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27 September 2016 - NW1822

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 164 on 29 February 2016, what steps are being taken to ensure that vehicle license renewal reminders are delivered timeously in the future?

Reply:

As, indicated previously, all the necessary steps have been taken to ensure that payment to the Post office are settled when they become due, therefore no delays are expected on the delivery of motor vehicle license renewal notices.

27 September 2016 - NW1921

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How is vehicle owner information obtained by any e-toll collection agency, (b) what process is used to obtain permission to access personal information of vehicle owners in this regard and (c) what process is followed in cases where a vehicle owner refuses to provide their personal information?

Reply:

(a) As the honourable member is aware in terms of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 vehicle owners are required to provide accurate address and contact details on registration and licensing of their vehicles.  These details are captured on the e-Natis system.  The information used for violator invoicing (VPC) is directly extracted from this database, in terms of the legal requirement to pay toll, as per the applicable legislation – Act No 7 of 1998. In the event that the information from e-Natis is inaccurate, and summonses are served, the lawyers may source additional information from other available sources as an offence was committed.

(b) No process is required.  If a road user is not paying toll in terms of a legal requirement, a debt against the name of the vehicle owner occur.  SANRAL is entitled to collect the outstanding toll/debt in terms of the SANRAL Act.

(c) If the information for a vehicle owner is accurate on e-Natis, a vehicle owner may not refuse that the information is made available to SANRAL. It is available in terms of the law and there is a legal requirement that users must ensure that their latest information is reflected on the Natis system. If address or contact details change, a user has 26 days in which to provide updated information.

I am confident that the honourable member does not tolerate lawlessness of any manner whatsoever. Not paying toll fees is a criminal offence. Although, it may be regarded as a white collar crime, it nevertheless remains a crime

27 September 2016 - NW1926

Profile picture: Stander, Ms T

Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) were the objectives of the Youth Road Safety Summit launched on 25 June 2016 in Pretoria, Gauteng, (b) was achieved, measured against the specified objectives, (c) are the timeframes for the specified objectives and (d) mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that the specified objectives are met?

Reply:

(a) The Youth Road Safety Summit that was held on 25 June was a culmination of provincial Road safety Youth Summits that were held in all provinces. The purpose was to establish a national structure of young people who are engaged in road safety. The aim is to place youth at the centre of finding solutions to the ever daunting task of road death, these affect youth more than any age category of road user.

(b) A national structure was established. It is made up of youth from all provinces and different organisations from business, NGOs, faith-based organisations, etc were also co-opted into the structure.

(c) The term of office of the elected body is one year. They have the responsibility of developing a programme that will focus on youth and road safety. In developing such a programme they will take into account what is being done in the fraternity and what the shortcomings are as well as coming up with innovative ways of appealing to the youth. The programmes have to be all inclusive and accommodative of divergent youth of the country.

(d) The RTMC has been mandated to provide support to the national structure, with other road entities interacting with the structure as well. The provinces are expected to play a similar role with regards to supporting the youth structures in respective provinces.

27 September 2016 - NW1917

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) How much money has been (i) collected since the launch of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) and (ii) retained for the management of the (aa) collections and (bb) collections infrastructure and (b) how much money has gone to servicing (i) road-related debt and (ii) road development; (2) how much money has been lost in each month through non-compliance with the e-toll system since the GFIP’s launch; (3) how many people have been (a) summoned for outstanding accounts and (b) found guilty for not paying the specified accounts in each month since the GFIP’s launch?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) See attached graph

(ii) All the funds collected were retained for servicing debt associated with all infrastructure of the GFIP project, maintenance of all infrastructure of the project and operational costs related to the provision of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), Incident Management Systems (IMS) and operational costs associated with freeway lighting and toll collections. Also refer to (1)(b) below.

(b We kindly refer the honourable member to Note 27 of the Annual Financial Statements as published in the various Annual Reports for details of Finance Charges as well as the Segment Report in note 39, providing detail of expenditure on roads, split between Toll and Non-toll. As the honourable member is aware these are the audited financial statements as audited by the Auditor General.

(2) No money is lost as the amount of Revenue which is not collected remains in debtors, therefore still collectible from the debtor. I also bring to the attention of the honourable member that the PFMA compels all debt owed to be collected from the debtors. I am confident that the honourable member does not wish the debt not to be collected and inadvertently disrespect the legislation.

(3) (a) 5449 individuals and 837 Corporate/Business

(b) None of these matters reached the courts yet.

27 September 2016 - NW1916

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What is the current total number of registered vehicles that are making use of the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP), (b) how many of the specified vehicles (i) have been e-tagged and (ii) paid their accounts; (2) how many vehicles that are making use of the GFIP (a) paid their accounts and (b) how many accounts are outstanding in each month as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(1) (a) Approximately 2.5 million individual vehicle registration numbers are identified on the GFIP during a month.

(b) (i) 1.4 million registered e-tag account holders.

(ii) Just over 1.3 million.

(2) (a) Just over 1.3 million.

(b) Currently in the VPC there are just over 2.9 million accounts with a balance owing, however 1.2 million thereof owe less than R500 each. (as at the middle of August).

27 September 2016 - NW1827

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the (i) time frames and (ii) milestones for the implementation of periodic testing of vehicles, (b) at what stage is her department in this regard, (c) what delays, if any, have taken place and (d) what steps were taken by her department to resolve the specified delays?

Reply:

(a) (i) No time frames have been developed yet.

    (ii) Department is currently busy with development of a process to deal with fraud and corruption within the motor vehicles testing environment to ensure that issuance of fraudulent road worthy certificates is reduced and ultimately eradicated.

(b) The Department is currently engaging with the sector on the development of a system that may be used by the testing station when testing motor vehicles to ensure that vehicles presented for the test instead of only the documentation being submitted. It is common knowledge that, if one was used to buying a fraudulent road worthy certificate they can still continue buying it, therefore it is critical that the environment be cleaned before you introduce a requirement that will only generate money but not assisting us in dealing with unroadworthy motor vehicles.

(c) The consultation on the finalisation of the appropriate system that can be incorporated in the vehicles testing environment and the cost implications.

(d) Consultations are still ongoing and no further delays are anticipated. It must further be noted that Periodic Vehicle Testing alone will not alone have an impact on reduction of fatalities hence the support by traffic law enforcement is prioritised.

 

27 September 2016 - NW1819

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) has any creditor payments outstanding for more than 30 days; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the amounts outstanding to date, (b) how long has each amount been outstanding and (c) by what date will these amounts be settled; (2) what steps does PRASA take to (a) communicate with suppliers and service providers when they are not paid on time and (b) ensure that suppliers and service providers are paid on time?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) has creditor payments outstanding for more than 30 days;

(a) Amounts outstanding to date is R796 million.

(b)

(c) At this stage PRASA is unable to give a firm undertaking as to when the outstanding amounts will be settled, however, PRASA is working tirelessly to ensure that it meets its obligations to its creditors.

(2) (a) PRASA communicates with suppliers where payments cannot be made through e-mails, phone calls and meetings.

(b) As long as PRASA has a cash flow problem, we will be unable to pay service providers on time. The contributory factors of the cash flow challenges include the tough economic climate, the unfunded mandate of Shosholoza Meyl, operational challenges such as the many coaches out of service, train burnings, major service disruptions, fare evasion and vandalism of infrastructure.  The Acting GCEO is leading Management in developing a Turn-Around plan by end October aimed at ensuring that PRASA is run efficiently, coaches out of service are brought back and quality commuter rail services are provided which generate the revenues required to operate the business.

27 September 2016 - NW1773

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether there are any delays in the delivery of the trains that were manufactured in Brazil under the Gibela Manufacturing and Supply Agreement; if so, what (a) were the originally agreed upon dates for the delivery of the specified trains under the specified agreement, (b) were the actual dates of delivery, (c) are the reasons for the delays in each case and (d) are the financial implications, in each case; 2) what (a) is the price of each train that still needs to be delivered under the specified agreement and (b) are the estimated differences between the agreed upon and actual costs of the specified trains?

Reply:

1. There have been no delays in the delivery of the trains manufactured in Brazil. Of the total 20 trains from Brazil, 10 trains have been delivered to the Wolmerton Depot Testing Facility as per the Schedule.

The table below provides the response for (a) and (b), i.e., the delivery dates of the new trains to Wolmerton Depot from Brazil:

Train No. from Brazil

Target delivery date

Actual Delivery Date to Wolmerton Depot

1

December 2015

20 December 2015

2

February 2016

26 February 2016

3

April 2016

01 April 2016

4

April 2016

18 April 2016

5

May 2016

19 May 2016

6

June 2016

08 June 2016

7

July 2016

04 July 2016

8

July 2016

13 July 2016

9

July 2016

27 July 2016

10

August 2016

19 August 2016

  (c) N/A

   (d) N/A

2. (a) The total value of the contract is R59 billion (excluding inflation) for 600 new trains

    (b) There is no difference between the agreed upon price and the actual costs of the new trains.

27 September 2016 - NW1769

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Has the SA Maritime Safety Authority applied the preference points and prescribed formula system in the awarding of all contracts within supply chain and procurement as expressed in (a) paragraph 2 of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, and (b) section 51 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, as amended; if not, why not; if so, (i) which contracts and (ii) to what value?

Reply:

(a) Yes, the preferential point system (in line with PPPFA) was applied on all transaction above R30,000.00

(b) Yes, a competitive bidding was followed for all transaction above R500,000.00

(i) And (ii) below is the list of all contracts awarded, preferential point system or method use and the transaction values for each contract.

No

Name of Supplier

Description (Contracts)

Evaluation Method

Value

1

Dinco Trading CC

Stationery

80/20

R137,894.83

2

Diventia Investments (PTY) LTD

Stationery

80/20

R123,700.00

3

Internet Solutions

MPLS

90/10

R359,901.98

4

MAKAVASA TRADING

Laminating Pouches

80/20

R63,000.00

5

Moribo wa africa trading enterprise

S-Clip files

80/20

R102,600.00

6

Nyalu Communications

Marketing Collateral

80/20

R39,680.08

7

PC Palace Gauteng

Computer Equipment: Dell Optiplex

80/20

R58,605.12

8

RAMBALANE TRADING PROJECTS

Stationery

80/20

R115,000.00

9

RAPOO RESOURCES(PTY) LTD

Stationery

80/20

R60,950.00

10

Ritlaku Trading Enterprise and Projects (Pty) LTD

Stationery

80/20

R35,600.00

11

Dimbuli Trading

Stationery

80/20

R90,000.00

12

DNV Business Assurance South Africa

Insurance

80/20

R280,203.45

13

RAPOO RESOURCES(PTY) LTD

Stationery

80/20

R150,000.00

14

WingsNaledi Corporate Travel Pty Ltd

Travel & Accommodation

90/10

R1,384,985.47

15

A New Aworkening Trading

First Aid Room Equipment

80/20

R344,251.84

16

LPV De Swardt

Job Evaluation & Grading

80/20

R39,250.00

17

TEKWENI TV PRODUCTION cc

Ship Repair Safety DVD

80/20

R62,700.00

18

Internet Solutions

MPLS

80/20

R364,161.91

19

KNMC Consultants

UPS installation - Richardsbay

80/20

R179,208.00

20

WingsNaledi Corporate Travel Pty Ltd

Travel & Accommodation

90/10

R1,520,859.55

21

Azas Projects (Pty) Ltd

UPS installation – Port Elizabeth

80/20

R204,495.00

22

KNMC Consultants

UPS installation - Durban

80/20

R443,916.00

23

MATHAMANE TRADING ENTERPRISE

Furniture

80/20

R55,500.00

24

Bathlodi Trading and Projects

Catering: Careers Expo

80/20

R46,500.00

25

Precision Networks

Laptops

80/20

R72,331.40

26

Internet Solutions

MPLS

90/10

R347,251.13

27

Internet Solutions

MPLS

90/10

R317,549.49

28

WingsNaledi Corporate Travel Pty Ltd

Travel & Accommodation

90/10

R1,156,839.79

29

WingsNaledi Corporate Travel Pty Ltd

Travel & Accommodation

90/10

R1,050,296.51

30

RAPOO RESOURCES(PTY) LTD

Stationery

80/20

R50,400.00

31

Sage Computer Technologies

Wireless Link for Hillcrest Office

80/20

R217,321.12

32

Fujitsu Service Core (Pty) Ltd

Server Maintanance

80/20

R73,596.51

33

Internet Solutions

MPLS

90/10

R351,849.91

34

WingsNaledi Corporate Travel Pty Ltd

Travel & Accommodation

90/10

R1,223,863.91

35

Biztech (PTY) Ltd

National Boat Show

80/20

R48,974.40

36

Business Connexion (Pty) Ltd

Software: Varonis Renewal

80/20

R131,345.43

37

Mccarthy

Vehicle

80/20

R315,000.00

38

Precision Networks

Laptops

80/20

R31,689.72

39

Introstat (Pty) Ltd

Laptops

80/20

R42,952.22

40

Internet Solutions

MPLS

80/20

R351,849.91

41

Itgility (Pty) Ltd

Dell NX400 storage

80/20

R80,469.34

42

3G Relocations and transport

Transversal Contract

 

R35,205.25

43

Basadzi Personnel cc

Advert

80/20

R106,557.90

44

OUTSOURCING DIGITAL

UPS Installation: Pretoria

80/20

R139,953.24

45

PC Palace Gauteng

Software: CITRIX Licence

80/20

R149,796.00

46

Sizwentsuluba VSP

Internal Audit

90/10

R281,748.00

27 September 2016 - NW1923

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why did the black economic empowerment partner (details furnished) withdraw from the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project, (b) when did the specified withdrawal take place, (c) under what conditions did the specified withdrawal take place and (d) what were the costs, if any, to (i) the SA National Roads Agency Ltd and/or (ii) any other Government entity or department in this regard?

Reply:

(a) it is assumed that the honourable member is referring to the black economic empowerment partner of the Electronic Toll Collection Company. The transaction is proposed between the main members of the Consortium that was awarded the toll operations portion of the GFIP project. We have been informed that the recently issued press statements by the affected parties indicated that this was a normal transaction wher the BEE partner was exercising its right to sell its shares.

(b) As stated above, the transaction has not been finalised yet.

(c) As stated above, the details of the transaction are not available to Government.

(d) There are no costs to be incurred by SANRAL or any other Government entity. This is a private transaction between the involved parties.

27 September 2016 - NW1920

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Transport

why do the vehicles of the Airports Company of South Africa have different registration numbers to that of all other vehicles, (b) on what statutory grounds do they rely in this regard and (c) how much revenue was generated by the (i) license and (ii) registration fees paid for the specified vehicles?

Reply:

(a) the Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited complies with the National Road Traffic Act (Act No. 93 of 1996) regarding the registration of all its vehicles as required. Vehicles are registered within the local municcipality uthoriyu boundaries and issued with the relevant licenses accordingly;

(b) The National Road Traffic Act (Act No. 93 of 1996);

(c) (i) Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited does not generate revenue from vehicle registration and licensing; and

(ii) Registration fees payable is as determined by the local municipal authority vehicle classification and applicable fee structure.

27 September 2016 - NW1918

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a) 415 on 8 March 2016 and (b) 1603 on 7 June 2016, a deadline has been set by which the new Chief Executive Officer of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa will be appointed; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

The Minister in consultation and by agreement with the Board of PRASA resolved at a meeting held on the 30th June 2016, that the environment within PRASA was not conducive for the appointment of the GCEO. In this regard, and following this agreement with the Board, the Minister seconded and the Board appointed Mr. Collins Letsoalo as Acting Group CEO effective 1 July 2016.

27 September 2016 - NW1915

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 421 on 23 March 2016, (a) what were the terms of reference for the investigation undertaken by the Passenger Rail Agency of SA into contracts awarded by its former Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Lucky Montana, (b) on what date did the specified investigation commence, (c) what are the details of the legal processes that determine the envisaged time frames and (d)(i) what budget was allocated for the specified investigation and (ii) what has been spent to date?

Reply:

(a) Werksman’s Attorneys were engaged by PRASA to investigate the irregular expenditure transactions identified by the Auditor-General in his report of the 2014/2015 financial year and those transactions that were related to these transactions, that were above R10 milllion and that were concluded by PRASA between 2012 and 2015 as per the remedial steps recommended by the Public Protector in her report of August 2015, titled Derailed.

(b) August 2015.

(c) The time frames of the different legs of the investigation:

  • I am informed that at the beginning of the investigation, it became clear that there was no reliable retention of information and documents being destroyed and concealed, there was information and documents that were forensically removed from computers belonging to key employees and key former employees of PRASA. At that point, the focus of the investicgation, was in piercing together the information and documents, ensuring that the information and documentation may be used in legal proceedings. It was therefore impossible to determine the time frames of the investigation.
  • It is further reported that the the information gathered showed some glaring irregularities that led to the decision to litigate in respect of the concerned contracts.
  • The glaring irregularities led to a suspicion by the Board that there may be commissin of criminal offences provided for in section 34(1) of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004 (PRECCA).
  • 41 Section 34(1) letters were sent to the Directorate for Priority Crimes and Investigation (the DPCI) on the 18th May 2016.
  • The launch of the civil litigation necessitated the provision of litigation support by the investigators. The major litigation is now at an advanced stage and the need for the support of the investigators has declined. The need will be on an as-an-when basis. The time frames are being discussed and will be finalised within the next two months.
  • PRASA is now at a point where it can define a clear scope of the forensic investigation. Discussions are underway with the investigators to determine this scope and a decision will be reached in this regard by the end of October 2016.

(d) (i) the forensic investigation started after the annual budgets had been finalised for the 2015/2016 financial year. The exercise that is being undertaken during October 2016, is to determine the extent of the remaining isssues and to agree on a budget and time frames for the remainder of the matters that require investigation.

(ii) R 97, 248,211.15, this amount covers the services of a team Advocates (Senior Counsel and Junior Councel), Attorneys with extensive experience in forensic investigations and litigation, Forensic Chartered Accountants, Chartered Accountants, Auditors and Forensic IT Specialists.

27 September 2016 - NW1825

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 1603 on 7 June 2016, what are the exact time frames and time lines for the specified appointment?

Reply:

The Minister in consultation and by agreement with the Board of PRASA resolved at a meeting held on the 30th June 2016, that the environment within PRASA was not conducive for the appointment of a GCEO. In this regard, and following this agreement with the Board, the Minister seconded and the Board appointed Mr. Collins Letsoalo as Acting Group CEO effective 1 July 2016.

20 September 2016 - NW1771

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Has the SA Passenger Rail Agency applied the preference points and prescribed formula system in the awarding of all contracts within supply chain and procurement as expressed in (a) paragraph 2 of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, and (b) section 51 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, as amended; if not, why not; if so, (i) which contracts and (ii) to what value?

Reply:

(1)(a) PRASA operates within the legislated regulatory framework, all contracts for goods, services and works are acquired through proper Supply Chain Management processes. Procurement requirements are defined in the Procurement Plan with estimates costs for the provision of the required goods, services or works. This is in order to determine and stipulate the appropriate preference point system to be utilized in the evaluation and adjudication of the bids and to ensure that the prices paid are market related. Based on the procurement requirements, the relevant preference point system (80/20 or 90/10) to be utilized for the evaluation of the bid are specified in the bid documents

Contracts are acquired in any of the following competitive bid methods: Term contracts, Panel of service providers, and Public Private Partnership; whichever way procurement process is used, all acquisitions serve through conventional Bid Committees. In the preparation of the bid documents for an invitation it is determine if the required goods, service or works has been designated for local production and content in terms of Regulation 9 of the Preferential Procurement Regulations. This will entail the inclusion of a specific condition in the bid documents that only locally produced services, works or goods or locally manufactured goods with a stipulated minimum threshold for local production and content will be considered, subsequently it will have a direct impact on the evaluation of the bid.

All bids specifications are approved before issued to bidders. Bids received are evaluated as per the preference point system outlined in the approved specification. Depending on the functional criteria the weight and points are calculated using a prescribed formula system and ensure that evaluations of bids are fair and transparent. When we invite bids that will also be evaluated on the basis of functionality as a criterion, the following aspects in the bid documents are mandatory:

  • Evaluation criteria for measuring functionality;
  • Weight of each criterion;
  • Applicable value; and
  • Minimum qualifying score for functionality.

Once bids have been evaluated using the aforementioned criterion a contract is awarded to the bidder with the highest points as per the prescribed Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, and

(b) section 51 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999 using basic Supply Chain Management principles.

(i) Number of Contracts awarded 01 April 2015 – 31 March 2016

Entity

BBBEE Level

 

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Total

Autopax-CPT

2

17

7

20

10

4

2

2

1

65

Autopax-HO

5

19

19

29

10

 

4

   

86

Autopax-JHB

5

15

13

32

16

4

5

 

2

92

Autopax-Pta

5

19

16

38

16

4

2

1

2

103

Intersite-HO

1

6

10

12

4

2

1

   

36

MetroRail-E-Cape

6

18

15

38

28

5

2

1

1

114

MetroRail-Gauteng

27

44

34

126

50

13

3

3

3

303

MetroRail-HO

1

13

13

45

11

5

1

2

1

92

MetroRail-KZN

5

40

34

64

43

11

14

3

3

217

MetroRail-W-Cape

5

48

47

62

43

5

3

1

1

215

Prasa Cres-Gauteng

9

37

14

99

37

1

1

 

1

199

Prasa Cres-Head Office

11

45

28

119

36

5

1

1

1

247

Prasa Cres-KZN

8

39

13

43

27

1

 

1

1

133

Prasa Cres-W.Cape

7

22

12

67

22

1

   

2

133

PRASA TECH HO

1

16

21

41

9

6

4

1

1

100

PRASA-HO

17

27

35

61

32

4

8

2

1

187

ShosMeyl-CPT

0

14

8

16

13

3

4

1

2

61

ShosMeyl-GP-South

5

24

6

47

11

6

1

 

2

102

ShosMeyl-HO

5

21

8

51

12

3

2

 

1

103

Total

125

484

353

1010

430

83

58

19

26

2589

(ii) Rand Value Contracts Awarded 01 April 2015 – 31 March 2016

Entity

Rand Value

 

Total

Autopax-CPT

R 69 473 933.06

Autopax-HO

R 79 622 337.06

Autopax-JHB

R 170 091 612.00

Autopax-Pta

R 151 475 615.81

Intersite-HO

R 9 030 512.79

MetroRail-E-Cape

R 137 991 514.15

MetroRail-Gauteng

R 825 748 045.45

MetroRail-HO

R 630 731 669.79

MetroRail-KZN

R 319 624 039.75

MetroRail-W-Cape

R 357 997 773.69

Prasa Cres-Gauteng

R 264 009 908.79

Prasa Cres-Head Office

R 1 125 500 625.63

Prasa Cres-KZN

R 267 700 985.70

Prasa Cres-W.Cape

R 190 407 810.48

PRASA TECH HO

R 1 892 628 020.65

PRASA-HO

R 1 790 159 755.47

ShosMeyl-CPT

R 22 774 876.13

ShosMeyl-GP-South

R 97 763 179.60

ShosMeyl-HO

R 1 038 915 431.48

Total Spending

R 9 441 647 647.48

20 September 2016 - NW1772

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

Has the Airports Company of South Africa applied the preference points and prescribed formula system in the awarding of all contracts within supply chain and procurement as expressed in (a) paragraph 2 of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, and (b) section 51 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, as amended; if not, why not; if so, (i) which contracts and (ii) to what value?

Reply:

(a) Yes, the Airports Company South Africa has applied the preference points and prescribed formula system in the awarding of all contracts within supply chain and procurement as expressed in section 2(1)(a) of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act 5 of 2000 (“PPPFA”) and;

(b) Yes, the Airports Company South Africa has applied section 51(1)(a)(iii) of the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 (“PFMA”), as amended.

   (i) A document has been attached illustrating the contracts that have been awarded from 01 April to 31 July 2016.

   (ii) The rand value of contracts is reported in the attached document referred to in (i) above.

20 September 2016 - NW1821

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)What amount has been spent on the Air Traffic Navigation Services Enterprise Development Programme in the last three financial years 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16, (b) for what purpose in each financial year, (c) how is the specified programme monitored and (d) how are the outcomes (i) monitored and (ii) measured for each beneficiary of the specified development programme?

Reply:

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS) started to implement Enterprise Development (ED) initiatives in 2014 and spent about R11million for the financial year 2014/2015 and 2015/2016. The budget is in line with the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment legislation which requires that 3% of the Net Profit After Tax (NPA) should be channelled towards Enterprise Development.

(b) In the financial year 2014/2015, ATNS supported Emerging Micro Enterprises (EMEs) where they were requested to register their business requirements through the ATNS website. ATNS furnished these suppliers with resources that they needed to be able to run their businesses; this enabled the respective suppliers to focus on their core businesses. In the financial year 2015/2016, ATNS focussed its Enterprise Development (ED) approach towards a more sustainable programme where the ED budget was channelled towards creating an Incubation Programme for twenty (20) Engineering Suppliers. The programme is intended to identify gaps and close them through relevant interventions.

(c) The programme is monitored by assessing how many suppliers have graduated from Enterprise Development to Supplier Development for both programmes.

(d) This programme yielded good outcomes in that the intention was that the beneficiaries should participate as active Suppliers to ATNS and some are already offering services to ATNS which means that they have already graduated from Enterprise Development to Supplier Development. This also helps in monitoring the number of those that are in the Supplier Development pool.

 

20 September 2016 - NW1820

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) are the details of each tender issued by the Air Traffic Navigation Services (ATNS) in the past three financial years and (b) is the value of each specified tender; (2) whether the ATNS issued any contracts in the past three financial years without following the correct tender processes; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was the value of each of the specified contracts awarded without following the correct tender processes, (b) to whom was each such contract awarded and (c) why did the specified contracts not go through the correct tender processes?

Reply:

This refers to the above request as follows:

  1. (a) Details of tenders issued/awarded in the past three financial years and (b) value of each specified tender.

Table 1 below illustrate details and values of tenders issued and awarded in the 2015/2016 financial year:

Table 1 below illustrate details and values of tenders issued and awarded in the 2015/2016 financial year:

Table 2 below illustrate details and values of tenders issued and awarded in the 2014/2015 financial year:

Table 3 below illustrate details of tenders issued and awarded in the 2013/2014 financial year.

2) 

  • No tender was awarded in the past three financial year without following proper tender processes. The ATNS SCM Policy provides suppliers with the opportunity to compete for business in an open and transparent manner within the confines of the law.

       (a) No value of contract awarded without following proper tender process

       (b) No supplier was awarded a tender without following proper tender processes.

      (c) All contract followed the proper tender processes

20 September 2016 - NW1770

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Has the SA National Roads Agency applied the preference points and prescribed formula system in the awarding of all contracts within supply chain and procurement as expressed in (a) paragraph 2 of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, and (b) section 51 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, as amended; if not, why not; if so, (i) which contracts and (ii) to what value?

Reply:

a) Yes, SANRAL adheres to the applicable legislative prescripts including that of the PPPFA. However, the honourable member may recall an instance reported in the Annual Report under the Auditor General’s report that in the opinion of the AG it was not. This was reported and discussed in the Portfolio Committee in October 2015. The honourable member may recall that the difference of opinion related to the interpretation of the phrase “lowest acceptable price”. We make use of this opportunity to once again clarify the matter. It is brought to the attention of the honourable member that neither the PPPFA nor its Regulations define the phrase “lowest acceptable price”. The Regulations define the terms “comparative price, “firm price” and “non-firm price”.

The PPPFA Act (No. 5 of 2000) requires SANRAL to award contracts to the tenderer with the “lowest acceptable tender”. It has been SANRAL’s experience that when awarding a tender at the lowest price (at face value), where the objective is to promote the development of SMMEs, they either underprice with unviable tenders to get the job or the main contractors exploit the sub-contractors by pushing for unrealistic pricing. Moreover, this opens up opportunities for collusive practices.

SANRAL therefore developed and introduced a statistical method to establish the lowest acceptable price for each RRM contract. The tenderer with the price closest to this computed price was considered for award after giving due merit to other evaluation criteria such as preference points, including the price offered. Upon establishing the “price”, all tenders were further evaluated in accordance with the applicable regulations. Thus maintaining the requirements of the PPPFA. This discouraged collusion among contractors and ensured the sustainability of SMMEs. This method was in use for over 11 years – the AG was aware of the rationale and method of award and there were no findings from the AG and/or complaints from the contractors.

In 2013, for the first time, the AG raised the finding that the statistical methodology was not compliant with the requirements of the PPPFA Act. This is notwithstanding that the AG could not show in terms of which clause of the Act the statistical method was non-compliant. The AG also noted that that the method was used to protect SMMEs and recommended that SANRAL apply for an exemption from this applicable section of the PPPFA from the Minister of Finance which SANRAL did.

SANRAL applied for an exemption in terms of section 3(c) of the PPPFA. The rationale for the request was explained. The exemption was not granted. SANRAL requested for a condonation of the irregular expenditure subsequently, which was also not granted. Consequently, the AG’s report has included a note on irregular expenditure in this regard and will be noted till 2016.

Of importance is for the honourable member to note that:

  • SANRAL has stopped awarding contracts on this basis, and has reverted to awarding contracts to the lowest price at face value, after due consideration of all other evaluation criteria; and
  • the above has been explained to the Minister of Transport and to the Portfolio Committee on Transport as recent as October 2015 and other stakeholders who queried this.
  • The honourable member is referred to the Annual Reports: Report of the auditor-general to Parliament on SANRAL.

(b) Yes, we have. (i) & (ii) Please see above.

 

15 September 2016 - NW1826

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) are the (i) time frames and (ii) milestones for each corridor of the eThekweni Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network and (b) mechanisms have been put in place by her department to ensure that the specified time frames and milestones are reached?

Reply:

a) The Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN) for eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality is made up of nine(9) trunk corridors, supported by feeder networks and services. One of these trunk corridors, corridor C2 from the northern communities of Phoenix, Inanda, Ntuzuma and Kwa-Mashu to Umlazi and Isiphingo in the south, is a rail corridor, for which the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) is responsible. The implementation of the remaining eight(8) road-based corridors is the City’s responsibility.

    i) Milestones and Timelines

The IRPTN in eThekwini is planned to be rolled-out over four(4) phases, with the first phase made up of the following trunk corridors:

  • Corridor C1: Bridge City (Phoenix, Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu) to the CBD
  • Corridor C2 (rail): Bridge City (Phoenix, Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu) to CBD to Umlazi and Isiphingo
  • Corridor C3: Pinetown to Bridge City
  • Corridor C9: Bridge City to Umhlanga
  • Inner City Distribution Sustem (ICDS)

Of the four corridors, corridor C3 will be the first to go live, i.e. start of operations, from July 2017 (testing and commissioning services), followed by C9 in 2019, and C1 in 2022. Key milestones for the C2 corridor have been the opening of the Bridge City (October 2013) and KwaMnyandu (April 2014) stations, with the delivery of the new rolling stock set to start in 2019, all going well. Key milestones and timelines for Phase1 can be summarised as follows:

 

C3

C9

C1

Right of Way

  • Completion of 24.90km of ROW
  • Commence Construction of 2.8km (Dinkelman)
  • Procure Contractor for Crossroads (0.43km)
  • Completion of Cornubia Bridge
  • Commence Construction M49 Interchange May 2017
  • Commence Construction of Cornubia Boulevard Feb 2017
  • Commence Construction of Early Start Package 1 by Nov 2016
  • Procure Contractors of Early Start Package 2 (Marbleray) by June 17

Depots

Commence Construction of Bridge City Depot by Jan 2017

Same as for C3

Same as for C3

Stations

Complete 10 stations by May 2017

March 2019

To be firmed up at tender award

Terminals

Complete Preliminary Civil Works by May 2017 – Bridge City terminal

Umhlanga terminal: date not firmed up yet, pending finalization of discussions with developers and the management association for Umhlanga town center

To be firmed up at tender award

Go Live

From July 2017 (testing and commissioning), with full service in December 2017

Planned for September 2019

Planned for January 2022 (some services)

b) Monitoring mechanisms

The following mechanisms have been put in place to not only monitor the achievement of milestones and timelines, but also provide support to the City, where necessary, in delivering its IRPTN:

   i) The City is required to submit monthly and annual progress reports to my Department, for us to monitor progress, and address any problem areas timeously

   ii) Officials from my Department and those from the City hold regular meetings, about every two months, to discuss implementation progress, address technical issues, conduct site visits, if necessary, and plan for future years, to ensure that the project stays on course, and that funding requirements are identified far in advance.

15 September 2016 - NW1824

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 489 on 8 March 2016, what are the exact details of the timeframes envisaged to finalise the proposed Single Transport Economic Regulator?

Reply:

The Department plans to present a Bill (draft legislation framework) to Cabinet to solicit gazetting approval for 60 days public consultations during 2016/17 financial year. Thereafter, inputs from the public consultations will be consolidated and a revised Bill will be resubmitted to Cabinet for approval by end of September 2017. Following the Cabinet approval, the Bill is anticipated to be tabled in Parliament by end of 2017/18 financial year. Upon promulgation of the Bill into a legislation, the Transport Economic Regulator establishment will commence.

13 September 2016 - NW1750

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to paragraph 3 of her answer to question 1145 on 25 April 2016, how the accused to whom no notices had been mailed despite the fact that notices were indeed generated in the system and remained there, will ever be in a position to make representation regarding the cancellation of such notices that were never received; (2) whether the system does not of its own accord cancel the notices in the system after 40 days; (3) whether it militates against the principle of legitimacy to keep the irregular notices in the system and then to issue them later when the situation arises; (4) why must accused persons react to such irregular notices if it is the issuing authority and/or the Road Traffic Infringement Agency that is at fault?

Reply:

  1. Yes I am informed that a notice that has been captured on the System remains until such notice is cancelled by the relevant Issuing Authority or by a Representations Officer upon receiving a representation. It should be noted that despite the alleged infringer not having received the notice, such an infringer has an option of checking his or her record on the System through the website.
  2. The System does not cancel the notices on its own accord after 40 days. The system is designed to mark notices as unenforceable if such notices are captured on the system after the prescribed time frames since the contravention was committed. The notices are kept in the System for record purposes in order to track the statistics of law enforcement, the performance of individual officers as well as for intelligence purposes.
  3. The System will not issue a notice after the 40 day period since the contravention has already lapsed, as indicated on response (2) above, such information serves as intelligence as well as for management purposes.

(4) Noting that there is a possibility that due processes were not followed, the honourable member should not infer that the alleged infringer did not contravene the law. The MP as a public representative should advise the alleged infringer to choose to react and challenge the lapse of due process through a representation.

13 September 2016 - NW1751

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since the implementation of the Gauteng e-tolling system in December 2013, this system or part of it (a) were not functioning or (b) malfunctioned; if so, (i) on which date(s) the system of parts of the system (aa) were not functioning or (bb) malfunctioned, (ii) which parts or sections of the system were faulty in each case, (iii) on which overhead gantreys this had an effect and (iv) how long the problem or problems persisted?

Reply:

(a)&(b) In answer to the question asked by the honourable member , SANRAL reports that from toll commencement on 3 December 2013 to 31 July 2016, the system has been operating as designed. The availability average across the system has been above the contractually required 99,8% per month.

Similarly for the back office systems – it has been above 99,9%.

13 September 2016 - NW1747

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What level of co-operation exists between the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa and local authorities; (2) whether there is a framework to guide such co-operation; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) what success has been achieved?

Reply:

1.There is a long standing relationship between the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) and various local authorities across the country. The establishment of Rail Steering / Liaison Committees was done many years ago, still in the days of the South African Rail Commuter Corporation (SARCC), with various local and district municipalities.

More recently, in terms of the National Land Transport Transition Act (NLTA), the establishment of Intermodal Planning Committees (IPCs) is required. To quote the NLTA “Every municipality that is establishing an integrated public transport network or has significant passenger rail services in its area must… establish an intermodal planning committee consisting of the prescribed technical officials and prescribed representatives of rail operators”.

Many IPCs have already been established, in which PRASA is an active participant and have to some extent replaced some of the Rail Steering / Liaison Committees. In the event where an IPC has not formerly been established, the co-operation between PRASA and the local authority continues through the existing committees or project related steering committees. PRASA reports to the Executive Authority on quarterly basis on the activities and progress regarding the work of the IPCs, as part of the Shareholders Compact.

2. The function of the IPC, as per the NLTA, is to coordinate and integrate public transport as well as non-motorised and freight transport. In addition where there are significant passenger rail services in the area, the intermodal planning committee must facilitate the conclusion of appropriate service level agreements between the municipality and the PRASA.

  (a) Terms of reference for the committees, as required by the NLTA, have been developed

  (b) The close co-operation between the parties has resulted in good co-ordination and alignment of plans and projects across the country. These include :

  1. Integrated Transport Plans
  2. Integrated Public Transport Network development
  3. PRASA Strategic Plan
  4. Joint projects (station precincts)
  5. Development of Memoranda of Action (MOA)
  6. Sharing of information

30 August 2016 - NW1647

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2549 on 14 July 2015, what provisions of the Protection of Personal Information Act, Act 4 of 2013, did her department rely on when it took the decision not to commercialise the use of decryption keys in the short to medium term; (2) where does one legally obtain a decryption key?

Reply:

1. The Protection of Personal Information Act, No 4 of 2013 promotes the protection of personal information by public and private bodies. The following provisions were considered in the decision not to commercialise the use of decryption keys in the short to medium term.

  • Section 2 – purpose of the act
  • Section 4 – lawful processing of personal information
  • Section 5 – rights of data subjects
  • Section 8 – responsible party to ensure conditions for lawful processing
  • Section 9 – lawfulness of processing
  • Section 10 – minimality
  • Section 11 – consent, justification and objection
  • Section 12 – collection directly from data subject
  • Section 13 – collection for specific purpose
  • Section 16 – quality of information
  • Section 19 – security measures on integrity and confidentiality of personal information.
  • Section 20 – information processed b operator or persons acting under authority.
  • Section 21 – security measures regarding information processed by operator.

2. I am informed that the decryption key is only legally available from the Department of Transport. The Department of

Transport is currently looking into the changing the configuration of the key to ensure that a public

portion of the key can be made available to relevant stakeholders.

29 August 2016 - NW1655

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the normal rates for the renting of the various spaces available for advertising at Cape Town International Airport; (2) what amounts were (a) invoiced to and (b) received by the Airports Company of South Africa from all political parties and/or their agents for each of the first eight months of 2016 in respect of advertising space rented at the specified airport ahead of the 2016 Local Government Elections; (3) do the invoices issued to political parties reflect a discount on the normal rates for advertising at the specified airport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the (a) discount rates and (b) reasons for these discounts; (4) whether any agencies acted on behalf of any political parties to advertise in the specified airport in the specified period; if so, which agency or agencies was or were involved in each case?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. Advertising rates are not generic but rather a function of:

    (i) Medium used e.g. Digital vs static vs banners etc.

    (ii) Zone or area used e.g. Security check-in before international departures;

    (iii) Size of structure;

    (iv) Seasonality and demand;

    (v) Importantly, the number of passing foot traffic and

     (vi) Assessment of the passenger behaviour and Living Standard Measure (“LSM”).

The rates per site range from R15 000,00 per site per month to as much as R150 000,00 per site per month – the factors noted above determine the rental negotiated.

2. (a) Airport advertising sites are concession to the out of home media owners from one month up to 5 years, these entities pay ACSA monthly rentals irrespective of securing an advertiser. The advertising concessionaire in-turn secures advertisers.

   (b) Airports Company South Africa is however aware of one political party advertising at the three National Airports (OR Tambo, King Shaka and Cape Town International Airport) for the period June 2016 to end August 2016 through advertising concessionaire called Provantage Pty Ltd (“Provantage”). The amount invoiced by Airports Company South Africa to Provantage for the sites is R346, 619.00 per month excluding VAT.

(3) (a) Invoices were issued by Provantage to the political party’s Advertising Agency i.e. Ogilvy. Provantage confirmed that no discounts were considered. ACSA did not discount the sites to Provantage.

     (b) In terms of the response in (a) above; this is not applicable to ACSA.

4. No, ACSA did not act on behalf of any political parties to advertise in the specified airport in the specified period. The appointed Advertising Concessionaire is Provantage Pty Ltd, and the Political Party Advertising Agency is Ogilvy.

17 June 2016 - NW1602

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any technologies have been installed in all vehicles owned by (a) her department and (b) all entities reporting to her to ensure that drivers are not intoxicated; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what steps are being taken to install such technologies; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Department

(a) The Department’s vehicles are not installed with technologies to detect intoxicated drivers.

   (i) The transport vehicle drivers by the VIP Protectors and the need to install such technology in these vehicles have not been raised by the respective Offices.

   (ii) Should the need be identified by the Offices of the Minister and Deputy Minister, the necessary procurement and installation will be processed.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(b)(i) and (ii) Such technology has never been installed in ACSA-owned vehicles and there are no plans to do so.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(b) ATNS has not fitted any technologies to its fleet of vehicles to alert intoxication.
(b)(i) ATNS internal controls and procedures have proven sufficient to prevent intoxication in the work place, which includes driving.
(b)(ii) ATNS does not intend to fit any technologies to ensure that drivers are not intoxicated whilst driving. ATNS internal controls and procedures to prevent intoxication in the work place, are working satisfactorily;

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(b) The 8 vehicles owned by SANRAL are all installed with real-time vehicle tracking and monitoring technologies to remotely monitor safety and security of our drivers, driver behavior and vehicle movement. The real-time vehicle tracking and monitoring system used do however not monitor if drivers are intoxicated at this stage.

(i) Currently no SANS certified vehicle inter-lock technologies are available in South Africa.

(ii) SANRAL are in frequent discussions with our vehicle tracking and monitoring system supplier to follow-up on progress made with certification of vehicle inter-lock technologies.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b) No technologies have been installed in the two (2) vehicles that are owned by the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency.

(i) Intoxication and/or drunkenness on duty is prohibited and dealt with in line with the Agency’s Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Code, which all employees have copies of and sign-off on. To this end, there are no reported case of intoxicate within the Agency.

(ii) The Agency is not taking any steps to install such technologies, as the control measure currently in place is working effectively.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) has implemented a fleet management solution which will result in the RAF not owning any vehicles, except for two trailers. Transfer of ownership of the last three motor vehicles registered in the name of the RAF is being arranged.

The fleet management solution does not provide for technologies to ensure that drivers are not intoxicated;

(i) the RAF does not experience challenges related to intoxicated staff driving fleet vehicles, therefore the cost associated with providing for technologies to ensure that drivers are not intoxicated would not be justified, more especially since such funding could be more appropriately channeled to one of the numerous RAF road safety initiatives targeting specific road user groupings

(ii) no steps are being taken to install such technologies

Road Traffic Management Corporations (RTMC)

(b)The RTMC has not installed such technologies in its vehicles.

(i) There is no policy that directs the RTMC to install such technologies in its vehicles.

(ii) N/A

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(b) There are no technologies installed for this purpose in RTIA vehicles. (b) The RTIA acquired the bulk of its fleet in 2015. Fleet management processes and policies are being aligned to ensure that appropriate control technologies are installed

(i) N/A and

(ii) Installation of technologies to track driver behaviour is being investigated and will be implemented in phases in the financial years 2016/17 and 2017/18.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a) Tracking systems have been installed in the vehicles.

(b) We ensure when we issue the vehicle that drivers are not intoxicated. Guidelines for official vehicle usage are in place.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(b) The Ports Regulator has not installed any technologies to the vehicle fleet to ensure that drivers are not intoxicated.

(i) The reason is that there is only one car which is used during business hours and for short trips. Also employees are always reminded of the policy governing the use of company vehicles which prohibits driving under the influence. The organization also has a substance abuse policy which prohibits the use of alcohol at work as well as being drunk on duty.

(ii) There are no steps being taken yet to install such technologies.

Railway Safety Regulator( RSR)

The RSR vehicles have been installed with tracking devices that monitor driver behaviour and confirms location. In addition to this, those using company vehicles have to undergo mandatory testing as per RSR’s vehicle policy.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(b) PRASA vehicles do not have technology to detect intoxication – the technology installed in vehicles is for tracking vehicle movement – empIoyees are tested for alcohol in the depots,

PRASA is currently preparing to go out on a bid for new technology for its vehicles and the issue of technology to detect whether drivers are intoxicated will be considered

14 June 2016 - NW1601

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any policies have been put in place to ensure that employees from (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her undergo advanced driving courses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) how many employees from (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her have undergone advanced driving courses in the (aa) 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years, (b) what were the costs in this regard and (c) what criteria were used to select employees to undergo the specified courses?

Reply:

Department

(1) (a) No employees within the Department underwent advanced driving courses. The Department does not have a plan for employees to attend such courses.

(1) (b)

(2) (a) (i) (aa) 2013 – 14 – None

(2) (a) (i) (bb) 2014 – 15 – None

(2) (a) (i) (cc) 2015 – 16 – None

(2) (b) Not applicable

(2) (c ) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1.(b) None of the ACSA Corporate office drivers or employees has attended advanced driving courses. ACSA intends sending all drivers for an advance driving course in the current financial year.

(2) Please refer to response provided in 1 (b) above.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

1.(b) As per ATNS Technical Services instructions, all ATNS Technical Support staff attend an advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course on an annual basis. This is typically a 2 day training course where participants receive both theoretical and practical training.

(2) (a) (ii) None

(aa) 2013-14: 134 Technical Staff members approximately R 108, 540-00

(bb) 2014-15: 132 Technical Staff members approximately R112, 860-00

(cc) 2015-16: 130 Technical Staff members approximately R117, 000-00

(b) For the 2015-2016 financial year the typical cost of a 2 day advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course was R900 per person.

(c) All ATNS staff members, who are required to drive to remote communications, navigation or surveillance sites as part of their routine work activities, are required to attend an advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

1. (b) The nature of the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s (SACAA) mandate and duties undertaken by its employees does not warrant them to undergo advanced driving courses.

2. (a) (i) N/A (ii) None (aa) None, (bb) None and (cc) None, (b) N/A (c) N/A.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(1) (b) At SANRAL all project managers that had to travel officially to construction sites underwent advance driving courses up to November 2013. This has since been stopped due to the National Treasury cost containment measures published in November 2013.

(2) (a)(ii)(aa) For SANRAL our 2 survey vehicle drivers was send on advance truck driving course (bb) None, and (cc) None,

(b) R4 050-00 per driver

(c) Required by the truck manufacturer that supplied the truck for the survey vehicle as part of the warranty agreement.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

1. (b) The C-BRTA does not have any policies in place to ensure that employees undergo through advanced driving courses. While the C-BRTA is aware that advanced driving courses will contribute to road safety, due to financial contraints no advanced driving training has been rolled out to employees. We however continue to work with other stakeholders in the road transport industry for collaborative partnerships with a view to promote road safety.

2. (a) (ii) (aa) 2013-14 None

(bb) 2014-15 None and (cc) None in 2015-16 financial years

(b) No costs were incurred as no advanced driving courses were offered.

(c) Not applicable as no employees were offered the advanced driving training in the 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years, those that would have undergone would have done so in their personal capacity.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

1. (b) The RAF has not put policies in place to ensure that employees undergo advanced driving courses; the RAF has however arranged for defensive driver training which included four employees);

2. (a)(ii) (aa) None

(bb) None, and (cc) Four (4)

(b) the cost related to the four employees attendance of the defensive driving course was R 4 200 (VAT inclusive), and

(c) no criteria applied specifically to the employees’ selection for enrolment for the defensive driving course

.

Road Traffic Management Corporations (RTMC)

  1. (b) The RTMC does not have a policy that compels employees to undergo advanced driving courses. However the RTMC realized the importance of such training for members of the National Traffic Police and has included such practical training as a module in the training of National Traffic Officers.
  1. (aa) In 2013-14 six (6) employees

(bb) in 2014-15, 184 employees and (cc) 2015-16 None employee undertook advanced driver training.

(b) R90 222

(c) Training was provided as part of the up-skilling of National Traffic Officers.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

1. (b) The RTIA does not have a policy that compels employees to undergo advanced driving courses. However, The entity’s approved HR strategy seeks to place Road Safety at the core of organisational culture and as such driver behaviour programmes including advanced driving training will be implemented

2. (a) (aa) 2013-14 – None

(bb) 2014-15 – None , and (cc) 2015-16 – None

(b) N/A

 (c) N/A

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

1. (b) The current fleet policy is silent on driver training and advanced driving. However, the company is in the process of reviewing its fleet policy and driver training is included in as follows:-

“All drivers/officials will be evaluated at regular intervals and training will be undertaken to ensure that they comply with the legislated laws”.

2. No employee of PRASA has undergone advanced drive training.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(1). The Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) does not have a policy in place that ensures employees undergo advanced driving course. The nature of the work done does not require driving skills. The majority of our work is done within the railway environment.

(2) Not applicable. Refer to 1 above.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. There is currently no policy for advance training.
  2. None of the employees have gone through advance training courses. Advanced Driving Courses were not budgeted for in the previous financial years.

None of the employees have done advance driving courses.

Ports Regulator of South Africa

  1. (b) The Ports Regulator has not spent any funds to train and develop employees for advanced driving lessons. This is because the job requirements for all Ports Regulator employees do not require employees to utilise advanced driving skills.
  2. (a) (ii) No employee of the Ports Regulator has undergone advanced driving courses in (aa) 2013/14, (bb) 2014/15 and (cc) 2015/16. (b) not applicable, (c) not applicable

14 June 2016 - NW1597

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the full reasons for non-compliance of SA Express which led to the SA Civil Aviation Authority grounding the specified entity from flying, (b) what was the timeframe given for the specified entity to become compliant, (c) what follow-up inspections were undertaken in this regard, (d) (i) when and (ii) by whom were the specified inspections conducted and (e) what were the results of the specified inspections in each specified case?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Iam informed that the reasons where the management and implementation of corrective actions and measures to rectify operational and maintenance issues identified during operations.

(b) SA Express was given seven (7) days to comply, i.e. provide an adequate corrective action plan to address identified inefficiencies in their systems.

(c) Following the suspension of SA Epress’ air operator certificate, the South African Civial Aviation Authority (SACAA) has intensified its oversight over this operator. The SACAA’s continued inspections included an audit of the organisation’s capabilities and internal control in relation to airline/flight operations and aircraft maintenance. In addition, the SACAA continues to focus on:

  • Monitoring the effective implementation of the operator’s corrective action plan submitted following the suspension of their approval;
  • Aircraft Maintenance Records; and
  • Rectification of Maintenance Defects.

(d) (i), Inspections took plance on 02 and 03 June 2016; (ii) conducted by the SACAA’s Authorised Officers (Safety Oversight Inspectors) from the SACAA’s Aviation Operations Division.

(e) Implementation of the SA Express Corrective Action Plan is on-going and is progressing well. SACAA has not picked up a repeat of the issues raised in the audit that led to the suspension of the operator’s Air Operator Certificate.

14 June 2016 - NW1596

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What transport plans (i) have been and/or (ii) are being put in place by (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her for the 2020 Commonwealth Games, (b) what are the respective timeframes and milestones in this regard and (c) what processes, procedures and/or mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that all specified milestones are reached; (2) (a) what amount has been budgeted in each specified case and (b) within which financial years?

Reply:

1. The Department transfers funds to SANRAL for maintenance and rehabilitation of non-toll roads. The Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG) allocation is a supplementary to the province toward investments in maintenance and rehabilitation of provincial roads whereas Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) funding is administered by Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

(a)(b)(c) With regards to national and provincial roads, maintenance and rehabilitation are ongoing, and the Department is awaiting for engagements with Ethekwini Municipality on critical projects that need focus. The Department shall consider any capacity requests from the municipality on implementation of critical projects that would be identified.

SANRAL will continue with its own normal routine road maintenance work to ensure that the national road network in KwaZulu-Natal is in good condition.

2. (a)(b) At the moment, no request was forwarded to the Department though maintenance is continued in the vicinity of the targeted area. Budgets will be allocated as soon as engagements with Treasury as well as host city have taken place.

Public Transport Branch

The Department of Transport and the eThekwini Transport Authority are working together

through the delivery of Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN) for the

Commonwealth Games in 2022. The IRPTN is expected to enhance capacity to be able

to address all the spectator and visitors’ transport needs, as well as some of the athletes’

Transport needs.

(1)(b) It is planned that the following elements of the IRPTN, most of which are already being implemented, will be in place in time for the Games:

    1. C3 Corridor: Pinetown – Bridge City/KwaMashu, start of operations around July 2017
    2. C9 Corridor: Bridge City/KwaMashu – Cornubia (Athletes’ Village) – Umhlanga, start of operations around July 2019
    3. C2 Corridor (rail by PRASA): Bridge City/KwaMashu – CBD – Umlazi), introduction of new trains in the second half of 2018
    4. Inner City Distribution System (ICDS) in CBD: a portion is already in operation from the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The extended network will be fully operational around July 2019
    5. Airport to CBD service contract, along mainly the N2 and M4 links (Contract expected to be awarded around January 2017). In addition, discussions are also underway to look at the possibility of accelerating the implementation of the C8 Corridor (Airport – Cornubia/Athletes’ Village – Umhlanga – CBD) from Phase 3 of the IRPTN to Phase1.

The Department and the eThekwini Authority meets on a quarterly basis to consider project progress on the delivery of IRPTNs.

For the event itself, a high level event transport plan has been put together to address the requirements of the athletes, Commonwealth Games Family, VIP’s and Games’ support. This plan will be fine-tuned as event sites are firmed up.

2. In the 2016/17 Medium Term Expenditure Framework, the city of eThekwini will receive a total amount of almost R3 billion from the Public Transport Network Grant (PTNG) for its Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network, and about R1.8 billion of City’s own contribution specifically to deliver on these. No provision has yet been made for event transport, this will be done in future financial years. Some R30 million will be provided in the 16/17 MTEF for the planning.

07 June 2016 - NW1601

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any policies have been put in place to ensure that employees from (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her undergo advanced driving courses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) how many employees from (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her have undergone advanced driving courses in the (aa) 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years, (b) what were the costs in this regard and (c) what criteria were used to select employees to undergo the specified courses?

Reply:

Department

(1) (a) No employees within the Department underwent advanced driving courses. The Department does not have a plan for employees to attend such courses.

(1) (b)

(2) (a) (i) (aa) 2013 – 14 – None

(2) (a) (i) (bb) 2014 – 15 – None

(2) (a) (i) (cc) 2015 – 16 – None

(2) (b) Not applicable

(2) (c ) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (b) None of the ACSA Corporate office drivers or employees has attended advanced driving courses. ACSA intends sending all drivers for an advance driving course in the current financial year.

(2) Please refer to response provided in 1 (b) above.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. (b) As per ATNS Technical Services instructions, all ATNS Technical Support staff attend an advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course on an annual basis. This is typically a 2 day training course where participants receive both theoretical and practical training.

(2) (a) (ii) None

(aa) 2013-14: 134 Technical Staff members approximately R 108, 540-00

(bb) 2014-15: 132 Technical Staff members approximately R112, 860-00

(cc) 2015-16: 130 Technical Staff members approximately R117, 000-00

(b) For the 2015-2016 financial year the typical cost of a 2 day advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course was R900 per person.

(c) All ATNS staff members, who are required to drive to remote communications, navigation or surveillance sites as part of their routine work activities, are required to attend an advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (b) The nature of the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s (SACAA) mandate and duties undertaken by its employees does not warrant them to undergo advanced driving courses.

       2. (a) (i) N/A (ii) None (aa) None, (bb) None and (cc) None, (b) N/A (c) N/A.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(1) (b) At SANRAL all project managers that had to travel officially to construction sites underwent advance driving courses up to November 2013. This has since been stopped due to the National Treasury cost containment measures published in November 2013.

(2) (a)(ii)(aa) For SANRAL our 2 survey vehicle drivers was send on advance truck driving course (bb) None, and (cc) None,

(b) R4 050-00 per driver

(c) Required by the truck manufacturer that supplied the truck for the survey vehicle as part of the warranty agreement.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

1. (b) The C-BRTA does not have any policies in place to ensure that employees undergo through advanced driving courses. While the C-BRTA is aware that advanced driving courses will contribute to road safety, due to financial contraints no advanced driving training has been rolled out to employees. We however continue to work with other stakeholders in the road transport industry for collaborative partnerships with a view to promote road safety.

2. (a) (ii) (aa) 2013-14 None

(bb) 2014-15 None and (cc) None in 2015-16 financial years

(b) No costs were incurred as no advanced driving courses were offered.

(c) Not applicable as no employees were offered the advanced driving training in the 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years, those that would have undergone would have done so in their personal capacity.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

1. (b) The RAF has not put policies in place to ensure that employees undergo advanced driving courses; the RAF has however arranged for defensive driver training which included four employees);

2. (a)(ii) (aa) None

(bb) None, and (cc) Four (4)

(b) the cost related to the four employees attendance of the defensive driving course was R 4 200 (VAT inclusive), and

(c) no criteria applied specifically to the employees’ selection for enrolment for the defensive driving course

.

Road Traffic Management Corporations (RTMC)

1. (b) The RTMC does not have a policy that compels employees to undergo advanced driving courses. However the RTMC realized the importance of such training for members of the National Traffic Police and has included such practical training as a module in the training of National Traffic Officers.

2. (aa) In 2013-14 six (6) employees

(bb) in 2014-15, 184 employees and (cc) 2015-16 None employee undertook advanced driver training.

(b) R90 222

(c) Training was provided as part of the up-skilling of National Traffic Officers.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

1. (b) The RTIA does not have a policy that compels employees to undergo advanced driving courses. However, The entity’s approved HR strategy seeks to place Road Safety at the core of organisational culture and as such driver behaviour programmes including advanced driving training will be implemented

2. (a) (aa) 2013-14 – None

(bb) 2014-15 – None , and (cc) 2015-16 – None

(b) N/A

  1. N/A

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

1. (b) The current fleet policy is silent on driver training and advanced driving. However, the company is in the process of reviewing its fleet policy and driver training is included in as follows:-

“All drivers/officials will be evaluated at regular intervals and training will be undertaken to ensure that they comply with the legislated laws”.

2. No employee of PRASA has undergone advanced drive training.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(1). The Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) does not have a policy in place that ensures employees undergo advanced driving course. The nature of the work done does not require driving skills. The majority of our work is done within the railway environment.

(2) Not applicable. Refer to 1 above.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a) There is currently no policy for advance training.

(b) None of the employees have gone through advance training courses. Advanced Driving Courses were not budgeted for in the previous financial years.

None of the employees have done advance driving courses.

Ports Regulator of South Africa

  1. (b) The Ports Regulator has not spent any funds to train and develop employees for advanced driving lessons. This is because the job requirements for all Ports Regulator employees do not require employees to utilise advanced driving skills.
  2. (a) (ii) No employee of the Ports Regulator has undergone advanced driving courses in (aa) 2013/14, (bb) 2014/15 and (cc) 2015/16. (b) not applicable, (c) not applicable

07 June 2016 - NW1603

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 415 on 8 March 2016, (a) what is the current status of appointing the new Chief Executive Officer of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa and (b) by what date will this process be completed?

Reply:

The process to appoint the GCEO of PRASA has progressed well and is at an advantage stage

07 June 2016 - NW1532

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1703E

Reply:

  1. Department was not approached by any political for funding;
  2. Falls away

07 June 2016 - NW1643

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

On what legal grounds is the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (SANRAL) of the opinion that all metrology instruments of the Gauteng e-tolling system comply fully with the requirements of the Legal Metrology Act, Act 9 of 2014 and the Trade Metrology Act, Act 77 of 1973, despite the fact that the Chief Executive Officer of the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications has indicated that SANRAL is not in compliance?

Reply:

As the honourable member is aware, the GFIP e-toll system basically uses camera images and dedicated short range communications equipment. In the case of the camera equipment installed on the GFIP system, this equipment complies with the technical requirements of SANS 1795, Part 5 on data capturing and recording devices for road traffic law enforcement.

With regard to the legislation referred to, there are currently no technical regulations published under the Legal Metrology Act which e-tolling must comply with. In the absence of specific technical regulations, this matter is being handled by the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) in terms of Section 22(2)(c) of the Legal Metrology Act, 9 of 2014.

The CEO of the NRCS is required to set requirements and conditions for use of the equipment in terms of Section 22(2) (c) of the Legal Metrology Act. The NRCS and SANRAL are addressing these requirements which will apply as an interim measure until technical regulations are published under the legislation. The Legal Metrology Act allows for interim measures to be used.

Additional information for the Minister:

The CEO of the NRCS also clarified this position in a letter to the Freedom Front Plus and this letter was made available to the public sometime last year. Unfortunately the contents of the letter are being mis-interpreted to cause confusion. The Legal Metrology Act allows for interim measures to be used.

In its letter of 4 March 2016 to the Freedom Front Plus, the NRCS clarifies the above and states the following:

" As there are currently no technical regulations which set out the specific requirements that the measuring instruments are to meet, compliance or non-compliance could not be established by the NATIONAL Regulator and hence there is no criminal prosecution taken against SANRAL at this stage. However, should non-compliance issues arise or be detected once interim measures are in place, enforcement measures will be applied as [provided for in the Legal Metrology Act."

07 June 2016 - NW1640

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why did KwaZulu-Natal request a rollover of its Provincial Road Maintenance Grant and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) According to our records which are contained in the Infrastructure Reporting Model (IRM), Kwazulu Natal Province have sent their allocation for Provincial Roads Maintenance Grants (PRMG) though the department as the Transferring National Officer (TNO), have withheld the fourth tranche payment.

(b) The Department is engaging with the province together with National Treasury to rectify expenditure as reported on IRM while we are awaiting response from National Treasury for the approval of rollover funds withheld. Note that Provincial Treasuries manage rollover funds on behalf of National Treasury.

07 June 2016 - NW1639

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her department’s Fourth Quarter Performance Report 2015-16 presented to the Portfolio Committee on Transport on 17 May 2016, what are the reasons for underspending on the (a)(i) Moloto Development Corridor, (ii) National Railway Safety Regulator Amendment Bill [B 32B-2008] and (iii) National Rail Safety Strategy project budget line items under Programme 3 and (b)(i) establishment of the Appeals Committee and (ii) amendment of the Civil Aviation Act, Act 13 of 2009 budget line items under Programme 5?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department completed the feasibility study on the Moloto Development Corridor in September 2014. PRASA submitted the Treasury Approval 1 (TA1) application to National Treasury at the end of October 2014. National Treasury only responded in December 2016. The allocated budget provided for an Option Analysis to be undertaken on the establishment of an appropriate structure to manage and oversee the implementation of the Moloto Rail Development Corridor. As a result of the protracted response by National Treasury and the fact that it was not supportive of the Moloto Rail Development Corridor, the Department did not occur expenditure.

(ii) The reasons underspending on the National Railway Safety Amendment Bill was due to delays in the procurement processes in securing a suitable service provider with the appropriate technical expertise to assist the Department. The service provider was appointed in October 2016.

(iii) The reasons for underspending on the National Railway Safety Strategy is a result of scarce skill related to railway safety expertise within the transport sector. A Request for Proposal was advertised in July (Bid Number DOT/04/2015/RT), however, by closing date, the Department did not received any bids. The tender was re-advertise and a service provider was appointed in January 2016.

(b) (i) The Appeals Committee is operational since 2010. An amount of R 1,45 million was provided for the remuneration of Committee Members. Committee Members are remunerated in terms of Section 123(1) of the Civil Aviation Act, 2009 and in line with the Minister of Finance’s approved Service Benefit Packages for Office Bearers. The need for the Committee to meet is guided by the number and complexity of appeals lodged by Appellants against decisions taken by the Director of Civil Aviation of the South African Civil Aviation Authority. Thirty seven (37) meetings were held in 2015/16 where eight (8) appeals were considered. The allocated amount for this project has been reduced to R 0, 803 million in the 2016/17 financial year.

(ii) Provision has been made in the 2015/16 financial year for and amount of R 1,0 million for the appointment of a specialised legal service provider to draft the Civil Aviation Amendment Bill. There was an urgent need to amend the Civil Aviation Act, 2009, to ensure compliance with international standards and practices set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). A decision, in line with Government’s Cost Saving Initiatives, has been taken to draft the amendments internally by officials in the Department. This has resulted in the under-expenditure as reported under Programme 5.

03 June 2016 - NW1600

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why did the SA National Roads Agency cancel its second bond auction in the beginning of May 2016 and (b) what contingency plans are in place should bonds be (i) cancelled and/or (ii) not meet required targets?

Reply:

(a) The second auction for the financial year was cancelled due to the continued unfounded comments about the GFIP including the lack of market appetite.

(b) Bonds can’t be cancelled due to cancelled auctions. Bonds are debt instruments, listed or unlisted, used to raise capital. It has a maturity date (when the capital must be repaid) and a coupon rate which indicates the “interest” rate that must be paid bi-annually.

    (i) SANRAL maintains a three-month liquidity buffer at all times and has access to short term funding as and when required to the extent approved by National Treasury.

    (ii) If SANRAL is unable to raise sufficient cash at auctions it increases a re-financing risk, repayment of maturing debt and servicing of existing debt. It also compromises continuous maintenance and operations of the toll roads across the country. Any capital projects not yet awarded will also be delayed or cancelled if the funding is depleted. 

03 June 2016 - NW1638

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 623 on 24 April 2013, (a) how many taxis have been scrapped through the Taxi Recapitalisation Programme, (b) what is the estimated average value of the scrapped taxis and (c) what are the details of the standard procedure when someone applies to scrap their taxi; (2) (a) who should applicants contact to scrap their taxis, (b) where is each office dealing with such applications situated, (c) under which department and/or section within her department do these offices operate and (d) what happens to taxis that are scrapped through the specified programme?

Reply:

1. (a) A total of 64,859 old taxi vehicles have been scrapped from the commencement of the programme to the end of March 2016. A total of 3,225 taxis were scrapped in the last financial year (1April 2015-31March 2016)

(b) The scrapping allowance for the current financial year is R82,400.00 but this is recalculated annually based on changes in the CPI. The scrapping for the last financial year was R77,000.00

(c) Standard Application Procedure in Brief:

  • An application submission consisting of application forms and supporting documentation (such as original certified copies of: the vehicle registration certificate, operating license, identity document etc.,) is submitted to a TSA main centre in the province.
  • The application is captured and then runs through several system background checks as well as manual checks on data and information sourced from both eNATIS and OLAS and across other substantiating documentation as may be required and/ or requested depending on application type.
  • On completion of successful documentary checks, the old taxi vehicle is scheduled for a vehicle inspection and then called to the site of application for physical checks and verification of vehicle identifying marks.
  • On completion of vehicle inspection, the vehicle is deregistered with the local licensing authority and payment via EFT of the scrapping allowance is then made to the successful applicant.
  • The old taxi vehicle is subsequently prepared for demolition, demolished and the scrap metal and other waste products disposed of according to waste regulations.

2. (a, b) The TSA National Call Centre number 0860 88 11 33 and the website address is www.scraptaxi.net. There is a TSA main centre in each province and two in Gauteng, physical address and contact details are as follows:

  • Gauteng: Elandsfontein - Cnr Kraft & North Reef Roads, 51 Rietfontein, 63IR, Elandsfontein Cell: 079 879 4316 Tel: (011) 822 9082
  • Gauteng: Rosslyn - 108 Diamant Street, Akasia Rosslyn Cell: 079 527 3575 Tel: (012) 542 7411
  • Mpumalanga - 25 Katoen, White River Cell: 079 524 8165 Tel: (013) 751 2841/ 750 0598
  • Kwa Zulu Natal - 35 Yaborough Road, Mkhondeni, Pietermaritzburg, 3201 Cell: 079 524 8166 Tel: (033) 386 0272
  • Eastern Cape - Old Government Garage, Zwelitsha, 5608 Cell: 079 517 6301 Tel: (040) 655 1100
  • Free State - 11 Yellow Street, Botshabelo, 9781 Cell: 079 527 3700 Tel: (051) 534 6348
  • Polokwane - Seshego Industrial Park, Unit 13, Freedom Drive, Zone 6, 0700 Cell: 079 557 6272 Tel: (015) 223 0578
  • North West - 1138 Matlalong, Department of Public Works, Road and Transport, Mmabatho 2735 Cell: 079 527 3539 Tel: (018) 384 2844
  • Western Cape - 18 Bloemhof Road, Ottery Cell: 079 884 4241 Tel: (021) 703 5963/ 5879
  • Northern Cape - 37 Central Road, Cnr Central & Woodburne Streets, Beaconsfield, Kimberley, 8300 Cell: 079 527 3700

(c) Branch: Public Transport, Chief Directorate: Public Transport Industry Development, Directorate: Taxi Recapitalisation Project

(d) The demolished taxi vehicles are sold as scrap metal and the proceeds received are distributed through the Transport Development Trust for project that benefit the Taxi Industry.

02 June 2016 - NW1567

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

Department

(a) (1) In the financial year 2015-16, the Department spent an amount of R10 382m on marketing and advertising. This amount includes spending on marketing and advertising in the print and electronic media, such as radio and television, outdoor advertising, Departmental campaigns such as the Easter and Festive Season Road Safety and the October Transport Month campaigns and various other events that the Department implemented.

(b) (1) In the 2016-17 financial year, the Department has budgeted an amount of R16 867m. This budget will be used for marketing and advertising in print and electronic media, including radio and television, outdoor advertising, Departmental campaigns including the Easter and Festive Season Road Safety and the October Transport Month campaigns and various other events that the Department will implement.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (i) N/A; (ii) an amount of R5.6 million was spent on advertising in the 2015/2016 financial year.
  2. (i) N/A; (ii) an amount of R12.2 million is budgeted for advertising in the 2016/2017 financial year.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. (i) N/A; (ii) 2015-2016 amount spend R 6, 033,114
  2. (i) N/A; (ii) 2016-2017 amount budgeted R 3, 676, 480

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) N/A; (ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority spend R1 352 711.74 on advertising during the 2015-16 financial year and

(b) (i) N/A (ii) and has budgeted R3 333 300.00 for advertising during the 2016-17 financial year.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a) (ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) spent R 29,927,823 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R 30,000,000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a) (ii) The RTMC spent R 29,927,823 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R 30,000,000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a) (ii) The RTIA spent R R 4.3mil on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R R 6.4milfor advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

The SANRAL spent R176 529 857 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R175 000 000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b) (i) The Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) did not spend on advertising in the financial years 2015-16.

(ii) The Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) did not allocate budget for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The RSR spent R213 240.34 on advertising during 2015-16 financial year, and an amount of R600 000 has been budgeted for the 2016-17 financial year.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA spent on R5.6 million advertising and awareness programmes in the 2015/16 financial year and the budget for 2016/17 financial year is R4.4 million.

Ports Regulator (PR)

  1. (ii) The Ports Regulator spent R 49 476.15 in the 2015/16 financial year, (b) the budget for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year is R 98 758.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA did not spend on adverting in the 2015/16 financial year due to cost containment measures. No budget has been allocated to advertising for the 2016/17 financial year due to the same reason.

02 June 2016 - NW1415

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether (a) her department and (b) all entities reporting to her are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

Department

(a) 

(b) 

(c)

(d) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(i) ACSA does run a development programme for small businesses.

(ii) ACSA does not have a development programme for Cooperatives. It is not part of the current Small Enterprise Development (SED) strategy.

(aa) ACSA has an annual Enterprise and Supplier Development funding programme which is aimed at empowering and assisting start-up businesses, emerging and small businesses. The programme also provide support in the form of mentoring and coaching, book keeping, tax, business acumen skills, tendering and contracting.

(bb) The fund value is R15 million.

(cc) About 70 jobs have been created through this programme.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(b) ( i) & (ii) ATNS has the Enterprise Development Programme in place which covers small businesses and co-operatives in the aviation space.

(aa) ATNS has a structured Enterprise and Supplier Development programme to address the lack of black suppliers in the aviation’s Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) domain. Through this structured programme, ATNS is currently developing twenty Black Owned Engineering Suppliers, preparing them to participate in the CNS space. A Gap Analysis Audit was conducted to identify gaps; currently ATNS is conducting training to close identified gaps.

(bb) In terms of the budget, 1% and 2% of the Net profit after Tax is channeled towards Enterprise Development and Supplier Development respectively.

(cc) once these gaps are closed, these Suppliers will stand a chance of getting business which will enhance job creating opportunities.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Not applicable. (b) (i); (ii); and (aa) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA), a Level 2 B-BBEE contributor, is running a skills development programme for businesses affiliated to the South African Network for Women in Transport (SANWIT). The programme focuses on providing training to women who are running businesses focused on the transport sector. The training is centred on aspects of effective bidding and supply chain management procedures. The initial training took place in March 2016 in Gauteng, and it is being rolled out country-wide as per the dates below.

Province

Date

Gauteng

16 March 2016

Eastern Cape

30 June 2016

Mpumalanga

6 July 2016

Limpopo

8 July 2016

Western Cape

20 July 2016

Northern Cape

26 July 2016

Free State

28 July 2016

North West

11 August 2016

KwaZulu-Natal

16 August 2016

(bb), and (cc) The total amount of spend on the programme is R478, 305.98. In addition, 88% of the SACAA’s budget was spent on Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) companies. During the 2016 - 17 financial year, the SACAA will be introducing a procedure that will track the number of jobs created and supported as a result of its initiatives and budget spend.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

(b)(i) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) has a unit that specifically focuses on developing the cross-border road transport with a view to empower the industry to maximize business opportunities. The unit has implemented an Entrepreneurship and Business Development Programme that is specifically designed for majority of cross-border permit holders who fall within the small, medium and micro enterprises (SMME) category. The programme supports SMMEs in the cross-border passenger operations by providing training interventions that will improve their business operations. The following training programmes have been offered:

  • Financially Management;
  • Business Planning;
  • Business Management;
  • Leadership Skills;
  • Entrepreneurial Competencies;
  • Risk awareness and financial implications in business; and
  • Understanding of legal, regulatory and tax imperatives as they relate to financial matters.

(ii) The C-BRTA has established two cooperatives for the previously disadvantaged individuals. This pilot project sought to determine the feasibility of empowering targeted groups to enter the cross-border road transport market.

(aa) One cooperative was established for women and the other for youth aspiring to enter the cross-border market. The C-BRTA carried the cost of registration of the cooperatives, identification of business opportunities related to cross-border operations, and determining the feasibility of identified opportunities. Cooperatives were assisted with the development of business and marketing plans in preparation for operations

Road Accident Fund

The (b) Road Accident Fund (RAF) is not running specific development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; however, both small businesses and co-operatives fall within the category of Exempted Micro Enterprises (EME’s) and as such are specifically provided for in the RAF’s BBBEE Scorecard, with 26% of the RAF’s procurement spend from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016 going to EME’s; questions (aa), (bb) and (cc) are not applicable.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

(b) The RTMC does not run a development programme for (i) small business and (ii) co-operatives because small business development is not the RTMC mandate

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(a) N/A

(b) RTIA

(i) Yes and

(ii) Yes;

(aa) RTIA has set up Enterprise Development Unit to provide access and ease of use of the Agency’s programmes by communities while assisting in creating job opportunities and enterprises in line with its commitment to the National Development Plan. The appointed enterprises will perform the extended services of the Agency. The programme further seeks to support and develop SMME’s and Cooperatives through structured programme of mentoring and incubation. A conducive environment will be created for such businesses to develop, flourish and grow into big businesses.

(bb) An amount of R60 million has been budgeted for the 2016/17 financial year.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

(i)(aa) SANRAL has an empowerment programme for SMMEs and Historically Disadvantaged contractors, consultants, and suppliers etc. – targeted enterprises – mainly through the award of contracts on national road projects. This is particularly driven through the Routine Road Maintenance projects and Community Development projects on the national road network. During 2015/16, 2052 SMMEs and Historically Disadvantaged companies worked for SANRAL, with a total expenditure of R3.5 billion.

For 2016/17:

(bb) Estimated budget for such empowerment and development programmes: R4.2 billion.

Estimated number of SMMEs and HD companies to benefit: 2 436

(cc) Estimated number of jobs to be created: 10 154 (All estimates are based on actuals for 2015/16 and approved budget for 2016/17)

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(b) Small businesses? Yes SAMSA is running such a programme in the form of an initiative called Black Youth and Women in the Maritime sector.

(aa) The programme aims to empower participation of black youths and women in the opportunities that exist in the maritime sector.

(bb) The initiative will have to seek partnerships to raise the funding for the work because part of the entities budget for the initiates was reduced. It is captured in our APP 2016-17 as a non-budget item.

(cc) The number of jobs that will be delivered given the constraints in budget will be further estimated.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(b) Yes PRASA supports Small Businesses and Co-operatives

(aa) PRASA has targeted and focused on increasing it’s spend on Women Owned Businesses and bringing them into broad railway environment. PRASA spent R1.4 Billion on Women owned companies in the 2015/16 Financial Year. PRASA has budgeted R1.2 billion for Women Owned Entities in the 2016/17 financial year

PRASA has a programme which focuses on Co-operatives cleaning its railway stations – for the 2015/16 financial year R12 million was spent on this programme, and 420 people participated in 61 Co-operatives for the 16/17 to 17/18 Financial Years – R51 Million will be spent on this programme.

(bb) PRASA has prioritized Youth Owned, Military veteran owned companies in its Corporate Plan for the 2016/17 Financial Year and spending will be increased for such entities.

Ports Regulator (PR)

(b) The Ports Regulator does not run any direct development programmes for (i) small business and (ii) co-operatives for the 2016/17 financial year. It must be noted that for procurement purposes, the Ports Regulator sets a target for procurement from certain suppliers with a specific BBBEE rating to achieve government objectives. Also through our Regulation business processes, efforts are being made to ensure that small businesses do benefit from tariff adjustments.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

RSR does not have development programs for small businesses or co-operatives due to the nature of our business. The RSR encourages the use of previously disadvantaged Engineering companies to support our investigation and technology audits. 

31 May 2016 - NW1498

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What amount did (a) her department and/or (b) any relevant entity reporting to her spend on releasing the tolling newsletter in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

Department

(a) The Department itself did not directly spend any amount on releasing the tolling newsletter in any of the three financial years indicated as (i), (ii) and (iii).

Civil Aviation Entities

The Civil aviation entities were not involved with the tolling newsletter. This Parliamentary Question is therefore not applicable to them.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA did not spend any amounts towards the tolling newsletter.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(b) The Ports Regulator did not spend any funds on releasing the tolling newsletter in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

RSR did not spend/ report on releasing the tolling newsletter in the financial years: 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(b) SANRAL has not published the Tolling Newsletter in the years referred to by the Honourable Member, that is (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15, and (iii) 2015-16 and therefore no money was spent on it.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA has not spent any amount on releasing the tolling newsletters.

23 May 2016 - NW1359

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a)(i) How many road users as a percentage of the total average number of monthly road users and (ii) what exact number of road users have made use of the offer by the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (Sanral) to obtain a 60% discount on their e-toll accounts if they pay the specified accounts before 1 May 2016 and (b)(i) what sum total payments and (ii) what percentage of payments has been been made in accordance with the specified offer by (aa) individual road users and (bb) business concerns; (2) whether Sanral intends taking futher legal steps agains non-paying e-toll road users; if not, why not; if so, (a) whether the envisaged legal steps include criminal legal processes, (b) what will be the extent of that, (c) by which date this will happen and (d) what is the extent of the legal costs which has been budgeted for settling the claims?

Reply:

(1) (a)(i) & (ii) There are approximately 2.5 million distinct vehicles using the GFIP on a monthly basis. Approximately 1,45 million vehicles are currently registered or making payment. SANRAL received more than 600 000 enquiries on the less60% offer via the web or via inbound calls from the public. Of the 600 000, approximately 130 000 have settled their account or made arrangements to settle. There is however still work in progress related to the balance of the 600 000 users indicated above.

(b)(i) R136m discounted paid and payment agreements for a further R123m discounted entered into.

(ii) (aa) & (bb) – the system is not set up to distinguish between type of users.

(2) SANRAL is an agency of Government and must comply with the requirements of the PFMA. There is a legal obligation on users to pay toll at a toll plaza or tolling point. SANRAL is obliged to collect outstanding debts to Government in terms of the PFMA.

(a) The SANRAL Act allows for both civil and criminal legal processes. Both are available to SANRAL and the prosecuting authorities.

(b) The extent of these processes are determined by legislation

(c) The NPA already successfully prosecuted a person in 2015 for the non-payment of toll as well as fraud. Further cases are investigated. The issuing of civil summonses already commenced.

(d) We trust that the honourable member is not suggesting that due to legal costs, SANRAL should neglect its obligation to collect the debt owed as mandated in the PFMA. As the honourable member would appreciate the costs are dependent on the particular process, legal costs are determined by the courts.

23 May 2016 - NW1282

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why are the contact names and details on her department’s website outdated (b) When will they be updated, (c) Whose responsibility is it to update the specified details and (d) What mechanisms and processes are in place to ensure that the specified information is always up-to-date in the future?

Reply:

a) The process of updating our website is underway including Contact us page. We have appointed an Online Media Service personnel to deal with it

b) The process is already underway and the Online Media Personnel is working on it

c) Its Communications Directorate to update content that goes on the Website

d) Online Media Service will be working with all stakeholders to collect information and update the website

23 May 2016 - NW1364

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many (i) individuals and (ii) business concerns have been summoned by the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (Sanral) regarding their outstanding e-toll accounts, (b) what is the scale from the smallest to the largest amount being claimed, (c) what is the legal cause of each specified claim, (d)(i) which legal firms have been employed to institute legal steps and (ii) in terms of which process were they appointed, (e)(i) whether senior advocates will be appointed regarding any of the specified claims, (ii) who are the senior advocates and (iii) in terms of what process were they appointed and (f)(i) what do the legal costs currently amount to regarding the issuing of summonses and (ii) what amount has Sanral budgeted for settling the specified claims?

Reply:

(a) (i) 5449 individuals

(ii) 837 Corporate/businesses

(b) Smallest amount = R204.75

Largest amount = R10 551 548.16

(c) The Legal cause is Non Payment of Toll.

(d) (i) & (ii) From a Summons issue perspective Daly Attorneys were used. They form part of the Contractor’s business model with their sub-contractors.

Werksmans Inc. is on a retainer as Sanral’s attorneys of record related to e-Toll matters. A due SCM process was followed in their initial appointment.

(e) (i) Senior advocates may be appointed depending on the specifics of the defences offered for specified claims. However, no matter has reached a stage where the particular defences are known.

(ii) (iii) The appointment of senior advocates depends on the legal matters to be argued and the availability of a particular senior advocate.

(f) (i) There are fixed costs applicable to the drafting of summonses, costs of the court and sheriff costs. (ii) There is no specific budget for legal costs. SANRAL has a general budget for legal costs. Furthermore, depending on the particular process, legal costs are determined by the courts and if a defendant found guilty, the costs are carried by the defendant.

23 May 2016 - NW1281

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any audits have been undertaken to determine how many ghost workers are on the books of (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and (v) 2015-16 financial years; if not, (aa) why not and (bb) when, if at all, will such audits be undertaken; if so, (2) in each case, (a) when were such audits undertaken, (b) by whom, (c) what were the outcomes, (d) what are the reasons for the specified phenomenon, (e) what costs were incurred, (f) how were guilty parties handled and (g) what is (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her doing with the information revealed in the specified audits?

Reply:

Department

(a) An audit on possible existence of ghost employees in the Department of Transport was undertaken by the Inhouse internal audit activity in the 2011/12 financial year, with a follow-up audit in the 2012/13 financial year.

(b) The results of both full-scale and follow-up audits revealed that there were no ghost employees in the payroll system (PERSAL) of the Department of Transport.

The issue of ghost employees is indicated as a high risk in the fraud risk register of the Department and is regularly and closely monitored by the relevant risk owners

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1.(b) The Airports Company South Africa has conducted audits to establish whether any “ghost workers” existed on the payroll for the financial years mentioned above, 2011 to 2016.

   (i) Yes, an audit was conducted to determine how many ghost workers with the Company in the 2011-12 financial year.

   (ii) Yes, an audit was conducted to determine how many ghost workers with the Company in the 2012-13 financial year.

   (iii) Yes, an audit was conducted to determine how many ghost workers with the Company in the 2013-14 financial year.

   (iv) Yes, an audit was conducted to determine how many ghost workers with the Company in the 2014-15 financial year.

   (v) Yes, an audit was conducted to determine how many ghost workers with the Company in the 2015-16 financial year.

2. (a) Audits have been conducted by Internal Audit and External Auditors for the period 2011 to 2014.

    (b) Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC) and Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo (SNG) for the period 2011 to 2014. The Auditor General of SA (AGSA) audited for the period 2015 to 2016.

    (c) There were no findings raised related to the existence of “ghost workers”.

    (d) – (f) Please see response to (c) above.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

1. As part of the part of the annual Internal Financial Controls audit, the payroll process is subject to audit annually with audit procedures applied to detect ghost employees.

(b) (i) 2011-12

(ii) 2012-13

(iii) 2013-14

(iv) 2014-15

(v) 2015-16

(aa) the audits are done annually.

(bb) the audits are done annually.

2. The audits are undertaken annually between November and February by internal audit and further by external auditors. There have been no ghost employees found through audit procedures over the years.

   (a) The audits are done annually.

   (b) Both ATNS internal audit and external audit.

   (c) No ghost employees were found.

   (d) None of the above.

   (e) None of the above.

   (f) None of the above.

   (g) None of the above.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

1. Yes (a) N/A

(b) the SACAA’s Internal Audit division conducted ghost employee checks/reviews through payroll audits which are performed annually.

(i) No audit was conducted in 2011-12,

(ii) Audits were conducted in 2012-13,

(iii) and 2013-14, (iv) and in 2014-15.

(v) The audit for 2015-16 has not taken place yet.

(aa) None of the above

(bb) 2015-16 audit is scheduled to take place during the 2016-17 FY.

2. (a) In each case the audits are conducted after the end of the financial year.

(b) The audits are carried out by the Internal Audit division using the Computer Assisted Audit Techniques (CAATs) to identify any anomalies within the payroll system.

(c) For the audits conducted in 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 NO ghost employees were identified.

(d) None of the above.

(e) None of the above.

(f) None of the above.

(g) None of the above.

(i) None of the above.

(ii) No incidences were revealed by the audits in the SACAA.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(1) (b) The C-BRTA has not undertaken any audits specifically to determine how many ghost workers are on the books on any of the given financial years i.e. 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and (v) 2015-16. However, the Agency has put internal control measures in place to ensure that only valid employees are paid and therefore mitigating against the risk of paying ghost employees. Among others, these internal control measures include but are not limited to:

  • Input on certain payroll transactions by one employee (a Senior Administrative Officer), where approval for processing is then provided by the Payroll Specialist;
  • The review of the monthly payroll by another employee at Senior Manager level, against all input documentation; and
  • The approval of Payroll for payment after a further review by the Executive Manager.

Furthermore, the periodic internal and annual external audits of the entity are undertaken with payroll being one of the specific audit items on the programme. None of these audits have uncovered any ghost workers in the reporting periods in question. (aa) The Agency has not seen the need to conduct these audits because the internal control processes in place have been found to be adequate and the risk of paying ghost employees is mitigated.

(bb) While there are no specific audits conducted on the ghost employees, the following internal auditors have conducted payroll audits and have found the controls within payroll environment to be effective:

Financial year

Internal auditors

External auditors

2011-12

IA Professionals and Related Services

Auditor General South Africa

2012-13

Nkonki

Auditor General South Africa

2013-14

Nkonki

Auditor General South Africa

2014-15

Price Waterhouse Coopers

Auditor General South Africa

2015-16

Price Waterhouse Coopers

Auditor General South Africa

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

1. (b) To determine whether any ghost workers are on the books of the Road Accident Fund (RAF), the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA), as part of its annual audit of the RAF, performs an audit to identify possible ghost employees, whilst the RAF performs: a 100% data analytics review, and on a sample basis, verification of employees on the SAP system against the physical information on personnel files; internal financial control reviews, on a sample basis, to ensure that employees who resigned, or who were dismissed, are timeously terminated on the SAP system; and, further ad hoc audits.

The number of respective audits totalled (i) 1 audit in the 2011-12, (ii) 2 audits in the 2012-13, (iii) 6 audits in the 2013-14, (iv) 6 audits in the 2014-15 financial years;

(aa) this question is not applicable as audits were undertaken during the aforementioned periods, (bb) the annual and other regular audits referred to in 1(b) will continue in future;

(2) In each case the audits -

(a) were undertaken:

(b) by:

following the RAF’s year-end at 31 March 2011, 31 March 2012, 31 March 2013, and 31 March 2014, as part of the statutory annual audit,

AGSA,

on 24 and 25 November 2011, in respect of an ad hoc 100% physical head count audit,

RAF Internal Audit Department,

during June 2013, September 2013, November 2013, March 2014, April 2014, July 2014, November 2014, and March 2015, as part of the internal financial control reviews,

RAF Internal Audit Department,

during April 2013 and April 2014, as part of the data analytics review,

RAF Internal Audit Department,

(c) no ghost employees were identified, therefore questions (d), (e), (f), and (g)(ii) are not applicable to the RAF.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

1. There hasn’t been any ghost employees for the period 2011/2012 – 2014/2015

The latest physical verification / audit was done during September 2015. In this verification process/ audit no ghost employees identified.

The 2015/2016 verification is still under progress, the results of which will be available once done.

2. (a) The latest verification was done during September and October 2015 – this verification relates to the 2014/2015 financial year.

(b) The verification for 2014/2015 financial year was done by the Payroll unit of the RTMC

(c) The outcome for the 2014/2015 verification dictates that there were no ghost employees at RTMC.

(d) Not Applicable as there was no ghost employees.

(e) There was no cost incurred for the 2014/2015 verification as the exercise was done internally by Payroll unit of the RTMC. The 2015/2016 verification process has not been completed, but were can indicate that there are no amounts to be incurred as the exercise is done internally by RTMC Payroll.

(f) Not Applicable as there was no ghost employees

(g) Not Applicable as there was no ghost employees

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

1. Yes, audits have been undertaken by the Road Traffic Infringement Agency in (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and 2015-16 Financial years.

(aa) Not Applicable

(bb) Not Applicable

2. (a) 2011/12 - ; 2012/13 – 01 May 2013; 2013/14 – 01 May 2015; 2014/15 – 05 May 2015; 2015/16 – 30 April 2016.

(b) Auditor General, SEMA/IRS and Audit & Risk Management Solutions

(c) No ghost employees were found

(d) Internal controls are in place and are reviewed periodically

(e) Payroll audits are conducted as part of Auditor General’s scope for audit. Internal audit does the payroll audit as part of their annual systems audit.

(f) Not Applicable

(g) Not Applicable

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

1. Yes, audits have been undertaken by the Road Traffic Infringement Agency in (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and 2015-16 Financial years.

(aa) Not Applicable

(bb) Not Applicable

2. (a) 2011/12 - ; 2012/13 – 01 May 2013; 2013/14 – 01 May 2015; 2014/15 – 05 May 2015; 2015/16 – 30 April 2016.

(b) Auditor General South Africa

(c) No ghost employees were found

(d) Internal controls are in place and AGSA performs on audit on an annual basis verifying each employees

(e) Payroll audits are conducted as part of Auditor General’s scope for audit.

(f) Not Applicable

(g) Not Applicable

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (b) There were no special audits undertaken by the Ports Regulator since both the internal and external auditors perform employee verification for all employees taking into account the fact that the Ports Regulator employs only 17 employees. The verifications are done annually and did take place in (i) 2011/12, (ii) 2012/13, 2013/14, (iv) 2014/15 and (v) 2015/16. (aa) N/A, (bb) N/A.
  2. (a) these audits were undertaken each year by (b) internal and external auditors and (c) there were no ghost employees found on the payroll. (d) Strict internal controls prevented this, (e) the audits were done as part of the annual audit (f) there were no guilty parties to be handled.

 

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA has not undertaken audits on ghost workers as a separate audit exercises. However, the Auditor-General does verify the existence of employees on the SAMSA payroll during their audits. The AG has not identified any ghost worker on the SAMSA payroll during their previous audits.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The Human Resources and Payroll Audits are undertaken on a yearly basis by both the Internal Auditors as well as the Auditor-General and no audit findings for ghost employees were identified for the following financial years:

Financial Years

Ghost Workers

2011-2012

No audit findings for non-existing employees during the Payroll auditing

2012-2013

No audit findings for non-existing employees during the Payroll auditing

2013-2014

No audit findings for non-existing employees during the Payroll auditing

2014-2015

No audit findings for non-existing employees during the Payroll auditing

2015-2016

No audit findings for non-existing employees during the Payroll auditing

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

1. No audits have been undertaken to determine specifically how many ghost workers are on the books of PRASA in the financial years mentioned. PRASA Internal Audit Department performs Human Capital Management (HCM) audits, where the scope relates to the adequacy and effectiveness of HCM processes including:

  • Policies and Procedures
  • Staff Retention and Succession Planning, Scarce Skills Plans
  • Overtime Management
  • Leave Management, Productivity and Absenteeism
  • Recruitment  and Selection
  • Terminations and Suspensions
  • Salary increases and promotions
  • Payroll
  • Organisational structure and reporting lines
  • Employee Wellness Programme

The Auditor General also performs audit on the HCM function as part of their annual year end audit. PRASA also undertakes monthly payroll reconciliations, and to date no discrepancies have been uncovered.

2. See (1) above.

09 May 2016 - NW1119

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 405 on 08 March 2016, (a) who are the members of the Vehicle Technical Committee (VTC), (b) what criteria were used to include the specified members on the VT, (c) what criteria were used to exclude members who previously served on the VTC?

Reply:

(a) The members of the VTC are:

  • National Department of Transport;
  • All nine Provincial Departments of Transport;
  • South African Police Sevice;
  • South African Bureau of Standards;
  • National Regulator of Compulsory specification;
  • Road Traffic Infringement Agency;
  • Road Traffic Management Corporation; and
  • Business Against Crime South Africa.

(b) As outlined in my previous response, the determining factors are those related to institutions that perform a regulatory function. This must be institutions that do not have financial interest in the development of a regulatory process geared at regulating the Vehicle Testing Stations.

(c) Those members that have any financial interest in the regulation of the sector, such members will be requested to be part of the Working Group that would input on the regulatory framework.

05 May 2016 - NW1121

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 484 on 8 March 2016, (a) what processes, (b) procedures and (c) mechanisms exist to ensure that each tenant has a legal, up-to-date and signed lease in each instance; (2) (a) how many tenants do not have a signed lease agreement, (b) why is this the case in each specified case, (c) what is being done to change this and (d) by what date will each tenant have a lease agreement

Reply:

1. (a) PRASA CRES has four (4) Regional offices which are responsible for the management of their respective property portfolios including residential stock. Each region has dedicated Leasing Consultants that sign up tenants in line with the organisation Leasing Policy.

(b) Leasing procedure requires compliance with the following;

  • Applicant completes an application form and provides the following documents:
    • Copy of identity document of an applicant
    • Copy of identity document of spouse (if married)
    • Foreign Nationals should have valid permits to reside in the RSA
    • Copy of Ante-Nuptial Contract if married by ANC
    • Copy of Divorce order & Settlement order - if divorced
    • Copy of current Utility or telephone bill
    • Copy of salary advice
    • Copies of 3 Month’s bank accounts
  • Credit assessment is performed
  • Affordability Test (income and expenditure analyses) performed
  • Family size assessment (Right house for number of occupants)
  • PRASA CRES Management final approval of application.

(c) Leasing Consultants conduct on a periodic basis a reconciliation exercise to ensure that house occupants are the tenants that have agreements with PRASA.

2. (a) A total of 193 residential occupants have no lease agreements across all four (4) regional

offices.

(b) Various reasons have been provided in table 1 below for each case per region.

(c)(d) Outstanding Lease Agreements will be concluded at different phases as provided in the

Table 1 below;

Table 1

REGION NAME

NUMBER OF TENANTS WITH NO LEASE AGREEMENTS

NAME OF THE PROPERTY

REASONS FOR A LEASE AGREEMENT ABSENCE

DATE FOR LEASE AGREEMENT CONCLUSION

Western Cape

5

43 De Maas Road Vasco

Illegal occupation.

The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

75 Mcgregor Street Maitland

Illegal occupation.

The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

81 Nyasa Road Retreat:

Illegal occupation.

Illegal occupant, The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

11 Nyasa Road Retreat:

Illegal occupation.

The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

12 Vlottenburg Station

Illegal occupation.

When this house became vacant due to the previous tenant absconding, the house was illegally occupied by the current occupants.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

Gauteng South

173

New Canada ( 5)

Illegal occupation.

Occupants refused to signed new leases with then Intersite when the assets where transferred from Transnet and they continue not to cooperate with the officials of PRASA, the cases were then taken to housing tribunal and the case is seating with PRASA legal team currently.

Legal team to conclude the process.

Evictions cannot take place without a court order to those tenants with files that have been handed over to legal.

The slow process of securing court orders to evict non-paying tenants’ results in premises being occupied without renewed leases especially in the case of paying tenants.

Most of the leases have a provision that in case there is no renewal of the lease, it is assumed to have been renewed on month-to-month basis.

   

Bekezela (110)

Illegal occupation.

An eviction order has been obtained and will be enforced soon.

 
   

Tshepo House (58)

Illegal occupation.

All cases are with lawyers

 

KwaZulu Natal

 

 

14

Legal Matters (5)

  • House no 10 Patterson Street
  • House no 09 Moodie Str
  • House no 05, Brad Street
  • House no 02 Station Road
  • House No 10 Station Road Kelso

Legal Matters (5)

Tenants that are handed over to the attorneys are mainly due to them being in arrears.

The legal matters are being addressed by attorneys.

The region has engaged with the other tenants with the intention to resolve all outstanding issues and get the leases signed accordingly.

It is the intention to finalize the process and have the lease agreements signed by no later than 30th September 2016.

   

Arrears (4)

  • House 6 Station Road, Umbongwithini
  • House no 03 Patterson Street
  • House No 01. Station Road
  • House no. 02 Station Road

Areas (4)

Tenants have not been handed over due to the fact that we try to negotiate and reach an acceptable settlement plan with the tenant prior to handing the matter over to the attorney.

 
   

Query ( 5)

  • House no. 6 Old Main Rd, Park Rynie
  • House no. 122 Vausedale Road
  • House 126 Vausedale Road
  • House no 08 Patterson Street
  • Scottburgh Station

Query ( 5)

Tenants there is a dispute with regards to the amendments he made to the lease. The matter has been referred to Legal in order to reach a compromise and finalize the lease. The other 2 tenants have disputes in terms of the structural repairs required on their properties. It is our intention to effect the repairs in the 2016/2017 financial year

 

Gauteng North

1

  • House No 39, Station House, Bloemhoff Station

The occupant of this property is an ex Transnet employee who is in occupation of the property for a very long time, the residential properties at Bloemhof Station falls within the properties which were taken over by PRASA from Transnet as part of the Legal Succession Act, when the property was taken over we found this tenant in occupation, we have signed leases with all occupants of the other houses at this station, however the occupant of House no. 39 is not co-operating to sign the lease.

Occupant has engaged with this tenant to get the agreement signed and has indicated to the tenant that should the lease not be signed in due course, we will have to give her notice. Lease Agreement is currently being negotiated with the tenant.

30th June 2016.

05 May 2016 - NW1114

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What newspapers have been printed and distributed by (a) her department and (b) any of its entities (i) in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016; (2) In respect of each specified case, (a) what is the total number of copies that were printed, (b) what were the costs involved, (c) what was the (i) objective for each newspaper respectively and (ii) how was the objective measured in each case and (d) what has been the result in each case?

Reply:

Department

From the DOT side we did not print any newspapers in the said period.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

  1. The (b) C-BRTA does not print or distribute newspapers however, we do print and distribute newsletters. (i) in 2014-15 and (bb) 2015-16 financial years: The Voice, and Transcending Borders. No newsletters have been printed since 1 April 2016.
  2. (a) The total number of copies per publication are as follows:

Publication

Number of copies

Frequency

Total in 2014/15

The Voice

350

One edition per quarter

1400

Transcending Borders

2000

One edition per quarter

8000

Publication

Number of copies

Frequency

Total in 2015/16

The Voice

350

Only one edition printed

350

Transcending Borders

None

None

None

(b) In the 2014-15 financial year, the C-BRTA spent R165 988. 26 on creative design and printing for both publications The Voice and Transcending Borders;

In the 2015-16 financial year, the C-BRTA spent R9 017.40 one edition of The Voice and nothing was spent on Transcending Borders; and

No newsletters have been printed in the current financial year.

(c) (i) Objectives of each newsletter:

  • The Voice – is the C-BRTA’s staff newsletters the objective of which is to inform, educate and inspire C-BRTA; and
  • Transcending Borders – is an external newsletter which seeks to inform, update and educate the C-BRTA clients (cross-border operators) on matters relevant to the industry.

 (ii) For The Voice – the objective is measured in two ways: 1) on the back page readers are requested to give feedback or make contributions to the publication, and 2) crossword competitions / puzzles for staff to resolve, are published; and

For Transcending Borders – there is no system of measuring the success of the objective.

(d) For The Voice – the results have been positive in most cases; and

For Transcending Borders – no formal feedback has been received or solicited.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(1) (b) RAF has not printed and distributed any newspapers (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since April 2016;

(2) (a) No copies were printed, (b) no costs involved, (c) (i) no objective (ii) no objective to measure (d) no results to measure in each case

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(1) (b) RTIA has not printed and distributed any newspapers (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since April 2016;

(2) (a) No copies were printed, (b) no costs involved, (c) (i) no objective (ii) no objective to measure (d) no results to measure in each case

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(1) (b) RTMC has not printed and distributed any newspapers (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since April 2016;

(2) (a) No copies were printed, (b) no costs involved, (c) (i) no objective (ii) no objective to measure (d) no results to measure in each case

South African National Roads Agency Limited

  1. (a) Please refer to Annexure 1

(b) Please refer to Annexure 1.

(i)(aa) Please refer to Annexure 1.

(bb) Please refer to Annexure 1.

(ii) SANRAL did not print and/or distribute newspapers since 1 April 2016

2. (a) refer to Annexure 1

(b) refer to Annexure 1

(c) (i) In 2014 we commissioned extensive research – both qualitative and quantitative – on SANRAL as a brand. The results showed that in general there is little awareness of road authorities and the roads they manage. According to the research results show that there is low awareness and limited understanding of the importance of road infrastructure and the role of SANRAL in the delivery of this backbone of the economy of South Africa. Research respondents preferred the following media channels in order of preference: television; newspaper; radio; mobile phone; e-mail and website. Our use of own media addresses these preferred forms as our newsletters are inserted in newspapers, is used on our digital platforms, and used to inform our other forms of communication on the broadcast medium. Our general objective through our publications was to inform and to famliiarise the public with SANRAL’s mandate and the extensive work it delivers. Specifically in regards this time period, refer to Annexure 1

(ii) SANRAL Publications are part of its “owned media” strategy. The latter is one element in the ESOP media mix – Earned media, shared media, Owned media and Paid media. Though we still invest in earned media (through public relations), shared media (though social media networks) and paid media (through advertising), we are putting more efforts in developing owned media because of the advantages it offers, namely, cost efficiency, longevity, versatility/mobility of content and editorial control.

This approach is informed by the National Communication Strategy Framework (2014-2019), which encourages the production of high volume communication platforms – such as Vuk’uzenzele – to achieve greater reach and impact.

The SANRAL publications are inserted in national, regional, local and community publications specific to audiences being targeted. In 2014/15, we produced publications with a total print run of 10 204 449 which were inserted in 233 publications which have a combined readership of 83 796 000.

In 2015/16, we produced publications with a total print run of 17 500 000 which were inserted in 252 publications which have a combined readership of 114 500 000

(d) SANRAL publishes its own media so that the members of the public are better informed of SANRAL’s mandate. This then aids the public to understand that SANRAL as an entity is more than just GFIP or tolls. The newsletters speak to all aspects of SANRAL’s activities including road safety, community development, environment, job creation, education, and the myriad aspects of road infrastructure maintenance, improvement and development. Perceptions about SANRAL as a brand and an understanding of what we do on a daily basis have improved from our interaction with member of the public who have commented positively on our newsletters. This we have gauged through the interactions we have on social media with those who have been exposed to or content.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. The were no newspapers printed and distributed by (a) N/A (b) the Air Company South Africa SOC Limited, in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016;
  1. In respect of each specified case, (a) N/A, (b) N/A, (c) (i)N/A and (ii) N/A and (d) N/A.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. The were no newspapers printed and distributed by (a) N/A (b) the Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited, in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2016;
  2. In respect of each specified case, (a) N/A, (b) N/A, (c) (i) N/A and (ii) N/A and (d) N/A.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. The were no newspapers printed and distributed by (a) N/A (b) the South African Civil Aviation Authority, in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016;
  2. In respect of each specified case, (a) N/A, (b) N/A, (c) (i)N/A and (ii) N/A and (d) N/A.

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

  1. The Ports Regulator has never printed any newspapers for the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and for the period since 01 April 2016.
  2. Not applicable.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. SAMSA has not printed nor distributed any newspapers.
  2. There is nothing applicable in this case

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The Railway Safety Regulator did not print or distribute any newspapers during 2014-15 and 2015-2016. RSR was complying with the Treasury note issued in 2014-2015 instructing organisations not to purchase newspapers.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. PRASA does not print and/or distribute newspapers. However, in respect of the above financial years, (i)(aa)(bb) and (ii) PRASA engaged the services of a company called KGP Media Investments (Pty) Limited (“KGP Media”) to publish on its behalf a commuter newspaper called Hambanathi and Kwela Express.
  1. In terms of the agreement between PRASA and KGP Media, KGP Media was obliged to produce “5 pages worth of exposure every month” produced biweekly and “12 insertions compatible for web and mobile broadcast”. Therefore KGP Media was obliged to produce

       (a) 24 publications in respect of the 2014/2015 financial year and 24 publications in respect of the 2015/2016 financial year

        (b) 2014/2015 – R6,370,362.12 and 2015/2016 – R6,370,772.58

        (c) (i) The objective was to disseminate updates on rail and public transport and to cover news that are informative and educational to empower the commuting public.

(ii) When the Public Protector found that the agreement between PRASA and KGP Media was concluded without following procurement procedures of PRASA, this agreement was terminated with effect from 10 March 2016

      (d) See response in (c).

03 May 2016 - NW1095

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)In light of various accidents involving ministerial security convoys, are government security details for Ministers (a) exempt from the National Road Traffic Act, Act 93 of 1996 Regulations and (b) ever (i) stopped and (ii) fined for road traffic act transgressions since 9 May 2009; if so, (2) (a) does the relevant department pay the fines involved and (b) has there been a national directive issued to all enforcement departments responsible for fine collections to ignore traffic fines via camera or any other means for vehicles belonging to the State; (3) what was the total amount of traffic fines that were issued to each Ministry in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years

Reply:

1. (a), Currently in terms of section 58 of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No. 93 of 1996) more in particular subsection (3) it provides amongst others that a traffic officer or a person appointed in terms of the South African Police Service Act, 1995 (Act No. 68 of 1995), who drives a vehicle in the carrying out of his or her duties or any person issued with the necessary authorisation and driving a vehicle may disregard the directions of a road traffic sign which is displayed in the prescribed manner. Section 60 of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 provides further that, notwithstanding the provisions of section 59, such may exceed the applicable general speed limit.

(b) (i) and (ii) No, they are not stopped whilst travelling with their lights on and therefore no fines are issued.

(2) (a) If a fine has been issued the relevant department pays the fines involved.

(b) No, a directive has been issued to disregard any offences committed by the Unit or any motor vehicle belonging to the state.

(3) The information requested is not available.

25 April 2016 - NW1034

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether there are any plans to extend the network of A Re Yeng, the Tshwane Bus Rapid Transit system, to (a) Atteridgeville, (b) Ga-Rankuwa, (c) Mamelodi, (d) Soshanguve, (e) Mabopane, (f) Winterveldt and/or (g) Temba; if not, why not in each case; if so, in each case, what are the (i) relevant details, (ii) current timeframes and (iii) anticipated date for (aa) infrastructure development and (bb) roll out of services to each of the specified areas?

Reply:

BACKGROUND

In 2011, the City of Tshwane (CoT) Mayoral Committee approved the Phase 1 report for the implementation of the BRT system. The Phase 1 network design comprises two trunk line services and numerous feeder services supplemented by a comprehensive NMT network. The trunk line service is divided into two (2) sections namely:

  • Line 1 – Pretoria CBD to Kopanong and
  • Line 2 – Pretoria CBD to Mahube Valley.

The trunk network is comprised of approximately 69 km (refer to ) of median dedicated trunk infrastructure and low floor median trunk stations. The BRT network integrates with the rail network at five key railway stations, these being Kopanong, Wonderboom, Pretoria Station, Hatfield as well as Denneboom. This provides for multimodal service integration to the North as well as the East of Pretoria CBD.

Furthermore, in February 2016 the CoT Mayoral Committee approved Line 3 evaluation report study which contains the BRT alignment between Pretoria CBD and Atteridgeville. The route alignment is 14.6km in length and integrates with the rail network at Saulsville rail station. shows A Re Yeng alignments.

The details below are based on Division of Revenue Act’s Public Transport Network Grant allocation. see the link: http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW1034-DivisionofRevenueAct.docx

Figure 1: A Re Yeng Alignment

Intermodal Facilities

Six public transport intermodal facilities are planned along the BRT network. This will allow for the affected operators (i.e. minibus taxi associations and bus operators) to transfer passenger to A Re Yeng services. The CoT is on the process of entering into agreement with affected operators to provide the feeder service between the suburbs/township and intermodal facilities.

The public transport intermodal facilities are earmarked at the following nodes:

  • Kopanong,
  • Wonderboom,
  • Akasia,
  • Saulsville,
  • Pretoria Station,
  • Menlyn, and
  • Denneboom.

Current A Re Yeng Operations

A Re Yeng inception phase (Line 2A) which operates between Pretoria CBD and Hatfield became operational in December 2014. The construction of A Re Yeng trunk route between Pretoria CBD and Wonderboom / Rainbow Junction (Line 1A) is underway and it is anticipated to become operational in 2016. The Rainbow Junction interim minibus taxi facility is also under construction. The purpose of these facilities is to enable seamless transfer of passengers between minibus taxi operators and A Re Yeng.

Three affected minibus taxi associations were selected to transfer passengers at (Wonderboom Station) Rainbow Junction. The affected minibus taxi associations are:

  • Hammanskraal Taxi Organisation (HATO);
  • Ga-Mokone, Hammanskraal, Stinkwater Taxi Association (GHSTA); and
  • Stinkwater Eersterust Taxi Association (SETA).

Permanent Rainbow Junction intermodal facility is planned to become operational in 2018 and additional affected operators will be required to transfer passengers at this facility.

RESPONSE

a) (i),(ii) Atteridgeville

A Re Yeng services to Atteridgeville are planned to become operational in 2020. Affected operators will transfer passengers at Saulsville intermodal facility and A Re Yeng stations along the route.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

b) (i),(ii) Ga-Rankuwa

Affected operators will provide the feeder services between Ga-Rankuwa and Akasia intermodal

facility. A Re Yeng services to Akasia are planned to become operational in 2019.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

c) (i),(ii) Mamelodi

A Re Yeng services to Mamelodi (Denneboom Intermodal Facility) are planned to become operational in 2020. Affected operators will provide feeder services between Mamelodi township and Denneboom Intermodal Facility.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

d) (i),(ii) Soshanguve

A Re Yeng services to Soshanguve (Kopanong Intermodal Facility) are planned to become operational in 2020. Affected operators will transfer passengers at A Re Yeng stations and at the following three intermodal facilities:

  • Kopanong,
  • Akasia, and
  • Rainbow Junction.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

e) (i),(ii) Mabopane

A Re Yeng services to Soshanguve (Kopanong Intermodal Facility) are planned to become operational in 2020. Affected operators from Mabopane will transfer passengers at A Re Yeng stations and three intermodal facilities at:

  • Kopanong,
  • Akasia, and
  • Rainbow Junction.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

f) (i),(ii) Winterveldt

A Re Yeng services to Soshanguve (Kopanong Intermodal Facility) are planned become operational in 2020. Affected operators from Winterveldt will transfer passengers at A Re Yeng stations and at the following three intermodal facilities:

  • Kopanong,
  • Akasia, and
  • Rainbow Junction.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

g) (i),(ii) Temba/Hammanskraal

A Re Yeng services to Rainbow Junction/ Wonderboom (Line 1A) are planned to become operational in 2016. Affected operators from Hammanskraal (i.e. HATO) will transfer passengers at Rainbow Junction interim minibus taxi transfer facility.

(iii) (aa) (bb) Refer to Figure 1 for more details.

NW1166E