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24 March 2016 - NW706

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA) has any plans in place to expand the (a) domestic and (b) international (i) passenger and (ii) cargo capacity of the Bram Fischer International Airport in Bloemfontein over the next 10 to 15 years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether marketing the specified airport as a (a) passenger and (b) logistics hub forms part of ACSA’s strategic medium- to long-term objectives; if not, why not; if so, in respect of each case (i) to which markets is it geared and (ii) what are the further relevant details of sector specific marketing; (3) whether any plans are underway to secure additional (a) passenger and (b) cargo flights both for the (i) domestic and (ii) international sectors at the specified airport over the medium-to-long term period; if not, why not; if so, in each case what are the relevant details; (4) whether any co-ordination to align the strategic objectives between (a) ACSA and (b) the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality exist to fully maximise the benefits of the massive investment into the Airport Node; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. Bram Fischer International Airport will be expanded based on traffic demand
  2. . At this stage there is no requirement for further expansion. This can however change at any time if the local conditions change.
  3. Bram Fischer International Airport is not seen as a logistics hub and is not marketed as such. The airport forms a critical link in the network of airports in South Africa but mainly for passenger traffic.
  4. Traffic growth to and from Bram Fischer will depend on the viability of the market and the ability of the airlines to obtain the required yields. Growth in the foreseeable future is limited.
  5. ACSA will definitely work closely with the Mangaung Municipality to maximize business benefit for both organizations by developing the airport precinct and surroundings in an optimal manner.

23 March 2016 - NW421

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) When will the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa’s report on its internal enquiry which was announced on 3 September 2015, be released, (b) who was tasked to lead the specified enquiry and (c) what was its terms of reference?

Reply:

(a) The investigation is ongoing and timeframes are dictated by legal processes.

(b) Werksmans Attorneys were appointed to lead the investigation.

(c) The focus of the investigation is based on the findings of the Auditor General in the financial statements of PRASA for the 2014/2015 financial year, and the Public Protector report titled ‘Derailed’.

23 March 2016 - NW483

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How are the various color schemes used for signage at the various airports determined, (b) what market research has been done in this regard, (c) how often has such research been conducted, (d) when was such research last conducted and (e) what were the outcomes?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) The various color schemes are determined by the international benchmark of all the signage for both navigational and disclaimer signage. The colors are then further explained on the actual signage and way finding guideline document.

(b) The research that was done in the initial stages of creating a signage philosophy that is easily recognizable by all passengers, was based on what was acceptable from an aviation regulation point of view in the international market. These standards were adopted to make sure that what is available in South Africa is available in any international airport in the world.

(c) The signage committee at the airports conducts a desktop, top line comparison of ACSA’s signage philosophy to that of international Airports around the world. The same philosophy that is used in South Africa is also used in the airports that ACSA is involved in building and maintaining. The company also works very close with the civil aviation authority to keep tabs on any regulatory changes on the signage philosophy.

(d) In 2013, the company made amendments to the signage guidelines based on international standards that were amended. These standards were as a result of comparison and benchmarking the ACSA signage philosophy and key international standards as outlined by the civil aviation authorities.

(e) The signage for smaller / regional airports were not visible enough and the size of fonts and specs needed to be changed.

  1. The new no smoking act: The signage was outdated and needed to include the actual act on it.
  2. Prohibition signage: The signs at the time did not have clear images / illustration of what the prohibition was for, this has since been changed.
  3. Prohibition signs: The signs that were on glass doors and walls were blank at the back. This has since been changed.

23 March 2016 - NW416

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether her department is contributing in any way to the (a) acquisition of additional coaches for the Gautrain and/or (b) construction of an additional Gautrain depot; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details of how her department is contributing, (ii)(aa) time lines and (bb) time frames and (iii) conditions in this regard?

Reply:

(a) No. The Gautrain Rapid Rail Link was procured and implemented as a Public Private Partnership in terms of Treasury Regulation 16 of the Public Finance Management Act. The acquisition of the additional coached will be procured in term of the provisions of the Treasury Regulations and the Concession Agreement entered into between the Gauteng Provincial Government and the Bombela Concession Company.

(b) No. See above.

  1. N/A
  2. N/A

23 March 2016 - NW490

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How is the National Transport Master Plan (Natmap) being incorporated into (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b)(i) how is the implementation of the Natmap being monitored and (ii) by whom and (c) what are the timelines and time frames in this regard?

Reply:

Department

(a) i) Incorporation of NATMAP into DOT plans

During the development of NATMAP 2050, an extensive consultation approach from the municipalities, provinces and agencies (bottom-up approach) was undertaken and that culminated into a product informed by plans from various stakeholders.

The NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report was submitted to the Cabinet on the 18th September 2013 and amongst others Cabinet approved that the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC) Management Committee (MANCO) and the Minister of Transport review the proposed NATMAP 2050. In line with the above Cabinet resolution, the Department has reviewed and updated the NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report and awaiting the Plan’s endorsement by PICC MANCO before it is resubmitted to Cabinet for approval.

NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update specifies outcomes and strategic objectives linked to key government policies that includes DOT Strategy amongst others. Its objectives will be delivered by linking key proposals with broader national policy areas, the MTSF 2014–2019, NDP 2030 and National Infrastructure Plan (NIP).

ii) Incorporation of NATMAP into Entities Plans

Based on the bottom-up approach that was adopted throughout the development process of NATMAP 2050, different implementing agencies will have to develop their own implementing plans in line with the interventions proposed on the Synopsis Update report. Upon submission of their strategic plans, the Minister will be ensure that implementation of NATMAP 2050 is finds a clear expression in their plans moving forward.

(b) i) Implementation Monitoring

The Department will regularly monitor the implementation of this Plan by engaging implementing agents in terms of getting the reports and serving on different fora or committees that will oversee the implementation of NATMAP 2050 interventions.

ii) By Whom

The Deputy Director General: Integrated Transport Planning will oversee the implementation process and supported by Chief Director: Macro Sector Planning and Director: Master Planning, Implementation and Review.

(c) Timelines

Interventions indicated on the draft NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update documents are categorised with the following timeframes:

1. Short term: 5 years (2015-2020)

2. Medium term: 10 years (2020-2030)

3. Long Term: 20 years (2020-2050)

It is worth noting that the Performance Agreement between the President and the Minister of Transport, says that by June 2016, the Integrated National Transport Plan should be developed and approved.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

a) (i) Not applicable to ACSA.

    (ii) NATMAP seeks to achieve “An integrated, smart and efficient transport system supporting a thriving economy that promotes sustainable economic growth, supports a healthier life style, provides safe and accessible mobility options, socially includes all communities and preserves the environment”. ACSA supports this vision by ensuring that the Airport Development Plans are aligned with relevant policies and through on-going stakeholder consultations.

  • NATMAP recommended the Aerotropolis concept as a means of promoting the integration of airport development with its surrounding land-uses.  At the OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA), ACSA and the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality have developed an Aerotropolis Master Plan including an implementation plan for the City of Ekurhuleni and ORTIA. The Plan was completed at the end of 2015 and implementation of catalyst projects has commenced.
  • At the Cape Town International Airport (CTIA), ACSA and the City of Cape Town are undertaking a study to determine the feasibility to pursue the Aerotropolis concept as a development strategy for the CTIA and surrounding area. This approach is also being considered in eThekwini for the King Shaka International Airport (KSIA), which includes the Dube Trade Port. The KZN Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs commissioned an Aerotropolis Master Plan Study, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2016.
  • The concept is also being explored at other ACSA airports, in particular in Bram Fisher International, East London and Port Elizabeth Airports through consultation with the respective Local Authorities.

b) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

c) ACSA is not in a position to respond to part (c) of the question.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a)(i) Not applicable to ATNS

(a)(ii) ATNS has been consulted by the DoT and has provided comments and input in respect of the National Airport Development Plan and National Civil Aviation Policy.

(b)(i) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

(b)(ii) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

(c) Not applicable to ATNS

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) Not applicable to SACAA

(ii) The National Transport Master Plan is not applicable to the South African Civil Aviation Authority

(b) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

(c) N/A

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a)(ii) There is good alignment between the Natmap and PRASA’s Strategic Plan (2012). Both plans identify short, medium and long term requirements through to the year 2050. The recent update of the Natmap 2050 Synopsis provided a further opportunity to strengthen and align the rail plan and requirements going forward.

Furthermore, PRASA’s Strategic Plan is incorporated in the company’s Corporate Plan focussing on the MTEF period (3-year) ahead. Key performance areas (KPAs) and milestones are identified in the plan. The KPAs are monitored and reported to the Department of Transport on a regular basis.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Natmap is not incorporated by the RSR.

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator has not received any directive in this regard from Department of Transport.

Roads Entities:

(a) (ii) The National Land Transport Strategic Framework 2015–2020 (NLTSF) which defines the strategies and policy intent of the Department of Transport with regard to integrated transport and land use planning country-wide over the five year period, incorporates the overarching objectives of Natmap along with National Development Plan 2030 Strategic Aims, Medium Term Strategic Framework (2014-2019) and transport oriented Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs) as identified by Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC).

Entities are expected to adopt the relevant intentions and guidance of the NLTSF and adjust it to local needs and circumstances. This will enable them to implement local planning intent interpreted and guided by national policy.

 

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

The National Transport Master Plan (NATMAP) provides an overarching integrated plan for the improved movement of people and freight in South Africa and as such informs and forms the basis for integrated planning within and across the various modes of transport. The South African Maritime Safety Authority is tasked with the mandates of:

  1. Ensuring the safety of life and property at sea
  2. To combat and prevent the pollution of the marine environment by ships 
  3. Promoting the Republic’s maritime interests 

SAMSA is therefore responsible for the efficient, safe, secure and environmentally sustainable movement of inbound and outbound seaborne freight through our national port infrastructure. To this end, SAMSA has aligned its plans towards realising the NATMAP vision by pursuing the following objectives and priority actions in line with other governmental plans:

a) Delivering an efficient, safe, secure and environmentally sustainable maritime transport system by

  • Protecting the environment;
  • Promoting safety and wellbeing; and
  • Infrastructure enhancement and management.

b) The socio economic development of South Africa’s maritime sector by undertaking the following: 

  • Grow the economy - this incorporates the pursuit of NATMAP priority actions of growing the economy fuelled by the marine transport development programme under the Operation Phakisa portfolio, specifically focusing on making better use of the maritime transport network, increasing its contribution to GDP and the creation of wealth for the country.
  • Freight integration - The promotion of developing a competitive integrated national supply chain perspective by working together across the freight transport value chain from Pit, Port to Market. 

23 March 2016 - NW691

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the current status of the Mabopane Transport Hub project in Pretoria, Gauteng, (b) how much has the project cost to date, (c) what are the reasons for the delays in completing the specified project and (d) when will the specified project be completed?

Reply:

The PRASA section of the Mabopane Transport Hub project is divided into two sub projects which are implemented by two different service providers. The two interlinked projects are outlined below;

  1. The Bridge project, and
  2. The Concourse project

a) The current status of the two projects;

Bridge project: The contract was terminated on 01st April 2015 after matter had been taken to Arbitration as per clause 40 of the JBCC Contract. The Arbitrator determined in favor of PRASA and ruled that the Contractor had unlawfully suspended the works and walked off site without complying with the procedural and substantive requirements of the contract.

At the moment PRASA is in the process of resuscitating the project. What remains is the process of appointing a new contractor to finish the project. Currently the project stands at 70% completion. Major outstanding works remaining are parts of the roof, the link bridge over the railway lines, trading stalls, finishes and some remedial work on some structures constructed by previous contractor which were condemned by the consulting engineers and have to be demolished and rebuilt.

Concourse project: The project is 40% complete with the erection of the roof structure. Works on several platforms including platforms 5 and 6 are 100% complete and works on platform 7 and 8 which is the last platform have just commenced.

Progress on the concourse which focuses on ground floor demolitions, concrete works, brickwork and structural steel work is in progress. The roof structure is nearing completion and the mezzanine level steel structure is complete.

b) Project costs

Bridge project cost to date:

Item

Description

Value

Comments

1

Original Project Budget

R 197 818 781

Including VAT

2

Project Expenditure to date

R 143 736 161

Including VAT

Concourse project cost to date:

Item

Description

Value

Comments

1

Original Project Budget

R 199 605 421

Including VAT

2

Project Expenditure to date

R91 128 353

Including VAT

c) Reasons for the delays in completing the projects;

Bridge project: There were various reasons that delayed the project other than the process that led to termination.

  • Land issues around ERF 433, Mabopane which resulted in the redesigning of the bridge to avoid the eminent land issues,
  • Negotiations with traders associations, who refused to vacate the construction site until temporary trading structures were built for them,
  • Community members and structures who demanded to be employed directly by PRASA instead of the appointed Main Contractor and therefore often stopped the site works in protest, and
  • Strikes from workers demanding better remunerations than what the Main Contractor could offer.

Concourse project:

Item

Problem

1.

Employment opportunities & subcontracting demands from community resulting in protests and work stoppages

2.

Project scope change. Increase in time and project cost

d) When the project would be completed;

Bridge project: The project is expected to finish within 8 months from the date of site handover to the new contractor (once all the Supply Chain Management processes have been completed).

Concourse project: The project is expected to be complete by end December 2016

16 March 2016 - NW490

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

How is the National Master Plan (Natmap) being incorporated into (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b)(i) how is the implementation of the Natmap being monitored and (ii) by whom and (c) what are the timelines and time frames in this regard?

Reply:

a) i) Incorporation of NATMAP into DOT plans

During the development of NATMAP 2050, an extensive consultation approach from the municipalities, provinces and agencies (bottom-up-approach) was undertaken and that culminated into a product informed by plans from various stakeholders.

The NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report was submitted to the Cabinet on the 18th September 2013 and amongst others Cabinet approved that the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC) Management Committee (MANCO) and the Minister of Transport review the proposed NATMAP 2050. In line with the above Cabinet resolution, the Department has review and updated the NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report and awaiting the Plan’s endorsement by PICC MANCO before it is resubmitted to Cabinet for approval.

NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update specifies outcomes and strategic objectives linked to key government policies that include DOT Strategy amongst others. Its objective will be delivered by linking key proposal with broader national policy areas, the MTSF 2014-2019, NDP 2030 and National infrastructure Plan (NIP).

ii) Incorporation of NATMAP into Entities Plans

Based on the bottom-up approach that was adopted throughout the development process of NATMAP 2050,different implementing agencies will have to develop their own implementing plans in line with the intervention proposed on the Synopsis Update report. Upon submission of their strategic plans, the Minister will be ensure that implementation of NATMAP 2050 is finds a clear expression in their plans moving forward.

b) i) Implementation Monitoring

The Department will regularly monitor the implementation of this Plan by engaging implementing agents in terms of getting the report and serving on different for a or committees that will oversee the implementation of NATMAP 2050 interventions.

ii) By whom

The Branch: Integrated Transport Planning will oversee the implementation process and supported by Chief Director Macro Sector Planning and Director Master Planning,

c) Timelines

Interventions indicated on the draft NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update documents are categorised with the following timeframes:

  1. Short term: 5 years (20152020)
  2. Medium term: 10 years (2020-2030)
  3. Long Term: 20 years (2020-2050)

It is worth noting that the Performance Agreement between the President and the Minister of Transport, says that by June 2016, the Integrated National Transport Plan should be developed and approved.

 

10 March 2016 - NW486

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

When will the National Rail Safety Strategy be (a) finalised and (b) tabled in Parliament?

Reply:

a) The National Rail Safety Strategy will be finalised during the 2016/17 financial year.

b) The Strategy will be tabled in Cabinet by March 2017.

10 March 2016 - NW485

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the construction and supply of locomotives to the Passenger Rail Agency of SA from overseas, (a)(i) when were the tenders in this regard issued and (ii) to whom, (b) what is the value of each tender, (c) what are the timelines and timeframes from initiation to (i) delivery, (ii) testing and (iii) final use of the locomotives by the public and (d) to which provinces will such locomotives be delivered to?

Reply:

a) (i) On the 26 July 2012

(ii) Mafori Financing t/a Swifambo Rail Leasing

b) R3.5 Billion

c) The time lines were 42 months from the date of initial payment which was 31 March 2013

(i)(ii)(iii) The seller was to complete, adjust and test the locomotives, including all material and components used for the manufacturing of the locomotives, both abroad before shipping and within South Africa in strict adherence to the agreement and to ensure that each of the locomotives supplied shall be fully operational and ready for use by PRASA.

d) The locomotives were going to be used on the mainline long distance services, whereby the main hub is Johannesburg, hence locomotives would be allocated in Gauteng, Durban, East London and Cape Town.

10 March 2016 - NW482

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with _, the specified R329 will be (a) widened and/or (b) repaired; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) when will this commence?

Reply:

a) Geotechnical investigations will be conducted in the 2016/17 financial year due to the budget constraints that limit the widening of the road.

b) (i) (ii) The road is in a fair condition however the routine maintenance contractor will attend to routine road repairs by the second quarter of 2016/17 to ensure the road is trafficable.

10 March 2016 - NW481

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Transport

How many persons have died in all forms of minibus taxi accidents (a) in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) since 1 April 2015?

Reply:

The table below provides the number of fatal crashes and fatalities with minibuses, per financial year, as received from the Road Traffic Management Corporation.

Period

Crashes

Fatalities

April 2014 - March 2015

425

590

April 2015 - Jan 2016

740

1024

The information above depicts that there were 425 fatal crashes with 590 fatalities during 2014/15 financial year. For financial year 2015/16 there were 740 fatal crashes involving minibuses with 1 024 fatalities.

10 March 2016 - NW420

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with regard to the bus rapid transit system in the City of Tshwane, any consultations and/or negotiations have taken place with the various taxi associations operating in the area; if not, why not; if so, (a) in what form did the consultations and/or negotiations take place, (b) on what dates, (c) which taxi routes were covered and (d) what were the outcomes of the specified consultations and/or negotiations in each case?

Reply:

The legal basis, background and motivation for these payments are set out below:

a. Compensation payments to the taxi industry or any other public transport operator affected by the introduction of BRT Services, are based on provisions of Section 41(1)(a) of the National Land Transport Act 5 of 2009 (NLTA). Such compensation is for the loss of business rights when the affected operators’ services are terminated and replaced by the BRT systems. The implication of the current Compensation Agreement is that regardless how long the dispensation will last, it will not increase the eventual total agreed compensation cost. It is therefore merely a re-arrangement of the timing of compensation payments. The target date for the last Permanent Compensation Agreement is no later than the second quarter of 2016.

A Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) was signed with the Taxi Industry during May 2013. The MOA provided for a structured approach with regards to engagements with the affected taxi industry.

The negotiations were undertaken with the affected taxi operators per implementation phase, in conjuction with the broader taxi representative structures to ensure peaceful engagements and to avoid the emergence of splinter groups due to lack of proper information dissemination within a volumenous industry such as the taxi industry. This approach proved to be effective in that even those operators that are not affected became fully conversant with the implementation of the BRT within their area of operation.

b & c

The affected taxi operators were all identified on the proposed BRT line and are being engaged in line with each implementation phase as approved by Council. The City of Tshwane implemented their Phase 1A between the Pretoria CBD and Hatfield during November 2014 and identified 3 taxi associations operating along that route. Compensation negotiations were finalised and agreement was with affected operators from the 3 taxi associations. Negotiations have commenced with an additional 3 taxi associations affected by the planned implementation of Phase 2A. It is envisaged that agreements will be concluded with the affected taxi operators from the 3 associations.

d. An interim compensation package was agreed in November for Phase 1a to Hatfield. The compensation negotiation for Phase 2a to Wonderboom is currently underway and is expected to conclude before the end of March 2016

NW433E

10 March 2016 - NW417

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What was the road safety strategy during the 2015/16 festive season, (b) what measurable (i) targets, (ii) processes and (iii) procedures exist to measure the successes of this strategy, and (c) what was the outcome in each case?

Reply:

(a) What was the road safety strategy during the 2015/16 festive season

The objectives of the 2015 National Road Traffic Safety Festive Season Plan was to:

  • Ensure high levels of visible traffic law enforcement on all major routes on a 24 hour 7 days basis;
  • Maximize the impact of education and law enforcement operations by heightening the level of seamless operations;
  • Sensitize road users about their road safety responsibility through communication and shock therapy techniques;
  • Increse the presence of law enforcement officers on our roads through the deployment of high a level support team to the provinces;
  • Provide on time auxiliary services to the deployed forces through the National Road Traffic Joint Operations Centre; and
  • Deploy undercover anti-corruption officers to ensure ethical conduct by officers and road users.

The focus of the strategy was on the following areas -:

  • Impaired Driving – Alcohol, Drug abuse, Fatigue
  • Dangerous Driving - Excessive Speed, Dangerous Overtaking, All moving violations
  • Occupants Safety - Front and Rear seatbelts, Child Restraints
  • Public Transport - Passenger Transport, Freight Transport
  • Vulnerable Road Users - Visibility, Drinking and Walking, Jay walking, Distracted Walking
  • Vehicle Fitness - Road Blocks
  • Road Traffic Information - Verified data

(b) (i) The targets are informed by the goals set out in United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety which commits the country to reduce road crashes and fatalities by 50% from 2010 to 2020.

(ii) the processes included a comparison undertaken with previous year’s data, in terms of the reduction of road crashes and fatalities. Other traffic information included vehicle population, traffic volumes as well as the human population in the analysis.

(iii) To measure the success of the strategy, data is collated during the festive period. This information is analyzed to identify new trends and causes of crashes. A report is then produced with all the factors that contribute to fatalities over the period

(c) What was the outcome in each case?

A closer look at the road crashes and fatalities over the 2015/16 festive season depicted the following trends.

  • Small motor vehicles accounted for 47.9% of total crashes during this season, followed by light delivery vehicles at 22.7%, minibuses or combis at 10.1% and trucks contributed 4.8%.
  • The majority of people who died were passengers at 38.3%, followed by pedestrians at 34.9%. Drivers contributed 23.9% of the fatalities and cyclists 2.8%.
  • The age group with the highest percentage fatalities in the categories: drivers, passengers and pedestrians is 25 to 39 years, accounting for about 47,9% drivers fatalities, 38.5% passengers fatalities and 34,3% pedestrians fatalities respectively. Children aged from 0 – 4 contributed 10.4% of pedestrian deaths.
  • The gender mostly affected, was males with a contribution of 74.4% to total fatalities. Females represent 25.2% of the fatalities. Very disturbingly, of this number 81.4% is apportioned to Blacks while the rest represents Coloured, Whites, and Asians.
  • The gender of 0.4% of the deceased was undetermined because they were burned beyond recognition.
  • Most crashes occurred on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
  • The highest number of fatal crashes was recorded on Saturday at 22.2% of the total fatal crashes, followed by Friday and Sunday with 18.8% and 16.9% respectively.
  • A new phenomenon was observed in the 2015/16 festive period where 51.4% crashes occurred between 14H00 and 23H00. This stark contrast to the norm might be attributed to the relentless and resilient implementation of the 24/7 law enforcement.

Key factors that contributed the most to the fatalities were jay-walking, speed that was too high for circumstances, overtaking in the face of oncoming traffic, hit and run accidents, driving under the influence of alcohol, tyre bursts, faulty brakes, and smooth tyres. Sharp bends, wet surfaces and poor visibility also played a significant role in the contributing factors.

10 March 2016 - NW414

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any research was conducted to reclassify certain traffic offences under Schedule 5 of the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977; if not; why not; if so, (a) according to what (i) local and/or (ii) international research findings were the specified reclassifications made and (b) what future research is planned in this regard?

Reply:

(a) (b)From analysis of road crashes over the years and law enforcement operations it has become clear that certain offences are committed repeatedly and consequences are strong enough in deterring road traffic offenders from engaging in dangerous behaviour.

10 March 2016 - NW412

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the Bus Rapid Transit system in the City of Tshwane, (a) what are the detailed reasons for reducing the car lanes into one, (b) which (i) engineer and (ii) report states that this is the best option, (c) what are the reasons for reducing the car lanes in each case, (d) when was this report signed off and (e) by whom?

Reply:

 

a) Reasons for the dedication of existing car traffic lanes for the BRT system are best addressed under the NLTA, no. 9 of 2009 wherein public transport systems are to be promoted over car based transport systems in urban areas. This is also a well recognised approach internationally under the sustainable transport agenda where the most optimum use of road space is gained through the promotion and development of public transport systems.

The City of Tshwane IRPTN (Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network) Strategy also adopts this policy position. The policy is however also reflective of the need to provide sufficient capacity on its road network for all users and in this regard even where a lane of traffic is dedicated to public transport the junction capacities along a particular corridor are protected in so far as is possible.

b) (i) & (ii)

In regard to the specific issues raised in the above question the City appointed a reputable consulting engineering company to undertake a TIA (traffic impact assessment) of the specific BRT project (Lynwood Road / Atterbury Road to Menlyn). The results of which confirm the adequacy of the surrounding road network to cater for the allocation of a general traffic lane to a BRT lane on Atterbury and Lynwood Roads. However, mitigation measures are also proposed to maintain junction capacities on these roads.

c) The allocation of existing car lanes to BRT reduces capital costs of the project, eliminates the need for extensive property expropriation, makes more efficient use of roadspace (as a general traffic lane will only carrying 1000-1500 passengers per hour whereas the BRT lane can carry up to 6000 passengers per hour) and most importantly promotes the use of public transport by existing car users.

d & e)

The report will be finalised by 12th March 2016 and will be processed by the Municipality, after which it will be realised to the public.

NW425E

10 March 2016 - NW278

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether she has initiated any investigations into individuals and groups in the transport industry who have begun to operate as a mafia by using intimidation and force to obtain control of the industry; if so, what has each investigation revealed; (2) whether she will publicly invite transport operators to provide information on any overt intimidation tactics that are being used against them to surrender their interests in the transport business; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The department is not investigating any individuals or companies that are running public transport operations.

2. The department informs me that they are not aware of any intimidation in the transport sector, and has no details on this matter

10 March 2016 - NW403

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the high demand for speed bumps in various areas across the country, and the high cost of placing such speed bumps, when will she propose changes to the National Road Safety Act, Act 9 of 1972, to permit the implementation of the cheaper bolt-down-type speed bumps?

Reply:

The legislation quoted speaks to the Road Safety Council and not to traffic calming measures. It must be noted that the latter can even cause more dangerous situations on urban and rural mobility roads as per Road Classification and Access Management Manual (TRH26). With regard to the bolt down type speed-bumps, the department cannot be seen as promoting individual products, but will set norms and specifications as per SABS.

29 February 2016 - NW164

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why have vehicle license renewal reminders not been sent to motorists on time and (b) what is being done to ensure that reminders are delivered timeously in the future?

Reply:

a) The delay was due to non-payment of Post Office outstanding fees, and now has been settled.

b) The facility has been activated at Post Office, there will be no further delays with regards to this service

25 February 2016 - NW24

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether her Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

There are no vacancies in the Ministry of Transport (a) (b) (c) Falls away

23 February 2016 - NW167

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What salary increases were given to Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) staff in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) in respect of each specified case (i) what amount was given to each staff member and (ii) on what basis was each specified amount determined; (2) (a) what are the salaries of the (i) chiefs and (ii) deputy chiefs of the RTMC, (b) how were these salaries determined and (c) when were the specified individuals appointed respectively; (3) whether State Security Agency (SSA) clearances were obtained for the appointment of each specified individual; if not, why not; if so, (a) what were the results of the obtained SSA clearances and (b) in what form did they come?

Reply:

  1. (i) 2012 - 2013

5% increment was approved for levels 13 and up as per DPSA circular 1 0f 2012. Increments for the 2012—13 salaries of staff were 7% across the board for all employees that fall within salary levels 1-12. The implementation date was as per Resolution 1 of 2012, Agreement between RTMC and Labour.

(ii) 2013/2014

Increments for the financial year 2013/14 as per the Resolution 1 of 2013, were implemented as follows:

Level

Increment

13 and above

5.6

11-12

7%

8-10

7.5%

1-7

8%

(iii) 2014/2015

Increments for the financial year 2013/14 were implemented as per Migration Plan from Equate (DPSA) dispensation to Patterson Job grading

Level

Increment

14

5%

13

5.5%

12-11

6.5%

10-7

Total Cost To Company (DPSA Packages as at 30 June 2015 + R40,000.00

6 (NTP)

Total Cost To Company increased to 50th percentile midpoint of B4/B5 (R233,860)

(b)(i) The amount given to each staff member is confidential information

(ii) All salary increments were subject to salary negotiations with recognised Labour.

(2) (a) (i) (ii) The salaries of all personnel in the Road Traffic Management Corporation including those of Chiefs and Deputy Chiefs are negotiable and confidential and cannot be disclosed to the public as this will be a contravention to the Protection of Information Policy approved by the board. (b) the salaries were negotiated with individuals based on the Paterson remuneration model and against their previous packages and erstwhile employers packages.

(3) (a)(b) The employment clearances conducted were in accordance with section 11.6 of the Recruitment, Selection and Placement Procedure. Confirmation of qualifications, and criminal records however they were not done by the State Security Agency (SSA) but by an independent verification company. Obtaining a clearance from SSA for senior managers in the RTMC is not a requirements in accordance with the RTMC recruitment policy.

23 February 2016 - NW171

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What amount of funding was given to each province by the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) what amount was given by each province to the RTMC in each specified financial year; (2) what are the (a) reasons and (b) provide the specified funds to provinces?

Reply:

  1. (a) Accumulated surplus for 2012-13; 2013-14 and 2014-15 which amount to

Accumulated surpluses

2012/13

R296 292 865

2013/14

R377 002 863

2014/15

R313 241 162

 

986 536 890

were distributed to provinces in line with the RTMC act as follows:

Road Safety Related Programmes

Province

Amount transferred

Eastern Cape

 

R 40 000 000

Free State

 

R 40 000 000

Gauteng

 

R 40 000 000

Kwazulu Natal

 

R 40 000 000

Limpopo

 

R 33 400 000

Mpumalanga

 

R 40 000 000

North West

 

R 40 000 000

Northern Cape

 

R 40 000 000

Western Cape

 

R 40 000 000

Total

 

R 353 400 000

 

 

 

Early Childhood Development & Rural Development

Province

Amount transferred

Free State

 

R 20 000 000

Gauteng

- ECD & Rural Development

R 10 000 000

 

- CCTV Campaign

R 30 000 000

Limpopo

 

R 20 000 000

Northern Cape

 

R 20 000 000

Total

 

R 100 000 000

 

Law Enforcement and Road Safety Improvement

Province

Amount transferred

Free State

Road Safety Improvement

R 17 500 000

Gauteng

Road Safety Education Pilot Programme

R 25 000 000

Mpumalanga

Implementation of a third law enforcement shift

R 15 000 000

North West Province

 

R 35 000 000

Total

 

R 92 500 000

     

Totals

R 545 900 000

2. (a) Funds were distributed to Provinces for the following reasons:

- Road Safety related programmes

- Early childhood and rural development

- Law Enforcement and Road Safety Improvement

(b) Provinces had to motivate for funding for Road Safety related programmes

23 February 2016 - NW2

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)How much of the R5,75 billion that was allocated by the fiscus to her department and the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (SANRAL) in 2012 to reduce the debt of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) was in fact used to pay off the bond loans; (2) what (a) was the original debt amount of the GFIP in January 2012 and (b) is the current outstanding balance of the bond loans for the GFIP as against the latest stated date for which information is available; (3) (a) what amounts (i) SANRAL and (ii) her department spent on the e-tolling project in the 2014-15 financial year on (aa) advertisements, (bb) public relations and (cc) related expenses and (b) what amount of the stated funds originated from (i) the income from the e-tolling project and (ii) government subsidies and extras in each case?

Reply:

  1. Apart from the 14% VAT, which was paid over to SARS, the full remainder was utilised for the funding of the SANRAL Toll portfolio. At the time, SANRAL was not able to go to bond auctions for funding, because investors were not comfortable with the risk: possible credit ratings downgrade, delay in toll commencement on GFIP, legal processes, etc. To reiterate, SANRAL does not use “mortgage loans” for funding, but issue various capital market bonds, listed on the JSE, with varying maturities and coupon rates. Details of this is available in our Annual Report.
  2. The Initial Construction Cost of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) was about R20 billion. However, construction was completed in 2010 and tolling only commenced in December 2013, therefore compounded interest accumulated from 2008, start of construction, to toll commencement. SANRAL’s Weighted Average Cost of Borrowing is published in the Annual Report. Apart from servicing the debt, the continuous maintenance and operations of the roads, such as emergency services, were also funded from this portfolio. SANRAL’s Non-current liabilities is also published in our Annual Report and details of this outstanding borrowings are published under Note 14.
  3. (a) (i) (aa) Toll Advertising spend total amount to R32 656 856 (b) spend from the Advertising Toll budget (bb) Public Relations are not separated into different portfolios. This exercise is carried out to inform the road user of the significance of the national road network that comprises 21451 km. It is unfortunate that the honourable member believes that SANRAL only deals with the GFIP that comprises 201 km, a mere 0,94% of the national road network. The spent totalled hours worked amounted to R13 184 474.82 (spent from the Non-toll budget(cc) related costs for e-tolling was R 20 526 160.85 for events, publications and brochures and promotional items (i) spent from the Advertising Toll Budget (ii) No extras.

23 February 2016 - NW168

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any incidences of negligent discharge of firearms by the National Traffic Police Unit occurred in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) investigations were undertaken respectively and (ii) disciplinary steps were taken in each instance; (2) whether all staff members of the National Traffic Police Unit have undergone business competency tests in accordance with the Firearms Control Act, Act 60 of 2000; if not, (a) why not and (b) how many staff members of each specified unit did not undergo business competency tests; if so, (i) how many of the staff members of the specified units undergone business competency tests in accordance with the specified Act and (ii) what were the results of all staff business competency tests undertaken in each instance?

Reply:

  1.  

Year

  1. (b) & (c)
  1. Incident
  1. Investigation Status
  1. Disciplinary steps

(a)2012/13

Officer accidentally discharged a fire arm in his room at the lodge in Colesburg while on deployment.

The case was reported to SAPS, they took the fire arm and it was handed over to Superintendent after 5 months.

The case was dismissed.

There was no internal disciplinary action taken.

(b)2013/14

No case reported

N/A

N/A

(c)2014/15

No case reported

N/A

N/A

     

2. All staff members of the National Traffic Police Unit have undergone business competency tests in accordance with the Firearms Control Act; 2000 (Act No.60 of 2000). In addition members also do maintenance shooting once a year to continue qualifying to possess their official firearms.

22 February 2016 - NW166

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How long after the arrival of a vehicle into South Africa from abroad does a person have to register such a vehicle locally and (b) what are the penalties if a specified person does not comply with the timeframe to register a vehicle from abroad and continues to drive the specified vehicle on the roads of the Republic?

Reply:

(a).

Regulation 7 of the National Road Traffic Act; 1996 (Act No. 93 of 1996) states:

“liability for the registration of a motor vehicle shall arise -in the case of a motor vehicle to be registered for the first time in the Republic - if the motor vehicle was acquired outside the Republic, on the date on which such motor vehicle is brought into the Republic or on the date on which such motor vehicle is cleared in terms of the customs and excise legislation, if applicable”.

(b).

The penalties in terms of operating a vehicle on a public road which is not registered and licenced varies from each magisterial area to the other

In addition, I recommend that the honourable member report to the relevant authorities an incident of this matter where he/she knows thereof.

22 February 2016 - NW3

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)How many road users have since 1 October 2015 purchased e-tags in each month for the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP); (2) how many of the e-tage purchased since 1 October 2015 (a) still constitute an active account and (b) are no longer in use; (3) how many road users in each month since 1 October 2015 have made use of the GFIP main roads on which the e-tolling system has been installed; (4) what is the monthly amount collected since 1 October 2015 by the e-tolling system?

Reply:

(1) October 2015: 31 802

November 2015: 24 667

December 2015: 18 845

January 2016: 29 621

(2) (a) October 2015: 28 950

November 2015: 22 558

December 2015: 17 481

January 2016: 27 983

(b) October 2015: 2 852

November 2015: 2 109

December 2015: 1 364

January 2016: 1 638

(3) These numbers are not to be construed as accounts that have been de-activated. Non-active accounts, inter alia, include a change of vehicle ownership for that account unit. The number of individual vehicle license numbers (number plates) that were read for the respective months:

October 2015: 2 672 227

November 2015: 2 669 777

December 2015: 2 792 687

January 2016: 2 651 127

(4) The graph below provides the projected cash flow as well as actual received for the GFIP since toll commencement. Note that the green bars shows the actual collected for the month, whereas the orange bars shows the projected revenue for the month. The projections are revised whenever circumstances changed, in order to project a reasonable cash flow projection.

22 February 2016 - NW4

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether traffic authorities are authorised to issue summonses of arrest in terms of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act (AARTO), Act 46 of 1998; if so, to which clauses and/or regulations such authorisation is applicable; (2) whether the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) may withdraw AARTO fines that were issued irregularly; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, which clauses and/or regulations support the RTIA in withdrawing such fines; (3) whether the RTIA may withdraw AARTO enforcement orders that were issued irregularly; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on which clauses and/or regulations support the RTIA in withdrawing such enforcement orders?

Reply:

1. The Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act does not in any way provide for summons of arrest. Under Criminal Procedure Act, there are two distinct documents which serve two different purposes viz, Summons (section 54) and warrant of arrest. Summons issued by traffic authorities for motorists who have failed to comply with rules of the road to secure appearance in a court of law whilst warrants of arrests are issued in instances where a person who was summoned to appear in court fails to do so without any explanation to the Court or Prosecutor.

In terms of the AARTO Act, the infringer has, as part of elective options, the right to be tried in Court. Under such circumstances, the notice will be cancelled and the local authority will issue summons. The criminal procedure process will then ensue. Secondly, where the violation is classified as an offence under schedule 3 of the AARTO regulations, such person will be dealt with in terms of the criminal procedure processes by way of issuance of a summons by the traffic authority concerned.

2. The RTIA does not issue fines and as such, it does not have the authority or legislative mandate to withdraw fines. This is the full competence of the authority that has issued the infringement. Section 18(6) of the AARTO Act provides for the RTIA to cancel an infringement notice in a case were a representation is allowed.

3. The Registrar of the RTIA is empowered by section 20 of the AARTO Act, to issue enforcement orders. Section 20(4) and (9) gives the Registrar authority to revoke such enforcement orders if the infringer pays the penalty and fees; the infringer applies to the RTIA in the prescribed manner and submits reasons to the satisfaction of the Registrar why an enforcement order must be revoked or the traffic authority applies in the prescribed manner for a revocation of an enforcement order.

22 February 2016 - NW9

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Mncwabe, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he intends to intervene in the (a) crisis at Ethekwini Local Municipality where hundreds of bus drivers and other staff are not being paid timeously and (b) sale and purchase of the bus company at a great loss to the ratepayers?

Reply:

(a) The contracting authority responsible for the bus company concerned (ie. Durban Transport) is the Provincial Department of Transport in Kwazulu Natal. The contractual arrangement between Durban Transport and Ethekwini Municipality is that of an owner and a contractor whereas the Province is the employer. It is the responsibility of the contracting authority (Province) to ensure that the operator exercise the highest degree of diligence in the provision of services and operate the service strictly in accordance with the relevant provisions of the contract. This includes deciding whether the operator has breached or failed to comply with the terms of the contract and taking the necessary action to resolve such matters. The response below was therefore, sought from Ethekwini Municipality, who responded as follows:

A solution has been developed by the City and the operator to address these challenges, and it includes the following:

i. A ring-fenced bank account will be opened to ensure that all revenues due to the company are collected and protected; and that only legitimate business expenses are paid,

ii. An intervention team made up of City and Provincial officials, as well as financial management capacity from the private sector, has been put in place to provide oversight to the management of the bank account, and improve financial planning and management in the company,

iii. An independent adjudicator will be appointed to resolve all the claims and counter-claims between the City and the operator.

iv. As a medium to long-term solution, the City is in the process of finalizing an option for the provision of this service. Having complied with the requirements of Section 78 of the Municipal Systems Act, and resolved to utilize an external mechanism for service provision in the form of a municipal entity, the City is now addressing the requirements of Section 84 of the Municipal Finance Management Act. Officials in my Department will be meeting with City and Provincial transport officials in the third week of February to discuss this proposal by the City. After this meeting, a joint discussion between officials from the National Department, National Treasury, Provincial Treasury, Provincial Department of Transport, Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs, and the City will be convened to finalize government’s position on the City’s intention to set up a municipal entity.

(b) There is no intention by the City to buy the company. As indicated in (a) above, the City has resolved to establish a municipal entity to provide the service currently provided by Tansnat. The previous processes were all subjected to due diligence processes, to determine fair value.

22 February 2016 - NW162

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 3650 on 1 December 2015, how many persons have been suspended with full pay within the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; (2) in each specified case, what (a) is the monetary value of the payments that were made by PRASA for each month in the specified financial years, (b) are the reasons for the suspensions, (c) is the cause of the delay in resolving these matters, (d) is being done to resolve these matters and (e) are the reasons for suspending the specified persons with full pay?

Reply:

  1. (a), (b) and (c) See attached spreadsheet.
  2. (a) See attached spreadsheet.

(b) The reasons are largely various misconduct cases that require intense investigations.

(c) The reasons for the delay in each of the 45 cases can be attributed to shortage of investigating staff, interference by Trade Unions and availability of competent presiding officials within the business.

(d) PRASA is considering contracting external resources to assist chairing the hearings and workshops are ongoing with Trade Unions to embrace the culture of discipline. With regards to investigations, engagements are ongoing since most of the complex investigations arise out of whistle-blowing.

(e) PRASA payment of people whilst suspended is in compliance with Labour Legislation that suspensions should be with full pay until the case has been resolved.

SUSPENSIONS PRASA

TOTAL EMPLOYEES FROM APRIL 2012 TO END MARCH 2015

MONTH

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

COST

Apr-12

49

R 1 693 354.84

May-12

52

R 826 088.50

Jun-12

56

R 1 132 427.29

Jul-12

55

R 526 936.50

Aug-12

43

R 629 743.92

Sep-12

44

R 381 269.58

Oct-12

48

R 427 562.90

Nov-12

55

R 1 046 926.67

Dec-12

74

R 685 183.32

Jan-13

85

R 776 380.61

Feb-13

67

R 613 075.90

Mar-13

64

R 744 852.20

TOTAL COST

 

R 9 483 802.23

Apr-13

56

R 69 706.90

May-13

69

R 771 349.90

Jun-13

65

R 774 211.30

Jul-13

69

R 1 205 592.86

Aug-13

74

R 917 732.76

Sep-13

62

R 1 238 635.45

Oct-13

72

R 854 256.10

Nov-13

65

R 676 097.90

Dec-13

72

R 681 433.43

Jan-14

84

R 1 249 710.39

Feb-14

63

R 598 795.90

Mar-14

64

R 820 755.02

TOTAL COST

 

R 9 858 277.90

Apr-14

68

R 1 243 403.18

May-14

74

R 1 075 369.07

Jun-14

77

R 1 167 082.58

Jul-14

77

R 1 547 841.69

Aug-14

74

R 2 108 047.61

Sep-14

64

R 2 029 532.82

Oct-14

98

R 1 048 966.07

Nov-14

96

R 1 298 015.23

Dec-14

99

R 1 954 646.99

Jan-15

109

R 1 457 473.31

Feb-15

120

R 1 405 544.46

Mar-15

112

R 1 414 013.43

TOTAL COST

 

R 17 749 936.45

TOTAL COST OF ALL 3 FINANCIAL YEARS

 

R 37 092 016.60

22 February 2016 - NW170

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What staff appointments were made by the Road Traffic Management Corporation in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) in each case, was the specified person appointed from the (i) public service and/or (ii) private sector?

Reply:

1) (a) (i) 2012- 2013

(b) (i) Names

Positions

Appointment date

Public/Private Sector

  1. Mr. Michael Mogorosi

Executive Manager: Finance

4 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Gift Mbanjwa

Unit Manager: Management Accounting

1 May 2012

Public

  1. Ms Gugulethu Mhlanga

Personal Assistant to the CFO

1 October 2012

Public

  1. Mr. Selebalo Phasha

Manager: Security Services

1 March 2013

Public

  1. Ms Tebogo Masha

Receptionist

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Beauty Manyama

Assistant Auditor

16 April 2012

Private

  1. Ms Onkgopotse Sefanyetso

Accountant

1 September 2012

Private

  1. Mr Edzani Netshipale

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Mpho Netshituni

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

None

  1. Mr. Festus Negondeni

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Lester Sampson

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Ms Simone Burgess

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Percy Mulaudzi

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Khuthadzo Tshikovi

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

None

  1. Mr. Rudzani Muofhe

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Public

  1. Mr Edward Motaung

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Mmboneni Nenzhelele

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Balanganani Magatshava

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Vusi Mlojwa

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Ms Ntangadzeni Matibe

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Thihanedzwi Masiagwala

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Ndivhoniswani Muthamaro

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Public

  1. Ms Elsie Motloutsi

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Ms Fhumulani Nekhumbe

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

None

  1. Mr Hulisani Ratshiendana

Traffic Officer

1 February 2013

Private

  1. Ms Dikeledi Leshaba

Project Administrator

03 April 2012

Private

(ii) 2013 - 2014

Names

Positions

Appointment date

Public/Private

  1. Mr. Kevin Kara-Vala

IT Project Manager

1 August 2013

Public

  1. Advocate Makhosini Msibi

Chief Executive Officer

1 January 2014

Public

  1. Mr. Mphikeleli Jele

Specialist: Traffic Engineering

1 July 2013

Private

  1. Ms Liana Moolman

Senior Manager: Revenue

15 July 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Baatile Mathibe

Chief Information Officer

10 July 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Zakhele Nkabinde

Deputy Chief: NTP

1 August 2013

Public

  1. Mr. David Paul

Senior Manger: Law Enforcement

1 November 2013

Public

  1. Ms Maria Bekker

Senior Manager: Road Safety, Education & Campaigns

1 April 2013

Public

  1. Ms Gabaikanngwe Botha

Manager: Corporate Strategy & Reporting

1 October 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Jonathan Spogter

Manager: Management Accounting

1 June 2013

Public

  1. Ms Zukiswa Sapepa

Manager: Enforcement Standards

1 September 2013

Public

  1. Ms Nombuso Mlotshwa

Senior Application Developer

1 September 2013

Private

  1. Ms Pulane Thibakhoane

Manager: Enforcement Coordination

1 October 2013

Public

  1. Ms David Maboeane

Manager: Traffic Training

1 November 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Thabo Raboshakga

Deputy Manager: Admin Services

1 July 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Frans Mogakala

VIP Driver

1 May 2013

Private

  1. Ms Phokoane Gopane

Payroll Practitioner

15 May 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Macdonald Molepo

Senior Payroll Practitioner

1 June 2013

 
  1. Mr. Stephen Msiza

Deputy Manager: Security Services

4 July 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Nzimeni Novasi

Professional Assistant

4 July 2013

 
  1. Mr. Mohale Malekutu

OD Specialist

1 September 2013

Public

  1. Ms Puleng Khitsane

Deputy Manager: Performance

1 July 2013

Private

  1. Ms Busiwe Dlamini

Deputy Manager: Traffic Training

1 June 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Anton Van Der Zandt

Deputy Manager: Traffic Training

1 June 2013

Public

  1. Ms Precious Cele

Financial Practitioner

1 August 2013

None

  1. Mr. Daniel Busang

Messenger/ Driver

1 May 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Mandla Myeni

OHS Specialist

1 October 2013

Public

  1. Ms Zanele Magagula

SCM Practitioner

15 May 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Ntandazo Somakwabe

Database Administrator

4 June 2013

Private

  1. Ms Priscilla Pataki

Revenue Practitioner

15 May 2013

Private

  1. Ms Annah Mahlangu

Personal Assistant

1 July 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Thato Mosapa

Admin Assistant

1 July 2013

Private

  1. Ms Lerato Mavhungu

Senior Corporate Secretariat Specialist

1 May 2013

Public

  1. Mr. Moeletji Mabuku

Manager: Contract Management

13 June 2013

Private

  1. Ms Metsa Malahlela

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Ms Vanessa Hleza

Team Leader: Call Centre

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Billy Pila

Team Leader: Call Centre

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Sidumo Khoza

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Mahlatse Letsoalo

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Public

  1. Mr. Brian Mulaudzi

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

None

  1. Mr. Paul Matlala

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

None

  1. Ms Busisiwe Mahlangu

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

None

  1. Mr. Zweli Zikalala

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

None

  1. Mr. Tsholanang Phiri

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Ms Xola Maseko

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Petrus Kutamo

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Ms Tlou Seroka

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Geoffrey Tshimbiluni

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Lloyed Ntlemo

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Ms Moshiane Mabala

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Sanele Magagula

IT Technician

21 June 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Sikhumbuzo Khanyile

IT Technician

21 June 2013

Private

  1. Mr. Papa Djan

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Lehlohonolo Ngwenya

Call Centre Agent

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Petunia Mohale

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Mr. Mosa Masemola

Team Leader: Call Centre

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Tshepiso Ramotloenya

Call Centre Agent

5 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Aletta Rankapole

Call Centre Agent

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Dineo Zimba

Call Centre Agent

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Koekie Mathebula

Call Centre Agent

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Modjadji Sebola

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Ms Shonisani Mahwasane

Admin Assistant

1 March 2014

Private

  1. Ms Maleshoane Zimba

Call Centre Agent

1 December 2013

Private

  1. Ms Tandokazi Sibulo

Admin Assistant

7 August 2013

Private


(iii) 2014/15

Names

Positions

Appointment date

Public/Private

  1. Mr M Razwinani

Company Secretary

1 February 2015

Private

  1. Ms NP Mkiva

DH Fin Mng Rev

1 February 2015

Public

  1. Ms NZ Mnguni

HOCEO

1 February 2015

Public

  1. Ms NJ Jolingana

Chief: National Traffic Law Enforcement

1 March 2015

Public

  1. Miss ME Francis

M PAYROLL

1 June 2014

Private

  1. Mrs MP Juma

Manager Corporate Reporting

1 June 2014

Public

  1. Ms JM Manamela

Admin Assistant Travel

1 December 2014

Private

  1. Mr TP Monareng

Messenger Drive

1 May 2014

Private

  1. Mr GV Matshika

AA Mark& Com

1 May 2014

Private

  1. Mrs CP Khokho

Proc Plan Prac

1 October 2014

Private

  1. Mr BS Zwane

Spokesp and Sec

1 February 2015

Public

  1. Mr TH Mabula

Corp Soc Inv Co

1 February 2015

Private

  1. Mr GP Martins

Chief Ops Officer

1 February 2015

Public

  1. Ms MG Gainewe

SM RTI

1 May 2014

Public

  1. Mrs M Fryer

SM Supply Chain

1 June 2014

Private

  1. Mrs M Rubombora

IT Consultant

1 July 2014

Private

  1. Ms T Mautla

Snr Network Eng

16 February 2015

Private

  1. Mr P Ranuga

Head Enterprise

1 November 2014

Private

  1. MS AN Nteyi

Personal Ass

6 June 2014

Private

  1. Mrs Y Strydom

Revenue Financi

9 September 2014

Private

  1. Mr S Ringane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms MC Mokgohloa

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Miss MD Maila

Supervisor

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms N Olisi

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms JM Nape

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr OK Malatji

Supervisor

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr L Hlongwane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr MF Nkome

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms NZ Magwaza

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr MM Mokalanyane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms MM Komane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Miss LM Kgomo

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms B Mafuxwana-Otipa

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Miss JD Kguto

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr MJ Nkuna

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr MT Engwane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms RM Ntoroane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr AR Lephogole

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr MJ Dolamo

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms EM Phoko

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Miss CL Ndiniza

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Miss L Rashamuse

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Miss KN Mncube

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms EB Mashigo

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms KG Segomoco

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms T Luvhimbi

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr AA Mzaza

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms S Mali

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms PN Masimula

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr EM Nkoe

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms CK Mogohloane

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Ms HS Thobela

Data Capturer

1 November 2014

Public

  1. Mr DE Hlatshwayo

Snr Network Eng

 

Public

  1. Mr S Mbizwo

Snr Netowrk Eng

 

Public

  1. Mr D Roux

SH Res and Deve

 

Public

  1. Ms DD Wechoemang

GE Human Capital

1 February 2015

Public

  1. Mr M Mokhantso

DH Road Safety

1 February 2015

Public

03 December 2015 - NW4267

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What part of the R5,75 billion granted by the fiscus to her department and the SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) in 2012 to reduce the debt of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) was actually used to pay off the mortgage loans; (2) what (a) was the initial debt burden of the GEPF in January 2012 and (b) is the current outstanding balance of the GEPF mortgage loans as at the latest specified date for which information is available; (3) (a) what amounts were used by (i) her department and (ii) Sanral for (aa) advertisements, (bb) public relations and (cc) related costs for the e-tolling project during the 2014-15 financial year and (b) in each separate case, what amount of the specified funds is from (i) revenue from the e-tolling project, (ii) Government subsidies and (iii) extras?

Reply:

  1. I am informed that, apart from the 14% VAT, which was paid over to SARS, the full remainder was utilised for the funding of the SANRAL Toll portfolio. At the time, SANRAL was not able to go to bond auctions for funding, because investors were not comfortable with the risk: credit ratings downgrade, delay in toll commencement on GFIP, legal processes, etc. SANRAL does not use “mortgage loans” for funding, but issue various capital market bonds, listed on the JSE, with varying maturities and coupon rates.
  2. The Initial Construction Cost of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) was about R20 billion. However, construction was completed in 2010 and tolling only commenced in December 2013, therefore compounded interest accumulated from 2008, start of construction, to toll commencement. SANRAL’s Weighted Average Cost of Borrowing is published in SANRAL’s Annual Report. Apart from servicing the debt, the continuous maintenance and operations of the roads, such as emergency services, were also funded from this portfolio.
  3. (a)(i) No amounts was used by the Department of Transport

(ii) aa) Toll Advertising spend total amount to R32 656 856 (b) spend from the Advertising Toll budget.

bb) Public Relations are not separated into different portfolios. This exercise is carried out to inform the road user of the significance of the national road network that comprises 21451 km. The spent totalled hours worked amounted to R13 184 474.82 (spent from the Non-toll budget)

cc) related costs for e-tolling were R 20 526 160.85 which covers events, publications and brochures and promotional items

 

(b)(i) spent from the Advertising Toll Budget.

(ii) Tolls are not funded from the Government subsidies

(iii) No extras.

01 December 2015 - NW3650

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many persons have been suspended with full pay within (i) her department and (ii) all entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 14-15 financial years and (b) in each specified case, what (i) is the value of these payments for each month by (aa) her department and (bb) all entities reporting to her, (ii) are the reasons for (aa) these suspensions and (bb) the delay in resolving these matters, (iii) is being done to resolve these matters and (iv) are the reasons to suspend persons with full pay?

Reply:

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) (i) see attached spreadsheet for number of employees suspended per financial year and per month

(b) see attached spreadsheet for value of payments per month in each financial year

( aa) the reasons are largely various misconduct cases that require intense investigations

(bb) The reasons for the delay in each of the 45 cases can be attributed to shortage of investigating staff, interference by Trade unions and availability of competent presiding officials within the business.

  1. (iii) to address the delays, PRASA is looking at contracting external resources to assist chair the hearings and workshops are ongoing with Trade unions to embrace the culture of discipline. With regards to investigations, engagements are ongoing since most of the complex investigations arise out of whistle-blowing.

(bb) (iv) The reason PRASA paid people whilst suspended is in compliance with Labour Legislation that suspensions should be with Full Pay until the case has been resolved.

01 December 2015 - NW4021

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Aviation Safety Investigation Board has been established; if not, (a) why not, (b) by what date will it be established and (c) what budget allocation has been made in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Civil Aviation Branch

(a) The Aviation Safety Investigation Board has not been established. (b) Chapter 4 of the Civil Aviation Act, which provides for the establishment of the Aviation Safety Investigation Board has not been proclaimed. (c) No budgetary allocation has been made for the establishment of the Aviation Safety Investigation Board. The Department will make a proposal for the amendment of Chapter 4 of the Act to provide functional independence of the Aviation Accident and Incident Investigation without creating an entity, which might not be sustainable.

01 December 2015 - NW4011

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What protection services in (i) the form of human resources and (ii) another form were provided to (aa) the chairpersons of boards of directors and (bb) any other members of the specified boards of directors of each of the entities reporting to her in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years, (b) what was the (i) budget allocation and (ii) actual cost in each specified financial year and (c) what criteria were used to provide protection services in each specified case?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. No protection services in (i) the form of human resources and (ii) another form were provided to (aa) the Chairperson of the Board of Directors and (bb) any other member of the Board of Directors of the South African Civil Aviation Authority in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years, (b) (i) N/A and (ii) N/A and (c) N/A.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. ATNS has not provided any protection services (i) in the form of human resources nor (ii) in any other form to (aa) the Chairperson of the ATNS Board, (bb) nor any other member of the ATNS Board (aaa) in 2012 – 13 (bbb) 2013 – 14 or (ccc) 2014 -15 financial years.
  2. No money was (i) allocated in the budget and (ii) no actual money was spent in each of the specified financial years
  3. Therefore there was no criterion required to provide protection services in any of the specified cases.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

ACSA does not provide protection services for (aa) The Chairperson of the Board of Directors and (bb) any other members of the Board of Directors.

Cross- Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

a) There were no protection services (i) in the form of human resources or (ii) in another form that were provided to (aa) the chairpersons of boards of directors and (bb) any other members of the specified boards of directors of the of the Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) in the aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years. (b) (i), (ii) and (c) are not applicable to the C-BRTA as no protection services were provided.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a) No protection services in (i) the form of human resources and (ii) another form were provided to (aa) the chairpersons of the RAF board and (bb) any other members of the RAF board in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years, the (b) (i) budget allocation was R 0-00 and (ii) actual cost in each specified financial year was R 0-00, and (c) no criteria were used to provide protection services as such services were not provided.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a) There has never been protection services offered in anyway.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a) The Human Resources is allocated on adhoc basis, depending on the threat analysis conducted from time to time

(aaa) In 2012-13 – there was no protection services offered.

(bbb) In 2013-14 there was no protection services offered

(ccc) In 2014-15, the protection services for the Chairperson is from time to time provided by the National Traffic Police officials employed in the National Traffic Law Enforcement Unit. They are budgeted for in the National Law Enforcement personnel expenditure.

(b) The security risk and threat analysis indicate that there is an ongoing penetration of crime syndicates in various forms throughout the Organization, to facilitate and further their aim to illegally profit from RTMC. The stringent steps led by the Board led by the Chairperson of the Board and the Chief Executive Officer to counter and eradicate these criminal elements from the business environment have positioned them as a prime targets of these criminal elements and syndicates. These include steps to identify, prevent and stop collusion between service providers and employees who illegally profit from crime within RTMC, which have increased the threat to the life of the Leadership.

South African National Roads Agency (SANRAL)

  1. SANRAL does not provide any kind of personal protection, nor has it done so, to any of its Board members. Therefore the rest of the question falls away."

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

  1. The RSR has not provided any protection services in the form of human resources or any other form to the Chairperson of the Board or any other members of the Board in any of the financial years 2012-13; 2013-14 and 2014-15.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator did not provide protection services in the form of (i) human resources or (ii) in any

other form to (aa) chairperson of the board (bb) other members/directors, in any of the specified years

(aaa), (bbb) and (ccc) and in terms (b), the budget allocation and actual costs were both zero in terms

of (i) and (ii). Item (c) is therefore not applicable.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa: (PRASA)

(aaa) PRASA did not provide any security to the Chairperson or any of the Board of Directors for 2012-13 financial year.

(bbb) PRASA did not provide any security to the Chairperson or any of the Board of Directors for 2013-14 financial year.

(ccc) PRASA provides security to the Chairperson of the Board Directors for 2014-15 financial year. This is informed by the security challenges facing the Chairman emanating from threats directed at the Chairperson of the Board. The security was instituted during the 2014/15 financial year.

2014-15 FINANCIAL YEAR

#

Item

complement

Value Per Annum

1

Protection for Chairman

1

R370 811

(b) (i) The budget allocations are tabulated above for the respective financial years.

(b) (ii) The cost for each financial year are tabulated above for the respective financial years.

(c) The criteria is informed by the security risks that prevailed at the time and prevail. In the case of the Chairperson it was informed by threats that were made against him due to his duties as Chairperson of the PRASA Board.

South African Maritime Safe Authority (SAMSA)

No protection services in the form of human resources or any other form was provided for the Chairperson of the Board of Directors or any other Board member.

 

01 December 2015 - NW4010

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What protection services in (i) the form of human resources and (ii) another form were provided to (aa) her department’s Director-General and (bb) each chief executive officer of each of the entities reporting to her in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years, (b) what was the (i) budget allocation and (ii) actual cost in each specified financial year and (c) what criteria were used to provide protection services in each specified case?

Reply:

Department

(a), (i), (ii), (aa), (aaa, )(bbb), (ccc), (b), (i), (ii) and (c)

No protection services were provided to the Director-General of the Department of Transport in the financial years 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15.

Cross- Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

  1. There were no protection services (i) in the form of human resources or (ii) in another form that were provided to (bb) the Chief Executive Officer of the Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) in the aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years. (b) (i), (ii) and (c) are not applicable to the C-BRTA as no protection services were provided.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a) No protection services in (i) the form of human resources and (ii) another form were provided to (aa) the Chief Executive Officer of the Road Accident Fund in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years, the (b) (i) budget allocation was R 0-00 and (ii) actual cost in each specified financial year was R 0-00, and (c) no criteria were used to provide protection services as such services were not provided.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

  1. There has never been any protection services offered in anyway.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

  1. The security risk and threat analysis indicate that there is an ongoing penetration of crime syndicates in various forms throughout the Organization, to facilitate and further their aim to illegally profit from RTMC. The stringent steps led by the Chief Executive Officer to counter and eradicate these criminal elements from the business environment have positioned him as a prime target of these criminal elements and syndicates. These include steps to identify, prevent and stop collusion between service providers and employees who illegally profit from crime within RTMC, which have increased the threat to the life of the Chief Executive Officer.
  2. The Group Chief Executive Officer works extended hours both in office and attending external meetings and roadside law enforcement operations.

(aaa) In 2012-13 – there we no protection services offered.

(bbb) In 2013-14 personal security services were provided to the Acting CEO of Road Traffic Management Corporation on a 24 hour period. The cost of the services were One Hundred and Fifty Eight Thousand One Hundred and Eighteen Rands (R 158 118.00) per month.

(ccc) In 2014-15, the protection services for the Chief Executive Officer were provided by the National Traffic Police officials employed in the National Traffic Law Enforcement Unit. They are budgeted for in the National Law Enforcement personnel expenditure.

(b) The protection services for the Chief Executive Officer are provided by the National Traffic Police officials employed in the National Traffic Law Enforcement Unit. They are budgeted for in the National Law Enforcement personnel expenditure

South African National Roads Agency (SANRAL)

  1. SANRAL does not provide any kind of personal protection, nor has it ever done so, to its CEO. Therefore, the remainder of the question falls away."

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. No protection services in (i) the form of human resources and (ii) another form were provided to (aa) N/A and (bb) the Director of Civil Aviation (Chief Executive Officer) of the South African Civil Aviation Authority in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years, (b) (i) N/A and (ii) N/A and (c) N/A.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. ATNS has not provided any protection services (i) in the form of human resources nor (ii) in any other form to (aa) the Department of Transports Director-General , (bb) nor the CEO of ATNS (aaa) in 2012 – 13 (bbb) 2013 – 14 or (ccc) 2014 -15 financial years.
  2. No money was (i) allocated in the budget and (ii) no actual money was spent in each of the specified financial years
  3. Therefor there was no criterion required to provide protection services in any of the specified cases.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

ACSA does not provide protection services for (bb) the Chief Executive Officer.

Railway Safety Regulator (PSR)

The RSR has not provided any protection services in the form of human resources or any other form to its Chief Executive Officer in any of the financial years 2012-13; 2013-14 and 2014-15.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator did not provide protection services in the form of (i) human resources or (ii) in an

Other form to (aa) chairperson of the board (bb) other members/directors, in any of the specified years

(aaa),(bbb) and (ccc) and in terms (b), the budget allocation and actual costs were both zero in terms of (i)

and (ii).item © is therefore not applicable

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(aaa) PRASA provided security to the former GCEO for the 2012-13 financial year tabulated below:

 

(bbb) PRASA provided security to the former GCEO for the 2013-14 financial year tabulated below:

 

(ccc) PRASA provided security to the former GCEO for the 2014-15 financial year tabulated below:

 

(b) (i) The budget allocations are tabulated above for the respective financial years.

(b) (ii) The cost for each financial year are tabulated above for the respective financial years.

(c) The criteria were informed by the security risks that prevailed at the time. VIP Protection for the GCEO was based on a residual risk that emanated during his tenure as DDG of Public Transport in the Department of Transport.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

No protection services in the form of human resources or any other form was provided for the SAMSA Chief Executive Officer for the respective years.

01 December 2015 - NW4009

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) (a) Since when has the payroll grading system for (i) her department and (ii) all entities reporting to her been used in each case and (b) what measurable have been put in place to ensure the integrity of such system; (2) whether there are any instances where such systems were not followed in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) details and (b) outcomes in each case respectively?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT

(1) (a) The Department of Transport has been using the EQUATE job evaluation system when it was introduced in 1998 by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA). The system became compulsory from 1999 as prescribed by the Public Service Regulations. The DPSA reviewed this system and in April 2015 introduced the new web-based system called EVALUATE which is now used by all Departments.

(1)(b) There is a component that is charged with the responsibility of managing job evaluations in the Department. The Directorate: Organisational Development and Change Management consists of staff members who have been trained and certified as Job Analysts and Job Evaluation Panelists to use the job grading system. The Department has developed a Job Evaluation Policy and has a functional Job Evaluation Panel that sits regularly to moderate jobs. The Department also makes use of external Job Analysts and Job Evaluation Panel members when necessary to evaluate and moderate certain jobs to maintain the integrity of the system. Organized Labour is invited to sit in the Job Evaluation Panel meetings to ensure transparency and accountability. Both the EQUATE and EVALUATE systems have security features i.e passwords that keep them safe from unauthorized access and use. The Department further keeps records of all the jobs that have been graded and decisions thereof. The Department reports annually through its annual reports on the number of posts that have been evaluated.

 

(2)

Please refer to information as per the table below:

Question (2) (a) (b) and (c)

Question (2) what are the (a) details

Question (2) (b) outcomes in each case respectively

2012 – 13 - 16 employees were granted higher salaries than the salary grades of their posts

  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 6 – R129 780pa, appointed on Level 7 - Level 7 - R149 742pa.

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 4 – R90 396pa, appointed on Level 5 - R118 983pa

 
  1. Counter offer – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 13 – R775 233pa, match offer from another institution on Level 14 – R1 042 839pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 13 – R860 388pa, appointed on Level 14 – R939 631pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 13 – R719 613pa, appointed on Level 14 – R1 012 251pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 12 – R550 992pa, appointed on Level 13 – R719 613pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 7 – R175 194pa, appointed on Level 11 – R464 919pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 8 – R198 975pa, appointed on Level 11 – R464 919pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 6 – R139 812pa, appointed on Level 9 – R236 532pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 3 – R81 312pa, appointed on Level 4 – R97 809pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 11 – R334 052pa, appointed on Level 12 – R407 745pa

 

12.Counter offer – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended

Higher salary approved by the former Director-General, Level of post Level 8 – R204 990pa, appointed on Level 9 – R240 075pa

 

13.Retention purposes – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended

Higher salary approved by the former Director-General, Level of post Level 13 – R798 663pa, offer on Level 14 – R872 214pa

 

14.Purchase offer – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended

Higher salary approved by the former Director-General, Level of post Level 12 – R522 669pa, appointed on Level 13 – R719 613pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 7 – R160 224pa, appointed on Level 8 – R198 975pa

 
  1. Purchase offer (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 12 – R550 992pa, appointed on Level 13 – R719 613pa

2013 – 14 - 3 employees were appointed on higher salaries than the salary grades of their posts

  1. Retention purposes (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 4 – R96 363pa, offer on Level 5 – R116 937pa

 
  1. Purchase offer – (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 7 – R170 799pa, appointed on Level 8 – R212 106pa

 
  1. Purchase offer – (Ministerial appointment) – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Higher salary approved by the former Minister

Level of post Level 5 – R122 280pa, appointed on Level 8 – R212 106pa

2014 – 15 - 2 employees were appointed on higher than the salary grades of their posts

  1. Counter offer – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended

Higher salary approved by the former Acting Director-General

Level of post Level 6 – R150 819pa, appointed on Level 7 – R188 985pa

 
  1. Counter offer – Part V C.3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended

Higher salary approved by the former Acting Director-General

Level of post Level 6 – R150 819pa, appointed on Level 7 – R197 616pa

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(1) (a) The payroll grading system was implemented in 2002 for (i) N/A (ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority.

(b)The system has different access control levels wherein only the payroll manager has access to the payroll grading system. Amendments to the job grading system can only be processed on payroll on the directive by the Director of Civil Aviation (DCA).

(2) There were no instances where the abovementioned process was not followed during (a) 2012-13 (b) 2013-14 (c) 2014-15 financial years and therefore (a) N/A (b) N/A.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. (a) Since its formation, (ii) ATNS has been using a job grading system. At inception ATNS used the Hay Job Grading System, and migrated to the Peromnes Job Grading System.
  1. The application of job grading within ATNS is guided by a Job Grading Policy, which guides the link to remuneration, especially in relation to movement inside and outside the grading bands; the formation of the Job Grading Committee; the grading process; as well as an appeal process. All committee members are trained on the principles of job grading. Job grading for positions which form part of the Bargaining Unit, involves the inclusion of Shop Stewards as part of the process.

The grading of jobs is performed on an electronic system, which belongs to an independent service provider, of which ATNS has administration rights to perform the evaluations. The system has built-in measures to ensure the accuracy and consistency of the rules applied for the grading of positions, as highlighted in the internal policy.

  1. The Peromnes Job Grading system within ATNS has been consistently applied and there are no deviations to note in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (a) (ii) ACSA has been using the Oracle system for payroll processing since 2008.

(b) The payroll system is designed according to the approved Remuneration and Benefits policies and procedures.

  1. There have not been any deviations to the Remuneration and Benefits policy and procedures in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

1. (a,ii) In terms of the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA), the J-easy grading system has been in place internally since 2013 supported by an independent provider. Prior to that, external service providers were used for the grading of all positions.

(b) To ensure integrity of the system, different approval processes exist as follows:

  • The job profiles are developed and approved by relevant levels; and
  • The segregation of duties in relation to the capturing and the actual evaluation exist for grading purposes and the correlation and benchmarking by an independent external body are in place

2. (a) None (b) None (c) None

(a) and (b) Not applicable as the system is followed.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

  1. (a)(ii) The Road Accident Fund’s (RAF) current payroll grading system has been in use since 1 September 2012, and (b) the following measurable controls have been put in place to ensure the integrity of the systems: (aa) a RAF Job Evaluation Policy is in place and enforced which policy provides that all positions in the RAF must be graded; grading must be linked to the salary structure; and, job gradings must be approved by the responsible divisional executive; (bb) job grades are verified annually during the annual salary adjustments for both the Human Capital HRIS system and Payroll SAP system; (cc) access to the Human Capital HRIS system and Payroll SAP system is password protected; (dd) access and user rights are approved by the Senior Management in Human Resources Shared Services and Financial Accounting, based on the function performed by the specific employee; and, (ee) the integrity of the Human Capital HRIS system and Payroll SAP systems are audited annually by RAF Internal Audit Division and the Auditor General - no material findings were reported during the audits;
  1. There were no instances where the payroll grading system was not followed in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

  1. (a) The SAGE Payroll system has been in used since 2013.

(ii) Road Traffic Infringement Agency – Entity

(b) Internal policies and procedures are in place as measure to ensure integrity. Statutory obligations and reporting also serve as a measure in such SAGE Payroll systems.

  1. 2012 – 13 : None, cause there was no Payroll system it was outsourced.
  2. 2013 – 14 : SAGE Payroll system followed
  3. 2014 – 15 : SAGE Payroll system followed
  1. 2012 – 13 : None, cause there was no Payroll system it was outsourced.
  2. 2013 – 14 : None
  3. 2014 – 15 : None

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

  1. a)The RTMC has since its inception been using the equate job evaluation tool in September 2014, a resolution was taken by the Board to implement the Patterson model. The VIP payroll module was used since 2010 and before then the Corporation was using Persal.

b)There is segregation of duties in the VIP payroll system. The payroll manager is responsible for managing the access to the system. The VIP Payroll software reduces risk by giving visibility to transactions and providing an audit trail. There are established process and procedure to manage the payroll function.

  1. There were no such instances where systems were not followed.

South African National Road Agency (SANRAL)

1)a) Since 1998, SANRAL made use of the Permones grading system.

b) To ensure integrity of such a system, job evaluation exercises are conducted across all levels of jobs referred to as “roles” in our terminology. This is done to determine the relative worth of a role in relation to other jobs within the organisation. The current job grading system is broad banded and forms the basis of the pay scales. The design of the scales promotes a competitive market anchor specifically for senior and technical portfolios and is used as a strategy to attract, retain and motivate high performers and prospective new incumbents

2. The Permones grading system has been followed since inception in 1998, including the financial years provided above. SANRAL operates in terms of its founding legislation, The South African National Roads Agency Limited and National Roads Act (Act No. 7,1998), thus SANRAL employees are not civil servants.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Herewith our response below to the question in as far as it relates to the RSR:

1(a) The RSR utilizes the Paterson Job Evaluation system and the payroll grading system is based on this.

1(b) The RSR has both a Job Evaluation and Remuneration Policy which both ensure the integrity of the payroll grading system. Both policies have been approved by the Board of Directors.

2(a) The RSR payroll system has consistently conformed to the provisions of the Job Evaluation and Remuneration Policies between 2012/2013, 2013/2014 and 2014/2015.

Ports Regulator South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (ii) The Ports Regulator of South Africa utilizes the Patterson grading system, this was implemented in the 2014/15 financial year, and has been verified by REM Channel, the survey institute of Price Water house Coopers.
  1. The system was only implemented after a human resource review was conducted which included a revision to policies, procedures, and a salary benchmarking exercise. This process was initiated in 2013/2014 and conducted in 2014/2015.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. (a) (i) Since 2010 the Hay system and pay scales have been used fir staff and a Paterson grading system was used for Executive positions
  2. To ensure the integrity of the system, there have been no changes to the grades since 2010. All remuneration reviews are approved by the Board of Directors, in addition, 21 Century Pay Solutions benchmarked the salaries of Executives
  1. Since 2010 to date when grading scales were implemented, no job was regarded. There however annual salary reviews implemented after approval by the board directors.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. (ii) PRASA uses the Paterson Grading System since June 2008; and

(b) All PRASA job evaluations have been validated by a third party to ensure and promote the integrity of the system.

  1. Since adopting Paterson there hasn’t been instances where any other job grading system has been followed.

18 November 2015 - NW4020

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the outcome of the investigation into the Namibian air ambulance crash in the Western Cape on 16 August 2015, (b) lessons were learned from the specified crash and (c)(i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms have been put in place to prevent the recurrence of such crashes in the future?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) The outcome will be determined upon conclusion of the investigation.

(b) The investigation is in progress and lessons learned will be in the final report when published.

(c) (i) & (ii) The investigation is at a stage where additional data/evidence is being collected for analysis for factual information report writing. Following that will be the compilation of the findings, cause/contributory factors, recommendations and approval process. After that the report with its findings and recommendations will be published.

(iii) Prevention mechanisms will be put in place as and when identified by the accident findings and causes.

18 November 2015 - NW3939

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the Airports Company of South Africa’s intention to increase its revenue from non-aeronautical services, (a) what partnerships (i) have been and (ii) will be entered into and (b) what are the (i) relevant details, (ii) time frames, (iii) timelines and (iv) deadlines in each specified case?

Reply:

The Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA) has set a strategic objective to increase the contribution of non-aeronautical revenue to total revenue from 37%, as it currently stands, to 55% by 2020.

(a) All non-aeronautical opportunities at one of ACSA’s nine airports, such as retail and advertising opportunities, are subject to an open tender process to ensure that an open, fair, transparent and equitable approach is followed. ACSA does not enter into partnerships for non-aeronautical services other than when the Company bids for concessions outside the Company’s nine airports, where shareholder agreements have been entered into by the Company.

(i) ACSA has a shareholder agreement between with GVK (an Indian conglomerate with diverse interests across various sectors including airports, transportation and energy), and Bidvest, for the concession held by the Company in Mumbai, and Invepar (a Brazilian investment group, which operates in the transportation infrastructure segment in Brazil) for the concession held in Sao Paolo.

(ii) There are no definite planned partnerships which ACSA will enter into in the future.

(b) Presently, the Company has 10% equity holding in the Mumbai concession and a shareholder agreement was signed in 2006. Also, since February 2012 the Company holds 10.2% equity in the Guarulhos Airport, Sao Paolo. ACSA does earn consultancy fees from Guarulhos Airport, which is rendered directly by Company to the Guarulhos Airport.

18 November 2015 - NW3933

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) Memoranda of Understanding and/or (ii) any similar documents have been signed by (aa) her department and (bb) any of the entities that report to her with (cc) driving schools and/or (dd) organisations and/or associations, (b) what (i) is the nature and (ii) are the terms of reference in each specified case, (c) when were the specified agreements signed and (d) what (i) measurable, (ii) timelines and (iii) milestones are there in respect of each agreement?

Reply:

(A)(i) - No MOU is signed between the Corporation and Driving Schools

(ii) - The Corporation facilitated the signing of a letter of acknowledgement by Min Ndebele.

(b) (i) The Minister Congratulate the Driving School Industry on the Establishment of the National Driving School Forum

(ii) The Minister lledged support to them to enhance the standard of learner driver training in SA. The Minister also stated that the National Driving School Forum will be consulted when the Driving School Legislative Framework will be finalized. The Minister stated that a Driving School Summit will as requested by the Forum. This Summit was held as requested ( facilitated by the Corporation during March 2011)

(c) the letter was signed on 07/04/2011

(d) A summit was held was held as requested by the Driving School forum

(cc) N/A

(dd) The letter referred to above was submitted to the National Driving School Forum, which consists of the following 4 national driving school associations: 

South African Driving School Association (SADSA)

South African Driving Operators Association (SADSOA)

Southern African Institute of Driving Instructors (SAIDI)

South African National Driving School Association (SANADS)

06 November 2015 - NW3650

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many persons have been suspended with full pay within (i) her department and (ii) all entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 14-15 financial years and (b) in each specified case, what (i) is the value of these payments for each month by (aa) her department and (bb) all entities reporting to her, (ii) are the reasons for (aa) these suspensions and (bb) the delay in resolving these matters, (iii) is being done to resolve these matters and (iv) are the reasons to suspend persons with full pay?

Reply:

Department of Transport

a) How many persons have been suspended with full pay within (i) her department.

(aa) 2012/13 financial year – None

(bb) 2013/14 financial year – One (1) employee

(cc) 2014/15 financial year – Five (5) employees

(b) in each specified case, what (i) is the value of these payments for each month by

(aa) her department

2013/2014 FINACIAL YEAR

NAME

MONTH

VALUE OF PAYMENTS

Mr Rajesh Jock

May 2013

R0

 

June

R77 356.42

 

July

R94 116.98

 

August

R94 116.98

 

September

R153 559.29

 

October

R94 116.98

 

November

R94 116.98

 

December

R94 116.98

 

January 2014

R94 116.98

 

February

R94 116.98

 

March

R94 116.98

TOTAL

R 983 851.49

2014/2015 FINACIAL YEAR

Mr Rajesh Jock

April 2014

R138 386.61

TOTAL

R138 386.61

   

Mr B C Hlabisa

July 2014

R118 521.91

 

August 2014

R124 311.78

 

September 2014

R53 130.51

TOTAL

 

R295 964.20

     

Mr V Ndwamato

October 2014

R27 974.57

 

November 2014

R70 907.76

 

December

R70 907.76

 

January

R70 907.76

 

February

R23 312.74

TOTAL

 

R264 010.00

     

Mr B Maphalela

October 2014

R16 478.74

 

November 2014

R41 769.04

 

December 2014

R41 769.04

 

January 2015

R41 769.04

 

February 2015

R13 732.29

Total

 

R155 518.14

     

Ms L Mahlangu

October 2014

R36 545.71

 

November 2014

R37 020.79

 

December 2014

R37 020.79

 

January 2015

R37 020.79

 

February 2015

R13 741.90

Total

 

R161 349.96

GRAND TOTAL

 

1 999 080.41

(ii) are the reasons for (aa) these suspensions

The Department received allegations of serious misconduct which warranted precautionary suspensions,

(bb) the delay in resolving these matters (iii) is being done to resolve these matters

The delays were caused by investigations; however the suspension were uplifted after the 60 days lapsed as per the provisions of the Disciplinary Code & Procedure. The Department is addressing capacity to deal with these matters,

(iv) are the reasons to suspend persons with full pay?

Answer: The Disciplinary Code & Procedure provides that precautionary suspension is with full pay.

Airports South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

The Airports Company South Africa, suspended people pending investigations and disciplinary action during the review period as follows:

  1. (aa) 2012/13, During this period nine (9) people were suspended at the average period of about 3 months (92 days).
  2. All cases were concluded and outcome reached during this year within the timeframes targeted to investigate and resolve such matters.
  1. The total value of the salaries paid to the 9 people during the period of suspensions amounted to R 286 889.90.
  1. (aa) 2013/14, During this period 19 people were suspended at the average period of about 3 months (95 days).
  2. All cases were concluded and outcome reached during this year within the timeframes targeted to investigate and resolve such matters.
  1. The total value of the salaries paid to the 19 people during the period of suspensions amounted to R 880 462.11.
  2. (aa) 2014/15, During this period 34 people were suspended at the average period of about 3 months (77 days).

(b) All cases were concluded and outcome reached during this year within the timeframes targeted to investigate and resolve such matters.

  1. The total value of the salaries paid to the 34 people during the period of suspensions amounted to R 2 298 887.60.

(ii) The reason of suspensions during investigation and conclusion in the period under review are listed below:

  • Assault
  • Breach of policy
  • Collusion
  • Concealment of information
  • Damage to property
  • Desertion of post
  • Dishonesty
  • Embezzlement of funds
  • Forging of sick note
  • Fraud
  • Gross negligence and/or
  • Competence, violation of policy.
  • Illegal micro lending
  • Insubordination
  • Intimidation, abusive and Insulting
  • Misrepresentation
  • Misuse of property
  • Non-disclosure of criminal record
  • Sleeping on duty
  • Tempering
  • Theft
  • Unacceptable conduct
  • Unauthorised conduct
  • Use of foul and insulting language

Conclusion of disciplinary action during the requested review period

(bb) All of the suspension cases for the period under review have been finalised and there were no delays in investigating and finalising disciplinary processes. Outcomes of majority of the disciplinary processes mainly resulted in decisions of:

  • Dismissed
  • Acquitted
  • Final written warning

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (i) N/A

(ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority suspensions are listed below for

(aa) None for 2012/13,

(bb) None for 2013/14; and

(cc) as per below table. (ii) (aa) (bb) (iii) and (iv) are stated in the table below.

Persons per department

No of days suspended

Reasons for suspension

Payment value of suspension in rand per month

Delay and Reasons

Action taken to resolve the matters

AIID

90days

Serious misconduct relating to misrepresentation of qualifications

R59,782.76 x3

R179,348.28

No delay*

Internal disciplinary hearing was concluded and the matter is closed.

ASO

90days

Serious Misconduct unethical conduct when doing inspection and audit.

R70,654.22 x 3

R211,962.66

No delay*

Suspension uplifted and internal disciplinary hearing commenced.

ASO

90days

Serious misconduct relating to conflict of interest and contravention of Civil Aviation Act, section 98.

R51,442.43 x 3

R154,327.29

No delay*

Suspension uplifted and internal disciplinary hearing commenced.

ASO

14days

Serious misconduct relating to conviction on criminal case.

N/A

No delay*

Internal disciplinary hearing held and the matter is closed.

FINANCE

150days

Serious misconduct relating misrepresentation of qualifications

R57,258.57 x 5

R286,292.85

The employee was suspended during festive holidays.

Internal disciplinary hearing was concluded and the matter is closed.

Total

   

R831,931.08

   

Footnote: * means that the suspension was within the SACAA Disciplinary Policy.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

SANRAL has not suspended any employee for the year(s) under review

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

  1. (ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) suspended with full pay (aa) 9 employees in 2012-13, (bb) 20 employees in 2013-14, and (cc) 10 employees in the 2014-15 financial years.
  1. (i) (bb) the value of the matters for each month in each financial year are:
 

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

April

R 76 000.00

R 160 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

May

R 45 000.00

R 215 000.00

R 465 000.00

       

June

R 85 000.00

R 255 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

July

R 85 000.00

R 245 000.00

R 450 000.00

       

August

R 75 000.00

R 225 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

September

R 90 000.00

R 125 000.00

R 550 000.00

       

October

R 55 000.00

R 100 000.00

R 550 000.00

       

November

R 30 000.00

R 205 000.00

R 430 000.00

       

December

R 58 000.00

R 175 000.00

R 320 000.00

       

January

R 92 000.00

R 200 000.00

R 130 000.00

       

February

R 70 000.00

R 300 000.00

R 130 000.00

       

March

R 70 000.00

R 420 000.00

R 130 000.00

(ii) (aa) the reasons for the suspensions are as provided for in the RAF Disciplinary Policy, which policy provides for the suspension of an employee on full pay in instances where the potential exists for the employee to interfere with witnesses and/or evidence; where the continued presence of the employee presents a threat to life or property; or where the employee’s presence will have a disruptive effect on other employees,

(bb) Some of the delays in resolving the matter are related to the ongoing investigations that must be completed; the employee getting sick; CCMA referrals for unfair labour practices; and, requests for legal representation and determination, which if granted ,impacts on the time taken to conclude hearings,

(iii) in order to resolve future matters, the RAF is amending its Disciplinary Policy to curb the maximum period for which an employee may be suspended on full pay and requiring the employee to be charged within one month after the suspension, and

(iv) the reason for suspending an employee is as outlined in (b)(ii)(aa) above, which suspension must be with full pay as the CCMA and Labour Court generally consider suspension without pay an unfair labour practice.

Roads Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

a)ii) The RTMC has only one (1) employee currently on suspension with full pay (National Traffic Police Unit).

cc) The employee was suspended on 11 June 2015

i)bb June-R 26 326.98, July-R 25 368.55, August-R 41 281.59, September-R 19 931.59

ii)aa) For Gross Negligence and putting the name of the Corporation into disrepute.

ii)bb) The are no delays in processing this case.

iii) On 21 September 2015 the parties agreed that the hearing be resume and the following dates were agreed upon, that is, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20 and 21 October 2015 in order to finalise the matter. The Chairperson of the Disciplinary Hearing has already confirmed his availability.

iv) The reasons employees are suspended with full pay is because this type of suspension is only a precautionary measure and does not in any way constitute a guilt finding on those who are suspended. Suspension with full pay is applied to those employees who may interfere with an investigation and witnesses if they are not suspended. This type of suspension is allowed in terms of paragraph 9.2(b) of the Disciplinary Code and Procedures of the Corporation.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a)(ii) 2012-2013 None, (bb) 2013-2014 None, (cc) 2014-2015 One (1) employee was placed on suspension from 29 September 2014 to 16 February 2015.

(i)(bb) R 261 541.15

(ii)(aa)The reasons for suspension were as follows: Bringing the Agency into disrepute, possession of confidential documents and distribution of confidential information.

(iii) A disciplinary process was undertaken at the end of which the employee was given a final written warning after a plea agreement was reached.

(iv) the reason for suspending an employee is as outlined in (b)(ii)(aa) above, which suspension must be with full pay as the CCMA and Labour Court generally consider suspension without pay an unfair labour practice.

Cross Border Road Transport Agency Limited (CBRTA)

ii) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA), in the (aa) 2012-13 (bb), 2013-14 (cc) 14-15 financial years (b) suspended eight (8) persons listed in the table below. The (aa), (i) The value of these payments for each month, (ii) the reasons for the suspensions and (bb) where there were delays in resolving these matters, and the reasons for the delays are provided in the table below:

Employee

Position

Period

Reason for suspension

Delay in resolving these matters

Total Value of payments

Average Monthly value

Ms. Khabo Rasebopye

HR Generalist

November 2012 - January 2013

Alleged Misconduct. Recruitment process not followed for appointment of new hires. Verbal offers of employment extended before requisite approval.

The matter was not delayed. The suspension was uplifted and an informal disciplinary hearing was conducted.

R 110, 233

R 36, 744

Ms. Felleng Magongoa

Senior Manager Human Resources

March 2013 – April 2013

Alleged Misconduct. Unprofessional conduct, fraudulently changing performance score, failure to carry out responsibilities with recruitment of Road Transport Inspectors.

The matter was not delayed, the employee resigned pending disciplinary enquiry

R 132, 743

R 66, 371

Mr. Dawid Noah

Senior Manager Law Enforcement

November 2013 – November 2014

Alleged misconduct. Gross Insubordination, unruly behaviour, gross negligence

Delays with investigations due to unavailability of witnesses due to work pressures as well as year-end closure.

Further delays with serving the employee with disciplinary hearing notice due to unavailability.

Postponement of disciplinary hearing on account of employee's request for more time to prepare.

First hearing adjourned on the basis of a technicality raised by the employee and his representative.

Still more delays for a few scheduled hearing dates due to unavailability of the employee's representative.
Eventually the case went to the CCMA for pre-dismissal arbitration.

The pre-dismissal arbitration was delayed among others due to ill health of the employee, unavailability of his representative, ill-health of the Commissioner, an interdict application to the High Court by the employee.

The matter was settled on 3 November 2014.

R 905, 609

R 75, 467

Ms. Lesego Tebele

Senior Data Administrator

July 2014 – May 2015

Allegations of misconduct - Frequent late-coming, Repeated absence without permission, Abscondment/desertion, Gross insubordination.

Suspension and hearing delayed on account of repeated failure by employee to respond to acknowledge receipt and/or to respond to disciplinary documentation, failure to attend the inquiry.

Unsuccessful use of the services of the Sheriff of the Court to serve documentation to employee. 1st hearing conducted in the employee's absence which led to her dismissal.

Appeal Chairperson granted that another hearing be conducted where she will be given an opportunity to state her case. 2nd hearing delayed due to unavailability of representative, ill-health of employee. Hearing is now finalised.

R 319, 513

R 31, 951

Mr. Patrick Chauke

Chief Road Transport Inspector

February 2013 – April 2013

Alleged misconduct. Making use of employer's resources for personal benefit. Leave without authorization.

The matter was not delayed. Disciplinary hearing was conducted.

R 114, 398

R 38,133

Ms Dineo Mathibedi

Executive Manager: Human Resources & Administration

22 February 2014 - 29 July 2014

Allegations of misconduct - Gross dereliction of duty, gross insubordination, and gross negligence.

Matter delayed by changes to external investigators. Finally a settlement agreement was reached.

R554, 666

R110, 933

Mr Mudunwazi Baloyi

Executive Manager: Facilitation and Industry Development

27 May 2014 - 30 November 2014

Allegations of misconduct - Gross insolence and undermining authority of superior.

The matter was not delayed. After further investigations, the matter was partly heard. A settlement agreement was eventually reached with the employee..

R786, 591

R131, 099

Mr. Donald Matlou

Senior Manager Information Technology

October 2014 – July 2015

Allegations of misconduct - Intended fraud.

Investigations into the alleged misconduct were lengthy and required extended time.

When suspension was uplifted with intention to pursue hearing, employee resigned.

R 796, 792

R 79, 679

iii) The C-BRTA has now developed and adopted Management Guidelines for Employee Suspensions as attached, that line management will now use when considering suspensions. The overall effect is that to date employee suspensions have become minimal and where there is need to isolate an employee from operations while investigations are underway, The C-BRTA places such an employee in other non-related roles to best derive equitable value for the salary earned.

(iv) the reason for suspending an employee is as outlined in (b)(ii)(aa) above, which suspension must be with full pay as the CCMA and Labour Court generally consider suspension without pay an unfair labour practice.

Ports Regulator South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (ii) The Ports Regulator has not suspended any employees with full pay for the periods 2012/13, 2013/14, 2014/15.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

Name

Financial Year

Value of Payment (R)

Reason/s for suspension

Dealay in resolving the matter

Reasons to suspend with full pay

Mark Hellenberg

2012/13

28 568.12

Incitement

No delay

Procedural fairness

Monica Le Roux

2014/15

19 142.25

Fraud, Gross dishonesty

No delay

Procedural fairness

Matsobane Sello

2014/15

26 679.17

Gross Dishonesty

Sick Leave

Procedural fairness

Tebatso Monnathebe

2014/15

70 616.88

Assault

No delay

Procedural fairness

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

Department

Date Suspended

Date Suspension Uplifted Termination

Value of payment per month

Total of payment whilst on suspension

Reason for Suspension

Reason for Delay in resolving matter

What is being done to resolve

Reason for suspension with full pay

2012/2013

ATNS

25 September 2012

24 December 2012

R56 767.00

R163 307.00

KPMG Audit –

Whistle blowing matter

Matter was dealt with as expedient as possible taking the audit into consideration.

Matter concluded

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

31 August 2012

14 September 2012

R20 833.33

R10 575.00

Gross Insubordination

Non availability of internal qualified Chairman.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

25 September 2012

24 December 2012

R72 399.00

R211 618.00

KPMG Audit

Whistle blowing matter

Matter was dealt with as expedient as possible taking the audit into consideration.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

28 March 2013

1 August 2013

R153 333.00

R634 561.00

Gross Insubordination

External legal team appointed based on seniority.

Matter concluded.

Employee dismissed.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

2013/2014

ATNS

4 July 2013

5 September 2013

R128 808.00

R271 466.00

Gross dishonesty

External legal team appointed due to seniority of employee.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

13 March 2014

25 July 2014

R80 424.00

R357 004.00

Gross Insubordination

External legal team appointed due to the seniority of the employee.

Matter concluded

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

2014/2015

ATNS

16 May 2014

To date

R111 435.00

R1 839 523.00

Whistle Blower on allegations of racism, discrimination, intimidation and victimisation of black employees.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing approaching finality.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing approaching finality.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

16 May 2014

To date

R94 350.00

R1 557 411.00

Whistle Blower on allegations of racism, discrimination, intimidation and victimisation of black employees.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing finalized.

 

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing finalized. Awaiting sanction outcome.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

SUSPENSIONS DURING THE FINANCIAL YEARS 2014/15 AND 2013/14

Kindly receive the brief suspensions for the mentioned financial years above.

2014/15

FY

REASONS FOR SUSPENSION

PERIOD OF SUSPENSION

MONEY PAID DURING SUSPENSION

1

Gross dishonesty, financial misconduct, insubordination and breach of duty of trust.

Four months

R388, 700,96

1

Misconduct

One month

R42, 316

TOTAL

     

2

   

R431,016.96

 

2013/14

FY

REASONS FOR SUSPENSION

PERIOD OF SUSPENSION

MONEY PAID DURING SUSPENSION

1

Misconduct

One month

R81, 433,50

1

Misconduct

Two months

R46, 474,64

TOTAL

 

2

   

R127, 908,14

 

Grand Total payment made for all the Financial Years Mentioned above: R558,925.10

NB: There were no suspensions for the Financial Years: 2012/13

06 November 2015 - NW3895

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport:

(1) Whether the traffic authorities are authorized to issue warrants for arrest in terms of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences (AARTO), Act 46 of 1998; if yes, according to which clause and/or regulation this authorization is executed. (2) Whether the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) may retract irregular AARTO fines, if not, what is the position in this regard; if yes, according to which clause and/or regulation does the RTIA rely to withdraw such fines; (3) Whether the RTIA may withdraw irregular AARTO enforcement notices; if not, what is the position in this regard; if yes, on which clause and/or regulation does the RTIA rely in order to retract such enforcement notices?

Reply:

  1. No, in terms of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences (AARTO), Act 46 of 1998, traffic authorities are not authorized to issue warrants of arrest for an AARTO infringement.
  2. In terms of the AARTO Act the issuing and serving of infringement notices is the responsibility of the issuing authorities. Therefore the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) does not have the power to retract irregular notices. However, should the RTIA become aware of irregular infringement notices being issued, it may recommend to an issuing authority in writing to retract such notices and provide reasons for the recommendation.
  3. All Enforcement Orders issued and served by the RTIA are done so in terms of the conditions as prescribed by the AARTO Act. These conditions are followed in order to ensure that no irregular Enforcement Orders are issued. However, should an infringer apply for the revocation of an Enforcement Order and submit substantive reasons that are to the satisfaction of the Registrar, an Enforcement Order may be revoked.

06 November 2015 - NW3862

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)How many railway accidents have taken place (a) in the year (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014 and (b) since 1 January 2015 with trains belonging to (i) Spoornet, (ii) Prasa and (iii) Metrorail; (2) (a) how many passengers (i) were injured and (ii) died in each specified railway accident in each specified year and period, (b) where did each specified railway accident take place and (c) what was the cause of each specified railway accident; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) In terms of the number of occurrences, per the main operators TFR and PRASA, the table below provides the annual numbers for the periods 2010/11, 2011/12, 2012/13, 2014/15, 2014/15 and the current period 2015/16 as at the end of Quarter 2 (30 September 2015).

 

Analysis of Occurrences

Annual Period

TFR

PRASA

Total

 

Number

of Total

Number

% of Total

 

2010/11(a)(i)

2256

54%

1356

32%

4181

2011/12(a)(ii)

2198

51%

1464

34%

4348

2012/13(a)(iii)

2198

52%

1468

34%

4262

2013/14(a)(iv)

2236

49%

1843

40%

4587

2014/15(a)(v)

2282

49%

1922

41%

4632

2015/16 YTD(b)

1045(i)

51%

950(ii) & (iii)

47%

2031

(2) (a)(i)(ii)

All operational occurrences and security-related incidents are captured as per the relevant category, and all fatalities and injuries are therefor recorded against such category. In terms of the number of fatalities and injuries per annum over the requested periods, the following table provides insight per operational occurrence category.

 

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16 Ytd

Operational Occurrence Category

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

A: Collisions during movement of rolling stock

4

164

2

1162

0

420

0

27

0

157

19

634

B: Derailments during movement of rolling stock

1

121

1

33

0

22

0

14

0

12

0

24

C: Unauthorised movements including rolling stock movements exceeding limit of authority

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

D: Level crossing occurrences

44

134

13

48

38

73

18

66

17

68

3

14

E: People struck by trains during movement of rolling stock

364

199

354

193

355

231

394

201

410

250

190

94

F: People-related occurrences: trains outside station platform areas or in section

0

88

3

106

0

77

4

194

2

320

7

158

G: Passenger-related occurrences: travelling outside designated area of train

12

78

7

80

21

86

16

80

21

134

4

40

H: People related occurrences: platform- train interchange

16

618

20

777

18

753

7

689

8

569

5

311

I: People related occurrences: station infrastructure

6

64

0

65

0

76

0

183

0

156

0

77

J: Electric shock

10

18

12

26

8

8

16

15

15

20

12

8

K: Spillage/leakage, explosion or loss of dangerous goods

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

0

0

L: Fires

0

50

0

30

0

41

1

29

0

31

0

1

Total per annum

457

1534

412

2520

440

1787

456

1498

473

1746

240

1363

The Table below provides insight into the number of fatalities and injuries as a result of security-related incidents

 

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16 Ytd

Security-related incident category

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

Fatalities

Injuries

1: Theft of assets (impacting on operational safety)

0

0

0

1

0

41

0

3

0

4

0

0

2: Malicious damage (vandalism) to property

0

15

0

4

1

0

0

14

2

34

0

5

3: Threats (to operational safety)

0

0

0

0

1

13

0

0

0

0

0

0

4: Hijacking of trains

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5: Crowd-related occurrences

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

11

0

2

0

0

6: Industrial action

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

9

0

0

7: Personal safety on trains

7

122

4

98

0

0

1

201

1

340

7

90

8: Personal safety on stations

9

60

0

88

3

45

1

137

5

165

2

64

9: Personal safety outside station platform area (including yards, sidings and depots)

14

6

9

34

2

25

8

11

4

52

1

15

TOTAL

30

203

13

225

7

124

10

379

12

606

10

174

(2) (b) A further analysis of these occurrences was done in order to establish where within the Republic these occurrences are taking place. Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape provinces are areas under which a significant number of such occurrences have been recorded during the requested reporting periods. This is mainly as a result of the location of the passenger lines as well as the density of the population which live in close proximity to the railway. The table below illustrates the distribution per province in terms of operational occurrence fatalities and injuries:

 

Fatalities

Injuries

Province

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Eastern Cape

2%

5%

3%

2%

5%

8%

2%

1%

3%

1%

1%

6%

Free State

3%

2%

2%

2%

2%

0%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

0%

Gauteng

32%

30%

35%

38%

43%

42%

56%

70%

62%

57%

50%

69%

KwaZulu-Natal

22%

26%

18%

23%

16%

26%

14%

15%

18%

17%

22%

10%

Limpopo

4%

1%

2%

2%

0%

0%

4%

0%

1%

1%

1%

0%

Mpumalanga

3%

3%

8%

3%

2%

2%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

0%

North West

4%

4%

3%

4%

2%

0%

3%

1%

2%

1%

3%

1%

Northern Cape

1%

0%

1%

1%

1%

2%

1%

0%

0%

0%

1%

1%

Western Cape

28%

30%

29%

26%

29%

20%

20%

10%

12%

20%

22%

12%

Grand Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

With regard to fatalities and injuries as a result of safety-related incidents, the statistics is a reflection of the national crime trends, as per the table below:

 

Fatalities

Injuries

Province

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Eastern Cape

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

2%

0%

2%

1%

0%

1%

Free State

0%

0%

0%

4%

0%

0%

0%

0%

1%

0%

0%

1%

Gauteng

46%

50%

50%

26%

43%

17%

44%

48%

52%

36%

43%

38%

KwaZulu-Natal

31%

27%

17%

26%

29%

0%

19%

17%

25%

15%

13%

12%

Limpopo

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Mpumalanga

4%

4%

6%

9%

0%

0%

0%

0%

1%

0%

1%

0%

North West

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Northern Cape

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Western Cape

19%

19%

28%

35%

29%

83%

34%

34%

19%

47%

42%

49%

Grand Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

(2) (c) Given the nature of the different types of occurrences, various causes have been identified as contributing towards such occurrences. The following four main reasons can be highlighted:

(i) Poor or lack of maintenance of rolling stock and infrastructure. One of the main contributing factors for derailments is poor maintenance of the track which results in broken or cracked rail, opening of the rail gauge underneath the train, defective signalling and electrical equipment and points. Other factors are the difference between the height of the platform and the train, which give cause to people falling when alighting trains. It has also become evident that lack of maintenance of roads leading to and from level crossings contribute to such occurrences.

(ii) Open / unrestricted access to the railway reserve. It is important to note that the majority of fatalities are as a result of Category E-People struck by trains which occur when a member of the public is struck by a train whilst crossing the railway track in an unauthorised place and manner. A significant number of persons who were struck by trains were the members of the public as well as employees. In terms of the members of the public, this is a further indication that people have an easy to the railway network. They may be using the network for various reasons such as crime, committing suicide or to access their amenities easily. A concern lies with the number of employees being struck by trains particularly on the running line. This suggests that these employees either do not adhere safety precautions when occupying the railway lines or the aspired safety culture is being neglected. The ease of access also contributes to collisions with obstacles such as livestock and game which move freely over and along railway lines. A further factor appears to be spatial planning which does not take the railway line into consideration.

(iii) Human factors. Various human-related factors such as train driver fatigue, poor supervision, lack of experience, negligence and poor communication have contributed to the majority of collisions between trains. Other aspects such as train driver behaviour, including speeding, passing signals at danger and not adhering to driver operating procedures have also been found as contributing factors.

(iv) Lack of enforcement / crime. One of the main reasons contributing towards level crossing occurrences, is the lack of law enforcement and lawless behaviour on the side of vehicle drivers. Signals and signs are not being observed, resulting in vehicles being struck by trains at a level crossing. Trespassing, theft of equipment and cables give further rise to an unsafe railway environment.

(v) The Railway Safety regulator produces on an annual basis the State of Safety Report in compliance with Section 20 of the National Railway Safety Regulator Act No. 16 of 2002 (as amended) (the Act) which requires that “The Regulator must produce and submit to the Minister an annual report on the safety of workers, the public and the environment associated with railway operations that the Regulator is required to regulate under this Act including any other matters that may be prescribed. The statistics of operational concurrences as provided below are therefore extracts from such reports for the periods as requested.

(3) The Railway Safety Regulator produces, on an annual basis, a report of the State of Safety in the railway environment in compliance with Section 20 of the National Railway Safety Regulator Act No. 16 of 2002 (as amended). The Minister of Transport tables this report annually in Cabinet. The statistics provided are extracts from these reports for the periods as requested.

06 November 2015 - NW3834

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) was the budget allocation for roads in the Northern Cape and (b) are the guidelines that are used by her department in deciding whether to tar a road or not; (2) is she aware that the road to Vaalputs in the Northern Cape is in an extremely poor state; (3) is the spill of radioactive material on our national roads deemed to be a national disaster; if not, why not; if so, what disaster management procedures are in place in the event of an accident containing radioactive materials in the specified province; (4) whether the transportation of radioactive material to Pelindaba was communicated to local communities; if so, (a) when (b) by whom and (c) what measures are in place to ensure that the roads upon which radioactive material is transported is continuously maintained; (5) does her department have any plans in place to tar the road from Springbok to Vaalputs?

Reply:

1) a) I want to alert the honourable there are three different questions. Budget allocation for 2015/2016: Provincial Road Maintenance Grant = R822.4m and Equitable Share = R193.5m (including day to day running of the programme);

b) TMH22 is used for the first order analysis as a guideline.

2) Yes. Only few isolated spots has gravel wearing course thickness above 50mm, however, it is drivable.

3) All spills on national roads are deemed to be dangerous and depending on the effects can be declared as disaster in terms of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 ( Act No 75 of 2002). This may depend on the toxicity levels and the magnitude of such a spillage. The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, together with the relevant Authority in whose area of jurisdiction that portion of the road fall may declare any emergency situation as a disaster. Provincial Departments are required to prepare disaster management plans for the entire province.

4) The National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) is responsible for the enforcement and the safe transportation of the radioactive materials. Transporting and handling of radioactive material is regulated by the National Nuclear Regulator and not by the Department of Transport.

5) The road from Springbok to Vaalputs (MR740) appears on a first order list of needs for upgrading. The equitable share funding is not enough to address all the upgrading needs of roads in the Northern Cape Province. Only R60m/annum available from equitable share is for capital works. This allocation is committed over the MTEF period

28 October 2015 - NW3368

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

How does her department intend to recover the billions of rand lost by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) as a result of the alleged fraud and mismanagement attributed to the Group Chief Executive Officer, Mr Lucky Montana, (b) and what measures will her department put in place to ensure that PRASA is able to successfully fulfill its mandate to provide the public with safe affordable and reliable rail services? NW 4027E

Reply:

The Minister of Transport and the Board have commissioned forensic investigations on several aspects that include maladministration and improper conduct by the former Group CEO, any employee of the Agency and any Board Member. Once these investigations on all aspects are finalized, the Minister will peruse the report and its recommendations and decide on the way forward for implementation of the outcome of the reports. Currently the group CEO is challenging the outcome of the Public Protector’s report by making some submissions, once the Public Protector has considered the submissions, a final report of the Public Protector will be issued and the Minister of Transport will be in the position to decide on the way forward, including reporting to the President

The Minister of transport have already advised the Board of PRASA to ensure that all employees are sent to various training which will enhance their capacity of comprehending amongst others the PFMA and its regulations and all other statutes that may be relevant for the performance of their dities.

The Minister will first peruse the recommendations of the forensic investigations, the final Public Protector’s report. Once all the parties has submitted their motivations and a final outcome of the investigations have taken into account all the affected parties statements the Minister will decide on the action to take. Currently it is premature to decide or announce what steps will be taken before the forensic investigation and the Public Protector’s investigations are finalized and perused. The Minister however guarantee to the members that steps will be taken against any person who may be fingered by the investigation reports.

26 October 2015 - NW3649

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

What (i) contracts, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding and/or (iv) any similar documents have been signed with the People’s Republic of China for the (aa) construction of locomotives or (bb) manufacturing of parts for locomotives, (b) when were the specified documents signed, (c) who signed the specified documents, (d) what are the locomotives going to be used for, (e) where will the locomotives be built, (f) when will the locomotives be completed and ready for operation and (g) what is the projected cost of each specified project?

Reply:

(i) (ii) (ii) None

(iv) (aa) (bb) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) The rest of the question falls away

Please refer this question to Department of Public Enterprise for response

26 October 2015 - NW3697

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) How many road users have bought e-tags for the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) e-tolling system in Gauteng in each month since 03 December 2013; (2) How many of the e-tags that have been bought since 03 December 2013 are (a) still active accounts and (b) no longer being used; (3) How many road users have been using the GFIP freeways where the e-tolling system has been installed in each month since 03 December 2013; (4) What is the monthly amount that has been levied by the e-tolling system since December 2014?

Reply:

  1. The number of road users who bought e-tags for the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) e-tolling system in Gauteng in each month since 03 December 2013 are as follows:

Date period

Tag assigned to account

20131203

265 514

201401

168 175

201402

114 062

201403

89 689

201404

71 590

201405

63 963

201406

67 275

201407

52 854

201408

41 796

201409

35 696

201410

32 398

201411

26 329

201412

19 426

201501

25 628

201502

23 285

201503

22 673

201504

19 892

201505

23 810

201506

30 626

201507

37 852

201508

31 738

201509

32 190

Total

1 296 461

  1. All e-tags bought since 03 December 2013 are (a) active as and when the road network is used.
  2. See (a) above.

(3)  How many road users have been using the GFIP freeways where the e-tolling system has been installed in each month since 03 December 2013;

Unique VLN's  (Unique vehicle plate numbers)

Class

Overall

Dec-13

2,410,896

Jan-14

2,364,201

Feb-14

2,262,121

Mar-14

2,356,039

Apr-14

2,389,110

May-14

2,389,987

Jun-14

2,373,444

Jul-14

2,423,919

Aug-14

2,442,606

Sep-14

2,437,115

Oct-14

2,521,269

Nov-14

2,539,513

Dec-14

2,654,032

Jan-15

2,544,343

Feb-15

2,483,322

Mar-15

2,599,570

Apr-15

2,593,900

May-15

2,571,134

Jun-15

2,521,515

Jul-15

2,607,359

Aug-15

2,614,246

Sep-15

2,585,302

(4) The monthly amount that has been levied by the e-tolling system since December 2014?

Please see the graph below

        

Please note that the cash flow projections for August and September 2015 took into account the 60% discount offering for historic debt that will now become available to the public from 2 November 2015.

26 October 2015 - NW3651

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) agreements, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding or (iv) any similar document have been signed with the Peoples Republic of China by (aa) her department and (bb) any of the entities reporting to her and (b) in each respect of each specified case, (i) when were such documents signed, (ii) who signed the documents, (iii) what are the relevant details, (iv) where would the realisation of such projects take place, (v) when will the projects be completed and ready for operation and (vi) what are the projected costs for each project?

Reply:

Department

i) Agreements NONE

ii) Tenders NONE

iii) Memorandum of Understanding;

  • Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the People’s Republic of China on Cooperation in Transport Related Matters.
  • Signed in 2010.
  • Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the People’s Republic of China on Cooperation in Railway Related Matters.
  • Signed in 2010.
  • The above mentioned agreements have lapsed and are due for review and renegotiation.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) ATNS has not signed any documents with the Peoples Republic of China.

(i) None

(ii) None

(iii) None

(iv) None

(b) Not applicable

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

(v) Not applicable

(vi) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa (SOC) Limited does not have any (i) agreements, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding or (iv) any similar document signed with the People’s Republic of China.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a)(i) N/A (ii) N/A (iii) N/A (iv) A Letter of Intent (LoI) was signed (aa) N/A (bb) between the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) and the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC). (b) (i) The LoI was signed on the 15th April 2015.(ii) The LoI was signed by Mr Gawie Bestbier, in his capacity as acting Director of Civil Aviation on behalf of SACAA and by Mr Li Jian, the Deputy Administrator of CAAC. (iii) The SACAA and CAAC agreed to cooperate in the field of civil aviation safety, especially in the airworthiness certification of aircraft and to start the process of the certification of aircraft LE500. (iv)The type acceptance of the LE500 will be done in accordance with the Civil Aviation Regulations, 2011. The process requires Certification Engineers of SACAA to audit the manufacturer of the aircraft in China. This is followed by the consideration of the application in the SACAA offices in Midrand. (v) The type acceptance process will commence once the manufacturer applies for the type acceptance of the aircraft and will be completed once the type acceptance certificate is issued by SACAA. (vi)The costs of the visit to the manufacturer are borne by the applicant, in this case, the manufacturer.

Cross Border Road Transport Limited (CBRTA)

(a) (i), (ii), (iii), (iv); (bb), (b) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) does not have any agreements, tenders, memorandums of understanding with the People’s Republic of China. (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v) and (vi) are not applicable as the C-BRTA does not have any agreements, tenders, memorandums of understanding with the People’s Republic of China.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

SANRAL has no agreement, tenders or memorandums of understandings or any similar documents with the People’s Republic of China.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a)(bb) The Road Accident Fund has not signed any (i) agreements, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding or (iv) any similar document with the Peoples Republic of China, and (b) therefore none of the further questions under this paragraph are relevant to the Road Accident Fund.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

The RTMC has not signed any agreements, tenders, memoranda of understandings with the Peoples Republic of China

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

The RTIA has not signed any agreements, tenders, memoranda of understandings with the Peoples Republic of China

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The RSR as an agency of the DoT does not have authority to enter into international agreements with states and therefor the RSR has no agreements, tenders, and memorandums of understanding or any similar document signed with the People’s Republic of China.

Passenger Rail of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. PRASA has no agreement, tender or memorandum of understanding with the People’s Republic of China. PRASA has a contract with Huawei, a global information and communications technology solutions provider from the People’s Republic of China.
  1. (i) PRASA entered into the contract with Huawei in March 2013.

(iii) I am told that after an open and competitive procurement process, Huawei was selected as the successful bidder, to provide PRASA with a digital radio railway signaling system for passenger rail services in South Africa. The system provides digital communications to the train driver and equipment on train protection (best practice), which replaces the current antiquated analogue system.

(iv) The system is being implemented across PRASA’s rail system.

(v) the completion date is January 2017. Gauteng is 70% complete while Kwa-Zulu Natal and the Western Cape is 30% complete.

(vi) The total cost of the project is R750 million.

Ports Regulator (PR)

  1. The Ports Regulator has not signed any agreements, tenders, memorandums of understanding with the Peoples Republic of China.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA does not enter into bilateral arrangements with countries. Accordingly SAMSA has not signed any agreements or tenders with the People’s Republic of China.

16 October 2015 - NW3652

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Has the enquiry set up by her department into the train crash that occurred in Denver, in Johannesburg, on 28 April 2015, been concluded; if so, what were the (a) findings of the specified enquiry and (b) costs associated with the damage arising from the specified incident; (2) have any of the recommendations arising from the specified enquiry been implemented to date? NW4319E

Reply:

RSR RESPONSE

1 a) The Board of Enquiry set up into the train accident at Denver Station has concluded its work. The main finding of the Board of Enquiry is that the driver of the Express Train passed the ‘signal at danger’, and rear ended train number 0600 that was stationery at Denver train station.

b) The cost of the damage is R22 million.

2. PRASA has started implementing the recommendations of the Board of Enquiry, in order to prevent a recurrence of an incident of a similar nature.

12 October 2015 - NW3303

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did her department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The information is based on the transactions recorded for trips to Cape Town from Gauteng irrespective of the routing and purpose

(1)(a)(i) The total amount spent on the Ministers travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for the financial year 2014-15 irrespective of the routing is R268,395-05

(1)(a)(ii) The number of trips undertaken by the Minister between Gauteng and Cape Town based on the record of transactions is 64.

(1)(b)(i) The total amount spent on hotel accommodation in Cape Town for the Minister is R980-00

(1)(b)(ii) Travel Services does not keep a record of this information.

Please note that this information is based on travel procured via Wings from March 2015. The Office of the Deputy Minister contacted their previous travel agent to supply the information.

(2)(a)(i) The total amount spent on the Deputy Minister’s travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for the financial year 2014-15 irrespective of the routing is R56,762-46

(2)(a)(ii) The number of trips undertaken by the Deputy Minister between Gauteng and Cape Town based on the record of transactions is 20

(2)(b)(i) The Deputy Minister did not have any hotel accommodation in Cape Town.

(2)(b)(ii) Travel Services does not keep a record of this information.

12 October 2015 - NW3580

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Integrated Public Transport System in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality and its operations agreement with a certain company (name furnished), (a) what are the reasons for paying compensation to taxi operators, (b) when did such payment commence and (c) what amount has been paid in each month from the date of inception up to 14 September 2015?

Reply:

With reference to the Integrated Public Transport System in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality and its operations agreement with a certain company (name furnished):

(a) what are the reasons for paying compensation to taxi operators

On 06 December 2012 the Municipality and Transbay (Pty) Ltd concluded an operator agreement with the taxi industry and bus industry to operate the pilot phase of the IPTS. As part of the pilot phase, the Municipality further concluded a compensation agreement with Kyoscan (Pty) Ltd, representing the taxi industry. In this agreement, 60 mini-bus taxi operators operating on affected routes within the pilot phase agreed to deliver their 60 vehicles and operating licenses to Kyoscan for safe storage in the facilities provided by the Municipality.

The purpose of the compensation agreement was to structure the removal of mini-bus taxis from the IPTS routes in order to create demand and eliminate competition between the operators and the IPTS buses. The operators were in turn fully compensated at a rate of R6 500.00 per month for their loss of revenue. The pilot phase commenced on 21 January 2013 and terminated on 20 January 2014.

b) when did such payment commence

The payments commenced at the start of the NMBM pilot operations in January 2013.

(c) what amount has been paid in each month from the date of inception up to 14 September 2015?

An amount of R6 500 per month has been paid from January 2013 to January 2014 to each of the mini-bus taxi operator who had surrendered their mini-bus taxi and Operating Licence. Lump sum payments were made for the period February 2014 to June 2014 and also for the period July 2014 to December 2014.

Amounts that have been paid to the mini-bus taxi industry to date are outlined further as follows:

 

Beneficiary

Amount

Year

Reason

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op (LTSSC)

2 812 500

July 2010

2010 Transport operations

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op (LTSSC)

2 050 000

Oct 2010

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op

1 227 038

May 2011

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op (To pay LTSSC creditors)

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op

8 599 531

July 2012

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op

18 946 516

2014

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op including LTSSC director’s back pay.

Transbay

32 129 189

2012/13 & 2013/14

Pilot Transport operations

120 IPTS Ambassadors

10 784 838

2013 & 2014

Salaries for the taxi drivers and conductors displaced due to the withdrawal of 60 taxis from Summerstrand route

Compensation for 60 Mini-bus taxi

9 360 000

2013 & 2014

Compensation for taxis removed from Summerstrand route.

12 October 2015 - NW3278

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) total amount did her department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that her department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The information is based on the transactions recorded for trips to Cape Town from Gauteng irrespective of the routing and purpose

  1. (a) Total amount spent by the Department on Air Travel between Gauteng and Cape Town irrespective of routing for the 2014-15 financial year is R7,577,182-43

(b) Total number of trips recorded per transaction undertaken to Cape Town for the same period is 1918

2.(a) Total amount spent by the Department on accommodation is R2,082,552-20

(b) Total amount spent by the Department on car rental in Cape Town is R1,120,983-85