Questions and Replies

06 September 2019 - NW737

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

a) The department didn’t host any event related to the 2019 budget vote

b) No gifts were distributed.

06 September 2019 - NW521

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the current status of the upgrades to the Lingcom Primary School in Graaff-Reinet and (b) are the details of the timeframes for the completion of the upgrades; (2) (a) what are the details of all outstanding amounts owed to the (i) main contractor and (ii) each other contractor or professional team and (b) by which date(s) will the outstanding amounts be settled; (3) what additional expenses has her department incurred for each month since the upgrade works were stopped?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the Province.

06 September 2019 - NW453

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1) With reference to the undocumented migrants who trade illegally within the borders of the Republic and her recent statements in this regard, what plans has her department put in place in order to identify all businesses run by undocumented migrants; (2) what is the annual contribution of the foreign-owned small businesses to the gross domestic product; (3) whether she has found reports that the Republic loses R7 billion annually in revenue due to foreign-owned tuck shops that have replaced the spaza shops run by South Africans are a true reflection of the facts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?”

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is participating in the National Joint Operational and Intelligent Structure which comprise of Home Affairs, South Africa Police Service, Intelligent Unit, South African Revenue Service and National Prosecuting Authority, which is aimed at addressing issues relating to undocumented migrants trading in South Africa as well as the production and dealing of illicit goods, among others.

The above mentioned multi stakeholder Task Team is working together with various Local Business Chambers to identify and quantify all businesses that are operated by undocumented migrants. As I announced during my budget vote speech, we are in the process of developing a database / repository of all informal businesses that are operating in South Africa.

2. The contribution of foreign-owned small businesses to Gross Domestic Product is unknown as they are part of the undeclared/ informal economy. Additionally, most businesses in the informal sector are unregistered, unlicensed and do not make use of banking and financial institutions. As such, these businesses do not pay tax as well.

As recently witnessed in news reports, some of the goods traded are counterfeit and in the food retail sector; most of the goods sold are not certified by health and other relevant authorities. It is therefore difficult to quantify the contribution of foreign-owned businesses to the local economy.

3. Spaza Shops in the Township and Rural Areas have grown to be predominately run by foreign nationals. There has been a decline in the number of South African owned shops due to reasons such as the lack of government support, which we seek to address as the Department of Small Business Development.

06 September 2019 - NW715

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What measures and mechanisms did her department put in place and is implementing to enable, promote and expand small business access to private sector credit from commercial banks, specifically by having the State acting as surety and/or providing debt financing as collateral for eligible small, medium and micro enterprises?

Reply:

As announced during our tabling of the Department's Annual Performance Plan (2019/2020, the Department has adopted a new operational model which includes Access to Finance as a full programme. This programme extends to risk cover and business rescue, SMME contracting models, SMME payments, Common Application Templates, Blended Funding, SMME Funding Policy, financial sustainability and innovative funding facilities. These Initiatives will progressively be rolled out throughout the next five years jointly with the private sector. Currently the credit guarantee scheme which is called Khula Credit Guarantee Scheme that is implemented through sefa is in partnership with the private sector. This scheme offers guarantee to lenders on behalf of SME borrowers who would otherwise have their access impeded by the lack of collateral required by various financiers. We intend to upscale this programme as part of expanding various funding options for SMEs.

 

06 September 2019 - NW152

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department has an instrument to measure the capacity and effectiveness of subject advisors whose job is to ensure that quality teaching and learning take place in schools; if not, what other mechanisms would help her department monitor effectiveness of what subject advisors do; if so, (a) are those instruments available across provinces and (b) are there consequences for non-compliance;

Reply:

The sector uses the instruments contained in the Education Management Service (EMS): Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) for office-based educators as contained in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) Collective Agreement No. 3 of 2017; as well as the job description of subject advisors as contained in Collective Agreement No. 4 of 2017 to measure the performance and effectiveness of subject advisors.

(a) Yes. As a national ELRC collective agreement, it is available across all provinces and implementation is mandatory. Subject advisors enter into, and sign annual performance agreements with their immediate supervisor. The agreements contain among others, the following:

  1. Key Result Areas (KRAs), which describe what is expected from the subject advisor in terms of the job description; and
  2. Core Management Criteria (CMCs); which are elements and standards used to describe and assess performance, taking into consideration knowledge, skills and attributes.

The performance agreement serves as the cornerstone of performance management of subject advisors at the individual level, while a workplan describes what will be achieved within particular timeframes through clearly defined activities and performance indicators.

(b) There are consequences for non-compliance as determined by the Labour Relations Act and the Employment of Educators Act, which prescribe the processes to be followed during such misconduct.

(2) whether her department has ways to prevent provinces from appointing persons who are not capable and/or suitably qualified and were not achieving good results during their teaching careers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1110E

Response

The process for the recruitment and selection of educators prescribed in relevant regulations, as stipulated in the Personnel Administrative Measures, Chapter B. The regulations prescribe educational requirements, statutory requirements, and experience required for appointment in education. The stipulated process includes the selection process, which involves formation of representative panels or Interview Committees that are responsible for the shortlisting a pool of suitable candidates and conducting interviews. It is the view of the department that the existing regulations and processes, are adequate to ensure that suitably qualified educators are appointed in every post.

06 September 2019 - NW133

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What total number of educators that teach Grade 3 are currently employed by (i) her department and (ii) each provincial department of education and (b) what number of the specified educators (i) were tested for English language proficiency and (ii) passed the English language proficiency test in each province?

Reply:

(a) (i) The National Department of Basic Education does not employ teachers.

(ii) The Department does not routinely collect information on the actual number of educators by Grade as part of regular monitoring and reporting. The figures below are an estimation based on the number of Grade 3 classes.

PROVINCE

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF EDUCATORS

Eastern Cape

5 125

Free State

1 680

Gauteng Province

4 770

KwaZulu-Natal

6 528

Limpopo

3 510

Mpumalanga

2 306

Northern Cape

805

North West

1 911

Western Cape

3 071

Grand Total

29706

Source: Education Management Information System Data, 2018

(b) (i) 2018 Foundation Phase (FP) English First Additional Language (EFAL) teachers were tested nationwide on English with emphasis on reading.

(ii) 65% of these teachers did very well, while the remaining 35% is getting attention through the Primary School Reading Improvement Programme (PSRIP).

06 September 2019 - NW110

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, in line with the Government policy of taking services to the people, she will commit to the development of nonviable schools within the communities where they are located, rather than closing them down and incurring huge costs for transporting learners to the well-developed schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she would consider developing a policy on the special post provisioning norm for this category of schools, which usually have a very low student enrolment due to their historic deeply rural background; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Rationalisation of schools cannot be implemented in a blanket approach, but on a case by case approach. In general, non-viable schools are a disadvantage to learners as they cannot be provided with resources and sufficient number of educators, to ensure quality education at par with other schools. However, where circumstances dictate that such schools be retained in communities where they are located, such a determination will be dictated by its peculiar circumstance. As such, it will not be prudent to commit that all non-viable schools will be retained where they are located.

2. The Department continuously monitors the effectiveness of the post provisioning norms including the provisioning to small schools. Once it is decided that it is viable to maintain or establish a small school after considering both educational effectiveness and cost efficiency, the post provisioning norms assists in determining the number of posts to be provided to such a school. The current Post Provisioning Norms are under review to ensure that small schools are adequately addressed. This is being done together with stakeholders in the Education Labour Relations Council.

 

06 September 2019 - NW716

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What measures and mechanisms did her department put in place and is implementing to enable, promote and expand small business access to equity financing?”

Reply:

Improving investment readiness is key to both debt and equity financing. The Department through its entities has a number of programmes that aimed at ensuring that SMMEs are enabled to access equity financing. We have incubation programmes that we are implementing through Seda where we provide structured training on both technical and soft skills to SMMEs. There is also a mentorship programme that is offered through Seda where we get skilled individuals to offer mentorship support to SMMEs. The agency also runs an investor pitching initiative called “Pitch & Perfect”, to close the large gap between what entrepreneurs present and what investors are looking for.

According to the Global Entrepreneurship Index, South Africa has higher innovation than the world average, but low risk capital and low start-up skills. Pitch & Perfect addresses these gaps, by providing annual seasons of both pitching masterclasses and pitching competitions at provincial and national level, to promote and enable investment readiness.

Through sefa, upon disbursement, if a client needs business support, sefa immediately assigns a mentor for a period of up to 12 months at sefa’s cost. In addition, sefa has an agreement with South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) to assist eligible sefa clients with management accounts at no cost to sefa clients.

_______________________________________________________________________________

06 September 2019 - NW752

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?”

Reply:

1. Following the proceedings of the Budget vote held on 12 July 2019, the Minister hosted a brief Stakeholder engagement session.

(a) The Stakeholder engagement meeting was held in the Parliamentary precinct at Palm Court, Marks Building.

(b) The total cost spent was R17, 866.00.

(c) The Protection of Personal Information Act prohibits the sharing personal details of participants however, the invitees comprised of stakeholders from SMME Organisations and Cooperatives, Incubators, Corporate entities, members of the public and support staff.

(2) No gifts were distributed.

(a)&(b) Not applicable.

06 September 2019 - NW441

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of learners have received (i) tablets and/or (ii) laptops from the Government since 1 January 2019 and (b) from which budget(s) was or were the devices bought?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii)

The Departments of Basic Education and Telecommunications and Postal Services in collaboration with ICASA provided 105 (North West=55, Mpumalanga=21 and Gauteng =29) schools with ICT equipment as part of the Universal Service and Access Obligations (USAO). Each school received the following ICT equipment:

  • 24 x Tablets for learners;
  • 1 x Server loaded with DBE electronic content;
  • 2 x Teacher laptops;
  • 2 x Wi-Fi Access Points;
  • 1 x data projector; and
  • 1 x Mobile charging trolley.

b) The budget for the rollout of USAO solution is part of the Network Operators Licence Obligations imposed by ICASA.

Further information about the procurement of tablets and laptops should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments. The PDEs are responsible for the rollout of tablets and laptops to teachers.

 

06 September 2019 - NW454

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Which schools in the Republic have been declared hotspots for crime and violence; (2) whether there are any interventions to curb crime and violence at the specified schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. See the attached list of schools declared as hotspots for the 2018/19 financial year.

Province

No of Schools

KwaZulu-Natal

202

Western Cape

147

Free State

90

Limpopo

22

Gauteng

251

Northern Cape

40

Eastern Cape

99

North West

80

Mpumalanga

414

TOTAL

2 345

2. The National School Safety Framework (NSSF) remains the Department of Basic Education (DBE) strategic response to school violence;

  1. It is a comprehensive approach that coordinates and consolidates all school safety interventions in the sector;
  2. It is based on a social ecological systems model which locates the school within its broader community;
  3. It relies on collaboration and partnership; and
  4. The INSPIRE framework provides further granularity to the NSSF focusing on seven (7) areas: Implementation and law enforcement; Norms and values; Safe environments; Parent and care-giver support; Income and economic strengthening; Response and support services; and Education and Life Skills.

The DBE also supports provinces to implement a number of interventions in response to crime and violence in schools; including for example:

  1. Strengthening the School Safety Committees through training to adequately respond to the challenges school face;
  2. Bullying prevention programmes roll-out in Eastern Cape
  3. Anti-gangsterism joint intervention programme with South African Police Service (SAPS) in the Northern Education Region – Port Elizabeth;
  4. In partnership with SAPS, searches and seizures are randomly held to seize dangerous weapons in school campuses;
  5. Moral rejuvenation seminars held in all North West Education districts in partnership with the QLTC in the Office of the Premier;
  6. District Safety Coordinators trained on Protocols on prevention of Corporal Punishment and Sexual Abuse and Harassment of leaners in schools;
  7. After the National Summit on School violence hosted by Minister in 2018, five provinces (Gauteng, North West, Free State, Western Cape and Eastern Cape) have convened provincial summits to roll-out the Declaration and implementation of the recommendations to enhance safe learning environments and instil a culture of respect and discipline among leaners and educators.

06 September 2019 - NW444

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total (a) number of schools that have been converted into inclusive schools and (b) monetary cost that has been incurred by her department in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The total number of schools that have been converted into inclusive schools is 832.

(b) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

05 September 2019 - NW559

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) whether she has been informed of CAS 25/3/2019 opened at the Brooklyn Police Station; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has taken any measures against the ambassador regarding the charges; if not, what steps will be taken; if so, what are the relevant details? NW 1557E

Reply:

1. Honourable Berman, yes, I was informed of CAS 25/3/2019 opened at the Brooklyn Police Station.

A locally employed personnel at the Official Residence of the Ambassador of Algeria to South Africa alleged that she has been a victim of sexual assault perpetuated by the Ambassador, and as such CAS 25/3/2019 was subsequently opened at the Brooklyn Police Station. The National Prosecuting Authority informed the Department on 19 July 2019 that it “has declined to prosecute the case”.

2. Based on the decision by the National Prosecuting Authority, the Department has not taken any measures against the Ambassador regarding the charges.

05 September 2019 - NW602

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the number of teaching and principal vacancies in each province?

Reply:

Province

Number of Principal Vacancies as at the end of June 2019

Number of Teaching Vacancies (Includes Deputy Principal, HOD and Post Level 1)

Eastern Cape

562

3 618

Free State

134

943

Gauteng

77

2 783

KwaZulu-Natal

322

758

Limpopo

697

6 124

Mpumalanga

113

237

North West

226

736

Northern Cape

37

195

Western Cape

234

1 211

Total

2 402

16 605

Source: Provincial Education Department Reporting, end of June 2019

05 September 2019 - NW619

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

a) (i) Dirco

Total Amount = R 6 793 492.69

b) (ii) ARF

Total Amount = R 0

Financial year 2017-18

(aa) Cleaning

Total amount paid: R 2 701 441.87

(bb) Security, None

(cc) Gardening, None

(bbb) Financial year 2018-19

(a) Cleaning

Total amount paid: R 2 639 082.47

(b) Security

Total amount paid: R 1 334 226.85

(c) Gardening

Total amount paid: R 118 741.50

05 September 2019 - NW655

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, in light of the Legacy Report of the Portfolio Committee on Small Business Development of the Fifth Parliament, wherein Recommendation 15.3 states that there is a lack of a national legislative framework to deal with the dominance of foreign nationals in the micro economy (details furnished), she has found that public hearings need to be held to engage South Africans on the specified issue; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?””

Reply:

The Department of Trade and Industry back in 2013 drafted a Business Licensing Bill which amongst other things was developed:

  • To provide for a simple and enabling framework for procedures for application of licensing of business by setting national norms and standards; to provide for framework for co-operative governance and harmonisation of standard procedures and minimum, requirements for application of business licence;
  • To provide for framework for support monitoring and standard setting by national government in order to build local government into an efficient, frontline agency capable of integrating the activities of all spheres of government for the overall social and economic upliftment of communities in harmony with their local natural environment;
  • To provide for the appointment of inspectors; to provide for framework of penalties and administrative fines for non-compliance; and
  • To repeal the Businesses Act, 1991 and all proclamations, notices, regulations promulgated under that law; and to provide for matters connected therewith.  

The Bill went through the stages of the legislation development processes including the tabling in Parliament in 2014. However, due to dissatisfaction from the business formations, the Bill was sent back to the dti in 2014 for further consultations. The dti spent a greater part of 2014 consulting with business formations and other relevant stakeholders. The process of retabling the Bill was not finalised given the transfer of the mandate of small business development to the newly formed Department of Small Business which did not adequate capacity to finalise the process.

Therefore whether it is regulations or legislation that is aimed at dealing with the issues around managing the economic activities in the microeconomy I am of the view that it will not be necessary to undertake consultations for the third time on the same issues.

05 September 2019 - NW593

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of students graduated with a degree in computer sciences in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below provides the number of students who graduated with an undergraduate degree in Computer and Information Science at public higher education institutions from 2013 to 2017.

Undergraduate Degree

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Computer and Information Science

2 531

2 670

2 746

2 617

2 843

04 September 2019 - NW467

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Why did the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) decide to stop providing book vouchers and award cash grants for books to each student; (2) (a) what is the monetary value of the book grant received by each student for the 2019 academic year and (b) how was this amount calculated; (3) whether NSFAS has put any mechanisms in place to monitor that the cash grants are used for its designated purpose of purchasing books; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what is the position of NSFAS on the possibility that students are purchasing pirated or illegally photocopied books instead of legally published books?

Reply:

1. The learning materials allowance is only available to DHET bursary students at universities. NSFAS stopped book vouchers for a number of reasons:

  • Students have been the target of voucher scams on various campuses;
  • There were many commercial interests involved, with merchants providing services to students using vouchers for a fee;
  • Students were trading the book vouchers for cash outside many shops;
  • The voucher system was limited to selected merchants that monopolised the student market;
  • There was no space for students to choose where to purchase books, including from second-hand retailers; and
  • The book allowance was changed to a learning materials allowance so that students can also decide to purchase other learning support materials, including laptops and tablets.

In addition, the call to change book vouchers to cash was one of the many demands by the student leadership, as part of their input into the policy governing student funding.

2. (a) R5 000 is the monetary value of the learning materials allowance received by each full time NSFAS student on the new DHET bursary scheme for the 2019 academic year.

(b) The learning materials allowance is set by the Department in the annual guidelines and is based on an affordable and fair standardised amount.

3. NSFAS has no mechanism to monitor the spending of cash allowances by students. NSFAS believes that students should be treated as adults and have the financial freedom to withdraw the cash voucher and make an informed decision on how best to utilise the funds. The ultimate responsibility is in the hands of the students. In the process, NSFAS expects students to grow to be responsible citizens and take charge of their economic freedom.

There is a concern that book sales have declined with the change in the policy. NSFAS and the Department believe that it is necessary to conduct proper research to explore the patterns of textbook usage and buying amongst students, and will engage with the university sector on this matter.

4. Research is necessary to determine whether this is indeed happening and what the patterns of student behaviour are in this area. NSFAS funding is provided to support student success and NSFAS students have to meet academic criteria set by institutions. There are many factors that play a role in student success, and access to learning materials and other financial support are part of these factors.

04 September 2019 - NW591

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Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of (a) engineers and (b) architects graduated in each of the past five years?

Reply:

The table below provides the number of students who graduated with an undergraduate degree in Engineering and Architecture at public higher education institutions from 2013 to 2017.

Undergraduate Degree

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Engineering

11 441

12 058

12 470

12 386

12 956

Architects

798

846

792

820

862

04 September 2019 - NW466

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What amount did each sector education and training authority (Seta) spend on catering (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; (2) whether any norms that Setas need to adhere to regarding spending on catering have been put in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. According to the information provided by entities, the table below shows the amount spent by each Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) on catering (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019.

SETA Name

Amount spent on catering

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Since April 2019/20

Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA)

R107 718.92

R137 437.03

R106 070.02

R150 725.32

R222 450.00

R67 340.00

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDPSETA)

R1 231 602.88

R1 503 452.23

R1 339 502.44

R1 574 235.83

R1 747 615.28

R6 861.18

Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

R19 634.00

R36 113.00

R35 600.00

R27 628.00

R74 568.00

R49 011.00

Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&MSETA)

R54 313.00

R98 080.00

R72 318.00

R28 392.00

R 73 921.00

R 32 575.00

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)

R22 623.50

R86 929.70

R87 724.95

R157 001.94

R204 406.98

R64 950.00

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA)

R2 204 083.51

R1 729 209.51

R1 532 200.20

R2 835 886.74

R3 103 967.84

R639 708.32

Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)

R347 369.64

R422 120.78

R384 334.67

R352 575.40

R473 486.08

R155 011.65

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA)

R322 212.71

R249 702.42

R259 125.77

R334 222.54

R638 351.71

R196 704.18

Food and Beverages Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV)

R58 000.00

R 94 000.00

R115 000.00

R117 000.00

R105 000.00

R71 000.00

Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)

R477 193.14

R114 133.40

R63 630.00

R244 232.20

R513 745.45

R185 994.50

Transport Sector Education and Training Authority (TETA)

R131 172.07

R108 878.40

R80 413.35

R115 332.25

R76 817.65

R35 973.60

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)

R730 263.79

R709 479.70

R1 397 211.12

R464 805.85

R631 371.59

R209 527.26

Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)

R125 174.71

R97 684.61

R474 641.09

R510 800.55

R752 426.20

R45 058.27

Manufacturing and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)

R212 283.00

R290 260.00

R356 171.00

R409 215.00

R427 311.00

R243 115.00

Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)

R221 000.00

R267 000.00

R258 000.00

R353 000.00

R369 000.00

R155 000.00

Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)

R58 000.00

R94 000.00

R115 000.00

R117 000.00

R105 000.00

R71 000.00

Culture, Art, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA

Data not available

R298 202.89

R111 939.64

R259 684.55

R211 515.21

R61 734.55

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)

R146 373.83

R165 439.83

R105 011.75

R107 111.30

R66 160.20

R700.00

Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SERVICES SETA)

R559 582.00

R698 426.00

R1 056 252.00

R960 312.00

R1 220 218.00

R255 584.00

Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

R408 622.01

R574 339.07

R457 839.98

R452 145.67

R235 002.56

R201 792.61

Media, Information and Communication Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)

R54 000.00

R122 000.00

R117 000.00

R190 000.00

R249 000.00

R131 108.00

2. SETAs’ spending on catering is guided by the National Treasury Instruction 02 of 2016/17 on cost containment measures. The instruction stipulates that public entities may not incur catering expenses for internal meetings, unless approved otherwise by the relevant Accounting Officer or Accounting Authority. This excludes meetings held with employees of the same institution coming from other areas other than where the meeting is held. The public entity may incur catering expenses for official engagements that lasts for five (5) continuous hours or more, including the hosting of conferences, workshops, indabas, forums, recruitment interviews, training sessions or hearings, meetings relating to commissions or commissions of inquiry, and meetings hosted by the Accounting Officer or Accounting Authority including governance committee meetings.

04 September 2019 - NW303

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

By which date will the SA Post Office situated in Columbine Avenue in Mondeor, Johannesburg, reopen to the public; 2. Whether her Department has taken any steps to secure the premises (a) from trespassers and (b) against vandalism, if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1269E

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

1. The Post Office situated in Columbine Avenue in Mondeor, Johannesburg will re-open on 01 November 2019.

2. (a) The Department provides oversight over SAPO and therefore, is not responsible for securing SAPO’s premises. However, SAPO has assured the Department that it has taken steps to secure the premises from trespassers, in that SAPO’s Security and Investigation Unit contacted the local SAPS for assistance and will continue to monitor the situation.

(b) Palisade fencing has been placed and lockable doors locked. The side gate is locked with a chain and lock.

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

04 September 2019 - NW594

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) What number of patents were filed in the Republic in 2018, (b) which industry or focus area filed a patent and (c) what number was filed by (i) the citizens of the Republic and (ii) foreigners?

Reply:

As a preface, this information is held by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC), an agency of the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic).

a) During the period 1 January to 31 December 2018, a total of 8 655 (eight thousand six hundred and fifty-five) patent applications were filed at the CIPC in the Republic.

Of these 1 884 (one thousand eight hundred and eighty-four) were provisional patent applications (first filing using the Paris Convention Priority), 1 142 (one thousand one hundred and fourty-two) were complete patent applications (which follow a provisional patent application and this application will proceed to grant) and 5 630 (five thousand six hundred and thirty) were Patent Cooperation Treaty national phase applications (an application filed in South Africa after filing an international application with the World Intellectual Property Organisation).

b) The following breakdown of industry areas were recorded [Note that a single application may cut across industry areas and thus more than one area may be designated for a single application].

INDUSTRY OF FOCUS

TOTAL

SECTION A (HUMAN NECESSITIES INCLUDING HEALTH, CLOTHING, AGRICULTURE AND FOOD)

2833

SECTION C (CHEMISTRY; METALLURGY)

2392

SECTION B (PERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING)

1243

SECTION G (PHYSICS)

898

SECTION H (ELECTRICITY)

746

SECTION F (MECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING)

563

SECTION E (FIXED CONTRUCTIONS)

433

SECTION D (TEXTILES; PAPER)

112

c) Of the 8 655 applications filed, 2 447 (two thousand four hundred and forty-seven) were by South African nationals and 6 208 (six thousand two hundred and eight) by international applications.

03 September 2019 - NW198

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the current total number of unemployed social work graduates nationally and (b) plans are in place to ensure that the social work graduates are employed without further delay?

Reply:

(a) The current number of unemployed social work graduates nationally is 7 583. This number is inclusive of graduates who were funded through the scholarship programme and those who paid their studies through varied other means.

(b) The department will utilize savings form the 2019 MTEF social work scholarshio training allocation to facilitate the appointment of 190 social work graduates by provincial department of social development. In addition, the department will, during the 2019/20 financial year finalise a strategy for the employment of social work graduates within the public and private sectors. This strategy will also be used to lobby the Department of Finance to allocate budget towards employment of social work graduates by various sector department.

03 September 2019 - NW465

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural DevelopmentQUESTION

With reference to her reply to question 251 on 18 July 2019, what (a) is the name of each assignee designated in terms of section 2(3)(a) of the Agricultural Product Standards Act, Act 119 of 1990 and (b) are the relevant details of the process followed to designate each assignee to conduct inspection on regulated agricultural products destined for (i) export and (ii) sale locally?

Reply:

(a) Names and details of assignees designated by the Honourable Minister in terms of section 2(3) of the Agricultural Product Standards Act No. 119 of 1990 (“the APS Act”)

Assignee designated for inspection on all regulated products destined for export

Name

Date of designation

Products covered for inspection

Perishable Product Export Control Board (PPECB)

23 August 1991

Fresh fruits and vegetables, agronomy, animal and processed products intended for export

Assignees designated for local inspections

Name

Date of designation

Products covered for inspection

South African Meat Industry Company (SAMIC)

30 January 1998

Classification and marking of meat intended for sale in South Africa

Product Control for Agriculture (PROKON)

18 March 1994

Potatoes intended for sale in South Africa

 

17 May 2016

Fresh fruits and vegetables intended for sale in South Africa

Impumelelo Agribusiness Solutions

09 December 2016

Processed products and canned processed products intended for sale in South Africa

Nejahmogul Technologies and Agric Services

09 December 2016

Dairy and dairy imitation products as well as edible ices intended for sale in South Africa

Agency for Food Safety

09 December 2016

Animal products (poultry and eggs) intended for sale in South Africa

Leaf Services

17 May 2016

Grains and grain products intended for sale in South Africa

(b) Designation of assignees

The process that is followed in terms of designation of the assignees is set out in section 2(3) of the APS Act. For purposes of transparency and competitive selection process, an invitation for prospective assignees accompanied by selection criteria, with respect to 2016 designation was publicized in the Government Gazette and national newspapers.

03 September 2019 - NW352

Weber, Mr WL to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural DevelopmentQUESTION

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

*All reflected costs are estimate amounts.

*This is not an exhaustive list as a number of Ministerial interventions may be proposed based on the market dynamics for agricultural products and Minister may also be invited by her counterparts on a bilateral issues and those of global governance. therefore, this will be updated regularly.

Date

Destination

Purpose of trip

Delegation

Flights

Accommodation

Other Expenses

31 July – 6 August 2019

Benin

FAO conference

Minister

Private PA

DG Mlengana

Act DG Sadiki

R111 000

R60 000

R10 000

August 29-30 2019

Denmark

World Food Summit

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R34000

September 2019.

(To be confirmed with Botswana)

Gaborone, Botswana

Resolve bilateral issues on trade in agricultural products.

To be confirmed

R27 000

R24 000

R7 000

25 to 26 September 2019

Brasilia

9th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

Minister +3 to be paid by the host country

R10 000

September 25 - 26

Brazil

Meeting of Ministers of Agriculture of BRICS, to be held in Brasilia

To be confirmed

R50 000

Host country provide accommodation for the (Minister + 3 )

R10 000

October 2019

Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA.

Attend the Specialized Technical Committee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Water and Environment. Minister is the outgoing 2nd Vice Chairperson of the Bureau of this committee.

To be confirmed

 

R30 000

R20 000

R 13 000

November 2019 (To be confirmed by Presidency)

Windhoek, NAMIBIA.

Binational Commission (BNC) postponed from last year. Minister may be invited to the Joint Cooperation Commission (JCC) which precedes the BNC to accompany the DIRCO Minister.

To be confirmed

R26 000

R20 000

R7 000

22 November to 01 December 2019

Abidjan, COTE D’IVOIRE.

5th Agriculture and Animal Resource Fair

To be an effective international interlocutor for the agriculture of South Africa and effectively contribute towards the African Agenda

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R10 000

2020 venue and date not available yet

2021 venue and date not available yet

Russia

India

10th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

11th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

Minister +3 paid by the host country as per ToR

R10 000

2020 (date still to be confirmed

Zimbabwe

31st FAO Regional Conference

To be confirmed

R50 000

R15 000

R10 000

November

Date not confirmed yet

France

F’SAGRI Steering Committee meeting

Deputy Minister

To be confirmed

R50 000

R16000

R10 000

May 2020.

Saudi Arabia

G20 Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R10 000

12 -16 July 2021

Italy, Rome

42nd session of the FAO Conference

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 928

R6000

January 2020 (last week to be confirmed by the AU Commission)

Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

African Union General Assembly

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R 10 000

2022 venue and date not available yet

China

12th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

Minister +7 paid by the host country as per ToR

R10 000

03 September 2019 - NW578

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether a certain person (Ms Daniel De Bruin ) was ever employed in her department as SA Consul General or in any other specified role; if so, on what date was the appointment made; (2) whether the specified person is still employed in that role; if not, on what date did she (a) stop being an employee and (b) receive her last pay check; (3) (a) what experience and qualifications did she have that qualified her for the job and (b) did she pass the necessary security clearance required for the job; (4) whether her department has at any time during her time in office received complaints regarding her behaviour towards staff or members of the public; if so what are the relevant details ; (5) whether her department has ever had to use government resources to defend the specified person in legal and/ or criminal matters; if so, (a) on what date, (b) where and (c) what amount of government money was used?NW1575E

Reply:

(1) Yes, appointed on 01 March 2015

(2)(a) 26 January 2019

(2)(b) 26 July 2019 but debt will be recovered from date of termination.

(3) (a) Ms De Bruin-Grady has the following qualifications: L.L.M. Studies, International Human Rights; Post-Graduate course in International Relations and International Diplomacy; Master of Law, International Human Rights Law. Relevant experience include the following: Commissioner - Cape Cod Human Rights Commission; ANC Lawyer’s Delegation; Participant in the Oxford University Foreign Service Program; and Patrice Lumumba Univeristy’s Head of ANC Women’s Section

(b) In terms of paragraph 4.1.3 of Chapter 5 of the Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS), Ms De Bruin is temporarily not eligible for any grade of security clearance as she had not been residing in South Africa for at least five (5) years

(4) Yes. A complaint was made by a member of staff alleging that Ms De Bruin-Grady had inter alia spoken to her in threatening terms, and that she

had been blocked from leaving an office. These allegation(s) were denied by Ms De Bruin- Grady. There were also other complaints about management of the

office and about actions that had been undertaken.

(5)Yes

(5)(a) October 2018 / November 2018 / January 2019

(5)(b) USA (Washington / Los Angeles)

(5)(c) R241 048.35

03 September 2019 - NW462

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) is the total number of his department’s mobile units in the Republic, (b) number of these mobile units are in operation, (c) geographic areas do the functional mobile units cover, (d) geographic areas are the non-functional mobile units supposed to cover and (e) was the average turnaround time in the last annual reporting cycle to repair faulty mobile units and return them to operation?

Reply:

a) The total number of mobile units in the country is 155 (hundred and fifty five). The number is made up of both the old 114 (hundred and fourteen) mobile units procured between 2005 and 2007 and the new 41 (forty one) mobile units procured between 2017 and 2019 respectively.

b) The total number of functional mobile units in the department is 100 (one hundred). The one hundred comprises of the old 59 (fifty nine) and new 41 (forty one) units. A total of 55 (fifty five) old mobile units are mechanically and economically irreparable, and as such, are earmarked for disposal.

c) The department's mobile units are utilised to complement the existing footprint. The units cover the deep rural and hard to reach areas where the department does not have sufficient coverage in all nine provinces.

d) All mobile units are strategically deployed to cover all rural and hard to reach areas in all 9 (nine) provinces in the republic.

e) The department did not repair any of the mobile units with mechanical problems as those 55 (fifty five) units had reached their end of life term and were economically irreparable. The distribution plan for the 100 (one hundred) units is as follows:

Eastern Cape 14, Free State 9, Gauteng 9, Kwa Zulu Natal 14, Limpopo 12, Mpumalanga 10, Northern Cape 10, North West 9 and Western Cape 10, Special Projects 3.

END

03 September 2019 - NW350

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the announcement by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that her department will receive R50 million from the Criminal Assets Recovery Account to strengthen civil society organisations working in the victim empowerment field, (a) which civil society organisations have been earmarked for the specified funding and (b) what amount in funding assistance will each specified organisation receive; (2) whether she intends to allocate any monetary amount towards the payment of social workers to ensure that no social worker working at a civil society organisation will earn less than the minimum wage?

Reply:

(1)(a) A call for proposals will be advertised for all Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in the Victim Empowerment Sector and those that are eligible will be considered. (b) the total amount of R40 million is allocated for transfers to CSOs which render services to victims of crime in all nine provinces. The specific allocation to individual organisation will be determined by the proposals submitted. Furthermore, R5 million is allocated for mentoring and coaching for emerging CSOs in order to build capacity of the small emerging CSOs in under resourced areas such as townships and rural areas and R5 million is for victim empowerment awareness campaign.

(2) The minimum wage of social workers within the COS’s space does not fall within the CARA funding mandate.

03 September 2019 - NW234

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to tourist visas issued by his department in the past three years, (a) what number of visas have been issued in each month, (b) from where were the specified visas issued, (c) what is the average turnaround time for issuing a visa, (d) what is being done to improve the turnaround time, (e) what processes are in place to ensure that turnaround times are improved and (f) what are the time frames, timelines and deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

(a-b) From available information a total of 1 068 227 Visitors Visas were issued in South African Missions abroad from 2017 to June 2019 as follows.

Year

2017

2018

2019

Number of Visas

451 855

403 164

213 208

A breakdown of the number of Visitors Visas issued by each South African Mission abroad for the respective years is attached as Annexure A. The data for the following countries are being verified for correctness and accuracy hence it is not on the list attached:

Country

Mission

Algeria

Algiers

Burundi

Bujumbura

Fiji

Suva

Finland

Helsinki

Japan

Tokyo

Madagascar

Antanarivo

Country

Mission

Mauritius

Port Louis

Morocco

Rabat

Netherlands

The Hague

Singapore

Singapore

Spain

Madrid

Sri Lanka

Colombo

Sudan

Juba

Sudan

Khartoum

Switzerland

Berne

Thailand

Bangkok

Tunisia

Tunis

Ukraine

Kiev

Vietnam

Hanoi

(c) The general processing period for the Visitor’s Visas is five (5) Working days.

(d) Where the Mission experiences high volumes and staffing challenges the Department deploys additional staff to support on a short term basis subject to availability of funds.

(e) The turnaround times are maintained and the Department is currently introducing the eVisa which is at testing phase.

(f) The eVisa will be piloted in October 2019 and depending on the results of the pilot, the eVisa should be operational in the 2020/2021. financial year.

END

02 September 2019 - NW212

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Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the total (a) number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

(a) None

(b) None

 

02 September 2019 - NW283

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) Total amount budgeted for his private office for the 2019/20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since May 2019?

Reply:

(a)

R20 717 000.00

(b)

(i)

R16 595 000.00

       
 

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

 

Salary Level

Job Title

Qualification

 

13

Private Secretary

  • Professional Receptionist and Personal Assistant Certificate,
  • IMM Marketing management Diploma,
  • Advanced Taxation Graduate Programme
 

9

Assistant Private Secretary

  • Diploma Secretarial,
  • Office Administration,
  • Advanced Certificate : Office Management
 

13

Senior Parliamentary and Cabinet Services

  • Bachelor of Commerce Degree
 

13

Head: Administration

  • Diploma in Human Resources Management
 

13

Media Liaison Officer

  • B. Tech Degree in Journalism
  • National Diploma in Journalism
 

12

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support Officer

  • Senior Certificate
 

9

Administrative Secretary

  • National Senior Certificate
 

8

Registry Clerk

  • Bachelor of Administration
 

7

Receptionist

  • Diploma in Office Administration
 

6

Driver/Messenger

  • National Senior Certificate
 

6

Driver/Messenger

  • National Senior Certificate
 

5

Food Service Aid

  • National Senior Certificate
 

(v)

Job Description of each employee appointed in his private office since May 2019. As per the DPSA benchmark job descriptions for Ministerial Support Staff.

02 September 2019 - NW531

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. (a) Why is there a delay in processing the capital transfer payment for the Iziko Museum’s infrastructure project and (b) why is the capital processed on a recovery basis by the Department of Public Works 2. Whether the project was initially allocated to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure ; if not, (a) to whom was it allocated initially, (b) what is the status of the project and (c) on what date did it commence 3. (a) what amount (i) was allocated for the project and (ii) has already been spent in this regard and (b) why is there a delay and /or lack of progress on the project; 4. Has there been any occurrence of fruitless and wasteful expenditure in this project; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.(a). The payment on the court yard project was delayed due to delayed submission of reports from Department of Public Works.

(b). the recovery basis is purely to claim for work done and this has been the practiced by DPW for many years. DAC does not transfer funds to DPW in advance.

(2)(a). the project has from the onset been allocated to DPW.

(b). the project is on construction stage.

(c). the project contract commencement date was the 29th June 2012 and site hand over date was 14 January 2013

3.(a)(i). R 296 000 000 has been budgeted for this project

(ii). R 252 384 531

(b). The delays were due to:

  • During procurement stage, the site hand over was delayed because the Department of Public Works could not find a suitable off-site storage to relocate all collections from the museum therefore the site was never handed over totally to the contractor. The site hand over was therefore delayed by over a year.
  • It was then agreed that the museum collections and staff will be moved from floor to floor after completion of the works on those floors.
  • Most of the stored collection were stored in alcohol and other flammable liquids in big tanks that took a year to store in the basement. It has not been easy to work on the project that is occupied.
  • During construction, the only compliant appointed specialized subcontractor responsible for the installation of compactus storage facility went under liquidation. The liquidation process and the procurement of the new subcontractor took long to complete.

4. Occurrence of fruitless and wasteful expenditure has not been recorded or reported.

02 September 2019 - NW538

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

Whether he will provide Mr T W Mhlongo with a list of each development initiative funded by Athletics South Africa (ASA) in the past three years, including (a) the class or category of athletes who benefited, or who were intended to benefit, from each development initiative and (b) an indication of the amount spent by ASA on each development initiative; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1533E

Reply:

  1. The ASA Board received a mandate from the ASA Council at the ASA QGM in 2016 to align the ASA Development Strategy, to achieve success at the Olympic Games, as its primary objectives.
  2. In this regard ASA has a National Development Strategy which is available on the ASA website http://www.athletics.org.za/centresofexcellence.
  3. Athletics is a labour intensive sport which requires substantial resources to engage large quantities of athletes, coaches, officials and administrators at all levels of participation.
  4. With the above in mind, the ASA Development Programme is an all-inclusive programme.
  5. Effectively, this means that ASA have to fund expenses related to international competitions, national competitions and skills development projects to level the playing field ensure that athletes from all communities has access to athletics.
  6. The strategy to fund all phases of development, are paying dividends for South Africa. The following is relevant:

6.1 To ensure that South African athletes are exposed to international competitions at youth, junior and senior level, ASA cover all expenses of all athletes in the team, e.g. clothing, travel, accommodation and per diems for the duration of the championships.

6.2 The ASA Youth Team is currently listed no.1 in the world on the medal tally

6.3 The ASA Junior Team is currently listed no.6 in the world on the medal tally

6.4 The ASA Senior Team is currently listed no.3 in the world on the medal tally

7. ASA is one of a few countries in the world that send representative teams to all IAAF World Championships, and CAA African Championships at youth, junior and senior level.

8. ASA cater for all disciplines of athletics, Track and Field, Road Running, Off-Road Running and ultra-distance. Most countries in the world cater for only some of the disciplines in athletics.

9. ASA Coaches serve as head coaches in countries such as Germany, India and many African Countries.

10. ASA National Coaches are used as facilitators/instructors in coaching courses by many countries in the world

11. ASA Technical Officials serve as Referees and Chief Judges in many international competitions.

12. ASA Leaders and Administrators are serving on many structures at African and IAAF level

13. Many countries in the world are now seeking guidance from ASA as to how to develop athletics in their countries

14. Many countries send their athletes to participate in South African events, and/or send them to training camps in South Africa to prepare for the Olympic Games

15. ASA have Squads of more than 300 athletes at senior, junior and youth level in preparation for the 2020 Olympic Games and 2024 Olympic Games

16. ASA expose annually, more than 2 000 000 athletes at the various levels of competitions to a network of more than 1500 IAAF/ASA certified competitions. Collectively, the ASA Development Programme is one of the largest, and one of the most effective programmes in the world.

ASA Development initiative

2017 -2019

Class or category

Summary of amount spent by ASA: 2017 – 2019

   

2017

2018

2019

Total

International events

Youth, junior and senior

3,035,364

5,548,643

2,887,882

11,471,889

National and provincial events

Youth, junior and senior

3,384,983

3,080,247

2,232,364

8,697,594

Skills development

National Symposiums/ Workshops for Athletes, Coaches, Officials, Administrators and educational material

2,303,293

2,393,780

2,056,780

6,753,853

Total

26,923,336

 

02 September 2019 - NW520

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether any cases of sexual harassment emanating from her department have been referred to the Commission for Gender Equality since 1 January 2016; if not, why not; if so, what number of (a) cases were referred to the Commission, (b) the specified cases resulted in findings against the perpetrator and (c) the specified cases are still not finalised?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Yes, there is a case of sexual harassment that was referred to the Commission for Gender Equality by the complainant.

  1. only one case was referred to the Commissioner for Gender Equality;
  2. the case is still pending disciplinary hearing;
  3. the case is still pending disciplinary hearing.

02 September 2019 - NW630

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1) What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The officials are busy collating data to make sure that the Hon. Member is given an accurate information. As soon as that process is done I will forward the Honourable Member the required information.

02 September 2019 - NW257

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department reserved a percentage of the department’s budget for the current financial year for disaster management; if not, why not, considering the risky nature of the agricultural sector; if so, what informed the percentage?

Reply:

The former Department of Rural Development and Land Reform established at national level, has sub-programme called Rural Disaster Mitigation Services which is aimed at coordinating departmental disaster management related functions in compliance with the Disaster Management Framework of 2005. As a result, the Department allocates within its budget, funds for capacity building and disaster risk reduction that are implemented annually. The sub-programme is allocated a total amount of R15.4 million.

During unforeseen disaster events, the Department, upon declaration of a disaster reprioritization or funding within existing budget for relief efforts in consultation with relevant stakeholders is made to cater for the disaster.

02 September 2019 - NW537

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1) Why did the Athletics South Africa (ASA) General Council refuse to answer the queries raised by KwaZulu-Natal Athletics (KZNA) at the ASA annual general meeting held on 27 October 2017; (2) (a) can she provide Mr T W Mhlongo with (i) a list of each source of income from which ASA has benefited in the past three years and (ii) a copy of ASA's annual budget and business plan for the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc)2018-19 financial years and (b) what percentage of ASA's total income is attributable to (i) fees/commission charged by ASA on road running events, (ii) sponsorship related to road running events and (iii) the issuing of ASA permanent licenses to road runners and/or road running clubs? NW2461E

Reply:

  1. KZNA submitted the questions after the deadline stipulated by the notice of the AGM.
  2. The ASA Board did have the answers on the KZNA questions ready, but the ASA Council instructed the Board not to answer, as KZNA did not follow constitutional protocol.
  3. Furthermore KZNA submitted Delegates for the AGM after the deadline. One of the 2 Delegates was not eligible as per ASA Constitution.
  4. The ASA Council ruled that the KZNA President must be allowed to be part of the Council Meeting but the ineligible member was not allowed to attend the ASA Council meeting.
  5. The KZNA President refused to be part of the ASA Council, and the ASA Council, with a quorum present, continued without the KZNA Delegation present.
  6. The ASA Council also reprimanded KZNA for submitting the financial statements to the media soon after ASA send the ASA Financial Statements to the ASA Members for scrutiny, but KZNA fail to submit the questions on the financial statements to the ASA Council in time.
  7. The ASA Council also mandated the ASA board to consult the KZNA regarding the manner the KZNA Delegation tried to intimidate and discredit the ASA Council.

(2) (a) can she provide Mr T W Mhlongo with

(i) a list of each source of income from which ASA has benefited in the past three years and

ASA income

2017

2016

2015

SABC

13 250 000.00

12 500 000.00

8 333 333.34

SASCOC

5 250 000.00

12 836 713.00

1 498 587.75

IAAF- Grant

374 943.00

3 425 967.00

 

Permanent licences

2 581 579.00

2 369 079.00

2 274 818.45

Rental Inc - Telkom tower

80 040.00

   

Grant - Lotto

14 260 400.00

36 884 800.00

2 500 000.00

SRSA Grant income

2 000 000.00

2 000 000.00

700 000.00

Rule book

84 296.00

168 290.00

27 350.00

Temporary licence

1 317 323.00

570 064.00

 

Old mutual

   

2 192 982.46

 

39,198,581.00

70,754,913.00

17,527,072.00

(ii) a copy of ASA's annual budget and business plan for the (a) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc)2018-19 financial years and

a) The ASA Business Plan was endorsed at the 2016 ASA AGM and is effective for the period 2016 – 2020, in other words for the 4 years from Olympic Games to Olympic Games.

b) The Business Plan and annual budgets are attached.

 

(b) what percentage of ASA's total income is attributable to:

a From 2014 to 2017, 100% of the ASA income was applied mainly due to the debt of more than R20 000 000.00 liabilities, inherited mainly from the previous Boards of 2010 & 2012, as well as projects according the ASA Business Plan.

b) Although some of the projects where scaled down during the period 2014 – 2017 to adhere to budget constraints, none of the ASA projects were cancelled and took place successfully.

(i) fees/commission charged by ASA on road running events,

a) ASA charged no commission or fees for any event including Road Races.

b) Provinces do charge levies on events, but ASA has no access to these resources as it is intended to finance the development of athletics at provincial and club level.

(ii) sponsorship related to road running events and

a) ASA did not have a Road Running Sponsor since 2010. National Road Running events are funded from levies from the sale of licenses.

b) The primary challenge is clubs called “Corporate Clubs” whom claim special treatment, yet contaminate the commercial space with their branding on clothing, in violation with IAAF advertising regulations.

c) All clubs are equal within ASA structures. The fact that some clubs are financially stronger does not give “Corporate Clubs” special rights within ASA.

d) “Corporate Clubs” whom claim to sponsor athletes, do not contribute towards the funding of races where their athletes must run, and fail to assist on expenses related to funding South African teams to international events.

e) “Corporate clubs” are using athletes as “running billboards” and very little of the commercial profits from such exposure is invested in developing athletics.

(iii) (iii) the issuing of ASA permanent licences to road runners and/or road running clubs? NW2461E

a) ASA obtain income annually on average R2 400 000.00 from the sale of licenses.

b) On average the cost of printing the licenses are R1 300 000.00.

c) The remaining income on license levies, on average R1 100 000.00, are used to subsidize the provinces who host the National Road Running Championships ( 10km; 21.1km; 42.2 km) and prize money for the road running category winners.

Expenses from Road Running often are more than the income obtained from licenses and have to be balanced from other income

 

02 September 2019 - NW485

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) Whether the integrity and lifestyle audits of senior officials in her department have commenced as she undertook during the Debate on Vote 11 - Public Works and Infrastructure Appropriation Bill in the National Assembly, on 10 June 2019; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the audits commence; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) by what date will the audits be completed; (2) what (a) are the terms of reference of the integrity and lifestyle audits and (b) aspects of the senior officers’ professional and personal lives will be audited; (3) whether integrity and lifestyle audits include declarations of conviction in cases of theft, criminal charges and pending prosecutions or convictions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether the integrity and lifestyle audits are being conducted by an external service provider; if not, what are the relevant details; if so, (a) who is the service provider and (b) how was the service provider appointed; (5) whether the integrity and lifestyle audits are based on self-disclosure; if so, how is the personal information being verified?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

1. The integrity and lifestyle audits of senior officials within the Department have not as yet commenced. The SIU has been identified to conduct this work in Government Departments. This mandate will be effected through a Presidential Proclamation which is still under consideration. On the day of the Budget Vote, 10 July 2019, the Department formally advised the SIU of its readiness to subject the Minister, Deputy Minister, the Director General and the rest of senior management to integrity and lifestyle audits.

(a) See the response above

(b) We will be advised by the SIU as soon as a Proclamation (which will spell out the terms of reference of the audit) is issued by the Presidency.

(i) See the response in paragraph 1 above

(ii) See the response in paragraph 1 above

2. See response in paragraph 1 above

3. See response in paragraph 1 above

4. See response in paragraph 1 above

5. See response in paragraph 1 above

02 September 2019 - NW546

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What total (i) number of erven are registered in the name of the state in the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) number of (aa) erven and (bb) hectares are registered as (aaa) private and (bbb) state-owned and (b) under which state department are the specified erven and hectares registered?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) Please refer to Annexure A for the total number of State land parcels presented in erven, hectares, client departments (occupation) and the registered owner for the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality.

The land parcels are either registered under National Government of the Republic of South Africa or the Republic of South Africa (RSA).

b) The National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure’s Immovable Asset Register (IAR) does not contain privately owned properties. The IAR comprises of State owned properties under the custodianship of NDPW&I.

ANNEXURE A

 

 

ERF & FARM

   

DESCRIPTION

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

ERF

55

795,4183

FARM

69

32457,65258

TOTAL

124

33 253,07

ERF PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

1

85,65

DEFENCE & MILITARY VET

2

0,0204

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

10

1,30

PUBLIC WORKS

4

0,60

SA POLICE SERVICES

33

4,38

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

0,08

VACANT STAND

1

0,03

WATER AFFAIRS

3

703,35

TOTAL

55

795,42

FARM PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

DEFENCE & MILITARY VETERANS

2

0,02

SA POLICE SERVICES

1

0,3187

TOURISM

21

7289,7544

TRANSPORT

1

139,22

VACANT FARM

5

110,79

VACANT STAND

2

0,09

WATER AFFAIRS

37

24 917,48

TOTAL

69

32457,67298

OWNERSHIP

   

OWNER DETAILS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

71

21 632,00

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

53

11 621,09

TOTAL

124

33253,09128

02 September 2019 - NW528

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) How does his department ensure that proper monitoring and evaluation is done on the allocation of the provincial budget towards Sports, Arts and Culture; (2) (a) what amount was allocated to each province to Sports, Arts and Culture for the past five years, (b) has any of the provinces underspent their budgets, (c) what total amount in each province was spent on (i) salaries and (ii) actual development of sports, arts and culture and (d)(i) what amount of the total amount was spent on soprts development in Namaqualand in the Northern Cape over the past five years and (ii) where was it spent; (3) Whether there is any allocation towards young developing cricket players in the Northern Cape, if not, why not?

Reply:

1.  – The Department coordinates quarterly meetings with all nine provinces to discuss the progress, challenges and the way forward in the implementation of the grant projects,

- Provinces also submit monthly financial, quarterly and annual evaluation reports for the department to monitor their spending and performance,

- Monitoring visits to projects are conducted and site meetings are attended regularly,

- The Department conducts an evaluation of the performance of the grant annually as required by the Division of Revenue Act.

- The Department allows provinces to use a maximum of 5 per cent of the total amount allocated to them for capacity building and provincial coordination of the grant. The Department advises provinces to utilise these funds for the purpose it is meant for and to improve project management skills and capacity.

- The Department continues to provide oversight over the implementation of the project through MINMEC and the TIC on a quarterly basis to ensure regular communication and reporting.

2. (a) what amount was allocated to each province to Sports, Arts and Culture for the past five years

past five years allocation

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

109 418

143 694

149 320

156 105

160 584

FS

119 013

155 776

157 758

159 017

159 504

GP

125 608

155 693

163 339

172 428

168 530

KZN

122 754

157 696

163 162

173 093

174 397

LP

81 010

112 156

115 295

121 184

125 643

MP

114 781

150 325

155 289

162 777

162 479

NC

118 396

147 121

152 313

163 000

159 554

NW

98 883

130 096

136 494

141 092

136 369

WC

126 347

158 469

164 162

171 264

176 624

TOTAL

1 016 210

1 311 026

1 357 132

1 419 960

1 423 684

(b) has any of the provinces underspent their budgets?

Yes,

Underspending

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

26 873

5 174

1 268

0

5 844

FS

5 566

459

1 528

14 805

17 650

GP

9 587

49 534

33 008

53 109

18 606

KZN

14 199

38 995

9 878

-68

-288

LP

37 439

15 502

408

7 041

14 200

MP

12 404

36 186

15 112

0

145

NC

18 549

23 976

18 703

30 714

3 754

NW

20 404

20 526

17 032

12 729

21 473

WC

0

464

0

0

0

TOTAL

145 021

190 816

96 937

118 330

81 384

(c) what total amount in each province was spent on

(i) salaries

budget spent on salaries

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

34 303

39 707

46 635

52 886

57 697

FS

25 383

38 834

60 906

72 996

68 533

GP

15 322

37 866

40 000

53 600

59 698

KZN

4 245

4 789

7 344

10 398

10 018

LP

12 214

20 783

31 946

35 430

37 182

MP

22 904

26 079

30 250

42 341

42 343

NC

25 037

27 821

37 652

43 408

51 171

NW

27 083

32 973

39 082

43 821

48 398

WC

86 762

110 774

122 710

134 147

151 531

TOTAL

253 253

339 626

416 525

489 027

526 571

(c) what total amount in each province was spent on

(ii) actual development of sports, arts and culture,

budget spent towards development of sports, arts and culture

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

75 115

103 987

102 685

103 219

102 887

FS

93 630

116 942

96 852

86 021

90 971

GP

110 286

117 827

123 339

118 828

108 832

KZN

118 509

152 907

155 818

162 695

164 379

LP

68 796

91 373

83 349

85 754

88 461

MP

91 877

124 246

125 039

120 436

120 136

NC

93 359

119 300

114 661

119 592

108 383

NW

71 800

97 123

97 412

97 271

87 971

WC

39 585

47 695

41 452

37 117

25 093

TOTAL

762 957

971 400

940 607

930 933

897 113

02 September 2019 - NW540

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports Arts and Culture

1. Whether his department has set aside a budget to embark on (a) Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) district consultations and (b) CCIFSA provincial summits; if so, (i) what is the total budget, (ii) on what date is the conference and (iii) did his department consult with stakeholders; 2. whether the CCIFSA leadership was endorsed at the national conference; if not,why not;if so, will he provide Mr. J W W Julius with a list of the new leadership that was elected. In terms of the provisions of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014 (Act no. 11 of 2014), (a) how many employees of his department have been found to be directors and/or members of private companies that are doing business with the state from 1 February 2017 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what is the value of the business by such companies for the said period?

Reply:

1. A budget was allocated for;

(a) CCIFSA’s district consultations

i) The toatal budget for 54 district summits amounts to R5,000,000.00

(b) CCIFSA provincial summits and national conference

(i) The total budget for 9 Provincial summits and a National Conference amounts to R8 650 000.00

(ii) The dates for the conference were 24th and 25th August 2019.

(iii)The Department engaged with the relevant stakeholders including CCIFSA members and the Creative Industries Task Team (CITT) members who were part of the organizing team.

2. The new CCIFSA leadership was endorsed at the national conference. The list of the new leadership as below:

LIST OF NEWLY ELECTED CCIFSA NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

 

DESIGNATION

NAME AND SURNAME

PROVINCE

1

PRESIDENT

JOY MBEWANA

KZN

2

DEPUTY-PRESIDENT

JOHANNES MSOMI

MP

3

SECRETARY GENERAL

AYANDA RODA

FS

4

DEPUTY SECRETARY GENERAL

ANELE MAKI

WC

5

TREASURER

MANGALISO MTSHULA

NC

6

NATIONAL CO-ORDINATOR

LUZUKO KHOHLI

EC

LIST OF NEWLY ELECTED CCIFSA SECTOR REPRESENTATIVES

ITEM

SECTOR

NAME AND SURNAME

1

CULTURAL AND NATURAL HERITAGE SECTOR

HANS KHANYE

2

INDIGENOUS WISDOM

ZUKO NTONZIMA

3

VISUAL ARTS AND CRAFTS

MASEGO MOILOA

4

DESIGN AND CREATIVE

SIBUSISO MABUZA

5

ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE TECHNICAL SUPPORT

EDWIN STHEMBISO KHUMALO

6

PERFORMANCE AND CELEBRATION

VUYOKAZI MESILANE

7

LANGUAGE AND PUBLISHING

JAHROSE NTHABISENG JAFTA

8

AUDIO-VISUAL AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA

PINKI TUSWA

9

ARTS EDUCATION AND TRAINING

MAHLUBI NIXON KRAAI

02 September 2019 - NW539

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(a) Who was appointed as Team Leader for the South African team travelling to the (i) 2018 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in Valencia, (ii) 2018 Junior and Youth Championships in London and (iii) 2016 World 100 km Championships in Los Alcazares, (b) which ASA officials and/or representatives are required to travel with athletes selected to represent the Republic overseas, (c) in what circumstances would an ASA official and/or representative other than the Head of Delegation be authorised to travel separately from the athletes forming part of a South African team competing internationally and (d) what are the reasons for certain athletes forming part of the South African team which competed at the World Junior and Youth Championships in London being booked on a flight separate from the ASA officials and/or representatives tasked with managing the team? NW1534E

Reply:

The Honourable Member asked exactly the same question last year. It was question 2555 and it was responded too. The status remains the same.

02 September 2019 - NW530

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1)What (a) are the relevant details of his department’s budget allocation for travel and subsistence for the past five financial years for (i) local and (ii) international travel and (b) amount was spent in each case in each financial year; (2) what is the breakdown for trips abroad with reference to the (a) destination, (b) purpose and (c) persons undertaking the specified trip abroad; (3) what steps has his department taken to reduce spending on travel and subsistence?

Reply:

The National Treasury has issues instructions that contain cost cutting measures that applies across government. We comply with those prescripts.

02 September 2019 - NW486

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether the results of the integrity and lifestyle audits of senior officials in her department, as undertaken by her during the Debate on Vote No 11 – Public Works and Infrastructure, Appropriation Bill in the National Assembly on 10 June 2019, will be available to the public; if not, why not; if so, how will the information be made available?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

The decision to disclose the results of the integrity and lifestyle audits has not been made. I will apply my mind after consulting with Cabinet colleagues on the best way to deal with the outcome of the reports arising from lifestyle audits.

02 September 2019 - NW529

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(a) What amount does his department spend on funding and overseeing the five national playhouses, (b) (i) in what provinces do they function and (ii) with how many productions in each province and (c) what total amount is annually generated by the playhouses? (

Reply:

(a) Amount spent by the Department:

Name of playhouse

(a) Total amount

(b) (i) Which Province they function

(ii) the number of productions in each province

(c) amount of self generated income

Artscape

60 912

Western Cape

844

22100

KZN Playhouse

49632

Kwa Zulu-Natal

172

31880

South African State Theatre

55 453

Gauteng

170

34753

Market Theatre Foundation (Windy Brow)

46303

Gauteng

35

22336

PACOFS

45322

Free State

24

3599

02 September 2019 - NW216

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms P

Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) his department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to him and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in

(i) his department

32 vacancies

(ii) each provincial departments reporting to him; and

None

(b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case.

The post of Director General was advertised during July 2019. Critical posts been prioritised to be filled.

02 September 2019 - NW547

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What total (i) number of erven that are registered in the name of the state in the Senqu Local Municipality and (ii) number of (aa) erven and (bb) hectares are registered as (aaa) private and (bbb) state-owned and (b) under which state department are the specified erven and hectares registered? NW1543E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) Please refer to Annexure B for the total number of State land parcels presented in erven, hectares, client departments (occupation) and the registered owner for Senqu Local Municipality.

The land parcels are either registered under National Government of the Republic of South Africa / Republic of South Africa (RSA) or are Unregistered.

b) The National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure’s Immovable Asset Register (IAR) does not contain privately owned properties. The IAR comprises of State owned properties under the custodianship of NDPW&I.

ANNEXURE B

 

 

ERF & FARM

   

DESCRIPTION

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

ERF

38

12,4082

FARM

7

426,6159

Grand Total

45

439,02

ERF PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

1

1,05

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

6

1,9895

POST OFFICE

1

0,05

PUBLIC WORKS

6

0,25

SA POLICE SERVICES

22

8,96

VACANT STAND

2

0,11

TOTAL

38

12,41

FARM PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

1

73,66

PUBLIC WORKS

1

57,0692

SA POLICE SERVICES

1

1,62

VACANT FARM

1

0,96

VACANT STAND

3

293,3091

TOTAL

7

426,6159

OWNERSHIP

   

OWNER DETAILS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

5

68,95

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

32

368,9309

UNREGISTERED

8

1,15

Grand Total

45

439,0241

02 September 2019 - NW541

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he can provide Mr J W W Julius with a progress report regarding the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) Ministerial Recommendations; if not, why not, if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the relevant details; and 2. Whether all of the recommendations of the Ministerial enquiry have been implemented; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) why was the original deadline of April 2019 to implement all recommendations not adhered to?

Reply:

The Task Team charged with the inquiry completed its task. In response to the recommendation made, the then Minister appointed Mr Mthobi Tyamzashe as the facilitator to SASCOC. On the weekly basis since then meets the SASCOC’s Organisational Development Task Team to map out and implementing the report.

Some of the recommendation depends on the amendment of the law which is before Parliament. The Parliamentary process will determine the pace of implementation.

Some of the issues will be dealt with at the SASCOC Annual General Meeting to be held in November of this year.

02 September 2019 - NW491

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Why was the deployment of troops only authorise for a two-month deployment instead of the several requests for a three-month deployment of soldiers in the Cape flats, Cape Town, (b) why were only about 400 soldiers deployed while the President authorised 1320 soldiers for deployment and (c) how will the R23 million authorised for the deployment be spent; (2) was the R23 million provided for in the existing budget of her department and the SA National Defence Force; if not, (a) how and (b) from where will the R23million be funded; if so, what will be the impact on the already underfunded budget?

Reply:

1. (a) The duration of the employment was decided upon following consultation with all relevant stakeholders.

(b) The Presidential Minute and the letters sent to Parliament indicated the employment of a total of 1320 soldiers, but for operational reasons the commanders can utilise the number of soldiers required at any given time during the operation.

(c) On allowances and operational support.

2. No

(a) and (b) through a reprioritisation with the existing budget allocation of the Department.

30 August 2019 - NW492

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether refunds from the United Nations are based on actual strength in the form of soldiers and equipment instead of the serviceability of deployed equipment as was reported to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans (details furnished); (2) whether she has found that the United Nations Organisation Stabilisation Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo secured and/or ring-fenced a refund for her department or the SA National Defence Force; if so, what are the costs and comparable revenue amounts for the past five financial years?

Reply:

1. The United Nations reimbursement is based on actual strength of personnel on the ground and the serviceability of equipment deployed. If a vehicle is not serviceable during Contingent Own Equipment (COE) inspection, a penalty is levelled against the vehicle and the would be drivers and supporting staff of the vehicle also. (For example serviceability of the vehicle can be questioned as a result of a missing mirror or fire extinguisher).

2. To date claims made to the United Nations amount to RM840 that includes flying hours, manpower and amunitionThe following depicts the comparable re venue amounts for the past five financial years:

Ser No

Year

Paid

Refund

a

b

c

d

01.

2014

1 155 767 612

356 088 658

02.

2015

1 035 291 166

451 096 017

03.

2016

985 927 629

887 227 546

04.

2017

886 945 063

509 547 709

05.

2018

820 494 657

320 612 050