality in respect of Tathum Mews has been finalised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the beneficiary list?

Reply:

(1) Honourable Member, I have been informed that the residents of Jika Joe Informal Settlements will benefit from the rental units under construction in Msunduzi Local Municipality. They are the primary beneficiaries of the new development as per the target market of the CRU Policy. The project is still in the first phase of construction.

(2) (a) The process of allocation has commenced per the Tenant Management Plan approved by Council and in line with the CRU Allocation Policy. Several community engagements have been held, requesting people to register at the office located at the CRU Complex.

(b) The rental charges range from R500 to R800 per month and are calculated at 30% of income.

(c) (i) It is anticipated that the first occupation will take place by 1 July 2021.

(ii) Rental agreements are expected to be concluded by the end of June 2021.

(3) A social survey of residents of the informal settlements was undertaken in 2018 and the information was updated in February 2021. The list of prospective tenants for the CRU project is available, however, we are not in a position to share it as it contains confidential individual personal details.

17 June 2021 - NW1672

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he will furnish details regarding the (a) timeline and (b) processes that will lead to the PE Opera House being gazetted as a cultural institution as he reported a year ago and recently during budget vote 37 that it will be awarded the status according to the cultural institutions act, act 119 of 1998; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) & (b). Mandela Bay Theatre Complex previously known as PE Opera House has been gazetted and declared as a Cultural Institution. The declaration was signed by Minister and announced on 31 May 2021; it was then published on June 4, 2021.

17 June 2021 - NW1683

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) How are tour guide trainers and educators assessed by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority as qualified, (b) what criteria are used to ensure that trainers meet the highest standards, (c) what are the set standards, (d) what qualifications are required in order for a person to qualify as a trainer and/or educator, (e) on what date was the curriculum updated and improved (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2021, (f) what were the updates and improvements and (g) who assessed and concluded the updates and improvements in each case?

Reply:

(a) The Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) accredits tour guide trainers based on the 8-core criteria document that was developed by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).  

(b) The eight core criteria are used to ensure that trainers meet the highest standards. Trainers must submit the following policies and procedures:

  1. Policy Statement: The organisation’s aims, objectives and purpose.
  2. Quality Management System: Outline procedures that implement quality management.
  3. Review Mechanisms: Outline how the implementation of policies would be monitored. 
  4. Programme Delivery: Outline how learning programmes would be developed, delivered and evaluated.
  5. Staff Policies: Outline policies and procedures for staff selection, appraisal and development.
  6. Learner Policies: Policies and procedures for the selection of learners are outlined, and learners are given guidance and support.
  7. Assessment Policies: Outline policies and procedures for forms of assessments that are used and how they are managed.
  8. Management System and Policies: Indicate the financial, administrative and physical structures and resources of the organisation, and procedures of accountability within the organisation.

(c) The set standards are the qualifications that are on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). There are two guiding qualifications, i.e. National Certificate: Tourism: Guiding, NQF level 2, SAQA ID 17174; and Further Education and Training Certificate: Tourist Guiding, NQF level 4, SAQA ID 71549. There are also skills programmes for Culture, Nature and Adventure Guiding.

(d) Over and above the trainers being tour guides themselves, they must be trained on the following unit standards:

-   Conduct outcomes-based assessment – SAQA ID 115753

-   Conduct moderation of outcomes-based assessments – SAQA ID 115759

(e) – (g) In the past three financial years there have been no improvements or changes to the qualifications as the industry has not requested them. However, there has been a need to re-align the qualifications to meet the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations standards, i.e. occupational qualifications. The curriculum is not improved by the SETA but by the accredited trainers. The SETA’s responsibility is to improve the set standards, i.e. the qualifications that are on the NQF with input from the guiding industry.

17 June 2021 - NW1332

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she has formally submitted the final justification and draft legislation regarding the merger of the Small Enterprise Finance Agency and the Small Enterprise Development Agency into a single entity to the Minister of Public Service and Administration and the Minister of Finance for consultation and inputs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The business case has been submitted to the relevant Ministers for inputs. The Department is currently taking the draft business case through government structures to get Cabinet endorsement on the preferred option first before finalisation of the business case which will then be followed by the drafting of the relevant legislation.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

15 June 2021 - NW1662

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with reference to the qualifications of a certain person (name and details furnished), more specifically the insignias the specified person was wearing on the left and right chest when the Commander-in-Chief announced the person’s new appointment in the SA National Defence Force, the person completed the academic and practical training in order to wear the insignias of a Special Forces operator, as well as a qualified paratrooper; if not, (a) what are the reasons that the person wore the two insignias, (b) what qualified the person to wear it on the left and right chest and (c) who awarded the person the right to wear the insignias; if so, (i) on what dates did the person complete the required training, (ii) what total number of Special Forces operations did the person take part in and (iii) what total number of parachute jumps has the person completed?

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)The member completed similar courses in Cuba in 1983.

(c) and (i)On a parade officiated by erstwhile C J Ops on 24 March 2006, the member was awarded honorary Special Force (SpecF) insignia; and again on a parade hosted by then Officer Commanding 44 Parachute Regiment on 05 September 2016, he was awarded honorary Dispatcher wings.

(ii) SpecF operations is a top secret matter.

(iii) Only operators currently executing SpecF tasks are required to maintain a jump log, it is not applicable to the member being enquired on.

15 June 2021 - NW1113

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department, as the majority shareholder in the Solms-Delta farm, has placed the farm in the Stellenbosch municipal area under business rescue; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was it placed under business rescue, (b) who are the business rescue practitioners and (c) what amount has been paid to the business rescue practitioners since the farm was placed under business rescue; (2) whether the business rescue practitioners produced a business rescue plan; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a copy of the plan; (3) (a) what is the current financial position of the farm and (b) how has the financial situation changed since the business rescue practitioners were appointed?

Reply:

1. No. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development is not a shareholder in the business of Solms Delta.

a) The Department did not put the Solms-Delta farm under business rescue. The shareholders are the ones who resolved to put it under business rescue on 27 July 2017. Ms Timme (first BRP appointed) was subsequently replaced by Tayfin Forensic and Investigative Auditors on 01 November 2018), when the former applied to the high court to place the business under liquidation. In response to Ms Timme’s action, the beneficiaries themselves approached the Department for assistance and intervention. This led to an out of court settlement between, the interested parties, which resulted in the appointment of Tayfin Forensic and Investigative Auditors on 01 November 2018

b) The business rescue practitioners were Price Waterhouse Cooper (PWC), represented by Ms Alison Mary Timme and Tayfin Forensic and Investigative Auditors, represented by Mr Mahier Tayob. The former resigned following the out of court settlement.

c) The amount of R1 120 293.00 was paid to the business rescue practitioners since the farm was placed under business rescue.

2. Yes. If the Business Rescue Practitioner agrees.

(3)(a) The current position of the farm is that the business is operating, even though not at full capacity partly due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

b) The financial situation has not changed much and that is why there is a meeting of stakeholders scheduled for 18 May 2021 to try to resolve the challenges.

15 June 2021 - NW1279

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the special COVID-19 report of the Auditor-General, what (a) number of beneficiaries were over-paid in May 2020, (b) amount was overpaid and (c) number of beneficiaries were not paid as a result of the specified overpayments; 2) (a) what consequence management measures were instituted due to the food parcels not agreeing with the content list of the Social Relief of Distress grant and (b) how was the distribution of food parcels monitored; (3) whether the food parcels only reached the intended beneficiaries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) Following a reconciliation of all available information, a total of 31 929 grants were paid to clients who did not qualify for these in the period from May to July 2020. The grants were paid as the information available to SASSA at the time excluded databases of COVID relief paid to citizens through other government programmes such as the relief to sportsmen, spaza shop owners and farmers. In addition, SASSA only received the database from correctional services which included information on inmates in correctional facilities later in the process.

(b) A total of R11 175 950 was paid to citizens who did not qualify.

(c) No qualifying beneficiary was not paid as a result of the above incorrect payments.

2(a) All food parcels which were identified as not complying with the standard set for food parcels issued by SASSA were replaced by the relevant service provider.

(b) The distribution of food parcels was monitored by SASSA staff in the provinces, as the food parcels were distributed. SASSA staff were available at all distribution points to confirm the content of the food parcel, that the food parcel was collected by the approved beneficiary and that the invoices for food parcels distributed was received from the relevant service provider.

3. The food parcels were distributed to the approved applicants. Where an approved applicant did not arrive to collect the allocated food parcel, the parcel would be distributed to another approved beneficiary, after following a standard process to cancel the initial application and replace it with another applicant, who met the qualifying criteria.

The processes followed at the time were all manual, as SASSA was operating under Level 5 lockdown restrictions, with minimal staff available for this project.

In conclusion of the project, SASSA undertook a reconciliation process, to ensure that for every food parcel ordered and distributed, there was an approved application form; and that the support provided was captured on our grant system. This has taken a lot longer than initially planned, but has been now been completed.

15 June 2021 - NW1741

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What other strategies, besides new stipulations on courses funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, is the Government adopting and implementing to encourage the uptake of science, technology, engineering and mathematics and related courses in 2021 and (b) how are such strategies expected to influence (i) universities in general and (ii) the offering of social sciences and humanities in particular?

Reply:

(a) Since the introduction of the Performance Monitoring and Evaluation System in 2010 and subsequent Medium-Term Strategic Framework, the Department has been engaging with universities through enrolment planning on their targets for scarce skills areas.  In the new enrolment planning cycle, the targets for first time entering students into the scarce skills areas of engineering, life and physical sciences, human health, animal health and vet science, and teacher education are indicated in Table 1 below:

TABLE 1: 2020 to 2025 Proposed targets for first time entering students in scarce skills

 

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

16 152

16 647

17 085

17 639

18 100

18 317

Life and Physical Science

16 948

17 161

17 584

17 391

17 459

17 614

Human Health

9 796

10 155

10 418

10 838

11 155

11 516

Animal and Veterinary Science

1 116

1 154

1 194

1 209

1 229

1 257

Initial Teacher Education

22 752

22 746

22 788

22 855

22 951

23 380

The targets for all undergraduate enrolments for the scarce skills are in Table 2 below:

TABLE 2: 2020 to 2025 Proposed targets for all undergraduate qualifications in scarce skills

 

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

77 062

77 003

77 158

78 916

80 796

83 019

Life and Physical Science

58 267

59 240

60 613

61 218

62 092

62 890

Human Health

47 411

47 488

47 597

49 120

50 406

51 926

Animal and Veterinary Science

5 001

5 208

5 343

5 469

5 592

5 729

Initial Teacher Education

136 272

139 733

142 893

144 791

147 471

150 117

 (b) (i) Universities are funded through Teaching Input Units (TIUs) based on their approved enrolment plans.  If the universities adhere to the agreed upon targets, they will receive their full funding in terms of their approved TIUs.  If they are more than 2% under-enrolled, universities will be penalised financially and if they are more than 2% over-enrolled in their first-time entering enrolments, they will also be penalised due to the impact which over-enrolment has on the sector.

(ii) The above-mentioned strategy is not expected to have a significant impact on the Social and Human Sciences as the enrolment plan targets are also set in terms of the percentage in the Human Sciences (includes Social Sciences).  The targets are reflected in Table 3 below:

15 June 2021 - NW1528

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With regard to the local production of beef and importation of beef products in the Republic, (a) what percentage of beef consumed in the Republic is (i) produced locally and (ii) imported and (b) from which countries is the beef imported; (2) what strategies is the Government implementing to boost local production of beef and ensure self-reliance, given that the Republic is a naturally conducive environment for beef production?

Reply:

(1) (a) South Africa fluctuates between being a net exporter or importer of beef. Drought and FMD outbreaks are the major factors that contributes to the direction of beef import or export. The country currently produces 1 081 900 tons and consumes about 1 065, 000 tons of beef per year. It is currently a net exporter of beef, with only 3 000 tons imported in 2019/2020. The country exported 37 000 tons in the same period. South Africa consumes just over 97% of the beef that is produced locally and only about 3% from the imports.

1 (b) From which countries is the beef imported;

In the past 12 months live animals were imported mainly from Botswana & Namibia for feedlots. In that period 383,400 live animals were imported from these countries. Beef cuts that were either frozen or fresh were imported from the following countries:

• Botswana

• Lesotho

• Namibia

• Swaziland

• Australia

• New Zealand

• France

• Germany

• Republic of Ireland

• Spain

• Switzerland

• the United Kingdom

• the USA

• Argentina

• Brazil and

• Uruguay.

2. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is implementing Beef Recording and Improvement Schemes including the transformative Kaonofatso Ya Dikgomo scheme, that tracks performance of the individual beef animals farmed in South Africa under stud and commercial farming. The scheme also focuses on getting a beef farmer to be on a continuous improvement path through training and linkages with good markets. DALRRD also strategically included beef farming support on all funding scheme i.e. CASP; Ilema/Letsema; Blended funding and the Jobs Fund. DALRRD is in the advance stage of implementing the Livestock Identification and Traceability system which will help with health control and market access and thus improved productivity and profitability of the sector.

15 June 2021 - NW1527

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What challenges are faced by small-scale indigenous farmers in the Republic during the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) whether her department has provided disaster-specific relief to the specified farmers as was done for other economic sectors during the pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Although agriculture was declared as essential service, smallholder production activities were negatively affected in the sector as they struggled to access their fields during initial lockdown period. There were post-harvest losses because of agro-logistics challenges experienced by farmers. Many smallholder farmers experienced loss of income and were also unable to prepare for the next planting season. There were reduced availability and access to extension services particularly during levels 5 and 4 of lockdown. There were other challenges such as:

  • Closure of input dealerships and temporary hike in input prices in the first two months of lockdown as well as challenges in travelling to purchase inputs due to movement restrictions during lockdown levels 4 and 5. This included the massive congestion at the Durban port as Cape Town was considered the epicenter of the pandemic from around April to end May/early June 2020
  • Lack of transport/slow processing of permits impeded the ability of workers to get to work in the first months of the outbreak of the pandemic and the general misinterpretation of disaster management regulations by law enforcement agencies
  • During levels 5 to 3 of lockdown, almost all types of informal markets where smallholder farmers supply their farm produce were closed, including those that trade in cooked / prepared food. Informal food traders were not allowed to operate during the hard lockdown without permit and distribution plans for the perishable foods already harvested); & even when they were eventually allowed to operate, the customer base was significantly reduced.

(2) Yes. The Department provided disaster-specific relief to farmers. The Minister of Agriculture of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development secured funding of R1.2 Billion to assist smallholder farmers during April and May 2020. The fund was able to assist about 14 400 distressed smallholder farmers due to COVID-19 pandemic. A further R1 billion was allocated to the Department from the Presidential Employment Stimulus Initiative (PESI) to assist about 74 626 subsistence farmers who were not considered for the R1.2 Billion COVID-19 Relief. The Department is still implementing the R1 billion PESI intervention through e-vouchers.

15 June 2021 - NW1515

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether there has been any feedback yet from the Treasury with regard to her department’s request to have the R350 grant extended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The request for the extension of the R350 grant has been processed through the relevant structures within government and as soon as guidance has been provided, the Department will be in a position to respond to the public accordingly.

15 June 2021 - NW1529

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) current status of cotton production in the Republic for the 2020-21 financial year, in terms of yields and (b) viability of the cotton production, given the current importing trends of cotton products?

Reply:

a) The major production areas for cotton in South Africa are Kwa-Zulu Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and North-West Provinces. The 2020/21 cotton crop is just over 80 000 lint bales for April 2021, which is considerably lower compared to the 2019/20 of 134 230 lint bales. This is largely because some cotton farmers have switched to food crops because of relatively good prices and the lateness of the marketing of the previous season’s crop that contributed to a contraction in planted area. In certain production regions, excessive wet and adverse conditions during planting season led to scaling down of number of hectares for cotton. Therefore, the 2020/21 cotton plantings are considerably lower compared to the previous season, which led to lower cotton crop volumes. The table below is an illustration of the status of cotton in the country.

 

Production

2021/21 estimate

2019/20

estimate

Hectares irrigated

5 836

11 543

Hectares dryland

11 122

16 132

Total ha

16 958

27 675

Yield: seed cotton kg per ha

Yield irrigated

4 542

4 393

Yield dryland

1 577

1 206

Total production of 200kg lint bales

80 235

134 230

b) South Africa is known for producing good quality cotton despite many challenges it is facing. It is true that the increase in volumes of imported cotton threatens the viability and sustainability of the cotton industry in South Africa. Government and stakeholders in the cotton sector established the Sustainable Cotton Cluster (SCC) in June 2014 led by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition. The SCC connects the entire cotton value chain under one umbrella: farmers, gins, yarn manufacturers, weavers and knitters, dyers, finishing plants and retailers. In the six years it’s been in operation, cotton production and processing has increased 800% and almost 50,000 jobs have been created or maintained in the cotton sector.

The outbreak of Covid 19 had a negative impact on this good initiative. During the lockdown harvesting and processing continued, but exports were suspended, striking a severe blow to the sector. Since then, export restrictions have been lifted, but global demand for cotton is decreasing and so are global prices. With around 80% of locally produced cotton being exported, this has significant implications for the sector. At the same time, severe financial strain on retailers is adding pressure. One of the main purposes of the SCC is to increase consumption of cotton by local retailers, aiming to increase local procurement from the pre-Covid average of 45% to 63% by 2030. Government is positive that by addressing the challenges, growth could be restored in 2021/22 and beyond.

15 June 2021 - NW1235

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department is taking any initiatives to address structural digital inequalities in e-learning in primary schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether, in view of the much-feared third wave of COVID-19 which might dawn on the Republic soon, with anticipated learning losses for all learners, and given that due to the digital divide between fee-paying and non-fee paying schools more losses are anticipated for learners in non-fee paying schools, her department has a long-term sustainable solution to fight the digital divide for primary school learners who are disadvantaged; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1) The Department of Basic Education has developed a comprehensive plan to provide learners and teachers with digitised content as well as Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSMs). Different types of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) gadgets will be provided to learners in the Primary as well as Secondary schools, based on the type of teaching and learning resources that will be installed on these devices.  The department has also developed the Remote Learning Strategy that ensures education continuity during the period imposed by the pandemic.  This includes the Tswelopelo platform for primary school learners, and the zero-rating of education sites.

(2) The Department of Basic Education is working with State Information Technology Agency  (SITA) and National Treasury to put all the necessary procurement processes in place to provide learners and teachers with ICT devices.  The DBE has partnered with the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies to zero-rate over 300 education sites, that provide digital and video content to all learners.  Furthermore, the DBE has developed a comprehensive recovery plan for teaching and learning that includes broadcast through TV OVHD Channel; use of both public and community radio broadcast; and printed materials have been made available and are collected at schools by parents and caregivers to complement all the other efforts by the department.  

15 June 2021 - NW1603

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)In view of the latest Language Policy Framework for Higher Education Institutions, published by his department on 30 October 2020, which uses a certain definition to define indigenous languages in the Republic (details furnished), Afrikaans and all Khoe- and San languages, such as Khoekhoegowab, are excluded thereby effectively designating the specified languages to the status of being non-indigenous, on what factual basis does the policy exclude both Afrikaans and Khoekhoegowab from the definition of indigenous South African languages, thereby effectively designating the languages as non-indigenous; (2) whether, since the policy regards both Afrikaans and Khoekhoegowab as foreign and/or non-indigenous languages in the Republic, he will indicate in which countries the specified languages are indigenous; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, since the policy explicitly states that an indigenous language is a language that is native to a region or country and spoken by indigenous people, the Government regards the speakers of Afrikaans and Khoekhoegowab as foreign, alien or otherwise non-indigenous to the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The definition of indigenous languages in the "Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions" (2020) was developed following broad consultations with different language practitioners and stakeholders in the country. In line with the Higher Education Act, the Department relied heavily on the advice from the Council on Higher Education, which made substantive input on the content of the policy, including the list of definitions included in the policy's initial draft. The Department also sought consistency in the use of terms with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, which uses the term "indigenous languages", to underscore the importance of recognising and developing historically marginalised languages of the people of South Africa.

Alternatively, the policy framework could have used the terminology "indigenous African languages" as commonly used in literature. However, this expression could easily have been construed as excluding Afrikaans as it emphasizes the "Bantu" origins of the languages and their wide usage by the native population. The definition of the term "indigenous languages" in the policy is used purely to highlight the historical marginalisation of African languages as a result of both colonial and apartheid legacies, and the need to develop these languages for scholarly ends.

The policy framework does not in any way exclude or disadvantage Afrikaans or any other South African language, for that matter, as the need to develop all official South African languages other than English is well articulated in the policy, and in fact is, its underlying motive. The main objective of the policy is not to argue or settle the debate around the issue of indigeneity or otherwise of languages, but rather to highlight the fact of historical marginalisation of African languages in academia and propose ways and mechanisms in which this historical injustice could be corrected.

In terms of the Khoi language, the definition includes the following “an indigenous language is a language that is native to a region or country and spoken by indigenous people”. It, therefore, includes the Khoi language family.

These definitions should be read in the context of the policy and its aims. The policy aims “to contribute to transformation in higher education with specific reference to universities through enhancing the status and roles of previously marginalised South African languages to foster institutional inclusivity and social cohesion”. This policy does in no way, imply that Afrikaans must be removed/or not further developed. It simply aims to achieve the aspirations of Section 29(2) of the Constitution by making sure that all previously marginalised languages enjoy parity of esteem and that language is not an obstacle to access for all South Africans.

As indicated above, the Policy Framework does not exclude Afrikaans and San languages as indigenous languages. The definition adopted in the Policy when read correctly within the broader context of the framework is meant to highlight the colonial and apartheid history of the exclusion of indigenous African languages or simply indigenous languages of Bantu origin. At no point is the Policy intended to settle the debate of the indigeneity or otherwise of Afrikaans or any other language.  

15 June 2021 - NW1534

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Given that budget adjustments were made in response to COVID-19 and its impact, resulting in the decrease of the technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges budget, while the infrastructure efficiency grant is also projected to decrease, as presented in Budget Vote 17, what are the implications of the specified adjustments on creating a competent workforce, which is one of the objectives of the National Development Plan and the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan; 2) how do the specified budget reductions affect the employability of graduates, especially from TVET colleges, which enrol over 700 000 students, mainly from economically disadvantaged households; (3) what measures has his department put in place to ensure that targets set for the Department of Basic Education will be reached, despite challenges such as COVID-19?

Reply:

(1) To assess the real impact of the proposed Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) system budget cuts, it is important that the earmarked budget provided by National Treasury for the purpose of implementing the TVET Post Provisioning Norms (PPN) be excluded from the baseline increase, as it is actually being subsidised through a baseline reduction from the TVET Direct Transfers (subsidies). The PPN allocation is, therefore in real terms not a baseline increase, as the TVET sector and public TVET colleges will receive no additional funding for this purpose in particular.

The following table reflects in real terms the proposed budget reduction for the TVET sector over the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), which excludes the PPN:

Budget

2021/22

R'000

2022/23

R'000

2023/24

R'000

Total

R'000

TVET Compensation of Employees (CoE) budget cut 

(908,399) 

(1,206,281) 

(951,175) 

(3,065,855)

TVET subsidy budget cut 

(100,000) 

 (100,000) 

(100,478)

(300,478) 

Sub-Total 

(1,008,399) 

 (1,306,281) 

(1,051,653) 

(3,366,333)

TVET operationalisation of new campuses budget cut

(16,664) 

(22,136) 

(31,648) 

(70,448)

TVET Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant budget cut 

(204,282) 

(265,613) 

(458,610) 

(928,505)

Total

(1,229,345) 

(1,594,030) 

(1,541,912) 

(4,365,287)

Impact on student enrolments: TVET CoE and subsidies 

 

 

 

 

Budget reduction % 

-8.39% 

-10.47% 

-8.60% 

-9.17%

Annual Performance Plan Targets 

 

 

 

 

Headcount enrolments in TVET colleges (State funded) 

505 770

 

 

 

TVET enrolment reduction 

(42 419) 

(52 978) 

(43 492) 

(138 889)

As can be noted from the above table, the budget for the rest of the MTEF has been reduced by R3.3 billion affecting the TVET Compensation of Employees (CoE) and TVET Direct Transfers (subsidies), which translates to a reduction of student headcount enrolments by approximately 138 889 over the MTEF period. 

(2)   For many young people, attending a TVET college secures them with the skills and opportunities for employment in industries and businesses, and for some to venture into self-employment. A reduced budget will restrict access to TVET colleges for many students who come from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, thereby exacerbating the challenges of escaping the generational trap of poverty.

(3)  The Department has been supporting TVET colleges in developing strategies to overcome the difficulties faced by the contracting budget:

-     The Department has identified the need for TVET colleges to expand access by developing partnerships with both private and public sector enterprises, and has incorporated this as a performance target for colleges to achieve. Colleges with partnerships have been able to increase their enrolments despite facing constrained budgets.

-     The Department has encouraged colleges to initiate online learning as a platform of learning that can be accessed by a larger number of individuals that do not require to be physically at the college.

-     In line with this and in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, computers will be disbursed to TVET students thereby enabling the digital revolution for expanded blended and online learning.

All these innovations will boost the quality and quantity of competency achieved by young people attending TVET colleges.

15 June 2021 - NW1439

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, in light of the number of social grants that increased from 2 million in 1994 to 18,2 million in December 2020, she has found that the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) can sustain the R190 billion annual social assistance programme, taking into account the extra 6 million unemployed Social Relief of Distress grant beneficiaries since May 2020; (2) whether SASSA is considering a more comprehensive social protection system; if not, how does SASSA envisage to sustain the current programme; if so, what are the relevant details of the programme?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department can sustain the social assistance budget of R190 billion. This allocation is made in terms of the Social Assistance Act (Act 13 of 2004),which mandates government to provide social assistance to specified categories of vulnerable people, including children, the elderly above the age of 60 years and persons with disabilities. All the social grants are means tested, with the exception of the foster child grant, to ensure that only the most vulnerable are able to access it. Over the past 20 years, the budget has been kept constant at around 3% of the national gross domestic product (GDP), thus staying more or less in line with the economic performance of the country.

2. Yes, the Department is considering a more comprehensive social security system, which will create a three-pillar system comprising social grants, contributory social insurance and voluntary insurance to ensure that those who are able to contribute towards their own social security provision are provided with appropriate institutional platforms to participate in social security cover. The policy makes extensive proposals for ensuring that all working people in the country, both in the formal sector and those in atypical forms of employment are mandated or encouraged to make contributions during their working years, so that they will have adequate income in the event of retirement, death or disability. These policy proposals will be the subject of wide stakeholder consultations during this financial year.

15 June 2021 - NW1569

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Who was appointed by her department as the administrator to ensure that the Richtersveld community sets up a committee to deal with issues of being a legal stakeholder within Alexcor and having legal mining rights, and that the community benefits fairly in terms of the set legal requirements, (b) what are the terms of reference for the specified administrator, (c) for what period will the administrator be appointed and (d) at what cost; 2) (a) what is the name of the trust account that has been set up for the community of Richtersveld, (b) what is the total amount of funding that is currently in the trust account, (c) who are the trustees of the trust account, (d) what is the total amount of funds that the trustees have withdrawn and (e) for what purpose(s) were the funds required?

Reply:

(1)(a) Following the application to the Northern Cape High Court, in terms of case number 961/2019, by the Director General of the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD), and the order granted by the same court on 28 February 2020; Honey Attorneys were appointed as Judicial Administrator of the Richtersveld Communal Property Association (CPA). Mr Don Madjiet is a representative of Honey Attorneys and responsible for the day-to-day running of the CPA as per the Court Order.

(b) The terms of reference of the Judicial Administrator are as per the Court order of 28 February 2020 of case number 961/2019. The Administrator is required to exercise powers of the executive committee of the Richtersveld CPA and perform all functions assigned to him in terms of the said court order. The Judicial Administrator has developed a comprehensive workplan which has been approved. The details are specified in the court order. Please refer to Annexure A.

(c) The Judicial Administrator is appointed for a period of three (3) years from the date of the court order i.e. 28 February 2020 until 28 February 2023.

(d) The costs are determined as per the rates of the Land Rights Management Facility (LRMF). The rate of compensation depends on the experience of the appointed Administrator and the hours he spends doing activities relating to the work of the CPA. The minimum is R475.00 to a maximum of R750.00 per hour, and the minimum per day is R3 800.00 to a maximum of R6 000.00.

(2)(a) In 1998 the Richtersveld community lodged a claim against the Government for dispossession of land under the Restitution of Land Rights Acts 22 of 1994. Following protracted court proceedings, the Constitutional Court awarded the land and mineral rights to the community of the Richtersveld. The Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) and the then Department of Land Affairs represented the Government in the settlement negotiations. The Deed of Settlement (DoS) was signed on 22 April 2007. In order to protect the interests of the community, the DoS sought to create a very comprehensive structure of Trusts and Companies to house the interests of the Community. The DoS signed by the parties in 2007 directed that at least two (2) Trusts: Richtersveld Community Trust and Richtersveld Investment Trust) and eight (8) companies must be established to manage and operate the various business dealings of the Richtersveld Community Claim and one (1) Communal Property Association as a land-holding entity. DALRRD is responsible for the CPA as determined through Communal Property Association Act, 28 of 1996. The Department of Justice, as the custodian of the Trusts in terms of the Trust Property Control Act 57 of 1988, is responsible for the administration and management of Trusts.

(b) DALRRD does not have any figures relating to the total amount of funding that is currently in the Trust account. It should be noted that Trusts are independent legal entities. Trustees had to report to the CPA on its operation but such could not be obtained from the previous CPA committee. The administrators function is to facilitate that such reports are consolidated and made available when meetings are convened and reports tabled to the members of the CPA.

(c) The term of office of the trustees has expired and DALRRD will assist the community with the elections of all structures within Richtersveld, as instructed by the Administration court order of 28 February 2020.

(d) DALRRD does not have that information and will only be known once trustees have reported to CPA members and submitted a report to the Administrator.

(e) Unknown at this stage.

15 June 2021 - NW1430

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 696 and question 697 on 23 March 2021, (a) on what date did the specified SA Social Security Agency (SASSA)-led investigations commence, (b) what number of the specified investigations (i) have actually been resolved and (ii) are still outstanding, (c) who specifically at SASSA is conducting the investigations, (d) what number of people at SASSA are currently responsible for conducting the investigations and (e) how are the investigations being conducted?

Reply:

With reference to her reply to question 696 and question 697 on 23 March 2021, (a) on what date did the specified SA Social Security Agency (SASSA)-led investigations commence

On 9 July 2020, SASSA received the findings from the Auditor General containing 20797 exceptions relating to the Covid-19 SRD grant. These exceptions included 216 government employees (PERSAL registered) who received the special COVID 19 SRD grant for the month of May 2020.

On 16 July 2020, SASSA received additional findings from the Auditor General containing 11845 exceptions of which 25 related to government employees (PERSAL registered) who received the special COVID 19 SRD grant for the month of May 2020.

Thus the total number of government employees who were flagged by the Auditor General is 241.

On 7 August 2020 SASSA received additional findings from the Auditor General containing 1513 exceptions consisting of company directors whose companies had received payment for government contracts. It is important to highlight that SASSA did not have access to the databases that the Auditor General used to identify the exceptions.

SASSA’s Project Management Office, upon consideration of the reports of the Auditor General and in consultation with management immediately suspended payments to certain categories of Covid 19 SRD grant beneficiaries. Among those that were immediately suspended were payments to the implicated government employees and the 1513 company directors.

As a result of the suspension of the payments, the implicated government employees each received R350 for May 2020 and no more.

SASSA engaged the Auditor General on the exceptions/findings with particular focus on some of the discrepancies. For instance, of the sample records tested from the findings provided by AGSA for instance the Grants it was noted that the applicants did not receive any grants in April 2020 – they only received grant payments from May 2020 and thus qualified to receive the R350 in May 2020. This was confirmed during a walkthrough with the AGSA on the system in terms of two records which AGSA themselves had chosen for verification and validation.

SASSA placed a focus on the 1513 company directors and the 241 government employees who received the Covid-19 SRD grant for further investigation.

SASSA has since written to the Departments where the implicated officials are employed so that disciplinary action can be taken including recovering the monies that were paid. Most of the implicated government employees work for the Department of Education (75), Department of Health (71) and the Department of Transport (45), with the remaining 50 officials spread across 16 departments.

The investigation into company directors who benefitted from the Covid funds was referred to the Fusion Centre that consists of various law enforcement bodies for further processing.

(b) what number of the specified investigations (i) have actually been resolved and (ii) are still outstanding

Please note that none of the investigations have been finalised. The Fusion Centre is still conducting the investigation into the company directors. Regarding, public servants, SASSA is engaging the relevant departments to ensure that the monies are recovered.

(c) who specifically at SASSA is conducting the investigations

The investigations at SASSA Head Office are conducted by 2 Fraud managers, 2 assistant managers and 1 specialist.

(d) what number of people at SASSA are currently responsible for conducting the investigations

The Fraud Management department at Head Office has 5 investigators, two of which are managers (level 12), 2 are assistant managers (level 10) and 1 level 8 specialist.

The post of General Manager: Fraud Management has been vacant for more than 5 years. However, this position has been advertised and a new GM: Fraud Manager has been appointed and expected to start duty as of 01 June 2021. The Fraud Management department does not have senior managers. In the interim the General Manager: Information Management has been assisting in managing the Department in addition to his normal functions.

This team is responsible for conducting all the investigations that emanate from Head Office or are cross-cutting, including SASSA card related fraud, general administration including supply chain matters, and the special Covid 19 SRD grant related matters.

(e) how are the investigations being conducted?

Due to shortage of staff, the SASSA fraud team relies primarily on data analytics in conducting its investigations. In addition the Fraud Management team works with law enforcement agencies, other state institutions and banking industry partners. Where possible the team also conducts field visits as part of the investigations.

It should be noted that the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) is also conducting investigations emanating from the presidential proclamations numbers R.37 of 2019 and R. 23 of 2020.

In addition, in February 2021 SASSA requested the Special Investigating Unit to assist the Agency with forensic specialists to conduct complex investigations.

14 June 2021 - NW1727

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What (a)(i) specific projects are anticipated for the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) of her department known as the Social Responsibility Implementation Programme (SRIP) in the 2021-22 financial year and (ii) are their details in each case, (b) amount has been budgeted for each project, (c) number of persons are to be employed in each project and (d) is the duration of each project; (2) what has she found will each project contribute to the skills development of the persons employed in the SRIP?

Reply:

(1)(a) and (d) The Member is kindly referred to the Annual Performance Plan for 2021/22-2023/24 that was tabled on 25 March 2021 (ATC no 43 of 2021) as well as the Presentation of 4 May 2021 to the Portfolio Committee on Tourism. Details of projects are reflected in the above-mentioned documents. As the member knows infrastructure projects will be implemented through the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) and they are currently in the planning phase.

(b) The skills projects are in an advanced procurement process. No budget can be disclosed until finalisation of such processes which include competitive bidding and price negotiations in some cases, as it will compromise the requisite competitiveness and could influence market prices. The member’s attention is drawn to slide 65 of the above-mentioned presentation where the overall budget for EPWP projects is reflected under Working for Tourism. This budget is also reflected in the Estimates of National Expenditure (ENE) page 779 as tabled by the Minister of Finance on 24 February 2021.

(c) No projects, are yet concluded for this Financial Year, thus the final number of persons employed/ gaining experiential work experience is not yet available. Slide 40 of the abovementioned presentation give an indication of the number of people that are targeted for the Work Opportunities of Infrastructure Projects and the target numbers for the Capacity Building projects are indicated in the presentation (Food Safety Programme, Chefs- Professional cookery, Wine Service Training Programme (Sommelier), Hospitality Youth Programme (HYP), Data Collectors and Tourism Safety Monitors)

(2) The participants in these projects are provided with accredited and non-accredited training and in some projects full accredited qualifications.

14 June 2021 - NW1403

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether the (a) Kwa-Zulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and (b) Msunduzi Local Municipality have (i) received and/or (ii) been allocated and/or (iii) spent any emergency funding from the Human Settlements Development Grant for the purposes of emergency relief for the victims of fire which occurred during the National State of Disaster at the Jika Joe Informal Settlement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) what amount has been spent and (bb) for what purposes?

Reply:

According to information received from the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and Msunduzi Local Municipality;

(i) & (ii) The HSDG funding has been received and allocated

(iii) In the aftermath of a fire that broke out in the Jika Joe Informal Settlement, the Msunduzi Local Municipality requested the assistance of the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements to appoint a service provider to supply building materials for the 174 households that were affected by the fire.

An amount of R1 510 416.00 was spent to supply building materials for the 174 households that were affected by the fire.

14 June 2021 - NW1540

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) has she found to be the reason that De Hoop Dam in Limpopo is unable to provide the communities around it with water, as was initially planned, (b) faults were made in the construction of the specified dam and (c) steps have been taken by her department to correct those faults, and hold the persons responsible to account?

Reply:

(a) The construction of the De Hoop Dam, Phase 2A, is complete and the dam is currently operational. With regard to Phase 2C, a steel pipeline from the De Hoop Dam to Steelpoort was completed and is also operational. The dam currently delivers raw water to Sekhukhune District Municipality through the water treatment plant at Ga-Malekana (Steel Bridge) and Steelpoort. It is the responsibility of the local authority to treat the water and arrange for its reticulation to communities.

Notwithstanding, it is critical to complete the remaining phases for the dam to be utilised optimally. The remaining phases and status are indicated below:

  • Phase 2B – Pipeline Flag Boshielo Dam to Mokopane, design complete, construction to commence once funding is available.
  • Phase 2D – New pipeline from Steelpoort to Mooihoek and Balancing Dam, pipeline design has been completed and final work packages for tender purposes was submitted to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) and are under review. The project is ready to commence with the construction stage pending confirmation of funding required for the entire project. In addition, delays in the finalisation of the acquisition of land may adversely impact the progress with the construction programme due to the required relocations/ resettlements.
  • Phase 2E – 10 km gravity pipeline from Mooihoek to Havercroft Junction, tender design stage. This phase is currently on hold due to no funding being allocated.
  • Phase 2F – 46 km gravity pipeline from Havercroft Junction to the existing Olifantspoort WTW, tender design stage. This phase is currently on hold due to no funding being allocated.

(c) The design and construction of the De Hoop Dam meets the requirements in terms of Chapter 12 of the National Water Act 36,1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998). The dam was developed under the auspices of an Approved Professional Person.

(d) Delays in completing the project cannot be attributed to specific officials, therefore, no officials of the department are being held to account in this regard.

14 June 2021 - NW1475

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

The Department has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010/11 financial year up to the 2020/21 financial year.

SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

(1) (a) South Africa and the Republic of Cuba signed a science and technology agreement in 2001 to promote development cooperation in S&T by means of exchanging scientists, research workers, specialists and scholars and exchange of scientific and technological information. However, the department has not employed any Cuban nationals and it is not due to employ any in the 2021-23 Medium Term Expenditure Framework period.

(b) There are no Cuban nations to be employed in the department, therefore there are no details of work to be carried out.

(c) There are no details for specific skills sets possessed by Cuban nationals to be communicated as there are no Cuban nationals employed/to be employed in the department.

(d) Details of the costs of employing Cuban nationals are not available as there are no Cuban nationals employed in the department.

2 (a) Despite having a bilateral agreement with the Republic of Cuba, the department has had no plans to employ Cuban nationals, and as such has not taken any steps to ensure that any specific skill set was not available amongst South African citizens.

(b) As no Cubans with specific skills set were employed by the department, the department has not taken any steps to ensure the specific skills set of the Cuban nationals were available in the Republic amongst South African citizens.

Some contextual issues

Following South Africa’s democratic transition, South Africa and Cuba established formal diplomatic relations on 15 May 1994 and opened resident Embassies in Pretoria (1994) and Havana (1995), respectively. Cuba has since become an established strategic partner for South Africa in the Latin American region. This led to the signing of an agreement on Scientific and Technological cooperation between the countries in 2001.

14 June 2021 - NW1747

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the fact that on the Annual Performance Plan of 2021-22 of her department, as well as her planning, through the destination development programme, to do some work at Ga-Tisana in the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality in Limpopo, (a) what exactly will her department be doing in the area and (b) how will the residents in the village and the surrounding areas benefit from the specified initiative?

Reply:

a) The Department will be undertaking work at the Tisani Cutural village situated in Ga-Tisani village, Makhuduthamaqa Local Municipality in the Sekhukhune District Municipality. The Department of Tourism has appointed the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) as the implementing agent to construction or complete the following: 10 chalets, 10 braai areas, conference facility, new entrance gate, swimming pool with ablution facility, cultural village with museum, furniture, security fence and landscaping.

b) Employment opportunities will be provided during the implementation of the project. The workers will mainly be from the villages of Tisani, Sekwati, Magukubu and Ga-Phaahla.

Non-accredited and accredited training will be also be provided during construction stage. After completion the project will be operational to create permanent jobs for local people.

14 June 2021 - NW1729

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Where is the Head Office of SA Tourism located, (b) what is the office’s (i) commercial grade and (ii) square meterage and (c) who owns the building in which the Tourism Head Office is located?

Reply:

(a) Bojanala House

90 Protea Road, Cnr Impala and Protea,

City of Johannesburg,

Sandton,

2196

Gauteng Province

b) (i) Zoning - Business 4 Offices as per Town Planning Regulations

(ii) Extent of property is 5 345.00 m². Gross building area including ground floor, first floor, basement, covered patios, balconies, guardhouse and refuse area is 6 025.00 m².

c) The building is owned by the South African Tourism Board.

14 June 2021 - NW1613

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has put any measures in place to assist the Harry Gwala District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal to resolve its water supply issues; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the measures?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is providing financial support to the Harry Gwala District Municipality in order to address water supply challenges. The support provided through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) is as indicated below:

a) The DWS is funding the implementation of the Greater Bulwer Bulk Water Project through RBIG. The project will supply water potable water to 23 729 households living within the Doctor Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma and Ubuhlebezwe Local Municipalities. The project is being implemented by the Harry Gwala District Municipality. The estimated project cost is R556 363 974. To date, the Department has transferred R352 973 445 to the municipality for implementation of the project.

b) Since the introduction of the WSIG in the 2016/17 financial year up to the 2020/21 financial year, the Department has transferred R384 518 000 to the municipality for implementation of various water and sanitation projects. The municipality has implemented the following projects funded through WSIG:

Name of project

Local municipality

Villages benefitting

Project status

Hlokozi Water Supply Phase 4

Ubuhlebezwe

Kwa-Bhengu, Nhlangwini, Sigcakini and Ngcikica

Completed

Nokweja/Mashumi Water Supply Scheme Upgrade Phases 1 and 2

Ubuhlebezwe

Nokweja, Mashumi, Webbstown, St Allois, Plainhill, Kwa Dladla, Nkoneni, Ngongoneni, Mazabekweni, Madungeni, Ntambama, Mdabu, Magaba and Bovini

Completed

KwaSpheni Water Supply Scheme

Ingwe

KwaSpheni, Maxhini, Maphempeni and Sokhela

Completed

Mqatsheni Stepmore Water Supply

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma

Mqatsheni and Stepmore

Completed

Ndawana Water Resource Upgrade

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana

Completed

Water Supply for Identified Villages under Umzimkhulu Jurisdiction

Umzimkhulu

Ngujini, Sdadeni/Nguse, Gujendlini, KwaSenti 02, Chancele, Pholanyoni, Thonjeni, Tsaule/Mbomvini, Ngwagwane and Gaybrook

Completed

Umzimkhulu Sanitation

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana, Nyanisweni, Bonvini, Nsikeni, Dumanomoeh, Nazareth, Ngwinjini, Chancele, KwaJames, Rhauka, Mfundweni, KwaTshaka, Bombo, KwaDay, St Barnabas, Madakeni, Gijima and Mahobe

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment/Updgrade in Kokstad: (Kokstad CRU Development)

Kokstad

CRU Developments

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade in Kokstad: Upgrade of CBD Pipeline

Kokstad

CBD Upgrade

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade in Kokstad: Upgrade of Mamiesa Developments

Kokstad

Mamiesa Developments

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma

Bulwer, Donnybrook, Kwezela, Nkumba

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade in Ubuhlebezwe: Upgrade of Jolivet Water Supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Jolivet

Completed

Mariathal, Mandilini and Esperance Water Supply Project Phase 4

Ubuhlebezwe

Mariathal, Mandilini and Esperance

Under construction

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade

Umzimkhulu

Riverside

Under construction

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade - Upgrade of Mhlabashana Water Supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Mhlabashana

Under construction

Universal Rural Sanitation coverage

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, Kokstad and Ubuhlebezwe

Construction of 1000 VIP toilets scattered in the following wards for Kokstad (6,2,3 & 4) & 1000 VIP toilets scattered in the following wards for Dr Nkosazane Dlamini-Zuma (1,4,6,12&14)

Under construction

Nokweja-Mashumi Water Supply scheme Phase 3

Ubuhlebezwe

Mbambalala and Mgodi

Under construction

Water Supply to Masimini Mbuzweni Villages Intervention Schemes

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana, Masameni, Mnyembe, Gudlintaba

Under construction

Water Supply to Masimini and Mbuzweni

 

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana, Masameni, Mnyembe, Gudlintaba

Under construction

Villages Intervention Schemes

Marriaskop Water Supply Intervention Schemes

Greater Kokstad

Marriaskop

Under construction

Refurbishment/ Augmentation of water supply schemes

Dr Nkosazane Dlamini Zuma

Mabedlane, Tarr's Valley, Goxhill, Kwa-Bhobhi, Sandanezwe

Under construction

Refurbishment/ Augmentation of Springvale water supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Springvale

Under construction

Refurbishment/ Augmentation of Ebhayi/ Gudlucingo Water Supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Ntapha, Gudlucingo, Chibini, Ngomakazi, Bhethani, Ebhayi, Thathani

Tender stage

The 2021 WSIG Medium Term Expenditure Framework allocations to the Harry Gwala Municipality for the completion of projects under planning and implementation respectively are as follows:

Financial Year

Amount

2021/22

R 90 700 000

2022/23

R 95 000 000

2023/24

R100 000 000

TOTAL

R285 700 000

 

c) A Directive has been issued to the Umgeni Water Board to commence with the planning and implementation of the Stephen Dlamini Dam to provide a long term sustainable water source for the Greater Bulwer Project.