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12 September 2017 - NW2568

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to him?

Reply:

The following boards were open on 11 June 2017 and closed 25 June 2017

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

Cross-Border Road Transport (C-BRTA)

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACCA)

The following boards’ applications opened on 27 August 2017 and will close on the 11 September 2017

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)

07 September 2017 - NW2528

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) Why have vacancies in the Board of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa not been filled and (b) by what date will these positions be filled; (2) whether he has found that board will be able to fulfil its mandate while it has vacancies on the board; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) An advert calling for nomination of persons to serve on the Board of the Agency was published in the Sunday Newspaper of the 05 February 2017. Members of the public responded positively and a number of nominations were received.

(b) The Department is currently busy with the shortlisting process and will make appointment in due course.

(2) The term of the Board lapsed on the 31 July 2017 and at the time there were five (5) remaining Board members. The Acting Chief Executive Officer of PRASA, Mr Lindikhaya Zide in terms of Section 49 (2)(b) has assumed the responsibility of the Accounting Authority of the Agency as an interim measure till the recruitment process of the new Board of Control has been finalized.

Section 49 (2)(b) of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999), provides that:

(1) Every Public Entity must have an Authority, which must be accountable for the purpose of this Act.

(2) If the Public Entity;

a) has a Board or other controlling body, that Board or controlling body is the Accounting Authority for that Entity; or

b) does not have a controlling body, the Chief Executive Officer or the other person in charge of the Public Entity is the Accounting Authority for that Public Entity unless specific legislation applicable to that Public Entity designates another person as the Accounting Authority”.

07 September 2017 - NW2523

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) Why has there been under expenditure with regard to the Rail Economic Regulator, (ii) what has his department done to change this and (iii) how is this being monitored and (b)(i) why were (aa) deliverables, (bb) timelines, (cc) timeframes and (dd) deadlines not met and (ii) what is being done to change the situation in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) The under expenditure resulted due to the poor quality of three draft reports received from service providers. Payment was not processed until the quality of the reports were addressed.

(ii) The Department has provided guidance to the service providers to improve the quality of the reports. A motivation for the rollover of funds was done to commit the funds that were not spent.

(iii) Meetings were held with the service providers and inputs provided in revising the reports to improve the quality and address the scope of work fully.

(b)(i) (aa), (bb), (cc), (dd)

The deliverables, timelines, timeframes and deadlines were not met due to the poor quality of three draft reports received from service providers. The Department did not process payment to service providers until such time as the quality of the reports were addressed.

(ii) The service provider has since fully delivered on the scope of work for the three reports and addressed the quality concerns. Payment has been processed.

07 September 2017 - NW2618

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether there is any obligation on any of the airports under control of the Airports Company of South Africa to close the roads running alongside the airport; if not, why the management of the O R Tambo International Airport has decided to close the roads that run alongside the airport; if so, (2) whether all airports are affected by this; if not, (a) why not, (b) what is the extent of the obligation on each airport so affected, (c) when the obligation needs to be implemented and (d) what are the reasons for this; (3) on what legal grounds is the obligation founded?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. The main object of Airports Company South Africa is the acquisition, establishment, development, provision, maintenance, management, control or operation of any airport of facility or service normally relating to the functioning of an airport. In executing this responsibility, the Airports Company is charged with the ensuring safety and security at all its airports. The frontage roads (upper and lower roadways) at O.R Tambo International Airport have been identified as a risk in that it provides easy access for criminals and illegal activities that threaten the safety and security of our airport and its passengers and stakeholders. This road is governed by the national road traffic act and is under the domain of the Ekurhuleni metropolitan municipality. We are in discussion with the metro on our position to restrict access to these roadways primarily to curb the existing safety and security concerns i.e. Cash in transit robberies, theft of passenger belonging and illegal touting.

2. Not all airports are effected. The risks and threat levels are significantly different for O.R Tambo International Airport. (a) Each airport will assess its own risks. (b) each airport will be responsible to implement mitigation measures to either control or erracate the risk

3. reastricted road access. This road is under the juristriction of the Ekurhuleni Metroppolitian municipality. The municipality is charged with this legal responsibility. The management of O.R Tambo International Airport has riased its concerns and suggested that the airport controls the access and egress onto the airport frontage roads.

07 September 2017 - NW2527

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on sponsorships in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years, (b) what are the relevant details in each case and (c) what criteria were used to spend the respective amounts on sponsorships?

Reply:

Department

(a)(i) Department did not provide any sponsorship.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

  1. the (ii) CBRTA did not spend any amount on sponsorships in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years.
  2. and (c) Not Applicable

Road Accident Fund

(a)(ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) spent the following amounts on sponsorships in:

(aa) 2014-15,

b) the relevant details in each case are:

(c) the criteria that were used to spend the respective amounts on sponsorships were the following:

R5 000 000

sponsorship of the Cape Town Jazz Festival comprising of the RAF obtaining exhibition rights at the festival i.e. the RAF exhibiting its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks, and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. The sponsorship showcased the RAF’s product service offering to the affluent masses that attend this event since it has a massive following with year on year growth;

sponsorships were selected where opportunity existed for further brand building and which allowed the RAF to deliver on its mandate;

sponsorship opportunities that targeted the broader spectrum of the South African road user market (across all segments) were leveraged upon; and

sponsorships that offered effective platforms to educate the public of the RAF’s full service offering bouquet; promote direct claims, and promote road safety were explored.

Due to ongoing cost containment measures the RAF is not entering into any new sponsorship agreements.

R1 436 400

sponsorship of the Comrades Marathon comprising of the RAF having second tier sponsorship rights for the Comrades Marathon and having sole branding rights to the halfway mark. This in addition also involved the RAF having broadcast rights on the race day through various TV broadcast elements on SABC 2 channel. As a second tier sponsor the RAF obtained exhibition rights at the Comrades Marathon exhibition i.e. both at the ICC and the airport allowing it to exhibit its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, promoting the safe use of roads amongst runners, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition areas. The RAF obtained branding exposure at the finish line through crowd banner advertising also. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product service offering to the masses as the event has a massive following with a year on year growth;

 

R855 000

sponsorship of the Two Oceans Marathon comprising of the RAF obtaining broadcast rights on race day on television in addition to the RAF obtaining exhibition rights at the event i.e. the RAF exhibiting its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product service offering to the masses as the event has a massive following with a year on year growth;

 

R974 700

sponsorship of the Cape Argus comprising of the RAF obtaining exhibition rights at the festival i.e. the RAF exhibiting its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product service offering and promote road safety amongst the affluent sector of the road user market. The event has a massive following;

 

(bb) 2015-16

 

R6874.20

sponsorship of the Gauteng Motor Festival comprising of the RAF obtaining exhibition rights at the event i.e. the RAF exhibiting its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. This is a sponsorship to educate motorists on road safety consciousness who are one of the primary target market of the RAF as outlined on its market segmentation model;

 

R1 585 740

sponsorship of the Comrades Marathon comprising of the RAF having second tier sponsorship rights for the Comrades Marathon and having sole branding rights to the halfway mark. This in addition also involved the RAF having broadcast rights on the race day through various TV broadcast elements on SABC 2 channel. As a second tier sponsor the RAF obtained exhibition rights at the Comrades Marathon exhibition i.e. both at the ICC and the airport allowing it to exhibit its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, promoting the safe use of roads amongst runners, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition areas. The RAF obtained branding exposure at the finish line through crowd banner advertising also. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product service offering to the masses as the event has a massive following with a year on year growth;

 

R61873.50

sponsorship of the Rand Easter Show comprising exhibition rights at the show i.e. the RAF exhibiting its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. The RAF was given a platform to have an experiential driving simulator to raise awareness amongst show attendants on issues around texting and driving etc. being disruptive to drivers. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product service offering to the masses as the event has a massive following with a year on year growth;

 

(cc) 2016-17 financial years

 

R50 000

sponsorship of the Tembisa Marathon comprising of the RAF branding the race with crowd banners and the RAF obtaining exhibition rights at the festival i.e. the RAF exhibiting its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product and drive road safety education to the masses of athletes at the bottom tier of the market;

 

R28 500

sponsorship of the South African Medical Association comprising of the RAF having exhibition rights to event and conducting a presentation educating the delegation on the RAF mandate. The RAF exhibited its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition area. This is a sponsorship partnership to educate on the RAF mandate and where the organization is headed;

 

R1 735 080

sponsorship of the Comrades Marathon comprising of RAF having second tier sponsorship rights for the Comrades Marathon and having sole branding rights to the halfway mark. This in addition also involved the RAF having broadcast rights on the race day through various TV broadcast elements on SABC 2 channel. As a second tier sponsor the RAF obtained exhibition rights at the Comrades Marathon exhibition i.e. both at the ICC and the airport allowing it to exhibit its full service offering, educating the public on how to lodge a claim directly with the RAF, promoting the safe use of roads amongst runners, distribution of service offering flyers, the RAF’ staff engaging attendants and assisting them with claims status checks and the RAF branding the allocated exhibition areas. The RAF obtained branding exposure at the finish line through crowd banner advertising also. This is a sponsorship to showcase the RAF’s product service offering to the masses as the event has a massive following with a year on year growth;

 

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

  1. (ii) RTIA:

(aa) 2014-15: R13,440.47

bb) 2015-16: RNIL

(cc) 2016-17: R 10,964.23

  1. relevant details and

(b) (aa) Sponsorship for the Department of Transport sports activities undertaken for recreational purposees.

(b) (cc) Sponsorship for David Motloung air plane ticket to the Netherlands.

  1. Request was made and warded based on the merits

Road Traffic Management Corporation

  1. the (ii) RTMC did not spend any amount on sponsorships in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years.
  2. and (c) Not Applicable

South African National Roads Agency Limited

  1. (ii)

aa) 2014/2015

(b) Details Sponsorship

(aa) Value of sponsorship 

(c) Criteria

International Math Olympiad

R 1 000 000.00

The IMO was hosted in Cape Town in July 2014, for the first time on African soil. The IMO is a problem-solving contest for high school students. The competition brings together the cream of the crop of high school learners from more than 100 countries and five continents to compete in the premier global mathematical competition. The event was endorsed by the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Science and Technology of the Republic of South Africa. By hosting a successful IMO and ensuring South African students excel in the competition, the country will be sending out the message to the rest of the continent that there is hope that Africa can measure up to international standards in the mathematical world by producing the next generation of mathematicians.

Ecological Award

R89 500.00

There are very few environmental focused initiatives carried out in this large scale. In order to address SANRAL’s environment communications pillar, the participation in the awards allowed SANRAL naming rights to the award, branding and SANRAL was included in all PR activities as well as social media initiatives.

(bb) 2015 - 2016

(b) Details Sponsorship

(aa) Value of sponsorship 

(c) Criteria

Ecological Award

R100 000.00

There are very few environmental focused initiatives carried out in this large scale. In order to address SANRAL’s environment communications pillar, the participation in the awards allowed SANRAL naming rights to the award, branding and SANRAL was included in all PR activities as well as social media initiatives.

Sponsorship of staff members comrades running kit

R4 243.75

The staff member was equipped with SANRAL and e-toll branded running kit to create greater awareness. The staff member approached SANRAL with this request as he is a proud brand ambassador of SANRAL and its projects.

Heuningvlei School bags

R34 413.75

As part of SANRAL’s Western Cape Imbizo, stationery was collected from all its suppliers and service providers at the Imbizo and sponsorship was offered to the region to purchase the school bags of the children in Northern Cape.

Laptops for EFATA School for the Blind in Mthatha

R68 400.00

SANRAL donated laptops to the school for the Blind Mthatha, off the R61 near the SANRAL project, as part of SANRAL’s outreach campaign. SANRAL donated 5 x Desktop Computers and speakers, including Windows Software, and a day of training.

Robotics programme in Waterkloof High School

R50 000.00

The Robotic programme is linked to Math education and basics of engineering.

School Quiz competition sponsorship of prize money

R49 875.00

SANRAL ran an outreach programme between schools in the Mpumalanga and North West areas with the winning schools awarded prize money towards their science and Math requirements. Sibusisiwe High School winner (Mpumalanga), Runners-up: Masitakhe Secondary School (Mpumalanga) and Barolong High School (North West).

Sponsorship of Blankets

R11 001.00

The sponsorship was part of an initiative by the DOT, as a result of the tragic fires in Plastic view township, where the residents lost their belongings during winter.

Sponsorship of school shoes

R19 540.00

School shoes were donated as part of an initiative by DOT.

Grocery packs

R67 097.04

Grocery packs were donated to communities as an initiative by the DOT.

Impumelelo Education Trust Event - Mpumalanga

R27 502.50

Career exhibition for the children in Mpumalanga. SANRAL assisted in sponsorship as well educating the children about its scholarship and bursaries.

SAICE Bridge Building Competition

R57 000.00

The competition involves schools throughout SA, Zimbabwe and Swaziland. Assists with building the careers with our youth and encouraging them to take math and science and entice them to study civil engineer which is part of the scares skills in SA. SANRAL gets the opportunity to brand at the event as well as on the logo is on the marketing collateral which then showcases SANRAL as one of the sponsors.

cc) 2016/2017

Details Sponsorship (b)

Value of sponsorship  (aa)

Criteria

Ecological Award

R100 000.00

There are very few environmental focused initiatives carried out in this large scale. In order to address SANRAL’s environment communications pillar, the participation in the awards allowed SANRAL naming rights to the award, branding and SANRAL was included in all PR activities as well as social media initiatives.

CEO sleep out

R100 000.00

The CEO sleep out took place on the Nelson Mandela Bridge, the aim was an opportunity for CEOs of corporations and organisations to make people aware of the plight of street children.

Robotics programme in Waterkloof High School

R50 000.00

The Robotic programme is linked to Math education and basics of engineering.

Grocery packs

R67 144.00

Grocery packs were donated to communities as an initiative by DOT.

SAICE Bridge building competition

R57 000.00

The competition involves schools throughout SA, Zimbabwe and Swaziland. Assists with building the careers with our youth and encouraging them to take math and science and entice them to study civil engineer which is part of the scares skills in SA. SANRAL gets the opportunity to brand at the event as well as on the logo is on the marketing collateral which then showcases SANRAL as one of the sponsors.

(c) SANRAL evaluated each sponsorship request on its individual merits linked to SANRAL's objectives, communication pillars of operation and the spatial proximity of SANRAL projects.

Ports Regulator Of South Africa (PRSA)

(ii) The Ports Regulator did not spend any funds for sponsorships in the (aa) 2014/15, (bb) 2015/16, and (cc) 2016/17 financial years. (b) not applicable. (c) not applicable.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

The table below depict the amount South African Maritime Authority (SAMSA) spent on sponsorships in the past three financial years.

The sponsorship was made towards an annual event named the South African Oceans Festival. SAMSA, in collaboration with a private company - Worldsport South Africa, provided sponsorship for the Cape Town stopover of the Volvo Oceans Race. This was aimed at raising the Authority’s profile within the maritime industry and was targeted at both local and international stakeholders.

SPONSORSHIPS: SOUTH AFRICAN MARITIME AUTHORITY (SAMSA)

       

Description

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

 

 

 

Actual Spending

1 140 000

-

-

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(aa)R17 069 076, 24

(bb) 2015-16 R10 691 097, 09

and (cc) 2016-17 financial years,

R1 635 934, 95

(b)

  • CSI: R12 376 303.84
  • Corporate Sponsorship: R4 692 772.40

2015/16

  • CSI: R2 294 900
  • Corporate Sponsorship: R8 936 197.09

2016/17

  • CSI: R909 934, 95
  • Corporate Sponsorship: R726 520.00

(c) There is a CSI and sponsorship policy that is used as a criteria, i.e.

  1. Commercial sponsorship:
  • PRASA sponsored commercial initiatives with a high return on investment, maximizing publicity of our brand, recognition and association of the brand/s
  • Contributed to increasing sales and loyalty to the brand/s and services
  • Actively targeted new customers and educated them about the unique benefits to be gained by using the services
  • Communicated directly to our target audience, by proactively combining other elements in our marketing mix
  • Visibly associated with prestigious events
  1. CSI/ Goodwill projects:
  • CSI projects were based on requests PRASA receives
  • PRASA supported goodwill projects in communities in and around our operational areas
  • Sought initiatives that increase contact with commuters and surrounding communities to encourage
    • Ownership and protection of assets by the community
    • Interaction with commuters and community by the leadership of the Agency.
    • Targeted events and initiatives at stations, corridors and communities
  • Supported initiatives in partnership with local municipalities in areas where PRASA operates to improve the conditions of those communities

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a)

(aa) 2014-15: R39.6m

(bb) 2015-16: R41.2m

(cc) 2016-17: R38.8m

(b) All financial years fell within the budget allocated.

(c) ACSA has aligned its SED Programmes to the 2030 National Development Plan (NDP) priorities. The following priority goals of the NDP have been adopted by the company, as they relate to the company’s SED focus areas:

• Economy and Employment

• Environmental Sustainability and Resilience

• Improving Education, Training and Innovation

• National Building & Social Cohesion

SED contributes 1% of NPAT to transformation, however ACSA is already spending 2% of NPAT towards socially and economically transforming societies within which our Airports exist through entrepreneurship, poverty alleviation programmes, youth development, empowerment of people with disability, women empowerment; skills development and IT infrastructure development in rural schools.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a), (i), Not applicable, (a) (ii), all sponsorships by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) are guided by the organisation’s Sponsorship Policy, and Corporate Social Investment priorities, which are:

  • Aviation related projects, including projects which support innovation within the industry;
  • Transformation projects, e.g. career awareness, bursaries; etc.;
  • Environmental protection initiatives; and
  • Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

FINANCIAL YEAR

  1. AMOUNT
  1. RELEVANT DETAILS
  1. SELECTION CRITERIA

(aa) 2014/2015

R74 823

Thirty (30) packs of groceries were donated to destitute families in the Prixley Ka Seme District area on 18 December 2014.

Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

 

R32 450

The SACAA sponsored a luncheon hosted on 12 December 2014 for 90 elderly women from Dipuo Difedile Centre situated in Soweto.

Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

 

R21 000

A cash donation of R21 000 was donated to Mayday-SA to fund its helpline.

Aviation related projects.

 

R75 000

The SACAA purchased a sponsorship package offered by Air Traffic Navigation Services (ATNS) for its Avi-Afrique Summit.

Aviation related projects.

 

R48 592

23rd ACI African Region Annual Assembly, which took place on 10-14 October 2014. The SACAA purchased a Silver Sponsorship package.

Aviation related projects.

 

R30 000

The SACAA sponsored an Aviation Camp, which was part of the Girl Fly Programme. This took place from 6 – 11 October 2014.

Aviation transformation related projects.

 

R100 000

Safety First Campaign, which is a campaign aimed at promoting superior airmanship. The campaign is a partnership supported by various stakeholders including the SACAA and Aeroclub of South Africa.

Aviation related project

Total for 2014/2015 FY

R381 865

 

(bb) 2015/2016

R106 335

50 Grocery hampers were donated to child-headed households in Perdekop, Carolina, Elukwatini, Koopleagte, Bergville, and Luganda on 18 December 2015.

Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

 

R12 368

50 pairs of school shoes were donated to child-headed households in Perdekop, Carolina, Elukwatini, Koopleagte, Bergville, Luganda and 18 December 2015

Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

 

R20 000

Sponsorship of Aeroclub’s 95th birthday celebrations

Aviation related projects.

 

R1 400

Sponsoring of artwork to design the logo and leatherhead for Wonders of Aviation.

Aviation related projects.

 

R20 000

MayDay-SA sponsorship

Aviation related project.

 

R100 000

Safety First Campaign, which is a campaign aimed at promoting superior airmanship. The campaign is a partnership supported by various stakeholders including the SACAA and Aeroclub of South Africa.

Aviation related project

Total for 2015/2016 FY

R260 103

 

(cc) 2016/2017

R318 530

The SACAA sponsored the training for members of the South African Network for Women in Transport. The training took place in all 9 provinces from 30 June to 15 August 2016, and focused on supply chain processes and tendering.

Transformation initiative.

 

R71 400

60 learners from five rural districts of Mpumalanga were transported for a tour of the OR Tambo International Airport, the SACAA, and the Air Traffic and Navigation Services air traffic control tower on 29 June 2017.

Transformation initiative.

 

R25 000

The SACAA sponsored the SAASMA Conference, which was attended by Aviation Medical Doctors and was hosted between 28 and 31 July 2016.

Aviation related projects.

 

R26 365

Sponsorship towards a Youth and Career Development programme event held in Perdekop on 25 March 2017

Transformation initiative.

 

R139 435

Donation of 100 Grocery hampers for child-headed households in Perdekop, Perdekop, Carolina, Elukwatini, Koopleagte, Bergville, and Luganda, held in December 2016.

Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

 

R30 000

Sponsorship of Aeroclub Airweek which took place in the Free State province.

Aviation related projects.

 

R100 000

The SACAA purchased a sponsorship package offered by Air Traffic Navigation Services for its Avi-Afrique Summit.

Aviation related projects.

 

R274 785.60

A Community Corporate Social Investment initiative whereby the SACAA partnered with other national transport entities to upgrade the conditions of a dilapidated school hostel in Tosca.

Community development projects aligned with national imperatives.

 

R100 000

Safety First Campaign, which is a campaign aimed at promoting superior airmanship. The campaign is a partnership supported by various stakeholders including the SACAA and Aeroclub of South Africa.

Aviation related project.

Total for 2016/2017 FY

R1 085 515.60

   

07 September 2017 - NW2526

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) number of consultants have been used by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him in each of the past three financial years, (b) are the reasons for using the services of consultants, (c) are the budget allocations and (d) are the actual costs incurred in each case respectively?

Reply:

Department

Financial year

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

(a)(i) Number of consultants used by Department

64

64

63

(b) Reasons for using the services of consultants for the Department:

Consultants were used to maintain the Electronic National Traffic Information System (eNaTIS), to scrap taxis, to oversee provincial road maintenance, to render oil pollution prevention services, to perform feasibility studies and to develop plans, strategies, policies and legislation.

Financial year

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

(c) Budget allocations for Department

R256,125,000

R325,807,000

R437,897,000

       

(d) Actual costs for Department

R443,607,000

R308,394,000

R718,486,000

In 2016/17 and in 2014/15 the actual costs exceeded the final budget allocations because the cost of maintaining the eNaTIS was unfunded.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

(a) (ii) (b), (c) and (d)

YEAR

(a) NUMBER

(b) REASON

(c) BUDGET

(d) ACTUAL COST

2014/15

9

Conducting market research on routes for the developing of market access regulation tool

R 2 953 149.77

R 1 122 279.60

   

Development of regulations for the Electronic Route Adherence Control

R 132 659.70

R 50 414.40

   

Interpretation services

R 63 152.85

R 23 999.85

   

Actuarial valuation of post-retirement medical benefit

R 72 510.45

R 27 556.00

   

Development of SMME Capacity building Initiatives

R 2 156 541.10

R 819 546.00

   

Conducting independent customer satisfaction survey

R 899 933.69

R 342 000.00

   

Legal Opinion

R 28 994.05

R 11 018.55

   

Conducting of forensic investigations

R 3 193 103.09

R 1 213 468.58

   

Transcription Services

R 4 955.30

R 1 883.16

   

TOTAL

R 9 505 000.00

R 3 612 166.14

2015/16

9

Transcription services

R 245 780.97

R 18 372.21

   

Conducting of forensic investigations

R 599 429.01

R 44 807.52

   

VIP Integration into Pastel Evolution

R 406 051.69

R 30 352.50

   

Payroll consulting

R 169 128.87

R 12 642.44

   

Disciplinary Hearing Chairperson

R 683 184.09

R 51 068.24

   

Piloting and implementation of SMME Capacity building initiatives

R 5 719 037.84

R 427 500.00

   

Development of electronic adherence route adherence control regulations

R 931 821.90

R 69 654.00

   

Development of Business Continuity Plan

R 640 532.24

R 47 880.00

   

Translation services

R 10 033.39

R 750.00

   

TOTAL

R 9 405 000.00

R 703 026.91

2016/17

9

Facilitation of Board Strategic Planning session

R 168 553.63

R 136 782.90

   

Development of CoBit 5 ICT governance frameworks

R 498 981.11

R 404 928.00

   

Transactional Advisor for the new permit issuance system

R 240 926.96

R 195 514.56

   

Development of Intranet

R 55 078.39

R 44 696.65

   

Actuarial valuation of post-retirement medical benefit

R 18 431.08

R 14 957.00

   

Conducting Job Evaluations and benchmarking

R 160 005.48

R 129 846.00

   

Conducting forensic investigations

R 221 790.33

R 179 985.00

   

Payroll consulting

R 33 872.67

R 27 488.00

   

Translation services

R 2 360.35

R 1 915.45

   

TOTAL

R 1 400 000.00

R 1 136 113.56

Road Accident Fund

REPLY

(a)(ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) used the following consultants[1] in the past three financial years:

(b) the reason for using the services of consultants in each instance was that the RAF either lacked capacity and, or, expertise to deliver the required services,

(c) the budget allocation in each case is set out below:

(d) the actual cost incurred in each case is set out below:

Bytes People Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

1,847,789.52

2,072,176.13

Edward Nathan Sonnenberg

 

110,236.53

110,236.53

Routledges Modise Incorporated

 

21,250,000.00

20,365,623.51

MFI Data & Networking Solution

 

579,347.10

579,347.10

Lindsay Keller Attorneys

 

685,323.81

685,323.81

Price Waterhouse Coopers Incorporated

 

188,939.27

563,972.82

CA Young Waardasies

 

66,316.65

66,316.65

Dyason Attorneys

 

76,438.01

76,438.01

Gildenhuys Lessing Malatji Inc

 

62,899.68

62,899.68

KPMG Services (Pty) Ltd

 

3,321,000.00

1,481,463.08

21st Century Pay Solutions

 

168,036.00

168,036.00

Deloitte & Touche

 

13,711,128.72

13,885,109.68

Gobodo Forensic Accounting

 

18,756.59

18,756.59

Maserumule Incorporated

 

2,600,000.00

2,099,296.97

South African Board For Personnel

 

167,037.76

167,037.76

Ernst & Young Advisory Services

 

5,527,854.42

10,300,791.16

P-E Corprate Services SA

 

171,233.70

171,233.70

Gijima Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

7,185,726.77

7,185,726.77

ICAS Employee and Organisational Enhancement Services

 

3,965,225.30

1,413,341.28

Independent Actuaries and Consultants

 

305,558.85

149,501.09

Bereau for Economic Research

 

500,000.00

39,672.00

Price Waterhouse Coopers Incorporated

 

4,105,238.68

2,605,192.42

Webber Wentzel

 

10,000,000.00

7,623,235.92

C2C Valuations CC

 

25,080.00

25,080.00

Bowman Gilfillan

 

160,092.49

160,092.49

Empowerdex Northern Regions (Pty)Ltd

 

209,109.00

209,109.00

Corporate Valuations CC

 

6,230.05

6,230.05

True South Actuaries & Consultants

 

7,824,401.30

6,173,690.33

Mothle Jooma Sabdia Incorporated

 

130,092.61

130,092.61

Ashreq Environmental Occupational

 

395,119.27

395,119.27

Rain Chartered Accountants (Pty) Ltd

 

500,000.00

143,301.42

South African Reward Association

 

41,295.00

41,295.00

SD Snyman t/a Rebel Documents

 

9,192.00

9,192.00

Alexander Forbes Financial Services

 

3,254,110.00

3,102,624.00

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo Inc

 

4,107,647.04

3,485,260.12

Core Focus (Pty) Ltd

 

18,146,300.60

10,542,313.02

Resolve Solution Partners(Pty)Ltd

 

26,238,181.76

8,969,162.04

Wolters Kluwer Tax and Accounting

 

432,649.38

432,649.38

NBC Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

2,735,000.00

2,520,000.00

Forensic Document Consultants

 

300,000.00

1,938.00

Perfect Transcriber

 

6,883.00

6,883.00

Performanta Technologies (Pty)Ltd

 

1,841,684.82

1,841,684.82

Lineran (Pty) Ltd

 

232,200.00

232,200.00

Matshekga Labour Consultants

 

500,000.00

194,218.50

Grant Thornton Verification Service

 

202,350.00

202,350.00

A Khan t/a Anisa Khan Attorneys

 

32,465.00

32,465.00

Masipa Incorporated Attorneys

 

1,350,000.00

1,199,232.72

Advanced Risk Solution 10000 (Pty) Ltd

 

500,000.00

253,880.00

Astute Advisory CC

 

21,386,400.00

21,218,644.42

Ravuku Strategic Dispute Resolution

 

500,000.00

488,500.00

Indyebo Incorporated (Pty)Ltd

 

1,500,000.00

1,368,622.88

Qina And Sekhabisa Incorporated Attorneys

 

1,669,408.68

1,099,394.11

Ez Trade 112 Cc t/a Just PC's

 

11,400.00

11,400.00

Diale Mogashoa Inc t/a Diale Mogashoa

 

31,464.00

31,464.00

Growth In Motion (Pty)Ltd

 

462,099.00

462,099.00

Edge Forensic And Risk Consultant

 

362,520.00

362,520.00

Govindasamy, Ndzingi & Govender Inc

 

241,199.26

241,199.26

Crosscheck Information Bureau (Pty) Ltd

 

250,000.00

250,000.00

Dwarika, Naidoo and Company

 

3,000,000.00

156,384.00

FCB Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

6,212,190.60

6,747,132.41

Baclan Energy (Pty) Ltd

 

4,098.30

4,098.30

  1. In this response the term “consultant” used in the question is interpreted to have the meaning assigned to the term by the National Treasury, .i.e. “a professional person appointed to provide technical and specialist advice or to assist with the design and implementation of projects and/or programs.” Accordingly, other service providers who do not meet the aforementioned definition are excluded.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(a) number of consultants have been used (ii) each entity reporting to him:

(b) are the reasons for using the services of consultants,

(c) the budget allocations and

(d) are the actual costs incurred in each case respectively?

Road Traffic Management Corporation

Please see response below:

South African National Roads Agency Limited

2014/15 = 104

2015/16 = 102

2016/17 = 116

2014/15 = R 1 275 124 727

2015/16 = R 1 503 036 446

2016/17 = R 1 777 223 195

2014/15 = R 1 127 245 893

2015/16 = R 1 202 029 289

2016/17 = R 1 601 028 593

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

139

83

67

(c) & (d) Budget Allocations and actual costs

 

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

Total

Budget

R94 560 169

R87 500 331

R76 385 640

R258 446 140

Actual

R69 744 073

R80 351 807

R89 727 542

R239 823 421

Strategic

Tactical

Operational

Operational (continued)

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

Reply IT Consulting Services

Year

Consultant 

Services Procured

Cost

Justification

Additional comments

2014/15

Bayajula

Business Process Mapping

R 3, 000, 000

To complement existing staff to ensure company-wide business processes were mapped in the allotted time

This was a once-off engagement

2015/16

Knowledge Integration Dynamics

Facilitation of workshops and development of specification for an enterprise Business Intelligence/Market Intelligence platform

R120 000

ATNS did not have the experience to conduct these workshops and extract appropriate requirements from users in relation to Business Intelligence/Market Intelligence area

This was a once-off engagement. The company did not tender for the work by virtue of having assisted in developing the specification

2015/16

KnowMax for IKM

Facilitation of knowledge management champions workshop

R 50 000

External expert facilitators were required to assist drive buy-in

This was a once-off engagement

2015/16

Aptronics

Provide IT network assessment services

R 140 000

There were network issues that were hampering the successful installation of data storage equipment.

This was a once-off engagement

           
 

IT does however sign support and maintenance agreements with service providers from which we have procured IT systems or they may have assisted us with the roll-out of IT systems for which they are accredited by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) to implement and support. These support and maintenance agreements allow us to access critical support services from these service providers whenever there are system malfunctions that cannot be resolved by internal IT staff and also to allow service providers to cover for critical resources whenever they take planned leave.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

Financial year

Consultant

Services received (b)

Budget ( c)

Actual costs (d)

2016/17

Meridiam Economics

Asset Valuation project for NPA assets

2 000 000

1 915 086

2014/15

KPMG

Development of Finance policies and procedures

55 900

33 141

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

The table below depicts the amount spent by the South African Maritime Authority (SAMSA) on use of consultants in the past three financial years.

The services of consultants were mainly used in providing ICT services in areas where SAMSA did not possess the necessary skills and expertise as well as where there was not adequate capacity internally. This is being addressed by beefing up (as evident from a reduction in actual expenditure) internal capacity with a view to ensure that these services are being provided internally within the Authority.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)Not applicable, (ii), (b), (c), (d), the South African Civil Aviation Authority has fully implemented National Treasury Cost Containment measures regarding the use of consultants as set out in National Treasury Instruction 01 of 2013/14 as well as National Treasury Instruction 02 of 2016/17. The services of consultants during the past three financial years is as follows.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

2014/15 Financial Year

(a)(ii) The total number of consultants used is 23.

(b) The services provided were:

Amount (R)

Services

54 475,00

Investigations

387 673,77

Engineering Consultant

423 669,60

Strategic planning Facilitators

496 675,20

MQS project

74 100,00

Strategic Plan Facilitators

19 950,00

Litigation costs

213 801,70

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

83 363,25

Pastel service consultant

572 280,00

Transactional advisor

61 978,00

Pastel Consulting and services

440 462,62

Legal advice

99 412,00

Legal advice

24 775,51

Legal Opinion

128 554,00

Legal Opinion

236 678,50

Legal Opinion

699 783,30

Drafting of a Rail regulation- Security

629 999,34

Drafting of a Rail regulation- Safety Critical Grades

363 438,02

Legal services- Board Of inquiry Investigation

230 281,75

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

239 670,40

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

6 726,00

Salary Surveys

177 803,77

Chairing Disciplinary Proceedings

240 996,00

HR Support

5 906 547,73

 

(c) The budget allocated for professional fees which are inclusive of consultancy fees for the financial year was R17 134 472, 52.

(d) The Actual costs incurred for consultancy services during the financial year amounted to R5 906 547, 73.

2015/16 Financial Year

(a ii) The total number of consultants used is 56.

(b) The services provided were:

 

2015-2016

Amount

Services

513 082,62

Leadership Allignment

221 318,39

Rail expert consultant

715 213,20

Management Quality Services

602 156,00

ICT Assessment Report

1 138 534,50

Development of RSR Value Culture

127 791,72

Facilitators Board Strategic Session

94 962,00

Investigation- misconduct

20 822,92

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

101 368,90

Ict Project Management

186 213,30

Pastel Consulting

512 436,00

ICT Assessment Report

246 753,00

Facilitator for Risk Management Training

99 636,00

Strategy Facilitators

457 368,00

Threat and Risk Assessment

1 088 700,00

Risk Management Services

124 420,04

Engineering services and Project

1 993 904,63

Development of the High Speed Rail Standard

547 120,00

Economic impact Analysis on the asset maintenance of railway stock

581 135,41

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

694 260,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

441 539,95

Cost Benefit Consulting

742 539,80

Engineering services- Signalling Assessment

116 109,00

Development of a Fatigue Management Standard

822 401,13

Drafting of Rail Regulations

616 500,00

Drafting of Rail Regulations- Rail Reserve Management

76 721,20

Legal Support

345 108,00

Legal Support

226 800,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

48 367,50

Legal Support

1 286 000,00

Research and Drafting of Regulations

1 000 688,50

Legal Support

27 000,00

Chairing of disciplinary Hearings

1 196 538,00

Legal support

68 500,00

Draft Regulations

60 131,00

Legal Support

77 753,33

Draft Regulations

239 400,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

229 297,54

Auditing Services- Board of Inquiry

366 624,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

304 500,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

609 440,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

510 670,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

329 360,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

190 836,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

219 840,00

Engineering services- BOI Investigation

926 991,60

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

101 500,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

96 957,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

60 876,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

975 327,00

HR Support

478 800,00

Organisational Alignment

396 262,29

Chairing Disciplinary Hearing

109 760,00

Pension Fund Advisors

34 200,00

Development of RSR Equity Plan

27 034,48

Disability Accessibility Audit for RSR

42 813,84

Caseware training and consulting

23 470 383,79

 

(c) The budget allocated for professional fees which are inclusive of consultancy fees for the financial year was R38 462 471.00

(d) Actual costs incurred for consultancy services during the financial year amounted to R23 470 383,79

2016/17 Financial Year

(a ii) The total number of consultants used is 35.

(b) The services provided were:

Amount

Services

704 919,00

Management Quality Services

1 177 881,27

Strategic Thinking Projects

498 000,00

Safety Culture Training

431 500,00

Executive leadership coaching

421 800,00

ICT Forensic investigations

521 048,06

Value Coaching

178 489,96

Establishment of the Pre-Audit unit

132 525,00

Board Evaluation

30 995,12

Board Induction Workshop

123 120,00

Legal Opinion

403 616,47

Risk vulnerability Assessment

4 345 112,56

Development of High speed Rail Standards

66 500,00

Regulatory Impact Assessment

599 098,50

Assessment and provision of Peer reviews of the safety assessments reports

496 900,00

Provision of Assessment of peer review of the safety reports on new works

584 019,69

Legal Opinion

1 067 150,25

Legal Opinion

55 119,34

Legal Arbitration

409 032,00

Legal Opinion

32 337,00

Litigations

527 472,27

Litigations

35 500,00

Chairing of Hearings

136 800,00

Legal Representations

111 815,46

Legal Opinion

361 500,00

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

140 402,40

Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

495 996,00

ICT risk assessment

14 747,83

Pastel System consultations

239 536,80

HR Support

174 852,00

Chairing of disciplinary Hearings

43 525,90

Investigation for improper conduct

20 559,60

Sage Pastel Consultations

571 508,24

Financial / Reporting Supports

7 338 058,36

Rail Risk Assessment

499 999,44

Cost Benefit Analysis

22 991 438,52

 

(c) The budget allocated for professional fees which are inclusive of consultancy fees for the financial year was R38 719 481.00

(d) Actual costs incurred for consultancy services during the financial year amounted to R27 228 633.07

  • 2016/17: 9 consultants
  • 2015/16: 5 consultants
  • 2014/15: 3 consultants
  • 2016/17:
  • HR Consulting related mainly to the introduction of the performance framework with a view to move away from current DPSA to Patterson dispensation;
  • The development of an organisational structure for the Agency and
  • Placement of human capital contractors for labour related matters and governance unit
  • IT audit is the outsourced services required by Internal Audit, the unit currently does not resources internally.
  • 2015/16:
  • Forensic Audit Services onto procurement
  • IT Audit Professional Fees
  • Accounting Opinion of the framework to be adopted for AARTO collections
  • Board and Committee Appraisals
  • Space Planning Services - confirming dimensions and structural and electrical
  • 2014/15:
  • Assessment of AARTO Readiness by Magna BC
  • Patterson Migration: Job Evaluation
  • Secondment Financial Accountant to assist with AARTO accounting after take over from the RTMC (complexities in the accounting treatment)
  • 2016/17: R12,800,000.00
  • 2015/16: R 8,872,000.00
  • 2014/15: R 8,245,997.00
  • 2016/17 = R 3,467,508.54
  • 2015/16 = R 786,999.56
  • 2014/15 = R 1,633,225.82
  1. (ii) SANRAL
  2. SANRAL uses the traditional construction and engineering procurement model of appointing built environment professional for design and supervision, and contractors for project delivery for all construction and maintenance projects. This model is also applied by other infrastructure SOEs. (project duration is normally between 1 to 5 years)
  3. Budget Allocations:
  4. Actual Costs:
  5. Number of consultants that have been used and each entity reporting to him in each of the Past three years:
  6. Consultants are used for three main functional areas namely:
  • ACSA Operation transport strategy
  • Board Evaluation
  • Board Evaluation Review
  • Board Strategy Facilitation
  • Business Development Strategy Development
  • Design and implement employee transport strategy
  • Employee housing project
  • Facilitation of Board Strategic Risk Assessments Workshop
  • Information technology strategy formulation
  • Re-engineering of company operating structure
  • SCM Strategy Analysis
  • SCM strategy formulation
  • SCM Transformation model and implementation plan
  • ACSA Value Chain Analysis
  • Advise on Caseware software
  • Airport Master Plans
  • Application of Property Developments Rights on the Western Precinct
  • Company valuation
  • Design & Facilitation of Performance Management sessions
  • ERP design, implementation and support
  • Financial results production
  • Geo-hydrological assessment for King Shaka International Airport
  • Guidance on the supply chain management process
  • Human resources optimization
  • Minority Shareholders
  • On- Boarding Workshops
  • Operational audits
  • Outsourced internal audit function
  • Permission application review and amendments
  • Procedure for navigation services
  • Specialist Resources for Finance
  • Traffic Forecast Study for ACSA
  • Airport Carbon Accreditation
  • Health risk assessment and Medical surveillance
  • Security Door Upgrade Project
  • ABS ISO 14001 Certification
  • ACI Conference: design and implementation of ACSA area
  • Administration services
  • Airport Operations Integrated Report for 2015
  • Aviation surveys and procedures
  • Architectural Services
  • Auto Pedigree Building - Subsidence Remedy
  • BBB-EE Rating
  • Bid Adjudication Committee Training
  • Brand Management
  • Business Analysts and project managers for IT projects
  • Cape Town International symphony way development corridor & general Planning Support including comment on zoning rectification
  • Coaching for managers
  • Commercial Areas Survey at Regional Airports
  • Competition Compliance Training
  • Crisis Services
  • CTIA Bi-Annual Stakeholder Survey
  • Design of the emergency evacuation diagrams for King Shaka International Airport
  • Digital design
  • DigSilent Simulation
  • Employee Wellbeing
  • Enterprise development award process evaluated
  • Environmental surveys
  • Environmental services at King Shaka
  • Feasibility study for solar power
  • GIS Data Maintenance
  • Ground Water Filtration System Design
  • IATA Airport Development Reference Manual for King Shaka
  • Implement fraud hotline
  • Infrastructure design changes to optimize available space
  • Infrastructure optimization of electrical components
  • Integrated reporting services
  • Investment Property Evaluation
  • ISO 1400 Environmental management system
  • ISO14001 Certification
  • Land audit and plans for all Regional Airports.
  • Land Surveying Services
  • Legal advice
  • Legal Compliance Evaluation Audits
  • Management of Wi-Fi
  • Motivational Speaker
  • Occupational Hygiene Surveys
  • ORTIA Western Precinct Commercialization Mixed Use Market Study
  • Outsourced communications
  • Passive diffusive monitoring campaign at OR Tambo
  • Photography
  • Property service provider
  • Proposal for a Petrol station
  • Remuneration analysis
  • Retail Study at King Shaka International Airport
  • Review of Social & Ethics Committee TOR and Work Plan
  • Security plans OR Tambo
  • Security Queuing Enclosure Project
  • Social Economic Development brochure design
  • Tender advertisements
  • Tender publication
  • Top Executive Survey
  • Topographical survey
  • Town Planning Services
  • Unplugged OHS Safety Induction Video
  • UPS & Battery Project
  • Water management SYSTEM AMR design
  • WCA
  • Web services and support
  • Zoning Certificates
  1. ii) The Ports Regulator has used the services of consultants as outlined in the table below:

    Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

     

    Reply IT Consulting Services

    Year

    Consultant 

    Services Procured

    Cost

    Justification

    Additional comments

    2014/15

    Bayajula

    Business Process Mapping

    R 3, 000, 000

    To complement existing staff to ensure company-wide business processes were mapped in the allotted time

    This was a once-off engagement

    2015/16

    Knowledge Integration Dynamics

    Facilitation of workshops and development of specification for an enterprise Business Intelligence/Market Intelligence platform

    R120 000

    ATNS did not have the experience to conduct these workshops and extract appropriate requirements from users in relation to Business Intelligence/Market Intelligence area

    This was a once-off engagement. The company did not tender for the work by virtue of having assisted in developing the specification

    2015/16

    KnowMax for IKM

    Facilitation of knowledge management champions workshop

    R 50 000

    External expert facilitators were required to assist drive buy-in

    This was a once-off engagement

    2015/16

    Aptronics

    Provide IT network assessment services

    R 140 000

    There were network issues that were hampering the successful installation of data storage equipment.

    This was a once-off engagement

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    IT does however sign support and maintenance agreements with service providers from which we have procured IT systems or they may have assisted us with the roll-out of IT systems for which they are accredited by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) to implement and support. These support and maintenance agreements allow us to access critical support services from these service providers whenever there are system malfunctions that cannot be resolved by internal IT staff and also to allow service providers to cover for critical resources whenever they take planned leave.

     

    Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  2. ii) The Ports Regulator has used the services of consultants as outlined in the table below:
  3. Financial year

    •  

    Services received (b)

    Budget ( c)

    Actual costs (d)

    1.  

    Meridiam Economics

    Asset Valuation project for NPA assets

    2 000 000

    1 915 086

    1.  
    1.  

    Development of Finance policies and procedures

    55 900

    33 141

     

    South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

    The table below depicts the amount spent by the South African Maritime Authority (SAMSA) on use of consultants in the past three financial years.

    The services of consultants were mainly used in providing ICT services in areas where SAMSA did not possess the necessary skills and expertise as well as where there was not adequate capacity internally. This is being addressed by beefing up (as evident from a reduction in actual expenditure) internal capacity with a view to ensure that these services are being provided internally within the Authority.

     

     

    South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  4. Not applicable, (ii), (b), (c), (d), the South African Civil Aviation Authority has fully implemented National Treasury Cost Containment measures regarding the use of consultants as set out in National Treasury Instruction 01 of 2013/14 as well as National Treasury Instruction 02 of 2016/17. The services of consultants during the past three financial years is as follows.
  5.  

     

     

    Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

    2014/15 Financial Year

    (a)(ii) The total number of consultants used is 23.

    (b) The services provided were:

     Amount (R)

    Services

                      54 475,00

    Investigations

                     387 673,77

    Engineering Consultant

                     423 669,60

    Strategic planning Facilitators

                     496 675,20

    MQS project

                       74 100,00

    Strategic Plan Facilitators

                       19 950,00

    Litigation costs

                     213 801,70

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

                       83 363,25

    Pastel service consultant

                     572 280,00

    Transactional advisor

                       61 978,00

    Pastel Consulting and services

                     440 462,62

    Legal advice

                       99 412,00

    Legal advice

                       24 775,51

    Legal Opinion

                     128 554,00

    Legal Opinion

                     236 678,50

    Legal Opinion

                     699 783,30

    Drafting of a Rail regulation- Security

                     629 999,34

    Drafting of a Rail regulation- Safety Critical Grades

                     363 438,02

    Legal services- Board Of inquiry Investigation

                     230 281,75

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

                     239 670,40

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

                         6 726,00

    Salary Surveys

                     177 803,77

    Chairing Disciplinary Proceedings

                     240 996,00

    HR Support

                  5 906 547,73

     

    (c) The budget allocated for professional fees which are inclusive of consultancy fees for the financial year was R17 134 472, 52.

    (d) The Actual costs incurred for consultancy services during the financial year amounted to R5 906 547, 73.

     

    2015/16 Financial Year

    (a ii) The total number of consultants used is 56.

    (b) The services provided were:

     

    2015-2016

     Amount

    Services

               513 082,62

    Leadership Allignment

               221 318,39

    Rail expert consultant

               715 213,20

    Management Quality Services

               602 156,00

    ICT Assessment Report

            1 138 534,50

    Development of RSR Value Culture

               127 791,72

    Facilitators Board Strategic Session

                 94 962,00

    Investigation- misconduct

                 20 822,92

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               101 368,90

    Ict Project Management

               186 213,30

    Pastel Consulting

               512 436,00

    ICT Assessment Report

               246 753,00

    Facilitator for Risk Management Training

                 99 636,00

    Strategy Facilitators

               457 368,00

    Threat and Risk Assessment

            1 088 700,00

    Risk Management Services

               124 420,04

    Engineering services and Project

            1 993 904,63

    Development of the High Speed Rail Standard

               547 120,00

    Economic impact Analysis on the asset maintenance of railway stock

               581 135,41

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               694 260,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               441 539,95

    Cost Benefit Consulting

               742 539,80

    Engineering services- Signalling Assessment

               116 109,00

    Development of a Fatigue Management Standard

               822 401,13

    Drafting of Rail Regulations

               616 500,00

    Drafting of Rail Regulations- Rail Reserve Management

                 76 721,20

    Legal Support

               345 108,00

    Legal Support

               226 800,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

                 48 367,50

    Legal Support

            1 286 000,00

    Research and Drafting of Regulations

            1 000 688,50

    Legal Support

                 27 000,00

    Chairing of disciplinary Hearings

            1 196 538,00

    Legal support

                 68 500,00

    Draft Regulations

                 60 131,00

    Legal Support

                 77 753,33

    Draft Regulations

               239 400,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               229 297,54

    Auditing Services- Board of Inquiry

               366 624,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               304 500,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

               609 440,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               510 670,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               329 360,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

               190 836,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               219 840,00

    Engineering services- BOI Investigation

               926 991,60

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

               101 500,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

                 96 957,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

                 60 876,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

               975 327,00

    HR Support

               478 800,00

    Organisational Alignment

               396 262,29

    Chairing Disciplinary Hearing

               109 760,00

    Pension Fund Advisors

                 34 200,00

    Development of RSR Equity Plan

                 27 034,48

    Disability Accessibility Audit for RSR

                 42 813,84

    Caseware training and consulting

            23 470 383,79

     

     

    (c) The budget allocated for professional fees which are inclusive of consultancy fees for the financial year was R38 462 471.00

    (d) Actual costs incurred for consultancy services during the financial year amounted to R23 470 383,79

     

    2016/17 Financial Year

    (a ii) The total number of consultants used is 35.

    (b) The services provided were:

    Amount

     Services

                   704 919,00

     Management Quality Services

                 1 177 881,27

     Strategic  Thinking Projects

                    498 000,00

     Safety Culture Training

                    431 500,00

     Executive leadership coaching

                    421 800,00

     ICT Forensic investigations

                    521 048,06

     Value Coaching

                    178 489,96

     Establishment of the Pre-Audit unit

                    132 525,00

     Board Evaluation

                      30 995,12

     Board Induction Workshop

                    123 120,00

     Legal Opinion

                    403 616,47

     Risk vulnerability Assessment

                 4 345 112,56

     Development of High speed Rail Standards

                     66 500,00

     Regulatory Impact Assessment

                    599 098,50

     Assessment and provision of Peer reviews of the safety assessments reports 

                    496 900,00

     Provision of Assessment  of peer review of the safety reports on new works

                    584 019,69

     Legal Opinion

                 1 067 150,25

     Legal Opinion

                      55 119,34

     Legal Arbitration

                    409 032,00

     Legal Opinion

                      32 337,00

     Litigations

                    527 472,27

     Litigations

                      35 500,00

     Chairing of Hearings

                    136 800,00

     Legal Representations

                   111 815,46

     Legal Opinion

                    361 500,00

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

                    140 402,40

    Legal Services- Board of Inquiry

                    495 996,00

     ICT risk assessment 

                      14 747,83

     Pastel System consultations

                    239 536,80

     HR Support

                    174 852,00

     Chairing of  disciplinary Hearings

                      43 525,90

     Investigation for improper conduct

                      20 559,60

     Sage Pastel Consultations

                    571 508,24

     Financial / Reporting Supports

                 7 338 058,36

     Rail Risk Assessment

                    499 999,44

     Cost Benefit Analysis

              22 991 438,52

     

     

     (c) The budget allocated for professional fees which are inclusive of consultancy fees for the financial year was R38 719 481.00

    (d) Actual costs incurred for consultancy services during the financial year amounted to R27 228 633.07

06 September 2017 - NW2531

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Which Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) have been signed by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him in the past three financial years, (b) with whom have they been signed, (c) what are the reasons for MOU in each instance, (d) what processes, procedures and mechanisms exists to ensure that the MOUs are met , (e)(i) which MOUs have not been adhered to, (ii) what are the reasons for this and (iii) what has been done to ensure that it is not repeated and (f) what are the financial implications of each MOU in each instance?

Reply:

List of International Memorandum of Understanding (MOUs) signed by the Department of Transport from 1 January 2014 to 2017

Date signed

Country

Title of agreement

Entry into force:

       

2012-08- 29

DRC: Aeronautical Authority SA

Aeronautical Authority

Memorandum of Understanding on Air Transport Agreement between Aeronautical Authority (South Africa) and Aeronautical Authority (Democratic Republic of Congo)

2012-08-29

2014- 02/ 21

Sri Lanka

Bilateral Air Services Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka

2014-12-17

2014-07-07

Botswana

Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Botswana regarding the Road and Bridge Infrastructure Development Initiative

2014-07-07

2015-06-18

France

Agreement in the Area of Transport between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the French Republic

Not in force

2015-06-22

USA

Memorandum of Cooperation between the Department of Transport of the Republic of South Africa and the Department of Transportation of the United States of America on Cooperation in the Field of Transportation

2015-06-22

2015-07-03

Benin

Agreement for the Cooperation in Transport Related Matters between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Benin

2015-07-03

2015-07-03

Benin

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Benin in Respect of the Project of Construction and Development of the International Airport of Glo-Djigbe

2015-07-03

2015-08-25

South Sudan

Bilateral Air Services Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of South Sudan

Not in force

2015-10-16

Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

Bilateral Air Services Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo

Not in force

2016-03-30

Uganda

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Uganda on Cooperation in the Transport Related Matters

 

2016-03-30

2016-10-13

Namibia

Bilateral Air Services Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Namibia

Not in force

2016-11-03

Zimbabwe

Bilateral Air Services Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Zimbabwe

Not in force

2017-01-20

Chad

Bilateral Air Services Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Chad

Not in force

2017-05-11

Tanzania

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania on Cooperation in Transport Related Matters

2017-05-11

2016-10-11

Kenya

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Republic of Kenya concerning the Development and Implementation of Lapsset Corridor Projects in the Republic of Kenya

2016-10-11

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

See attached

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

 

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDINGS ENTERED BY ATNS IN THE LAST THREE YEARS

Item

Contracting Parties

Nature of contract

Contract summary

Commencement date

1.

Thashani Trading Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

MOU

To request the chief finance officer to approve the appointment of Thashani Trading Enterprise as a Service Provider.

28-Feb-15

2.

Info Guardian (Pty) Ltd

MOU

Contract for trend Antivirus support.

29-Jul-15

3.

Giftbucks (Pty) Ltd

MOU

Designing and implementing a recognition scheme for ATNS.

01-Sep-15

4.

The HR Touch (Pty) Ltd

MOU

For assisting ATNS with the recruitment of its Executive staff.

01-Oct-15

5.

Knowledge Integrated Dynamics (Pty) Ltd

MOU

For facilitating the business intelligence workshop for ATNS.

13-Oct-15

6.

The International Civil Aviation Organization

MOU

Regional Training Centres of Excellence.

19-Oct-15

7.

International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO)

MOU

For the recognition of ATNS as an ICAO Regional Training Centre of Excellence (RTCE).

19-Oct-15

8.

Road Refurbishment (Pty) Ltd

MOU

Maintenance contract for the Belzberg radar site access road.

01-Nov-15

9.

Civil Aviation Authority of Botswana

MOU

For the provision of developing a mutually beneficial business relationship.

10-Nov-15

10.

International Civil Aviation Organization African Regional Monitoring Agency (ARMA)

MOU

For the provision to establish the ICAO AFI Region Monitoring Agency.

26-Jun-17

11.

Interim South African Development Community Aviation Safety Organisation (ISASO)

MOU

For the provision of resources for training purposes for ATNS.

15-Mar-17

12.

Aew Solutions (Pty) Ltd

MOU

Collecting and disposing of electronic waste for ATNS.

01-Feb-16

13.

TO70 Consultancy

MOU

For Co-operation in ATM related projects in Africa.

10-Feb-16

14.

SITE (State Information Technology Agency Engagement Contract)

MOU

Providing ATNS with IT infrastructure and services.

8-Mar-16

15.

South African Space Agency (SANSA)

MOU

To ensure that south Africa aligns itself with global initiatives.

20-May-16

16.

Zambia Airports Corporation Limited

MOU

Aimed at developing a fruitful co-operation in the area of air navigation services.

13-Oct-16

17.

Zambia Airports Corporation Limited (ZACL)

MOU

For the development of a fruitful co-operation in air navigation services.

03-Feb-17

18.

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

MOU

For the discussions relating to a possible collaboration in research.

9-May-17

19.

Department of Transport

MOU

For the provision of the Medium Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR).

2-Jun-17

20.

Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority (TCAA)

MOU

For the co-operation of air traffic navigation services including aeronautical world geodetic surveys, billing and collection services

15-Jun-17

21.

Department of Transport (SASAR)

MOU

For the provision of aeronautical and maritime search and rescue (AMSAR) Services.

28-Jun-17

22.

Thusani Foundation (NPO)

MOU

For the empowerment of under privileged youth to realise their full potential in the area of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

8-Aug-17

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(ii) The Ports Regulator of South Africa has signed 2 MOUs within the past 3 years

(b) The MOUs were with the Competition Commission as well as the National Transport Forum (NTF).

(c) The MOU with the Competition Commission is a requirement of the National Ports Act (12 of 2005), s30(2)(b), and is required to co-ordinate and harmonise the exercise of jurisdiction over competition matters, and to ensure consistent application of the principles of the National Ports Act. The MOU with the NTF was a request from the DOT, in order to harmonise cooperation between its stakeholders in delivering on the department’s mandate and to create a discussion platform to address transport issues facing South Africa in general.

(d) Each MOU outlines processes, procedures, and mechanisms to ensure that MOUs are met.

(e) All MOUs have been adhered to.

(f) There are no direct financial implications in the 2 Ports Regulator MOUs except the costs of occasional meetings and interactions and associated travel costs, which are not known until they are required.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

  1. (ii) The MOUs that have been signed in the past three financial years are listed in table below:
  1. Stakeholder

Date signed

  1. Mpumalanga Department of Roads & Transport

July 2014

  1. Limpopo Department of Roads & Transport

August 2014

  1. DHA

March 2016

  1. Ekurhuleni Municipality

May 2014

  1. RAF

June 2014

 

  1. Reasons for the signing of the MOUs are exchange of information sharing, collaboration, training, sharing of resources.
  2. The MoUs are implemented through forums e.g. municipal forums; joint law enforcement operations, Border Management Authority structures and through information sharing.
  3. Not Applicable
  4. All the above MOUs have no financial implications.

Road Accident Fund

(a)(ii) The following MOUs[1] have been signed by the Road Accident Fund (RAF) in the past three financial years,

(b) with the following:

(c) in each instance the reason for the MOU is,

(d) the following processes, procedures and mechanisms exist to ensure that the MOUs are met,

North West Department of Human Settlement, Public Safety and Liaison

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

Operationalisation Plans are put in place with specific deliverables. If there is non-compliance with the terms of the MOU the respective relationship managers of the parties to the MOU may engage each other in an effort to address any non-compliance with the terms of the MOU. Where efforts to address non-compliance are unsuccessful the matter can be escalated to an appropriate level in an effort to resolve the non-compliance,

Limpopo Department of Roads and Transport (LDRT)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Eastern Cape Department of Transport

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Northern Cape Department of Transport and Community Safety

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Gauteng Department of Community Safety

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Transport

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Western Cape Department of Transport

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Free State Department of Road and Transport

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Mpumalanga Department of Health

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Johannesburg Metro Police Department (JMPD)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Hibiscus Municipality

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

South African Social Security Agency (SASSA)

information sharing and collaboration on claim processing

 

Road Transport Management Cooperation (RTMC)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on initiatives of mutual interest

 

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Transnet

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on activities on mutual benefit

 

Compensation Fund (CF)

information sharing and collaboration on fraud and corruption initiatives

 

South Africa Local Government Association (SALGA)

promotion of RAF services and collaboration on activities of mutual benefit

 

Autopax

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Financial Services Board (FSB)

collaboration on financial education to claimants

 

Special Investigation Union (SIU)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on fraud and corruption initiatives

 

KZN Department of Health

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

South African Revenue Services (SARS)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption.

 

Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Emfuleni Local Municipality

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Eastern Cape Department of Health

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

Free State Department of Health

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

Gauteng Department of Health

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

South African Insurance Crime Bureau (SAICB)

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on fraud and corruption initiatives

 

Quadriplegic Association of South Africa (QASA)

information sharing and collaboration on road safety and other initiatives of mutual interest

 

Maponya 911 Ambulance

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

National Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South Africa (NAAMSA)

information sharing and collaboration on activities of mutual interest

 

SA Taxi

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

AmaWheelies

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

South African Road Freight Association

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives.

 

Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP)

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

Road Safety Awareness Africa (RSAA)

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

1Life Cycling Academy

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

N3 Toll

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives.

 

Bakwena N1 & N12 Toll

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on road safety initiatives

 

BusaMed

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

Life Group Hospitals

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption.

 

South African Youth Council (SAYC)

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

Road Safety Awareness, SA

collaboration on road safety promotion initiatives

 

KwaZulu Natal Law Society

information sharing in support of claim processing and collaboration on prevention of fraud and corruption

 

(e)(i) all MOUs have been adhered to, consequently questions (ii) and (iii) are not applicable, and (f) there are no financial implications in respect of the MOUs.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

  1. (ii) Road Traffic Infringement Agency an Entity of the Department of Transport.
  1. With whom have they been signed?
  2. Department of Small Business Development,
  3. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA),
  4. Monash University, and
  5. NICSA.
  1. What are the reasons for MoU in each instance?
  2. Department of Small Business Development,
  • Purpose: Financial leverage for the implementation of the Enterprise Development Programme
  1. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA),
  • Purpose: Financial leverage for the implementation of the driving simulators programme.
  1. Monash University, and
  • Purpose: Knowledge transfer programme for RTIA and other Transport Entities’ employees
  1. NICSA.
  • Purpose: Educate members of the public about road safety and their responsibilities as road users; Provide spiritual and moral support to victims of road accidents; and to establish road safety ambassadors.
  1. What processes, procedures and mechanisms exist to ensure that the MoUs are met?
  • Steering Committees and Inter-Agency structures have been established to oversee implementation of these MoUs
  1. (i) Which MoUs have not been adhered to?
  • None

(ii) What are the reasons for this?

  • N/A in all four MoUs.

(iii) What has been done to ensure that it is not repeated?

  • N/A in all four MoUs.
  1. What are the financial implications of each MoU in each instance?
  2. Department of Small Business Development,
  • R180m (joint contribution by RTIA and DSBD)

ii. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA),

  • R10m allocated

iii. Monash University, and

  • N/A

iv. NICSA.

  • N/A

Road Traffic Management Corporation

(a)(i) RTMC has an MoU with the (b) CSIR (c) for collaborations on Research projects, (d) The processes in the MOU that ensure adherence and control include:

  1. Appointment of accountable Project Managers
  2. Escalation Clause
  3. Agreement on a project by project basis which would entail the Service Level Agreement
  4. Project proposals are taken through a Bid Adjudication Process to ensure adherence to the PFMA

(f) R906 000 was paid to CSIR during 2015/16 financial year in this regard

South African National Roads Agency Limited

For the financial Year 2014/2015

  1. EThekwini Metropolitan Municipality
  1. Cost sharing for upgraded interchange on N3 at Hammarsdale
  2. Clause 10 – Breach

Clause 14 – Dispute resolution (Inter-governmental dispute resolution mechanism, failing which by adjudication

  1. (i) None

(ii) Refer to answer provided in (e) (i) above

(iii) Refer to answer provided in (e) (i) above

  1. R 93,5 million (ninety three and a half million) EThekwini has made financial contribution in tranches in terms of this Agreement.

For the financial year 2015/2016

  1. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA)
  1. To promote a coherent and effective quality assurance system for education and training in the transport sector
  2. (-) Development of standard operating procedures for implementing this memorandum;

(-) Holding of regular meetings to monitor implementation of the MOU

  1. (i) None

(ii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

(iii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

  1. Not specified, however parties recognised that they are responsible for financing their own quality assurance functions and activities with respect to their constituent training providers.
  1. Eastern Cape Parks and Tourism Agency
  1. Condition of Environmental Authorization for N2 Wild Coast Toll Road requires a Biodiversity Offset Agreement to be signed before commencement of construction of the Greenfield section of the N2.
  2. The Agreement provides for monitoring through regular progress reports, expenditure and budgeting plans by ECPTA.
  3. (i) None

(ii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

(iii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

  1. R370 (three hundred and seventy) million rands over 10 years

For the financial year 2016/2017

  1. Human Development Agency (HDA)
  1. A portion of the Greenfield N2 Road alignment was illegally occupied. The HDA committed to the management and the subsequent relocation of the occupants of the unbuilt N2 road reserve to a permanent or alternative accommodation upon securing funds for land acquisition and the subsequent development thereof. The HDA shall liaise with the Department of Human Settlements in order to secure for the acquisition and the subsequent development of land for the resettlement of the occupants.
  2. The implementation of this Agreement is overseen and monitored by a working group that meets monthly.
  3. (i) None

(ii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

(iii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

  1. In consideration for the fulfilment by the HDA of its obligations in terms of this agreement, SANRAL has paid the HDA a total amount of R409 402.35 from August 2016 to July 2017.
  1. Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality (MAP)
  1. Reconstruction of the single lane Wilge River bridge providing two way traffic linking the new N5 interchange to the Harrismith CBD. MAP to contribute 50% of cost of new bridge
  2. (-) Clause 10 – Breach

(-)Clause 14 – Dispute resolution (Inter-governmental dispute resolution mechanism, failing which by adjudication). Payments are split over three financial years. Thus far MAP have not contributed. Project is due for completion in March 2018.

  1. (i) None

(ii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

(iii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

  1. R8,151 (eight million one hundred and fifty one thousand rands)
  1. Mpofana Municipality
  1. Overload control enforcement at the Mooi River Traffic Control Centre
  2. (-) Clause 13 – Breach

(-) Clause 18 – Dispute resolution (Inter-governmental dispute resolution mechanism, failing which by adjudication)

  1. (i) None

(ii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

(iii) Refer to reply provided in (e) (i) above

  1. R0, 35 million/month over three years. SANRAL makes payments monthly over three financial years.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (i), Not applicable. Details pertaining to (ii), (b), (c), (d), (e) (i), (ii), (iii), and (f), are covered in the table below:

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a)(ii) / (b) / (c) / (d)

  1. Memorandum of Action (MOA) signed between PRASA and the City of Cape Town, May 2015:
    1. The MOA is the outcome of ongoing deliberations between the parties to build a strong implementation oriented partnership to address service delivery imperatives. The objective being to facilitate the delivery of priority projects, programmes and interventions relating to:
      1. Infrastructure Investment
      2. Operations Management
      3. Strategic Investment Interventions
    2. The Land Transport Advisory Board (LTAB) and Intermodal Planning Committee (IPC) have been established in the City in terms of the National Land Transport Act. These multi-stakeholder structures are used as an ideal conduit to for PRASA and the City to work together in implementing the MOA. These formal structure with supporting working groups are scheduled to meet on a regular basis where progress is monitored.
    3. The financial implications of the MOA is linked to agreed priority projects, programmes and interventions.
  1. Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed between PRASA and the China Communications Construction Company Limited (CCCC), September 2016:
    1. The purpose of the MOU is to assist in establishing and developing cooperation between the parties in their respective capacities as state-owned entities in order to explore the possible funding and / or implementation of new projects in the rail transport sector in South Africa. The Moloto Rail Corridor Development is one such initiative where possible areas of cooperation is being explored.
    2. A Steering Committee has been established comprising, PRASA, CCCC, National Department of Transport, Treasury and the Department of International Relations and Cooperation to:
      1. Oversee and manage the cooperation of the parties under this MOU.
      2. Ensure that the relationship between the parties is conducted within the prescripts of applicable legislation.
    3. Funding / implementation models is being explored, guided by relevant South African laws and regulation. Each party is responsible for their own costs associated with tasks emanating from the MOU / Steering Committee.
  1. Memorandum of Understanding signed between PRASA and SNCF, March 2017
    1. The purpose of the MOU is to assist in establishing and developing cooperation between the parties in their respective capacities as state-owned entities in the rail sector. SNCF is France's national state-owned railway company that operates and maintains the French national rail network.
    2. The focus of the cooperation, during the rail renewal and modernisation phase, will be on key areas including managing organisational risks, safety management, compatibility between the new rolling stock and existing and new infrastructure, maintenance approach, life cycle optimisation, support infrastructure, training, change management and communications.
    3. The MOU makes provision for the establishment of a Steering Committee to:
      1. Oversee and manage the cooperation of the parties under this MOU.
      2. Ensure that the relationship between the parties is conducted within the prescripts of applicable legislation.
    4. Each party is responsible for their own costs associated with tasks emanating from the MOU / Steering Committee.
  1. Memorandum of Action signed between PRASA and the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, April 2017
    1. The purpose of the MOU is to restructure and formalise the liaison between the parties relating to passenger rail matters in line with legal provisions and agreed liaison protocols.
    2. The formalisation of the Rail Steering Committee and Sub committees with clear terms of reference is aimed at enhancing cooperation and coordination of transport activities in Ekurhuleni.
    3. The costs associated with the involvement of officials in these structures are borne by the respective parties.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(ii) To date the following MOUs have been signed by the RSR with Organs of State:

(b) Department of Labour;

  • National Department of Safety and Security;
  • National Nuclear Regulator;
  • Department of Mineral Resources;
  • Department of Environmental Affairs;
  • Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs;
  • Road Traffic Management Co-operation;
  • Transportation Education and Training Authority; and
  • Road Rail Association;
  • Chemical and Allied Industry Association; and
  • Heritage Rail Association of South Africa.
  • South African National Accreditation System.

(c)

  • Department of Environmental Affairs:

To collaborate on environmental issues within the railway space;

  • South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) :

To support the RSR with regards to the introduction of the regulations to monitor the suppliers of the safety critical equipment and services to the railway industry;

  • Department of Labour (DoL);

To establish a formal working relationship between DoL and the RSR on areas of common or mutual interest and where parties have concurrent jurisdiction to ensure occupational health and safety and operational safety within the Railway environment.

  • National Nuclear Regulator (NNR);

To provide for a working relationship between NNR and the RSR with regards to rail transportation of radioactive materials.

  • National Department of Safety and Security;

To give effect to the principles of co-operative governance and intergovernmental relations contemplated in the constitution of the republic of South Africa, 1996, in particular cooperation between organs of state on which functions in respect of railway safety, security and policing are conferred.

  • Department of Mineral Resources (DMR);

To establish a formal working relationship between DMR and the RSR on areas of common or mutual interest and where parties have concurrent jurisdiction and where there is overlap between surface railway (operational safety) and occupational health and safety with the mining environment.

  • Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA);

To formalize the relationship between the RSR and the COGTA on issues of disaster management and municipal rail infrastructure as it relates to safe railway operations.

  • Road Traffic Management Co-operation (RTMC);

To formalize the relationship between the RSR and the RTMC on issues of training, level crossings and road/ rail interface.

  • Transportation Education and Training Authority (TETA);

To establish a formal working relationship between the RSR and TETA regarding rail related training including; safety related work, skills development, critical and scarce skills, and rail related qualification(s).

  • Road Rail Association (RRA);

To formalize the relationship between the RSR and the RRA regarding the development of Industry and National STANDARDS. .

  • Chemical and Allied Industry Association (CAIA);

Certain Railway Operators as well as Consignees and Consignors of dangerous goods are members of CAIA and this MoU provides for a formal relationship between the RSR and CAIA regarding the safe transportation and handling of dangerous goods by rail.

  • Heritage Rail Association of South Africa (HRSA).

To establish a formal working relationship between HRSA and the RSR on areas of common or mutual interest.

  • Operation Lifesaver

The purpose of this agreement is to support the institutional growth and sustainability of the RSR mainly, in the area of education and awareness. Through this agreement, the RSR aims to resolve the five focus areas which are derailments, people struck by trains, collisions, level crossing incidents and platform train interface and train surfing. OLI will assist towards the achievement of the RSR’s mandate in as far as the education and awareness is concerned.

This agreement will allow the RSR as the OLI’s member country to extend its network to railway operators and associations in the SADC and the rest of Africa.

  • The Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) / Business Sweden (the Swedish Trade and Invest Council)

Establish attractive investor markets by providing innovative railway safety assurance services and products; and to

Gain a better understanding of the opportunities for Private Public Partnerships with industry. The scope of the collaboration will combine the following resources: market intelligence, networks within the SADC region with RSR’s technical expertise, Swedish and South African networks to conduct technical assessments in specific markets to gain understandings of opportunities in the fields of common interest.

(d)

  • Specific responsibilities of the signatories to the MoU’s and the areas of collaboration have been specified within the MOUs.
  • Regular meetings are held between the RSR and its MoU partners to execute collaboration activities, monitor progress on the collaboration initiatives and to discuss areas of further collaboration

 

 

(e)(i)

None. The RSR enjoys co-operation from its MOU partners and this plays an important role to ensure safe railway operations. Officials from the Department of Labour and the Department of Safety and Security have also been appointed to serve on the RSR Board of Directors, the thereby giving strategic inputs to the RSR in the areas of Occupational Health and Safety and the Organizational and Personal Safety.

(ii)

Refer to (e) (i) above.

(iii)

Refer to (e) (i) above.

(F)

There are no negative financial implications. The MOU partners collaborate on activities of mutual interest, which are part of the deliverables of each individual partner. The MOU in each case assist through leveraging on each other’s existing resources/strength for mutual benefit. This results in efficiencies and cost savings.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a,(i); b, c, d, e (I, ii, iii) and f)

(a) Which Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) have been signed by

SAMSA- Management of the Fisheries Vessels

(i) SAMSA

(b) With whom have they been signed, Department of Agriculture forestry and fisheries

(c) What are the reasons for MOU in each instance, at the request of DAFF, Market failure imminent due to the vessels not being operational, No suitable management company sourced by the DAFF.

(d) What processes, procedures and mechanisms exists to ensure that the MOUs are met, Signed SLA

(e) None

(i) Which MOUs have not been adhered to, none

(ii) What are the reasons for this and not applicable

(iii) What has been done to ensure that it is not repeated not applicable and

(f) What are the financial implications of each MOU in each instance? No negative financial implication- User Pays model

06 September 2017 - NW2442

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the annexure to his reply to question 1875 on 3 July 2017 regarding transaction advisers, what was the monetary value of the Braamfontein and Long Lead tender HO-SCM-TECH/411/03/2016 for which the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa used a certain transaction adviser (name furnished)?

Reply:

Gibb’s appointment was for R4, 272, 082.03 incl VAT.

04 September 2017 - NW2555

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With respect to the e-toll collection contract, what (a) is the monthly collection budget, (b) are the monthly costs for collection, (c) are the actual monthly costs and (d) are the actual monthly amounts collected for the period 1 April 2014 to date; (2) will he provide Ms D Carter with a copy of the monthly figures?

Reply:

1. (a) Please see the graph link below: (please turn to the next page for more visible graph)

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW2525GRAPH-170904.pdf

(b) The average monthly cost of toll collection amounts to R53,8 million.

(c) See (b) above.

(d) See (a) above.

(2) The honorable member is invited to view the information at the offices of SANRAL.

04 September 2017 - NW2551

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Transport

What were the circumstances that resulted in the grounding of (a) the Air Zimbabwe flight at O R Tambo International Airport on 18 August 2017 and (b) the SA Airways flight in Harare, Zimbabwe, on 19 August 2017?

Reply:

(a) As part of its mandate to uphold aviation safety and security, the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) routinely conducts ramp inspections on aircraft operating into and within the South African air space.

On the evening of Friday, 18 August 2017, one of the aircraft inspected was a Boeing 767-200 operated by Air Zimbabwe. The inspection conducted by SACAA personnel discovered that the operator, Air Zimbabwe, was not complaint with both international civil aviation standards, and Part 129 of the South African civil aviation regulations. Part 129, among others, requires an operator to be in possession of a Foreign Operator’s Permit in order to conduct operations into South Africa. A copy of the Foreign Operator’s Permit, together with other documents, must be on-board an aircraft at all times, and made available for inspection on request by the relevant authorities.

As a result of the inability of the Air Zimbabwe flight crew to produce a copy of the Foreign Operator’s Permit, the SACAA instructed the crew not to take off until such time that there is full compliance with Part 129 of the South African civil aviation regulations.

The airline resumed operations as soon as they were issued with a Foreign Operator’s Permit.

(b) The SACAA was informed by South African Airways (SAA) that its operations were affected on 19 August 2017 when the Civil Aviation Authority of Zimbabwe (CAAZ) instructed the SAA flight crew not to take off until such time that there was full compliance with the applicable Zimbabwean civil aviation regulations. It was established that, SAA, just like Air Zimbabwe was not in possession of a Foreign Operator’s Permit that would allow them to operate commercially in the Zimbabwe airspace.

Both airlines resumed operations as soon as they were respectively issued with Foreign Operator’s Permits.

04 September 2017 - NW2532

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What criteria must be met for a driving school to be qualified to offer driving lessons for vehicles of all description and (b) what is the purpose of a drivers licence test?

Reply:

(a) There are no criteria for Driving Schools in force in Road Traffic Legislation at present. Provinces and Local Authorities apply Regulation 250 of the ROAD TRAFFIC ACT NO. 29 OF 1989 to register only Driving School Instructors.

The following should be noted in regard to the DRAFT Driving School Legislative Framework which is not yet in force, as published in Government Gazette, No. 38142 dated 31 October 2014 and 28 January 2015 No. Gazette 38429. This draft legislation addresses numerous of the current shortcomings in the driver training system of the country. The following is a list of the most important areas which will be addressed by the draft driving school legislative framework should the Department put this legislation in force:

Legislation

Area which legislation will regulate once in force

Section 28

Instructor to be registered

Section 28A

Application for registration as instructor

Section 28B

Registration and grading of instructors

Section 28C

Suspension and cancellation of registration of instructor

Reg 114A

Application for registration as instructor

Reg114B

Examination and test to determine competence to act as instructor

Reg 114C

Registration of instructor

Reg 114D

Cancellation or suspension of registration of instructors

Reg 114E

Application for Grades of instructors amendment of registration of instructor

Reg 114F

Grades of instructors

Reg 114G

Manner of application for registration of driving school

Regulation 114H

Consideration of suitability of driving school and person or body of persons to operate a driving school

Reg 114I

Requirements to be met for registration of a driving school

Reg 114K

Manner of registration of a driving school

Reg 114L

Notification of change of particulars of a driving school

Reg 114M

Approval for appointment of an instructor prior to appointment by a registered driving school

Reg 114N

Grades of driving schools

Reg 114O

Manner of suspension or cancellation of registration of a driving school

Reg 114P

Duties of a driving school

Reg 114Q

Powers and duties of inspectorate of driving schools

(b) The the purpose of a driving licence test is to test the competency of applicants when operating a motor vehicle on a public road whilst obeying all road rules and signs. The Driving Test is prescribed in the applicable K53 Manuals for the various categories of vehicles.

04 September 2017 - NW2529

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to all the persons arrested during the 2016-17 festive season, how many of the evidential blood test results were positive for ethyl alcohol; (2) broken down by (a) age group and (b) gender, how many of these blood test results showed (i) an ethyl alcohol level of (aa) between 0,05g per 100ml and 0,08g per 100ml of blood sampled, (bb) between 0,09g per 100ml and 0,14g per 100ml of blood sampled and (cc) 0,15g per 100ml or greater of blood sampled and (ii) the presence of drugs having a narcotic effect; (3) how many convictions have arisen therefrom to date; (4) what has been the average turnaround time in the return of ante mortem evidential blood test results?

Reply:

1. Evidential blood test results are handled by forensic laboratories and handed directly to the SAPS for processing in court.

2. This information is contained in the SAPS docket and the RTMC does not keep this data.

3. This matter is handled by the SAPS and the justice department.

4. This information is kept by the SAPS as the authority that processes the cases for court.

04 September 2017 - NW2478

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why has the R600 road between Winterton and the Drakensberg mountains in the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal not been maintained, resulting in severe deterioration, (b) what are the full relevant details of (i) maintenance and/or (ii) rebuilding plans that are planned for the specified road, (c) on what date will the maintenance and/or rebuilding plans be implemented, (d) what amount will it cost to rehabilitate the road and (e) which contractors will be contracted to rehabilitate the road?

Reply:

(a) R600 is Main Road P212 which is 34km under Okhahlamba Local Municipality; the

bi) Departmental has been maintaining the road by means of the following activities:

  • Verge Maintenance is being done on regular basis;
  • Pothole Patching has been done by the Departmental internal team when it is required; and
  • During the 2016/17 financial year seal rejuvenation has been done on the road between km 0.5 to km 13.

b) Main Road P212 is due for Heavy Rehabilitation and design is schedule to commence in the first quarter of 2018/19 financial year in order to start Phase1 Construction in the third quarter of the 2018/19 financial year.

c) The Rehabilitation of Phase 1 is anticipated to commence in the third quarter of 2018/19 financial year.

d) The project cost estimate is R 161.8 million for Rehabilitation of 34kilometres in three financial year.

e) The Department will advertise the contract through open tender to get contractor to rehabilitate the road.

04 September 2017 - NW2525

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) Why has there been underexpenditure with regard to the development of the White Paper on Rail Transport, (ii) what steps has his department taken to turn this around and (iii) how is this being monitored and (b)(i) why were (aa) deliverables, (bb) timelines, (cc) timeframes and (dd) deadlines not met and (ii) what steps has his department taken to turn each situation around?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Department has appointed a service provider to assist with the development of the White Paper National Rail Policy. Payments of invoices are aligned to project deliverables/milestones. The Department only process payment once it is satisfied with the deliverables and any delay in the deliverables subsequently leads to under expenditure for that period.

(ii) The project team had regular engagements with the service provider in order to fast-track the deliverables.

(iii) This is monitored through constant engagement and technical discussions in finalizing the policy positions.

(b)(i) (aa)(bb)(cc)(dd)

During the finalization of the draft White Paper process it became apparent that some policy proposals needed further research to consider implementation challenges. This was done in order to balance the views of different stakeholder’s that emerged during consultation.

(ii) The draft White Paper of Rail Policy has been finalised and payments have been processed on those deliverables achieved. The consultations with provinces is underway.

04 September 2017 - NW2556

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)In light of the current e-toll collections contract that will expire in the next 18 months, (a) does the Government intend to continue with the e-toll project; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) does the Government intend to renew the current contract; if not, will the collection contract go out on tender; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1). The e-toll scheme is official government policy and shall continue to be implemented subject to a decision to the contrary from Cabinet.

(2). The current e-toll operations contract comes to an end in December 2019 and has an option to be extended for a further 2 years. Government will review its options and the performance of the current contractor before making a decision whether to extend the contract for such an extension or retender.

31 August 2017 - NW2413

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Does the Air Traffic Navigation Services SOC Ltd (ATNS) provide its services to SA Airways (SAA) on an equal basis as it does to all other airlines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the relevant details of (a) each service that ATNS provides to (i) SAA and (ii) each other airline, (b) the rates that are charged for the specified services, (c) the payment terms given and (d) total amounts owed as at 31 July 2017 and (e) age analysis of the amounts owed as at 31 July 2017 in each case; (3) whether ATNS made any changes in the payment terms given to the SAA from 1 April 2017 up to 31 July 2017; if so, what are the full details of the changed payment terms

Reply:

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

1. ATNS provides its services equally to all airspace users, and our credit terms are 30 days from date of invoice. SAA has from 01 April 2017 to date been settling their invoices on average 45 days after due date and as a result ATNS has been charging SAA interest due to late payment.

2. (a)(i) ATNS provides air traffic control services, air traffic flow management services, aeronautical information management services and alerting services to SAA and (ii) similarly to all other airspace users, (b) the rates charged are as per government gazette no 40552 dated 20 January 2017, Notice 29 of 2017, (c) ATNS credit terms are 30 days from date of invoice and this applies to SAA as well, (d) The total amount owed by SAA as at 31 July 2017 was R 65 610 477, (e) The below table is the age analysis as at 31 July 2017:

Customer Name

Customer Balance

Current

31 - 60 Days

61 - 90 Days

91 - 120 Days

121 & Over

SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS

65,610,477

33,278,543

32,158,541

173,394

-

-

3. ATNS never extended/agreed to change its payment terms to SAA, from 01 April to 31 July 2017, SAA has not adhered to ATNS credit terms and as such ATNS charged SAA interest on late payments.

31 August 2017 - NW2524

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) Why has there been under expenditure with regard to the Rail Safety Strategy (ii) what has his department done to change this and (iii) how is this being monitored and (b)(i) why has there been (aa) deliverables, (bb) timelines, (cc) timeframes and (dd) deadlines that were not met and (ii) what is being done to change the situation in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Department has appointed a service provider to assist with the development of the National Railway Safety Strategy. Payments of invoices are aligned to project deliverables/milestones. The Department only process payment once it is satisfied with the deliverables and any delay in finalising the deliverables subsequently leads to under expenditure for that period.

(ii) The project team had regular engagements with the service provider in order to fast-track the deliverables

(iii) This is monitored through constant engagement, progress reports and regular follow ups with the service provider.

(b)(i) (aa))bb)(cc)(dd) The period which was initially set out for stakeholder consultation proved to be insufficient and this affected delivery period that has subsequently affected the timelines, timeframes and deadlines.

(ii) The timelines, timeframes and deadlines are interrelated and in addressing them the Department continuously work closely with the service provider to ensure that the missed time-frames/timelines/deadlines are corrected.

NW2781E

31 August 2017 - NW2522

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) Why has there been under expenditure with regard to the National Rail Safety Strategy, (ii) what has his department done to change this and (iii) how is this being monitored and (b)(i) why were (aa) deliverables, (bb) timelines, (cc) timeframes and (dd) deadlines not met and (ii) what is being done to change the situation in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Department has appointed a service provider to assist with the development of the National Railway Safety Strategy. Payments of invoices are aligned to project deliverables/milestones. The Department only process payment once it is satisfied with the deliverables and any delay in finalising the deliverables subsequently leads to under expenditure for that period.

(ii) The project team had regular engagements with the service provider in order to fast-track the deliverables

(iii) This is monitored through constant engagement, progress reports and regular follow ups with the service provider.

(b)(i) (aa)(bb)(cc)(dd) The period which was initially set out for stakeholder consultation proved to be not sufficient which affected deliverables, the timelines, the timeframes and the deadlines.

(ii) The the timelines, the timeframes and the deadlines are interrelated and in addressing them the Department continuously work closely with the service provider to ensure that the missed time-frames/timelines/deadlines are corrected.

NW2781E

31 August 2017 - NW2521

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) Why has there been underspending with regard to the Rail Safety Amendment Bill, (ii) what has been done to change the situation and (iii) how is this being monitored and (b)(i) why have the (aa) deliverables, (bb) timelines, (cc) timeframes and (dd) deadlines not been met and (ii) what is being done to change the situation in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department appointed a service provider to assist with the drafting of the Railway Safety Bill and payment of invoices are aligned to project deliverables/milestones. The Department only process payment once it is satisfied with the deliverables and delays in finalising the deliverables subsequently leads to under expenditure.

(ii) The project team has regular engagements to fast-track the deliverables.

(iii) This is monitored through constant engagement, progress reports and regular follow ups with the service provider.

(b) (i)(aa)(bb)(cc)(dd) The Railway Safety Bill had to undergo the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System(SEIAS) process, which was not anticipated, as the SEIAS process was not yet introduced by the time the project timelines were drafted. The stakeholder consultations process also took longer than was anticipated and this further prolonged the completion of the deliverables. This subsequently also negatively affected the timeframes and the deadlines.

(ii) The draft Railway Safety Bill has been finalised and it is due for submission to Cabinet for approval for further broader consultation.

NW2778E

31 August 2017 - NW2417

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

1. (a) What is the total amount that has been spent on Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) system to date and (b) what was the initial budget; (2) (a) on what date was the specified BRT system supposed to have been fully operational, (b) by what date will the specified BRT system be fully operational and (c) what additional amount is needed in order for the BRT system to become fully operational; (3) what are the reasons for the delay in making the specified BRT system operational?

Reply:

(1) (a) What is the total amount that has been spent on Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) system to date and (b) what was the initial budget;

The amount spent on the City of Ekurhuleni’s Bus Rapid Transit system has spent R1 687 509 216 to date and the initial budget was R 2 272 685 751.

(2) (a) on what date was the specified BRT system supposed to have been fully operational, (b) by what date will the specified BRT system be fully operational and (c) what additional amount is needed in order for the BRT system to become fully operational;

 (a) The date that the BRT system was supposed to be fully operational was June 2016.

 (b) The BRT system will be partially operational (kerbside) by the end of September 2017, subject to the finalisation of negotiations with affected taxi operators. Full operations (on trunk route) are scheduled to when the infrastructure is fully complete, in 2018.

 (c) There is no additional money that is needed in order for the BRT system to become fully operational, outside of the allocated budget of R660m for infrastructure and operations for the 2017/18 financial year.

(3) what are the reasons for the delay in making the specified BRT system operational?

The reasons for the delay in making the BRT system operational include but are not limited to:

(a) Delays in the procurement process for the various work streams, especially BRT Infrastructure. Currently, the stations, stream crossings, pedestrian bridges, bridges on the trunk route are still under construction.

 (b) The slow pace of construction by some of the infrastructure contractors as well as financial cash flow challenges, and lack of performance experienced by some contractors, some of whom had their contracts terminated. For instance, the contractors for some sections of the trunk were constantly penalised due to failure to meet project milestones and delivery deadlines while the initial station contractors were terminated due to inability to proceed within the budget as a result of poor cash flow management.

 (c) The protracted process of negotiations between the City of Ekurhuleni and the Ekurhuleni Taxi Industry, and the long process of establishment of the Special Purpose Vehicle (Vehicle Operating Company named KTVR), which will be contracted for the BRT operations by the City of Ekurhuleni.

NW2665E

28 August 2017 - NW2195

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) Why is the National Public Transport Regulator not conducting operator technical accreditation regionally, (b) what qualifications and further criteria need to be fulfilled for a person to undertake inspections, (c) what mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that athe criteria are maintained, (d) why is the accrediting of licences experiencing delays and (e) what (i) steps are being taken to curb the delays, (ii) are the reasons for the delays in each case and (iii) are the deadlines in this regard; (2) (a) why is one standard licence with one set of conditions for operator technical accreditation issued and (b) what is being done to accommodate different requirements by various operators

Reply:

1.(a) Presently the NPTR has not taken up all the functions as prescribed in legislation. However, when the volume of applications for accreditations increases the matter will be discussed with the PRE’s. In the interim MOUs have been signed between the NPTR and PRE’s for the latter to serve as a post office for applications to the NPTR.

(b) M + 3 years qualification. Diploma in Examiner of Vehicles or Traffic Policing is an added advantage.

(c) Pre-employment checks and security vetting

(d) Submission of incomplete applications by operators and lack of capacity of NPTR support staff.

(e) (i) appointment of additional support staff is currently in progress. The number of days for meetings of the NPTR for adjudication has been increased. In addition remuneration for overtime payment for support staff has been approved

(ii) see (i) above

(iii) Additional staff are envisaged to be appointed in the next two monts

2. (a) The Operating Licences for all forms of tourism transport services as well as the general conditions for operators is standard.

(b) Specific conditions differ from operator to operator based on their requirements

28 August 2017 - NW2204

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Transport

(a)(i) What are the reasons for the under-expenditure in the Moloto Development Project and (ii) what are the amounts concerned, (b) what is being done to ensure the under-expenditure does not reoccur, (c)(i) why is the specified project behind schedule and (ii) what are the financial implications thereof and (d) what procedures, processes and mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that the project runs according to schedule?

Reply:

(a)(i) & (ii) The Mpumalanga and Limpopo sections of Moloto road (R573) were transferred to SANRAL in July 2015. At the time SANRAL indicated to National Treasury that the timelines are severely dependent on the regulated procurement, design and land acquisition processes to be followed by SANRAL, running according to plan.

On the Mpumalanga section a Consulting engineering firm was appointed in February 2016 and in March 2016 for the Limpopo section, for design and supervision of the construction contracts.

Due to the urgency in addressing the safety concerns on the route, a process to accelerate the works was initiated. To this end, one construction project in Mpumalanga and Limpopo, each, commenced in January 2017, where the delays of regulatory requirements were limited.

MOLOTO ROAD PROJECT

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Totals

 

R’ 000

R’ 000

R’ 000

R’ 000

R’ 000

Budget

R 660 834

R 1 279 029

1 806 813

1 691 990

5 438 660

Transfer to date

R 660 834

R 639 515

n/a

n/a

R 1 300 380

Table 1: Summary of SANRAL Budget Allocations and Expenditure

(b) The Gauteng section of the R573 Moloto road is not transferred to SANRAL. SANRAL and Gauteng Province signed an implementing agent agreement, in which the funding for the design, land acquisition and construction is provided by the Gauteng Province. To date, the Province has not been able to secure the funding and therefore construction has not started.

The under-expenditure is therefore only on the Gauteng Provincial section of the Moloto Road.

(c)(i) The section of the project under SANRAL’s jurisdiction is not behind schedule, however the following challenges exist:

 

  • Encroachment of the road reserve – The fact that no proper statuary control was exercised in the past, a high number of formal and informal structures were erected within the road reserve. These need to be relocated from the road reserve prior to any construction works commencing.
  • Tribal Land Issues – No formal sub-divisions and title deeds exist in tribal areas. To determine compensation for a land owner, SANRAL needs to first establish the land affected, which is normally done from sub-division diagrams available at the deeds office. Since that is not existing for this area, SANRAL first need to survey the area and establish such basic sub-division diagrams based on conflicting stakeholders input. This leads to an extended stakeholder engagement and land acquisition process.
  • Demands and threats placed on contractors and subcontractors by local community and organised groups – demanding employment and business opportunities. To date, delays of 2.5 months and 4 months have been experienced for current construction projects in Mpumalanga and Limpopo, respectively. This will be an ongoing challenge throughout the project.
  • Environmental and mining authorisations – longer procurement, design and stakeholder engagement processes affect these regulatory processes, thus delaying the implementation phase of the projects.

(c)(ii) None.

(d) (i) Extensive engagement with stakeholders i.e. Local and Tribal Authorities, Land Occupiers and Service Providers.

(ii) Community Participation – Setting up of Public Liaison Committees (PLCs), appointment of the Project Liaison Officers (PLOs) and recruitment processes, which involves setting up databases for labourers and sub-contractors; and selecting labourers through the raffle methods in their Wards (32 in Mpumalanga). All these processes need to be completed prior to any construction works commencing.

(iii) Workshops for SMME’s and prospective contractors and sub-contractors.

28 August 2017 - NW2271

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the reply to question 2632 on 13 December 2016, which permits may and/or can be issued by the permit offices rather than by the Minister; (2) on what legal grounds does he support such authorisation, since authorisation is not provided for in the National Road Traffic Act, Act 93 of 1996; (3) on what legal grounds does his department support the permit fees and exemption from permit fees, since there are not provisions with regard to such permits?

Reply:

(1) The other permit which can be issued other than an exemption issued by the Minister is a permit issued by the MEC’s in terms of section 81(2) of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No. 93 of 1996) authorising the conveyance in a safe manner on a public road of passengers or any load which does not comply with the provisions of the NRTA.

(2) Section 81(2) of the NRTA supra, empowers the MEC’s of respective provinces to authorise the conveyance or transportation as the case maybe, in a safe manner of passengers or any load which does not comply with the provisions of the NRTA.

(3) Section of 81(3) of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No. 93 of 1996), provides further that, an MEC shall determine the fees or charges payable for a vehicle or load that does not comply with the NRTA.

28 August 2017 - NW2412

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Does the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) provide its services to the SA Airways (SAA) on an equal basis as it does to all other airlines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. ACSA affords all its airline clients fair and equal treatment based on the terms and conditions of the client’s contract – with no preferential treatment provided to any airline.

2. Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA) provides all aviation/ airport related services as defined in the Airports Company Act (44/1993) as amended and charges regulated tariffs per the Government Gazette 29 December 2016 Notice 961 of 2016, In addition ACSA provides non – aeronautical services. (Refer below full list of our revenue lines).

All aeronautical services to all Airlines are standardized with no differentiation. Airlines choose pay to utilize our Non – aeronautical services.

ACSA imposes a late charge (interest) on delayed payments of invoices. In line with the National Credit Act, 2005 (No.34 of 2005, chapter 5, interest and fees), Airports Company Act, 1993 (Act No. 44 of 1993) and PFMA (section 80, Act 1 of 1999).

Aeronautical revenue

Aeronautical revenue is recognized when the services are provided to the customer.

Type of Revenue

Determination

Landing fees

Using regulated tariffs for aircraft landings based on the maximum take-off weight of landing aircrafts for each landing.

Passenger service charges

Using regulated tariffs for each departing passenger at an airport of departure.

Aircraft parking

On regulated tariffs for each aircraft parked for over four hours, based on the maximum take-off weight of aircraft parking per 24-hour period.

Non-aeronautical revenue

Non-aeronautical revenue is recognised when services are provided to the customer.

Type of Revenue

Determination

Examples

Advertising

Based on the higher of a minimum guaranteed rental or a percentage of turnover.

Rental of advertising space to concessionaires.

Retail

Based on the higher of a minimum guaranteed rental or a percentage of turnover.

Rental of retail space to concessionaires.

Parking

Based on time-based tariffs.

Providing short- and long-term parking facilities.

Car hire

Rental is based on the higher of a minimum guaranteed rental or a percentage of turnover.

Concession fees and the rental of space and kiosks to car hire companies.

Property rental

Based on medium- and long-term rental agreements with tenants.

Rentals of office, air lounges, aviation fuel depots, warehousing, logistics facilities, hotels and filling stations.

Hotel operations

Accommodation income is recognised at the date the guests are invoiced.

Invoice value of accommodation and sale of food and beverages.

Recoveries

Recoveries include water, electricity and other utility charges recovered from tenants.

Water and electricity invoices.

Interest

Interest levied on overdue debtors

Interest is charged at the Prime Lending Rate

The relationship between Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA) and South African Airways SOC Limited (SAA) is governed by an agreement which has obligations that are continuously monitored.

South African Airways SOC Limited (SAA) utilizes the following services from ACSA:

  • Aeronautical Services (Regulated Tariffs)
  • Landing fees
  • Passenger service charges
  • Aircraft Parking
  • Non-Aeronautical Services
  • Property (Office Property, Terminal Offices which includes ticketing, check in and information counters, VIP passenger Lounges and normal passenger lounges)
  • Staff Parking
  • Recoveries of Utilities
  • Staff Access Permits

SAA is charged interest at the prime lending rate as with all other airlines and customers.

SAA Age analysis.

 

 

Corporate Office

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group Finance

     

 

http://outlook.airports.co.za/Pics/ACSAsmall.jpg 

 

Central Finance Operations

   

 

           

 

 

Debtor: South African Airways SOC Ltd

 

 

 

 

Debtor Number: 1336

   

22-Aug-17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACSA Age Analysis Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of Date : 31-Jul-17

         

 

 

         

 

Airport

Outstanding Amount (ZAR)

Advance Billing (ZAR)

Current (ZAR)

1-30 Days Past Due (ZAR)

31-60 Days Past Due (ZAR)

90+ Days (ZAR)

BFN

43 319.82

-

43 319.82

-

-

-

CORP

246 292.57

-

-

-

-

246 292.57

CTIA

33 420 756.99

822 899.45

10 401 705.46

9 269 601.82

6 161 084.08

6 765 466.18

ELS

4 603 499.15

90 832.90

1 343 233.16

1 267 290.13

901 129.35

1 001 013.61

GRG

5 441.51

23 360.00

4 774.51

-23 480.00

120.00

667.00

KSIA

18 044 827.89

504 996.57

5 719 097.48

5 094 980.14

3 423 290.90

3 302 462.80

ORTIA

233 162 780.34

3 197 406.64

71 132 090.22

64 368 406.82

41 836 573.71

52 628 302.95

PLZ

5 464 833.92

97 819.01

1 640 101.07

1 535 714.76

1 029 669.08

1 161 530.00

Total

294 991 752.19

4 737 314.57

90 284 321.72

81 512 513.67

53 351 867.12

65 105 735.11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. ACSA has a standardized payment term,. of 30 days to all customers/airlines.

  • ACSA has a financial risk management committee which monitors, inter alia, any delinquent clients and appropriate action is initiated in line with its Credit Management Policy, contracts and agreements in place including the regulations of the Government Gazette 29 December 2016 Notice 961 of 2016.
  • ACSA has not changed its official payment terms with SAA.
  • ACSA and SAA from time to time have gone into restructuring agreements.
  • Historically SAA has not defaulted on any payment agreements and is constant communication with ACSA regarding any amounts due.

NW2660E

24 August 2017 - NW2319

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the status of the plan to standardize a national number plate format and (b) what is the expected time line before this happens including (i) public hearings, (ii) legislative amendments and (iii) the period before motorists must comply with the changes?

Reply:

(a) MINMEC at its meeting held on the 5th September 2014 resolved on standardisation and regulation of number plates in the Republic, and a Task Team was established to look into the current value chain of number plates through consultative process with provinces, a process which was concluded during November 2015.

(b) (i) & (iii) As the process of consultation with other relevant stakeholders like the National Treasury is still underway, and having consulted with the Government Communication Information System on the matter, a final roll-out plan will be drafted and communicated accordingly with specific timelines set.

(ii) The National Road Traffic Regulations have been published for public comments during January 2015 and all provinces have been engaged on the proposed amendments, which will only be finalised once all consultation is concluded.

24 August 2017 - NW2064

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entities reporting to him are funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally; if so, (aa)(aaa) what are the names of the specified institutions and (bbb) what are their functions, (bb) from what date has his department or any entity reporting to him been funding them and (cc) what amount has his department contributed towards such funding?

Reply:

Department

(a)(b) The Department of Transport does not fund any research and development institutions, but funding is provided to students who are currently studying towards their Post Graduate programmes such as Honours, Masters and PHD programmes through academic institutions.

Not applicable

(i)(ii) Not applicable.

(aa)(aaa) Not Applicable.

(bbb) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

(cc) Not applicable.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) is working with Wits University (Tshimologong Digital Innovation Precinct) to address Authentication and Access Management

(a) N/A

(b) ACSA is working with Wits University’s Tshimologong Digital Innovation Precinct to run the “ACSA Access and Authentication Management Challenge” calling on innovative developers to think out of the box and come up with novel solutions for the current challenge of using multiple username and password.

i. Domestically

ii. N/A

(aa) (aaa) Wits University (Tshimologong Digital Innovation Precinct)

(bbb) Institute of Higher Learning tasked with research and education.

Airport Company South Africa currently uses multiple systems and devices in their daily operations. Some of the systems require users to identify themselves, either so that security protocols can be managed or to match the features of the system to the profile of the user by username, password and/or other mechanisms e.g. Biometrics, Identification cards, etc. The burden of managing access to these systems is currently a major challenge together with managing multiple username and/or password pairs, both for the organisation and the users. There’s no single view of who has access to what systems and the level of access they have on the system which creates problem related to segregation of duties.

The purpose of this initiative is to identify a solution that utilises authentication methodologies to access all systems in the organisation in a secure, seamless, unified and integrated manner. The ability to grant users access to the right and relevant information while having a comprehensive view of all access granted to all users.

The target is BSC graduate from software engineering specifically black South Africans. 100 youth will benefit in this project.

(bb) Since 2016 to 2019

(cc) R7,2 million

Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS)

(b)(i) No, ATNS is not currently funding any domestic institution of research and development;

(b)(ii) No, ATNS is not currently funding any international institution of research and development;

Note:

ATNS had a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering of the University of Pretoria. This MOU ran for a 5 year period (from 2012/13 - 2016/17 Financial Years). The purpose of this MoU was to participate in the forefront research activities to deliver the world class research and educational output for the benefit of ATNS, UP and telecommunications industries.

The following were the objectives of the agreement between the two parties:

  • Promoting study and research,
  • Promoting human capital development, in particular development of skills in ICT field and addressing historical imbalances of high skilled engineers.

ATNS have benefited in terms of interaction with experts in the field of telecommunications and research and development. This include benefiting in terms of the following:

  • Research,
  • Teaching,
  • Short courses in related field.

The funding over the 2012/13 - 2016/17 Financial Years to the University of Pretoria was R500 000, R700 000, R800 000, R900 000 and R1 000 000 respectively.

(a)(aaa) N/a

(bbb) N/a

(bb) N/a

(cc) N/a

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Not applicable, (b) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) is NOT funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally. (aa)(aaa), (bbb), (bb) (cc) These questions are not applicable as the SACAA does not fund any institution for research and development purposes.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) is not funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally; consequently the remainder of the questions in respect of paragraphs (aa)(aaa), (bbb), (bb) and (cc), are not applicable.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(b) The RTMC does not fund any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally; consequently the remainder of the questions in respect of paragraphs (aa)(aaa), (bbb), (bb) and (cc), are not applicable.

Cross Border Transport Road Agency (CBTRA)

(b) The Cross Border Road Transport Agency does not fund, including by way of discretionary funding any institution of research and development (i) domestically and or (ii) internationally; consequently the remainder of the questions in respect of paragraphs (aa)(aaa), (bbb), (bb) and (cc), are not applicable.

Road Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(b) The Road Traffic Infringement Agency is not and has not funded any institution of research and development, either (i) Domestically or (ii) Internationally; consequently the remainder of the questions in respect of paragraphs (aa)(aaa), (bbb), (bb) and (cc), are not applicable.

South African National Roads Agency (SANRAL)

(b) The SA National Roads Agency (SOC) Limited (SANRAL) has spent the following amounts on educational initiative’s and R & D:

(aa)(aaa) Name of Institution

(bbb) Function of Institution

Purpose of Funding

(bb) Date

(cc) Amount

(R)

  1. UCT

(University of Cape Town)

University

Chair: Transportation Planning

2011

20 Million

2. UFS

(University of the Free State)

University

Chair: Mathematics and Physics

2015

30 Million

3. UFS STEM

University ICT Lab

Family maths and Science & STEM

2015/16

7 774 635-00

4. US

(University of Stellenbosch)

University

Chair: Pavement Engineering

2016

30 Million

5. NMMU

(Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University)

University

STEM laboratory

2016/17

3 151 495-00

6. CSIR

Research Council

Road Research

2008-2017

48 million

7. UP & CSIR

(University of Pretoria)

University &

Research Council

National Reference Laboratory Facilities

2016-2019

150 million

South African Maritime Authority Safety (SAMSA)

South African Maritime Authority (SAMSA) does not provide direct funding to research and development institutions.

In line with its strategy of attracting and retaining adequately skilled staff, the Authority has in place a scholarship programme for full-time students and financial assistance to employees studying towards careers related to the promotion of the maritime discipline. Some of the institutions with students funded by the Authority include The World Maritime University in Sweden and the Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth. The students and employees sign a contract that requires them to work back the number of years covering the funding period.

Ports Regulator (RSA)

(b) The Ports Regulator does not fund any institution of research and development both (i) domestically and (ii) internationally.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(b) For the 2017/18 financial year PRASA is not funding any Research and Development domestically or internationally. However,

(aaa) i) From 2011 – 2016 (5 years) PRASA funded the PRASA Rail Chair at Stellenbosch University.

(bbb) i)

  • Maintenance Management

• Operations Management

• Systems Engineering

• Change Management Programmes

• Risk Assessment and Safety Engineering

• Reliability Improvement Engineering

• Lean Supply Chain Management

• Logistics

• Project Management

• Knowledge Management

• Process Improvement

• Modelling and Simulation

• 3D and Finite Element Modelling

• Reverse Engineering

• Material Conformance Testing

• Regenerative Power Engineering

(bb) The Research programme was from 2011 – 2016 (5 years)

cc) The cost of the Programme was R15 million over the five year period.

PRASA has membership subscription in the following International institution:

(aaa) International Suburban Rail Benchmarking Group (ISBERG) managed by Imperial College of London

(bbb) A group of 14 International railways that agreed to a set of Key Performance Indicators that is updated annually and 5 studies the members mutually agree on to fund for research by the facilitators of the group – Imperial College of London.                                                                 

 (bb) PRASA is participating in this Group from February 2014.

(cc) An amount of R1.5 million was spent between 2013 and 2017. We have not as yet paid 2017 membership fees that is expected to be in the order of R550 000 for the year.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(b) No, the RSR does not fund any institution of research and development

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

24 August 2017 - NW2196

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he intends to conduct lifestyle audits on the top leadership of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) how would such an audit be conducted, (ii) who would conduct it, (iii) what form would it take and (iv) what are the consequences for those that demonstrate a lifestyle beyond their means?

Reply:

Department

(A) If the need arises in future, I will conduct lifestyle audits on the top leadership of the Department.

(I) The Department set up a panel of service providers, appointed to perform lifestyle audits. The service providers would be required to provide a quotation on a case by case basis.

(ii) Any one of the service providers on the panel, appointed to perform lifestyle audits.

(iii) Unknown, since the service provider appointed would propose the form as part of their Quotation

(iv) Unknown at this stage, since the consequence will be informed by the findings and recommendations from the audit conducted.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa has not developed a framework to conduct lifestyle audit on its employees. ACSA employees submit financial disclosure form annually.

Currently security screening and vetting is conducted by the State Security Agency in terms of Section 2A of the National Strategic Intelligence Act 39, of 1994 as amended.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. N/A (b) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) endeavors to conduct lifestyle audits as and when necessary, within the bounds of the law. This is catered for in the entity’s employment contracts. By signing the contract of employment every employee agrees to be subjected to a lifestyle audit, whenever the employer deems it fit. This includes but is not limited to investigations. (ii) a service provider would be appointed when the need is identified (iii) the method will be investigated at the relevant time, and (iv) the organisations’ disciplinary policy will be followed for those employees that demonstrate a lifestyle beyond their means.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

b, ATNS intend performing the lifestyle audit

(i) Following the prescribed audit standards

(ii) An external independent consultant(s) or firm would be appointed to perform such audit

(iii) The scope will be provided by management and the consultants will follow the set audit methodologies/standards (also refer to item (ii))

(iv) Disciplinary process against anyone who has violated the rules or policies of the company based on evidence (findings) and recommendations by the consultant(s) or firm appointed to conduct the audit.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) has not, conducted lifestyle audits on the top leadership; but will do so where suspicions of living beyond the means surfaces, in respect of declared income and suspicious accumulation of wealth. Should the lifestyle be proven to be beyond an employee’s means, there would be a review of other possible sources of income (other family members, inheritances etc.). Should there be proof of irregular income due to their role within RAF, then there would be a forensic investigation and disciplinary process – with punitive action if and as applicable.

South African National Road Agency (SANRAL)

(b) SANRAL will conduct a lifestyle audit on the top management team of SANRAL.

  1. An independent service provider with the necessary knowledge and skills to conduct lifestyle audits will be appointed following a tender process to conduct the audit.
  2. It would be conducted by an independent service provider.
  3. As advised by the service provider – the investigation would be expected to include a review of fixed and movable assets owned, travel and holiday patterns etc.;
  4. Should the lifestyle be proven to be beyond an employee’s means, there would be a review of other possible sources of income (other family members, inheritances etc.). Should there be proof of irregular income due to their role within SANRAL, then there would be a forensic investigation and disciplinary process – with punitive action if and as applicable.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

The RTMC conducts a comprehensive disclosure of information system to obtain information on its top leadership and has not made any plans to conduct lifestyle audits. (b) The Corporation has not found evidence to justify undertaking such an audit.

Cross Border Roads Transport Agency (CBRTA)

b) The C-BRTA has no immediate plans to conduct a lifestyle audit on its top leadership as there is no information that has come to our attention that necessitate such an audit.

(i) – (iv) Not applicable

Road Infringement Agency (RTIA)

b) The RTIA has not yet conducted a lifestyle audit but intends to do so based on the results of its assessment;

(i) The Agency has appointed a service provider to conduct a fraud prevention and detection assessment;

(ii) This is conducted by an independent service provider;

(iii) The assessment will take form of an analysis of the remuneration and lifestyle of all staff;

(iv) The results of the assessment will identify and highlight the attendant risks related to employees living beyond their means and such results will inform the process of conducting lifestyle audits where necessary and due process followed as per Agency’s policies.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(b) Targeted lifestyle audits are conducted as and when is necessary.

(i) It would be conducted by forensic investigation.

(ii) The lifestyle audit would be conducted by an external company who would be selected after a procurement process is followed.

(iii) Investigation.

(iv)The outcomes of the investigations will be shared with them. If they have contravened the code of conduct, they will be subjected to a disciplinary hearing.

Ports Regulator (Ports Regulator SA)

(b) The Ports Regulator is not aware of any requirement as regards the PFMA or any instruction notes issued by the Treasury in this regard. Also the Auditor General has not issued any finding in this regard and has not expressed the need for such an audit. Furthermore, the Regulator is not aware of any guideline issued which may form the basis for procedures to be followed in the event that such a requirement becomes statutory. The Ports Regulator has also not identified life style issues within its risk register and strategy which has necessitated the need for the skills audit to be conducted.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA has not conducted lifestyle audits on the top leadership of the Agency.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Railway Safety Regulator has not conducted lifestyle audits on the top leadership of the Agency.

24 August 2017 - NW2197

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he intends to conduct a skills and qualifications audit on the top leadership of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) how will the audit be conducted, (ii) who will conduct the audit, (iii) what form will it take, (iv) what are the intended consequences to those who have lied or provided misleading information with regard to their skills and qualifications?

Reply:

Department

(a) The Department of Transport conducted a comprehensive skills audit commissioned by the then Minister: Ms Dipuo Peters during 2016/17 financial year. The project included employees across all levels including top leadership.

(i) The skills audit was conducted through employees responding to electronic questionnaires. The report was generated as per the approved Terms of Reference.

(ii) The Department appointed the service provider through a tendering process to conduct the skills audit in collaboration with the Human Resource Team and other relevant departmental stakeholders.

(iii) The skills audit was conducted to identify the skills matrices for the organization which resulted in departmental competency dictionary. Employees were requested to respond to questions that assist in the identification of the available qualifications, skills, knowledge and competencies against the identified skills profile for the organization. The Department achieved the response rate of 95%, which are the leading institutions where the service provider conducted such a project.

(iv) The Department is continuously verifying all the qualifications for employees. All the qualifications in which employees alleged to have are verified with the South African Qualification Authority. In terms of skills, the department was assured that the skills audit system had a build-in function to pick any discrepancies and normalize it accordingly.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) Yes, the audit and verification of qualifications was once again conducted in February 2016 for all Executives at ATNS. This is an ongoing process, whereby verification of skills and qualifications gets done by the MiE Background Screening, as and when the recruitment and/or promotion takes place.

(b) Yes

  1. The Audit gets conducted using the External Verification Agency known as MIE Background Screening from time to time and this was further handled with the State Security Agency. This was further followed by the verification of both the skills and qualifications for both Top Management and Senior Management in November 2016 as part of the Talent Management Process. This will be ongoing as it now forms part of our Talent management process and succession management
  2. The Verification Agency called MiE Background Screening
  3. All the Individual’s qualifications get forwarded to the Agency for verification. The Agency contacts the stated tertiary institutions for confirmation and verification of the qualifications and thereafter, reports confirming the authenticity/legitimacy of qualifications gets forwarded to ATNS.
  4. The intended consequences will be a disciplinary action, that may result in termination of employment of the individual.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

The (b) C-BRTA conducted a qualifications audit on the top leadership in 2016 through MIE. For new appointments, qualifications are audited through MIE prior to extension of offer of employment and also verification is done with referees provided by the employee before appointment to confirm the skills mentioned on their curriculum vitae and during the interviews.

(i),(ii),(iii) – Not applicable

(iv) The intended consequences to those who would have been found to have lied or provided misleading information was to subject them to disciplinary action if already appointed and disqualify them if they are considered for appointment.

Road Accident Fund

(b) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) conducted a skills and qualifications audit on its top leadership: on 31 October 2015; and it has implemented an updated Resourcing Policy and associated Standard Operating Procedure (collectively hereinafter referred to as “the Framework”), which Framework provides for extensive controls prior to the appointment of a job applicant, including: reference checks to establish whether the job applicant was found guilty of any misconduct or breach of trust; criminal record checks; financial stability checks; psychometric and competency assessments, which focus on critical generic leadership, managerial competencies, technical and professional competencies; and, verification by an external service provider of the authenticity of all qualifications.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(b) The Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) does intend to conduct a skills and qualification audit on its leadership personnel;

(i) The audit will be conducted by assessing gaps of current job holders with job profile competency and qualification requirements;

(ii) An independent service provider will be appointed to conduct the audit;

(iii) The audit will be conducted through a competency-based battery of tests, simulation scenarios and written tasks;

(iv) The applicable policies and current practice approaches will be followed to deal with cases of those that have lied or provided misleading information with regard to their skills and qualifications.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

The RTMC has the skills and qualifications audit of the top leadership which can be provided.

(i); All top leadership’s qualifications were verified; they wrote competency assessment tests which was conducted by a qualified Psychologist during their recruitment to assessed their skills and competencies, the results of which informed their appointment.

(ii); (iii); (iv) fall away. No one was found to have lied about their qualifications at top leadership level.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

(a) SANRAL already conducts skills and qualifications audits of its Top Management and Board members. This was initiated back on 2014.

  1. A once off verification was done for all incumbents in 2014 and all new employees are subjected to the same verification upon recruitment
  2. This is conducted through MIE
  3. As per the supplier – verifications of all alleged qualifications are done with the identified institutions of higher learning. Staff are also required to reproduce copies of qualifications for filing purposes.
  4. Employees that are found to have misrepresented qualifications are subjected to a disciplinary process, in line with the company disciplinary code.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa process followed

Given the ongoing misrepresentation of academic qualifications taking place in the country, and its adverse impact on the Country’s reputation, the creditability of its Institutions and the National Qualification Framework, the Government has taken a firm stance to crack down on qualification fraud in the public sector. The Government has therefore called upon all its Departments to act decisively in addressing this challenge.

The Minister of Transport thus requested the ACSA Board to conduct a full scale audit of the qualifications of all its senior employees to identify any discrepancies which may exist.

The Top Management Qualifications audit was subsequently concluded by the Internal Audit Department and a report submitted to the Board of Airports Company South Africa.

Airports Company South Africa response to subsection of the Parliamentary question

Whether he intends to conduct a skills and qualifications audit on the top leadership of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him

It was done and fully concluded by the 2015/2016 financial year.

(i) how will the audit be conducted, (ii) who will conduct the audit, (iii) what form will it take,

The audit was conducted by Internal Audit of the business and reported to the Board of the Company;

The information was verified as valid against declared qualification/s reflected on the CV via an independent third party service provider, MIE.

(iv) what are the intended consequences to those who have lied or provided misleading information with regard to their skills and qualifications?

In the Qualifications Audit completed, no Employees in top leadership (Executives) at ACSA were found to have misrepresented. This therefore did not necessitate any action be taken.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Not applicable, (b) the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) conducted a skills and qualifications audit for its leadership team, i.e. the Board, Executives, and Senior Management, during the 2015/16 financial year. (i) A service provider was appointed to conduct each audit. (ii) The SACAA conducted the skills audit through an audit; and the qualifications audit was conducted through a vetting process. (iv) The entity takes any misinterpretation very seriously and would invoke the disciplinary policy or procedure on affected employees. There were no misinterpretations found.

(b) South African Maritime Safety Authority(SAMSA)

(c) 

(d) (b) Yes.

(e) (i) Electronically

(f) (ii) External party sourced through a procurement process.

(g) (iii) Skills audit will be done by comparing skills required for the job with skills of the employee in that job. Qualifications audit will be done through verification agencies and/or submission of original copies.

(h) (iv) Disciplinary process shall be followed.

Ports Regulator (RSA)

(b) A qualification audit of the PRSA was requested by the previous Minister of Transport to be done by SAQA. This was done and submitted to the Minister. All qualifications were verified to be accurately represented.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) The PRASA Board through the instruction of the Department of Transport Minister has conducted a Skills and Qualifications Audit on All PRASA Executives, General Managers and Senior Managers.

(i) Formal qualification supplied on appointment of employee and subsequent qualifications will be submitted to the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)

(ii) The Skills and qualifications Audit was done through the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).

(iii) All formal qualifications supplied by the employees have been verified,

(iv) There are 22 employees that were withdrawn by SAQA either because the employees have since resigned, are dead, the qualification had been misplaced or they are not in the management level.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Railway Safety Regulator has not conduct a skills and qualifications audit on the top leadership

24 August 2017 - NW2200

Profile picture: Jooste, Ms K

Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any mechanisms have been put in place in (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him to ensure that audit outcomes are improved; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) what (aa) are the time frames and (bb) early warning mechanisms exist and (ii) how is this being monitored periodically in each case?

Reply:

Department

In December 2008, Cabinet passed a resolution that Accounting Officers and Accounting Authorities should implement recommendations included in the AGSA Final Management Letters. The National Treasury then issued a circular requesting institutions to provide corrective steps to be taken to address concerns raised in their audit reports on an annual basis. The Department develops action plans which are implemented by Management to address audit outcomes. These are monitored and tracked by Internal Control and reported to Executive Committee and Audit Committee on a quarterly basis. National Treasury also tracks and reviews progress on an annual basis. The public entities also send their quarterly progress reports to the Department on implementation of action plans. The Department also implements a compliance checklist to detect any early warning signs of noncompliance. This is reviewed on a quarterly basis.

REPLY (b)

The Minister has meetings with the AGSA to assess progress on action plans for the whole transport portfolio. Interventions and commitments are made by the Minister to the AGSA and those commitments monitored to ensure that progress is made.

The audit committees at the public entities perform assessments and the audit reviews are done quarterly. The entities audit outcomes have improved. Public entities have implemented audit strategies to monitor audit outcomes, entities report on quarterly basis about progress of audit findings

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(b) Airports Company South Africa received an unqualified audit opinion with findings in the 2015/16 financial year. Airports Company South Africa is also in the process of driving a number of initiatives to address the findings within the Auditor General Management report which are monitored through its various governance structures.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(b) ATNS has mechanisms put in place to ensure that audit outcomes are improved.

(i) A tracking register of all audit findings is kept and monitored on a monthly basis by Internal Audit as well as Executive Committee to ensure that mitigation plans are implemented. Furthermore, consequence management linked to unresolved audit findings is being driven at Board level to ensure that Management responds adequately to repeat findings by both internal and external auditors.

(aa) Progress is monitored on a monthly basis by Internal Audit as well as Executive Committee. Quarterly by the Audit and Risk Committee of the Board.

(bb) Monthly reviews of the tracking register as well as the resolution rate of the outstanding audit findings (expressed in percentages) is used as an indication of early warning signs.

(i) A follow-up on outstanding findings is performed on a monthly basis by Internal Audit. The tracking register is tabled and discussed at the Executive Committee meetings monthly as well as quarterly by the Audit and Risk Committee of the Board.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Not applicable, (b) (i), (aa), (bb), (i) the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) has well-developed mechanisms and processes to ensure that audit outcomes are tracked and closed accordingly. All findings are listed on the SACAA’s tracking register, and a timeframe is allocated for the closure of each finding. The tracking register is monitored by the SACAA’s Internal Audit division to ensure that the findings are adequately closed.

 

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) put in place a mechanism to ensure that audit outcomes are improved through follow-up audits by the RAF’s Internal Audit Department;

the (i) (aa) nature, timing and extent of follow-ups take into account the following factors: significance of the reported observations or recommendation; degree of effort and cost needed to correct the reported condition; complexity of the corrective action; and, the timeframe within which management’s action plans are required - all action plans are implemented by management as follows, unless another implementation date has been agreed with the Chief Audit Executive: critical- within 1 month of finalization of the draft report; high- within 3 months of finalization of the draft report; medium- within 4 months of finalization of the draft report; and low- within 6 months of finalization of the draft report; and (bb) early warning mechanisms exist in the form of a monthly Audit Tracking Report and dashboards, and

(ii) periodic monitoring takes place through the following process: on or about the 20th of every month an email is sent to line management for them to provide a status update on Team Central (an audit and issues tracking database) to comment whether an issue has been resolved or not. If not, reasons for not completing must be provided. Line management has 2 days to respond to this. Fieldwork starts on resolved issues once comments are received from line management and takes approximately 7 days. Once fieldwork is finalised, the Audit Tracking Report is sent to line management and executives for comment within 3 days. After receipt of comments from line management and executives, the Audit Tracking Report and respective dashboards are reviewed by Internal Audit management and then submitted to the Chief Executive Officer for comment and further discussion at EXCO. The Board committees i.e. REMCO and Audit Committee also monitor the resolution of the audit findings.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(b) The RTMC has established an Enterprise Risk & Audit Committee comprising of senior managers to consider existing and/or emerging operational & strategic risks affecting the Corporation, implementation of Internal Audit findings and Auditor General’s findings.

  1. (aa) The Enterprise Risk & Audit committee sits on a weekly basis to review progress with the implementation of audit findings, identify emerging risks and required remedial actions.
  2. The Committee is accountable to the Executive Committee.
  3. This is monitored through reports submitted to the Board through the Audit & Risk Committee.

Cross Border Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b) Yes, the C-BRTA has put in place mechanism to ensure that audit outcomes are improved.

(i) (aa)

The C-BRTA has put in place an audit findings tracking register with action plans to ensure that controls are put in place to mitigate against the risk of audit findings recurring.

The action plans are tracked monthly by the Internal Control Unit and reported quarterly to the Executive Committee, and Audit and Risk Committee.

(ii) (bb)

The internal audit function performs regular follow up audits on the implemented action plans, including assessing whether the plans mitigate the identified risks. The audit reports serve at the Executive Committee meetings and Audit and Risk Committee meetings and provide assurance on whether the internal controls are implemented to mitigate the identified risk.

(iii) The Internal Control Unit monitors the implementation of action plans on a monthly basis through engagement with various line functions and progress on implementation of improvement controls is report to the Executive Committee and Audit and Risk Committee of the Board on a quarterly basis.

 

South African National Roads Agency (SANRAL)

(b)(i) SANRAL uses an electronic database (CURA) to capture all findings raised by internal and external auditors. Each finding is allocated to the applicable responsible person (owner) and a realistic timeframe in which to address the finding. The status of the finding is updated by the owner on a regular basis. Once the finding is addressed, the status is updated to “Ready for Audit”, after which internal audit reviews the action to ensure that it addresses the deficiency adequately and effectively. If an action is not concluded within the timeframe, the finding is flagged and reported.

(ii) The Internal Auditors provide a report from CURA to the Audit and Risk Committee, indicating the status and progress of all findings. Management reports to the Board and the Auditor-General on a quarterly basis regarding progress on addressing key audit matters.

Roads Infringement Agency (RTIA)

The Road Traffic Infringement Agency has put mechanisms in place to ensure improved audit outcomes.

(b) (i) (aa) The timeframes are for annual implementation;

(b) (i) (bb) The early warning mechanism implemented from the 2016/17 period involves the allocation of “champions” for every risk area, weaknesses and underperformance identified in the previous audit, as well as determining and implementing the related and applicable intervention measures;

(b) (ii) All the interventions are monitored through the Agency’s governance structures, being discussed at the Management Committee, Executive Committee, Audit & Risk Committee and ultimately to the Board of Directors on a regular basis and included in the quarterly reports on a regular basis.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

1. In 2016 SAMSA implemented the following measures to address audit outcomes and improvements thereon:

1.1 An audit tracking sheet used to track progress on resolution of audit outcomes. The tracking sheet is reviewed by the Audit and Risk Committee of the Board at least four times a year;

1.2 An Audit Steering Committee comprising of senior staff from the Audit-General and SAMSA was set up with a view to review audit risks and ensure that these are identified and addressed prior to financial year end.

1.3 A Risk Register that reviews major risks in the organisation and measure implemented to mitigate these risks. The Risk Register is reviewed quarterly by the Audit and Risk Committee of the Board.

2. Any items considered to have an impact in the organisation and the audit are discussed on an ongoing basis by EXCO, The Audit and Risk Committee and The Board. These include changes in legislation that may have a bearing on the Authority, eg recent changes in the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework (PPPFA) etc. This is monitored on a quarterly basis by various governance structures.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

Yes PRASA has put mechanisms in place to improve audit outcomes.

(aa) The majority of the findings are in the Supply Chain Management (SCM)area. The SCM policy is being updated and will be finalised by end of September. SCM policy and procedures are being supplemented and the process will be finalised by end of September. SCM Practitioners will be trained post the implementation of the updated policy.

(bb) The internal audit performs a probity role throughout the procurement process and provides an early warning mechanism.

(cc) The probity function provides a live monitoring of the procurement process, and flags problems as they arise. The Audit and Risk Committee of the Board monitors the improvement of the audit outcomes. .

Ports Regulator (RSA)

(a) The Ports Regulator prepares the audit outcomes action plan which is monitored by the Ports Regulator audit committee and the internal audit on a quarterly basis to ensure that all the identified audit findings are addressed. The Ports Regulator has received “clean audits” for 2014/15, 2015/16, and again for 2016/17

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(b) In the RSR measures have been put in place to ensure improvement in the outcomes of the audit. The following are some of the measures in place:

(i) (aa) Risk-based internal audit plans developed by Chief Audit Executive in consultation with Management for approval by the Audit and Risk Committee (ARC) of the Board. The audit reviews conducted by Internal Audit focus on those areas considered medium-high risk as per RSR’s risk profile, which in essence addresses the control environment as well as governance processes.

Annual audit plans include the review of AGSA’s Management letter and conducting follow-up on the implementation of corrective actions by Management. These follow-ups are conducted on an on-going basis immediately upon issuance of the AGSA Report.

Internal Audit reports quarterly to the ARC on the progress of the corrective actions as guided by the implementation dates as committed by Management.

ARC on a quarterly basis reviews the progress made by the Internal Audit against its plan.

bb) Early warning mechanisms exist viz:

  1. Monthly EXCO reporting by various departments
  2. Monthly risk sessions with Management
  3. Monthly Risk Reports including emerging risks discussed at EXCO (standing agenda Item)

(ii) Management reports on organisational performance, Risk Management as well as financial position of the entity are also presented to the ARC on a quarterly basis for evaluation and approval.

24 August 2017 - NW2205

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) properties were leased by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years, (b) are the reasons for leasing these properties, (c) are these properties used for and (d) are the costs involved in each case?

Reply:

Department

(a) Forum Building was leased by (i) the Department and in the (aa) 2014 – 2015, (bb) 2015 – 2016 and (cc) 2016 – 2017 financial years, (b) The Department is leasing Forum Building through DPW as the only office accommodation to house the Head Office, (c) These property is used as office accommodation for Head Office and (d) Yes there are costs involved in each case. Amounts for each financial year are as follows:

2014-15: R38 180 673.50

2015-16: R56 283 847.68

2016-17: R52 018 294.20

REPLY

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency:

  1. The properties are leased by the Agency to house its operations; in Pretoria is its Head office and regional offices for law enforcement operations. These regional offices are located at strategic point of entries.

(a)(ii) and (aa), (bb) and (cc)

(b) and (c)

(d) Rental and utilities

   

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

Office accommodation - Head Office – ERF 49 Menlyn

FY: 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17

The lease was for provision of office accommodation for Head Office and was used for the purpose of office accommodation.

R8,724,383

R8,132,674

R9,477,201

         

Office accommodation - Zeerust Regional Office – Bhayat Motors

FY: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17

The lease was for provision of office accommodation at the region and was used for the purpose of office accommodation.

R101,574

R123,785

R118,476

Office Accommodation – Ladybrand Regional Office – Proud Afrique Trading 90 PTY (LTD)

FY: 2015/16 and 2016/17

 

-

R95, 760

R101, 027

Office Accommodation – Ladybrand Regional Office – Ross Real Estates

FY: 2014-15

 

R58, 306

-

-

Office Accommodation – Nelspruit Regional Office – Presidor Twenty Four

FY: 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17

 

R277, 905

R424, 877

R426, 494

Office Accommodation – Durban Regional Office – Brackdale Investment

FY: 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17

The lease was for provision of office accommodation at the region and was used for the purpose of office accommodation.

R96, 785

R101, 130

R141, 305

Office Accommodation – Mokopane Regional Office – Rayveen CC

FY: 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17

 

R233, 969

R288, 974

R277, 479

Office Accommodation – Upington Regional Office – Upington Agri-Estate

FY: 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17

 

R118, 680

R128, 166

R141, 102

Road Accident Fund:

(a) (ii) The properties were leased by the Road Accident Fund (RAF) in the:

(b) the reasons for leasing these properties are:

(c) these properties are used for:

(d) the costs (rental, operating cost, and parking) involved in each case is:

(aa) 2014-15,

 

 

 

Cape Town - 1 Thibault Square - Long Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 11,886,159

Cape Town - 1 Thibault Square - Long Street (Parking)

Parking

Regional office

R 323,407

Durban - Embassy Building - 199 Anton Lembede Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 9,834,816

New Castle - TM Centre - 79 Harding Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 169,523

Port Elizabeth - Regency House - 35a Third Avenue, Newton Park

Office Accommodation

Forensic office

R 246,117

East London - Metropolitan Life Building - c/o Drury Lane and Caxton Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 7,657,040

Port Elizabeth - Main Post Office Building, Govan Mbeki Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 497,416

Centurion - Eco Glades II Office Park - 420 Witch Hazel Road

Office Accommodation

Head Office

R 19,291,003

Centurion - Eco Glades Square - Witch Hazel Road

Storage

Head Office

R 668,900

Bloemfontein - Southern Life Plaza Building - 41 Charlotte Maxeke Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 819,404

Kimberley - 10 Black Street, New Park

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 176,900

Johannesburg - Marble Towers - 212 Jeppe Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 13,077,751

Polokwane - Koos Smit Centre - Grobler Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 402,585

Mafikeng - Mega City Shopping Centre - c/o Sekame Street and James Maroka Drive

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 511,524

Tzaneen - 21A Peace Street (Parking)

Parking

Satellite Office

R 3,840

Tzaneen - 21A Peace Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 119,994

Nelspruit - Mbombela Shoprite Centre - 25 Samora Machel Drive

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 356,615

Pretoria - Middestad Centre - 252 Andries Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 976,170

(bb) 2015-16, and

 

 

 

Beaufort West - 1 BP Office Park - c/o Nuwe and Voortrekker Street

Office Accommodation

Hospital Based Office

R 27,360

Cape Town - 1 Thibault Square - Long Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 11,772,226

Cape Town - 1 Thibault Square (Parking)

Parking

Regional office

R 379,195

Cape Town - Metrofile Offices - 1 Munich Street, Airport Industria 2

Office Accommodation

Data recovery site

R 38,780

Durban - Embassy Building - 199 Anton Lembede Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 10,900,944

Durban - Devonshire Parkade - Anton Lembede Street

Parking

Regional office

R 349,800

New Castle - TM Centre - 79 Harding Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 197,648

Port Elizabeth - Regency House - 35a Third Avenue, Newton Park

Office Accommodation

Forensic office

R 278,017

East London - Metropolitan Life Building - c/o Drury Lane and Caxton Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 8,659,955

Port Elizabeth - Main Post Office Building, Govan Mbeki Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 377,372

Centurion - Eco Glades II Office Park - 420 Witch Hazel Road

Office Accommodation

Head Office

R 18,908,882

Centurion - Eco Glades Square - Witch Hazel Road

Storage

Head Office

R 680,706

Bloemfontein - Southern Life Plaza Building - 41 Charlotte Maxeke Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 1,177,992

Kimberley - 10 Black Street, New Park

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 222,440

Johannesburg - Marble Towers - 212 Jeppe Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 14,533,451

Polokwane - Koos Smit Centre - Grobler Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 581,347

Mafikeng - Mega City Shopping Centre - c/o Sekame Street and James Maroka Drive

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 679,188

Pretoria - Menlyn Mall - c/o Atterbury and Lois Avenue

Parking

Regional office

R 1,118,360

Tzaneen - 21A Peace Street (Parking)

Parking

Satellite Office

R 1,920

Tzaneen - 21A Peace Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 129,033

Nelspruit - Mbombela Shoprite Centre - 25 Samora Machel Drive

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 302,513

Nelspruit - Canary Walk Mall - Bester Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 392,000

Pretoria - Middestad Centre - 252 Andries Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 670,920

(cc) 2016-17 financial years

 

 

 

Beaufort West - 1 BP Office Park - c/o Nuwe and Voortrekker Street

Office Accommodation

Hospital Based Office

R 137,884

Cape Town - 1 Thibault Square - Long Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 13,122,557

Cape Town - 1 Thibault Square (Parking)

Parking

Regional office

R 580,872

Cape Town - Metrofile Offices - 1 Munich Street, Airport Industria 2

Office Accommodation

Data recovery site

R 77,560

Durban - Embassy Building - 199 Anton Lembede Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 11,882,480

Durban - Devonshire Parkade - Anton Lembede Street

Parking

Regional office

R 1,276,770

New Castle - TM Centre - 79 Harding Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 208,124

Port Elizabeth - Regency House - 35a Third Avenue, Newton Park

Office Accommodation

Forensic office

R 309,230

East London - Metropolitan Life Building - c/o Drury Lane and Caxton Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 9,149,587

Port Elizabeth - Main Post Office Building, Govan Mbeki Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 306,662

Centurion - Eco Glades II Office Park - 420 Witch Hazel Road

Office Accommodation

Head Office

R 19,925,809

Centurion - Eco Glades Square - Witch Hazel Road

Storage

Head Office

R 720,418

Bloemfontein - Southern Life Plaza Building - 41 Charlotte Maxeke Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 759,424

Kimberley - 10 Black Street, New Park

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 233,684

Johannesburg - Marble Towers - 212 Jeppe Street

Office Accommodation

Regional office

R 15,448,571

Polokwane - Koos Smit Centre - Grobler Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 678,257

Mafikeng - Mega City Shopping Centre - c/o Sekame Street and James Maroka Drive

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 910,478

Pretoria - Menlyn Mall - c/o Atterbury and Lois Avenue

Parking

Regional office

R 1,271,607

Tzaneen - 21A Peace Street

Office Accommodation

Satellite Office

R 2,153

Nelspruit - Mbombela Shoprite Centre - 25 Samora Machel Drive

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 8,468

Nelspruit - Canary Walk Mall - Bester Street

Office Accommodation

Customer Service Centre

R 615,651

The following properties were leased by the Road Traffic Infringement Agency:

The Road Traffic Infringement Agency has leased premises for accommodating its Head Office from where it runs its business and dispense of its mandate.

  1. Properties
  1. Reasons for leasing
  1. Property use

(aa) 2014/15

(bb) 2015/16

(cc) 2016/17

leased from the Public Investment Corporation (PIC)

To provide accommodation for the Agency’s business operations

Office accommodation- used for housing the Agency’s business operations.

R2 233 943

R2 847 072

-

Mowana Properties (Previously Public Investment Corporation Properties)

To provide accommodation for the Agency’s business operations

Office accommodation- used for housing the Agency’s business operations.

-

-

R2 945 456

The following properties were leased by the Road Traffic Management Corporation:

Name of Supplier

Name of Building

Reason for Lease

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

M&T developers

Faerie Glen Office Park (Boardwalk Office Park - Pretoria)

Office accommodation

R11 360 939,55

R12 525 196,39

R14 545 861,02

JHI Properties

Waterfall Office Park (Midrand)

Office Accommodation

N/A

R 6 787 825,50

R 8 695 204,89

The following properties were leased by the South African National Road Agency Limited:

  1. Properties
  1. Reasons for leasing
  1. Property use

(aa) 2014/15

(bb) 2015/16

(cc) 2016/17

SANRALS’s Southern Region in Port Elizabeth

To accommodate SANRAL’s staff

Office accommodation

R2 571 000

R3 496 000

R4 025 000

Mall Kiosks

To render services to customers

Serves as a customer service centres for activation of E-toll tags and queries

R564 846

R1 443 187

R4 573 509

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(ii)

Description

Reason for leasing

Property used for

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Head Office - Bruma

Office Space

Rental of office space

5,433,142

8,232,101

5,996,261

 

Documents storage Facility

Storage of confidential documents

8,614

9,167

10,250

Bloemfontein

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

444,730

591,056

438,751

La Mercy

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

753,319

934,785

994,393

Cape Town

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

546,498

489,743

919,216

East London

Office Space

Rental of office space

158,835

192,703

216,333

 

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

21,545

398,595

56,177

George

Office Space

Rental of office space

83,737

74,350

80,403

 

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

70,187

0

157,833

Other Sites

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

294,997

330,262

562,653

Total

   

7,815,603

11,252,761

9,432,271

Description

Reason for leasing

Property used for

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Head Office - Bruma

Office Space

Rental of office space

5,433,142

8,232,101

5,996,261

 

Documents storage Facility

Storage of confidential documents

8,614

9,167

10,250

Bloemfontein

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

444,730

591,056

438,751

La Mercy

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

753,319

934,785

994,393

Cape Town

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

546,498

489,743

919,216

East London

Office Space

Rental of office space

158,835

192,703

216,333

 

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

21,545

398,595

56,177

George

Office Space

Rental of office space

83,737

74,350

80,403

 

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

70,187

0

157,833

Other Sites

Remote communication Navigational Aids & Surveillance Systems

Installation of navigational and surveillance systems

294,997

330,262

562,653

Total

   

7,815,603

11,252,761

9,432,271

(ii)

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (ii) Please see the tables below in response.

Table 1 of 2

 

Rentals for year ended 31 March 2017 exc. utilities and VAT

Rentals for year ended 31 March 2016 exc. utilities and VAT

Rentals for year ended 31 March 2015 exc. utilities and VAT

Comments

ACSA Corporate: Head Office

Offices leased from:

Address:

24 Johnson Road

Riverwoods Office Park

Bedfordview

Accommodation Type:

Offices including storerooms, basement parking and open parking.

Required to accommodate corporate office persons serving all 9 airports. Lease expires on the 31 May 2019.

R 2 101 116,67

Growthpoint Properties

5960 sqm to 1 March 2017, thereafter

10 075 sqm 

R 908 642,31

ACUCAP Management Services (Pty) Ltd

5960 sqm 

  R 833,616.80  

  

ACUCAP Management    Services (Pty) Ltd

  

5960 sqm                                

Leased from ACUCAP from 1 April 2006 until 31 March 2016 onwards at R 833,616.80 per month escalating at 9% per annum.

Leased from GROWTHPOINT PROPERTIES from 1 April 2016 until 31 May 2019 onwards at R 2,101,116.67 per month escalating at 9% per annum.

Table 2 of 2

 

Rentals for year ended 31 March 2017 exc. utilities and VAT

Rentals for year ended 31 March 2016 exc. utilities and VAT

Rentals for year ended 31 March 2015 exc. utilities and VAT

ACSA Regional Airport Central Office

Offices leased from:

Chai Properties CC

Address:

Block C,39 Wordsworth St Andrews Office Park.

Accommodation Type:

Offices - 578 square meter

Balcony -54 square meter

Basement Parking Bays - 12Bays

Shade cloth Parking -5Bays

Open Parking Bays -6Bays

Storeroom- 61square meter

Required to accommodate centralised persons serving all 6 airports, accommodation not currently available at regional airports and leased at market related rentals from 1 March 2015 for 4 year term.

R 1,547,477

R 1,495,703

Leased from 1 March 2015 onwards at R89,000 per month escalating at 10%

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (i) Not applicable, (ii) (aa), (bb), (cc), The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) leased four properties during the 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17 financial years. The properties leased are as follows:
  • Office Building “Ikhaya Lokundiza 1” situated at 16 Treur Close, Waterfall Office Park, Bekker street, Midrand;
  • Office Building “Ikhaya Lokundiza 2” situated at 178 Howick Close, Waterfall Office Park, Bekker street, Midrand;
  • Office Suite at the Southern Office Block of the Cape Town International Airport, Cape Town; and
  • Offices and Aircraft Hangar at Execujet Terminal situated at Lanseria International Airport, Lanseria.

(b), (c), The SACAA is leasing these premises to provide office accommodation for its employees based in Johannesburg, and Cape Town. The Lanseria premises are used to provide office accommodation for SACAA employees, and also to securely park the flight inspections aircraft. (d) The cost of leasing the various properties are as follows:

Name of Building

2014/15 FY

2015/16 FY

2016/17 FY

Ikhaya Lokundiza 1

R10 693 257

R12 140 020

R13 271 445

Ikhaya Lokundiza 2

R6 067 615

R6 583 362

R7 142 947

Cape Town International Airport

R798 108

R909 015

R747 513

Lanseria International Airport

R473 874

R506 500

R502 510

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

1

Tuzi Gazi Waterfront

Richards Bay

2

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (SA) Pty Ltd/ InterparkSA Pty Ltd

Durban

3

Rikkert Sales SA

Port Elizabeth

4

Rikkert Sales SA (Regional Office)

Port Elizabeth

5

Transnet National Ports Authority

Port Elizabeth

6

Plaza Aquad CC

Mossel Bay

7

JHI (19 th Floor)

Cape Town

8

JHI (18 th Floor)

Cape Town

9

Growthpoint Properties (MRCC/CSWR)

Cape Town

10

Transnet National Ports Authority

Saldanha

11

SA Post Office

Port Nolloth

12

All Tops/Enha Properties

Pretoria

  1. For office and parking use
  1. The offices are accommodating SAMSA employees and only use for office space and parking
  1. Cost associated with leasing the offices

LANDLORD

PLACE

COSTING 2014/2015

COSTING 2015/2016

COSTING 2016/2017

Tuzi Gazi Waterfront

Richards Bay

R 348 959.12

R 374 503.74

R 397 236.01

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company (SA) Pty Ltd/ InterparkSA Pty Ltd

Durban

R 1 293 376.63

R 1 820 217.68

R 1 870 808.57

Rikkert Sales SA

Port Elizabeth

R 643 974.54

R 854 224.80

R 938 689.02

Rikkert Sales SA (Regional Office)

Port Elizabeth

R 776 567.40

R 708 373.35

R 779 210.67

Transnet National Ports Authority

Port Elizabeth

R 25 107.36

R 25 428.84

R 30 837.73

Plaza Aquad CC

Mossel Bay

R 232 061.42

R 254 210.78

R 270 231.21

JHI (19 th Floor)

Cape Town

R 4 411 645.48

R 3 879 945.25

R 4 976 872.41

JHI (18 th Floor)

Cape Town

 

R 2 062 532.79

R 2 638 147.74

Growthpoint Properties (MRCC/CSWR)

Cape Town

R 1 506 893.16

R 1 642 944.96

R 1 830 247.80

Transnet National Ports Authority

Saldanha

R 594 322.08

R 621 311.26

R 680 128.16

SA Post Office

Port Nolloth

R 38 102.25

R 37 981.32

R 39 479.66

All Tops/Enha Properties

Pretoria

R 11 878 307.17

R 17 148 185.95

R 16 581 025.03

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

(a)(ii) The Ports Regulator entered into a lease agreement for the rental of office accommodation with (aa) 2014/15 Old Mutual properties, (bb) 2015/16 and (cc) 2016/17 with Delta property fund. (b) the property was leased by the Ports Regulator from the landlord for the sole purpose of office accommodation. (c) the properties are used by the Ports Regulator for business purposes only. (d) the rental costs were as follows for each of the financial years: 2014/15 R 1 218 186, 2015/16 R 1 339 015, 2016/17 R 1 610 812.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(ii) Railway Safety Regulator

(aa) Office Building in Gauteng-Head Office (one), KwaZulu Natal (one) and Western Cape (one)

(bb) Office building In Gauteng-Head Office (one), KwaZulu Natal (one) and Western Cape (one)

(cc) Office building in Gauteng-Head Office (one), KwaZulu Natal (one), Western Cape (one) and Gauteng-Regional Office (one)

(b) To use as office accommodations, the Regulator does not own a building/properties

(c) To be used as the Regulator’s offices for staff for head and regional offices

(d) Cost disclosed below relate to building base rentals only:

2014-15 Pretoria-Head Office: R 5 670 868.86

Kwa Zulu Natal: R 503 817.27

Western Cape: R 299 716 .14

2015-16 Pretoria-Head Office: R 7 308 890

KwaZulu Natal: R 583 314.24

Western Cape: R 532 210.14

2016-17 Pretoria-Head Office: R 8 325 812.88

KwaZulu Natal: R 2 007 658.19

Western Cape: R 910 315 .48

Gauteng-Regional Office: R 407 155.60

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA has leased 12 properties over the period.

  • 3 leases as stations from Transnet for Metrorail operations
  • 2 leases as ticket offices for Metrorail operations
  • 1 temporary office space whilst refurbishing Metrorail offices
  • 1 lease for Depot purposes from Transnet
  • 5 leases for office space due to insufficient office space available in property portfolio

For further detail see attached spreadsheet

17 August 2017 - NW2156

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What is the (a) optimal and (b) actual number of air traffic control officers at each airport? (2) how many airplanes (a) land in, (b) depart from and (c) travel over our airspace daily?

Reply:

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(1)

Centre

 

ATCO 1

ATCO 2

ATCO 3

Sector

 

Required

Actual

Required

Actual

Required

Actual

FABE

Bisho

6

8

 0

 0

 0

 0

FABL

Bram Fisher (Bloemfontein)

6

7

 0

 0

8

10

FACT

Cape Town

 0

0

 0

0

65

60

FAEL

East London

4

3

 0

 0

8

12

FAGC

Grand Central

6

10

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAGG

George

4

4

 0

 0

8

11

FAGM

Rand

6

10

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAKM

Kimberley

6

8

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAKN

Kruger

 0

0

6

5

 0

 0

FALA

Lanseria

 0

1

16

12

 0

 0

FALE

King Shaka (Durban)

12

9

 0

 0

17

16

FAMM

Mafikeng

4

5

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAOR

OR Tambo (Johannesburg)

30

24

 0

 0

103

80

FAPE

Port Elizabeth

8

4

 0

 0

17

18

FAPM

Pietermaritzburg

6

7

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAPN

Pilanesberg

5

7

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAPP

Polokwane

 0

0

6

7

 0

 0

FAUP

Upington

6

6

 0

1

 0

 0

FAUT

Umtata

6

11

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAVG

Virginia

6

7

 0

 0

 0

 0

FAWB

Wonderboom

 0

1

9

8

 0

 0

   

121

132

37

33

226

207

(2) (a) Average Arrivals – 850 daily

(b) Average Departures – 841 daily

(c) Average traffic utilising airspace – 3086 daily

17 August 2017 - NW2202

Profile picture: Jooste, Ms K

Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the reasons for withholding the Rural Roads Asset Management Systems (RRAMS) grant from municipalities over the past three financial years, (b) which municipalities have been affected in this regard, (c) what steps has his department taken to ensure that the RRAMS grant is paid out to each specified municipality and (d) what are the financial amounts (i) for each municipality (ii) in each specified financial year?

Reply:

a) As per Division of Revenue Act (DoRA), there are different responsibilities given to the Receiving Officer (RO), District Municipalities, as well as the Transferring Officer (TO), Department of Transport. Non-compliance to DoRA condition(s) gives the TO the right to withhold allocation of the grant.

b) Affected municipalities were Umkhanyakude and OR Tambo District Municipalities during the 2016/17 financial year.

c) The Department has engaged the affected municipalities, through intervention meetings to discuss the identified challenges and assist them to comply.

d) Withholding took place during the 2016/17 financial year and amounts were R 2.773 million and R 2.516 million for OR Tambo and Umkhanyakude District Municipalities respectively.

17 August 2017 - NW2203

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) are the reasons for withholding the payout of the Rural Roads Asset Management Systems (RRAMS) grant from the Road Traffic Management Corporation in the past three financial years, (b) is being done to ensure that the RRAMS grant is paid out and (c) are the relevant amounts for each financial year?

Reply:

(a), (b), and (c) The Road Traffic Management Corporation does not receive Rural Roads Asset Management Systems (RRAMS) grant.

17 August 2017 - NW2201

Profile picture: Jooste, Ms K

Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How (i) does the Integrated National Transport Plan differ from the National Transport Master Plan and (ii) are the two integrated and (b) have all entities reporting to him been incorporated into the Integrated National Transport Plan?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Integrated National Transport Plan and the National Transport Master Plan are one and the same Plan. It is defined as the National Transport Master Plan 2050 (NATMAP).

(ii) Yes, It is one Integrated Plan across modes and spheres of Government.

(b) The Plan which was approved by Cabinet in 2016 incorporates inputs from the Department of Transport, Transport Public Entities, Provinces, Municipalities, other sector departments and the general South African public. The Plan seeks to reinforce the vision that transport is the heartbeat of the economy and the fabric of our country’s socio-economic development. It is aligned with key policy, legislation and planning frameworks recently developed. The NATMAP 2050, therefore, aims to achieve:

An integrated, smart and efficient transport system supporting a thriving economy that promotes sustainable economic growth, supports a healthier life style, provides safe and accessible mobility options, socially includes all communities and preserves the environment.

17 August 2017 - NW2199

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply to question 163 on 8 March 2016, which (a) (i) private sector representatives and (ii) non-governmental organisations (NGOs) were invited and (b) of the specified (i) representatives and (ii) NGOs attended?

Reply:

(a)(i) Private sector representatives

SADSOA

RSACA

SADI

Cochrane steel

Digital technologies

Jampu business

Afro fleet

SMEC

Driver info bureau

Tracker

NIRSA

Tshelihle FC

AG Consultants

TT Projects

Impolompolo

Essilor

Driving Schools Association

Imbuba yenbokodo

Alcohol breathalyser

YOURS

Siyoyo

O B Broadcast

(a) (ii) non-governmental organisations

Stars of life

Autism SA

Santaco

Childrens forum

SRSC

Siyathuthuka FM

SANWIT

East Coast Radio

Sakhiswe

Town shop news

Gagasi fm

SAPTWU

SADD

Kwa-Zulu Natal Bus Council

Mgobozi

TMDM

YOURS

SAYCC

b) The number of those representatives referred to in (a) (i) All Private sector companies and (ii) Non-governmental orgarnisation that were invited sent representative.

17 August 2017 - NW2198

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the reply to question 404 on 1 March 2016, what are the outcomes of the specified investigation; (2) whether any measures have been put in place to prevent a recurrence of such crashes in the future; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(1), (2) An investigation to determine the probable cause of an accident involving a Namibian aircraft, with the registration marks V5-NRS, is still on-going. In the meantime, the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) has released an interim statement detailing progress achieved thus far. The interim statement, which is also available on the SACAA website (www.caa.co.za), was also shared with the State of Registry and Operator, which is Namibia.

Thus far, the following facts have been established, and form part of the interim statement:

  • the pilot was properly qualified to conduct the flight;
  • the approach procedure was not flown as indicated by the approach plate;
  • no flight plan was completed before the flight;
  • the control tower at Eros Airport was not properly manned during the take-off;
  • during the time of the accident, the radar at the Cape Town International Airport was unserviceable; and
  • weather conditions at the time of the accident was bad.

Aircraft investigations vary in complexity, and this particular one is still on-going and investigators are interrogating other aspects of this accident which may have safety implications. No interim safety recommendations have been issued. The completion of an investigation is marked by the release of a final accident report, which may also contain safety recommendations aimed at improving levels of safety and avoiding a recurrence of causal factors.

 

10 July 2017 - NW1743

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

Department

(a) No employees were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the:

(i) 2014-15 – none

(ii) 2015-16 – none

(iii) 2016-17 – none

(aa)(aaa) – not applicable

(bbb) – Not applicable

(bb) (aaa) & (bbb) – not applicable

Air Traffic Navigating and Services (ATNS)

a.N/a

b.N/a. ATNS has not awarded any contracts or agreements to its employees to conduct business with any state entity

(i) 2014-15 : Nil

(ii) 2015-16 : Nil

(iii) 2016-17 : Nil

aa (aaa) : N/a

(bbb): N/a

bb (aaa) : N/a

(bbb) : N/a

Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA)

Not applicable.

ACSA policies do not allow for contracts to be awarded to staff members.

South Africa Civil Aviation Authority (SACCA)

(a)Not applicable, and (b), (i), (ii), and (iii): The South African Civil Aviation Authority is not aware of any staff member being awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity, nor has it granted an approval to any of its staff members to conduct business with any state entity during the 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 financial years.

As such questions: (aa), (aaa), and (bbb); and (bb), (aaa), and (bbb) are not applicable.

Roads Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(b) No staff member at RTMC was awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (ii) 2016-17 financial years.

(aa)(aaa) N/A

(bbb) N/A

(bb)(aaa)N/A

(bbb) N/A

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) Staff of the Road Accident Fund (RAF) who perform external remunerative work are required to obtain prior written permission to do so in terms of the RAF’s applicable policies and procedures, however the RAF would not know, beyond the prescribed declarations of interest forms completed by bidders in respect of the RAF’s own tenders and supply chain management policies and procedures, whether any staff member was awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with other state entities in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; consequently, the RAF is unable to respond to questions (aa)(aaa), (aa)(bbb), (bb)(aaa) and (bb)(bbb).

South Africa National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(b) (i)(ii) SANRAL’s employee contracts prevent any employee from receiving any secondary income for goods or services, unless authorised by the CEO. Additionally, staff are required to declare their interest in any entities. To the best of SANRAL’s knowledge and in terms of the declaration of interests received from staff annually, SANRAL is not aware of the award of any contracts or agreements to SANRAL staff, to conduct business with SANRAL or any other state entity, in any of the financial years listed herein.

Roads Infringement Agency (RTIA)

N(b) umber of staff awarded contracts

(i) 2014/2015=0

(ii) 2015/2016=1

(iii) 2016/2017=0

(aa) (aaa) Names and professional designations:

2014/2015=0

2015/2016 (1) =Mr K Maeyane (Risk Management Specialist)

2016/2017=0;

(bb) (aaa) Details of the contracts:

2014/2015=0

2015/2016=Audit Committee Member/Consultant to Fetakgomo Municipality.

2016/2017=0;

(bbb) Amounts in each case:

2014/2015=R0,00

2015/2016=R5721,00

2016/2017=R0,00

Cross Border Roads Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b) In terms of declaration of interest records, no employee disclosed any financial interest with state entities during (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years.

The external audit for 2015-16 financial year revealed that the companies with which some of the employees affiliate, had conducted business with state entities. The relevant information as per the audit management letter is in the table below.

(aa)(aaa) Names

(bbb) Professional designations

(bbb) Amounts

Siphiwinhlanhla Nkala

Road Transport Inspector

R 27 657.41

Patrick Mathebula

Manager Training Ext. Act Coordinator

R 173 462.40

Sharon Mkhize

Manager: Business Planning and Performance

R 333 000.00

(bb) (aaa) The Agency does not have the details of the contract (s) and/or agreement (s) awarded as the information was not disclosed in the declaration of interest forms by the employees.

South Africa Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

From a review of the Contract Register as well as the Declaration of Members Interest, there were no employees (including executive members) or Board members awarded contracts or agreements to conduct business with the South African Maritime Authority (SAMSA) during the 2014/15, 2015/16 or 2016/17 financial years.

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

Ports Regulator secretariat staff has not conducted business with state entities in the 2014/15-2015/16 financial years (this has been audited by the Auditor General) and to the best of our knowledge, no staff has conducted business with state entities in the 2016/17 financial year (based on verbal verification with staff members).

Railway Regulator Safety (RSR)

(b) (i) (ii) (iii) No. None of the RSR staff have conducted business with any state entities in the financial years mentioned.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA has discovered that certain employees were conflicted with regards to certain contracts. Please see annexure for details.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2026

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Airports Company of South Africa has any contracts with a certain company (name furnished); if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the (i) cost and (ii) description of each specified contract?

Reply:

Airports South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

ACSA does not have any contract with the respective supplier.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2003

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the relevant details of the breakdown of the payments to e-tag procurement from third parties with regard to the (a) names of the third parties, (b) payments received and (c) relevant service and/or obligation in each case; (2) what is the annual breakdown of payments towards invoice printing and posting for e-toll collection in each year since its inception; (3) what are the details of the kiosk rental agreement with regard to the (a) amount per unit, (b) number of units and (c) beneficiary or beneficiaries within the current e-toll structure?

Reply:

1. E-tag procurement from third parties:

(a) Names of third parties:

The parties that were contracted for the provision and maintenance of e-tags were:

  • Kapsch Trafficom AB - Sweden;
  • Q-Free ASA – Norway.

(b) Payments received:

The above parties have received the following payments for e-tag’s provided:

  • Kapsch Trafficom AB: R167 220 930.96 (Excl VAT)
  • Q-Free ASA: R58 317 748.41 (Excl VAT)

(c) Relevant service and/or obligation:

The above parties were contracted for the supply and maintenance of e-tags in accordance with SANRAL specifications and in accordance with the required specifications of an international CEN-278 standard. The e-tags were procured in batches in accordance with demand in terms of the e-toll registration for the GFIP project and for the conventional toll plazas country wide.

2. Payments towards invoice printing and posting:

The annual breakdown of payments towards invoice printing and posting for e-toll collection as per SARS and AARTO requirements is as follows (excl VAT):

  • 3 December 2013 to 31 December 2014: R124 635 007.73
  • 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2015: R58 422 869.55
  • 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2016: R112 289 632.03
  • 1 January 2017 to May 2017: R32 043 385.45

3. Kiosk rental:

(a) Amount per unit:

The amount per unit differs between “temporary” kiosks and “permanent” kiosks, and from shopping mall to shopping mall, depending also on kiosk floor area.

  • The monthly rental for a temporary kiosk currently ranges between R7 000 and R22 680 per month (excl VAT).
  • The monthly rental for a permanent kiosk ranges between R15 226.09 and R78 797.24 per month (excl VAT).

(b) Number of units:

  • There are currently five temporary kiosks in operation.
  • There are currently 17 permanent kiosks in operation.

(c) Beneficiary or beneficiaries within the current e-toll structure:

There are no beneficiaries from kiosk rental within the e-toll structure (i.e. the e-toll Operator - ETC). The kiosks are rented from the various owners of the shopping malls. ETC receive 2.5% of the rental for arranging and managing the rental agreements in terms of their contract. This percentage was tendered by ETC as part of the competitive tender for this contract.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2002

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount was spent on the Road Accident Benefit Scheme (RABS) brand development with regard to (a) marketing and brand-promotion projects, (b) advertisements in the media, (c) billboards, (d) mounted stickers and advertisements in lifts and malls, (e) promotional articles such as key rings, (f) printed booklets and pamphlets and (g) the RABS website?

Reply:

Parliament has consistently over recent years, starting in 2014/15, approved, on the recommendation of the Portfolio Committee on Transport an objective in the Road Accident Fund’s (RAF) Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plans, which objective provides for alignment of the RAF’s administrative dispensation with the RABS Bill, in order to prepare for the transition to RABS.

In addition to approving the objective, Parliament also approved, on the recommendation of the Portfolio Committee on Transport, the RAF’s annual budgets in relation to work to be performed in relation to the objective.

The objective is sensitive to Parliament’s consideration of the Bill and the Department of Transport’s responsibility in respect of formulating legislation for consideration by Parliament.

In 2014/15 the objective was for the RAF to support the Department of Transport to draft the Bill, Rules and Regulations as per the approved RABS policy. 

In 2015/16 the focus moved from the legislative process to readying the RAF to administer claims under the proposed Bill.  The focus was on internal readiness in terms of the business architecture and design.

In 2016/17 the focus was on developing a Transition Plan that is intended to assist the RAF in the transition. The plan is a conceptual document designed to enable the RAF to prepare for the administration of claims under the proposed Bill.  

The RAF spent the following amounts in relation to RABS, although not necessarily in respect of brand development:

With regard to -

in the 2014-15,

2015-16

and 2016-17 financial years:

(a) marketing and brand-promotion projects,

R Nil

R Nil

R 80 109.10

(b) advertisements in the media,

R2 896 662

R5 404 190

R6 365 666

(c) billboards,

R Nil

R Nil

R Nil

(d) mounted stickers and advertisements in lifts and malls,

R Nil

R Nil

R 4 300

e) promotional articles such as key rings (although no costs was incurred in respect of key rings, but in relation to mouse pads, CD’s and T-Shirts),

R 363 126

R 27 103

R 73 319

(f) printed booklets and pamphlets, and

R Nil

R Nil

R47 982

(g) the RABS website

R Nil

R Nil

R Nil

 

Advertisements in the media were published on mass-reach media platforms, for example radio, print and television. All expenditure took place following procurement in accordance with the provisions the RAF’s policies and the PFMA.

 

10 July 2017 - NW2001

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Does the Road Accident Fund (RAF) make use of external organisations to process claims; if so, what (a) are the names of the organisations, (b) is the extent of their involvement, (c) is the basis of the contractual agreement(s) in terms of functional role and scope, (d) is the duration of agreement(s) and (e) are the terms of contract(s) value; if not, (2) did the RAF enter into the specified agreements with the external organisations in the past five financial years; if so, (a) what is the name of each organisation, (b) what services did each organisation provide and (c) for how much?

Reply:

(1) The RAF does not currently make use of external organisations to process claims; therefore questions (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) are not applicable, however,

(2) The Road Accident Fund Act, No. 56 of 1996 (the Act) provides in section 8 for the appointment by the Board of agents to investigate and settle claims contemplated in section 17(1) of the Act (identified claims), similar to comparable sections contained in the Act’s predecessors. However, an appointment made under section 8 of the Act would constitute a public private partnership (PPP) under Treasury Regulation 16, where the full RAF function is outsourced. Considering the technicalities, timing and cost associated with PPPs the RAF Board elected instead to insource administrative capacity to assist the RAF to process the backlog of claims. Service providers were appointed following a compliant supply chain management process in respect of an open tender (RAF/2013/00027) advertised in the Government Tender Bulletin on 8 August 2013. The contracts commenced on 9 January 2014 and expired on 8 January 2017. Importantly, throughout the appointments the RAF remained responsible to approve the final settlement mandate in respect of the claims administered by the service providers, (a) the RAF appointed the following service providers (i) Ernst & Young Consortium [comprising of Ernst & Young Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd and A2A Kopano Incorporated and Alexander Forbes Compensation Technologies (Pty) Ltd (who subsequently left the consortium)] and (ii) Medscheme Holdings (Pty) Ltd, (b) to assist the RAF with the validation and verification of claim information; investigation and assessment of merits; investigation and assessment of medical records and reports relating to injuries sustained by claimants; investigation and assessment of quantum; negotiation of settlements based on approved mandates by the RAF; dealing with all litigation arising on a specific matter after instruction; keeping accurate records and reporting timeously; and communicating with claimants, attorneys and the RAF, (c) for the amounts as set out in the table below:

COSTS INCURRED – SERVICE PROVIDER INVOICES

Number

Description

Ernst & Young Consortium

Medscheme

Total

1

Paid invoices

R116,288,436

R184,175,692

R300,464,128

2

Outstanding invoices

R5,293,672

R2,856,544

R8,150,216

Total invoices received

R121,582,108

R187,032,236

R308,614,344

 

3

# Quotation for withheld reports

R22,365,349

R12,815,390

R35,180,739

Total

R143,947,457

R199,847,626

R343,795,083

# Note: The service providers incurred expenditure in obtaining expert reports and other information and, or documentation prior to termination of the contracts. The service providers requested re-imbursement for such expenditure and withheld the reports, subject to reimbursement. The contracts did not make provision for reimbursement for such expenditure. Approval by National Treasury, subject to certain conditions, has been obtained for the RAF to pay for additional reports. Re-imbursement is also subject to Board approval. The process to obtain Board approval has commenced.

 

 

10 July 2017 - NW1710

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether regular maintenance is being undertaken on information technology facilities and systems within the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa; if not, (a) why not (b) what steps have been taken to change this (c) why have no officials been (i) charged and/or (ii) suspended for not ensuring that these systems and facilities are maintained; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

PRASA does undertake regular maintenance of its information technology.

(a) Financial constraints at PRASA have resulted in key technical vacancies that have affected the maintenance in certain areas of Information Communication Technology (ICT).

(b) PRASA is exploring a partnership with other SOE’s in particular Transnet and Broadband Infraco for support in fibre maintenance. This is an interim measure while PRASA is building internal capacity to carry out the maintenance.

(c) There has not been any reason to charge employees; the challenges are structural and not related to ill-discipline.

(d) Skills and funding (operational funding) over and above the infrastructure Capital outlay remains a challenge. As PRASA modernizes, many of its ICT projects are in various stages of implementation and the full maintenance implications from an Operational funding point of view are still unclear.

03 July 2017 - NW1875

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

Department of Transport

Name of Transaction Advisor

Tender

Contract Value

Amount Paid

Notes

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(v)

Utho Capital

Transaction Advisor for PPP - Government Fleet

R4 900 000.00

R3 876 000*.00

*Total amount paid. Contract finalised

J Maynard SA

Feasibility Study for the Tug Boat Building Project in Preparation of a PPP

R9 033 360.00

R4 382 721.86*

*Amount paid to date. Contract terminating in 2019

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa does not have any transaction advisors for tenders as far as could be established for the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(b) ATNS did not appoint a transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016, therefore (i), (ii) and (iii) not applicable.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Not applicable, (b), (i), (ii), (iii), and (iv): During the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016, the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) used the services of a transaction advisor only once. KPMG, a global professional service company, was appointed in October 2014 to guide the SACAA in its quest, through a tender process, to acquire and implement an Enterprise Business System (EBS) from a suitable and competent service provider. The EBS had to be a best-practice and industry-appropriate information system which would improve organisational efficiency and augment compliance with the International Civil Aviation Organization standards. KPMG was tasked with among others, drafting questions and answers as well as the vetting of suppliers. The total amount of the EBS tender was R94, 091, 131.20, which covers the four-year implementation period.  KPMG, as the transaction advisor was paid R144, 068.64

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

The (b) Cross Border Road Transport Agency appointed a transaction advisor in the financial year ending March 2016. (i) The appointed transaction advisor was Gartner, (ii) Gartner was appointed to provide transaction advisor services for the procurement of the New Permit System, (iii) The budget of the New Permit System of which Gartner was appointed to provide transactional advisory services for was R9 million and (iv) Gartner was awarded a contract of R651, 715.20 of which R195, 514.56 was invoiced and paid.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

 

The (b) On the premise that the term “transaction advisor” refers to a service provider with appropriate skills and experience appointed to assist and advise in connection with a specific tender or tenders, the Road Accident Fund (RAF) appointed one transaction advisor to assist and advise with one tender in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; (i) Deloitte & Touche was appointed to receive and store bids; manage response handling; arrange, co-ordinate and manage the briefing session; collate questions and answers from the briefing session; publish questions and answers; close the tender; open bids; register bidders; oversee evaluation of bids; audit the Bid Evaluation Committee scores; prepare shortlists; and, prepare letters of regret / award, (ii) in connection with the RAF Panel Attorney Tender; (iii) for which tender the pricing is forecast at approximately R 8, 2 billion over the 5 year term of the tender; and, for which services the transaction advisor was paid R 1 640 109.68, or 0.019% of the tender value. The RAF Panel of Attorneys Tender secured 88 contracted firms to manage the RAF’s litigation defense in litigated claims throughout the country.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

Transaction advisors to the RTMC for the periods 01 January 2012 – 31 December 2016

Transaction advisor no.1

Heading

Comments

Year

2014

Name of transaction advisor

Grant Thornton

Purpose of transaction advisor

To develop the scope of work for the appointment of a technical advisor that would assist RTMC in the sourcing of rental accommodation

Transaction Advisor total payments

R 152 360.54 (transaction advisor payments specific to Tender 01/2014/15)

Tender on which transaction advisor worked on

Tender

RENTAL OFFICE SPACE: RTMC BID 01/2014/15

Tender Price

R105 432 274.76

Transaction advisor no.2

Heading

Comments

Year

2014

Name of transac