Questions and Replies

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16 September 2021 - NW1926

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In light of concerns raised over governance in Rwanda, will the Minister consider proposals (see attached Road Map for a Promising Future for Rwanda) on dialogues from Rwanda citizens and civil society to promote in its inter-governmental talks with the government of Rwanda, as to how reform can be achieved by considering the following:- (a) That South Africa support the consideration of proposals made by Rwanda’s civil society organisations; (b) to note that such proposals are in line with the United Nations Strategy for Peace Consolidation, Prevention and Conflict Resolution in the Great Lakes; (a) That South Africa support the consideration of proposals made by Rwanda’s civil society organisations; (b) to note that such proposals are in line with the United Nations Strategy for Peace Consolidation, Prevention and Conflict Resolution in the Great Lakes; (b) Whether South Africa will also advocate and support such proposals within the international community, at United Nations level and through diplomatic channels to European countries, the United States and United Kingdom and individual countries in the African Great Lakes region, the South African Development Community and East African Community.

Reply:

a) The South African Government has not been directly approached by the mentioned organisation or Rwandan citizens or civil society on this matter.

South Africa’s foreign policy is based, amongst others, on mutual respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of countries with whom it has diplomatic relations. In this regard, South Africa believes in non-interference in the internal affairs of other countries unless requested or invited to do so by the affected country or as part of a multilateral team or mandate. In principle, South Africa encourages parties involved in political conflict to settle internal disputes and differences through dialogue and within the confines of their domestic law. In the case of Rwanda, South Africa conducts its bilateral relations through the Joint Commission for Cooperation (JCC) and high level meetings where issues of mutual concern are discussed, including those of human rights where merited.

b) South Africa has not been approached by any party from Rwanda to intervene in Rwanda. Rwanda is a member state of the East African Community (EAC) and as such, any proposals for intervention should be processed through the EAC and supported by the Rwandan parties. The success of South Africa’s national reconciliation, nation building and respect for human rights is internationally recognised and should any country wish to emulate the South African example and learn from the experience, South Africa is most willing and available to assist or share.

15 September 2021 - NW1914

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his address to the nation on 16 July 2021, wherein he characterised the unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng from 9 to 18 July as a popular insurrection, (a) on what ground(s) did he rely to classify the unrest as a popular insurrection and (b)(i) what are the details of the evidence that informed his decision to classify the unrest as a popular insurrection and (ii) which persons and/or entities supplied the specified evidence?

Reply:

In my address to the nation on 16 July 2021, I described the violence and destruction of the preceding days as an attempted insurrection that failed to gain popular support.

In that address I outlined some of the key features of this attempted insurrection, including:

  • deliberate, coordinated and well-planned actions intended to cripple the economy, cause social instability and severely weaken – or even dislodge – the democratic state;
  • the exploitation of the social and economic conditions under which many South Africans live to provoke ordinary citizens and criminal networks to engage in opportunistic acts of looting;
  • economic sabotage through targeted attacks on trucks, factories, warehouses and other infrastructure necessary for the functioning of our economy and the provision of services to our people;
  • attempts to inflame racial tensions and violence through social media, fake news and misinformation.

The characterisation of the unrest in these terms was based on reports and analysis received by the National Security Council, meetings with stakeholders, site visits to areas in KwaZulu-Natal affected by the violence and media reports of the events.

15 September 2021 - NW1913

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether there are specific conditions which must be satisfied before the National State of Disaster imposed to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is lifted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All organs of state must develop sustainable regulatory measures for the control of COVID-19 beyond the state of disaster. Measures must be infused into policies and regulations to normalise COVID-19 preventative measures in the society.

The current measures contained in the regulations for dealing with the disaster in the context of the risk adjusted strategy remain necessary to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Once sustainable sectoral regulatory measures for COVID-19 response are in place or the need to invoke current extraordinary measures provided for under the state of disaster ceases, all the Regulations and Directions issued under the national state of disaster will cease to exist.

Accordingly, ongoing assessments by the National Coronavirus Command Council and Cabinet will determine the satisfaction of conditions for terminating or allowing the state of disaster to lapse.

15 September 2021 - NW1860

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total amount did each (a) national and (b) provincial government department spend on paying overtime to Public Service employees in the (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 financial years; (2) Whether her department has developed norms and standards for the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date were the norms and standards developed and (b) how often are the norms and standards (i) monitored and (ii) reviewed?

Reply:

  1. 1. The total overtime expenditure by provincial and national departments for the 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial years are set out in the table below. In instances where no values are displayed, it is due to either the department splitting or merging with another/other department(s) or overtime payments not having been captured on the PERSAL system:

Department Name

2019-20

2020-21

 

Amount

(R)

Amount

(R)

Eastern Cape Provincial Administration

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,207,384.23

131,393.44

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

511,581.59

249,209.73

 

Education

18,113,853.20

13,965,584.32

 

Health

829,123,891.33

922,173,581.39

 

Human Settlements

183,421.78

130,867.37

 

Office of the Premier

959,684.20

155,510.05

 

Provincial Treasury

65,511.58

5,302.19

 

Roads and Public Works

1,876,901.37

537,655.44

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

4,583,294.67

3,966,340.06

 

Safety and Liaison

956,381.49

191,975.32

 

Social Development

3,258,168.59

1,348,584.50

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

971,988.92

29,116.44

 

Transport

39,490,326.66

44,816,427.05

Free State Provincial Administration

Agriculture

1,406,881.16

1,517,070.60

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

27,482.18

326,724.86

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

3,686,637.87

1,145,811.34

 

Education

6,663,922.23

6,077,107.86

 

Health

412,804,512.48

448,065,887.45

 

Human Settlements

919,669.23

282,820.62

 

Office of the Premier

5,841.27

28,560.38

 

Police, Roads and Transport

26,522,898.56

26,223,630.44

 

Provincial Treasury

193,997.36

129,203.80

 

Public Works

1,261,530.82

1,371,970.70

 

Social Development

9,747,433.92

6,324,314.36

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

1,029,939.76

116,687.64

Gauteng Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

3,992,205.46

836,076.84

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

280,270.04

954,484.62

 

Community Safety

26,033,682.97

77,501,930.44

 

E-Government

4,989,355.16

6,067,932.15

 

Economic Development

14,159.93

40,695.39

 

Education

21,995,472.75

24,786,642.54

 

Health

2,435,543,294.00

2,763,210,382.50

 

Human Settlements

129,667.01

58,370.18

 

Infrastructure Development

28,723,049.87

29,295,939.15

 

Office of the Premier

713,338.14

2,973,302.02

 

Provincial Treasury

441,709.44

256,062.17

 

Roads and Transport

2,286,377.10

8,877,497.13

 

Social Development

1,435,832.52

1,268,506.95

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

6,240,455.90

706,086.43

KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

7,863,906.28

8,384,542.17

 

Arts and Culture

221,106.35

11,173.32

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,130,739.09

563,901.35

 

Community Safety and Liaison

260,549.36

 
 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

1,150,064.72

648,309.55

 

Education

45,741,563.54

42,181,719.06

 

Finance

1,374,313.87

615,340.64

 

Health

1,443,466,029.40

1,651,250,447.20

 

Human Settlements

1,753,104.14

487,113.17

 

Office of the Premier

1,133,266.41

1,083,368.74

 

Public Works

1,273,475.07

671,446.33

 

Social Development

4,797,599.77

6,104,190.08

 

Sport and Recreation

3,602,378.24

1,135,364.42

 

Transport

120,146,901.38

114,084,581.30

Limpopo Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

10,515,966.75

2,981,688.70

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

4,358,545.18

1,093,578.77

 

Community Safety

88,452.17

 
 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

21,306,916.98

17,419,216.45

 

Education

21,490,655.33

12,084,855.07

 

Health

912,828,046.45

834,820,747.92

 

Office of the Premier

2,626,255.86

207,299.01

 

Provincial Treasury

61,181.02

83,157.58

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

5,185,352.43

1,313,613.05

 

Social Development

644,331.84

171,781.02

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

381,760.10

19,709.53

 

Transport and Community Safety

134,489,211.93

118,715,430.12

Mpumalanga Provincial Administration

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

2,512,911.27

1,108,970.79

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

535,146.73

448,455.16

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

21,406,246.29

27,837,333.02

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

3,558,405.69

1,892,291.27

 

Economic Development and Tourism

786,429.45

8,047.20

 

Education

9,496,317.00

10,047,619.84

 

Health

425,888,487.00

495,675,959.89

 

Human Settlements

2,742,950.17

1,418,061.16

 

Office of the Premier

689,522.46

502,770.65

 

Provincial Treasury

867,846.68

62,664.65

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

25,012,772.13

28,574,276.03

 

Social Development

1,779,451.45

13,441,056.28

North West Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

2,926,869.15

3,070,211.19

 

Arts, Culture, Sports and Recreation

280,463.39

496,449.11

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

48,715,985.02

40,785,276.66

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,154,554.32

1,826,152.58

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

815,951.62

509,190.39

 

Education

12,774,961.63

7,752,329.84

 

Health

493,620,723.57

648,705,462.33

 

Human Settlements

 

29,555.38

 

Office of the Premier

916,062.45

1,049,945.94

 

Provincial Treasury

3,060,051.70

1,629,648.73

 

Public Works and Roads

14,270,996.60

5,642,349.40

 

Social Development

1,116,656.03

1,731,924.82

Northern Cape Provincial Administration

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1,419,518.86

751,237.42

 

Education

4,511,565.10

3,364,596.93

 

Environment and Nature Conservation

461,153.72

170,158.66

 

Health

189,446,067.37

223,175,196.17

 

Office of the Premier

891,074.34

549,628.18

 

Provincial Treasury

64,866.20

 
 

Roads and Public Works

1,556,828.92

419,632.24

 

Social Development

193,823.21

193,274.31

 

Transport, Safety and Liaison

1,630,716.95

3,176,554.74

Western Cape Provincial Administration

Agriculture

3,802,633.61

2,770,686.47

 

Community Safety

1,857,729.80

1,460,201.91

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

1,686,526.30

135,725.04

 

Economic Development and Tourism

131,377.14

174,957.97

 

Education

11,463,379.32

5,749,486.77

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

326,097.58

63,502.19

 

Health

1,157,736,241.00

1,243,312,634.20

 

Human Settlements

5,295,675.96

1,742,808.98

 

Local Government

943,099.21

851,712.07

 

Provincial Treasury

669,139.26

389,753.04

 

Social Development

8,378,531.97

9,032,576.23

 

Department of the Premier

3,517,839.63

1,247,110.44

 

Transport and Public Works

12,378,007.36

9,447,650.95

 

National Departments

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

17,779,803.32

 
 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

80,389,519.07

40,098,966.40

 

Basic Education

7,897,621.06

5,681,828.67

 

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

794,037.21

400,803.16

 

Communications

541,647.64

 
 

Communications and Digital Technologies

639,577.01

138,099.45

 

Cooperative Governance

4,412,709.39

4,270,256.25

 

Correctional Services

193,914,775.91

211,578,343.23

 

Economic Development

280,232.85

 
 

Employment and Labour

55,125,049.13

53,047,865.35

 

Energy

612,460.36

 
 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

10,565,727.39

12,219,404.08

 

Government Communication and Information System

2,950,394.84

702,593.22

 

Health

20,001,395.84

25,895,317.01

 

Higher Education and Training

16,976,257.16

9,595,677.26

 

Home Affairs

85,684,534.47

50,468,033.79

 

Human Settlements

2,257,343.29

1,731,822.84

 

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

1,816,320.14

1,339,076.49

 

International Relations and Cooperation

11,755,886.85

8,905,729.97

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

18,089,042.44

9,119,949.42

 

Military Veterans

1,804,463.19

917,236.95

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

4,878,887.82

2,823,676.98

 

National School of Government

225,216.84

14,284.23

 

National Treasury

16,347,923.84

3,179,421.72

 

Office of the Chief Justice

2,194,424.04

856,071.81

 

Office of the Public Service Commission

380,286.14

118,374.03

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

1,099,056.25

408,591.27

 

Police

1,058,957,936.40

703,439,233.53

 

Public Enterprises

633,577.65

54,097.31

 

Public Service and Administration

1,182,159.50

941,606.03

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

41,830,007.47

22,785,119.14

 

Science and Innovation

634,812.48

176,458.79

 

Small Business Development

258,870.39

80,442.36

 

Social Development

3,978,318.46

5,318,308.53

 

Sport and Recreation South Africa

740,229.15

 
 

Sport, Arts and Culture

2,211,959.45

1,123,723.21

 

Statistics South Africa

1,750,411.32

1,208,001.54

 

The Presidency

11,214,516.50

4,723,079.39

 

Tourism

711,130.74

1,497,175.97

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

1,058,217.03

282,276.81

 

Traditional Affairs

550,756.28

23,888.86

 

Transport

3,285,644.20

2,572,738.80

 

Water and Sanitation

33,960,826.74

31,247,215.11

 

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

190,896.72

44,683.56

Data Source: PERSAL

Compile by the DPSA

Excludes Defence and the State Security Agency

1. Overtime work is informed by the service delivery requirements of a department. Hence, Regulation 49 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that a department must have an approved overtime policy in place. The said departmental overtime policy must be in keeping with the overarching policy requirements set out in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, applicable collective agreements and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended.

a) The overarching policy requirements were established with the introduction of the Public Service Regulatory Framework in 1999 and the conclusion of Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999.

b) The said policy requirements are reviewed as and when required, for example, with the introduction of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended, in the Public Service in July 2000 and with the promulgation of the 2016 Public Service Regulations. The applicable Regulation is currently being reviewed.

End

15 September 2021 - NW2003

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What (i) tourism intern programmes does her department currently have underway and (ii) is total number of interns in each programme and (b) how are interns allocated to projects; (2) whether a community tourism organisation (CTO) can apply for interns from the specified intern programmes; if not, why not; if so, how does a CTO apply for these interns?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The department has an internship programme, for a 24-months period, which started in 2020.

(ii) A total of thirty-two (32) interns have been appointed into this programme.

(b) A needs analysis is done prior to the start of the internship programme. An advert clearly stipulates the fields and recruitment panels are set up to select and recommend suitable interns per field, from applications received. Mentors from each programme are identified and linked to an intern.

2. No, the departmental internship is done as a public service programme. Thus, it does not provide for organisations outside the department. Applications are done by prospective interns in their individual capacity.

(Please see below a table with the number of interns per programme)

Branch / Office

Programme

Number

Ministry and Deputy Ministry

-

2

Office of the Director-General

-

1

Corporate Management

Strategy and Operations

2

 

Transport and Travel Services

1

 

Financial Management

3

 

Risk and Integrity Management

1

 

Communications

1

 

Legal Services

1

 

Internal Audit

1

 

Information Technology

1

 

Human Resources Utilisation and Employee Health and Wellness

2

 

Human Resources Administration and Employee Relations

1

Tourism Sector Support Services

Enterprise Development

2

 

Transformation

1

 

Tourism Visitor Services

1

 

Responsible Tourism

1

 

Tourism Incentives Programme

1

Destination Development

Destination Planning

1

 

Working for Tourism

2

 

Programme Coordination Unit

1

 

Tourism Enhancement

1

Tourism Policy Research and International Relations

Research

1

 

Knowledge Management

1

 

Bilateral Relations

1

 

Monitoring and Evaluation

1

15 September 2021 - NW2004

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether there is funding available from her department for community tourism organisations (CTOs) in rural areas as part of her department’s initiative to promote tourism in villages, towns and small dorpies (VTSDs); if not, how does her department plan to promote tourism in VTSDs without empowering local CTOs; if so, (a) how and (b) what criteria apply to CTOs in rural areas when they apply for funding as part of her department’s initiative to promote VTSDs?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Community Tourism Organisations (CTOs) are independent associations based on voluntary participation by their membership. The organisations are responsible for their own operations including financial aspects thereof. The Department of Tourism does not fund CTOs. The work of the department is guided by the Annual Performance Plan wherein all the details are provided.

15 September 2021 - NW1946

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the names of the beneficiaries of the COVID-19 Relief Fund who are residing in (a) villages, (b) townships and/or (c) small towns?

Reply:

The Honourable member is referred to the Department of Tourism’s website where a list of all beneficiaries of the Tourism Relief Fund is published. The Honourable member is also referred to responses to Parliamentary Question (NA) 219 of 15 June 2020 and PQ 197 (NCOP) of 5 June 2020. Below is link to the Department’s website to access the list of beneficiaries:

https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Documents/Tourism%20Relief%20Fund%20Beneficiaries.pdf#search=Tourism%20relief%20Fund

15 September 2021 - NW1861

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether her department has developed a policy on the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date was the policy developed and (b) how often is it monitored and reviewed, (2) Whether her department monitors the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, how often does her department monitor the payment of overtime in the Public Service?

Reply:

1. Overtime work is informed by the service delivery requirements of a department. Hence, Regulation 49 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that a department must have an approved overtime policy in place. The said departmental overtime policy must be in keeping with the overarching policy requirements set out in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, applicable collective agreements and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended.

a) The overarching policy requirements were established with the introduction of the Public Service Regulatory Framework in 1999 and the conclusion of Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999.

b) The said policy requirements are reviewed as and when required, for example, with the introduction of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended, in the Public Service in July 2000 and with the promulgation of the 2016 Public Service Regulations. The applicable Regulation is currently being reviewed.

2. Overtime payments are a function located in departments through the PERSAL system. The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) does not have access to, and control over the payment function taking place in departments. However, the DPSA from time to time does extract data on overtime from PERSAL and analyse the overtime expenditure in the Public Service. This analysis is used to engage with departments to ensure compliance with Public Service Regulations, 2016 including on the proper alignment of departmental structures to service delivery requirements. Since 2020, the DPSA has held regular meetings with departments that have been found to be non-compliant with applicable regulations and technical support has been provided to improve compliance.

End

15 September 2021 - NW2002

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What programmes, initiatives, streams and/or projects are available to community tourism organisations (CTOs) who would like to apply for funding at a national, provincial and local level, (b) how do CTOs apply for the specified funding opportunities and (c) on what date will the funding be made available; (2) whether all tourism (a) businesses and (b) service providers are required to register with their local CTO; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) legislation guides this requirement?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Tourism does not have programmes, initiatives, streams and/or projects regarding Community Tourism Organisations. The Department’s point of entry to community organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate

(b)– (c) Not applicable

2. (a – b) Not applicable

(i)-(ii) The Department of Tourism does not have policy and/or legislative responsibilities regarding Community Tourism Organisations. However, the department has a responsibility to reach out to tourism stakeholders at all levels, and to maintain sound intergovernmental relations by working with and through provinces and local government where appropriate. The department acknowledges concurrent legislative competence and that local govenment is responsible for the development of local tourism including matters related to community tourism organisations.

15 September 2021 - NW665

Profile picture: Walters, Mr TC

Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department and SOEs as follows:

a) DEPARTMENT

Yes

(i) Name of the company

Vimtsire Protection Services

(ii) Purpose

To provide physical security for the department (both Hatfield and Cape Town offices).

(iii) Value

R 18 091 921,34

(iv) Duration

Three years (01 December 2018 – 30 November 2021)

b) State-Owned Entities (SOEs)

Entity

(b)

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv)Duration

ICASA

Yes

Modise Protection Services

Physical guarding

R 5 097 931.15

3 years

   

CIYTech Systems Cc

Maintenance of security systems

(CCTV cameras & biometrics)

R 174 018.00

3 Years

   

ADT Fidelity

Armed response & alarm monitoring

R 88 591.40

3 Years

   

Modise Protection Services

Physical guarding

R 262 649.76

1 Year

   

Televonic Systems

Maintenance of security systems (CCTV cameras & biometrics)

R 56 223.50

3 years

   

Rishumele Trading

Maintenance of security systems (CCTV cameras & biometrics)

R 95 041.17

3 years

   

Ubomi Technologies

Physical guarding

R 298 515.13

7 months

   

Pro-Secure PTY Ltd

Maintenance of security systems (CCTV cameras & biometrics)

R 99 056.80

2 years

   

Multi-Locking systems

Maintenance of security systems (CCTV cameras & biometrics)

R 268 984. 16

4 Years

   

Multi-Locking systems

Maintenance of security systems (CCTV cameras & biometrics)

R 173 111.71

3 Years

   

Postbank

Yes

Vusela Security Company

Monitor access control; screening employees; escorting clients; protection of company assets and personnel, report criminal activities to SAPS and assist in handover of Postbank Visa and SASSA cards

R 44 000 per month

5 years

   

Nemisa

Yes

Rise Security Services

Provide physical protection in the Parktown Building

R 3 732 056.51

3 years (ending March 2021)

   

PEPLER ALARMS CC

Provide reaction service and 24/7 monitoring of the alarm in the Franschhoek Building

R 462.30

Month to month contract

   

SABC

Yes

Mafoko Security Patrols

(Head Office-Gauteng)

Provision of physical security services at SABC Auckland Park offices and TV Outside Broadcasts

R 185 519 425. 61

5 years

   

Khayalami Security CC

(Eastern Cape)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 13 838 216. 62

2 years

   

Khayalami Security CC

(Western Cape)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 11 525 746. 05

3 years

   

Vhugi Protection Services (Limpopo)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 17 421 396. 43

3 years

   

Modise Protection Services

(North West)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 17 415 286. 04

3 years

   

Mafoko Security Patrols

(Free State)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 7 186 607. 46

3 years

   

Khayalami Security CC

(Northern Cape)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 4 569 137. 04

3 years

   

Mafoko Security Patrols

(Mpumalanga)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 4 966 994. 66

2 years

   

Mafoko Security Patrols

(Gauteng)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 3 236 391. 24

2 years

   

Mafoko Security Patrols

(KwaZulu Natal)

Provision of physical security services at TV Outside Broadcasts and Provincial offices

R 7 361 514. 50

3 years

   

Broadband Infraco (BB)I

Yes

Selkirk Security services

Provision of security services at Head Office

R 2 440 944. 00

3 years

   

Mzuzovama (Pty) Ltd

Provision of alarm monitoring and ad hoc call outs for emergency responses at Newcastle Point of Presence

R 148 940. 00

2 years

   

Nthuthuko Zulu Innovative Holdings

Provision of alarm monitoring and ad hoc call outs for emergency responses at Mzintlava Substation

R 20 400. 00

2 years

   

Azifani Security and Cleaning Services

Guarding services on emergency basis and escorting of technical employees to dangerous sites in the Northern Cape and Gauteng regions

R 1 220 662.12

As and when – value is for the period 1 April 2020 to 28 February 2021

Provision of alarm monitoring and ad hoc call outs for emergency responses at Mzintlava Substation

R 20 400.00 - 2 years

   

National K9 Security Services

Guarding services on emergency basis and escorting of technical employees to dangerous sites in KwaZulu-Natal

R 572 784. 00

As and when – value is for the period 1 April 2020 to 28 February 2021

   

Bohlale Security Services

Guarding services on emergency basis and escorting of technical employees to dangerous sites in the Free State

R 208 874. 00

As and when – value is for the period 1 April 2020 to 28 February 2021

     
   

Sentech

Yes

Collins Sebola Financial Services (PTY) LTD JV Ramadzwi Security Services and Training Agency (PTY)

NKP Security guards’ deployments

R 14 532 175. 93

3 years

   

Afriguard Security Services

Security guarding for the sites

R 4 591 766. 81

2 years

   

Fidelity Security Services

Emergency security guard’s deployment due to power and RF cable theft on site

No contract value, services charged on a month to month basis

Month to month until new contract is set up.

   

Fidelity-ADT Security Services

Armed Response and monitoring

R 32 905. 00

5 years

   

Buyisa Security Services

Guarding of the offices afterhours only and 24 hours on weekends and Holidays

R 753 210. 36

3 years

   

Fidelity ADT and Technical

Armed Response and monitoring

R 27 000. 00

3 years

   

National Security and Fire

Armed Response and Monitoring

R 24 443. 64

3 years

   

National Security and Fire

Armed Response and Monitoring

R 15 120. 00

3 years

   

Red Alert (PTY) LTD

Armed Response and Monitoring of all four areas/sites

R 85 523. 71

3 years

   

Harambe Technologies

CCTV system maintenance

R 663 964.56

5 years

   

Craddock Sekuriteit CC

Armed Response, monitoring and escorts to sites

R 9 457,20

3 years

   

SAPO

Yes

Fidelity Cash Solutions

** All Provinces

South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) Pay point Services

  • Cash-in transit (CIT) & Guarding

R 825 000 000. 00

2 years (RFP to be issued)

   

Fidelity Security Services

** Gauteng

Guarding Services

  • Static and SASSA

R 201 032 089. 00

5 years

   

Fidelity Security Services

** Eastern Cape

Guarding Services

  • SASSA

R 81 449 264. 51

5 years

   

Fidelity Security Services

** Western Cape

Guarding Services

  • SASSA

R 33 376 527. 70

5 years

   

G4S

** All Provinces

CIT Services

R 400 447 987. 28

5 years

(New Award pending)

   

Vusela Sanmva Joint Venture

** Free State

** North West

** Kwazulu-Natal

** Northern Cape

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 240 656 922. 50

5 years

   

Isidingo (UNITRADE 1047 CC)

** Western Cape

Guarding Services

  • Static

R 33 422 400. 00

5 years

   

Tyeks Security Services

** Eastern Cape

Guarding Services

  • Static

R 59 942 143. 30

5 years

   

Marumofase Security

** Limpopo

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 2 859 247. 04

1 year

   

Ally’ s counter Force Security

** Limpopo

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 1 714 828. 32

1 year

   

Clearpoint Security & Hygiene

** Mpumalanga

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 1 153 047. 60

1 year

   

Sakhile Ezweni Group

** Mpumalanga

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 4 191 095. 23

1 year

   

Khayalami Security

** Mpumalanga

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 8 667 153. 9

5 years

   

Ndivhuwo Security Training

** Limpopo

Guarding Services

  • Static & SASSA

R 3 302 970. 48

5 years

 

Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA)

Yes

PMT Security Service

Provision of physical security services

R 29 000 per month

1 year

 

SITA

 

SITA currently does not have security contracts in place for the East London, Bhisho and Port Elizabeth offices.

SITA is receiving security services from the Landlord’s Security at East London and Bhisho that are on site.

At Port Elizabeth there is currently no security on site. It is for this reason that a new Security Contract for SITA has been concluded for all 3 sites.

SITA is not paying for security service exclusively, as it is incorporated in the lease agreements.

We can thus not quantify any value for security service.

East London

Lease Term: 01 Mar 2019 to 28 Feb 2024

Port Elizabeth

Lease Term: 08 Jul 2020 to 07 Jul 2021

Bhisho

Lease Term: 01 Nov 2019 to 31 Oct 2024

   

Bangilizwe Security Services

Physical Building security for SITA Eastern Cape premises (East London, Gqeberha and Bhisho)

R 475 410. 00

6 months

   

Tyeks Security Services

Provide guarding and security services for SITA Free State premises ( Fort Drury Building and DATA CENTRE in Bloemfontein)

R 2 752 318. 30

3 years

   

4B Protection Services

Provide 24/7 Physical Security Services for SITA Gauteng premises (Erasmuskloof, Centurion, Beta and Numerus Buildings )

R 50 248 823. 29

3 years

   

Sbu & Sbo Protection Services (Pty) LTD

Provision of 24/7 Physical Security Services for SITA KZN premises (Pietermaritzburg & Durban Office)

R 4  839 720. 07

3 years

   

R5 Security services Pty Ltd

Provision of physical security services for SITA Limpopo premises (Polokwane Office)

R 2 741 598. 87

3 years

   

Mthenjankave Security Service

Provision of physical security service for SITA Mpumalanga premises

R 1 495 315. 01

3 years

   

This forms part of the Landlord (Bridge Trust) Lease agreement. The security company is CCL Services

Provision of physical building security for SITA Northern Cape premises (Kimberley office)

R 151 800. 00

(Only 1 day shift guard, seven days a week from 06h00 to 18h00)

1 year

   

SITA currently does not have a security contract in place as this forms part of the Landlord Lease agreement.

Provision of security services for SITA North West premises (Mafikeng, Rustenburg and Potchefstroom)

SITA is not paying for security service exclusively in terms of the lease agreements.

We can thus not quantify any value in terms of security.

The Film and Publication Board (FPB) and ZADNA do not make use of any private security firm as their offices are located at an office park which has its own security company.

15 September 2021 - NW1854

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is her department’s strategy in light of an imminent COVID-19 fourth wave to protect the tourism sector from further decimation?

Reply:

The department’s focus is on implementation of Norms and Standards for safe operations by the sector. The department also supports the call for South Africans to get vaccinated so that we could reach population immunity which would be a more sustainable way to mitigate against economic disruption.

15 September 2021 - NW1915

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has found that the popular insurrection was instigated by certain persons and/or factions of the African National Congress; if not, which persons and/or factions have been identified as instigators of the popular insurrection; if so, what (a) action, if any, does he intend to take against the specified instigators and (b) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Law enforcement agencies have arrested several individuals alleged to have been involved in the instigation and/or incitement of the violence that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July 2021. These cases are now before the courts and the law must be allowed to take its course. Investigations by law enforcement agencies are ongoing. It would not be correct to pre-empt the outcome of these processes.

In addition, I have appointed a panel of experts led by Professor Sandy Africa to undertake a full analysis of the possible causes of the unrest and the response of our law enforcement agencies. I look forward to their report, which they have promised me will be ready at the end of the year.

15 September 2021 - NW1974

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With regard to the recent murder of a female law student at the University of Fort Hare in the Eastern Cape, what appropriate steps has his department taken to create more awareness regarding gender-based violence (GBV) and femicide and the unacceptable level of occurrence in the institutions of higher education; (2) what progress has been made by tertiary institutions to adhere to the requirements and recommendations of The Policy and Strategy Framework Addressing Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education Sector to date; (3) whether the tertiary institutions have implemented the required changes to accommodate the specified policy framework on GBV; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the current update?

Reply:

(1) All universities have measures in place to raise awareness and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include but are not limited to workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via Higher Health, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school system.

There is a need for more comprehensive training embedded in institutional policies. The Ministerial Task Team established to advise the Minister and Department on gender- based violence and related matters, is exploring the possibility of national standards and principles about what should be included as a minimum in training sessions.

Higher Health has established relationships with campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to sexual and gender-based violence, and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also Higher Health's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages. The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

(2) Following the release of the policy framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions. Amongst others, the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and gender-based violence and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable the effective implementation of the policy framework.

(3) It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and Higher Health aims to support campuses in addressing the problem. There has to be a coordinated implementation of the framework by universities through a fully coordinated national response. The Ministerial Task Team will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to gender-based violence and sexual harassment, and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the national policy framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

Higher Health, through the Department, has released a set of instruments that will further strengthen the realisation of the policy framework. These instruments are directives to all institutions and management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape and sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor-friendly infrastructure are developed across campuses.

The Department will play an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

15 September 2021 - NW319

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

With reference to the pension of SA Post Office (SAPO) pensioner, Mr Carl Olivier, (details furnished) and the fraud committed on his account, (a) what steps have been taken to stop the fraudulent activity on Mr Olivier’s pension account, (b) what progress has been made in issuing Mr Olivier with a functional SA Social Security Agency card that will allow him to draw his pension, (c) by what date will this matter be resolved, (d) what number of other accounts have been fraudulently accessed in a manner similar to the specified person's account and (e) what steps are being taken by the SAPO to deal with the matter?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SAPO as follows:

(a) On 11/07/2020 a fraudulent reissue card was performed (Card number 4213 xxxxxx100415) at Umzinto Post Office. The account was reimbursed on the 28/09/2020.

(b)(c) Another card was issued (4213xxxxx991290) on 18/11/2020 at Halfway Post Office which has an active status on the client’s profile.

(d) SAPO did not receive any new affidavit for any other disputed amounts.

Stats below refer:

(e) The modus operandi that criminal syndicates embark on from time to time changes continually. SAPO/POSTBANK have embarked on a process of cleansing its payment system and circumventing unauthorised access.

15 September 2021 - NW1782

Profile picture: Holomisa, Dr BH

Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he was satisfied that when he instructed that a certain person (name and details furnished) should be placed under precautionary suspension, based on adverse findings of the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) in an audit of the 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years of the National Skills Fund that any other officials, including the specified person, as the Accounting Authority, had not been coerced, forced and/or given any political directives which led to the irregularities and/or qualified opinion(s); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether any other government (a) departments and (b) organisations such as the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, sector education and training authorities, and/or state-owned enterprises have received qualified audits from the AGSA in the past five financial years, where the Accounting Authority of any such department and/or organisation was placed under precautionary suspension by (i) him and/or (ii) a Minister; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, which government (aa) departments and/or (bb) organisations; (3) whether any investigations were conducted into government (a) departments and/or (b) organisations that (i) he and/or (ii) any of his Ministers placed under precautionary suspension; if not, why not; if so, what were the broad outcomes of such investigations?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of South Africa has in terms of section 42A(3) of the Public Service Act,1994 (Proclamation 103 of 1994) delegated powers to the Minister of Home Affairs to deal with the possible precautionary suspension of the Director-General of the Department of Higher Education and Training, Mr Qwebinkundla Qonde. This arises from adverse audit findings made by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) in an audit of the financial years 2018/19 and 2019/2020 of the National Skills Fund, where the DG is an Accounting Authority.

The DG, as required by the law, was afforded an opportunity to make representations before the decision could be taken on the matter. After considering the entire case, he was put on precautionary suspension to pave the way for the forensic investigations to be conducted without any form of disturbance or interference. It is important to note that each case needs to be considered on its own facts.

In terms of the Public Service Act and the PFMA the relevant and responsible Ministers are in a position to respond to the Ministry-specific questions. Furthermore, questions related to the Auditor-General can be posed directly to the Auditor-General as the Auditor-General is accountable to Parliament.

15 September 2021 - NW539

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether the SA Post Office offers a registered email communication and/or registered SMS service to its customers; if not, why not; if so, (a) what IT system/supplier is being used to provide this service, (b) on what date was the service procured, (c) at what cost was the service procured and (d) what are the full details of the relevant tender?

Reply:

I have been advised by the South African Post Office (SAPO) as follows:

Yes, the South African Post Office does offer registered digital communication. There is one system in operation, namely:

(a) Registered electronic mail system on RiPoste TrEx from Escher Group (IRL) Ltd;

b) SAPO entered into the Escher contract on 29 November 2013 and a modification was done on 27 June 2016. The original design of the service was one sender to one recipient. One sales engagement with customers, it became clear that customers were looking for an automated system to cater for one sender to many recipients (bulk). The cost of the modification amounted to R17 398.00.

c) The original cost was R 8 512 830.00. The maintenance cost amounted to R677 988.00 per quarter. SAPO has not paid maintenance for nine quarters due to the process of changing hosting providers. However, SAPO does not anticipate the need to pay outstanding maintenance costs.

d) The registered electronic mail system was concluded on agreement number 4600000491. The tender number was RFP No 03 E Registered Mail 12/13/HM. There was no tender conducted for the revenue sharing concept, it followed an investment procedure. The SAPO/Service Provider Agreement; SAPO Limited Bidding Document; and e-Registered Mail Statement of Work Agreement is attached as Annexures B1, B2 and B3 respectively.

15 September 2021 - NW2055

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How has the crime stats affected the tourism trends in the Republic in the past three years and (b) what are the details of her department’s efforts to ensure that tourism is not affected by the crime trends in the Republic?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Engagements with both trade and media in the markets indicate that crime is a factor in tourist decision making. To this end, the department working with South African Police Services put in place and implemented the Tourism Safety Strategy. However, it is encouraging that respondents to the exit survey conducted on departing inbound tourists through South African Tourism, indicate a higher level of satisfaction with the levels of safety in the country based on their experiences.

13 September 2021 - NW2000

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the cause of the delay in construction of the N2 bridge over the Gwaing River at George in the Western Cape and (b) are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) The Contractor KPMM ran into financial difficulty around November / December 2018 and declared the commencement of business rescue proceedings in May 2019. Up to the present date KPMM is still in business rescue and this has significantly slowed the N2 Gwaing River bridge construction progress. SANRAL has provided the necessary support the during this process in the interest of ensuring that the project is completed. The Contractor has now informed SANRAL that they cannot continue with the works.

b) The contract was awarded to KPMM Roads and Earthworks (Pty) Ltd to the value of R161 200 000-00 (including VAT). The contract commenced on 29 January 2018 with a completion date of 28 July 2020. The contract duration was for a 30 months period. At this stage, the works are 58.4% complete with a total of R 96 238 948.87 (including VAT) spent to date. SANRAL has been in continuous discussions with the Contractor regarding performance and has been applying all applicable contractual penalties. With the contractor now having informed SANRAL that they cannot continue any longer, SANRAL is taking the necessary actions in terms of the Contract to assign the contract to a replacement contractor to complete the outstanding works.

13 September 2021 - NW1993

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, with reference to the SA Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions registration for Health and Safety Officers, Managers and Agents exams and interviews, persons who have failed the exam (a) are entitled to (i) view their exam paper in order to determine where they went wrong and (ii) an explanation as to where they failed and (b) have to pay the full exam and/or interview fee again to rewrite the exam; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case;

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

The information that I have received from the SACPCMP in response to the question is as follows:

1. (a) (i) Candidates who want to view their examination script are at liberty to apply to

view their scripts.

(ii) Candidates will know which questions they got right or wrong when they view their script and that should assist them to go back to the drawing board to fix their mistakes.

(b) Candidates who failed examination or interview are required to pay the full fee to rewrite.

(2) (a) The cost of examinations includes hiring venues, marking, moderating, storage and logistics of managing the entire examination process by the appointed service provider. This should be understood in the context of the Council being a self-funding entity. For business sustainability, the administrative cost of all of the Council’s processes must be recovered.

(b) The breakdown of the costs will reflect in the annual report for the 2020/21 financial year, which will be submitted to Parliament together with audited financial statements.

(3) The Council has determined that examinations should be delivered online and urgently, spurred on by the constant disruptions to examinations brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic and its restrictions. However, security considerations necessitated the Council to investigate options to ensure that examination and interview security are not compromised. The Council has had a breach of its examination administration in the past, which was plagued with security vulnerabilities and corruption, where examination papers were leaked and also on social media platforms, in some cases, sold online. It is important that the Council, when it transfers its examination administration to an online system, ensures that it is secure and make breaches of the past impossible to repeat.

The Council had to ensure that it explores all the avenues required to enhance examination security including preventing the leaking of examination questions, which is paramount, given the high stakes nature of the examinations. The following aspects are being considered and finalised:

• Development of an online examination platform;

• Protecting the examination process through virtual proctoring software;

• Creating accessibility to the online examinations;

• The new logistical hurdles occasioned by the transition to a different delivery mode; and,

• The financial impact of moving examinations online – to ensure that there is no exorbitant increase in cost that must be transferred to applicants.

The timeline for the launch of online examinations has been determined as follows:

• The development of the online examination platform will be finalised and tested within four (4) weeks.

• Supply Chain Management (SCM) processes for procuring of a virtual proctoring service provider will commence after the budget review in October 2021.

• Once a virtual proctoring service provider is appointed, it will require approximately four (4) to six (6) weeks to set up the proctoring environment and integrate with the Council’s examination platform.

• The Council is most likely to be able to launch its online examinations in November 2021.

• Management will require approximately six (6) months to develop a plan for creating accessibility to its online examinations, through amongst others, partnering with service providers or institutions who have suitable computer facilities, disturbance free environments and secure Internet.

13 September 2021 - NW2174

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Chief Director for Roads in the North West, who has been suspended and the matter not yet finalised for four years since suspension, on what date will he or his department finalise the matter?

Reply:

The matter was referred to the Section 100 Administrator for the North West Department of Public Works& Roads and he confirmed that the suspension of the Chief Director for Roads in North West has been finalized and he was dismissed from Public Service on 29 November 2019. This matter is currently before the General Public Service Sectoral Bargaining Council as he is challenging his dismissal.

13 September 2021 - NW2176

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What measures does he have in place to cut the reliance on the State Information Technology Agency and secure an efficient IT system for Home Affairs offices, since his department is still failing to mitigate the situation of long standing queues?

Reply:

1. The Department is in the process of evaluating its internal skills with a view to creating the necessary capacity for its work.

2. A review of its enterprise architecture is also underway. This will allow it to better plan its systems in line with the Government Wide Enterprise Architecture framework while pointing out areas where dependency on SITA can be managed

3. In addition, the Department has had an Executive Engagement with SITA, and the following interventions are currently in the pipeline:

  • SITA’s proposal for an upgrade to Gold or Platinum will be tested through a proof of concept.
  • Go to Market Strategy for Access Link – The implementation of a strategy wherein DHA has access to a localised pool of pre-approved service providers wherein a procurement of a connectivity service can be expedited without the onerous procurement processes has long been awaited by DHA. SITA’s promise to implement in early 2022/23 will be closely monitored and reported upon.
  • SITA Strategy and Investment Plan for Uninterruptible Networks - SITA submitted a proposal to DHA that required a financial investment by DHA to the tune of R700m, whilst the Plan may not have been wholly accepted by DHA, the following critical parts of the Plan are being implemented by SITA and DHA:
    • Upgrade and maintenance of the dilapidated network equipment (routers and switches) - DHA.
    • Upgrade of SITA Switching Centres – SITA.
    • Expansion of SITA Core Network to reduce regional network outages – SITA.

END

13 September 2021 - NW2137

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) In view of the fact that the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, signed a Border Management Authority (BMA) Commencement Proclamation in December 2020, which only allowed for the appointment of a Commissioner and Deputy Commissioners for the BMA, on what date will the section 97 Presidential Proclamation be signed to transfer relevant border law enforcement functions to his portfolio; (2) What deadline has been given for the current draft proclamation to be revised to remove reference to identified pieces of legislation which pose challenges to some departments; (3) GIven that the President in his 2021 State of the Nation Address committed to fast-track the implementation and capacitation of the BMA to curb illegal immigration and cross-border crime, what is the deadline envisaged for the operationalisation of the entire BMA Act, Act 2 of 2020?

Reply:

1. The draft Proclamation in terms of section 97 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (the “Constitution”), to transfer functions from relevant Organs of State, has been drafted and being consulted on with the said relevant Organs of State. Once there is concurrence on the contents of the Proclamation, the draft Proclamation will be forwarded to the Presidency for the President to approve same. Thereafter, the Department will cause the Proclamation to be gazetted.

2. The current draft Proclamation, in terms of section 97 of the Constitution has been revised to remove legislation that affects SARS-Custom and the SANDF. The Department is currently undergoing consultations with organs of state as required by the requisite processes and they have undertaken to provide such feedback by no later than 10 September 2021.

3. The establishment of the BMA in South Africa is an unprecedented “Whole-of-Government” endeavour led by the Presidency and guided by the Department of Public Service and Administration, and the National Treasury in terms of the Public Service Act, the Public Finance Management Act and the National Macro-Organization of Government (NMOG)principles.

The operationalization of the BMA Act involves multiple Organs of State, and complex regulatory, legislative, staffing, budgeting and funding processes; and as such, the BMA Act, 2020 will be operationalized in an incremental manner over a ten (10) year period ending in 2030.

END

13 September 2021 - NW1942

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What steps has he taken with regard to poor services rendered at the office in Matatiele, especially in relation to the renewal of temporary identity documents?

Reply:

The Department of Home Affairs in partnership with the Matatiele Local Municipality has identified space to temporarily accommodate Home Affairs. This will ease congestion at the current location which is within the Department of Justice. The current space does not suit the needs for clients and resultantly leads to complaints and poor services in the area.

The envisaged temporary relocation to the ESKOM Building makes way for the erection of the office structure on the offered land to the Department by the Matatiele Local Municipality Council, which is next to the Matatiele Police Station.

The Department took a decision to render certain services during adjusted lockdown level 3. This amongst others, includes the issuance of identity documents to first time issuance and temporary identity certificates for those who may have lost their IDs.

END

13 September 2021 - NW1994

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether the SA Council of Project and Construction Management Professionals passed on the payment waiver for annual fees it was offered by the Council for the Built Environment for the 2020-21 financial year; if not, why not; if so, (a) how was the waiver communicated to members and/or prospective members and (b) what number of persons benefited from the waiver; (2) whether the fee waiver was a partial waiver; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what percentage was applied to each level of registration; (3) whether the new registrations paid the full registration fee; if not, what are the details of the waiver they were granted; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what (a) is the total number of (i) persons who failed to renew their registrations during the 2020-21 year and (ii) new registrations that were received during this period and (b) is the difference in numbers of registered members between the 2019-20 period and the 2020-21 period in each category?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) (a) (b) Information I received is that CBE waiver was not passed on to registered persons. The CBE levy waivered accounts for 1.1% (for Candidates R21 per person and for Professionals R42 per person) of the total annual fee invoice, the waiver granted by CBE which amounts to R218 672 for the 2020/21 financial year was utilized to assist the Council with some financial relief as cashflow was affected.

(2) No. see (1) above.

(3) Yes, new registrations paid the full registration fee; however, they are subjected to a pro-rated discount on their annual fees which is dependent on when the persons got to register.

(4) Below is a reconciliation of registered persons from 2019/20 to 2020/21 financial years. The reconciliations are as at 31 March 2021.

(i) Unpaid registered persons were 5 349 as at 31 March 2021 and

(ii) New registrations were at 900.

Analysis of declared membership movement

 

 

 

 

Professional

Candidates

Totals

Record of client membership headcount 31 March 2020

6 979

4 684

11 663

Opening Balance at 01 April 2020 / Declared/audited

6 979

4 684

11 663

Movement

   

 

Additions

435

465

900

Upgrade to professionals

40

- 40

-

Reinstatement

17

12

29

De- Registration - Bad debts write off

- 289

- 783

- 1 072

Less/Add Balancing Figure that could not be traced

   

- 96

Closing Balance at 31 March 2021 / Declared/audited

7 182

4 338

11 424

Less unpaid registered persons

2 844

2 601

5 349

Total paid up membership declared: Paid membership- 2020/21

4 338

1 737

6 075

(b) Levies declared to CBE during the 2020/21 Financial Period

 

 

 

Paid up membership

Total paid up membership declared: Paid membership- 2020/21

4338

1737

6075

CBE levy rate

42

21

 

Total payable to CBE for 2020/2021 period

182 196

36 477

218 673

(4)(b) The difference between registered persons is 239 (see table below).

Professional Category

2019/20

Financial year

2020/21

Financial year

Difference

Professional Construction Manager

888

919

31

Professional Construction Project Manager

1689

1679

-10

Professional Construction Mentor

28

13

-15

Professional Construction health and Safety Agent

100

109

9

Construction Mentor

8

9

1

Construction Health and Safety Officer

3367

3437

70

Construction Health and Safety Manager

921

905

-16

Candidate Construction Manager

417

542

125

Candidate Construction Project Manager

1945

1654

-291

Candidate Construction Health and Safety Agent

139

125

-14

Candidate Construction health and Safety Manager

107

78

-29

Candidate Construction Health and Safety Officer

2054

1954

-100

Grand Total

11663

11424

-239

13 September 2021 - NW2188

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he plans to open a technical vocational educational and training college in oPhongolo, Northern KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has no plans to open a Technical and Vocational Education and Training College in ePhongolo.

13 September 2021 - NW1883

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the approval by the City of Ekurhuleni Municipal Council of item: A-TP (01-2021) in its virtual sitting on 28 January 2021, which sought to pay interim compensation to the Ekurhuleni taxi industry for the operation of phase 1 of the Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network project, the National Treasury has found that the compensation is necessary; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will the National Treasury be ensuring that the approved item is actioned; (2) (a) what is the total figure in respect of the approved recommendation stating that the payment of R10,00 fare per passenger on the Harambee Service between Tembisa-ORTIA and extension to Bartlett to affected taxi operators for the daily passenger revenue loss, which will be from the R17,00 per passenger fare collected, (b) what are the reasons that the amount to be paid has not been capped and (c) which taxi associations are part of the Ekurhuleni taxi industry; (3) whether the National Treasury has received correspondence from the caucus of a certain political party (name furnished) on this matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) In line with the Public Transport Action Plan and Strategy of 2007, the National Land Transport Act (NLTA) of 2009 and the Division of Revenue Act (DORA) Public Transport Network Grant framework, provision is made for the payment of compensation to incumbent public transport operators whose businesses will be affected by the implementation of Integrated Public Transport Networks (IPTN’s).

The interim compensation item is contained in periodic project progress reports that are submitted to the National Department of Transport and National Treasury.

The NDoT has informed the City that the interim compensation started in 2017/18 and was expected to be replaced by a final compensation agreement by 2018/19. The City is therefore required to urgently conclude a final negotiated compensation agreement that is based on an accurate valuation of the operating licences that will be affected.

2(a) R3.6 million.

2(b) The interim compensation agreement makes provision of R10.00 per fare paying passenger for the compensation of daily passenger revenue loss.

2(c) The Ekurhuleni Taxi Industry (ETI) comprises of the following Associations:-

LIST OF TAXI ASSOCIATIONS WITH COE AREA

No.

Taxi Association

Abbreviation

 

Johannesburg Tembisa Taxi Association

JJTA

 

Kempton Park Taxi Association

KETA

 

Birchleigh Oakmoor Taxi Association

BOTA

 

Lethabong Taxi Association

LETA

 

Tembisa Pretoria Taxi Association

TEPTA

 

Tembisa Alexandra Taxi association

TATA

 

Tembisa Local Taxi Association

TELTA

 

Tembisa Long distance Taxi Association

TELDTA

 

Benoni Taxi Association

BTA

 

Greater Brakpan Taxi Association

GBTA

 

Springs Long Distance Taxi Association

SLDTA

 

Springs Taxi Association

STA

 

Nigel Taxi Association

NTA

 

Daveyton-Kempton Park Taxi Association

DKTA

 

Zonkizizwe Taxi Association

ZOTA

 

Vosloorus Boksburg District Taxi Association

VBDTA

 

Katlehong People’s Taxi Association

KAPTA

 

Reiger Park Boksburg District Taxi Association

RTA

 

Greater Germiston Taxi Association

GGTA

 

Greater Alberton Taxi Association

GATA

 

Bushbuck Transport Services

BTS

 

Thaba-Bosiu Express Services

TBES

 

Thahameso Nthwanatsatsi Thusanang

TNT

LIST OF TAXI ASSOCIATIONS WITH COE AREA

No.

Taxi Association

Abbreviation

 

Germiston-Natalspruite LD Taxi Association

GNLDTA

 

Germiston Limpopo LDTA

GLLDTA

 

Ezibeleni Sterkspruite LDTA

ESLDTA

 

Germiston- Jane Furse LDTA

GJFLDTA

 

Inkanyezi LDTA

INLDTA

 

Thuthukani LDTA

TLDTA

 

Zamokhuhle LDTA

ZLDTA

 

Taung-Bophirima LDTA

TBLDTA

 

Izizwezomsinga LDTA

IZLDTA

CROSS-BORDER OPERATORS REGISTERED WITH THE CROSS-BORDER ROAD TRANSPORT AGENCY (CBRTA), OPERATING THE CROSS-BORDER ROUTES FROM WITHIN THE AREA OF JURISDICTION:

No.

Taxi Association

Abbreviation

1.

Boksburg Cross-Border Taxi Association

 

2.

Ekurhuleni Cross-Border Taxi Association

 

3.

Kempton Park Taxi Association (Cross-Border members)

KETACB

4.

Benoni Taxi Association (Cross-Border members)

BTACB

5.

Springs Long Distance Taxi Association (Cross-Border members)

SLDTACB

6.

Springs Cross-Border Taxi Association

SLDTACB

7.

Thaba-Bosiu Express Taxi Association (members)

TBES

8.

Kopanang Dikila Makaota Cross-Border Tax Association???

KDMCBTA

9.

Thahameso Nthwanatsatsi Thusanang Taxi Association

TNT

10

AMR Chitova Bus Express (Pty) Ltd

 

11

LJ Mokhabela Bus Company

 

(3) The NDoT has not been informed of the abovementioned correspondence by National Treasury and requests that this be sent directly to the Director General of the Department of Transport.

 

13 September 2021 - NW2120

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA), (a) at which South African airports have the Instrument Landing Systems (ALS) not been operational and/or switched off in the period 1 January 2020 to 15 August 2021, (b) on what dates were the systems not operating, (c) what are the reasons that the systems were not operating, (d) what are the relevant details of the persons who have been held accountable for the systems not being operational, (e) what are the reasons that no person has been held accountable, (f) what are the relevant details of the persons and/or entities who were responsible for the maintenance of the ALS during the specified period and (g) what are the relevant details of the persons and/or entities who have been responsible for the maintenance of the ALS as at 15 August 2021?

Reply:

The SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA), (a) During the period 01 January 2020 and 15 August 2021 the following Instrument Landing Systems were switched off / were non-operational:

(a)

Station

Facility

Description

(b)

Unserviceable Dates

(b)

Serviceable Dates

(c)

Reasons why the systems were not operating.

(d) (e)

Details of the persons who have been held accountable for the systems not being operational

(f) (g)

what are the relevant details of the persons and/or entities who were responsible for the maintenance of the ALS during the specified period

FAPP

ILS

FAPP ILS RWY

August 2020

N/A

System unserviceable

Airport Management

The maintenance of ILS facilities is the responsibility of the airport management.

FAKN

ILS

KMIA ILS RWY 05

29-30 March 2021

31-Mar-21

25 days extension expired

The SACAA Flight Inspection Unit aircraft crashed on 23 January 2020 and the organisation went on a tender to source a service provider to conduct the calibration for its clients. The tender was approved, and an SLA signed in April 2020. The service provider appointed sub-contracted equipment and crew from a European company. Due to Covid-19 the service provider could not reposition the aircraft from Europe to South Africa due to Covid-19 travel restrictions. There were delays in obtaining a Foreign Operator Permit from the Air Service Licencing Council due to the Covid-19 outbreak.

All the major airports are equipped with modern based technology such as GNSS and RNAV approaches, in addition to the standard VOR approaches. So, being without an ILS doesn’t leave an airport stranded with traffic that cannot land in bad weather. They can also use the GNSS/RNAV approaches to achieve the same effect.

At the time of submitting this report all ILSes were operational and within the regulated parameters except for those where the owners opted not to calibrate.

 

FALA

ILS

Lanseria ILS RWY 05

27-Mar-21

18-May-21

FALA Airport closed down due travel restriction

   

 FAOR

ILS 03R

OR Tambo ILS 03R

10-Aug-20

22-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   
 

ILS 21L

OR Tambo ILS 21L

10-Aug-20

23-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   
 

ILS 03L

OR Tambo ILS 03L

10-May-21

11-May-21

Exemption not yet granted

   
 

ILS 21R

OR Tambo ILS 21R

10-May-21

11-May-21

Exemption not yet granted

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

FACT

ILS 19

Cape Town ILS 19

13-Aug-20

25-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   
 

ILS 01

Cape Town ILS 01

13-Aug-20

26-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

FALE

ILS 06

King Shaka ILS 06

06-May-20

02-Sep-20

Maintenance failure that needed flight calibrations resulting in the equipment NOTAM'd off air

   
 

ILS 24

King Shaka ILS 24

02-Jul-20

31-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 FAEL

ILS 29

East London ILS

16-Aug-20

12-Sep-20

Exemption Not Granted

   
 

ILS 11

East London ILS

16-Aug-20

11-Sep-20

Exemption Not Granted

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 FAPE

ILS 08 

 Port Elizabeth ILS 08

18-Aug-20

14-Sep-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   
 

ILS 26

 Port Elizabeth ILS 26

18-Aug-20

28-Sep-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

FAGG

ILS

George ILS 11

10-Jul-20

29-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   
 

ILS

George ILS 29

10-Jul-20

28-Aug-20

Exemption Period Lapsed

   

 

13 September 2021 - NW2034

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Public Transport Network Grant, (a) what exactly is the grant money for, (b) is there a contract with his department for the grants, (c) what proportion of the grants are allocated to capital expenditure and (d) what is the total breakdown of all capital expenditure for each of the five phases up to and including completion; (2) What was the exact (a) operating costs, (b) fare income and (c) council funding for each specific cost including operational in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

1. Public Transport Network Grant

a) The Public Transport Network Grant (PTNG) is a Division of Revenue Act (DoRA) schedule 5B conditional Grant allocation;

To provide funding for accelerated construction and improvement of public and non-motorised transport infrastructure that form part of a municipal Integrated Public Transport Network (IPTN) and to support the planning, regulation, control, management and operations of fiscally and financially sustainable municipal public transport network services.

b) The PTNG allocations are subsequently appropriated to municipalities that submit business plans with associated expenditure estimates per Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) period, wherein the 1st year of the MTEF reflects an actual appropriation whilst the 2 outer years are indicative allocations.

The allocation is governed by the Public Transport Network Grant Framework that is published with the annual Division of Revenue Act.

c)Infrastructure allocations:

Items

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Infrastructure component: Ekurhuleni

 R 450 m

R 581 m 

R 478 m

R 413 m

R 289 m

d) Capital expenditure for each of the five phases.

See table below. The initial costing of the system was based on build first and operate later approach whereby all corridors will be developed with dedicated bus lanes, however this approach is being reviewed and a financially contained approach will be implemented for future phases.

The total costs to date on Phase 1 are R 2 2290 mil. Due to a scaling down to now operate first and built later strategy, the infrastructure expenditure has been reduced for the next few years and for future phases. The estimates for the future phases are high-level and more accurate estimates will be developed during the design stage of each phase.

The NDoT will continue to work with the City to reduce costs, ramp up operations faster and increase fare revenue while reducing operating deficits.

It must be noted that the City is still operating a starter pilot service since November 2017 and therefore it is operating sub optimally and should have scaled up to a fully fledged service by July 2019.

Phase

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Phase 5

 

Total
(R mill)

Corridor

2

1

3

5

4

7

6

   

 

 

 

Financial Year

2021/22

191

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

191

 

2022/23

330

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

330

 

2023/24

385

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

385

 

2024/25

421

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

421

 

2025/26

439

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

439

 

2026/27

92

391

 

 

 

 

 

 

483

 

2027/28

 

430

 

 

 

 

 

 

430

 

2028/29

 

473

 

 

 

 

 

 

473

 

2030/31

 

284

407

 

 

 

 

 

691

 

2032/33

 

170

428

221

 

 

 

 

819

 

2033/34

 

 

470

199

 

 

 

 

669

 

2034/35

 

 

376

219

 

 

 

 

595

 

2035/36

 

 

263

131

350

 

 

 

745

 

2036/37

 

 

 

144

385

271

 

 

801

 

2037/38

 

 

 

 

424

298

 

 

722

 

2038/39

 

 

 

 

466

328

 

 

794

 

2039/40

 

 

 

 

513

361

 

 

874

 

2041/42

 

 

 

 

 

397

348

 

745

 

2042/43

 

 

 

 

 

 

383

 

383

 

2043/44

 

 

 

 

 

 

422

 

422

 

2044/45

 

 

 

 

 

 

464

 

464

(2) What was the exact (a) operating costs, (b) fare income and (c) council funding for each specific cost including operational in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years?

Items

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Operations Cost

 R0

R119,2m 

R126,7m

R168,4m

R232,2m

Fare Income

 R0

R0,33m 

R4,7m 

R8,1m

R8,5m

Council Funding

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

 

13 September 2021 - NW1992

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With reference to the SA Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions registration for Health and Safety Officers, Manager and Agents exams and interviews, what number of persons have failed (a) the past three exams and/or interviews for (i) construction health and safety officer, (ii) health and safety officer, (iii) health and safety agent and (iv) professional health and safety agent and (b) more than once; (2) whether guidelines are provided as to what materials should be studied for each exam and/or interview; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details. (3) whether questions are asked around the guidelines provided only or are there other areas that are covered in the exam and/or interview; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure :

The information that I have received from the SACPCMP in response to the question is as follows:

(1) (a) (i) The number of construction health and safety officers who failed examinations is 299 out of 585.

(ii) The number of construction health and safety managers who failed examinations is 61 out of 92

(iii) The number of construction health and safety agents who failed interviews is 6 out of 12

(iv) refer to (iii) above

(b) 32 failed more than once.

(2) The examination/interview tests the competence in the application of the scope of services and regulations that govern the Construction, Health and Safety Professions. It is an expectation therefore that candidates must be conversant with these.

(3) The examination/interview tests competence in the application of scope of services and regulations that govern the Construction, Health and Safety Professions.

13 September 2021 - NW2056

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that the Road Traffic Management Corporation’s acknowledgment of a backlog of 500 000 licences waiting in the system among other licence-related challenges such as renewals, (a) what is his department’s position on the suggestion to allow the renewal of licences over the weekend and after-hours until the backlog is resolved and (b) how best does his department intend to deal with licence-related challenges, especially in Gauteng?

Reply:

a) In 7 of the 9 provinces affected by the backlog, working hours have been extended including operations on Saturdays. Challenges relating to overtime is preventing the extension of operating hours in some provinces.

b) The department has extended the validity and grace period of all learner’s licences, driving licence cards, temporary driving licences and professional driving permits that expire during the period that commenced from 26 March up and including 31 August 2021 to 31 March 2022l.

Considering that Gauteng poses the biggest challenge due to the large population of motorists and the fact that it remains the only province that has extensively deployed the online booking system, an email service for Gauteng users who experience difficulties with online bookings and renewing their licences has been activated.

Processes are underway to introduce online payments.

The RTMC is in discussions with the Health Professions Council of South Africa to conclude a Memorandum of Understanding which will allow motorists to make use of private optometrists who will have the authority to upload eye test results directly to the Natis system.

The interface of live enrolment units with home affairs has been completed. This will enable immediate validation of the fingerprints and reduce delays.

A process to deploy new Natis end-user equipment in all provinces has started.

The RTMC is opening additional DLTCs with more staff working from 7 in the morning and ending at 9 at night for seven days a week. This initiative will increase the capacity in Gauteng by 30%. The initiative can be deployed nationally in consultation with the MECs concerned

A new DLTC in Tembisa has opened its doors.

Two busses have been fitted with state of the art equipment to serve as mobile centres to assist with licence renewals

Two self-service kiosk are being prepared for testing and should be rolled out by October 2021.

13 September 2021 - NW2033

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

In view of his replies to question 497 on 2 March 2021 and question 1030 on 14 November 2019, what are the current and/or latest (a) reasons that the City of Ekurhuleni do not have 40 buses operating, (b) actions that his department has taken with the City for missing the various deadlines and (c) amount spent each month for leasing each bus that is in use?

Reply:

a) The City of Ekurhuleni’s 40 buses for Harambee are currently operational

b) The City has been instructed to speed up the Phase 1 operations rollout, reduce costs, increase passengers to over 10 000 a day and urgently conclude a final compensation agreement. Until all this is achieved, no future phases will be approved.

c) The City of Ekurhuleni does not have a bus lease contract as the 40 buses have been purchased outright by the bus operating company.

13 September 2021 - NW2172

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that the roads in the (a) Molelema and (b) Matsheng villages under Greater Taung Local Municipality in the North West are in a state of serious deterioration, what is the cause for the delay by his department in finalising the construction of the Matsheng-Molelema Road after a contractor was appointed as constructions have been halted for a year now?

Reply:

The matter was queried with the North West Department of Public Works and Roads and the Administrator has indicated that there are disputes that are being handled in court and committed that the Department will maintain the roads until the litigation processes are complete as to ensure trafficability and safe condition of the road for commuters. Upon completion of the Legal processes, Department will expedite procurement processes as to ensure completion of all the outstanding work.

13 September 2021 - NW2084

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, given that in 2021 the National Research Foundation (NRF) introduced new funding criteria and processes for the funding of master’s students and doctoral candidates for part and full cost of study, and in view of the fact that the specified processes have made it difficult for such students and candidates to receive their funding on time and thus frustrating higher learning and research, his department has adopted any urgent processes to ensure that the NRF pays out the funds for the master’s students and doctoral candidates within 2021 before some of them finish their studies; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) whether his department is taking any steps to ensure that the NRF criteria and processes of paying out funds due to eligible master’s students and doctoral candidates in 2022 is improved, so that they receive the funding on time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. In December 2020, the NRF communicated the funding outcomes for new successful masters and doctoral student applications for the 2021 academic year, including the extension support for masters and doctoral studies who would have completed in 2020 but were impacted negatively by the Covid-19 lockdowns. In March 2021, additional awards for extension support were made following the DSI approval of R9,08 million of reprioritised funds to award additional masters and doctoral extension support funding for the 2021 academic year. The deadline date for the submission of honours applications was extended to March 2021 to accommodate universities whose academic years have been extended due to the Covid-9 lockdown. Between April 2021 and May 2021 all honours awards had been concluded and communicated.

Successful applicants received their provisional award letters for postgraduate funding from the NRF and were required to submit the signed Conditions of Grants (CoGs), together with the proof of registration to the NRF, for the funds to be released to the university. Delays in the release of funding by the NRF were due to delays in the submission of the signed CoGs, and proof of registration. The Department has duly instructed the NRF to maintain constant communication with the universities’ Research Offices to facilitate the submission of outstanding documentation, by the universities to the NRF, to enable the release of outstanding funds within this year and before some of the students finish their studies.

In order to manage cash-flow, the universities have a grant deposit from the NRF which is used to pay out funds to postgraduate students and other grantholders. The grant deposit ensures the availability of funds at the university to honour grant payments and is replenished as the university invoices the NRF on grant expenditure.

2. Between 2017 and 2019 the NRF entered into a phase of preparing for the implementation of the DSI-NRF Postgraduate Funding Policy and held numerous engagements with the university stakeholder community. In 2020 and 2021, the NRF continued to hold virtual engagements with all 26 universities to ensure alignment with the implementation plan of the policy and to address challenges experienced by stakeholders. It must be noted that the start of the implementation of the policy coincided with the start of the COVID-19 related national lockdown and this may have impacted on the readiness of institutions to implement the new Full Cost of Study (FCS) and Partial Cost of Study (PCS) Funding.

The DSI has requested the NRF to engage further with the universities to streamline the payment processes in the 2022 academic year. Towards this goal/end, the NRF has made and authorised the following adjustments in relation to improving the payment processes for the 2021 academic year:

Accredited private rental accommodation - The NRF has taken note of the challenges relating to the requirement for universities to accredit all private rental accommodation occupied by postgraduate students and has therefore taken the decision to rescind the requirement for ‘accredited accommodation.’ The NRF is considering the option of setting regional accommodation allowances which could eliminate the need for a valid lease agreement for the private rental accommodation.

Payment of allowances to students - In order to be audit compliant, payments for allowances will be made either on a monthly or quarterly basis to students. The quarterly provision is made to accommodate institutions that have not as yet implemented systems and processes for monthly payments of student allowances.

Payments may be made according to the semester of registration – The NRF has provided clarity to the universities relating to this matter. If the student registered in the first half of the year (first semester), regardless of the month of registration, and is registered for the full year, the student is eligible for the full year scholarship which must be made available to the student. Likewise, if the student registers in the second half of the year (second semester), only half the scholarship may be made available for the 2021 academic year. The payment rules for each of the allowances still apply.

Payment of allowance for electronic study device – The NRF has provided clarity to the institutions relating to this matter. The institution and the NRF will not require quotations or proof of purchase for the electronic study device allowance. The allowance will be made available only once irrespective of whether the student receives NRF funding for a further postgraduate degree(s).

10 September 2021 - NW1937

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What (a) relief measures has he put in place to assist black-owned small businesses and emerging industrialists who lost their properties during the recent unrest in (i) KwaZulu-Natal and (ii) Gauteng, (b) total number of the specified businesses were funded by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and (c) steps has the IDC taken to ensure that the businesses are able to operate again?

Reply:

The DTIC, together with the IDC and NEF developed a relief package for businesses covered by the recent unrest in parts of KZN and Gauteng and full details of the measures were made public shortly after they were finalised and further details were subsequently provided to Parliament through the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry, on 24 August 2021.

Funding was reprioritised from the budgets of the three entities and this was further supplemented by a fiscal transfer from the National Treasury. The components of the funding covered ddifferent kind of support, often as a ‘blended’ product comprising:

  • Grants: this portion is not repayable and is normally granted based on need or developmental objectives being achieved
  • Loans: granted at concessionary terms and it is typically for working capital, machinery, repairs to premises, fitment replacement, etc.
  • Bridging finance: covers ‘cash-flow’ challenges until SASRIA payouts are made.

The Critical Infrastructure Reconstruction Programme aims to leverage investment by supporting damaged infrastructure. This is a cost-sharing grant of 50% of the total qualifying infrastructure costs with a maximum cap of R30 million.

The Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP) Economic Stabilisation Fund that provides funding to companies affected by the unrest and associated supply chain disruptions. This will be achieved through financing uninsured businesses not covered by insurance or those with funding insurance shortfalls. The fund offers concessionary funding through interest-free loans with a maximum investment of R50 million.

The NEF Economic Recovery Fund supports affected businesses in all sectors of the economy focused on manufacturing, retail and services businesses. The support targets building improvements and fittings for premises, replacement of machinery, equipment, commercial vehicles and replenishing stock and working capital shortfalls owing to supply chain disruptions. A maximum of R10 million in loan funding will be provided.

In particular, IDC Support Package totalling R1.5 billion from its own balance sheet, made up of R800 million developmental grants and R700 million concessionary loans. To focus the implementation efforts on the delivery of this package, the following essential institutional arrangements were put in place:

  • Refined investment guidelines and simplified evaluation process.
  • Multidisciplinary deal teams including Business Development Managers, Risk Analysts, and Legal Advisors who meet daily to drive transaction delivery.

Applications are approved by a special Exco committee, composed of IDC Divisional Executives and Senior Professionals, which meets daily.

IDC is also administering the dtic’s R400-million Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP) Economic Stabilisation Fund that supports manufacturing companies affected, including those impacted by supply chain disruptions. Fund offers concessionary funding through interest-free loans.

The IDC is participating in physical visits to the affected companies. Together with the dtic the IDC is conducting coordinated publicity events to ensure that the funding packages are well advertised to the affected enterprises. This includes roadshows, webinars, virtual and physical site visits to affected clients.

The IDC is also providing Post-funding Business Support to offer non-financial advisory support aimed at restoring the long-term resilience and competitiveness of the affected businesses.

On 24 August 2021, the Department provided information on the approvals made as at that date through the IDC and NEF funding. Since then, a number of further transactions have been approved. The Department will be releasing the updated figures within the next five days and I will provide a copy of the updated data in a supplementary reply.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW2047

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) What has he found to be the challenges that are currently experienced in erecting more wind farms in the Eastern Cape and (b) how much energy in megawatts does his department anticipate will be generated from the wind turbines located in the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

(a) There are currently no known challenges. Projects are expected to manage the process of securing land use rights from landowners and ensure compliance with environmental requirements.

The projects are also dependent on the availability of grid capacity which Eskom has indicated is starting to become a limitation.

(b)  The current procured and contracted capacity of Wind Energy Facilities in the Eastern Cape is about 1432 MW. According to the Grid Connection Capacity Assessment 2023 report published by Eskom, the Eastern Cape electricity network can accommodate an additional 1740MW of generation capacity and it will therefore require upgrading in the future.

10 September 2021 - NW1977

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1. Whether her department is opposed to the global treaty on multilateral environmental agreement dealing with non-plastic pollution (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 2. whether her department is considering to import more plastic waste; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 3. whether she has found that the current systems and processes of the Republic are effective in significantly reducing the amount of plastic waste, in particular the amount of waste going into the ocean; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

  1. South Africa is aware of the global discussions around a potential new international treaty on marine litter and plastic pollution and has been participating actively in the United Nations Environment Assembly’s Ad Hoc Open-Ended Expert Group on Marine Litter and Microplastics, where the matter has been considered. South Africa has not finalised the due process to inform any pronouncement on a position concerning the global treaty for plastic pollution. This will only be done after a position paper is taken through the Cabinet Cluster process.
  2. South Africa is a party to the Basel Convention on the control of the trans-boundary movement of waste. The 2019 amendments of Annexes to the Basel Convention addresses plastic waste in guiding member countries on the management of import and export of plastic waste. Using the guidance from the Basel Convention, the department has set up systems to handle applications for the importation of plastic waste. The applicants that intend to bring plastic waste into the country are obliged to indicate the intended use of the plastics and evidence of scarcity of the type of plastic waste they intend to import into South Africa.
  3. South Africa’s current systems and processes are effective in significantly reducing the amount of plastic waste, in particular the amount of waste going into the ocean. The department has introduced the following to address the potential leakages of plastic into the ocean:

a). The Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) Regulations were published in Government Gazette 43879 (Notice No. 1184) on 05 November 2020 for implementation and apply to the following sectors: electrical and electronic equipment, lighting and paper, packaging and some single use products. These EPR Regulations outline a new approach to waste management in South Africa and will contribute significantly to the diversion of plastic waste from landfill.

b). In September 2020, Cabinet approved the National Waste Management Strategy, 2020 in terms of section 6 of NEM: WA. The strategy is based on the update and revision of the 2011 version and built on the success and lessons learnt from the previous version. Waste Minimisation forms part of the focus areas in the latest version of the strategy.

c). The amended regulations to Plastic Carrier Bags and Plastic Flat Bags Regulations were gazetted on 07 April 2021 in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998) (NEMA) and NEM:WA. The amendments focus on promoting a circular economy and ensuring circularity by prescribing the design through setting minimum recycled content in a phased manner starting in the year 2023 until 2027. The amended regulations create a demand for plastic waste to be used as a recyclate.

d). The department is also supporting other initiatives that are led by numerous organisations (private and civil society) in the country that are aimed at generating valuable information to support policy making for the management of plastic waste in South Africa. These initiatives include, amongst others, the initiative to end plastic waste, the Plastic Pact and the Plastics Master Plan (led by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC)).

e). The department implements various Environmental Programmes that are aimed at cleaning waste in the environment. The department's Source to Sea initiative aimed at stemming the flow of litter from upstream sources and catchments on land into the ocean environment is one such programme. Under this project, the department is working with municipalities to deploy litter interception devices in priority rivers and to collect litter from these rivers systems.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 10/09/2021

10 September 2021 - NW1999

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a list of (a) 12 organisations linked to a certain journalist (name furnished) that allegedly received grants from the National Lotteries Commission, (b) the amount of money granted to each of the organisations, (c) the year that each of the funds were disbursed and (d) any other relevant details thereof; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? [

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission. The reply states that the NLC received “a formal anonymous complaint” relating to Mr Raymond Joseph having direct or indirect interest in eight NLC funded organisations. The NLC provided a list of the organisations, which did not contain the details of the alleged link. I have requested that such information be supplied and will prepare a supplementary reply after receipt of the information.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW2050

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What are his department’s existing and planned efforts to (a) boost exports, promote investment and create high-value, high-paying jobs in order to build back from the effects of COVID-19 and (b) ensure every part of the Republic benefits from our trade strategies? [

Reply:

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, to which the DTIC contributed, sets out the overall approach by Government to boost exports, promote investment and create decent work opportunities as part of the response to Covid-19.

Within that framework, the Annual Performance Plan of the Department tabled in Parliament this year sets out a more detailed set of actions covering trade, investment and industrial development. This was further complemented by the package of measures announced recently to address the damage caused by the unrest in parts of KZN and Gauteng in early July 2021.

The work programme cover inter alia the following

  • Progressing the work on the African Continental Free Trade Agreement, specifically focused on completion of a set target on rules of origin on industrial products; and conclusion of discussions on services.
  • Implementing a number of sector growth plans, covering core industrial activities (steel and autos), food security (poultry and sugar) and consumer goods (clothing & textiles and furniture).
  • Expanding levels of private sector investment in the economy to boost economic output, including through support to firms in implementation of pledges made at South African Investment Conferences.
  • Improving the business environment through providing an efficient company registration service and addressing unnecessary regulatory requirements applicable in DTIC public entities;
  • Promoting opportunities for a larger number of South Africans through competition and empowerment policies, which include the work of development finance institutions; and
  • Supporting equitable development in different parts of the country through a new focus on district development and compiling economic information on each district municipality.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW2013

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether a well-known personality (name furnished) and/or her company, (details furnished) received any grant funding from the National Lotteries Commission; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the funding?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission that the NLC has not funded the individual or the named company.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW1938

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What total number of the businesses that supply (a) chicken, (b) rice and/or (c) car accessories in the Republic are South African-owned? [

Reply:

(a) The Department does not keep a register of all chicken suppliers. According to SA Poultry, there are 1 117 chicken and egg suppliers in South Africa, the vast majority of which would be South African owned.

(b) The Department does not keep a register of rice suppliers.

(c) It is not clear whether the question on car accessories is intended to refer to items that are solely ‘accessories’ i.e. dash covers, mirrors, car seat covers, phone mounts etc, for which details are not kept; or whether it covers auto components too. The Department has furnished me with the number of local component manufacturers they are aware of – once the question is clarified, the number can be provided.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW2014

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Whether there has been an investigation by the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) and/or his department into R4,5 million fraud in the NRCS; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) whether 4000 illegally imported flat screen television sets that were seized by the NRCS were stolen from the NRCS warehouse; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details; (3) what (a) items have been stolen from any premises of the NRCS in the past 12 months and (b) was the total value of the items stolen in each case?

Reply:

The CEO of the NRCS, Mr Mamaditse, has provided the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) with the following information.

(1) A case of fraud was detected in the NRCS in December 2020. The NRCS reports that it commissioned a full investigation of the matter which confirmed that fraud amounting to R4,501,488.21 was committed. The disciplinary process is underway and a criminal case has been opened. The NRCS insurers have been notified and are currently assessing the claim. The NRCS reports that it has also reviewed its procedures to mitigate the risk of this type of fraud recurring.

(2) Six hundred and seventy-two (672) illegally imported television sets were handed over to the NRCS on 4 July 2017. The NRCS reports that 641 were stolen and the theft was discovered in December 2018. A criminal case was opened. The NRCS Legal Services unit has been tasked with investigating the matter and is assisting the police investigation.

(3) (i) Losses Due to the Unrest in Durban

One of the NRCS rented warehouse in Durban was looted during the unrest and the full extent of the loss is still in the process of being determined. The warehouse was used to store Electro-technical, Automotive and Chemicals, Materials and Mechanicals products.

(ii) Reported and confirmed Losses over the past 12 Months, excluding the loss arising from looting in Durban.

Premises

a) Product

Quantity

b) Value

Port Elizabeth

Safety Shoe

21

R8 400

Port Elizabeth

Paraffin heaters

110

R55 000

Total

   

R63 400

The NRCS reports that it is actively addressing the challenges experienced with regard to products being stolen. To this end, the NRCS has appointed a panel of service providers to destroy non-compliant products. In addition, it advises that it has undertaken a review of its storage facilities and will shortly issue a tender to source more secure storage facilities.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW1978

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1. (a) On what date will (i) phase two of the Social-Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIS) be concluded and (ii) the draft policies be published and (b) how will they take into account the outstanding SEIAS phase two process; 2. whether she will ensure that all stakeholders in the fishing industry have been adequately and comprehensively consulted by her department to ensure that the process is fair and thorough?

Reply:

 

(1) (a)

We hope to publish phase two of the Social-Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIAS) by mid-September.

(ii)The SEIAS Phase 2 documents, which will be made available to stakeholders for comment during the public participation process on draft policies in mid September.

(b) Yes consultation will conform with Promotion of Administrative Justice Act (PAJA) requirements .

(2) Yes.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 10/09/2021

10 September 2021 - NW1964

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1. What total number of municipalities in each province have applied for and received waste licences for hazardous waste activities in terms of section 45 of the National Environmental Management: Waste Act, Act59 of 2008, from her department; 2. whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. There are only two municipalities in South Africa that applied in terms of section 45 of the National Environment Management: Waste Act, 2008 (Act No. 59 of 2008), namely:

- Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality applied for and received a Waste Management Licence for the disposal of both General and Hazardous Waste.

- Eden District Municipality applied for and received a waste management licence for the Disposal of both General and Hazardous Waste.

2. All licences issued in terms of waste listed activities can be found on the South African Waste Information Centre website on http://sawic.environment.gov.za/?menu=88

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 10/09/2021

10 September 2021 - NW2046

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) (a) What total number of applications to erect wind farms in the Eastern Cape were approved by his department, (b) what total number of wind farms are erected in the Eastern Cape currently following the approval of such applications and (b) where is each wind farm located in each case; (2) whether his department has identified other areas in the Eastern Cape for potential wind farms; if not, why not; if so, (a) where will each such project be located and (b) on what date is it envisaged that construction will (i) commence and (ii) be completed?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy does not receive applications for the erection of Wind Farms but receive bids following a request for proposals. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment is probably best placed to provide this information based on environmental impact assessments applications they receive.

(b) Find below a list of wind-based projects in the Eastern Cape procured under Bid Windows 1 – 4.

Project

Area

Dorper Wind Farm

Stormberg

MetroWind Van Stadens Wind Farm

Port Elizabeth

Kouga Wind Farm

Port Elizabeth

Jeffreys Bay Wind Farm (RF) (PTY) LTD

Jeffereys Bay

Cookhouse Wind Farm

Cookhouse

Amakhala Emoyeni

Bedford

Tsitsikamma Community Wind Farm Project

Tsitsikamma

Waainek

Grahamstown

Grassridge

Coega

Chaba

Komga

Nojoli Wind Farm

Cookhouse

Red Cap-Gibson Bay

Oyster Bay

Nxuba Wind Farm

Cookhouse

Golden Valley Wind

Cookhouse

Wesley-Ciskei

Hamburg

Oyster Bay Wind Farm

Humansdorp

2. Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) does not dictate the location of the Wind Energy Facilities. IPPs are required to select their own location and conduct the necessary studies to ensure viability of the project.

The department has however worked with international partners and local industry associations to produce the Wind Atlas. The Wind Atlas is a high-resolution wind resource map that shows South Africa’s wind resource.

 

10 September 2021 - NW2012

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to his reply to question 159 on 5 March 2021, (a) what are the reasons that he has not yet provided the requested information and (b) on what date will he provide the information?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane advises as follows:

“ (1)(a) Venalor NPC applied to the National Lotteries Commission in the 2018 and 2020 financial years in terms of section 2A (4) Lotteries Act No 57 of 1997 as amended (“the Act”) and the application was adjudicated by the ACNHDA in terms of section 26 of the Act and related regulations.

The first application for the 2017/18 financial year was for an amount of R4 672 180.00 and the second application was awarded in the 2019/20 financial year for an amount of R2 292 300.00.

The National Lotteries Commission funded Venalor NPC to host the annual awards ceremony that recognise the contribution of South African female artist in their respective genres and facilitate a platform in which up and coming aspiring artists can have access to a larger audience and to perform alongside established artists in the industry in line with the funding focus areas.

(b) The funding covered amongst others workshops, marketing and communications, women summit, mbokodo awards and other logistical matters such as transport, security.

(2) The NLC conducted a site visit with regards to the grant for the R4 672 180.00 to ascertain whether funds are being used according to the conditions stated on the Grant Agreement. The site visit reports found that the funded organisations utilised the funds in line with the conditions of the grant. Following submission of a satisfactory progress report, the project has been closed.

The NLC conducted a site visit with regards to the grant for the R2 292 300.00 to ascertain whether funds were utilised in accordance with conditions stated in the Grant Agreement. To date the funded organisation has submitted a satisfactory interim progress report for the first tranche that was paid. The NLC continues to enforce the Grant Agreement.”

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW2142

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)(a) Whether he has consulted the lead senior negotiator, on the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) at his own department regarding South Africa’s proposed localisation policies, considering the fact that Dr Morgenie Pillay believes that the said localisation policies are incongruent with the AfCFTA; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details regarding the outcomes of the consultations; (2) whether he has found that localisation policies are incongruent with the nondiscrimination obligations and commitments imposed on the Republic in the AfCFTA; if not, why not; if so, what is the justification for the continued push for localisation policies by his department [NW2431E]

Reply:

The South African Government’s industrialisation and localisation policies aim to build and upgrade domestic production to supply domestic and foreign markets, support wider economic development and promote employment growth.

I draw the Honourable Member’s attention to the fact that localisation policies are not simply that of the DTIC. Localisation is a policy framework that enjoys resounding support among South Africans who recognize the need to industrialise our economy. It is the policy of the Administration and follows the commitment in the Manifesto of the ruling party to stronger localisation as a pillar of its industrial policy. The commitment to localisation is included in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan of government.

The approach on localisation has also been unanimously endorsed by the business, labour and community representatives at Nedlac. They represent a large number of firms and entrepreneurs, workers in different sectors of the economy and organisations made up of representatives of various community interests. Indeed the agreement at Nedlac specifically provides for a quantitative target and a list of sectors and products. In these circumstances, the consultations on the South African approach to localisation were at the appropriate level at which consultations on policy matters normally take place, namely with social partners and with other Government policy-makers.

I further draw the Honourable Member’s attention to local industrialisation policies of governments across the world, in both developed and developing countries. It is what governments do to enable achievement of national objectives and indeed there is today a growing consensus on the value of carefully targeted and well-implemented industrial policy measures. I will be happy to brief the Portfolio Committee in due course on these developments should the Committee so request. There is also a growing literature on the subject which is easily accessible to the public.

In respect of trade, the localisation policies are consistent with South Africa’s international trade obligations and building industrial capacity is the very purpose of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement in order to reduce the over-reliance by countries on the continent to imports of manufactured products from elsewhere in the world. The localisation policies followed by the SA government (with the support of business, labour and community organisations) represents inter alia the plan to build South Africa’s industrial capacity within the framework of the AfCFTA.

I also draw attention to the Policy Statement on Localisation for Jobs and Industrial Growth as well as the Trade Policy for Industrial Development and Employment Growth, available on the DTIC’s website.

-END-

10 September 2021 - NW2045

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy Mr Jacob MbeleDeputy Director General

(1) What total number of applications for the erection of wind farms and/or wind turbines have been received by his department in each district in the (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21 financial years; (2) what (a) total number of objections were received and (b) are the reasons for the objections in each case?

Reply:

1. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy does not receive applications for the erection of Wind Farms but receive bids following a request for proposals. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment is probably best placed to provide this information based on environmental impact assessments applications they receive.

2. See response to (1) above.

10 September 2021 - NW1988

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1). What (a) are the details of the progress of the (i) Sekhing, (ii) Jouberton and (iii) Mathibestad clinics that are under construction by his department in the North West, (b) is the name of the company to whom his department awarded the contract to build each clinic and (c) amount did each clinic cost his department; (2) whether the three clinics are currently in operation; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the current breakdown of the vacancy rate of health care workers in each (a) hospital and (b) position in the North West?NW2222E

Reply:

(1)and (2)

(I) CONSTRUCTION OF A NEW JOUBERTON CHC

1.1 STATUS SUMMARY

The project status summary is highlighted in the matrix below.

Table 1.1: Project status summary: Construction of a new Jouberton CHC

No.

Item

Description

1

Contract Number

DoH/020/PS/11

2

Date of Site Handover

19 September 2016

3

Original Contractor

JV Group Five & ENM

4

Implementing Agent

NWDoH

5

Principal Agent

Tiki Architects

6

Contract Commencement Date

19 September 2016

7

Contract Duration ( Original )

410 Calendar days

8

Practical Completion (Original )

3 November 2017

9

Revised practical completion date (As per EoT 8)

21 May 2019

10

Cost of EoT

R 4 358 562,97 Excl VAT

11

Contract value before EOT 8 (with EOT 7)

R 205 320 122, 91 Excl VAT

12

Revised contract value with EOT 7 & 8 awaiting Approval by Provincial treasury

R 209 678 685,88 Excl VAT

13

Original Contract Amount

R 146 622 724,20 Excl VAT

14

Progress to Date

100 %

15

Expenditure to date

R 222 217 461.09

​1.2 PROJECT SCOPE STATEMENT

The project scope includes the following health units amongst others:

CTOP, Dental, Emergency, Maternity, Theatre, Outpatients, Crisis Control, Radiology, Sputum Booth, TB and appurtenant works.

The following service units are also included:

Guardhouse, Main Reception and Administration, Pharmacy, Service Building, Generator and Gas Control, Medical Waste and refuse Deposit, Pump Station, Carports. Staff accommodation comprising of six (6) two bedroom flats and four (4) one bedroom flats and appurtenant works also forms part of the scope of works.

​1.3 PROGRESS TO DATE

The project is at 100% completion, with final completion achieved. The clinic is currently operational.

(ii) CONSTRUCTION OF A SEKHING chc

​1.4 STATUS SUMMARY

The project status summary is highlighted in the matrix below.

Table 1.1: Project status summary: Construction of a new Sekhing CHC.

No.

Item

Description

 

Contract number

NWDOH/PS/019/11

 

Contract sum

R 84 026 731.26

 

Commencement date

4 October 2012

 

Original Contractor

ENM Trading Pty Ltd

 

Principal Agent

Phitlhelelo Properties Pty Ltd

 

Project Period

22 months

 

Practical completion date (original)

31 August 2014

 

Revised practical completion date

21 February 2019

 

Progress to date

89%

 

Revised contract amount (Incl approved V.O’s)

R 130 686 350.69

 

Expenditure to date

R 121 557 456.64

​1.5 PROJECT SCOPE STATEMENT

Community Health Centre with Administration Building, OPD, Male and Female Medical Wards, CTOP, EMRS, Crisis Control, Pharmacy, Dental Unit and Services Building. Residential Accommodation with parking Bays, Water storage tanks, Generator and Diesel Tank Rooms, Boundary Fence for both developments and parking for visitors.

​1.6 PROGRESS TO DATE

The contractor has currently abandoned the site citing financial difficulties, and further requested settlement on the project. The Department has appointed an external investigator on the project, of which the finding on the report shall provide a way forward on the project as the Department is considering termination.

iii) Information about the Mathibestad CHC is still being verified by the Province, it will be submitted as soon as it is completed.

(3) According to the North West Provincial Department of Health the current breakdown of the vacancy rate of health care workers in each hospital are as follows (a)-

HOSPITAL / HEALTH CARE WORKER CATEGORY

FILLED

VACANT

TOTAL

VACANCY RATE

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

220

34

254

13.4

Brits District Hospital

377

72

449

16.0

Ganyesa District Hospital

96

27

123

22.0

Gelukspan District Hospital

142

37

179

20.7

Gen De La Rey District Hospital

44

14

58

24.1

Job Shimankane Tabane Hospital

792

113

905

12.5

Joe Morelong Memorial Hospital

289

40

329

12.2

Klerksdorp Tertiary Hospital

1032

144

1176

12.2

Koster Hospital

91

11

102

10.8

Lehurutshe District Hospital

74

25

99

25.3

Mafikeng Provincial Hospital

593

56

649

8.6

Moses Kotane District Hospital

426

119

545

21.8

Nic Bodenstein District Hospital

94

23

117

19.7

Potchefstroom: Hospital Primary

457

98

555

17.7

Schweizer-Reneke Hospital

72

16

88

18.2

Taung District Hospital

330

39

369

10.6

Thusong District Hospital

136

32

168

19.0

Tshepong Primary Hospital

121

26

147

17.7

Witrand Regional Hospital

509

130

639

20.3

Zeerust District Hospital

67

17

84

20.2

Grand Total

5962

1068

7035

15.2

(b) Position in the North West

The North West Provincial Department of Health has an overall health care workers vacancy rate of 15.2%. The North West Provincial Department of Health’s budget baseline for the financial year 2020-2021 is reduced over R400 million and therefore the department is mainly filling critical replacement posts and some priority posts which were identified in the beginning of the financial year. The posts are being filled as and when the budget is available and confirmed by the Chief Financial Officer.

The Province ensure that health care service are continuously provided in the Province and not compromised through payment for overtime for additional hours worked by health care workers.

END.

10 September 2021 - NW1967

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) total amount has been allocated for food relief in (i) KwaZulu-Natal and (ii) Gauteng, (b) criteria will be used to allocate food relief and (c) measures will be put in place to eliminate double-dipping;(2) what number of food vouchers (a) have been distributed to date and (b) will be allocated; (3) what is the breakdown of the value of each food parcel in terms of (a) food items, (b) packaging, (c) transport and/or (d) any other relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) The amount that has been allocated by the Department of Social Development for food relief as a result of the violent protests is R100 million, which was distributed as follows: in (i) KwaZulu-Natal = R60 million for 81 429 food parcels and (ii) R40 million for 57 143 food parcels in Gauteng.

In addition to this allocation, SASSA has an allocation for social relief of distress in both provinces, which is used for the issuing of vouchers for affected families – not specifically for the response to the unrest.

(b) The criteria which will be used to allocate food relief includes:

  • People experiencing hunger as a result of the public violence and looting.
  • Families with bread winners who have been laid off from industries that have closed down.
  • Families battling with hunger where there is no income (Living below the food poverty line of R585 per month).
  • Targeting 70% rural & 30% urban areas of KZN

(c) The measures that have been put in place to eliminate double-dipping include verification of qualifying beneficiaries against the different lists, such as the SASSA social relief of distress vouchers vs the identified beneficiaries by Social Development officials;

(2) a) SASSA issued 5 568 food vouchers in KwaZulu-Natal and 337 food vouchers in Gauteng region to respond to the unrest for the period between 1 April 2021 to end July 2021.

b) Vouchers to be allocated will depend on the assessment of applications received since provision of this benefit is needs based and dependent on available resources. SASSA will provide assistance in accordance with the provisions as set in the Social Assistance Act, 2004.

Food relief provision from the Solidarity Fund was purely using food parcels and no vouchers were part of this response. This was due to the fact that the food outlets in some of the affected areas were destroyed. The provision of food parcels therefore ensured that vulnerable citizens had access to food;

(3) The cost of each food parcel is R700. The breakdown in terms of (a) food items, (b) packaging is as follows:

Category

Food items

Unit

Qty

Starch

Fortified Maize meal

KG

10

 

Rice

KG

10

 

Potatoes

KG

7

Protein

Tinned fish -Pilchards in Tomato Sauce

400g TIN

6

 

Baked Beans in Sauce

410g TIN

6

 

Sugar Beans/Split Peas

KG

2

 

Milk Full Cream (Powder - not creamer) or liquid

KG

Litres

1

6

Vegetable

Butternut OR Cabbage (Any veg in season)

KG

10

3

Seasoning

Onions

KG

2

 

Cooking Oil

LIT

2

Other

Soap

Bar

2

(c) Transport and/or (d) food sourcing, packaging and distribution to households is fixed to not more than 5% of the food parcel value = R35 per food parcel.

10 September 2021 - NW1976

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1.Whether she has been informed of the storage of dangerous chemicals close to an important Natural area (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2. what ate the full relevant details of the chemicals that wee stored at the facility before it burnt down; 3. what number of complaints were received by her department from members of the public regarding the impact of the acrid fumes on their health?

Reply:

1. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) was not aware of the storage of the chemicals in close proximity to the natural area prior to the fire incident that took place in July 2021. The DFFE is not the competent authority for issuing environmental authorizations in respect of such an activity as this function lies with the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs. As a result of the fire incident, the DFFE received a notification in terms of section 30 of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998) and has subsequently therefore become aware of the storage facility.

2. On the 25* of August 2021 the Minister in the National Assembly committed to release the findings of the investigation by a multi-departmental investigative team in relation to the compliance profile of United Phosphorus Limited (UPL) by the end of September 2021. The drafting of that report is at an advanced stage and the department remains on track to disclose this to the public as the Minister committed to do.

3. The DFFE received 12 (twelve) complaints from the public through the departments Environmental Crime and Incidents Hotline at the time when the fire was not fully extinguished. It should, however, be noted that the majority of the complaints were reported to the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: .10/09/2021