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19 December 2022 - NW3544

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) (a) What amount was (i) budgeted and (ii) actually received with regard to the grading fees in each (i) province and (ii) of the past three financial years; (2) what (a) were the reasons for the discrepancies in each case and (b) steps have been taken so that the discrepancies are not repeated in future?

Reply:

Grading fees charged by TGCSA is determined by three (3) variables namely the number of units the establishment has, the category of the establishment and the average room rate. The National Grading system is a voluntary scheme and membership is reliant on members’ intention to be graded. Targets are based on the South African Tourism Annual Performance targets.

1. (a)(i)-(ii) The target for number of graded establishments for the period with accompanying budget and revenue is below:

 

Year

TGCSA Budget

TGCSA Revenue Received

Target Graded Establishments

Actual Graded Establishments

Variance

Reason for Variance

2019/20

R 58 M

R 23 M

6229

5 173

-1 056

High Cancellation Rate

2020/21

R 61 M

R 18 M

N/A

(Due to Covid-19 pandemic)

5 034

5 034

No target set due to the Covid-19 pandemic

2021/22

R64 M

R 15 M

5250

4 707

-543

Limited establishments open due to Covid-19

The percentage breakdown of establishments per province is reflected below for 2019-20; 2020-21 and Year-to-date (YTD) 2021-22:

(a) (i) and (ii) The percentage breakdown of establishments per province is reflected below for 2019-20; 2020-21 and Year-to-date (YTD) 2021-22:

Province

2019-20

2020-21

YTD 2021-22

Eastern Cape

12%

13%

13%

Free State

3%

3%

3%

Gauteng

22%

21%

23%

KwaZulu Natal

13%

13%

13%

Limpopo

7%

7%

7%

Mpumalanga

7%

8%

7%

North West

5%

5%

5%

Northern Cape

3%

3%

3%

Western Cape

29%

27%

26%

(2) (a) and (b)

2020 – 2021 have been impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic as many establishments suspended trading or closed permanently. Fiscal 2022/23 has seen a return to business and many establishments re-joining TGCSA star grading system. Quality Assurance is key to the tourism sectors success, therefore TGCSA is currently reviewing the post-pandemic consumer requirements and key tourism sector changes to assess the impact of sector change on the TGCSA grading criteria. Many interventions such as workshops, training and the implementation of the Tourism Grading Supporting Program are in progress. Fiscal 2022/23 is on track for the achievement of its current targets of 5 355 Graded establishments for the fiscal.

19 December 2022 - NW3767

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) What is the total amount spent for her pre-recorded video message warning tourists about crime; (2) whether the expenditure on the specified video was budgeted for; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) how will the video assist in curbing crime against tourists; (4) whether she has found that the taxpayers' money spent on the video will be worth it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No funds were spent on a pre-recorded video message

(2) There was no budget allocated to a pre-recorded video message

(3) It is the intention of the Department to do a pre-recorded message by the Minister as part of the Festive Season Tourism Safety Awareness campaign. This pre-recorded message will provide precautionary safety tips and advice to tourists, whilst also providing the key emergency numbers should tourists require support. The department’s tourist safety plan, emphasises “Proactive Measures” which include safety awareness messaging like the pre-recorded message. Providing pre-cautionary safety tips and advice to tourist in any form, be it through SMS notification, website posting, pamphlets or leaflets, videos clips, radio messages, etc. is always advisable. It’s a common practice in many countries where authorities use various platforms to provide generic tourist information, including messaging on safety and support.

(4) To reiterate, no money was spent on the pre-recorded message.

19 December 2022 - NW4001

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) With reference to marketing aimed at international markets since 1 April 2019, (a)(i) what marketing events and/or programmes were executed in each financial year, (ii) where did each marketing event and/or programme take place and (iii) what criteria were used to determine where each marketing event and/or programme would take place, (b)(i) who were the partners in each case, (ii) what criteria were used to determine which partners would be used for each market event and/or programme, (iii) on what date did each marketing event and/or programme take place in each case and (iv) which markets was each event and/or programme aimed at in each financial year, and (c) what amount was budgeted and spent in each financial year for each market; (2) (a) how are the successes and failures of the marketing events and/or programmes measured and (b) what are the results of the markets in each year? NW4904E

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) – (ii) Marketing Events

Please refer to the SA Tourism Annual Reports for the periods stated below. For your convenience, a link to each has been provided:

  • 01 April 2019- 31 March 2020

South African Tourism Annual Report tabled on 5 November 2020, ATC no 160 of 2020

https://live.southafrica.net/media/278970/sat-annual-report-2019_2020.pdf

Kindly refer to pages 43 to 56

  • 01 April 2020 – 31 March 2021

South African Tourism Annual Report tabled on 30 September 2021, ATC no 133 of 2021

https://live.southafrica.net/media/290945/sat-a-report-2020-21-final.pdf

Kindly refer to pages 46 to 61

  • 01 April 2021 – 31 March 2022

Annual Report tabled on 30 September 2022, ATC no 150 of 2022…, pages 47 to 54

https://live.southafrica.net/media/298986/south_african_tourism_2021_2022_annual_report.pdf

Kindly refer to pages 47 to 54

  • 01 April 2022 – to date

Information will be finalised after the end of the fiscal.

(a) (iii) Criteria for Marketing events

The SA Tourism Marketing Investment Portfolio determines where market activities take place.

(b) (i)-(iv) Partners and Markets

(i) Relevant partners are detailed in the SA Tourism Annual Reports as indicated above.

(ii) Partners are selected based on criteria in the SA Tourism Partnership Policy.

(iii)- (iv) Kindly refer to the South African Tourism Annual Reports as per (1) (a) above

(c) (i) Budget and spent for each Financial Year

  • 01 April 2019- 31 March 2020

Information on page 61 of the South African Tourism Annual Report for the 01 April 2019- 31 March 2020 details the budget and expenditure on Leisure Tourism Marketing for the fiscal.

  • 01 April 2020- 31 March 2021

Information on page 72 of the of the South African Tourism Annual Report for the 01 April 2020- 31 March 2021 details the budget and expenditure on Leisure Tourism Marketing for the fiscal.

  • 01 April 2021- 31 March 2022

Information on page 62 of the of the South African Tourism Annual Report for the 01 April 2021- 31 March 2022 details the budget and expenditure on Leisure Tourism Marketing for the fiscal.

  • 01 April 2022 – to date

The Budget is reflected in the Annual Performance Plan for 2022-2023

Kindly find the link below and refer to page 67. Please note the Annual Performance Plan for South African Tourism was tabled on 18 March 2022, ATC no 42 of 2022

Please note the expenditure still needs to be audited

(2) Successes and failures

(a) Evaluation metrics for measuring successes of events and programmes are predetermined and articulated upfront in the respective Annual Performance Plans. Failures will be determined against non-achievement of these.

(b) Performance results can be found in the South African Tourism Annual Reports referred to above.

Kindly note:

  1. Budgets and targets are available in the tabled Annual Performance Plans since 2019
  2. Furthermore, information is also available in presentations to the Portfolio Committee by SA Tourism as well as the minutes agreed to by the Portfolio Committee on Tourism since 01 April 2019 to date.
  3. Responses by the Minister to similar questions on Marketing.

19 December 2022 - NW4018

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What will her department’s participation and contribution be at the 27th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to be held in Egypt in November of this year?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism is not participating in the Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to be held in Egypt in November 2022. The attendance and participation at Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the responsibility of the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment.

19 December 2022 - NW4513

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) number of persons have applied for funds from the (i) Green Incentive Fund applicants in the past two quarters and (ii) the specified applicants were successful, (b) amount did each successful applicant receive and (c) was the purpose for which the amount was received by each such applicant?

Reply:

(a) (i) No persons have applied for financial support under the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) during Quarter One (Q1) and Quarter Two (Q2) of the 2022/2023 Financial Year as there were no GTIP application windows open during this period.

Applications for the GTIP are managed through defined application windows, during which a call for applications are published to encourage prospective applicants to submit applications for support in line with the programme guidelines.

During Q1 and Q2 of the 2022/2023 Financial Year, the GTIP team was busy processing pipeline applications including the 179 applications received during the previous application window that was open from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022. The next application window opened on 10 October 2022 and will close on 31 January 2023, after which the number of applications received can be reported on.

a) (ii) Not applicable

(b) &(c) Not applicable

 

19 December 2022 - NW3986

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has been informed of the nomad e-visas that are being rolled out by 40 countries globally, including Namibia; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has any plans to advocate for nomad e-visas to attract remote workers via interaction with the Department of Home Affairs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department has become aware through reports in the public domain of the introduction of nomad visa regimes by countries including African countries.

2 The Department of Tourism engages the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) on visa matters prioritising tourism priority markets identified in the country’s marketing investment framework.

DHA has indicated during discussions that they are considering the issuing of remote working visas. In addition, one of the five objectives of Operation Vulindlela refers to ‘A visa regime that attracts skills and grows tourism’.

19 December 2022 - NW3706

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What processes were used to appoint service providers for tourism marketing strategies in international markets in each financial year in each market, (b) who were the appointed service providers, (c) what amount was (i) budgeted and (ii) spent, (d) how are the (i) successes and (ii) failures of the marketing strategies measured, (e) what are the results of the marketing strategies in each market in each year and (f) what lessons have been learnt from the tourism marketing strategies in each of the past three financial years in each case?

Reply:

a) What processes were used to appoint service providers for tourism marketing strategies in international markets in each financial year in each market?

SA Tourism followed the prescribed processes and procedures as outlined in the organisation’s supply chain procurement policy in the appointment of in-market agencies. These were appointed through a competitive bidding process.

(b) who were the appointed service providers? (c) What amount was (i) budgeted and (ii)

spent?

Most agency contracts are not retainer contracts but project-by-project basis contracts.

Services Procured

Business Unit

Budgeted and Spent Amounts

Creative Services

India- Mumbai

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Services

India- Mumbai

Variable cost

Event Management, Activation and Brand Experience Services

India- Mumbai

Rate card/Variable cost

Media Buy

India- Mumbai

Rate Card

Integrated Marketing Services

South Europe Office

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Activation and Creative Services

Central Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Integrated PR & Marketing Services

Central Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Media Buy

Australia

Rate card/Variable cost

B2C & B2B Media Strategy, planning and buying Agency

UK & IRELAND

Rate card/Variable cost

Public relations and communication services

UK & IRELAND

Rate card

Creative, digital, B2C & B2B Media Strategy, planning and buying and activation services

North Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Integrated PR & Marketing Services

North Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Marketing Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Media Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Activations Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Marketing Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Multi-Disciplinary 360 Degree Marketing Services

South America

Rate Card

(d) how are the (i) successes and (ii) failures of the marketing strategies measured?

Evaluation metrics for measuring successes of campaigns are predetermined and articulated upfront in the respective Annual Performance Plans in the form of Technical Indicator Descriptions. Failures will be determined against non-achievement of these.

(e) what are the results of the marketing strategies in each market in each year?

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Global lockdown and travel restrictions in source markets.

No in-market campaigns implemented as there was no assigned investment.

Planned deal driven campaigns were executed as stated on pages 54 of the 2021/22 SA Tourism Annual Report tabled to Parliament.

Delivery on the planned campaigns for this fiscal is currently in progress.

(f) what lessons have been learnt from the tourism marketing strategies in each of the past three financial years in each case?

Having a compelling brand positioning supported by sufficient financial investment and an all of Government barrier removal approach is critical to win. This is underpinned by building strategies over a long time to create consistency and affinity in the consumer's mind whilst staying agile enough to course correct when the need arises. 

19 December 2022 - NW4611

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Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date was the Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa (TTCSA) constituted, (b) what is the lifespan of the TTCSA, (c) how were members of the TTCSA chosen, (d) what is their mandate and (e)(i) what is the objective of the TTCSA and (ii) how will this be measured?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Tourism has put transformation at the centre of its programmes since the promulgation of the Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code in 2015. The first Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa was formally known as the Tourism B-BBEE Charter Council, was appointed in 2012. The Council is appointed with representatives from civil society, tourism businesses and labour. In 2019/20 the name was formally changed to the Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa. A call for the nomination of new members to be appointed to the Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa (TTCSA) was issued publicly in the national newspapers on the weekend of 30 October 2022, including on 02 November 2022. The closing date for nominations was 30 November 2022.

(b) The lifespan of the TTCSA is 3 years.

(c) In accordance with the Amended Guidelines for Developing and Gazetting Sector Codes, issued under Section 9 of the B-BBEE Amendment Act, the Minister has the responsibility to appoint members of the Sector Charter Council to monitor transformation in the sector. According to Section 6 of the Act, members of the Council must represent different relevant constituencies including businesses (large and small), trade unions, community-based organisations, youth, academics and others. Criteria for nominees is published in the call for nominations. The Council should consist of not fewer than 10 and no more than 15 members.

(d) The TTCSA is mandated to:

  • Provide guidance on sector-specific matters affecting B-BBEE in entities within the sector.
  • Compile reports on the status of B-BBEE within the sector.
  • Share information with sector members, approved accreditation agencies, B-BBEE Commission, B-BBEE Presidential Advisory Council, the Line Minister and the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition.
  • Monitor the implementation of the Amended Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code.

(e)(i). The TTCSA is appointed to encourage and support transformation in the Tourism sector in order to ensure inclusive growth. The Council monitors the implementation of the objectives of the Amended Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code. The Council also advises the Minister on transformation matters in both the public and private sectors.

(e)((ii). The TTCSA measures the state of transformation in the tourism sector by:

a) Conducting annual studies on the state of implementation of the Amended Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code in the five applicable elements including: Ownership; Management Control; Skills Development; Enterprise and Supplier Development and Socio-Economic Development.

b) Quarterly Reports submitted to the Minister on the business of the Council.

c) Hosting Transformation Dialogues and Roundtables.

d) Submission of adhoc reports as requested by the Minister

 

19 December 2022 - NW3987

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) social media campaigns is her department running, (b) total amount is her department spending on social media campaigns promoting it on (i) Facebook and (ii) Instagram and (c) other social media platforms is her department using?

Reply:

a) The Department is currently running the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) campaign on its social media platforms.

b) No advertising costs have been incurred on the Green Tourism Incentive Programme social media campaign including on i) Facebook ii) Instagram iii) Twitter iv) YouTube and v) LinkedIn.

c) None

 

19 December 2022 - NW3848

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her replies to questions 2531 and 2532 on 12 December 2021, what are the details of the current status of the (a) recovery process and (b) independent investigation?

Reply:

(a) The department instructed the State Attorney to recover the R50 000.00 from the business owner. Summons was issued and a Default Judgment was obtained. Currently, the State Attorney is waiting for the Court to grant the writ of execution.

(b) The independent investigation is in progress.

19 December 2022 - NW3900

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether, considering that the tourism industry, which has been a jewel in the crown of the Republic for decades and contributing billions of Rands to the fiscus while providing millions of jobs, was decimated when COVID-19 arrived (details furnished), and noting that good and dynamic policy is needed to mitigate and conquer the challenges of crime and unpredictable electricity and water that is slowing the recovery of the tourism industry, her department will provide a comprehensive timeline for the drafting and implementation of the new overall policy for tourism in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The internal drafting of a new Green Paper for tourism has been finalised and external consultations on the draft are being undertaken. It is intended to finalise the consultations at the end of the 2022/23 financial year.

 



19 December 2022 - NW3829

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

How is SA Tourism (a) packaging messages around incidents such as the murder of a Ukranian tourist in 2018 and the recent murder of a German tourist and (b) working with the (i) SA Police Service and (ii) private sector to ensure that the image of the Republic as a preferred tourist destination is not tarnished further?

Reply:

How is SA Tourism (a) packaging messages around incidents such as the murder of a Ukranian tourist in 2018 and the recent murder of a German tourist

a) South African Tourism has regularly kept all (domestic and international) trade partners and stakeholders up to date with regards to issues that impact on South Africa including safety and security. To this end, over the last few months, South African Tourism has participated in key trade shows in various parts of the world including IMEX America, International Golf Travel Market in Italy, participation at World Routes in the United States of America and Travel Expo in Zimbabwe and also currently at a Tourism industry leadership conference in Botswana with a constant message that South Africa remains a safe destination.

Following the incident of the murder of the German tourist, South African Tourism released a joint statement together with private sector industry partner, TBCSA, condemning the incident. This was followed by a media briefing led by Minister of Tourism Lindiwe Sisulu after having met with the affected tourists and the victim’s wife. South African Tourism has reiterated the Minister’s message that such incidents are taken very seriously as the safety of tourists and citizens alike remains key. Over and above this, in all the marketing and promotional work that South African Tourism embarks on, the message that we are a safe destination is shown through the various interactive and immersive experiences shown in the visual elements through our people.

(b) working with the (i) SA Police Service and (ii) private sector to ensure that the image of the Republic as a preferred tourist destination is not tarnished further?

b) We have a National Tourism Safety Strategy with a view to foster public- private sector partnership in addressing issues of tourism safety in a more coordinated manner to provide an enhanced visitor experience and in the long term to change perceptions of South Africa as an unsafe destination. The National Tourism Safety Strategy is centered upon three key pillars which include, Proactive measures (putting in place measures to ensure that tourists are safe before they embark on a trip), Responsive measures (mechanisms that ensure quick and effective turnaround time to attend to tourist in distress when an incident of crime occur); and Aftercare Programmes (providing care and comfort to tourist in distress immediately after an incident has occurred and beyond).

In working with the SA Police Services and the Department of Tourism, South African Tourism co-ordinates key messaging on a case by case basis with the sole aim of synchronizing messaging and efforts relating to citizen and tourists’ safety in the build up to the festive season and beyond. We continue with our efforts of working with the greater tourism sector in removing any barriers that hinder the growth of our sector.

SA Tourism, Mpumalanga Tourism and the private sector have recently collaborated to improve safety around the access routes into the Kruger National Park.

19 December 2022 - NW4612

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Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How does her department intend to improve the state of the Bourke’s Luck Potholes site, (b) what are the reasons for the current status of the specified site and (c) how does her department intend to ensure that (i) the state of the site does not continue to deteriorate in the future and (ii) tourism numbers increase at the site?

Reply:

(a)-(c)Tourism is a concurrent function. Bourkes Luck Potholes is site owned and managed by the Mpumalanga Provincial Government. The Department will, however, engage with the Provincial Department and offer support. The Honourable Member is requested to refer this question to the relevant authority.

 

 

 

19 December 2022 - NW2843

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total amount has her department spent on (a) events and conferences, (b) travel, (c) expenses for running her office and (d)(i) flowers, (ii) condolence cards and (iii) stationery for the (aa) her, (bb) the Deputy Minister and (cc) the Director General (aaa) in the 2021-22 financial year and (bbb) since 1 April 2022?

Reply:

(a) Events and conferences

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

74 896.07

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

360 756.65

To be audited

(cc) Director General

20 848.50

To be audited

(b) Travel

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

1 552 304.13

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

423 837.29

To be audited

(cc) Director General

39 329.29

To be audited

(c) Expenses for running the office

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

985 833.13

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

648 598.68

To be audited

(cc) Director General

60 608.48

To be audited

(d) (i) Flowers, (ii) condolence cards

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

1 500.00

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

0.00

To be audited

(cc) Director General

1 000.00

To be audited

(d) (iii) Stationery

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

3 046.70

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

65 341.10

To be audited

(cc) Director General

4 240.00

To be audited

15 December 2022 - NW4483

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details of funding provided by her department to private companies that are responsible for supporting emerging farmers with technical support for each commodity and in each province throughout the Republic in the past 10 years; (2) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with a detailed report on the progress made through such support for each (a) farm, (b) commodity and (c) year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4393

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in (i) his and (ii) the Deputy Minister’s private offices and (b)(i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package of each specified person?NW552

Reply:

In June 2022 Cabinet approved the appointment of staff to support the Acting Minister linked to the acting term.

The 2 November 2022 amended Ministerial Handbook provides for the appointment of 14 staff in the Office of the Minister, which includes 5 support staff to be appointed by the department and 10 staff in the Office of the Deputy Minister, which includes 3 support staff to be appointed by the department.

(a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in their private offices:

(i) Office of the Acting Minister, Mr TW Nxesi, MP = 13

(ii) Office of the Deputy Minister, Dr MCC Pilane-Majake, MP = 9

(b) (i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package

Office of the Acting Minister

Job Title

Annual Remuneration Package

Staff appointed in the Office of the Minister

1

Chief of Staff

R1,308,051 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 20,340 Non pensionable allowance

R1,412,811

2

Private and Appointment Secretary

R1,105,383 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 20,340 Non pensionable allowance

R1,210,143

3

Community Outreach Officer

R766,584 all-inclusive package

R 19,680 Non pensionable allowance

R786,264

4

Receptionist

R 248,790 all-inclusive

R 19,200 PNP allowance

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R282,630

5

Media Liaison Officer

R1,105,383 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 20,340 Non pensionable allowance

R1,210,143

6

Parliamentary Officer

R1,105,383 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 20,340 Non pensionable allowance

R1,210,143

7

Administrative Clerk

(Acting as Assistant Appointment and Administrative Secretary and receiving acting allowance accordingly)

R539,384 all-inclusive

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 17,400 Non pensionable allowance

R641,204

Staff appointed by the department to provide support to the Office of the Minister

1

Driver/Messenger

R241,495 all inclusive

R 19,200 PNP allowance

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R275,335

2

Food Aide Services

R146,858 all-inclusive

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R161,498

3

Administration Support & Coordination

R766,584 all-inclusive package

R 19,680 Non pensionable allowance

R786,264

4

Parliamentary & Cabinet Support

R889,656 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 19,680 Non pensionable allowance

R993,756

5

Registry Clerk

R248,790 all-inclusive

R 19,200 PNP allowance

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R282,630

Internships

1

Intern

Stipend of R76,330

Office of the Deputy Minister

Job Title

Annual Remuneration Package

Staff appointed in the Office of the Deputy Minister

1

Head of Office

(Acting Head of Office, reassigned from within the Department. Only receiving PNP allowance contemplated in Clause XIX of PSCBC Res 3 of 1999 for support to the Member, in addition to her Director level salary paid by virtue of being on the same salary level)

R 84,420 PNP allowance

2

Private and Appointment Secretary

R908,502 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 20,340 Non pensionable allowance

R1,013,262

3

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

R766,584 all-inclusive package

R 84,420 PNP allowance

R 19,680 Non pensionable allowance

R870,684

4

Household Aide

(Acting as Receptionist and receiving acting allowances accordingly)

R248,790 all-inclusive

R 19,200 PNP allowance

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R282,630

5

Acting Household Aide (Contract)

R175,587 all-inclusive

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R190,227

6

Household Aide

R175,587 all-inclusive

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R190,227

Staff appointed by the department to provide support to the Office of the Minister

1

Driver/Messenger

R208,091 all-inclusive

R 19,200 PNP allowance

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R241,931

2

Food Aide Services

R146,858 all-inclusive

R 14,640 Non pensionable allowance

R161,498

Internships

1

Intern

Stipend of R76,330

END

15 December 2022 - NW4594

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) With reference to his reply to question 2335 on 17 July 2022, what (a) total number of the 77 Water Services Authorities who initially failed to comply with the non-compliance letters issued by his department submitted corrective action plans since June 2022 and (b) are their names. 2) whether he will make a statement on the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) Fifteen (15) of the remaining 77 Water Services Authorities (WSAs) have submitted action plans since June 2022.

(b) The following fifteen (15) WSAs have submitted action plans:

  • O R Tambo DM
  • Sunday River Valley LM
  • Kouga LM
  • Beaufort West LM
  • Kannaland LM
  • Matzikama LM
  • Prince Albert LM
  • Swellendam LM
  • Siyacuma LM
  • Tsantsabane LM
  • Merafong LM
  • Lesedi LM
  • Rand West LM
  • Pixley Ka Seme LM
  • Ngaka Modiri Molema DM

Four (4) additional WSA have requested support for the development of the action plan as indicated below:

  • Msukaligwa LM
  • Thaba Chweu LM
  • Emalahleni LM
  • Chris Hani DM

The Department is implementing the Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP) to strengthen its support and intervention at municipal level based on actual data or most available data, the aim of the programme is to ensure that support and intervention at municipal level is proactive, consistent, and systematic. There has also been concerted effort with SALGA and MISA to assist remaining municipalities with the development and implementation of the action plans.

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15 December 2022 - NW3775

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department intends to assist farmers who are farming on land that is more than 60 000 hectares that was damaged by veld fires; if not, why not; if so, (a) what form of assistance does her department plan to give and (b) by what date does her department intend to roll out the specified assistance; (2) whether her department intends to procure firefighting machinery and/or equipment to assist the farmers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4285

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) is the total number of parolees who violated their parole conditions since 1 January 2014 and (b) total number (i) was re-arrested and taken back to jail and (ii) remains out of jail?

Reply:

A total of 82 972 violated their parole conditions since 01 January 2014, to the end of the second quarter of 2022/23. This total includes all those who violated the parole conditions had parole revoked and absconders (parolees who avoid being monitored). When a parolee or probationer violates supervision conditions, an investigation is done, and a motivation and recommendations to revoke the parole is done.

Since 01 January 2014, up to the second quarter of 2022/23 a total of 39 947 parolees and probationers absconded. This category has violated conditions by disappearing and avoid being monitored or supervised. The breakdown per region is as follows:

Question

Region

01.01.2014

To

31.03.2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

 

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

 

2022/2023

What (a) is the total number of parolees who violated their parole conditions since 1 January 2014

EC

282

765

969

898

825

821

853

486

606

122

 

FS/NC

298

1059

1053

1078

1034

1183

989

710

898

759

 

GP

1315

2382

2327

2128

2222

2290

2177

1801

2186

1844

 

KZN

111

350

381

542

493

493

345

395

426

449

 

LMN

1127

1105

1102

1130

1092

1096

185

486

606

122

 

WC

782

4959

4791

4775

4888

4089

3584

2438

2774

1496

 

Total

3915

10620

10623

10551

10554

9972

8133

6316

7496

4792

(i) What is the total number of parolees re-arrested and taken back to jail

EC

130

440

555

581

551

612

599

432

522

431

 

FS/NC

162

654

685

677

688

964

789

553

696

481

 

GP

258

917

772

606

692

618

603

397

621

392

 

KZN

74

256

276

387

349

368

361

237

335

437

 

LMN

124

102

99

127

89

93

83

81

81

72

 

WC

626

4173

4099

4022

4015

3480

2941

1888

2129

1207

 

Total

1374

6542

6486

6400

6384

6135

5376

3588

4384

3020

(ii) What is the total number of parolees who remain out of jail?

EC

152

325

414

317

274

209

254

1746

1718

1586

 

FS/NC

148

417

378

485

366

491

366

252

309

328

 

GP

1057

1465

1555

1522

1530

1672

1574

1404

1565

1452

 

KZN

37

94

105

155

144

457

84

158

91

212

 

LMN

1003

1003

1003

1003

1003

1003

102

405

525

50

 

WC

156

786

692

753

873

609

643

550

645

289

 

Total

2552

4092

4145

4232

4189

4440

3022

4510

4850

3915

END

15 December 2022 - NW3511

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will provide a standard protocol of the maintenance of agricultural colleges in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has found that all colleges are adhering to the required standards and protocol; if not, what measures has she put in place to impose compliance; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there have been colleges that were given notices for not complying with the required standards; if not, why not; if so, which colleges?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4268

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

In light of the fact that the High-Level Panel report discovered that only 5% of employed people work in agriculture, what plans and strategies has she put in place to improve the capacity of the agricultural sector to create more jobs in order to increase the employment rate in the sector?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4572

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Which forms of assistance have been offered to small-scale farmers, especially at Rooiwal Village in the North West, who can no longer farm due to cable and farming equipment theft?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4533

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether his department has any alternative plans put in place to provide (a) rural households and (b) persons with disabilities living in rural areas in KwaZulu-Natal with bulk water supply; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the alternative plans?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation is funding various bulk water supply projects which benefit rural househols as well as persons with disabilities in KwaZulu-Natal. The following are the projects which are being implemented in the various municipal areas:

Project name

Municipality

Estimated project cost

No. of beneficiaries

Overall progress

Nongoma BWS

Zululand DM

R822 m

153 236

100%

Greytown BWS

uMzinyathi DM

R523.4 m

27 824

92%

Driefontein BWS

uThukela DM

R536.2 m

204 306

99%

Ngcebo BWS

iLembe DM

R1 096.7 m

585 900

100%

Greater Bulwer BWS

Harry Gwala DM

R339.6 m

113 256

80%

Maphumulo BWS

iLembe DM

R649.9 m

112 320

76%

Mandlakazi BWS Phases 5&6

Zululand DM

R2 988.0 m

279 297

61%

Middledrift BWS

King Cetshwayo DM

R290.9 m

177 576

54%

Greater Mthonjaneni BWS

King Cetshwayo DM

R2 025.5 m

99 612

65%

Greater Mpofana BWS

UMgungundlovu DM

R954.9 m

181 590

87%

uMshwathi BWS

uMgungundlovu DM & iLembe DM

R2 308.7 m

362 682

50%

15 December 2022 - NW4485

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details of (a) Onderstepoort Biological Products purchase price of vaccines from Botswana for each unit and (b) the price that the specified units are being sold to the South African government?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4595

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to Part 9 of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, what measures has his department taken to ensure the compliance of water treatment package plants with their licensing conditions in each province in (a) 2018, (b) 2019, (c) 2020, (d) 2021 and (e) 2022; (2) what (a) punitive measures have been taken against those who contravened their licence agreements in the specified period in each province and (b) additional measures is his department taking to ensure that privately owned water treatment package plants are licensed and compliant for the period under review in each province?

Reply:

1. Part 9 of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998 addresses the review and renewal of licenses, and the amendment and substitution of conditions of licenses. Water treatment package plants, either for drinking water treatment or for wastewater treatment, usually have a design capacity range of between 1-2ML/day. This capacity range is small and has a low impact compared to the conventional larger water treatment plants. Lower-risk water uses are generally authorized through Part 6: Section 39 (General Authorization) of the National Water Act, depending on the sensitivity of the catchment. Licenses are issued for larger treatment plants. The table below provides a summary of regulatory requirements for wastewater treatment and drinking water treatment package plants.

Legal requirements

Wastewater Treatment Package plants

Drinking Water Treatment Package Plants

Water use authorization required

  • General Authorization for wastewater discharge.
  • Most privately owned plants discharge into the municipal sewer systems and are regulated through Municipal by-laws.
  • General Authorization for abstraction
  • Storage (where applicable)

Common design Capacity

1-2Ml/day

1-2ML/day

Monitoring for compliance

Part of Green Drop

Part of Blue Drop

Mandate

DWS and Water Services Authorities

DWS and Local government as Water Services Authorities

Measures taken by the Department to ensure the compliance of water treatment package plants between 2018 and 2022 include:

  1. The revival of the Green and Blue Drop certification programs
  2. Monitoring action plans for non-compliant systems
  3. Enforcement actions
  4. Review of the norms and standards for drinking water
  5. Confirmation of general authorizations for new plants
  6. As part of the license conditions, package plants are mandated to submit to the DWS, monthly water quality analysis which should be in line with the applicable limits for each parameter analysed.

2. (a) The Water Services Act, Act 08 of 1997 does not make provisions for penalties. However, the DWS carries out audits to monitor compliance and implements enforcement actions to rectify contraventions related to non-compliance to the conditions of authorizations.

(b) The Department is monitoring compliance of package plants as provided for by legislation. The department undertakes audits as part of regular monitoring activities and where there is non-compliance, issues Notices or Directives to the owners of the package plant. In some cases, investigations are triggered by reports of suspected cases of non-compliance which are followed up by the department. Where administrative enforcement actions are implemented, the department monitors to ensure full compliance with the conditions of authorisations.

The table below indicates instances where the Department has undertaken compliance monitoring audits and investigations triggered by complaints received and the subsequent administrative actions to address non-compliances.

Table 2: Compliance monitoring audits, inspections conducted, and enforcement actions taken

Activities and administrative action taken

Activities and administrative action taken

Activities and administrative action taken

Activities and administrative action taken

Activities and administrative action taken

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

3x audits and 1x inspection undertaken in Eastern Cape i.e. Mzimvubu / Tsitsikamma

4x audits and 1x inspection undertaken in Eastern Cape i.e. Mzimvubu / Tsitsikamma

1x inspection and 2x audits undertaken in Eastern Cape i.e. Mzimvubu / Tsitsikamma

2x inspections and 1x audit undertaken in Eastern Cape i.e. Mzimvubu / Tsitsikamma

2x inspections undertaken in Eastern Cape i.e. Mzimvubu / Tsitsikamma

2x Notices issued

3x Notices issued

2x Notices issued

3x Notices issued

2x Notices issued

-

3x Directives issued

1x Directive issued

-

-

Complaints received and investigated

1x complaint received from Limpopo regional office (i.e. Limpopo WMA)

2x complaints received from North- West and KwaZulu Natal regional office (i.e. Pongola/Mtamvuna and Limpopo WMA)

3x complaints received from North-West and Limpopo regional office (i.e. Limpopo WMA)

-

-

1x Investigation undertaken

2x investigations undertaken

3x investigations undertaken

-

-

1x Notice issued

Both cases were recommended for administrative action

3x Directives were issued

-

-

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15 December 2022 - NW4305

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What are the relevant details of how the current net worth of the President’s Fund has been arrived at; (2) What total number of victims of apartheid (a) have and (b) have not received financial reparations; (3) (a) Under what criteria does the specified fund pay interim reparations and (b) what is the total amount in this regard?

Reply:

1. The net worth is made up of the capital amount, royalties and cumulated interest received over the years. The funds that are not yet used are invested in money markets through the Public Investment Corporations (IPC).

2. (a) The total number of victims that have received the once-off individual grants of R30 000 is 17 423; and

(b) The total number of victims that have not received the once-off individual grants of R30 000 is 4 253.

3. (a) The initial Interim reparations were paid in terms of the Urgent Interim Reparations regulations, gazetted on 3 April 1998, under Gazette no. 6154. It should, however, be noted that interim preparations are no longer being paid out as the Truth and Reconciliation Committee (TRC) has been dissolved. The criteria were as follows:

(i) application for urgent Interim reparation, an application for urgent interim reparation in terms of section 26 (1) of the Act must be made in the form, as set out below:

1. The Committee must consider each application for urgent interim reparation made to it in terms of section 26 (1) of the Act and if, in the opinion of the Committee:

a) the applicant is a victim ; and

b) the applicant is alive at the time when the application is considered; and

c) the applicant is in urgent need of medical, emotional, educational, symbolic, social, legal or administrative assistance or intervention; and

d) the applicant has suffered hardship as a result of the gross violation of his or her human rights; and

e) the applicant is not a relative or dependant as defined in regulation 1 (2), of a victim who is alive on the date on which the application is submitted to the Committee, the Committee must make a recommendation as contemplated in sub regulation (2) in respect of such applicant.

2. if the Committee:

a)  finds that an applicant is a victim in need of urgent interim reparation as contemplated in sub regulation (1), the Committee may, subjected to the provisions of paragraph (b) recommend that an amount in respect of urgent interim reparation, not exceeding two thousand Rand, be paid to such a victim and that such information as the Committee may consider necessary for the victim to address his or her urgent needs referred to in sub regulation (1) (c), the provided to such victims; or

b) is, In view of the exceptional circumstances of a particular case, of the opinion that it will cause undue hardship or will be manifestly unfair or unjust if the urgent interim reparation is limited as set out in paragraph (a) the Committee may, notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (a) recommend that such greater amount as it may deem appropriate in view of such exceptional circumstances, be granted to such victim.

(b) The total amount is R53 165 325.00

END

15 December 2022 - NW4344

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether his department has been informed of any sewerage spillages into natural water sources in the (a) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (b) Senqu Local Municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) is the location of each spillage and (ii) steps has his department taken to assist the Joe Gqabi District Municipality to (aa) fix the infrastructure and (bb) rehabilitate the specified natural water sources?

Reply:

a)  The Department is aware of the sewage challenges experience by Joe Gqabi District Municipality. There have been long standing issues at the Burgersdorp sewage system and Steynsburg Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). The status regarding progress made is as follows:

  • Contractors are currently at both sites
  • Progress made at the Burgersdorp WWTW is at 95%
  • Progress made with the Steynsburg sewage system is at 80%.

b) (i) Site of pollution

(ii) (aa) steps taken by department to assist through repairs to the infrastructure

(ii) (bb) rehabilitation of the specified natural water sources

Burgersdorp - pollution of the Stormberg Spruit

  • A directive had been issued and funding support was received from Municipal Infrastructure Grant and funding from Joe Gqabi DM
  • Four (4) sewage pumpstations repaired as follows:
    • repairs completed on 2 pumpstations
    • repairs ongoing on 2 pumpstations and are in final stages, planned for completion at end November 2022.

Rehabilitation included removal of any paper and solids for burial and application of chloride of lime to disinfect affected areas

Steynsburg Sewage Ponds in the catchment of Teebus stream

  • Funding support from Water Service Infrastructure Grant
  • Project is about 80% complete with all work due to be completed by end February 2023.

Rehabilitation includes removal of papers, disinfection with chloride of lime and natural attenuation

Sterkspruit Activate Sludge Works

Sterkspruit Activate Sludge Works have been repaired and the works are functioning normally, thus removing the overload on the Sterkspruit Pond System

Overflow from the Sterkspruit sewage ponds had impacted the Sterkspruit Stream, but has since been resolved

---00O00---

15 December 2022 - NW4304

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Considering that the President’s Fund was established in terms of section 42 of the Promotion of National Unity and Reconciliation Act, Act No 34 of 1995, to pay from the specified fund all amounts payable to victims by way of reparation in terms of regulations made by the President, and noting that according to the Presidency’s 2020-21 Annual Report the fund had an accumulated surplus of R1,811,577,000 and net assets of R1,818,723,000, by what date will the fund publish its 2021-22 Annual Report; (2) What is the current net worth of the fund; (3) How was the fund capitalised when it was first established; (4) (a) Who were the donors and (b) what total amounts did they donate; (5) What total amount in grants have been paid to the fund by the State since it was established?

Reply:

1. The Annual Report for the President`s Fund was published on 23 November 2022.

2. The current net worth of the President`s Fund is R1 869 640 848.08 as at 31 October 2022.

3. When the Fund was first established, it was capitalised by Government which made a total contribution of R800 001 000.00, broken down as follows:

(a) First contribution of R100 000 000.00 – in the year ended 31 March 1999;

B) Second contribution of R200 000 000.00 – in the year ended 31 March 2000;

c) Third contribution of R190 000 000.00 – in the year ended 31 March 2002 and

d) Final contribution of R310 001 000.00 – in year ended 31 March 2003.

4. (a) The donors were Royal Netherlands, Southern Life Foundations, Swiss Government, Eskom and private individuals.

(b) The donors mentioned in (a) above contributed a total amount of R7 165 390.00.

The table below provides details of the donors and total amounts donated:

(a) Donor

(b) Amount

Royal Netherlands

R3 702 870.00

Southern Life Foundation

R75 000.00

Swiss Government

R998 193.00

Eskom

R1 000 000.00

5. The total amount, in grants paid to the Fund by the State since it was established, is R800 001 000.00

15 December 2022 - NW4283

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) current backlog in the provision of water and sanitation in the rural areas across the Republic and (b) total cost attached to the backlog?

Reply:

a)  The current backlog in the provision of water in the rural areas across the Republic are as follows:

  • Out of a total of 19,368,622 households in South Africa 6 396 431 households are classified as rural households
  • Out of 6 396 431 rural households 4 760 182 (86%) have access the RDP level of service for water
  • Out of 6 396 431 rural households, only 3 157 091 (61%) have access to a reliable supply of water

b) A funding gap of R33 billion must be closed each year for the next 10 years, through improved revenue generation and reduced costs based on a study undertaken through the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan (NWSMP). The department has embarked on the development of a Five-Year Reliable Water and Sanitation Services Delivery Implementation Plans that will, after completion, produce a pipeline of projects for each WSA with the associated costing. National grant funding programmes will be aligned with these needs.

---00O00---

15 December 2022 - NW4341

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether there has been any progress on the process of appointing a Master Data Specialist, who should have been appointed by the end of September 2020; if not, why not; if so, what progress has been made in this regard?

Reply:

A court order issued on 10 December 2019, against the former Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, now Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD), by the Land Claims Court (Court), ordered the appointment of the Special Master for Labour Tenants. The Special Master does not report to the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, but will supervise, oversee and monitor the functions of the Department regarding outstanding Labour Tenants’ claims.

The same court order, dated 10 December 2019, also granted permission to the Special Master to appoint consultants to provide opinions, reports and other assistance. The position of the Master Data Specialist was subjected to a job evaluation process, to ensure that the correct salary level was determined before the post was submitted to be filled through a recruitment and selection process. A job description was developed for the post by benchmarking against similar posts with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation. The process however took longer than anticipated and the Special Master requested that the process not be continued. The Special Master was seeking alternative solutions in filling lower-level positions that can assist in the administrative functions of his Office.

The Department is, therefore, in the process to fill the following positions allocated to the Office of the Special Master:

  • 1 x Systems and Operations Manager post filled.
  • 1 x Programme Administrator and Office Manager post filled.
  • 1 x Corporate Affairs and Stakeholder Manager post filled.
        • 1 x Office Assistant post filled.
        • 1 x National Programme Manager post. Post advertised and the closing date of the advertisement is on 20221014. Filling of the post is anticipated to be by 20230101.
        • 1 x Programme Coordinator. Seconded from the DALRRD.
        • 1 x Senior Administrative Officer post. Filling of the post through a recruitment and selection or transfer processes and filling of the post is anticipated to be by 20230101.
        • 1 x Messenger post. Filling of the post through a recruitment and selection or transfer processes and filling of the post is anticipated to be by 20230101.

15 December 2022 - NW3757

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

How is she utilising the African Continental Free Trade Area as policy instrument to gain markets for agricultural products?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4710

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with reference to complaints by many members of the public about the poor care and demeaning attitudes of Public Service officials towards persons with disabilities, his department has any collaborative programmes in place with BlindSA to provide sensitivity training to Public Service staff at government service offices in order to address issues of stigmatisation and ensure that all South Africans receive equal and adequate assistance from government officials; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The unprofessional behaviour and conduct of Public Service officials towards persons with disabilities is unacceptable and must not be tolerated. The Bill of Rights protect our vulnerable citizens and public service officials are required to act in ways that uphold the dignity and humanity of all our citizens.

The Disability Rights Awareness Month (DRAM) 2022, was launched by the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities on 3 November 2022. The theme for this year’s DRAM is titled “Empowering Persons with Disabilities through resourceful, sustainable and safe environments”. Government’s Disability Rights Awareness Campaign is part of the 365 days Calendar on disabilities to create more awareness about the disabilities, showcase gaps and challenges that are experienced in delivery of services for persons with disabilities, showcase inroads and achievements made to date by government in line with the MTSF priorities and forge further partnerships between persons with and without disabilities to support the social cohesion towards realization of disability inclusion in all our programs and all aspects of society.

The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities and the National School of Government signed a Memorandum of Agreement on Disability Inclusion Training for public servants, on 3 November 2022. This training is aimed at empowering public servants in ensuring disability inclusion in their programmes and services of their departments.

The National School of Government has several training programmes in place to build awareness of these issues in public service officials. The compulsory programmes such as the “Championing Anti-discrimination in the Public Service”. The NSG has partnered with the UNFPA on “Achieving Disability Inclusiveness through Universal Access and Reasonable Accommodation” course. Furthermore, it offers “Know your Constitution” and “Ethics in the Public Service” as free courses. The NSG uses the specialised services to develop training materials that are accessible to officials who have barriers to learning.

End

15 December 2022 - NW3758

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department and the private sector is succeeding in maintaining current market access and looking towards new market access in order to (a) broaden the exporter base and diversify exports and (b) increase the export of value-added products; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4588

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to the estimation that, based on current usage trends, water demand will exceed availability of economically usable fresh water resources in the Republic by 2025, and in view of the fact that the continuing trend in industrialisation and urbanisation of the population is expected to place further pressure on the Republic’s sources of water supply unless appropriate corrective action is taken, (a) what is his department currently doing to ease the pressure as alluded to, (b) what are the key specific workable strategies to deal with the envisaged water demand and (c)(i) which areas will be the most affected when it comes to water demand and (ii) why?

Reply:

a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) undertakes planning studies over different planning horizons, to develop interventions that are implemented to ensure water security for the country. These interventions comprise of enablers like governance, financing, human capacity building as well as science and innovation which facilitate implementation of water projects at National, Provincial and District and Local Municipality level.

b) The interventions implemented to ensure water security are contained in the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), through which the minister gives effect to the National Water Act, as well as the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan (NWSMP). Additional interventions include the following:

  • Planning and implementing a range of major projects to augment national bulk water resource infrastructure and
  • Establishing the National Water Resource Infrastructure Agency (NWRIA) to finance and implement the large-scale investments in national water resource infrastructure that are required to ensure that South Africa has sufficient bulk water supply now and in future.
  • The department is prioritising increased but sustainable use of groundwater
  • The department is also exploring seawater desalination.
  • Strengthening the department’s its role in supporting and intervening in municipalities where water and sanitation services are failing, in conjunction with provinces, COGTA, National Treasury and SALGA.
  • The Department is updating the National and sectoral Water Conservation and Water Demand Management strategies. This is to ensure effective performance of WCWDM practices by the sector.
  • The DWS has also developed the Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP) to strengthen its support and intervention at municipal level based on actual data or most available data. The aim of the programme is for the Department to ensure that support and intervention at municipal level is proactive, consistent, and systematic.
  • In line with the WSIP, the department has further established the Water Partnership Office (WPO) within the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA). The WPO has developed five standardized National Programmes for private sector participation in municipal water and sanitation services,
  • One of the five National Programmes within the WPO is Non- Revenue Water (NRW) programme aimed at implementing the Water Conservation and Water Demand Management and cost recovery programme focusing on reducing losses, reducing over consumption, and improving cost recovery

The various studies that inform the NWRS are available on the DWS website, at http://www6.dwa.gov.za/iwrp/projects.aspx, and the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan (NW&SMP) is available at http://www.dwa.gov.za.

c) (i-ii) All provinces are affected by the growing demand for water due to:

  • Demand outstripping supply due to extensive growth of urban settlements
  • Extension of services to previously serviced rural settlements
  • Poor maintenance of ageing infrastructure - at a municipal level - that has also reached the end of its lifespan
  • Non-revenue water is currently sitting at 45.1% (31,9 % is losses through physical leakages)
  • The management of water treatment plants adds to the crisis as many of the municipal treatment plants are operating below average standards and a third are critical based on the Blue Drop reports.
  • Shortage of bulk water (owing to droughts, delayed planning for and delivery of bulk water infrastructure such as dams and associated infrastructure)

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15 December 2022 - NW4689

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her department’s under-expenditure in the Presidential Employment Stimulus Initiative (PESI) and the complications surrounding the voucher programme under the PESI earlier in 2022, what are the relevant details of her department’s reasons for not being able to provide and secure a sustainable land reform and agrarian transformation for small-scale farmers to achieve a more integrated and inclusive rural economy?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4109

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Which processes were followed in choosing the Beefmaster Group as a strategic partner, (b) how has or is the Beefmaster Group contributing to the transformation of the feedlot sector in the Republic, (c) how will farmers benefit directly from the programme and (d) what financial support has the Beefmaster Group given to small-scale black farmers in the sector in the past three financial years?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is looking into the requested information and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4219

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether, with the lapse of security identified by his department and the clear obstruction of the department’s procedural security measures, such as regular patrols, frequent searches of cells and the control over objects entering correctional centres, he and his department has found the specified acts as being indicative of their failed attempts to create a secure and rehabilitative environment according to their mandate; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the details of the steps that his department has taken to (a) prevent and (b) minimise the negligence of officials to proactively ensure a safe and secure environment which in turn enables the overriding of procedural security measures?

Reply:

1. The Department has introduced the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) on Security which was rolled out to all Correctional Centres and cascaded to all officials for implementation.

The following prevention plans have also been implemented in Correctional Centres:

  • Contraband prevention Plan
  • Bag less society
  • Gang Combating strategy
  • Plans to counteract Smuggling
  • Back to Basics Philosophy and Practice
  • Strategy to counteract infiltration of Community based gang into Facilities.

2. (a) Preventative measures are as follows:

  • Strict application of resolution 01 of 2006 dealing with disciple of staff
  • Searching of officials and all persons at various check points
  • Implementation of a bag less society
  • Security committee meetings are held on a monthly basis to discuss measures to curtail security breaches.
  • Regular visits are conducted by Senior Personnel during the night and day;
  • The use of the K9 unit to sniff put contraband
  • The posting of EST officials at strategic points
  • Use of Body Scanners to enhance searching of inmates, officials and services providers entering and leaving the Correctional Centres
  • Regular patrols in and around the Correctional Centres

2. (b) The following are efforts to minimise the negligence of officials to proactively ensure a safe and secure environment which in turn enables the overriding of procedural security measures.

  • Basic training of officials
  • Development and Implementation of a contraband prevention plan
  • Ongoing orientation for staff members and service providers on security information and awareness.
  • Visibility of Managers at security posts and Units

15 December 2022 - NW4415

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What is the (a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in (i) his and (ii) each of the Deputy Ministers’ private offices and (b)(i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package of each specified person?

Reply:

The total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in the private offices is provided below. The employment is in accordance with the Ministerial handbook and excludes advisors.

Office of the Minister

No.

(b)(i) Job Title

Salary level

 

Chief of Staff

14

 

Private Secretary

13

 

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support Officer

13

 

Administrative Secretary

13

 

Assistant Appointment Secretary

9

 

Secretary/Receptionist

7

 

Registry Clerk

7

 

Service Aide in Parliamentary office in Cape Town

5

 

Driver/Messenger

5

Office of Deputy Minister Gina

No.

(b)(i) Job Title

Salary level

 

Head of Office

13

 

Private Secretary

12

 

Technical Specialist

13

 

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

11

 

Community Outreach Officer

11

 

Receptionist

7

 

Household Aide

3

 

Driver/Messenger

5

Office Deputy Minister Majola

No.

(b)(i) Job Title

Salary level

 

Head of Office

13

 

Private Secretary

12

 

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

11

 

Community Outreach Officer

11

 

Receptionist

7

 

Senior Registry Clerk

6

 

Household Aide

3

 

Household Aide

3

 

Driver/Messenger

6

In addition to the above staff complement, there are two interns placed in the Ministry who are paid a stipend.

-END-

15 December 2022 - NW4020

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) percentage and (b) hectarage of communal land in the Republic is currently occupied under (i) apartheid-era Permission to Occupy certificates and (ii) other forms of non-registrable tenure?

Reply:

(a)(i),(ii) and (b)(i),(ii)

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW3804

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to question 2351 on 26 August 2022, it is the policy of his department to permit public servants to serve as councillors in municipal councils; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the public servants who are currently serving as councillors had to obtain approval from their respective municipal councils to work in the public service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the total number of public servants who serve as councillors whom obtained such permission?

Reply:

1. Policy that permits public service employees to serve as councillors in municipal councils

a) Participation of public service employees as candidates for elections and becoming members of municipal councils is regulated by section 36 of the Public Service Act, 1994 (PSA) and regulation 15 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 (PSR).

b) Section 36(1) of the PSA provides that an employee can stand as a candidate for elections in a municipal council, but must comply with the public service code of conduct (Chapter 2 of the PSR) and any other prescribed limits and conditions.

c) Section 36(2) of the PSA provides that if an employee is elected as a full-time member of a municipal council, the employee will be deemed to have resigned from the public service.

d) Section 36(4) provides that an employee who has been elected as a part-time councillor may only remain an employee in the public service if such an employee complies with the provision of section 30(1) of the PSA. Section 30(1) of the PSA requires that an employee have the written permission of the Executive Authority of his/her department when the employee performs or engages in remunerative work outside his or her employment in the relevant department. The process for obtaining permission is outlined in the Directive on Other remunerative Work outside the Employee’s Employment in the Relevant Department, as Contemplated in Section 30 of the Public Service Act, 1994 (“Directive”, Nov 2016).

e) The provisions of section 36 is supported by regulation 15 of the PSR, which outlines the procedure to be followed by an employee who wants to stand as a candidate for elections. In terms of regulation 15 of the PSR, an employee is required to inform his/her head of department (HOD), in writing, about his/her intention to stand as a candidate for election a day after receiving the certificate issued by the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). Furthermore, the employee should also submit the certificate from the IEC to the HOD. Employees are also required to take annual leave immediately after the certificate is issued as provided in regulation 15(2).

2. Approval for other remunerative work

a) Section 36(4) requires that a public service employee who is elected as a part-time member of a Municipal Council should comply with section 30 of the PSA. Section 30 of the PSA requires that an employee who would like to perform other remunerative work outside his/her employment in the relevant department should obtain written approval to perform other remunerative work from the Executive Authority of the department. This should be obtained before performing that other remunerative work. In deciding the request, the Executive Authority shall consider whether or not the outside work could reasonably be expected to interfere with or impede the effective performance of the employee’s function in the department concerned or constitute a contravention of the code of conduct.

b) In November 2016, the Minister for Public Service and Administration issued a Directive (see par 1(d)) prescribing the procedure to be followed by employees in applying to perform other remunerative work. In terms of the Directive, written approval is issued in a form of a certificate signed by the Executive Authority or delegated authority in the department.

c) Public service employees who are part-time councillors in the municipalities should, therefore, have an approval certificate as proof that they have obtained written permission to perform other remunerative work outside their employment in the department.

d) The Department of Public Service and Administration is in the process of collecting information from the affected Departments regarding whether employees have complied with section 36(4) of the PSA and regulation 15 of the PSR.

End

15 December 2022 - NW3684

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has found that the (a) public and (b) private sector is succeeding in maintaining current agricultural market access and look towards new market access in order to broaden the exporter base and diversify exports, as well as increase the export of value-added products; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4019

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Considering that at the Subtrop Transformation Summit held in Tzaneen on 26 May 2022, she pointed out that the Government was ready to deal with the contentious issue of national communal land tenure and in taking steps towards the regularisation of communal land rights, what (a) percentage and (b) hectarage of communal land is currently not surveyed in (i) the Republic and (ii) each of the nine provinces?

Reply:

(a)(b),(i),(ii) The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

15 December 2022 - NW4589

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Considering that the total surface water available in the Republic averages about 49 200 million m3 annually, of which about 4 800 million m3 annually originates from the Kingdom of Lesotho, a portion of this runoff known as the Ecological Reserve needs to remain in the river in order to maintain the natural environment along the watercourse, (a)(i) what total amount in water bill does the Republic pay to the Kingdom of Lesotho on annual basis and (ii) which areas benefit more from this water agreement, (b)(i) what is the nature of contract between the Kingdom of Lesotho and the Republic regarding water and (ii) by what date will the contract lapse and (c) what is the Republic doing to ease the burden on the Kingdom of Lesotho such that it is self-sufficient on water?,

Reply:

a)(i) The allocated budget for royalties for the period 1 Jan to 31 Dec 2022 is R 1 330 million.

(ii) Article 4 of the Treaty describes the purpose as follows: “The Project shall be to enhance the use of water of the Senqu/Orange River by storing, regulating, diverting and controlling the flow of the Senqu/Orange River and its affluents in order to effect the delivery of specified quantities of water to the Designated Outlet Point in the Republic of South Africa and by utilizing such delivery system to generate hydro-electric power in the Kingdom of Lesotho.” The water is transferred into the Vaal River system to mainly supply water users in Gauteng.

a) The implementation, operations and commitments to deliver water to South Africa from the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP) are governed by the Treaty of 1986 and its Protocols and the Phase II Agreement of 2011. The purpose of the Treaty and Agreement is to provide the legal basis for the implementation of Phases I and II of the LHWP as well as for the operation and maintenance of infrastructure.

i) There is no date by when the obligations of the Treaty in respect of water deliveries to South Africa will lapse.

ii) There are extensive programs in place as part of Phases I and II, including:

  • Water supply for affected communities
  • Sanitation programs for affected communities.
  • Releases of water from the LHWP tunnel system for purposes of augmenting the Lesotho Lowlands Water Scheme that delivers water to Maseru and urban areas in the lowlands of Lesotho.

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15 December 2022 - NW3814

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) are the (i) detailed estimates and (ii) all important variables of the long-term damage of the KwaZulu-Natal floods on the sugar sector and (b)(i) total number of farmers ceased operations and exited the market due to losses incurred in the floods and (ii) is her department doing to help them; (2) what (a) are the details of other crops that were affected by the KwaZulu-Natal floods and (b) actions are being taken to support affected farmers?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is collating the information required and will tabled a response as soon as possible.

14 December 2022 - NW4356

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he will furnish Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi with an organogram of all the technical vocational education and training colleges; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Please find attached the organogram of 48 Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges (TVET). 

https://www.dst.gov.za/owncloud/remote.php/webdav/Fifty%20TVET%20Colleges%20Organogram.zip

Username : BabuleleB
Password: Science1

13 December 2022 - NW4709

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Following reports that he has appointed a repatriation and restitution advisory committee for the liberation war veterans who died while outside the Republic during apartheid, what (a) are the details as to the committee’s progress and (b) total amount is the appointment of the committee costing taxpayers?

Reply:

(a) The Minister appointed the advisory committee for the Repatriation and Restitution Advisory Committee in 2021 immediately after the Cabinet had approved the National Policy on the expatriation of Human Remains and Heritage Objects to develop criteria, monitor its implementation and advise on ethical matters related to the restitution and repatriation of human remains.

The Advisory Committee had its first meeting on 03 December 2021 and comprises the DSAC, DMV, eminent members in the academia and members from other sectors with extensive experience on heritage, memorialisation and repatriation of human remains.

A second meeting of the Advisory Committee on the National Policy on the expatriation of Human Remains and Heritage Objects was held on 10 May, where the Committee resolved that:

The workshop took place on 04-05 August 2022 at Freedom Park to determine the most impactful but less costly repatriation model and implementation plan. Subsequent to the August workshop, the Advisory Committee took in the Consultative National Workshop for Military Veterans to present the proposed model and implementation plan to garner support and solicit buy-in from Military Veterans on 02 December 2022.

(b) The Advisory Committee will only be remunerated for the meetings attended in implementing the objectives of the National Policy on Repatriation and Restitution of Human Remains and Heritage Objects. The remuneration will be in line with the National Treasury regulation gazette; on remunerations of committees.

.

13 December 2022 - NW4708

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Following reports that his department estimated the cost of repatriation of the remains of war veterans to be at R40 000.00 per coffin, what (a) total number of war veterans have been identified and (b) steps has his department taken towards repatriation efforts?

Reply:

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) has not estimated the cost of repatriation of remains of war veterans at R40 000.00 per coffin. However, through past experience the DSAC understands the expensive nature of undertaking repatriation of human remains hence the DSAC hosted a workshop on 04 – 05 August 2022 to develop the most cost effective yet impactful model and implementation plan for the repatriation of human remains.

(a). The identification of and the total number of war veterans is a continuous process involving engagements with various stakeholders to provide comprehensive information, records, and where possible maps of the graves of the deceased war veterans in each country. However, current records to date estimate that the number of humans remains of war veterans outside the country is about 1 400.

(b). The DSAC has taken the following steps towards repatriation:

  • Development of the National Policy on Repatriation and Restitution of Human Remains and Heritage Objects. Cabinet approved the Policy in March 2021.
  • Amongst others the policy calls for the Miniter of Sport, Arts and Culture to appoint an Advisory Committee, which the Minister has implemented.
  • Another very important recommendation of the Policy is the establishment of the Repatriation and Restitution Office (RRO) within the South African Resources Agency. The RRO is in the process of being established accordingly, as a manager has already been appointed.
  • The hosting of a workshop on 04 – 05 August 2022 to develop the best model and implementation plan for the repatriation of human remains.
  • Presentation of the proposed model and implementation plan to the Presidential Technical Task Team on Military Veterans on 04 November 2022.
  • Implementation of the Presidential Technical Task Team on Military Veterans’ directive to host a Consultative National Workshop for Military Veterans to present the proposed model and implementation plan to garner support and solicit buy-in from Military Veterans on 02 December 2022.

13 December 2022 - NW4721

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the details of the agreement made between South Africa and Nigeria on the audio-visual co-production which aims to promote sport, deepen cooperation and strengthen bond of solidarity between the countries?

Reply:

The Agreement on the Audio-Visual Co-Production is an Agreement for Audio-Visual works only and that includes film and television productions of varying lengths. Participants will be from both South Africa and Nigeria. The filmmakers will make use of locations and post-production facilities of both countries. Minimum financial contribution is set at 10% and maximum at 90%. This is the contribution to the overall production budget of the project. The production once certified as an official co-production, will qualify for maximum local financial benefits. This will be 35% of the film and television incentive as administered by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC).

The production will also qualify as national film in terms of local quotas. The film will qualify to be entered into the South African Film and Television Awards as a local production where the categories feature South Africa. It will also be eligible under the best film category should the director be South African. The agreement will offer films from the two countries to access each other’s markets. The overall benefits at local level will be the promotion of South African technical expertise, locations, crew, cast and facilities.

The agreement between the two countries was signed in Abuja, Nigeria, during the State Visit to that country in December 2021. South Africa has met with all its constitutional requirements to bring this Agreement into force and is awaiting confirmation from Nigeria to indicate whether all the constitutional requirements to bring the Agreement into force have been met.

13 December 2022 - NW4720

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With regard to the visit by the President , Mr M C Ramaphosa, to Bali for the G20 Summit, during which he and the President of the People’s Republic of China reiterated the shaping of the relations on initiative such as the Belt Road Initiative, the Republic’s Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan investments in the and the energy sector and the implementation of the Forum on China – Africa Cooperation in South Africa, (a) what role will her department play in these opportunities and (b) how does her department intend to promote the interest of the Republic in its involvement in these plans?

Reply:

DIRCO’s role would be, firstly, focused on assessing the bilateral and multilateral foreign policy implications of the BRI, FOCAC, and potential Chinese investments in key economic sectors e.g., energy and transport, and secondly, in facilitating cooperation between the government of China and relevant South African government departments that would be key implementing partners on projects where Chinese programmes complement national development projects, including those aligned to the EERP.

More specifically, DIRCO’s mandate and role is to promote the national interests of South Africa vis-à-vis the BRI, FOCAC and Chinese investments by:

  • Positioning South Africa vis-à-vis the PRC in such a way that delivers maximum political and socio-economic benefit from the strategic relationship.
  • Delivering bilateral consultations at high level on issues that include FOCAC, infrastructure development, and the BRI in Africa. For example, through the upcoming Binational Commission, Strategic Dialogue, and the BRICS Summit.
  • Advising partner government departments on developments and trends in the bilateral relationship and in the international political milieu that may affect their involvement in associated projects.
  • Facilitate bilateral cooperation between the relevant departments of the government of China and partner departments in their various areas of specialisation, including trade, investment, agriculture, infrastructure, education, training, and tourism.
  • Coordinate efforts with partner government departments in:
    • Identifying and assessing potential opportunities for economic reconstruction and development that stem from the bilateral relationship, including FOCAC and the BRI.
    • Reporting on the progress achieved by partner government departments in delivering on FOCAC projects.
    • Proactively identifying and work through obstacles to the implementation of bilateral commitments.

13 December 2022 - NW4719

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether her department has considered purchasing more of its own buildings and/ or apartments for residential purposes of missions to reduce its expenditure on rentals; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so (2) Whether her department has taken any action and/or steps in this regard ; if not why not; if so, what are the details of the timeline with dates that her department would start to buy properties?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department is considering purchasing properties for Chanceries and residential purposes.

2. The Department is currently considering the purchase of a Chancery property in Nairobi. It is envisaged that a feasibility study, as well as valuation for the proposed acquisition of the Chancery in Nairobi will be finalised by end of January 2023. The outcomes of the two studies will inform the decision to purchase the targeted property.