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11 March 2019 - NW361

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of (a) road deaths per 100 000 persons occurred in (i) 2016, (ii) 2017 and (iii) 2018 and (b) the specified road deaths were pedestrians in each specified year?

Reply:

(a) Road deaths per 100 000 persons

(i) 2016: The number of fatalities per 100 000 population = 25,2

(ii) 2017: The number of fatalities per 100 000 population = 24,9

(iii) The 2018 figures are still being finalised.

(b) Road deaths for pedestrians

(i) Pedestrians fatalities for 2016: 5 410

(ii) Pedestrians fatalities for 2017: 5 337

(iii) The 2018 figures are still being finalised

11 March 2019 - NW354

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Road Accident Fund (RAF) and the proposed Road Accident Benefit Scheme (RABS), (a) what difference would there be in the respective revenue models and (b) how would this model (i) assist in making the RAF and/or RABS solvent and (ii) be more beneficial to claimants?

Reply:

With reference to the RAF and the proposed RABS, the (a) difference in the respective revenue models will be that currently section 5 of the Road Accident Fund Act, No. 56 of 1996 (the RAF Act) provides that the RAF is funded through the dedicated RAF Fuel Levy, and through loans, to make payment of claims on a “pay-as-you-go” basis, with no provision in the RAF Act for any balancing of revenue with expenses, whilst the provisions of Chapter 4 of the Road Accident Benefit Scheme Bill [B 17B -2017] (RABS Bill) provides for an additional funding stream in the form of appropriations by Parliament, in addition to the dedicated RABS Fuel Levy (which is the current RAF Fuel Levy that will in future fund RABS), and loans, in order to make payment of claims that arise under the RABS Bill on a fully funded basis and RAF claims that arose under the RAF Act on a “pay-as-you-go” basis, with specific provision in section 32 of the RABS Bill for the matching of revenue and expenses based on a funding ratio,

(b) this model will (i) assist, together with the overall benefit design set out in the RABS Bill (i.e. no-fault liability, removal of general damages , defined and limited benefits, structured payment, benefit review, and no automatic increases), to make the RABS solvent over time, noting that actuarial projections indicate that the benefits under the RABS Bill are more than 20% cheaper as compared to compensation paid under the RAF Act and

(ii) be more beneficial to claimants by: providing more inclusive access to cover, through the removal of fault; enabling much faster assessment of claims, and provision of access to benefits, due to the removal of fault and because of the defined benefit design; providing for a deemed income, on which benefits are calculated for those who earn below the deemed income and those who cannot prove an actual income; providing assistance, including financial assistance, to claimants to claim; providing for faster and cheaper resolution of disagreements through an internal dispute process, or externally, through an Appeals Committee; and, reducing the diversion of funds meant for beneficiaries to intermediaries

11 March 2019 - NW356

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What legal action has taken place between Airports Company South Africa and a certain company (name furnished) (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2019, (b) why was legal action instituted in each case, (c) what has been the outcome in each case and (d)(i) which matters are still outstanding and (ii) why is each of the specified matters still outstanding?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

a) An application under case number 25363/2018 to declare that the Invitation for bidders to submit a proposal to be issued a license to provide ground handling services issued to market was in violation of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act 3 of 2000.

(i) The only legal action is as per (a) above and it was only in the last financial year 2018/2019

(ii) There has been a continuation of the matter under case number 25363/2018. Swissport South Africa Proprietary Limited have been successful in joining the Minister of Finance in relation to the argument pertaining to the constitutionality of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act 5 of 2000

(b) Airports Company South Africa issued a request for an “Invitation for bidders to submit a proposal to be issued a license to provide ground handling services” to market on 16 May 2018, following which Swissport South Africa Proprietary Limited launched the application under case number 25363/2018 as it believed the Invitation was unlawful and in violation of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act 3 of 2000.

(c) The matter is still sub judice

(d)(i) The matter under case number 25363/2018

(ii) The matter is still sub judice as a result there can be no finality until a competent court has handed down judgment and the parties do not appeal or cannot appeal the judgment.

11 March 2019 - NW220

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply to question 800 on 23 May 2018, (a) why has a permanent board not been appointed for the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, (b) what are the (i) main key performance indicators (KPIs) for the current interim board and (ii) deadlines for each KPI and (c) how will the process be monitored?

Reply:

(a) Because the process of appointing a full-term Board is not finalised as anticipated. The Minister appointed the interim Board of PRASA with effect from 12 April 2018 for a period not exceeding twelve (12) months as an interim measure while fast tracking the appointment of the new Board. However, the Minister is in a process of considering the relevant and suitable appointable candidates to the Board.

(b) The main KPI’s of the current Interim Board are the following:

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR (KPI)

PERFORMANCE TARGETS

  • Operational Generated Revenue
  • Improve Solvency ratio
  • Fleet Availability
  • Bus Servicing (On Time service rate)
  • Breakdowns per 60 000 km
  • Accidents per kilometres Travelled
  • Fatalities per number of passengers Transported
  • Injuries per number of passengers transported
  • Preliminary System design and implementation of business application
  • Increased passengers/ patronage growth (Long Distance Operations)
  • Reduced Passenger Complaints on Passengers transported
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023
  • 2019-2023

(ii) The deadlines for each KPI is 2023

(c) The Accounting Authority reports to the Department and National Treasury on a quarterly basis in accordance with the prescribed format stipulated as a directive in the National Treasury Institution Note No 2 of 2014/15

11 March 2019 - NW355

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to vehicles purchased in the past three financial years and since 1 January 2019 by his department and entities reporting to him, (a) what number of vehicles have been purchased each month, (b) for what purpose was each vehicle purchased in each case, (c) what make of vehicles were purchased in each case and at what cost in each case, (d) what assessments were undertaken as to the need for vehicles in each case, (e) who undertook the assessments in each case, (f) what were the results of each assessment in each case, (g) how are vehicles monitored once purchased and (h)(i) what number of vehicles have travelled 10 000 kilometers or less, (ii) which vehicles are those in each case and (iii) why had each vehicle travelled 10 000 kilometers in each instance?

Reply:

Department(a) number of vehicles purchased

(b) purpose of each vehicle purchased

(c) make of vehicles purchased

(d) assessments undertaken as to the need for vehicles in each case,

(e) who undertook the assessments

(f) what were the results of each assessment

(g) how are vehicles monitored once purchased and

(h)(i) number of vehicles travelled 10 000 km or less,

(ii) which vehicles

(iii) why had each vehicle travelled 10 000 km

 

2017/2018

Apr-17

CA481964

 

Deputy Minister for use in Cape Town

JAGUAR XJ 3.0

R800, 000.00

Vehicle had reached its lifespan as prescribed in the Ministerial Handbook

Head of the Office of the Deputy Minister

Met the replacement criteria

Based on age and kilometres travelled

50186

N/A

N/A

 

Apr-17

FV70GJGP

 

Deputy Minister for use in Pretoria

BMW X5 XDRIVE A/T

R984, 896.25

Vehicle had reached its lifespan as prescribed in the Ministerial Handbook

Head of the Office of the Deputy Minister

Met the replacement criteria

Based on age and kilometres travelled

11888

N/A

N/A

 

Apr-17

CA450060

3 IN APRIL 2017

Minister for use in Cape Town

TOYOTA FORTUNER 2.8

R557, 927.65

Vehicle had reached its lifespan as prescribed in the Ministerial Handbook

Chief of Staff

Met the replacement criteria

Based on age and kilometres travelled

21274

N/A

N/A

 

Jul-17

FX47LFGP

1 IN JULY 2017

Minister for use in Pretoria

M-BENZ E350D AMG

R924, 146.24

Vehicle had reached its lifespan as prescribed in the Ministerial Handbook

Chief of Staff

Met the replacement criteria

Based on age and kilometres travelled

66358

N/A

N/A

2018/2019

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SINCE 1 JAN 2019

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a)(i) Four fire tenders were purchased in Financial Year 2017/18;

  1. Twenty-four (24) light commercial vehicles were purchased in Financial Year 2017/18;
  2. One all-terrain vehicle was purchased in Financial Year 2016/17;
  3. Twenty-seven (27) light commercial vehicles were purchased in Financial Year 2015/16.

(b) The vehicles were purchased to operate at ACSA owned airports and mostly for airside use. This included fire and rescue vehicles, surface maintenance, electrical maintenance, aircraft marshalling and security vehicles.

(c)(i) The four Rosenbauer fire tenders purchased in Financial Year 2017/18, cost R61,459 408 ex VAT;

  1. The twenty-four light commercial & passenger vehicles purchased in Financial Year 2017/18, comprised of the following vehicles:
    • Two BMW vehicles at a cost of R1,080 677 ex VAT;
    • Nineteen Toyota vehicles at a cost of R11, 708 646 ex VAT;
    • Three Nissan vehicles at a cost of R528 477 ex VAT.
  2. The one all-terrain vehicle purchased in Financial Year 2016/17, cost R 258 000 ex VAT.
  3. The twenty-seven-light commercial and passenger vehicles that were purchased in Financial Year 2015/16, comprised of the following vehicles:
  • Fourteen Ford vehicles at a cost of R4,419 453 ex VAT;
  • Two Mercedes vehicles at a cost of R1,186 095 ex VAT;
  • Eleven Chevrolet-vehicles at a cost of R1,470 259 ex VAT.

(d) ACSA agrees minimum operating standards for all vehicles operating on the airside with the aviation industry to ensure that vehicles are serviceable and pose no risk to the safety of operations on airside. The age limit is 6 years for light commercial vehicles and 12 years for specialised vehicles. The replacement program is planned and executed in line with these minimum standards. ACSA also uses operational planning to determine the number of vehicles required for example how many planes need to be marshalled into aircraft parking bays in the peak hour of operations. That will dictate the staff requirements and vehicle requirements.

(e) The ACSA Airport Fleet Management Department based on the age limit for operating on airside and detailed operational planning.

(f) Vehicles were only purchased were there was an operational requirement.

(g)(i) Vehicles on the airside of the airport may not leave the airside and is only used for operational purposes within the perimeter fence.

      1. At the main airports each vehicle is tracked in real-time through mode-s transponders to avoid any possibility of runway incursions.
      2. The few vehicles that operate on public roads have a log books that have to be completed for every trip.
      3. Audits are done on these to ensure compliance with company policy.
      4. Each vehicle also has a fleet petrol card and issues like fuel consumption is monitored every month.

(h)(i) None. (ii) Not Applicable. (iii) Not applicable.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

a) No new vehicles were leased since 1 January 2019. Refer to the attached Annexure A, Column H for the installation date. All vehicles are leased under a full maintenance lease.

b) Company vehicles are used for performing both preventative and corrective maintaining on Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) infrastructure and facilities across the country.

c) Refer to attached Annexure A, which reflects the make of vehicle in column F and the cost in column G.

d) The need arises from the fact that most of ATNS aviation Communications, Navigational, & Surveillance (CNS) infrastructure and facilities are strategically placed in remote areas to provide the required coverage and cater for all air traffic movements across the country. It is also a requirement by the aviation regulating authority of South Africa (SACAA) that scheduled preventative maintenance on these sites are performed routinely and in case of failure, for ATNS to respond and perform corrective maintenance and ensure continuity of service. Since most of the sites are in remote areas, ATNS need to drive to those sites to perform maintenance as required and require vehicles with greater clearance.

e) Given the current and anticipated requirements (informed by planned infrastructure investments), the company evaluates and include the needs as part of the company operating model.

f) In line with the Permission approval, the evaluation is done and approved for a period of 5 years.

g) The leased vehicles are monitored through the fleet tracking system with verification to actual slips submitted and in conjunction with the company’s Maintenance Management System. This system is fitted with each leased vehicle and on monthly basis, a report is received from the service provider (AVIS Fleet) highlighting the monthly utilisation.

(h)(i) One vehicle.

(ii) A Ford Ranger 2.2 TDCI XLS 4X4 D/CAB A/T

(iii) The vehicle is earmarked and used mainly by the WGS84 Surveyors whose main Job is visit the air traffic centres (airports) to confirm al the surveyed points and airport obstructions, CNS facilities to survey the site coordinates and above ground heights.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The table below provides comprehensive answers by the South African Civil Aviation Authority to all questions, i.e. (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g), and (h)(i), (ii), and (iii).

a)

No of Vehicles purchased

  • 2 vehicles were purchased as follows: -
  • March 2017
  • June 2018

b)

Purpose

  • Both vehicles were purchased to enable our inspectors to conduct inspections and fulfill the mandate of South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA).

c)

Vehicle Make

  • Ford Ranger; March 2017; R393,344.68
  • Ford Ranger; June 2018; R401,720.52

d)

What assessment

  • The need was determined by the services that SACAA has to render to its clients. These clients include different airports, Aviation Training Organisation at outlying areas e.g. aerodrome inspections. The other assessment was the flight costs; car hire costs incurred vs costs of having a pool vehicle for each division.

e)

Who conducted the assessment

  • The assessment was conducted by the relevant head of division with the assistance of Supply Chain Management department in sourcing the vehicles

f)

Results of assessment

  • The result was that it was better for each two divisions to have a pool vehicle to conduct inspections, this reduced cost of flights and private vehicle claims by inspectors travelling with their own car and or hiring a vehicle in case where an inspector does not own private vehicle. Also, where the inspectors are not allowed to use their own vehicle i.e. ramp inspection at the airport; the airport required a vehicle in certain colour that was branded according to the ACSA specification.

g)

Monitoring of vehicles once purchased

  • Departmental Log Book and Register is maintained
  • Altech Netstar Business Travel Logbook
  • Standard Bank Fleet Management Services

h)

KM Travelled

  1. One Ford Ranger
  1. CAA 004 WP
  1. It has not reach 10 000 km as yet. The vehicle is at 5854km. This vehicle was purchased recently

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA):

  1. Please see Annexure A for the number of vehicles that have been purchased each month.
  2. Please see Annexure B for the purpose for which each vehicles was purchased in each case.
  3. Please see Annexure C for the make of vehicles that were purchase in each case and at what cost in each case.
  4. The different end user departments with the assistance of fleet management, do their own assessments on the basis of the work that needs to be done, number of personnel, number of vehicles required and the vehicle type that will suit the purpose.
  5. The different end user departments with the assistance of the fleet management department undertook the assessments in each case.
  6. The results of the assessments found the current vehicles fleet is old, with an average of eight (8) years and the running costs are high, hence the need to procure new vehicles to replace the old ones.
  7. PRASA is a participant on the RT15 tender with National Treasury which include live tracking system for vehicles.
  8. (i) 224 vehicles have travelled 10,000 kilometres or less.

(ii) Please see Annexure D

(iii) The vehicles which have travelled 10,000 kilometres and less are due to their operations within the different business units and some of these vehicles do not cover long distances. Vehicles with zero (0) kilometres are waiting for fitments which are currently in the process.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

The CBRTA (a) has not purchased any vehicle in the past three financial years and since 1 January

2019, therefore (b) – (h) are not applicable.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

The RAF (a) has not purchased any vehicle in the past three financial years and since 1 January 2019,

therefore (b) – (h) are not applicable.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

The RTIA (a) has not purchased any vehicle in the past three financial years and since 1 January

2019, therefore (b) – (h) are not applicable.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR):

  1. The RSR did not purchase any vehicles in the applicable period.
  2. Not applicable.
  3. Not applicable.
  4. Not applicable.
  5. Not applicable.
  6. Not applicable.
  7. Not applicable
  8. (i) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(iii) Not applicable.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator has not purchased any vehicles in the past three financial years.

(a)(b)(c)(d)(e(f)(g(h) Not applicable

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a) number of vehicles purchased

(b) purpose of each vehicle purchased

(c) make of vehicles purchased

(d) assessments undertaken as to the need for vehicles in each case,

(e) who undertook the assessments

(f) what were the results of each assessment

(g) how are vehicles monitored once purchased and

(h)(i) number of vehicles travelled 10 000 km or less,

(ii) which vehicles

(iii) why had each vehicle travelled 10 000 km

1 (one) in Dec 2016

Used by Mechanical expert from the crush investigation unit

Mercedes Benz Viano Mixto

In each instance a needs assessment and/or business cases were developed on the various specialised units. Thereafter submissions were processed and authorised by the relevant delegated official before procuring the vehicles through R-57 contract.

The specialised vehicles (Mobile units as well as buses) were procured through the normal tender process.

The end-users of the vehicles initiated the processes with inputs from their management as well as fleet management. The delegated authorised parties also added comments and inputs during the approval process

The results of these assessments / motivation /business cases were all used as motivation for the procurement

Due to the specialised nature of the procured vehicles, they have firstly been allocated to specific people and/or units that make use of them.

Secondary to that all these vehicles are governed by the approved Policies and Procedures on fleet. Further to this, monthly submissions are made to Fleet unit to reconcile back to the RT-46 stannic reports

0

Mercedes Benz Viano Mixto

N/A

X2 (two) 65 seater buses in July 2017

  • Transportation of Students between training venues
  • Transportation of children for Road Safety Education’s annual PET Debates

Hino / Busmark 65 seater buses

       

0

Hino / Busmark 65 seater buses

N/A

4 Mobile testing Vehicles and Venter trailers in Sep 2017

  • NTP Unit for deployments nationally

FAW truck Horses with customised trailer units with mobile weigh bridge equipment

       

4

FAW truck Horses with customised trailer units with mobile weigh bridge equipment

Staff were still in training until Sep 2018

25 (twenty-five) in Dec 2018

Replacement of National Anti-Corruption Unit pool vehicles

VW Golf 7 GTI DSG

       

25

VW Golf 7 GTI DSG

Short period of time used

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(a) number of vehicles purchased

(b) purpose of each vehicle purchased

(c) make of vehicles purchased

(d) assessments undertaken as to the need for vehicles in each case,

(e) who undertook the assessments

(f) what were the results of each assessment

(g) how are vehicles monitored once purchased and

(h)(i) number of vehicles travelled 10 000 km or less,

(ii) which vehicles

(iii) why had each vehicle travelled 10 000 km

1 (one) in Feb 2018

SANRAL Western Region utility vehicle

Nissan UA7-NP200 1.6 WR

Replacement of existing vehicle

Project Management Team

Recommended for replacement

Log book and Travel request control sheet

8524

Nissan UA7-NP200 1.6 WR

N/A

1 (one) in March 2018

Operations and Maintenance at the Huguenot Tunnel - Staff Transport Bus. Collect and deliver material, spares and suppliers. Provide transport for emergency stand-by team to various areas around the tunnel and the toll plaza.

Toyota Quantum 2.7 Ses'fikile 16S

Replacement of existing vehicle

Project Management Team

Recommended for replacement

Log book and Travel request control sheet

73320

Toyota Quantum 2.7 Ses'fikile 16S

N/A

1 (one) in June 2018

Operations and Maintenance at the Huguenot Tunnel - Maintenance Vehicle use by various technicians to operate and maintain the tunnel and toll system.

Nissan 2,5TD 4x2 WR

Replacement of existing vehicle

Project Management Team

Recommended for replacement

Log book and Supervision Management

7031

Nissan 2,5TD 4x2 WR

N/A

The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) response is as follows:

Total number

Question (a) (i)

5 (Total purchased during the period in question)

What is the purpose of each vehicle

Question (b)

Transporting of staff and official passengers, collecting and delivering of parcels and documents at various places; travelling to training venues, meetings and other official matters, travelling to places to inspect/survey vessels and investigate incidents, travelling to oil pollution and other incidents

Make of each vehicle

Question (c)

Toyota Hilux SC 2.7 VVTI RB SX

Costs of vehicle: R315 000.01

 

Toyota Corolla 1.6 Prestige

Costs of vehicle: R275 617.80

 

Toyota Corolla 1.6 Prestige

Costs of vehicle: R275 617.80

 

Ford Ranger Wildtrack 3.2 TDCI Double Cab

Cost of vehicle: R507 143.82

 

Toyota Hilux 4.0 V6 D/C 4x4 Raider Automatic

Cost of vehicle: R395 748.26

Assessment undertaken

Question (d)

No assessment was undertaken. Due to SAMSA’s operational needs and terrain to travel, LDVs 4x4 have previously been identified as suitable for official use.

Passenger vehicles were identified in the mid pricing range which is fuel efficient and which can comfortably carry up to 5 persons

Who undertook the assessment Question (e)?

N/A

Results of the assessment Question (f)

N/A

Monitoring of vehicle

Question (g)

Vehicles are fitted with a tracking device. Manual record is being kept of the movement of the vehicle

Vehicles travelled less than 10 000 kilometers

Question(h)(i)

All vehicles have travelled more than 10 000 kilometers, except the one of the East London Office

Which vehicles travelled less than 10 000 kilometers

Question(h)(i)

Toyota Hilux 4.0 V6 D/C 4x4 Raider Automatic

Why had each vehicle travelled less than 10 000 kilometers?

Question (h)(iii)

The one of the East London office is new (procured during September 2018)

11 March 2019 - NW149

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Hugo, Mr RT to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by his department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a)(i) (i) R5,562.26 in 2017/2018

(a)(i) (ii) Nil

(a)(ii) (i) and (ii) Nil

(b)(i) (i) and (ii) Nil

(b)(ii) (i) and (ii) Nil

(c)(i) (i) and (ii) Nil

(c)(ii) (i) and (ii) Nil

(d)(i) (i) and (ii) Nil

(d)(ii) (i) and (ii) Nil

NOTES:

According to the 2007 Ministerial Handbook, the travel privileges of former Ministers / Deputy Ministers and their spouses / widows /widowers are administered and paid for by Parliament.

For former Minister ED Peters, who relinquished her office on 31 March 2017, a flight was booked to travel from OR Tambo International Airport to Kimberley on 11 April 2017 at a cost of R2,934.63. A return flight from Kimberley to OR Tambo International Airport on 15 April 2017 was added to the booking, bringing the total cost of the flights to an amount of R5,562.26. In an e-mail dated 11 April 2017, Travel Services indicated that the flights were part of the relocation of former Minister ED Peters as approved by the Chief of Staff.

11 March 2019 - NW180

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 2188 on 26 June 2018, what is the status of the devolution of rail services from the national Government to metropolitan governments?

Reply:

With reference to the reply in Parliamentary Question 2188, the Department will develop a Devolution Strategy that would allow the Department to consider the viability of developing transport functions to Metropolitan Authorities. The current status concerning rail is that no rail service has been devolved to Metropolitan Authorities.

11 March 2019 - NW183

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) Why was an amount of R 5,7 billion moved to the SA National Roads Agency Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project in his department’s Medium-term Budget Policy Statement in October 2018, (b) what are the details of the purpose(s) for which the funds will be utilized and (c) why were the funds transferred from the non-toll network’s allocation; (2) whether he has found that the specified transfer of funds was based on a rational decision in the interest of all citizens considering the need for repairs on South Africa’s non-toll road network; if so, what are the relevant details? NW193E

Reply:

1. (a) Due to the SANRAL Toll portfolio experiencing financial difficulty and in order to ensure that SANRAL does not default on its payments to investors, as well as to continue with the maintenance of the toll network across the country, funds were transferred from the non-toll network to the Toll network.

(b) Falls away – refer to (a) above.

(c) Because no additional funding could be sourced from the National Treasury, this was part of a reprioritisation exercise until a permanent solution is generated by Government to deal with the e-Toll challenge.

2. Even though the non-payment by Gauteng road users has a severe impact on SANRAL’s sustainability, an event of default would have even more dire consequences for the country. This would result in SANRAL ‘s full debt of R47bn becoming due and payable to investors. It is however a fact that any money that is diverted from the non-toll network to support GFIP negatively affects road maintenance and improvements elsewhere in the country. This transfer was a necessary intervention while a permanent solution is sought by Government for the e-Toll challenge.

11 March 2019 - NW359

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What is the name of the (a) engineer who conducted a certain inspection (details furnished) and (b) company that the specified engineer works for; (2) has he found that there is no threat of structural damage and/or danger to life; (3) by what date will all the recommendations of the engineer be implemented; (4) will he furnish Mr M Waters with a copy of the full report of the engineer?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. The inspections were carried out by Mr. Nathaniel Seseletsi, who is employed by Airports Company South Africa in the capacity of Chief Civil Engineer. Mr. Seseletsi’s background is structural engineering and is a Certified Bridge Inspector by the South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL).

2. The considered findings, which are contained under Section 2 of the enclosed report, confirm that there is no danger to human life. The report further confirms that, whilst cracks are structural in nature (i.e. they result from structural behaviour of the Bridge), they will not result in the collapse of the bridge.

3. The recommendations of the Chief Civil Engineer have been implemented, however the final inspection has not been conducted as the piers still need to re-painted. All works on the Piers will be concluded by Friday 01 March 2019.

4. The ACSA internal memo with the findings, conclusions and recommendations (Titled Pier 23 at ORTIA elevated road and dated 30 January 2019) has been enclosed with the responses.

11 March 2019 - NW297

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act (AARTO), Act 46 of 1998, on what policy basis and other considerations it has been decided that the AARTO testing phases in Johannesburg and Tshwane were successful; (2) whether he has found that there is a reduction in the number of motor vehicle accidents; if not, (a) why does he find that AARTO has not made a difference and (b) why the implementation of AARTO nationwide will deliver a different outcome; (3) whether the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) has the operational efficiency to effectively deal with the adjudication of offences; if not, why will the RTIA function more effectively in the adjudication of offences, especially as the volume of offences will increase drastically; (4) whether he has found that the collection of fines was better than before AARTO was established; if not, why will the implementation of AARTO nationwide definitely ensure that the collection of fines will improve with regard to the previous system and the creation of AARTO courts across the country that currently do not exist; (5) whether he has clear evidence that the implementation of AARTO nationwide will make the roads safer; if not, why are they continuing to implement the system; if so, whether he and his department accept personal responsibility if the roads become more unsafe and more people are killed or injured by reckless driving?

Reply:

(1) The AARTO Pilot Report, identified the weaknesses in the implementation and the related interventions that should developed. With the identified loopholes corrected, the implementation has subsequently proven to be successful. The last of the remaining weaknesses relate to the legislative framework and the amendments to the AARTO Act have recently been approved by the Portfolio Committee as well as the National Council of Provinces;

(2) Yes, (a) there was 19% reduction in fatalities in Gauteng, where AARTO is operational, recorded for the 2018 December/2019 January festive season. Enforcement Orders issued acted as a catalyst to ensure that lleged infringers comply with the infringement notices issued and in retun allowed for a compliant road user and a safer road traffic environment.

(b) Intenternational Research indicates that the Points Demerit System substantially reduce the accident rates upon implimentation thereof. It is envisaged that the same will apply with the national implimentation of AARTO, which will include the enforcement of the demerit points system.

(3) Audited performance reports over the last three years shows that the Agency has easily cope with the volumes of representation applications received within an average of 5 days, which is significantly less than the prescribed 21 day period. The Agency adjudicated 87,848 representations during the 2015/16, 96,310 during the 2016/17and 133,790 during the 2017/18 periods respectively.

Furthermore, only a small percentage of infringement notices results in representation applications, since there are currently four other elective options that an infringer can choose from.

(4) In the first instance, the AARTO system is not just based on the collection of traffic penalties. AARTO seeks to decriminalise road traffic violation. It provides for five different options from which an infringer must elect and exercise their right, such as challenging it by submitting a representation, electing to go to court, nominating the driver, making a once-off payment or arranging to pay in installments. Generally, revenue increase has been experienced, given the easier process of payments at additional payment platforms throughout the country, thereby introducing greater convenience for infringers to effect payments where applicable. throughout the country. It would be incorrect to move from a point that AARTO is only about collection of fines.

(5) The implementation of AARTO nationwde will include the Points Demerit System (PDS) and international studies have shown that the PDS has a direct bearing on the reduction of road fatalities. The evidence in this regard is based on the following:

  • Norway - reduction of 10.49% of road crashes when demerit points was introduced during 2009/2010;
  • Denmark - reduction of 16.2% of road crashes when demerit points was introduced during 2009/2010
  • Germany - reduction of 7.24% of road crashes when demerit points was introduced during 2009/2010;
  • A study by Stichting Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Verkeersveiligheid (SWOV) Institute, Leidshendam, Nederlands dated 2012 on Demerit Point Systems founded that the general effect on the reduction of injury accidents after the introduction of a PDS will be between 15-20% for the first one and a half year after introduction.

The Minister, the Department and all its roads Agencies, firmly believe that road safety is everyone’s responsibility. Thus the strategic position is to show leadership by engaging with all stakeholders and members of the public to ensure full compliance to all road traffic laws, which will ensure the achievement of the goal of increased road safety. We all accept that any road fatality or serious injury is one too many to accept and thus everyone must ensure that we contribute to the success of a safer road traffic environment.

27 February 2019 - NW184

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the reply to question 3520 of 10 November 2017, on which specific date did (a) the Bus Rapid Transport kerbside and (b) trunk route both become fully operational; (2) have negotiations with taxi associations been completed; if not, what are the obstacles preventing finalisation of the negotiations; (3) on what date were all the pedestrian bridges (a) completed and (b) opened?

Reply:

(1) With reference to the reply to question 3520 of 10 November 2017, on which specific date did (a) the Bus Rapid Transport kerbside and (b) trunk route both become fully operational;

(a) The Kerbside operations of the City of Ekurhuleni’s Bus Transport commenced in October 2017 with an introductory service (operating with limited buses) which will be ramped up to full operations as the system matures.

(b) The trunk route is not fully operational. The operations of the trunk route have been delayed by the construction of median trunk stations and the stream crossing. The trunk route is expected to be fully operational early 2019/20 financial year.

(2) Have negotiations with taxi associations been completed; if not, what are the obstacles preventing finalisation of the negotiations;

Significant progress has been made regarding the negotiations with the Taxi industry, however the negotiations were suspended due to the expired contract of the Taxi Industry Technical Advisory (TITA) Team. The pending appointment of TITA and Market surveys are the main obstacles preventing the conclusion of the negotiations.

(3) On what date were all the pedestrian bridges (a) completed and (b) opened?

(a) The pedestrian bridges are still underway construction. The completion of the pedestrian bridges was delayed by design related issues including the bulk water pipeline which was detected during construction and plexiglass specifications.

(b) The planned completion date for pedestrian bridges is during May 2019.

27 February 2019 - NW8

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2618 on 7 September 2017, he was informed of the proposed plan in due course to close the roads adjacent to the entrances of O R Tambo International Airport to the public because of security considerations; if not, what are the relevant details of the plan, including (a) the full explanation of the plan and concomitant periods of time, (b) the legal grounds on which the execution of the plan is based, (c) any traffic, social and economic impact studies undertaken in this regard, (d) any public participation opportunities in which role players were offered the chance to make inputs and (e) any workable alternatives for (i) travellers who will be affected by the intended plan and (ii) businesses conducting parking services from the specified airport; (2) whether he has been informed that the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) has been in contact with the SA National Airport Parking Association (SANAPA) and that ACSA has given SANAPA an undertaking to participate in the process regarding the proposed road closures; (3) whether he has been informed of the current form of intimidation being conducted against parking operators by ACSA and the Ekurhuleni metro police, who allegedly are having cars picking up and dropping passengers at the entrances towed and stored, and that this has the result of random removal and storage of the cars of bona fide users of the pickup and drop-off points; if not, will he conduct an investigation in this regard; if so, (a) why is this happening and (b) what steps will he take in order to ensure that individuals are given a reasonable time to pick up or drop off passengers?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(1)(a) The terrorist attacks in the landside area of Brussels Airport on 22 March 2016 and Istanbul Airport on 28 June 2016, has brought aviation security sharply into focus from all aviation stakeholders, governments and the media. Ensuring the security of the traveling public is a top priority for ACSA. The appropriate authority has defined “landside.” To include areas of mass gathering inside or close to the terminal, where there is a regular concentration of people. There is collaboration with the appropriate authority responsible for civil aviation security matters and other security agencies to conduct risk and vulnerability assessment of Airports to determine if any adjustments to current security measures are warranted. This requirement is contained in our National Civil Aviation Security Programme that allocate responsibilities to state agencies. Engagement with the National and Airport Security Committees on appropriate measures to implement on specific threat scenarios.

(i) Metal barriers and bollards are being used to prevent drive-in attacks

(ii) The separation of vehicle drop-off and pickup areas from the terminal building

(iii) Relocation of vehicle parking close to the terminal building to open areas further from the buildings

(iv) Management of crowds around the landside areas to reduce gatherings of meters and greeters has been implemented.

(v) Security considerations have been considered for access areas such as balconies, terraces or windows that open, close to the terminal building where an active shooter or bomber might have access to crowded public areas by enhancement of patrols and CCTV surveillance.

(vi) Airport workers & passenger awareness & communication, there is a continuous reminder through the public-address system to passengers and visitors to be vigilant and report unattended baggage or suspicious behavior.

(vii) Security awareness training is provided for all Airport workers (both airport and non-airport employees, including those not involved directly in security) to recognize suspicious behavior, and provide a simple and quick means to report it.

(b) Airports Company South Africa is not obligated under any legal grounds to implement the restricted road access. This road is under the jurisdiction of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan municipality. The municipality is charged with this legal responsibility. The management of O.R Tambo International Airport has raised its concerns and suggested that the airport controls the access and egress onto the airport frontage roads.

(i) Aviation-specific security regulations focus on the airside spaces (non-public spaces of airports accessible only to air passengers who hold a valid boarding pass and to security cleared staff). These regulations are designed to prevent unlawful interference with air transport. Landside spaces (airport spaces accessible to the public) are subject to general security regulations enacted by national civil aviation authority. It is therefore up to the national civil aviation authority to review and coordinate with airports to identify the appropriate measures that match their specific threat scenario.

(ii) A new set of standards regarding landside security are included in Amendment 15 to Annex 17 of the Chicago Convention (April 2017) which require States to ensure that landside areas are identified, that measures are established to mitigate and prevent attacks based on a risk assessment, that measures are appropriately coordinated, and that responsibilities are allocated within a State’s national civil aviation security programme.

(iii) Accompanying this standard is guidance material within Doc8973, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Security Manual, which provides additional information on how measures might be implemented. DOC 8973 states that no vehicle shall park within 50 meters from the terminal building.

(iv) The following list provides some best practices in detection, deterrence or mitigation of landside threats that reflect current ICAO guidance material and other industry best practices.

(v) Consider infrastructure and airport design features to mitigate the threat from attack. These might include:

(vi) bollards, flowerpots and other structures to prevent drive-in attacks

(vii) the separation of vehicle drop-off and pickup points from the terminal

(viii) Reduce access areas (such as terraces) where an active shooter or bomber might have access to crowded public areas.

(c) Studies was conducted by a traffic consultant in accordance to municipal by laws

(d) Public participation will be done prior to implementation

(e) Workable alternatives are:

(i) the separation of vehicle drop-off and pickup points from the terminal

(2) (a) none

3. (i) ASA and the Ekurhuleni metro police, doesn’t intimidate parking operators at the airports. In terms of ICAO Doc 9873 and National Civil Aviation Program vehicles cannot be left unattended on the roadway and within 50 meters from terminal building.

(ii) ACSA must ensure adequate road marking and appropriate signages in accordance to road ordinance act.

21 February 2019 - NW95

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply to question 2677 on 9 October 2018, (a) what number of deaths have occurred in each month since 1 October 2018, (b) what were the reasons for each specified death, (c) where did each death occur, (d) what steps has his department taken to reduce the occurrence of deaths, (e) what number of family members of the deceased have been compensated and (f) what are the costs involved in each specified case?

Reply:

Date of Occurrence

(c) Place of Occurrence

Province

Number of Fatalities

(b) Detailed description of occurrence/incident

(a) Total number of Fatalities October 2018 = 29

2018-10-01

Crossmoor

KwaZulu Natal

1

Asian male, Nelson Govender, 50 yrs, was struck by Metro train 9683 on the running line and was fatally injured.

2018-10-01

Oorstezee

Western Cape

1

Ms Yolanda Theron was struck by metro train no. 9626 (test trip). The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2018-10-02

President

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was found next to the rails with head and right arm cut off. The cause of death is unknown.

2018-10-02

Dunswart

Gauteng

1

L.E.Ngwenya disembarked between the coaches of metro train and fell on the rails sustaining fatal injuries.

2018-10-04

Klapmuts

Western Cape

1

Mr Andile Mqongwana was struck by metro train no. 3523 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Paarl Morgue.

2018-10-04

Delmore

Gauteng

1

L.Stephen jumped out of a moving metro train 0999, fell on the rails and was fatally injured.

2018-10-05

Klaarwater

KwaZulu Natal

1

An African male Hlela Cele, 24 years old, was struck by a goods train and was fatally injured.

2018-10-05

Southfield

Western Cape

1

Mr Alexander Fisher was struck by metro train no. 0502 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-10-06

Nancefield

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was found fatally injured on the platform.

2018-10-13

Kaalfontein

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 1530 while lying on the rails.

2018-10-13

Kliptown

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was found fatally injured on the platform.

2018-10-12

Nyanga - Philippi

Western Cape

1

Mr Madalitsho Chikabvumbwa was found in the section. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-10-15

Mamelodi Gardens - Greenview

Gauteng

1

An unknown male was hit by T8106 at Greenview station K/Point 23/3 -23/4 while crossing railway line and was fatally injured.

2018-10-16

Denver

Gauteng

1

L.Mazeka was fatally injured when struck by metro train 0504 while crossing the rails.

2018-10-18

KwaTandaza

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro train 1033 struck an African male, Philani Bede, 27 years old, who was on the running line and was fatally injured.

2018-10-21

Stock Road - Philippi

Western Cape

1

The body of a male person was found in the bushes next to the railway line. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-10-21

Tembisa - Limindlela

Gauteng

1

K.F.Mbhoshane was fatally struck by metro train 1534 while crossing the railway line.

2018-10-21

Kempton Park - Van Riebeeck

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 0623 while crossing the railway line.

2018-10-22

Doornfontein

Gauteng

1

T.Sontshantsha was pulled from platform edge by metro train to the rails and was fatally injured.

2018-10-23

Webber-Parkhill

Gauteng

1

J.Lekgau was fatally injured while hanging outside moving metro train and fell onto the rails.

2018-10-25

Doornfontein

Gauteng

1

T.Mokhumo fell from a moving metro train onto the rails and was fatally injured.

2018-10-26

Limindlela

Gauteng

1

Unknown person was fatally struck by metro train.

2018-10-28

Suurbekom

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 0410.

2018-10-28

Kempton Park

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 0636.

2018-10-27

Tooronga - Denver

Gauteng

1

M.Madonsela was fatally struck by metro train 0635 while crossing the railway line.

2018-10-30

Phefeni

Gauteng

1

L.Mgoduka was staff riding on moving metro train 9721 and slipped between the coaches and the train as a result he was declared dead.

2018-10-31

Berea Road

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro train no.0786 struck an unknown African male age +/-25 who was on the running line next to Mast Pole No.03/89 Signal No.DAL3032 and was fatally injured.

2018-10-22

Atteridgeville

Gauteng

1

Mr H Makinta was hit by metro train 0062 when he walked in front of the train and was fatally injured.

11-10-2018

Lebaleng - Kopanong

Gauteng

1

A male person was hit by metro train 1813 between K/Point 15/491 and 15/194, when he he threw himself infront of a train and was fatally injured.

(a)Total number of Fatalities November 2018 = 20

2018-11-06

Marianhill

KwaZulu Natal

1

An African female Neliswa Magoqovana, 32 yrs was sick and later passed away at Marianhill station.

2018-11-08

Roodepoort

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 0225 when he jumped in front of the train.

2018-11-10

Nonkqubela

Western Cape

1

A female person was struck by metro train no. 9902 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2018-11-10

Houtheuwel

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 9000.

2018-11-10

Mzimhlophe - New Canada

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was found dead lying next to the rails.

2018-11-12

Pilot - Kwesine

Gauteng

1

N.Majozi was electrocuted while train surfing on a moving metro train, fell on the rails and was fatally injured.

2018-11-12

Selpark - Springs

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was hit by metro train 1080 while crossing the rails, he was fatally injured.

2018-11-13

Compensation

KwaZulu Natal

1

An unknown African male, ±32 years old, who was on the running line was struck by Metro train no 0219 in the section between Compensation and Frasers stations, close to mast pole no: 130/315. He was fatally injured.

2018-11-12

Mutual

Western Cape

1

Mr Ndomeso Songetye was electrocuted while travelling on the roof of metro train no. 9925 and fell on the platform. He sustained fatal injuries and the deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-11-14

Langa - Mutual

Western Cape

1

The body of Mr Itumeng Sherman was found in the section. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-11-15

Kraaifontein - Muldersvlei

Western Cape

1

A male person was struck by metro train no. 0890 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2018-11-16

Brackenfell - Eikenfontein

Western Cape

1

The body of a male person was found in the section. No further information available.

2018-11-05

Ravensklip-Knights

Gauteng

1

M.Khalumashu, was hit by metro train, while crossing the rails and was fatally injured.

2018-11-15

Westrand-Krugersdorp

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was found dead lying next to the rails.

2018-11-17

Millsite

Gauteng

1

F.Mbombi fell from moving metro train and fell on the rails, he was fatally injured.

2018-11-22

Kuils River - Blackheath

Western Cape

1

Ms Shedlene Cloete was struck by TFR Goods Train no. 5261 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2018-11-22

Mount Ruth - Egerton

Eastern Cape

1

A 12 year old African boy was struck by metro 0014 between Mount Ruth and Egerton next to mass pole 22/17 and 22/18. The deceased was taken to NU1 Mortuary at Mdantsane.

2018-11-29

Merafe - Naledi

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 9934 while standing on the rail and ignoring the train hooter.

2018-11-21

Kempton Park

Gauteng

1

N.Mabaso fell while staff riding on metro train 1569 and fell on the rails, he was fatally injured.

2018-11-21

Kuils River - Blackheath

Western Cape

1

Ms Shedlene Cloete was struck by TFR Goods Train no. 5261 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

  1. Total number of Fatalities December 2018 = 22

2018-12-03

Kempton Park

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by metro train 8752 while crossing the railway line and ignoring the train hooter.

2018-12-03

Kraaifontein

Western Cape

1

Mr Marshal Matthews was struck by metro train no. 3506 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2018-12-05

Kenville

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro Train 9278 struck an African male Sbonelo Luthuli (30 yrs) on the running line when he jumped in front of the train between mast pole 170/13 and 170/18.

2018-12-06

Bellville

Western Cape

1

A male person threw himself in front of metro train no. 3518 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased person was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2018-12-09

Wolseley

Western Cape

1

A male person was struck by metro train no. 3506 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Wolseley Morgue.

2018-12-10

Anglers - Midannedale

Gauteng

1

J.Mathe jumped out of a moving metro train 9013 and fell onto the rails and sustained fatal injuries.

2018-12-10

Du Toit - Koelenhof

Western Cape

1

Mr Xolani Mboleni (14 years old) jumped in front of metro train no. 3414. He sustained fatal injuries and was taken to Paarl Morgue.

2018-12-11

Maitland

Western Cape

1

The body of a male person was found in the section. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-12-14

Kwa Mashu

KwaZulu Natal

1

Nkosinathi Ndlovu, 34 years old, was struck by Metro train 9484 on the running line at the Mastpole VB 2/643 and VB 2/693. MC/50064 and was fatally injured.

2018-12-16

Tongaat

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro train 0294 struck an African female Philangani Gumede (24 yrs.) who was on the running line and was fatally injured.

2018-12-16

Durban Yard

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro Train 0294 struck an unknown person who was on the line and was fatally injured.

2018-12-16

Barracks

Gauteng

1

A male person boarded on the top of a stationary goods train no 18330 where he was electrocuted by overhead wires and was fatally injured.

2018-12-17

Arnoldton - Mtsotso

Eastern Cape

1

Area Security Commander Temba Mbenyana informed JOC that metro 0041 fatally struck an unknown male tresspassing in the operating tunnel outstide Arnoldton and Mtsotso station at mast poles 32/03 and 32/04. Protection Services and Railways SAPS informed. Train driver Donald Davoran, Train Assistant Lubabalo Katana and Metro Guard Phumeza Kanti send for trauma counselling the following day. Protection Services and Railways SAPS informed. Body taken to Mdantsane mortuary.

2018-12-20

Kwesine - Pilot

Gauteng

1

N.Ngqbese was fatally struck by moving metro train 7620.

2018-12-20

Nyanga - Philippi

Western Cape

1

The body of Mr Andrew Plaatjies was placed on the tracks with fatal stab wound. Metro train no. 9902 drove over the body after seeing it too late to stop in time.

2018-12-23

Tooranga

Gauteng

1

S.Mntanbo’s dead body was found on the rails .

2018-12-23

Kraaifontein

Western Cape

1

A male person was struck by metro train no. 3504 when he jumped in front of the moving train. He sustained fatal injuries and the body was taken to Tyberberg Morgue.

2018-12-24

Egerton - Fort Jackson

Eastern Cape

1

On Monday 24 December 2018 at 07:49 SSC Mkhonkqo informed JOC that metro 0002 locomotive 35/260, struck a 33-year-old male, later identified as Mr V Myamfilo between Egerton and Fort Jackson stations at mast poles 19/16 and 19/26. All relevant role players informed. It alleged the victim was standing on the railway line and ignored the hooter of the locomotive and was fatally struck. Train driver Dickson Ntanjana, Train Assistant Billy Ziwele and Metro Guard Nolitha Dyeshana send for trauma counselling. Body taken to NU1 Mdantsane mortuary

2018-12-24

Marianhill

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro train 1048 struck an unknown male who was on the running line and was fatally injured.

2018-12-25

Ysyerplaat - Paarden Eiland

Western Cape

1

The body of a male person was found with no visible injuries next to the railway line. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-12-26

Nyanga - Philippi

Western Cape

1

Mr Mzwandile Somdyala was struck by metro train no. 9525. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2018-12-30

Westonaria - Suurbekom

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by moving metro train 0414.

  1. Total number of Fatalities January 2019 = 30

2019-01-01

Rossburgh

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro Train driver of 1065 struck William Steenkamp, aged 81 years, who was walking on the running line and was fatally injured.

2019-01-05

Northmead

Gauteng

3

T.Chipent who was carring J.Mokoena on her back and holding J.Moveswa’s hand was fataly struck by moving metro train 8807 while standing on the railway line and ignoring the train hooter.

2019-01-06

Tembisa-Limindlela

Gauteng

1

P.Selelo was fatally struck by moving metro train 1511 when he just lied on the rails and ignoring the train hooter.

2019-01-08

Mountain view

Gauteng

3

Rear end collision occurred between metro train 0810 and metro train 1818 resulted in 817 injuries and 3 passenger fatalities.

2019-01-09

Luipaardsvlei-Lanwen

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by unknown metro train.

2019-01-11

New-Canda-Longdale

Gauteng

1

D Lewis jumped in front of oncoming metro train 9478 and as a result was struck and sustained fatal injuries.

2019-01-12

Kwaggastroom-Houtheuwel

Gauteng

1

Unknown male was fatally struck by moving metro train.

2019-01-09

Philippi - Lentegeur

Western Cape

1

The body of Mr Shafiek Salie was found with a gunshot wound to his chest in the section. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2019-01-12

Diep River

Western Cape

1

A female passenger was struck by metro train no. 0165 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2019-01-14

Woodstock

Western Cape

1

A male person was struck by metro train no. 0198 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased person was taken Salt River Morgue.

2019-01-14

Karserne - West

Gauteng

1

R Neluheni was fatally struck by moving metro train 9022.

2019-01-17

Residensia

Gauteng

1

L Tshabalala was fatally struck by metro train 9036 while lying on the rails and ignoring the train hooter.

2019-01-21

Angus - Randwater

Gauteng

1

K Sephondo (child) was put on the rails by his father when moving goods train approached and the child was fatally struck by the train.

2019-01-22

Elsburg

Gauteng

1

Kgasimang was fatally struck by metro train 7636 while crossing the railway line wearing headphones and ignoring the train hooter.

2019-01-23

Elandsfontein

Gauteng

1

Unknown boy (15 years) was train surfing on top of moving metro train 1574 when the overhead wire fatally shocks him and landed on the roof of the train.

2019-01-24

Groutville

KwaZulu Natal

1

Metro Train 0229 Set N8 struck a 59-year-old, J Ngema, who was on the running line at the level crossing and sustained fatal injuries.

2019-01-22

Nyanga - Philippi

Western Cape

3

The burnt bodies of three male persons were found in the section. The bodies of the deceased,were taken to Salt River Morgue.

2019-01-23

Philippi

Western Cape

1

A male person was travelling on the roof of metro train no. 9902 and was electrocuted. He sustained fatal injuries and was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2019-01-26

Naledi-Merafe

Gauteng

1

A Maluleke was electrocuted when he was train-surfing on moving metro train 9317 and fell onto the rails, he was declared dead.

2019-01-28

Duffs Road

KwaZulu Natal

1

Unknown African male was struck by Metro Train 0213 in the section between Duffs Road and Phoenix next to Kilometer point 161/369 and 161/312 as a result he was fatally injured.

2019-01-29

Woltemade - Maitland

Western Cape

1

A 13-year-old school boy was struck by metro train no. 3514 and sustained fatal injuries. The deceased boy was taken to Salt River Morgue.

2019-01-29

Limindlela - Leralla

Gauteng

1

T Sithole was fatally struck by moving metro train 1569 while walking on the rails and ignoring the train hooter wearing his earphones.

2019-01-30

Tygerberg

Western Cape

1

The body of a male person was found lying between the tracks. The deceased was taken to Tygerberg Morgue.

2019-01-31

Tembisa - Limindlela

Gauteng

1

L Ndlovu was fatally struck by moving metro train 1502, while crossing the rails.

(d) Steps taken to reduce the occurrences of death are:

  1. Ongoing Safety Awareness Campaigns are conducted in all the regions.
  2. The Roll Out and Implementation of the Fencing Project to curb illegal access to the operational tunnel.
  3. Elimination of high risk level crossings.
  4. Deployment of Security Personnel, Safety Patrollers and Level Crossing attendants.
  5. Roll out of new train sets equipped with technology that does not permit a train to move with open doors.

(e) PRASA is liable for the Mountainview train collision in January 2019. Eight family members of the deceased from that collision have been identified. PRASA is currently working on determining the adequate quantum of support for the eight dependents from the two families that were affected by that collision.

(f) The costs from the Mountainview collision are still being determined.

21 February 2019 - NW97

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 641 on 22 March 2018, what was the total number of (a) SA Police Service and (b) private security company members who were employed to secure Metrorail operations (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018 in each province?

Reply:

a) Although PRASA does have the numbers of members that the SA Police Service (SAPS) has availed for PRASA Operations, PRASA is not permitted to share this SAPS information. Therefore, the question must be directed to SAPS.

b) 

 

(i)

(ii)

Region

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Gauteng

2,117

1,687

1,687

1,687

1,324

1,324

Western Cape

654

799

799

799

799

799

Kwazulu Natal

186

183

56

140

140

140

Eastern Cape

98

98

98

98

98

98

MLPS

346

321

323

315

315

315

Total

3,401

3,088

2,963

3,039

2,676

2,676

06 December 2018 - NW3541

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa train stations near economic activity hubs, (a) how have the specified stations been identified, (b) what criteria were used to identify stations near economic activity hubs, (c) what are the current status of the stations, (d) what are the plans for stations that do not meet the requirements for economic activity hubs, (e) who will undertake the specified plans and (f) what are the timelines, timeframes and deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

a) PRASA has inherited and thus operates services with train stations which to a large extent reflect the past regime’s historical planning, which located people outside of the economic hubs.

b) As per the above response in (a), the stations near the economic hubs referred to, have been inherited and were developed in the past regime motivated by the policy of housing certain races outside of economic hubs.

c) The PRASA property portfolio train stations near economic hubs are limited to areas within the following Cities:

  • City of Johannesburg
    • Park Station in City Centre
    • Naledi (Soweto)
  • City of Tshwane
    • Mabopane station
    • Pretoria Station
    • Saulsville Station
  • City of Ekurhuleni
    • Dunswart
    • Germiston
  • City of Ethekwini
    • Durban Station
    • Berea Station
  • City of Cape Town
    • Woodstock Station
    • Saltriver Station
    • Cape Town Station
  • Buffalo City and Nelson Mandela.
    • East London Station
    • Port Elizabeth Station

Stations are in various states of functioning, depending on the demographics of the area and the demand of transport in the area. PRASA has over the past five (5) years invested a substantial amount of Capital in improving the major stations through various programmes such as National Station Upgrade Programme (NSUP) and National Station Improvement Programme (NSIP). Whilst upgrading and improving stations, PRASA will identify the commercial opportunity and include it in the upgrade project. Other commercial opportunities identified will be as and when capital is available to cater for the commercial requirements or offered to the market for leasing.

d) Stations are classified as Super Core, Core, Medium, Small and Halts based on the number of commuters making use of the stations. Furthermore, the Local Authorities/Cities earmarks areas based on the demographics and development planning of the City.

Stations that do not meet the requirements of economic hubs are normally stations that have very limited commercial potential and only small station cafés or informal trade will take place until the fabric of the surrounding area changes, making it potential commercial hubs. Once again PRASA does not decide whether the area is earmarked as economic hubs as it is the Local Authority that determines this based on their Integrated Urban Development Plans, such as housing development, retail, etc. PRASA responds to these plans.

e) The Local Authority decides on an area and undertakes studies depending on demographic changes of the area.

f) The time frames are based on the Local Authority planning cycle and once the areas are developed into economic hubs, PRASA will respond with the upgrade of stations which includes commercial development and or residential developments.

06 December 2018 - NW3413

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to television, radio and newspaper advertising done by his department and the entities reporting to him, (a)(i) what are the details of adverts that were flighted and/or printed and (ii) on what medium were the adverts flighted and/or printed, (b) on what dates were the adverts printed and/or flighted, (c)(i) what were the objectives for the adverts in each case and (ii) how were those objectives measured in each instance and (d) what was the monthly spend on advertising?

Reply:

Department

(a)(i) In the 2017/18 The Department of Transport (DOT) requested Government Communications and Information System (GCIS) to assist with the media buying of their campaign to communicate their various programmes, events, new developments, future projects and their achievements. The department implemented the campaign on radio and television only there was no printing advertising.

The television advert was a road safety message recorded by the Honorable Minister to heighten awareness about road safety during the festive season and this was flighted on SABC stations during December 2017.

The radio adverts which were recorded and flighted highlighted the department’s achievements with regards to Public Transport and a road safety message.

(ii) The adverts were flighted on Television and Radio.

(b) The television advert flighted from 21/12/2017 – 04/01/2018

Radio Phase 1: 09 March 2018 – 16 March 2018

Radio Phase 2: 26 March 2018 – 03 April 2018

Radio Phase 3: 04 October 2018 – 11 October 2018

 

    1. The television advert flighted from 21/12/2017 – 04/01/2018.This was the Minister’s Festive Season Message with the objective of creating awareness about road safety and to encourage travellers to be safe on the road.

Radio Phase 1 & 2: 09 March 2018 – 03 April 2018. Easter Campaign, once again the main objective was to encourage people to drive and travel safely on the roads to their places of destination.

Radio Phase 3: 04 October 2018 – 11 October 2018 Transport Month Launch. The objective was creating awareness regarding the launch of Transport Month and also highlight the key projects and events for the month.

  1. The only element to be measured was the reach and frequency of the campaign which is measured using an independent media buying software called Telmar.

(d) The total expenditure on Television, SABC Stations, Community Stations and Commercial stations for the 2017/18 was R 9 678 478.48. Unfortunately, this cannot be broken down per month as the campaign was an ongoing campaign that started in December and ended at the start of Transport month this year.

Cross-Border Road transport Agency (C-BRTA)

(a)(i) The Cross-Border Road transport Agency (C-BRTA) does not utilise television, radio and newspaper advertising (ii) (b), (c) (i) (ii) and (d) Not applicable as no television, radion and newspaper advertising is utilised.

(a)(i) With reference to television, radio and newspaper advertising done by the Road Accident Fund (RAF) since 1 April 2018 to 31 October 2018,

(a)(ii) the details of the adverts flighted or printed are,

and (ii) the medium on which the adverts were flighted and/or printed was,

(b) the adverts were printed and/or flighted on the following dates,

(c)(i) in each case the objectives for the adverts were,

and (ii) in each instance the objectives were measured as follows,

road safety for primary school learners on TRU FM and Good Hope FM

radio

TRU FM: 16 April 2018 to 20 April 2018 and Good Hope FM: 23 April 2018 to 27 April 2018

to promote road safety among primary school learners

reach of targeted audience:

TRU FM - estimated listenership of 300 000 people and Good Hope FM - estimated listenership of 667 000 people

youth claimant’s statistics and road safety in Move! Drum, Daily Sun, Sunday Sun and Isolezwe

magazine and newspaper

Move! and Drum: 18 July 2018

Daily Sun: 11 July 2018

Sunday Sun: 15 July 2018

Isolezwe: 12 July 2018

to promote road safety and create awareness in respect of the RAF’s post-crash care

reach of targeted audience:

Drum - estimated readership of 2.9 million people

Daily Sun - estimated readership of 2.9 million people

Sunday Sun - estimated readership of 2.5 million people

Isolezwe - estimated readership of 1.2 million people

to clarify whether outstanding RAF claims will be processed under the Road Accident Benefit Scheme on Ukhozi FM, Umhlobo Wenene FM, Phalaphala FM, Munghana Lonene FM, Radio 2000, RSG, Ikwekwezi FM, Ligwalagwala FM Motsweding FM, Lesedi FM, Metro FM and Thobela FM

radio

17 September 2018 to 24 September 2018

to inform the public that the RAF has not ‘shut down’, but that it is still operating and processing claims and will continue to do so under the Road Accident Benefit Scheme dispensation

reach of target audience:

Ukhozi FM - estimated listenership of 7.5 million people

Umhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Phalaphala FM - estimated listenership of 739 000 people

Munghana Lonene FM - estimated listenership of 1.2 million people

Radio 2000, RSG - estimated listenership of 447 000 people

Ikwekwezi FM - estimated listenership of 1.3 million people

Ligwalagwala FM - estimated listenership of 947 000 people

Motsweding FM - estimated listenership of 2.6 million people

Lesedi FM - estimated listenership of 3.4 million people

Metro FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Thobela FM - estimated listenership of 2.8 million people

to promote the RAF’s products and services in the Daily Sun

newspaper

2, 16 and 31 October 2018

to promote direct claims processes, funeral benefits and the RAF’s footprint

reach of target audience:

Daily Sun - estimated readership of 5.3 million people

Skeem Saam storyline integration on North West FM, YFM and Capricorn FM

radio

30 October 2018 to 31 October 2018

to create awareness in respect of the Skeem Saam storyline integration and the RAF’s products and services

reach of target audience:

North West FM - estimated listenership of 212 000 people

YFM - estimated listenership of 706 000 people

Capricorn FM - estimated listenership of 549 000 people

event advertising for RAF – on – the – Road in Motherwell, East London on Umhlobo Wenene FM and Algoa FM

radio

Umhlobo Wenene FM: 23 April 2018 to 27 April 2018 and Algoa FM: 16 April 2018 to 27 April 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF - on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims and claims verification

reach of target audience:

Umhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Algoa FM - estimated listenership of 588 000 people

event advertising for RAF – on – the – Road in George, mini RAF – on – the – Road in Siyabuswa, RAF Mobi Blitz and Cape Town direct claims campaign on Eden FM, Ikwekwezi FM, Good Hope FM, Radio Zibonele, Rise FM and uMhlobo Wenene FM

radio

8 May 2018 to 31 May 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF - on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Eden FM - estimated listenership of 115 000 people

Ikwekwezi FM - estimated listenership of 1.3 million people

Good Hope FM - estimated listenership of 667 000 people

Radio Zibonele - estimated listenership of 236 000 people

Rise FM - estimated listenership of 47 000 people

uMhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

event advertising for Cape Town direct claims campaign, Comrades Marathon, mini RAF – on – the – Road in Bizana, Libode and Mbombela and Mobi Blitz on Radio Zibonele, Umhlobo Wenene FM, Metro FM, 5 FM, Heart FM, Radio 2000, Ukhozi FM, Good Hope FM, Vaaltar FM, North West FM, Kanyamazane FM, Radio Turf, Madibaz, Rhodes FM, TUT FM, VUT FM and Ligwalagwala FM

radio

7 June 2018 to 30 June 2018

promoting RAF direct claims processes, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Radio Zibonele - estimated listenership of 236 000 people

Umhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Metro FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

5 FM - estimated listenership of 862 000 people

Heart FM - estimated listenership of 838 000 people

Radio 2000 - estimated listenership of 477 000 people

Ukhozi FM - estimated listenership of 7.2 million people

Good Hope FM - estimated listenership of 588 000 people

Vaaltar FM - estimated listenership of 71 000 people

North West FM - estimated listenership of 203 000 people

Kanyamazane FM - estimated listenership of 10 000 people

Radio Turf - estimated listenership of 29 000 people

Madibaz - estimated listenership of 27 000 people

Rhodes FM - estimated listenership of 24 000 people

TUT FM - estimated listenership of 1 000 people

VUT FM - estimated listenership of 96 000 people

Ligwalagwala FM - estimated listenership of 1.5 million people

event advertising for mini RAF – on – the – Road in De Aar, Butterworth and Strand, RAF – on – the – Road in Bungeni and Empangeni and RAF open days in Kroonstad and Bothaville on Ukhozi FM, Icora FM, Gagasi FM, Umhlobo Wenene FM, Zibonele FM, Heart FM, Munghana Lonene FM, Capricorn FM, Segosese FM, Giyani FM, Hlanganani FM, Lesedi FM and RSG

radio

14 July 2018 to 28 July 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF – on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Ukhozi FM - estimated listenership of 7.2 million people

Icora FM - estimated listenership of 135 000 people

Gagasi FM - estimated listenership of 1.4 million people

Umhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Zibonele FM - estimated listenership of 236 000 people

Heart FM - estimated listenership of 634 000 people

Munghana Lonene estimated listenership of 1.2 million people

Capricorn FM - estimated listenership of 1.4 million people

Segosese FM - estimated listenership of 110 000 people

Giyani FM - estimated listenership of 25 000 people

Hlanganani - FM estimated listenership of 41 000 people

Lesedi FM - estimated listenership of 4 million people

RSG - estimated listenership of 1.5 million people

event advertising for RAF – on – the – Road in Thokoza, mini RAF – on – the – Road in Mqanduli, Boitekong and Volsrust and a RAF open day in Thabazimbi on Lesedi FM, Kasie FM, Motsweding FM and Umhlobo Wenene FM

radio

4 August 2018 to 25 August 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF – on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Lesedi FM - estimated listenership of 4 million people

Kasie FM - estimated listenership of 97 000 people

Motsweding FM - estimated listenership of 2.6 million people

Umhlobo Wenene FM -estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

to promote the #Keepitsimple campaign (direct claims promotion) and event advertising for RAF – on – the – Road and mini RAF – on – the – Road in Lusikisiki on Umhlobo Wenene FM, Motsweding FM, Rise FM, and Mughana Wenene FM

radio

1 September 2018 to 30 September 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF -on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Umhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Motsweding FM - estimated listenership of 2.6 million people

Rise FM - estimated listenership of 46 000 people

Mughana Wenene FM - estimated listenership of 925 000 people

event advertising for RAF – on – the – Road in Port Shepstone and Nyanga,

radio story integration (direct claims promotion), Paddle Power collaboration (road safety awareness drive) and support for the Durban regional office on Radio Zibonele, Umhlobo Wenene FM, Ukhozi FM, Thobela FM, Metro FM, Voice of Cape Town and Radio786

radio

6 October 2018 to 29 October 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF – on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Radio Zibonele - estimated listenership of 236 000 people

Umhlobo Wenene FM - estimated listenership 4.1 million

Ukhozi FM - estimated listenership of 7.2 million people

Thobela FM - estimated listenership of 2.1 million people

Metro FM - estimated listenership of 4.1 million people

Voice of Cape Town - estimated listenership of 122 000 people

Radio786 - estimated listenership of 155 000 people

direct claims promotion on SABC 1 (Sports @ 10 interview) and SABC 2

(Comrades Marathon advertising with rotating logo, squeeze backs and a TVC)

television

9 June 2018 to 10 June 2018

to promote direct claims and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

SABC 2 - estimated average weekly target audience of 24.9 million people

direct claims promotion on SABC 1 (Skeem Saam story integration), SABC 2 (TVC, squeeze backs, opening and closing billboards)

television

24 September 2018 to 30 September 2018

to promote direct claims and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

SABC 1 - estimated average weekly target audience of 25.8 million people

direct claims promotion on Skeem Saam story integration on SABC 2

television

1 October 2018 to 31 October 2018

to promote direct claims and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

SABC 2 - estimated average weekly target audience of 24.9 million people

direct claims promotion in By the Way newspaper

newspaper

1 June 2018 to 30 June 2018

to promote direct claims and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

By the Way - estimated readership of 100 000 people

direct claims promotion for women’s month in Drum and Sunday Times

magazine and newspaper

9 August 2018 to 24 August 2018

to promote direct claims and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Drum - estimated average weekly target audience of 51 000 people

Sunday Times - estimated readership of 3.5 million people

direct claims promotion in By the Way newspaper

newspaper

1 September 2018 to 30 September 2018

to promote direct claims and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

By the Way - estimated readership of 100 000 people

event advertising for RAF – on – the – Road in Nyanga in the Voice of Cape Town newspaper

newspaper

10 October 2018

activation of communities to attend the RAF – on – the - Road campaign in the respective areas to promote direct claims, claims verification and RAF access points

reach of target audience:

Voice of Cape Town - estimated listenership of 122 000 people

and (d) the monthly spend on advertising was

 

Media and public relations

Marketing

April

R121 509.00

R696, 319.95

May

N/A

R519,268.80

June

R266 327.24

R1,712,916.00

July

N/A

R2,236,278.64

August

N/A

R 753,683.63

September

R1 408 209.50

R616, 806.19

October

R357 403.44

R1 996 251.00

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC

(a)(i) The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) took out adverts about the introduction of the National Traffic Information System (NaTIS) Online Pre-Booking Service in Gauteng. The online services are: Online Pre-booking for Learner’s Licence appointments; Online Pre-Booking for Driving licence appointments; Online Booking for renewal of driving licence cards

(ii) The adverts were placed in the following publications: Business Day, The Citizen, Pretoria News, Sowetan, The Star, Sunday World and City Press

(b) The print adverts were placed between 3 September to 4 October 2018

Pretoria News

3 September 2018

3 October 2018

The Star

31 August 2018

4 October 2018

Citizen

3 September 2018

4 October 2018

City Press

2 September 2018

 

Sowetan

5 September 2018

 

Sunday World

2 September 2018

 

Business Day

31 August 2018

 

(c) (i) the objectives for the adverts in each case were:

To introduce, create awareness and promote the NaTIS Online Pre-Booking and licence renewal services.

To generate maximum publicity and awareness for the Pre-Booking online services which will eliminate bribery and fraudulent activities at DLTCs as it pertains to the ‘selling’ of slots online system.

To reduce the number of people queuing to renew their licences and time spent in queues.

(ii) The objectives were measured by monitoring the number of people that were using the system compared to those who walked into the DLTCs to make applications.

As of 30 September, the online applicants have exceeded walk-ins consistently

Data extracted as at 31 October 2018.

(d) Total Advertising spend in print publications: August – September = R 500 000.00

South African Nations Road Agency (SANRAL)

(a)(i) The South African Nations Road Agency (SANRAL) the details of the advert flighted and printed below under the heading Campaigns

(ii) The mediums of adverts flighted and printed below under the heading Detail.

(b) The dates of the flighting and publications listed below under the heading Dates.

(i) CAMPAIGNS

(ii) MEDIUMS UTILISED

(b) DATES

"Coffee" Launch Campaign

Radio-Power Fm, Capricorn Fm, East Coast Radio, Jacaranda Fm, Kaya Fm, 702, Cape Talk, Metro FM, Ukhozi Fm, Motsweding Fm, Thobela Fm, Umhlobo Wenene Fm, Ikwekwezi Fm, Phalaphala Fm, RSG & Jozi Fm.

Week commencing (wc) 27 May - wc 5 August

"Coffee" Launch Campaign

Print Schedule – Mainstream (City Press, Daily Sun, Sowetan, Sunday Sun, Sunday World, Mail & Guradian, Business Report, Citizen, Sunday Times & Rapport)

27 May - 24 July

"Coffee" Launch Campaign

TV-SABC 1,2 3, eTV, eNCA news package, Tennis package, Breaking news package (CNN, Sky News & BBC), Limited offer Package.

27 May - 30 June

Youth Month Campaign

Youth Month Campaign- 38 Community print titles

wc 24 June

Adhoc Print Schedule

IMIESA Magazine- IFC

August, Oct, Nov

Adhoc Print Schedule

ON ROUTE Magazine - A4FC

September & December

Brand Family TV Phase 3 Mainstream

S1, S2, S3, Etv, DSTV Packages 3 x 30" Ads

26 Aug- September

Adhoc Print Schedule

Aspire magazine, Pan African Parliament, Business Day Empowerment, African Decisions, Future Stars & The Thinker.

August & October

Youth Event OB

OB - Ikwekwezi FM

30th June 2018

Bell MOU Print

The Business Report (The Star, Mercury, Cape Times, Pretoria News)

29th July

PIARC 2018

Engineering News, PSM, Kuluma, Construction World & Sawubona)

Aug, Sep, Oct

Women's Month Campaign

City Press, Daily Sun, Rapport, Son, Sowetan, The Star, The Mercury, Daily Dispatch, Mail& Guardina, Cape Argus & Citizen.

August

Nelson Mandela Centenary Print MainStream

City Press, Daily Sun, Beeld, Sowetan, Daily Dispatch, Sunday World, Mail&Guardian, Business Report, Isolezwe & Citizen.

August

Nelson Mandela Centenary Print Community

Imbewu news, Inhlumelo news, Rainbow news, St Frances Chronicle, Skawara news, Pondo news, Taxi mail, Izimvo zabantu, Xhamla Press, Ikhwezi la se Mthata, Dikelethu news.

August

Brand TV Phase 3 Community

Soweto, 1KZN, Bay & Tshwane TV = 30" @150 spots

August - September

Brand TV Phase 3 Mainstream

Cape Town TV = 30" @93 spots

August - September

Brand Radio Phase 3 Mainstream

23 Stations @ 382 spots - 30"

August-September

Brand Radio Phase 3 Community

11 Stations @304 spots

August-September

Albertina Sisulu Outdoor MS

2 X Sites Orlando West Soweto

September & October

Albertina Sisulu Print Mainstream

City Press, Daily Sun, Rapport, Isolezwe, Sowetan, The Star, The Mercury, Daily Dispatch, Mail& Guardian and The Herald.

September

Albertina Sisulu Print Community

16 Titles @30x6FC

September

Road Safety 365 Radio mainstream

30" ads All languages

September & October

Road Safety 365 TV mainstream

45" & 30" Ads - SABC, ETV, DSTV PACKAGES

September & October

Road Safety 365 Print mainstream

City Press, Rapport, Daily Sun, Beeld, Sowetan, Daily Dispatch, Sunday World, Mail&Guardian, Cape Argus, The Star, The Herald, The Mercury & The Citizen.

September

Road Safety 365 TV Community

Soweto, 1KZN, Bay & Tshwane TV = 45" @196 spots

September & October

Road Safety 365 Radio Community

Jozi Fm, Rise Fm, Motheo Fm, Mahikeng Fm, Radio Unitra, Icora, Energy Fm, Radio Teemaneng & Radio Tygerberg.

September & October

Road Safety 365 Print Community

46 titles

September

Adhoc Print Schedule

4 Titles - Car&Getaway magazine, MansiTravel, Business Intergrator, AA Travel

Dec, Jan, March

FMS TOLL CAMPAIGN

City Press, Rapport, Daily Sun, Sowetan, Sunday Times (Lifestyle Magazine), Mail&Guardian (Transport Month Supplement) & Transport Tribune.

October

Top Employer

M&G Feature

October

Transport Month Ministerial Interviews

5 Stations @ 2 x 30 minutes interviews

October

Transport Month Ministerial Pre-Event Print MS

The Mercury, Isolezwe (KZN edition, Daily News, Zululand Observer, Sowetan (KZN edition), Daily Sun (KZN edition), Mail Guardian (Transport Month supplement)

October

Transport Month Ministerial OB

Morning Live OB plus News Clock & Squeeze backs

30th October

(c)(i) SANRAL develops a detail communication strategy that links to the National Communication Strategy Framework (NCSF). All sub-strategies and campaigns link to the overall SANRAL communication strategy as well as SANRAL pillars of operations. The objectives of the campaigns indicated were as follows:

  1. Business coffee campaign: An approved strategy guides SANRAL’s marketing and communications and it was informed by and consistent with the National Communication Strategy Framework. SANRAL strives continually to improve our communication engagement with members of the public, to inform them of our work and increase understanding of what the SANRAL brand represents. The good reputation of SANRAL is invaluable to our ability to play a role in promoting national investment, growing the economy and creating jobs. 

We have endeavored to present a comprehensive picture of how we deliver on our mandate to assist road users. The business coffee concept was developed to reinforce the universal truth of how interconnected our lives are, even the everyday things that we may overlook are the products of an interconnected network of people, business, and products that are all woven together by a vast system of national roads. SANRAL manages 22 214km of roads throughout South Africa. These roads are the driving force of South Africa that contribute to the GDP of the south African economy.

Business relies on the infrastructure of the roads to drive the economy. SANRAL has a responsibility to ensure that it delivers roads that are well designed, constructed and maintained. This safely engineered infrastructure aids in the driving experience; assists in prolonging the wear and tear of cars and trucks using these roads and enabling users to get themselves and goods to their intended destinations. This advert is pertinent in the current environment of needing to stimulate economic growth by investing in infrastructure.

The coffee ad was powerful and in line with SANRAL’s Horizon 2030 strategy. The commercial demonstrates the role and impact of road infrastructure in supporting businesses both large and small.

The commercial took the agricultural sector as an example and demonstrated through the harvesting and logistical transportation of coffee beans, bringing them to market and eventually at the consumer's hand to enjoy. It also reaffirms SANRAL’s slogan of beyond roads, as roads are not an end in themselves but a means to improving people's lives.

  1. Brand Family:

As with the Business Coffee campaign the strategic intent was to profile how SANRAL goes ‘Beyond Roads’ to build advancements that connect. We want South Africans to think of SANRAL as the brand that brings the ability to connect with their loved ones, their jobs, new business opportunities, tourism, etc. We want them to see how easy and convenient it is to connect with the things that matter in their lives. The emotive approach to communications generated positive feedback about the brand from which we can be able to leverage.

  1. Youth Month:

The objective behind our youth campaign is to attract young talent and future leaders to our organisation whilst building the key stakeholder pillar. Whilst showcasing the bursary we offer to students. The tactic here has been to profile young graduates and their success stories within the different departments of SANRAL.

  1. Bell MOU: SANRAL has embarked on partnerships with companies to promote SMME utilisation and access to equipment. The advertorial aimed to showcase the importance of the MOU as well as to encourage other entities to come forth and offer similar opportunities for SMMEs.
  2. PIARC 2018:

The World Road Association-PIARC was established in 1909. It brings together the road administrations of 122 governments and has members -individuals, companies, authorities and organizations- in over 140 countries. The purpose of this is to share knowledge and techniques on roads and road transportation SANRAL was awarded the contract to host and run the PIARC conference in Cape Town from 4th – 9th November 2018. It is an international conference that is attended by road agencies, engineers and other road entities. As part of the commitment to this committee SANRAL was required to produce communication that would be used to announce the date and venue for this conference, invite delegates to attend and share knowledge about their countries or ideas on how to make roads work better for road users. In addition to this, an opportunity was awarded to students to attend a hackathon over a weekend to develop a road app that could be launched to public to assist with road usage. This hackathon was promoted in publications and on line. Entities were also invited to display posters showcasing their business at the conference.

  1. Women’s Day:

As part of the Horizon 2030, SANRAL has committed to uplift and empower women in South Africa. 9th August is international women’s day and SANRAL wanted to show their appreciation and respect of women.

  1. Nelson Mandela Centenary:

The commemoration of Nelson Mandela was integrated into the four communication blocks which already inform SANRAL’s communication strategy. These are: marketing and advertising; owned media; internal communications; social media; media engagement; community outreach; stakeholder engagement; and partnerships with other government departments and SOEs.

  1. Albertina Sisulu Centenary:

The commemoration of Albertina Sisulu was integrated into the four communication blocks which already inform SANRAL’s communication strategy. These are: marketing and advertising; owned media; internal communications; social media; media engagement; community outreach; stakeholder engagement; and partnerships with other government departments and SOEs.

The commemorative adverts were done to profile the role played by this amazing female leader during the apartheid era as well as her contribution towards education and the upliftment of communities. The aim was for South Africans especially our youth, who are our future leaders, to find inspiration in ma Sisulu and her achievements as a leader, as a woman, a mother, a wife, a daughter and still being a mother to all. SANRAL worked together with the Sisulu family to respectfully pay homage to a great female leader.

  1. Road Safety 365: Road safety is still one of South Africa’s biggest challenges. Every year 1,24 million people die in the world due to road crashes. South Africa contributes to the highest number of injuries and fatalities due to crashes on the roads. 60% of these victims are young people between ages 15 – 35 years of age. In addition to the effect on the economy it robs the country of skills and future leaders and affects economic growth. Bad and irresponsible behavior cannot be changed without all stakeholders working together (i.e. DOT, roads entities, the public, civil society groups, schools and more). So, when we look at a SANRAL Road Safety Campaign, we look at it from a ‘partners’ view. We see it as SANRAL contributing to the fight against road crashes and fatalities in SA. We look at other campaigns that have the same objectives in mind – and then see how we can add a different voice, a different point of view – that may resonate with South Africans.

While other campaigns are focused on the Easter and Festive Season periods, SANRAL’s approach is that of a year-long campaign. When other campaigns use gory visuals and scare tactics to make their point, we look at a more emotional, more ‘adult’ approach but also relatable to different target audiences – hence the theme of the legacy left by parents for their kids. That as ‘adults’ we should be mindful of our actions as they may encourage the next generation of drivers to do as we do.

The objective of the campaign is to:

promote safe road practices and behaviour amongst South Africans when travelling on the roads throughout the year.

increase road user engagement and personalise the message to the road users.

encourage all road users to respect the rules of the road – they are there for your safety.

As we reframe ‘road safety’ in the hearts and minds of South Africans, we are also reminding them of the results of irresponsible behaviour on our roads. The legacy element even if you are not a parent but an aunt or uncle, your nieces and nephews also look up to you.

  1. FMS Toll Campaign: As an agency of the government, much like others, SANRAL is painted with the same brush of mistrust, corruption and lack of questionable leadership. The past and the looming elections thrusts SANRAL at the centre of the conversation as another agency that doesn’t have the interest of the people at heart. So much so that even the road users who advocated for and are compliant are starting to lose faith in being the only ones who continue to do the right thing.

The overall objective is therefore educational in nature to shift perceptions about the user-pays, user-benefits principle as a road funding method from negative to neutral and/or positive. The aim is to

To educate the South African public about tolling

Promote the user-pays, user-benefits principle as a sustainable model for funding SA roads

To build effective relations with media and other relevant stakeholders

Encourage increased voluntary compliance regarding e-tolls and reduce opposition thereto.

Tolling is ultimately about the consumer’s hard-earned money and therefore the focus of this campaign is on the consumer: ME, MY CAR, MY JOURNEY AND MY MONEY.

  1. Top Employer:

The Top Employers Institute is a global HR certification organization that enables employers to improve their HR practices and enhance the working environment for their employees. Established more than 25 years ago, this year the Top Employers Institute certified over 1 500 organizations in 118 countries. These Certified Top Employers positively impact the lives of over 5,000,000 employees globally.

SANRAL was certified a Top Employer for the ninth consecutive year by the Top Employers Institute. In the face of fierce competition for engineering skills, SANRAL seeks to attract and retain talent through good working conditions, skilled human resources management, and growing its own talent. The approach has yielded results. SANRAL has a staff turnover rate of just 2.5% a year.

It is for this reason that SANRAL advertised in the official publication of the Top Employers
Awards.

  1. Transport Month: Transport Month is hosted yearly in October. SANRAL is one of Department of Transports entities that supports the awareness and significance of this month, in highlighting infrastructure delivery and its effect on the development of South Africa’s communities. The month also advances the economic benefits of the sector.

The Minister officially launched the Mt Edgecombe interchange during this month. The aim of the advertising was to profile the interchange and its benefits for the community as the communities and road users were interested in the progress of this massive upgrade. At an investment of R1.1 billion rand the interchange is one of the largest projects undertaken by SANRAL in KwaZulu-Natal and is more than a masterpiece of award-winning architecture - it is a vital artery of the greater eThekwini metropolitan highway system and has greatly contributed to SMME development. This upgrade has forever changed the landscape, and will no doubt become a recognizable landmark.

  1. Ad hoc advertising: SANRAL manages a fiscal year planning calendar and plots out its themes to be communicated per month. The Ad hoc advertising is carried out when approached by publications and broadcasts that offer value for money as well as links to the theme’s planned for in the year.

c(ii) The performance is tracked using the industry performance planning tool that provides the performance of the campaign which is reach, frequency and impact for broadcast. The campaign was tracked against viewership statistics supplied from the performance. For print, readership and circulation figures are reviewed.

(d) The following is the monthly spend for television, print and radio to date.

2018/19 FISCAL YEAR

SPEND AND ANTICIPATED SPEND

APRIL

R0,00

MAY

R23 562 438,50

JUNE

R854 710,13

JULY

R200 001,90

AUGUST

R5 390 291,83

SEPTEMBER

R10 309 136,13

OCTOBER

R5 550 691,37

 

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

 

(a)(i) The Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) With reference to television, radio and newspaper

Adverts were flighted on radio and newspapers focusing on AARTO public awareness and education.

(ii) medium the adverts were flighted and/or printed,

The Bursaries were flighted on community radio stations and advertised on community newspapers.

Ministerial Imbizo adverts were flighted on community radio stations and community print newspapers

(b) dates when the adverts were printed and/or flighted,

1st August to 31st September 2018

15 -28 September 2018.

National Prayer day 10 October 2018 outside broadcast through Tembisa FM

26 October 2018 AARTO activation in Soweto, Maponya Mall

A Mandela centenary celebration done through print adverts and took place on the 1st to 18th July 2018

Albertina Sisulu centenary awareness campaign -1st to15th August 2018.

Traffic Reports on AARTO National Radio station- 15 September to 31st October 2018.

(c)(i) objectives for the adverts in each case and

The objective was to encourage potential first year’s students to apply for a bursary to study at a university of their choice. The focus was on Finance, Law and Road Traffic qualifications.

Ministerial Imbizo in Khayelitsha was focusing on AARTO and road safety education

To invite Ekurhuleni communities to the Agency’s flagship programme and to promote AARTO and road safety awareness

AARTO Mobile Office public awareness and educational drive. An Outside Broadcast was done via Jozi FM community radio station. The objective was to inform and invite the Soweto community to learn more about their rights and responsibility as prescribed by the AARTO Act.

To highlight the importance of education to the youth through the RTIA’s bursary scheme.

Albertina Sisulu centenary awareness campaign to highlight the role played by this stalwart in social cohesion. This print campaign was in line with motorists’ rights and responsibilities as prescribed in the AARTO Act.

Sponsoring AARTO Traffic Reports on National Radio station to educate motorists on AARTO Act.

(ii) how objectives measured in each instance and

The adverts are measured by the number of calls received in the call center and ratings reports from the media buyer from radio station on how many people were reached.

(d) what was the monthly spend on advertising?

Campaigns

Month of Placement

Amount

Bursary Recruitment Campaign

20 July 2018; 12 Aug – 18 Sept 2018

30 Seconds adverts

R 818 831.51

Ministerial Imbizo (Radio broadcast)

Sept – Oct

One week live reads

R 493 802.99

Ministerial Imbizo Print

21 Sept – Oct 2018

R 71 262.00

National Prayer Radio

14,19,21 &26 October 2018

R 179 978.00

Aarto Mobile Office Soweto Outreach

22-26 October One week live reads adverts

R 191 506.00

Mandela Campaign

13,18 & 22 July 2018

R 1 340 182.00

Mam Sisulu Campaign

8,12&14 August 2018

R 1 458 444.00

Traffic Reports

15 Sept – 30 Oct

30 Seconds Traffic sponsorship live reads

R 10 072348.68

TOTAL AMONUT

R 14 626 355.18

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

  1. (i) A public service announcement was made that deals with the challenges facing the railway

industry and the role that all stakeholders should play to ensure safer railways.

(ii)The announcement was flighted on SABC 1, 2, 3 and Cape Town TV.

  1. The adverts were flighted as follows:

Sales Area

Date

Time

Programme

SABC 1

2018/11/02

15h40

YOTV

 

2018/11/05

15h50

YOTV

 

2018/11/16

06H20

KIDS NEWS AND CURRENT AFFAIRS

 

2018/11/24

09H50

IMIZWILILI

 

2018/11/29

15H50

YOTV

SABC 2

2018/11/01

07H20

MORNING LIVE

 

2018/11/07

16h40

HECTIC NINE

 

2018/11/10

11H10

BLEACH

 

2018/11/14

16H40

HECTIC NINE

 

2018/11/26

07H10

MORNING LIVE

 

2018/11/28

07H40

MORNING LIVE

 

2018/11/30

06H50

MORNING LIVE

SABC 3

2018/11/02

12H50

MIAMI VICE S3

 

2018/11/05

13H40

ON POINT

 

2018/11/06

06H10

EXPRESSO

 

2018/11/11

10H10

ISIDINGO

 

2018/11/19

06H20

EXPRESSO

 

2018/11/26

06H40

EXPRESSO

 

2018/11/27

15H50

TOP BILLING

CAPE TOWN TV

SLOT

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

 

12/11/2018

13/11/2018

13/11/2018

14/11/2018

15/11/2018

16/11/2018

17/11/18

08:00 - 12:00

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

12:00 - 15:00

X

 

X

 

X

X

X

15:00 - 18:00

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

18:00 - 20:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20:00 - 22:00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22:00 - 00:00

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

  1. (i) The objectives for the adverts are to heighten awareness of rail safety and to communicate

that rail safety is everyone’s responsibility.

(ii) The campaign started on 1 November 2018 and will conclude on 30 November 2018. The

objectives have not been measured yet, but the reach will be measured at the end of the

month when the campaign ends.

  1. The amount spent on advertising is R299,000.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA):

  1. (i) Two television adverts with a new story line and incorporating progress that PRASA has

made since it was launched in 2009 and the rail modernisation programme.

Advert 1: We Do It for You

The purpose of “We Do It for You” campaign is about PRASA’s investment programme in transforming rail infrastructure and service delivery. It is designed to position rail as a backbone of public transport and mode of choice.

This is PRASA’s flagship programme highlighting:

  • Rolling Stock Fleet Renewal
  • Signalling System
  • Depot Modernisation
  • Station Modernisation
  • Station Upgrades / Improvement
  • 120km Programme

Advert 2: In the Future

The purpose of “In the Future” is to showcase how PRASA is delivering on its promise in reviving rail as the backbone of public transport in South Africa and a mode of choice. This campaign showcases the future of public transport and is designed to excite and prepare the commuter for the ultimate: A World Class Metro Service.

(ii) The adverts were flighted on television and radio

  1. The adverts were flighted on:
  1. Television – SABC 1, 2 and 3

Please refer to Annexure A and B for the TV Media Schedule

(18 November to 15 December 2017)

  1. Radio

5FM

Metro FM

Radio Sonder Grense

Ukhozi FM

Umhlobo Wenene

Lesedi FM

Thoblea FM

Motsweding FM

Please refer to Annexure C for the Radio Schedule (21 November 2017 to 4 December 2017)

  1. (i) The objectives for the adverts in each case were to:

Create awareness and affinity with the PRASA brand and its business imperatives;

Promote PRASA’s Modernisation Programme and Services;

Position rail as the backbone of public transport and mode of choice;

Build positive media and stakeholder relations and instil public trust; and

Promoting a sense of ownership of the assets (trains, stations and infrastructure) amongst commuters, communities and the public at large.

(ii) This was a once off campaign over the period of November and December 2017.

  1. The amount spent on advertising were as follow:

Television: R6,230,000 excluding VAT (Media cost for flighting on SABC 1,2, & 3)

Radio: R3,100,000 excluding VAT (Radio Sports)

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a)(i) In 2017/2018 there was no advertising, in 2018/2019 the advertising is as per the table below

(ii) The medium used were Print, Online and Inflight TV

(b) The dates are as per the media plan table above

(c)(i) The objectives per medium are listed below:

and (ii) the objectives were measured as follows;

(ii)(a) the correct target audience

(ii)(b) the reach of the publication

(ii)(c) the cost per insert

(d) what was the monthly spend on advertising?

 

Airports South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Renaming Advertising Spend

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Print- newspaper

Weekend Argus / Independent Newspapers

R53464.32

C/Times Monday, 28 May, C/Argus Wed, 30 May & Weekend Argus (26 & 27 May)

Number of name suggestions received

To create awareness of this meeting print and radio platforms were used.

Print-newspaper

Die Burger

R13415.36

Saturday, Die Burger 26 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

To create awareness of this meeting print and radio platforms were used.

Print-newspaper

Die Burger

R13415.36

Friday, 1 June 2018

Number of name suggestions received

To create awareness of this meeting print and radio platforms were used.

Print newspaper

16 community newspapers

R50434.78

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

To create awareness of this meeting print and radio platforms were used.

Radio Advertisements

Cape Talk / Prime Media

R57499.20

Tues, 29 May - 4 June 2018 (excl Sun 3 June)

Number of name suggestions received

To create awareness of this meeting print and radio platforms were used.

Radio Advertisements

Good Hope FM

R44640.00

Tues, 29 May - 4 June 2018 (excl Sun 3 June)

Number of name suggestions received

To create awareness of this meeting print and radio platforms were used.

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Print- newspaper

Diamond Fields

R3 847.54

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport & Kimberley Airport Renaming Suggestions

Print-newspaper

Cape Times

R10 006.66

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport & Kimberley Airport Renaming Suggestions

Print-newspaper

Daily Dispatch

R8 500.80

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport & Kimberley Airport Renaming Suggestions

Print newspaper

The Herald

R9 028.80

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport & Kimberley Airport Renaming Suggestions

Print newspaper

Sunday Times

R47 995.20

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport & Kimberley Airport Renaming Suggestions

Print newspaper

City Press

R47 995.20

23 May 2018

Number of name suggestions received

Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport & Kimberley Airport Renaming Suggestions

Airports Company South Africa OAG Award Adverts Advertising Spend

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Print- newspaper

Business Report National

R74 641.50

16, 18 & 20 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Print-newspaper

Isolezwe Ngesonto

R9 366.00

17 & 19 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Print-newspaper

Isolezwe Ngesonto

R17 087.00

15 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Print-newspaper

Financial Mail

R68 700

20 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Print newspaper

Sunday Times

R260 178.00

15 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

702

R32 524.86

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

KFM

R34 584.74

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

East Coast Radio

R42 941.12

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

Ukhozi Fm

R57 024.90

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

Kaya Fm

R22 045.40

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

Power Fm

R27 989.34

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

Metro Fm

R90 423.56

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Radio Advertisements

Cape Talk

R11 347.46

16 – 19 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Digital Platforms

Isolezwe Ngesonto

R20 000

16 July 2018

Home page Take Over, views & impressions

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Digital Platforms

Financial Mail

R20 000

19 July 2018

Home page Take Over, views & impressions

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Digital Platforms

Sunday Times

R30 000

17 & 23 July 2018

Home page Take Over, views & impressions

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Outdoor

R24 Freeway, O.R. Tambo International Airport

R137 724.00

15 July – 14 August 2018

Traffic volumes and billboard views

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Outdoor

St George’s hotel, R21 Freeway, enroute O.R.T & Pretoria

R38 203.44

15 July – 14 August 2018

Traffic volumes and billboard views

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Outdoor

Cape Town International Airport exit

R111 580.00

15 July – 14 August 2018

Traffic volumes and billboard views

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Outdoor

King Shaka International Airport Entrance

R100 598.40

15 July – 14 August 2018

Traffic volumes and billboard views

Airports Company South Africa’s OAG Award Recognition Campaign.

Airports Company South Africa’s 25th Birthday Celebration Advertising Spend

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Print- newspaper

Business Report

R24 880,50

23 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Print-newspaper

Isolezwe

R21 770,00

22 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Print-newspaper

Sunday Times

R260 178,00

22 July 2018

Publications Readership & Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration

Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

702

R16 262,43

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

East Coast

R21 470, 56

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

Ukhozi

R28 512,45

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

Kaya

R22 318,46

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

Metro

R45 211,18

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

Power

R13 994,67

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Radio Advertisements

Cape Talk

R5673, 73

23 July 2018

Radio Station Geographic Reach.

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads

Digital Platforms

Business Report

R30 000,00

17 - 23 July 2018

Home page Take Over, views & impressions

25 Years Celebration Campaign Ads – Home Page Take Over

Regional Airports Advertising Spend

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Print- newspaper

The Herald -Port Elizabeth

26 548.00

09 November 2018

Number of attendees at workshops

Invitation for SMMEs to attend ESD and SCM Workshops

Print-newspaper

Daily Dispatch

14 490.00

09 November 2018

Number of attendees at workshops

Invitation for SMMEs  to attend ESD and SCM Workshops

Print-newspaper

Idinga- George

3 100.00

09 November

2018

Number of attendees at workshops

Invitation for SMMEs to attend ESD and SCM workshops

Radio

Algoa FM

28 750.00

09 November – 13 November 2018

Number of attendees at workshops

Invitation for SMMEs to attend ESD and SCM workshops

Radio

Eden FM

8167.00

06 November -10 November 2018

Number of attendees at workshops

Invitation for SMMEs to attend ESD and SCM workshops

Cape Town International Airport Advertising Spend

Airport profiling

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Magazine

Western Cape Business

R39 350,00

2018 Edition

Inquiries received from passengers, business opportunity proposals and SED proposals.

To position the airport positively and to provide information about projects and opportunities.

Magazine

Hello magazine

R14 700,00

Mar-18

Inquiries received from passengers, business opportunity proposals and SED proposals.

To position the airport positively and to provide information about projects and opportunities.

Magazine

Mining Decisions

R46 000,00

Issue 01/2018

Inquiries received from passengers, business opportunity proposals and SED proposals.

To position the airport positively and to provide information about projects and opportunities.

Magazine

Leadership

R56 000,00

Feb-18

Inquiries received from passengers, business opportunity proposals and SED proposals.

To position the airport positively and to provide information about projects and opportunities.

Peak Season Campaign

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Radio Advertisements

Cape Talk / Prime Media

99 610.50

12- 20 January 18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Good Hope FM

149805,00

12-19 January 18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Heart FM

75036,00

12-19 January 18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Smile FM

99977,00

12 -21 January 18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Cape Times

29000,00

12-Jan-18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Cape Argus

36500,00

12-Jan-18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Weekend Argus

36500,00

13-Jan-18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and others.

To support operational requirements.

Radio Advertisements

Saturday Die Burger

38650,00

13-Jan-18

Facilitation time and efficiency of processes – ASQ survey results and various feedback received from passengers on social media platforms and other.

To support operational requirements.

ESD

Medium

Title

Cost

Date

Measure

Content/Objective

Radio Advertisements

Cape Talk / Prime Media

46 188.48

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Good Hope FM

56 385.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Heart FM

59 850.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Smile FM

50 388.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Bush Radio

11 242.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Radio Tygerberg

7 000.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Voice of the Cape

13 600.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Radio 786

8 000.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

Radio Zibonele

12 641.60

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Radio Advertisements

CCFM Radio

5 400.00

15 - 22 August 2018

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Print- newspaper

Cape Times / Argus & Weekend Argus

28 641.60

18 - 22 August 18

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Print- newspaper

Die Burger

13 424.00

22-Aug-18

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Print- newspaper

16 community newspapers (Independent)

34 977.60

22 & 23 August

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

Print- newspaper

Tygerburger (MEDIA 24) x14 areas

30 600.00

22-Aug

The amount of people who attended the roadshow, email feedback received

To create awareness of the roadshow and to ensure that smme’s attend and benefit from its content.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The table below outlines all television, radio and newspaper advertising done by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) since the beginning of the year. Further, the table outlines as per (a)(i), (ii),(b), (c)(i) (ii) (d): the objectives of the adverts, the media platform used to flight the adverts, the details of the flighted advert, the return on investment measurement criteria, as well as the total spend in each instance and for that particular month.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) Advertising: 1 January 2018 – 30 October 2018

Media platform

Dates

Objective

Details

Measurement

Monthly Spend (R)

Total

Television

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Radio

           

SAfm - Interviews

8 - 10 Aug 2018

Promote Global Aviation Gender Summit

The interviews were used to promote the Global Aviation Gender Summit, and South Africa as the first country to host such an event.

Media monitoring analytics. All were positive stories.

R41 079.15

R41 079.15

SAfm – Outside Broadcast

10 Aug 2018

Promote Global Aviation Gender Summit

To share the outcome of the summit and the way forward on the discussions held.

Media monitoring analytics. All were positive stories.

R239 700.00

R239 700.00

Publications

(Newspaper /Magazines)

           

African Decisions

Jan 2018

Promoting transformation

2 page feature which was promoting transformation in aviation.

Media monitoring analytics of the printed copy. The featured content was positive.

R46 388.4

R46 388.4

Women Magazine

(Leadership)

May 2018

Promoting women in leadership

8 page feature in which SACAA female executive members were featured as women in leadership.

Media monitoring analytics of the printed copy. The featured content was positive.

R34 595.00

R34 595.00

BMF Magazine (Sunday Times)

June 2018

Promoting transformation

2 page - feature which was promoting transformation in aviation and celebrating youth month.

Media monitoring analytics of the printed copy. The featured content was positive.

R77 625.00

R77 625.00

  • African Pilot,
  • World Airnews,
  • SA Flyer,
  • Global Aviator

July 2018

Launch of the Civil Aviation Industry Awards

Announcement and call for entries to the Civil Aviation Industry Awards.

Media monitoring analytics of the printed copy. The featured content was positive.

R55 033.25

R55 033.25

Pan African Parliament

Oct 2018

Promoting transformation

2 page feature which was promoting transformation in aviation.

Media monitoring analytics of the printed copy. The featured content was positive.

R84 246.70

R84 246.70

Total

R578 667.5

R578 667.5

Ports Regulator Of South Africa (PRSA)

a)(i) The Ports Regulator did not use television, radio nor newspapers for advertising purposes.

(b) N/A

(c)N/A

(d) N/A

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a) (i) Details of the advert:

Chief Financial Officer

(ii) Advertising Mediums

Sunday Times

City press

(b) Dates of advertising:

6 to 14 May 2018

(c) (i) What were the objectives for the adverts in each case?

The objective was to attract a wider pool of applicants

(ii) How were those objectives measured in each instance?

85 applications were received

(d) Monthly spend on advertising

Sunday Times

17 191.20

City Press

11 801.04

Vat

4 348.84

Total

33 341.08

06 December 2018 - NW3411

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the total number of (i) promotional buses, (ii) mobile offices and (iii) other such vehicles that are owned by (aa) his department and (bb) the entities reporting to him in each province, (b) what is the purpose of each specified vehicle in each instance, (c) how is the efficiency and effectiveness of each vehicle measured and (d) what costs are involved for each vehicle?

Reply:

Department

a) (i)(ii)(ii) The Department does not own such vehicles.

(aa)(b)(c)(d) Not applicable

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

a (i) Only 1 vehicle 3D, Air Traffic Control 3D Mobile Simulator (ii) None (iii) None (aa) N/A (bb) None (b) to provide awareness on air traffic control and associated equipment for (career awareness in Air Traffic Management), (c) Air Traffic Management and associated Aeronautical Engineering is rarely known. Awareness campaigns are improving the understanding of ATNS core business and Career Awareness to learners at schools. Number of schools visited or number of people who visited the simulator and shown the process (d) The Mobile Simulator was purchased at a price of R1,2 million. Other costs are operating costs (Fuel and tolls)

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (bb) The South African Civil Aviation Authority does not own any (i) promotional buses, (ii) mobile offices and (iii) other such vehicles. (aa) N/A (b) N/A (c) N/A (d) N/A.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa SOC Ltd (ACSA) does not own any promotional buses or mobile offices. It does however have operational vehicles that operate mostly on the airside of the airports. These would include the following:

Fire & Rescue vehicles that are used for any eventuality at the airports but more specifically to assist in event of aircraft emergencies. Depending on the Category of the airport the number of vehicles will differ to ensure that the appropriate volumes of water, foam and powder is available in the event of an incident.

Maintenance vehicles used for activities around the airport. ACSA does first line maintenance in-house in the areas of electrical and civil maintenance.

Marshalling vehicles used by staff assigned to guide aircraft into the parking bays. The number of vehicles differ per airport depending on the number of flights that need to be handled, ORTIA does just over 300 arriving aircraft per day.

Vehicles used by the training academy to transport staff to and from their place of work for regulated training.

All ACSA vehicles are properly marked with signage, strobe lights and all decals as per Aviation standards. The vehicles are therefore very visible and also tracked. A full vehicle management system is in place through which we manage the distance travelled per month, the average fuel consumption, damage to vehicles and areas of operation.

Cross-Border Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

(a)(i)(ii) The (bb) Cross-Border Road transport Agency (C-BRTA) does not own any promotional buses, mobile offices and (iii) any such vehicles (b), (c), and (d) are not applicable as no promotional buses, mobile offices and any such vehicles are owned by the C-BRTA.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a)(i)(ii) The (bb) Road Accident Fund (RAF) does not own any promotional buses, mobile offices and any such vehicles (b), (c), and (d) are not applicable as no promotional buses, mobile offices and any such vehicles are owned by the RAF.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a)(i)(ii) The (bb) Road Traffic Management Corporation does not own any promotional buses, mobile offices and any such vehicles (b), (c), and (d) are not applicable as no promotional buses, mobile offices and any such vehicles are owned by the RTMC.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a)The (bb) Road Traffic Infringement Agency does not onw any (i) promotional buses and (iii) such vihiches (ii) onws 05 AARTO Mobile Offices.

(b) The mobile offices bring all AARTO services to motorists; a road safety awareness drive in the form of a “Know Your Traffic Fine Status” campaign; The aim of the campaign is to assist raod users with tracking of their traffic fines and managing them; To advise motorists are also about available payments platforms such as banks, Post Office, Registering Authorities (RA’s) and Driving Licence Testing Centres (DLTC’s); The Points Demerit System; Enforcement Orders; Available options to an alleged infringer after receiving an infringement notice.

(c) The consolidated monthly statistics reports about members who have been assisted through the AARTO mobile offices; The mobile offices covers country wide communities (All Provinces); Payments can be made at in the mobile offices for those with outsatanding fines;

(d) Total costs for the 5 busses is R 27.7 million

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(a)(i)(ii) The South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) owns none of (i) promotional buses, (ii) mobile offices

(iii) Other Vehicles are Freeway Management Services provided on the Gauteng road network as part of GFIP:

23 Mobile Policing Vehicles (MPV) purchased in 2010 for Gauteng Freeway Improvement Projects (operated by the Department of Community Safety (GDCS).

10 Incident Response Units (IRUs),

10 Light Towing Recovery Units (LTRUs),

8 Heavy Towing Recovery Units (HTRUs),

6 Medical Response Units (MRUs), and

6 Motorcycle Medical Response Units (MMRUs)

(b) Mobile Payment Stations - The purpose of the mobile payment stations is to provide Customer Service to road users i.e. taking and receiving payments of E-Toll Accounts to Customers/E-toll users, and account registrations and do promotions on the GFIP network and to do joint Enforcement deployments with policing vehicles for number plate and other traffic offences.

Medical Response and Light and Heavy Towing

The primary responsibility of the IRUs is to respond to an incident, cordon off the scene and
ensure the safety of the motorist and victims.

The primary responsibility of the LTRUs and HTRUs are to remove stationary vehicles in or
overhanging a travel lane and take them to an area of the road network where traffic is not
obstructed.

The primary responsibility of the MRUs and MMRUs is to provide intermediate life support
services.

Mobile Policing Vehicles - The purpose of the Policing vehicles is to do normal traffic patrolling and enforcement deployments on the GFIP network.

(c) Efficiency and Effectiveness (MPS’s) - The Customer service deployments are measured in accordance with performance requirements set in the contract.

Efficiency and Effectiveness (Medical Response and Light and Heavy Towing)

Each category of vehicles (i.e. IRU, MRU/MMRU, L) have target response times. Example, the target response time for IRUs are less than 11.2 minutes.

The average response times to an incident of all IRUs in a month is calculated. Should the average response time be more than 11.2 minutes the Main Contractor is penalized (in terms on the monthly fee), similar if its less than 11.2 minutes the Main Contractor is rewarded.

The other categories of vehicles are measure similarly. Each have their own target response times.

Efficiency and Effectiveness (MPV’s) - The contractor is expected to provide a minimum of 18 operational vehicles per day to undertake roads safety and law enforcement activities in accordance with an agreed strategy.

(d) Costing (MPS’s)

Purchase cost of fully equipped vehicle = R1 471 254.00

Monthly Operations: Vehicle and equipment maintenance and operational costs are paid according to contracted payment rates. Average monthly cost of 10 Mobile payments stations is R376 000

Costing (Medical Response and Light and Heavy Towing)

Purchase cost of fully equipped vehicles:

    • LTRU: R7 038 500 (total cost for all 10 vehicles – 2011)
    • HTRU: R15 523 496 (total cost for all 8 vehicles – 2011)
    • IRU: R6 317 500 (total cost for all 10 vehicles – 2011)
    • MRU/MMRU: R323 800 (total cost for all 6 vehicles – 2011)

Operation and Maintenance per month (operations, maintenance of vehicles, staffing, travel kilometers, replacement of emergency equipment as and when required)

    • LTRU: R500 000 (fully inclusive – all costs as described above for all the vehicles, 2010)
    • HTRU: R640 000 (fully inclusive – all costs as described above for all the vehicles, 2010)
    • IRU: R700 000 (fully inclusive – all costs as described above for all the vehicles, 2010)
    • MRU/MMRU: R768 000 (fully inclusive – all costs as described above for all the vehicles, 2010)

Costing (MPV’s)

Purchase cost of fully equipped vehicle = R229 751.00 per vehicle (2010)

Operational Costs - Average monthly cost of 23 Mobile police vehicles is R475 000

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR):

a) (i) The RSR does not own any promotional buses

(ii) The RSR does not own any mobile offices

(iii) The RSR does not own any other such vehicles

b) Not applicable. Refer to (a) (i) – (iii)

c) Not applicable. Refer to (a) (i) – (iii)

d) Not applicable. Refer to (a) (i) – (iii)

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA):

a) (i) PRASA does not own any promotional buses

(ii) PRASA does not own any mobile offices

(iii) PRASA does not own any other such vehicles

b) Not applicable. Refer to (a) (i) – (iii)

c) Not applicable. Refer to (a) (i) – (iii)

d) Not applicable. Refer to (a) (i) – (iii)

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (i) The Ports Regulator does not own promotional buses, (ii) No mobile offices, (iii) No other such vehicles. (bb) The Ports Regulator does not have provincial offices as there’s only one office in the country.
  2. N/A
  3. N/A
  4. N/A

South African Maritime Safety Authority(SAMSA)

The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) response is as follows:

Total number

Question (a) (i)

Description Question (a) (ii)

Costs of vehicles (2016/2017 financial year) Question (a) (iii)

Costs of (2017/2018 financial year) Question (a) (iii)

Costs of vehicles

(2018/2019 financial year) Question (a) (iii)

What is the purpose of each of the specified vehicles Question (b)

5

         
 

Toyota Hilux SC 2.7 VVTI RB SX

R315 000.01

   

Transporting of staff and official passengers, collecting and delivering of parcels and documents at various places; travelling to training venues, meetings and other official matters, travelling to places to inspect/survey vessels and investigate incidents, travelling to oil pollution incidents

 

Toyota Corolla 1.6 Prestige x 2

 

R275 617.80

 

Transporting of staff, Board Members and official passengers, collecting and delivering of parcels and documents at various places; travelling to training venues, meetings and other official matters, travelling to places to inspect vessels and investigate incidents

 

Toyota Corolla 1.6 Prestige

 

R275 617.80

 

Transporting of staff, Board Members and official passengers, collecting and delivering of parcels and documents at various places; travelling to training venues, meetings and other official matters, travelling to places to inspect vessels and investigate incidents

 

Ford Ranger Wildtrack 3.2 TDCI Double Cab

 

R507 143.82

 

Transporting of staff and official passengers, collecting and delivering of parcels and documents at various places; travelling to training venues, meetings and other official matters, travelling to places to inspect/survey vessels and investigate incidents, travelling to oil pollution incidents

 

Toyota Hilux 4.0 V6 D/C 4x4 Raider Automatic

   

R395 748.26

Transporting of staff and official passengers, collecting and delivering of parcels and documents at various places; travelling to training venues, meetings and other official matters, travelling to places to inspect/survey vessels and investigate incidents, travelling to oil pollution incidents

06 December 2018 - NW3322

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) duration of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

Department

a) The Department did not award any tender or contract to the companies (names and details furnished) during the period from 1 January 2009 to 30 September 2018.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(b)(i) Vox Telecommunications: For the Provision of a budgeting, forecasting and reporting tool for ATNS

(ii)(aa) value - R 3, 829,135.40 VAT Exclusive.

(bb) Once off

(iii) Bid Adjudication Committee and contract was signed by Achmed Wadee (Chief Information Officer) in the year 2016.

(iv) Yes

Airports South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(b)(i) Supplier and Services Provided

From the list provided, ACSA has only awarded contracts to Vox Telecommunication. The rest of the suppliers listed have not been awarded contracts over the period stipulated. Vox Telecommunications provided various IT Connectivity Services

(b)(ii)(aa) Total Value of Business Awarded

2008/2009

454 963,01

2009/2010

790 883,62

2010/2011

881 159,22

2011/2012

798 161,99

2012/2013

555 392,22

2013/2014

391 813,83

2014/2015

302 805,09

2015/2016

42 000,00

Grand Total

4 217 178,98

(b)(iii) Awards Approvals

The awards were approved in line with stipulated ACSA DLA’s for the periods covered.

(b)(iv) National Treasury Regulations

Yes, the process followed National Treasury procurement guidelines.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a) Not applicable (b), out of all the companies named, Vox Telecommunications is the only company that was awarded a contract by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) . The table below provide further details relating to the following portions of the Parliamentary Question: (i) services provided, (ii) (aa) the value of the contract, and (bb) duration of the contract, (iii) approval pertaining to the contract and (iv) whether the contract was done in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) information relating to tender(s) awarded after 01 January 2009 to specific companies as named in Parliamentary Question Number: 3322

Name of company

Services provided

Duration of the contact

Tender approval

Were National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines followed when awarding the tender?

Value of the contract

Vox Telecommunications

(2011/000797/07)

Internet and Mail Hosting Solution

01 December 2016

until

30 November 2021

(Five years)

In line with SACAA procurement processes and policies, the Bid Adjudication Committee, Bid Evaluation Committee, Director of Civil Aviation (CEO), the Board’s Procurement Oversight Committee, and the Board respectively played their part in the approval process.

The SACAA confirms that the tender process complied with all National Treasury and organisational procedures and guidelines. The Tender was also vetted by Internal audit as per section 3.5 of the National Treasury Instruction Note on Enhancing Compliance Monitoring and Improving transparency and accountability in SCM on Auditing of bidding processes for bids in excess of R 10 million (all applicable taxes included).

R17 121 910.46

(Seventeen million one hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and ten rand and forty six cents)

Total

R17 121 910.46

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

(b) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency awarded a contract to Vox Telecommunications in 2014.

(i) The service that was provided by Vox Telecommunications to the C-BRTA was for a Right Fax solution

(ii) (aa) The value of the contract was R56 220.24 (bb) The duration of the contract was once off installation in 2014

(iii) The contract was approved by the Chief Financial Officer in line with the C-BRTA’s Supply Chain Management delegations (iv) Yes, the contract was in line with all the National Treasury and C-BRTA procurement guidelines.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) The Road Accident Fund awarded contracts and/or tenders to the following companies from 1 January 2009 up to 31 October 2018: Vox Telecommunication

(i) the service provided was,

(ii) (aa) value of the tender and/or contract was

(bb) duration

(iii) approved by

and (iv) the tender and/or contract was in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines

Right Fax

R2 878 090.00

3 years

Date signed: 2013-03-14

ACEO

Yes

Right Fax

R 1 090 774.80

1 Year

Date signed: 2016-09-08  

ACEO

Yes

Fax solution

R9 593 996.15

5 years

Date signed: 2017-11-20

ACEO

Yes

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(b) The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) did not awarded a contract and/or tender to Vox Telecommunications from 1 January 2009 up to date.

(i) Not applicable

(ii) (aa) (bb) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(b) The Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) did not awarded a contract and/or tender to Vox Telecommunications from 1 January 2009 up to date.

(i) Not applicable

(ii) (aa) (bb) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

South African Road Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(b) The South African Road Agency Limited did not awarded a contract and/or tender to Vox Telecommunications from 1 January 2009 up to date.

(i) Not applicable

(ii) (aa) (bb) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

b) The Ports Regulator did not award any contracts/tenders to any company as per the atatched list to the question from 1 January 2009 up to 09 November 2018. (i) N/A, (ii) N/A, (iii) N/A, (iv) N/A.

c) South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

The South African Maritime Safety Authority did not award any contracts/tenders to any company as per the atatched list to the question from 1 January 2009 up to 09 November 2018. (i) N/A, (ii) N/A, (iii) N/A, (iv) N/A.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR):

(b)

Name of supplier

Contract / Tender

(i)

Service Provided

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

     

(aa)

(bb)

   

Vox Telecommunications (2011/000797/07)

Yes

Provision of maintenance, support and management of wide area network infrastructure

R4,184,661-84

36 months

CEO

Yes

Passenger Rail Agency of South Afrcia (PRASA):

(b)

Name of supplier

Contract / Tender

(i)

Service Provided

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

     

(aa)

Value

(bb)

Duration

   

DCD Group (2006/037611/07)

Yes

  • Supply and delivery of composition brake blocks for the Metrorail and Shosholoza Meyl train fleet
  • Ad-hoc repairs, call out and technical support for Shosholoza Meyl in Gauteng region

R17,959,667

R22,000,000

1 August 2012 to 31 December 2014

1 April 2014 to 30 June 2019

Approved by PRASA

Approved by PRASA

(all work relating to ad-hoc suppliers was cancelled on 30 June 2016)

The ad-hoc contracts were found to be irregular by the Auditor General during the audit of the 2015/16 financial year as they were procured through a confinement process. The irregular expenditure has since been disclosed in the subsequent financial years ending March 2017 and 2018. PRASA is busy with and open tender process for this work.

06 December 2018 - NW3539

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why has the Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town link been closed, (b) by what date will the link be re-opened and (c) what alternatives are in place?

Reply:

a) On 28 January 2018, a delivery truck struck a descending boom at the level crossing. The force of the accident sent the boom crashing into a 3,000 volts overhead power supply with disastrous consequences. The powerful current rippled down the line, destroying three relay rooms (cabins) in its wake. The damage affected both the automated signaling system and the operation of the boomed level crossings.

b) The line was re-opened end of April 2018.

c) During extended closures the train shuttle is replaced by a bus shuttle.

05 December 2018 - NW3542

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How are trains, coaches and locomotives transported via any rail that is not electrified, (b) for how long has this been the situation in each case, (c) what are the costs in each case, (d) what are the future plans for the rail lines and (e) what are the timelines, timeframes and deadlines in this regard in each case?

Reply:

a) All lines where Metrorail trains are running, are electrified and this is done through electric motor coaches with plain trailers (coaches without motor unit). The only exception is the Eastern Cape services in East London and Port Elizabeth. Here the plain trailers (coaches) are pulled with diesel locomotives.

Mainline Passenger Services coaches (sleepers and sitter coaches) are pulled with diesel locomotives.

b) The status of these lines is as it were since the start of the South African Rail Commuter Corporation. Transnet can provide exact details.

c) The cost for diesel in MLPS was R33,964m for 2017/18 and for Eastern Cape Metrorail R39,158m for the same period.

d) PRASA does not own the lines which are not electrified and therefore cannot respond on this.

e) Not applicable for PRASA.

05 December 2018 - NW3414

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) maintenance and infrastructure upgrade plans are in place for the rail tracks that run through Pinetown and surroundings areas, (ii) are the timeframes in this regard and (iii) budget has been allocated and (b) what (i) plans are there to implement additional lightening and security, (ii) are the timeframes in this regard and (iii) budget has been allocated for this?

Reply:

a) (i) Specifications for the replacement of corroded rails have been approved and a tender is expected to be issued in January 2019. Appointment of the supplier is planned for the first quarter of the 2019/20 financial year.

As part of the KZN Re-Signalling Project, all stations from Pinetown to Bellair were recently signalled and commissioned.

(ii) Timeframes for replacement of the rails will be seven months from date of delivery of the rails.

(iii) The total amount of is R103 million has been prioritised from the MTEF capital allocation in the region.

b) (i) The Pinetown line has additional lighting and security in the main stations with no permanent security but has high volumes of commuters and high crime hot spot. PRASA did a full renovation of stations including halts on the line, during 2016/17 and repaired them again in the 2017/18 financial year.

(ii) This is a going maintenance activity with no timelines.

(iii) The cost estimated to repair the vandalized electrical work amounts to R280,000 for Seaview Station and R650,000 for Sarnia Station. The budget for security on this line is R136,000 per month.

05 December 2018 - NW3540

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What research, analysis or any other type of data-gathering exercise has been undertaken on the current state, needs analysis and upgrade requirements of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa train stations, (b) on what dates were the specified exercises done, (c) what were the outcomes of the exercises at each station, (d) who undertook the exercises, (e) what plans have been put in place as a result of the findings of the exercises, (f) who will undertake the specified plans and (g) what are the timelines, timeframes and deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

a) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), manages its property portfolio through its property management division; Corporative Real Estate Solutions (CRES). PRASA CRES has five (5) regional offices located in Eastern Cape, Western Cape, KwaZulu Natal, Gauteng South and Gauteng North.

Regional offices conduct, on a periodic basis, station condition assessment to achieve and maintain acceptable levels of compliance and functionality of the Railway stations facilities. The assessments include ongoing visual assessments for cleanliness, safety compliance and functionality particularly for Super and Core railway stations as these stations carry the highest commuter numbers.

b) Consolidated data relating to dates and outcomes on condition assessments is attached as Annexure A for Super and core stations.

c) Consolidated data relating to dates and outcomes on condition assessments is attached as Annexure A for Super and core stations.

d) Refer to the response in (a).

e) Station improvements, Preventative and Corrective maintenance plans have been put in place by the respective CRES regional offices in line with established programmes.

f) The Station improvements, Preventative and Corrective maintenance plans are executed by the respective CRES regional offices.

g) Planned timelines vary for each of the programmes (Station Improvements, Preventative and Corrective Maintenance) depending on the size and scale of work required for each of the station projects).

05 December 2018 - NW3489

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What number of road users in each month since 1 December 2013 until the present have paid e-toll accounts in relation to the total number of road users on the roads where the Gauteng e-tolling system is operative, as regards (i) the total numbers and (ii) percentages of (aa) paying road users and (bb) the total number of road users and (b) what are the particulars regarding the total amount of the monthly income generated in each month by the e-tolling system in the specified period that is paid to a certain company (name specified) and/or any other foreign firm/service provider and what amount remains in South Africa; (2) whether any plans exist to extend the e-tolling system to other roads in Gauteng or in any other provinces; if not, whether he regards the non-extension of the e-tolling system as an indication that the system has failed; if so, what are the full relevant particulars regarding the roads and timelines of the planned extension of the system; (3) whether any standards regarding legal metrological technical regulations have been created for the e-tolling instrumentation and technical system in terms of the of the Legal Metrology Act, Act 9 of 2014; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant particulars in this regard and (b) whether the e-tolling measuring instruments were verified accordingly and comply with the requirements; if so what are the full particulars in respect of the date on which it took effect; (4) whether regular inspection is required; if not what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant particulars of the verification; (5) whether the e-tolling measuring instruments were imported legally in terms of the previous Act, the Trade Metrology Act, Act 77 of 1973, or any other relevant legislation; if not, how did it happen that unverified instruments were imported and taken into use; if so, what are the full relevant particulars?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) Road use on Gauteng e-tolling system is measured in terms of total individual transactions at all Toll Gantry locations. Please see table below for the Transactions Paid (aa) versus the Total Transactions (bb) in a month.

(a) (ii) Road use on Gauteng e-tolling system is measured in terms of total individual transactions at all Toll Gantry locations. Please see table below for the Paid % in a month.

Transactions

Paid Transactions

Total Transactions

Paid %

Dec-13

20,785,542

53,003,201

39%

Jan-14

25,079,987

60,093,598

42%

Feb-14

26,308,532

61,275,089

43%

Mar-14

27,772,020

66,566,742

42%

Apr-14

27,670,060

66,005,652

42%

May-14

28,840,313

69,524,695

41%

Jun-14

27,620,694

68,070,263

41%

Jul-14

28,864,702

73,105,125

39%

Aug-14

28,346,546

73,710,373

38%

Sep-14

27,176,734

72,779,790

37%

Oct-14

28,448,201

78,214,190

36%

Nov-14

25,969,036

74,337,111

35%

Dec-14

21,328,075

67,223,456

32%

Jan-15

22,400,799

69,249,776

32%

Feb-15

22,931,526

71,629,658

32%

Mar-15

24,244,365

80,003,523

30%

Apr-15

21,394,927

72,664,902

29%

May-15

23,036,505

76,951,582

30%

Jun-15

22,909,536

74,975,032

31%

Jul-15

25,301,965

80,642,609

31%

Aug-15

24,467,085

77,919,932

31%

Sep-15

26,697,723

77,605,567

34%

Oct-15

27,938,500

82,326,471

34%

Nov-15

27,054,182

80,290,924

34%

Dec-15

23,624,266

72,805,287

32%

Jan-16

24,573,362

73,257,559

34%

Feb-16

26,733,544

79,066,173

34%

Mar-16

26,402,052

80,007,973

33%

Apr-16

26,275,066

79,992,761

33%

May-16

27,621,133

82,293,707

34%

Jun-16

27,063,279

80,464,054

34%

Jul-16

27,157,391

83,677,522

32%

Aug-16

26,707,601

82,447,442

32%

Sep-16

27,443,254

85,039,339

32%

Oct-16

27,197,586

85,772,379

32%

Nov-16

27,259,360

85,106,234

32%

Dec-16

22,657,693

75,664,235

30%

Jan-17

23,358,303

75,596,764

31%

Feb-17

24,063,244

77,147,835

31%

Mar-17

26,886,316

86,732,583

31%

Apr-17

23,129,194

77,126,837

30%

May-17

26,482,251

86,221,226

31%

Jun-17

25,152,145

82,555,665

30%

Jul-17

26,020,789

87,141,156

30%

Aug-17

26,222,692

87,224,633

30%

Sep-17

25,075,823

85,216,222

29%

Oct-17

26,054,251

88,279,240

30%

Nov-17

25,815,329

87,712,942

29%

Dec-17

21,374,274

77,973,117

27%

Jan-18

22,191,182

78,445,802

28%

Feb-18

22,743,772

79,692,925

29%

Mar-18

23,751,346

85,614,183

28%

Apr-18

22,216,963

81,085,686

27%

May-18

24,143,853

87,426,578

28%

Jun-18

23,063,671

84,761,844

27%

Jul-18

23,567,230

87,581,258

27%

Aug-18

23,303,900

87,920,771

27%

(b) Please see table below that reflects the projected cashflow and actual cash receipts from account holders. All payments are deposited into SANRAL’s bank accounts which are audited by the Auditor General. The toll operator was appointed through an open tender process. It is a locally registered company with local and international shareholding. SANRAL is not privy to the agreements with their shareholders and the handling of losses and/or profits. The toll operator is compensated in terms of their tendered rates for services provided under the contract and does not receive a share of the toll revenue. To render the required services under the contract, they currently employ 1029 people of which 1024 or 99.5 % are South Africans.

Month

Actual Income

Forecast Income

Dec-13

R63 455 430

R37 290 000

Jan-14

R98 610 974

R66 670 000

Feb-14

R94 017 402

R74 430 000

Mar-14

R107 586 423

R93 930 000

Apr-14

R113 428 985

R85 050 000

May-14

R116 865 284

R114 310 000

Jun-14

R119 516 621

R117 530 000

Jul-14

R108 740 225

R131 280 000

Aug-14

R100 003 412

R137 480 000

Sep-14

R87 741 205

R124 390 000

Oct-14

R75 199 510

R68 400 000

Nov-14

R64 871 679

R57 000 000

Dec-14

R72 350 461

R34 200 000

Jan-15

R44 962 429

R45 600 000

Feb-15

R61 398 683

R45 600 000

Mar-15

R67 672 141

R45 600 000

Apr-15

R60 816 286

R45 600 000

May-15

R75 717 000

R45 600 000

Jun-15

R77 980 230

R54 735 730

Jul-15

R81 557 505

R54 735 730

Aug-15

R73 530 822

R119 586 705

Sep-15

R59 411 220

R60 000 000

Oct-15

R63 583 365

R60 000 000

Nov-15

R71 546 170

R60 000 000

Dec-15

R61 356 654

R115 000 000

Jan-16

R86 241 110

R135 000 000

Feb-16

R66 470 717

R145 000 000

Mar-16

R80 287 535

R105 000 000

Apr-16

R125 000 000

R130 000 000

May-16

R110 658 054

R101 000 000

Jun-16

R65 330 000

R101 000 000

Jul-16

R62 223 000

R101 000 000

Aug-16

R61 276 860

R101 000 000

Sep-16

R68 100 000

R101 000 000

Oct-16

R71 400 000

R101 000 000

Nov-16

R72 461 000

R65 000 000

Dec-16

R30 802 706

R65 000 000

Jan-17

R84 825 000

R65 000 000

Feb-17

R55 325 172

R65 000 000

Mar-17

R66 466 277

R65 000 000

Apr-17

R64 327 952

R69 000 000

May-17

R56 013 668

R86 000 000

Jun-17

R59 142 222

R65 000 000

Jul-17

R68 459 234

R65 000 000

Aug-17

R57 787 465

R65 000 000

Sep-17

R59 443 095

R65 000 000

Oct-17

R72 781 413

R65 000 000

Nov-17

R68 702 155

R65 000 000

Dec-17

R16 548 442

R65 000 000

Jan-18

R84 302 761

R65 000 000

Feb-18

R61 735 537

R65 000 000

Mar-18

R56 577 112

R65 000 000

Apr-18

R63 421 845

R65 000 000

May-18

R62 028 447

R65 000 000

Jun-18

R46 545 853

R65 000 000

Jul-18

R73 700 653

R65 000 000

Aug-18

R39 851 834

R65 000 000

Sep-18

R50 364 399

R65 000 000

2. The current phase of the Gauteng Open Road Tolling (GORT) project was the first phase of approximately 200km. An additional 150 km of new freeways were envisaged as part of the next phases of the GFIP.

The roll-out of new freeways in Gauteng is dependent on the Government’s final decision on the infrastructure funding mechanism, including that of e-tolling for any further extension in Gauteng and in the other provinces.

The of the roads and timelines will become clear once Government has decided on infrastructure funding mechanism as indicated in above.

(3) Interim requirements have been developed and accepted by the acting CEO of the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications in accordance with Section 22 (2) (c) of the Legal Metrology Act.

(a) Contained in the interim requirements of the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications for more detail (Copy can be provided if required).

(b) The equipment has been type approved in accordance with the interim requirements and a type approval certificate was issued on 16 May 2018 after conclusion of the type approval process.

(4) The measuring instruments are subject to regular verification at periods not exceeding 12 months (refer to the Interim technical requirements for further detail). It is noted that initial verification was successfully completed as part of the type approval process.

(5) The instruments were imported legally. There were no requirements published as technical regulations for the type of equipment that are used on the GFIP gantries in terms of the Trade Metrology Act and initially the equipment was not considered to fall within the ambit of the Trade Metrology Act. After the new act was published, SANRAL discussed the way the equipment operates with the NRCS and the agreed process as described above in paragraph (3) and (4) was developed.

05 December 2018 - NW3532

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2257 on 28 August 2018, the process of installing security cameras at the East London Airport open parking lot B – Long Term has been completed; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the (i) installation be completed and (ii) parking lot be reopened; if so, (aa) on what date was the installation completed and (bb) why has the parking lot not yet been reopened?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) Installations have been requested and are being processed. It requires new cable ways to be provided which was not in the original scope hence the delays.

(b)(i) Camera installations will be completed before the end of the financial year.

(ii) Parking is technically reopened for peak days only when capacity runs out. The official re-opening will be done, as the airport has had 3-meter-high fences installed. Foot patrols have been improved by adding in 6 security officers which can suffice until the cameras have been installed.

(aa) and (bb) Plans are underway to officially reopen the parking before the December 2018 school holiday 2018.

05 December 2018 - NW3538

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What relationship do Airports Company South Africa and the SA Civil Aviation Authority have at the airport in Nelspruit, (b) what memorandums of understanding (MOUs) are in place and (c) which parties signed these MOUs?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a)  The SACAA has issued aerodrome licences to two airports in Nelspruit, namely (i) Nelspruit Municipal Airport and (ii) Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport. SACAA has an oversight obligation over these airports in terms of the mandate conferred by the Civil Aviation Act, No 13 of 2009. The SACAA must ensure that airports comply with the requirements of the Civil Aviation Regulations as promulgated.

b) There are no MoU’s in place between the SACAA and Airports Company South Africa in relation to the two airports referred to under (a).

c) Not Applicable

05 December 2018 - NW3517

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply to question 625 on 29 March 2017, what (a) was the total number of accidents that occurred on the N1 between Bela-Bela and Polokwane (i) in the 2017-18 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the total number of persons who were killed in each case, (c) were the causes of each fatal accident and (d) actions did his department take to ensure that (i) road users abide by all road rules and (ii) number of fatal accidents is drastically reduced?

Reply:

a) Total number of accidents that occurred on the N1 between Bela-Bela and Polokwane

(i) As from 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 there were = 102 Fatal crashes

(ii) Since 1 April 2018 there were = 69 Fatal crashes

b) The total number of persons who were killed in each case

(i) As from 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 there were = 178 Fatalities

(ii) Since 1 April 2018 = 134 Fatalities

c) Causes of fatal crashes

Most of the fatal crashes occurred due to the following crash types:

i. Single vehicles overturned

ii. Head-on

iii. Accident with pedestrian

iv. Head-rear

d) Actions taken by the department

(i) road users abide by all road rules - The Department through the RTMC has deployed traffic officers on the route in support of efforts that have been put in place by the Limpopo Province. This is to ensure visibility as deterrent but also to enforce traffic laws and regulations. The focus is on the following offences: speed, seat belt, overload, cell phones and reckless and negligent driving amongst others.

In addition to this, the RTMC has also intensified its road safety education and awareness programmes on the said route. These includes, amongst others, having activations at the taxi ranks targeting drivers and passengers before they embark on their journey, educational road blocks, handing out information pamphlets at the tollgates, and information exhibitions that encourage road user behaviour change.

(ii) Reduce number of fatal accidents -Based on the absolute figures, there is a slight reduction in the number of fatal crashes and fatalities when comparing the two (2) financial years (2016/17 and 2017/18).

05 December 2018 - NW3595

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What are the names of the contractors employed by the SA National Roads Agency Ltd to construct the N1 - 27: Polokwane Eastern Ring-Road Phase 2, (b) why did this important contract (details furnished) come to a halt, (c) on what date did the project start, (d) on what date was it halted, (e) what is the total cost of the project and (f) what total amount had already been paid to the contractors of the project as at the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) whether the contract includes any penalties for late completion; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) will this project be completed; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Basil Read Limited

(b) Contract NRA N.001-270-2013/1: NATIONAL ROUTE 1 SECTION 27: THE POLOKWANE EASTERN RING-ROAD PHASE 2 : NEW CONSTRUCTION AND IMPROVEMENTS BETWEEN KM 10.5 AND KM 25.4

The project came to a halt because Basil Read Limited fell into severe cash flow difficulties early in 2018 and went into voluntary Business Rescue on 15 June 2018 in terms of applicable legislation.

(c) Commencement date was 1 December 2015.

(d) Halted on 15 June 2018.

(e) Total cost of the construction at award was R 561 919 579.46 excluding Contingencies, Contract Price Adjustment, Rise and Fall, and VAT.

(f) R 403 000 000.00 excluding VAT. Up to end October 2018.

2. Yes, the original contract includes penalties of R80 000 per day excluding VAT for late completion. Penalities become applicable only after the contractural end date has been reached.

3. Yes, the Project will be completed. Under Business Rescue Legislation SANRAL has to provide Basil Read Limited with the opportunity to complete the construction. However if the Business Rescue process fails, SANRAL will follow the contractural procedures and engage with with the guarantor to step-in and make sure that the Project is completed successfully.

 

22 November 2018 - NW3397

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What is the reason for the non-completion of the road widening project on the N2 North bound between Ballito and Stanger and (b) by what date (i) was the project supposed to be completed and (ii) will the project be completed; (2) (a) What amount (i) has been spent to date on the construction of the specified road, (ii) has been spent to date on safety measures for motorists including onsite personnel and (iii) is required to complete the project and (b) have any charges been laid against the contractor(s) who did not complete the road construction; (3) Has each company that was involved in the project been blacklisted; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the previous contractor(s), including the (a) name and (b) identity number of each director?

Reply:

  1. (a) Nyoni Projects was appointed through open tender process on 23 February 2016 to complete the roadworks at both the Mhlali and Mvoti River crossings, with an estimated completion date of 22 February 2017. The Contractor had experienced significant cashflow problems and went into business rescue on 3rd October 2017. After various meetings between Nyoni Projects, the Business Rescue Practitioner and SANRAL, SANRAL terminated the Nyoni Projects contract on 14th February 2018 after their liquidation. SANRAL had requested National Treasury to approve a deviation to appoint the second lowest tenderer. National Treasury did not approve this, but instead approved that all previous tenderers be invited to submit a price to complete the outstanding works. This process has since started to source the service providers to complete the project.

(b) (i) 22 February 2017

(ii) A date has not been set since the new contractor has not yet been appointed due to unresolved matters with National Treasury. A total of ten months is required to complete the works.

(2) (a) (i) R15 678 620.13 (Excl. VAT)

(ii) For nine months from February 2018 until October 2018, a total of R 562,962.00 (Excl. VAT)

(iii) Latest estimate R65 764 304.37 (Excl. VAT)

(b) As the construction company has been liquidated, the Performance Guarantee to value of R5.7 million was paid by the guarantor to SANRAL for the non-performance by the contractor in fulfilling his obligations to complete the contract.

3. As indicated the company Nyoni Projects (Pty) Ltd has been liquidated and are no longer in existence.

(a) The directors of Nyoni Projects (Pty) Ltd were Macloud Nyoni (Managing), Sibongile Nyoni (Financial), Gugulethu Samantha Nyoni

(b) Identity Numbers:

Macloud Nyoni (Managing) - 660313 5567 084

Sibongile Nyoni (Financial) - 670928 0895 082

Gugulethu Samantha Nyoni - 920601 0812 083

22 November 2018 - NW3415

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) On what date were the online services for (i) learner drivers and (ii) license applicants introduced, (b) where was the service introduced, (c) how does his department measure the success of the system and (d) what are the findings regarding the performance of the system thus far?

Reply:

(a) The Pilot project for (i) learner drivers and (ii) license applicants was launched on 30 August 2018

(b) At Centurion Driving Licence Testing Centre (DLTC), Tshwane. The service was the rolled out to other DLTCs from 01 September 2018.

(c) The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), one of the entities in my Department, monitors the success through daily reports of the number of slots booked online versus the number of slots of walk-in applicants. Further thereto the RTMC in close co-operation with the Gauteng Department of Transport, monitors the calls logged via its 24-hour call centre and addresses issues raised as soon as practically possible - although the majority of these calls were resolved by guiding the applicant through the process.

Since the end of September (30 days after the introduction of the service), the number of slots booked online has exceeded the walk-in applicants daily.

(d) The system has a 99.99% uptime and availability and there are always slots available throughout the Gauteng province, albeit it might not be at the applicant’s most preferred DLTC.

22 November 2018 - NW3333

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

1. Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2618 on 7 September 2017, he was informed of the proposed plan in due course to close the roads adjacent to the entrances of O R Tambo International Airport to the public because of security considerations; if not, what are the relevant details of the plan, including (a) the full explanation of the plan and concomitant periods of time, (b) the legal grounds on which the execution of the plan is based, (c) any traffic, social and economic impact studies undertaken in this regard, (d) any public participation opportunities in which role players were offered the chance to make inputs and (e) any workable alternatives for (i) travellers who will be affected by the intended plan and (ii) businesses conducting parking services from the specified airport; 2. Whether he has been informed that the Airports Company South Africa (Acsa) has been in contact with the SA National Airport Parking Association (Sanapa) and that Acsa has given Sanapa an undertaking to participate in the process regarding the proposed road closures; (3) Whether he has been informed of the current form of intimidation being conducted against parking operators by Acsa and the Ekurhuleni metro police, who allegedly are having cars picking up and dropping passengers at the entrances towed and stored, and that this has the result of random removal and storage of the cars of bona fide users of the pickup and drop-off points; if not, will he conduct an investigation in this regard; if so, (a) why is this happening and (b) what steps will he take in order to ensure that individuals are given a reasonable time to pick up or drop off passengers?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(1)(a) The terrorist attacks in the landside area of Brussels Airport on 22 March 2016 and Istanbul Airport on 28 June 2016, has brought aviation security sharply into focus from all aviation stakeholders, governments and the media. Ensuring the security of the traveling public is a top priority for ACSA. The appropriate authority has defined “landside.” To include areas of mass gathering inside or close to the terminal, where there is a regular concentration of people. There is collaboration with the appropriate authority responsible for civil aviation security matters and other security agencies to conduct risk and vulnerability assessment of Airports to determine if any adjustments to current security measures are warranted. This requirement is contained in our National Civil Aviation Security programme that allocate responsibilities to state agencies. Engagement with the National and Airport Security Committees on appropriate measures to implement on specific threat scenarios.

i)Metal barriers and bollards are being used to prevent drive-in attacks

ii) The separation of vehicle drop-off and pickup areas from the terminal building

iii) Relocation of vehicle parking close to the terminal building to open areas further from the buildings

iv) Management of crowds around the landside areas to reduce gatherings of meters and greeters has been implemented.

v) Security considerations have been considered for Access areas such as balconies, terraces or windows that open, close to the terminal building where an active shooter or bomber might have access to crowded public areas by enhancement of patrols and CCTV surveillance.

vi) Airport Workers & passenger awareness & communication, there is a continuous reminder through the public-address system to passengers and visitors to be vigilant and report unattended baggage or suspicious behavior.

vii) Security awareness training is provided for all Airport workers (both airport and non-airport employees, including those not involved directly in security) to recognize suspicious behavior, and provide a simple and quick means to report it.

(b) Airports Company South Africa is not obligated under any legal grounds to implement the restricted road access. This road is under the jurisdiction of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan municipality. The municipality is charged with this legal responsibility. The management of O.R Tambo International Airport has raised its concerns and suggested that the airport controls the access and egress onto the airport frontage roads.

(i) Aviation-specific security regulations focus on the airside spaces (non-public spaces of airports accessible only to air passengers who hold a valid boarding pass and to security cleared staff). These regulations are designed to prevent unlawful interference with air transport. Landside spaces (airport spaces accessible to the general public) are subject to general security regulations enacted by national civil aviation authority. It is therefore up to the national civil authority to review and coordinate with airports to identify the appropriate measures that match their specific threat scenario.

(ii) A new set of standards regarding landside security are included in Amendment 15 to Annex 17 (April 2017) which require States to ensure that landside areas are identified, that measures are established to mitigate and prevent attacks based on a risk assessment, that measures are appropriately coordinated, and that responsibilities are allocated within a State’s national civil aviation security programme.

(iii) Accompanying this standard is guidance material within Doc8973, ICAO Security Manual, which provides additional information on how measures might be implemented. DOC 8973 states that no vehicle shall park within 50 meters from the terminal building.

(iv) The following list provides some best practices in detection, deterrence or mitigation of landside threats that reflect current ICAO guidance material and other industry best practices.

(v) Consider infrastructure and airport design features to mitigate the threat from attack. These might include:

(vi) bollards, flowerpots and other structures to prevent drive-in attacks

(vii) the separation of vehicle drop-off and pickup points from the terminal

(viii) Reduce access areas (such as terraces) where an active shooter or bomber might have access to crowded public areas.

(c) Studies was conducted by a traffic consultant in accordance to municipal by laws

(d) Public participation will be done prior to implementation

(e) Workable alternatives are,

(i) the separation of vehicle drop-off and pickup points from the terminal

(2) whether he has been informed that the Airports Company South Africa (Acsa) has been in contact with the SA National Airport Parking Association (Sanapa) and that Acsa has given Sanapa an undertaking to participate in the process regarding the proposed road closures;

(a) none

(3) whether he has been informed of the current form of intimidation being conducted against parking operators by Acsa and the Ekurhuleni metro police, who allegedly are having cars picking up and dropping passengers at the entrances towed and stored, and that this has the result of random removal and storage of the cars of bona fide users of the pickup and drop-off points; if not, will he conduct an investigation in this regard; if so, (a) why is this happening and (b) what steps will he take in order to ensure that individuals are given a reasonable time to pick up or drop off passengers?

i) Acsa and the Ekurhuleni metro police, doesn’t intimidate parking operators at the airports. In terms of ICAO Doc 9873 and national civil aviation program vehicles cannot be left unattended on the roadway and within 50 meters from terminal building.

Acsa must ensure adequate road marking and appropriate signages in accordance to road ordinance act.

22 November 2018 - NW3416

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the reasons that the rental for accommodation at train stations has been increased at train stations, (b) on what date did the rental increase and (c) what is the impact of the increased rental on the tenants and potential tenants?

Reply:

a) Reasons that the rental for accommodation at train stations has been increased are:

  • Tenants at all stations entered into Lease Agreements as prescribed by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa’s (PRASA) Leasing Policy for the use of such premises.
  • The rentals paid at the station are market related and are negotiated and agreed upon with the tenant on a lease document signed by both parties.
  • PRASA’s lease agreements provides for a rental escalation which occurs at the anniversary of each agreement.
  • Such annual rentals escalation are market related researched and determined by the approved registered property valuers serving in the property sector.

b) Date of rental increase:

  • Law of contract prescribes the lease agreement to have a start and end date to be a valid contract.
  • Each contract will clearly indicate when the lease shall be due for escalation on the annual anniversary of each lease.
  • Lease commencement dates will differ from lease to lease depending on when the agreed use of the property is envisaged to take place.

c) The impact of the increased rental on tenants and potential tenants are:

  • Payment of increased rental based on escalation rates which is aligned to inflation and increased rates and taxes as well as electricity, the tenants will consider and adopt cost effective ways of doing business.

22 November 2018 - NW3190

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) From what date to what date are the SA National Roads Agency television advertisements to air, (b) what are the total costs in this regard, (c) what are the objectives for the specified adverts and (d) how are these objectives measured?

Reply:

BUSINESS COFFEE TELEVISION ADVERT

a) The Business Coffee advert flighted from 27 May 2018 to 30 June 2018 on mainstream television stations.

b) The cost to produce the business advert was R10 376 558.00 and the cost for flighting the advert was R9 628 113.00. The advert was also placed on Youtube for additional views. The advert has longevity and will be used again in 2019.

c) An approved strategy guides SANRAL’s marketing and communications and it was informed by and consistent with the National Communication Strategy Framework. SANRAL strives continually to improve our communication engagement with members of the public, to inform them of our work and increase understanding of what the SANRAL brand represents. The good reputation of SANRAL is invaluable to our ability to play a role in promoting national investment, growing the economy and creating jobs. 

We have endeavored to present a comprehensive picture of how we deliver on our mandate to assist road users. The business coffee concept was developed to reinforce the universal truth of how interconnected our lives are, even the everyday things that we may overlook are the products of an interconnected network of people, business, and products that are all woven together by a vast system of national roads. SANRAL manages 22 214km of roads throughout South Africa. These roads are the driving force of South Africa that contribute to the GDP of the south African economy.

Business relies on the infrastructure of the roads to drive the economy. SANRAL has a responsibility to ensure that it delivers roads that are well designed, constructed and maintained. This safely engineered infrastructure aids in the driving experience; assists in prolonging the wear and tear of cars and trucks using these roads and enabling users to get themselves and goods to their intended destinations. This advert is pertinent in the current environment of needing to stimulate economic growth by investing in infrastructure.

The coffee ad was powerful and in line with SANRAL’s Horizon 2030 strategy. The commercial demonstrates the role and impact of road infrastructure in supporting businesses both large and small.

The commercial took the agricultural sector as an example and demonstrated through the harvesting and logistical transportation of coffee beans, bringing them to market and eventually at the consumer's hand to enjoy. It also reaffirms SANRAL’s slogan of beyond roads, as roads are not an end in themselves but a means to improving people's lives.

d) The performance is tracked using the industry performance planning tool that provides the performance of the campaign which is reach, frequency and impact, as indicated below. The campaign was tracked against viewership statistics supplied from the performance.

Audience : AGE 15+ ALL ADULTS (ADS15) U: 34 801 000, S:8134

Total Viewers

TVR

CPP 30"

Total CPP

Reach %

AveFreq

177 058 800

507,13

R10 109

R12 656

70,9%

7,2

           

Audience AGE 25+, HH INC R 14 000+, U:4 438 000, S:1010

Total Viewers

TVR

CPP 30"

Total CPP

Reach %

AveFreq

12 855 360

289,82

R17 689

R22 145

50,2%

5,8

           

TVR (television rating) – % of the people / target audience watching the programme/TV

Total TVR – total number of television ratings bought

30” CPP – cost per point for a 30” advert

Total CPP – cost per point for the against target audience.

Reach % - % number of the target audience reached

Ave.Freq – number of times the planned target audience has been exposed/seen the message.

ROAD SAFETY TELEVISION ADVERT

a) The Road Safety 365 TV advert flighted from 23 September 2018 to 8 October 2018 on both Mainstream and Community television stations.

b) The cost for producing the advert was R8 227 302.90 and the cost for flighting on both Mainstream and Community television was R3 037 807.60. The advert was also placed on Youtube for additional views and will is scheduled to fight again in early 2019.

c) Road safety is still one of South Africa’s biggest challenges. Every year 1,24 million people die in the world due to road crashes. South Africa contributes to the highest number of injuries and fatalities due to crashes on the roads. 60% of these victims are young people between ages 15 – 35 years of age. In addition to the effect on the economy it robs the country of skills and future leaders and affects economic growth. Bad and irresponsible behavior cannot be changed without all stakeholders working together (i.e. DOT, roads entities, the public, civil society groups, schools and more). So, when we look at a SANRAL Road Safety Campaign, we look at it from a ‘partners’ view. We see it as SANRAL contributing to the fight against road crashes and fatalities in SA. We look at other campaigns that have the same objectives in mind – and then see how we can add a different voice, a different point of view – that may resonate with South Africans.

While other campaigns are focused on the Easter and Festive Season periods, SANRAL’s approach is that of a year-long campaign. When other campaigns use gory visuals and scare tactics to make their point, we look at a more emotional, more ‘adult’ approach but also relatable to different target audiences – hence the theme of the legacy left by parents for their kids. That as ‘adults’ we should be mindful of our actions as they may encourage the next generation of drivers to do as we do.

The objective of the campaign is to:

  • promote safe road practices and behaviour amongst South Africans when travelling on the roads throughout the year.
  • increase road user engagement and personalise the message to the road users.
  • encourage all road users to respect the rules of the road – they are there for your safety.

As we reframe ‘road safety’ in the hearts and minds of South Africans, we are also reminding them of the results of irresponsible behaviour on our roads. The legacy element even if you are not a parent but an aunt or uncle, your nieces and nephews also look up to you.

d) The performance is tracked using the industry performance planning tool that provides the performance of the campaign which is reach, frequency and impact, as indicated above. The campaign was tracked against viewership statistics supplied from the performance.

Please note that community TV reach will always be low due to broadcast footprint, especially if it’s compared to the national tv channels that have a bigger foot print and cover almost 99% of the population.

MainstreamTV

             
   

Audience : AGE 15+ ALL ADULTS (ADS15) U: 34 978 000, S:8153

Total Viewers

TVR

 

CPP 30"

Total CPP

 

Reach %

AveFreq

44 749 244

127,94

 

R10 530

R12 779

 

47,7%

2,7

               
   

Audience AGE 25+, HH INC R 14 000+, U:4 297 000, S:960

Total Viewers

TVR

 

CPP 30"

Total CPP

 

Reach %

AveFreq

4 757 462

110,73

 

R12 166

R14 298

 

45,8%

2,4

               

Community TV

             
   

Adults 15+ years

Total Viewers

Total TVR

 

Total CPP R

30Sec CPP

 

Reach %

Avg Freq

2 574 785

7,36

 

62, 784

41, 856

 

3

2,5

               
   

AGE 25+, HHINC R14 000+

Total Viewers

Total TVR

 

Total CPP R

30Sec CPP R

 

Reach %

Avg Freq

428 694

9,74

 

47, 463

31,642

 

1,8

5,4

22 November 2018 - NW3465

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) On what date did his department last conduct an audit of artwork owned by Government which is under his department’s curatorship and (b) what are the details of each artwork under the curatorship of his department according to the Generally Recognized Accounting Practice 103; (2) Whether any artworks under his department’s curatorship have gone missing (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. (a)(b) The Department of Transport does not own artwork by Government.
  2. (a)(b) Falls away

22 November 2018 - NW3412

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Which department or entity is responsible for the naming of the airports, (b) what process is followed in this regard, (c) which airports are due to be renamed, (d) what criteria are used to decide that renaming is required, (e) what airports are in the process of being renamed and (f) what are the timelines in each instance?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) According to the South African Geographical Names Council Act (Act No. 118 of 1998) the Minister of Arts and Culture is responsible for the approval of geographical names after receiving recommendations from the South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC). The SAGNC is only responsible for geographical features of national concern including, but not limited to, towns/cities, suburbs and any form of human settlement, post offices, stations, highways, airports and government dams. The SAGNC is also responsible for natural landforms like mountains, hills, rivers, streams, bays, headlands and islands. Since airports are administered by National Department of Transport through the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) it is within their mandate to process their renaming through the South African Geographical Names Council

(b)(1) The Minister/Department of Transport through ACSA should initiate consultation in relation to the proposed changes or coordinate any of such process from the public or any stakeholder.

2. A notice in terms of Promotion of Administrative Justice Act of 2000 (where an intention to change the names will be stated clearly and the public will be asked to comment). At the same time there should be consultation with all affected families whose names will be used to give written permission for use of those names and they can also advise on the format in which names should appear on signage (if some of the airports will be named after people). ACSA should also consider staging public hearing around the affected airports, any municipality around each of the affected airports can be an ideal venue and a partner for this exercise.

3. Once all the inputs have been collected the South African Geographical Names Council’s application forms should be completed taking into consideration the inputs from the public and then taken to the relevant Geographical Names Provincial Committees (e.g. if the Airports in Gauteng then Gauteng Provincial Committee, KwaZulu-Natal then KZN Geographical Names Committee, Eastern Cape the Eastern Cape Geographical Names Committee etc.) for processing.

4. The relevant Provincial Committees will then forward the application forms to the South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC) after they have checked that the applications comply with the guidelines as stated in the Handbook on Geographical Names. For example, checking if the name is not offensive or a duplication of an existing one etc.

5. The South African Geographical Names Council will then take a decision on the form or forms of names and recommend them for the Minister of Arts and Culture’s approval.

6. Once the names have been approved by the Minister, they will then be published in the Government Gazette which will mean that they are official. The Department of Transport and ACSA will then have to implement the official names as soon as possible. This can take form of events to unveil the names and installing proper signage.at the airports and on relevant roads.

(c) Public notices proposing the renaming of Cape Town International Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport, Kimberly Airport, and East London Airport were published in May 2018.

(d) All government departments, provincial governments, local authorities, the SA Post Office, property developers and any other body or person may apply for a name change through the South African Geographical Names Council.

(e) Public notices proposing the renaming of Cape Town International Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport, Kimberly Airport, and East London Airport were published in May 2018.

(f) The process can take up to 4 months from submission of application for name change to the National Geographical Names Council if there are no legal challenges and objections.The renaming process may be further lengthened or delayed depending on the individual circumstace of each application. The Council meets three times per year.

22 November 2018 - NW3474

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the number of busses that are operated by the Government in each province?

Reply:

Provincial bus services are operated by private operators but subsidized by government through contracts entered between provinces and these operators. The peak number of subsidized buses per province is as follows:

Province

Number of buses

Eastern Cape

553

Free State

257

Gauteng

2423

Kwazulu Natal

1393

Limpopo

830

Mpumalanga

601

North West

581

Northern Cape

54

Western Cape

1087

TOTAL

7779

22 November 2018 - NW2810

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Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) With reference to the forensic findings against a senior official at Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA), what (a) action has been taken to date and (b) are the reasons for the delays in taking action; (2) What (i) are the reasons for the resignation of ACSA board members and (ii) is being done to replace the members and (b) how are decisions of the board approved without a full complement of board members?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(1)(a) After consideration of the first forensic report, the Board agreed that a second report be obtained. The Open Water report was concluded in January 2018 and the previous Board constituted a Board Sub-committee to review the report. The sub-committee met in February 2018, discussed the report and a recommendation was made to the Board in this regard. However, before this could be discussed at a Board meeting, the term of office of the then acting chairman expired and two Board members resigned. That left the Board with two Non-Executive Directors and one Executive Director, namely the Chief Executive Officer. The matter was then held over for the new Board to be appointed.

(b) After the appointment of the new board, the forensic reports have been considered by the Audit and Risk Committee (“ARC”). A Board ad hoc committee constituted by two members each from the Remuneration and Nominations Committee and ARC has been tasked with working on these reports and external advice has been sought in this regard. It is envisaged that the matter would be concluded soon.

(2)(a)(i) The Board members cited various reasons, information of which can be forwarded on request.

(ii) The Minister has appointed six Board members who have assumed their directorships with effect from 1 September 2018. The Board Chairman has subsequently been appointed with effect from 9 November 2018.

(b) In terms of clause 13.1.1 of ACSA’s Memorandum of Incorporation (“MOI”), the Board shall, at all times, consist of a minimum of three directors and a maximum of twelve directors, of which a majority shall be non-executive directors. The decisions taken by the Board have been taken by a fully constituted board in terms of the MOI.

22 November 2018 - NW3332

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the answer to question 2271 on 28 August 2017, a provincial member of the executive committee can delegate the competencies to issue permits to permit offices and officials; if not, on what legal grounds does such member of the committee rely in order to execute the specified delegation of competencies?

Reply:

Before responding to the question, I deemed it prudent to refer the honourable Alberts to the provisions of section 91(2) of the National Road Traffic Act, 1993 which provides as follows

91. Delegation by Minister and MEC

(2) The MEC concerned may

(a) delegate to any other person any power conferred upon him or her by or under this Act; and

(b) authorise any other person to perform any duty assigned to the MEC by or under this Act,

and may effect such delegation or grant such authorisation subject to such conditions as he or she may deem fit.

From my reading and interpretation of section 91(2) as outlined above, it would appear authority of the MEC goes beyond delegation by him or her of the competencies to issue permits but also include “…. any power conferred upon him or her under this Act”

Furthermore, may authorise any other person to perform any duty assigned to the MEC by or under this Act.

16 November 2018 - NW3254

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

Department

(a)(i) The Department of Transport has not borrowed any money from the People’s Republic of China since 1 April 2018.

(ii) None of the Entities borrowed money from the People’s Republic of China since 1 April 2018.

(aa) The Department and its entities have not borrowed any money from the People’s Republic of China over the past three years.

(bb) As per response above.

(b) As per response above.

(c) As per response above.

(d) As per response above.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa did not borrow money from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in each of the past three financial years and since 1 April 2018.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

Not applicable to ATNS.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

NIL (i) N/A (ii) South African Civil Aviation Authority did not borrow any amount from the People’s Republic of China (aa) N/A (bb) N/A (b) N/A (c) N/A (d) N/A.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

The (a) (ii) Cross-Border Road Transport Agency did not borrow any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b), (c) and (d) are therefore not applicable.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

The (a) (ii) Road Accident Fund did not borrow any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b), (c) and (d) are therefore not applicable.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

The (a) (ii) Road Traffic Management Corporation did not borrow any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b), (c) and (d) are therefore not applicable.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

The (a) (ii) Road Traffic Infringement Agency did not borrow any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b), (c) and (d) are therefore not applicable.

South African National Road Agency Limited (SANRAL)

The (a) (ii) South African National Road Agency Limited did not borrow any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b), (c) and (d) are therefore not applicable.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(a) No amount was borrowed by the RSR from any entity in the People’s Republic of China,

(aa) in any of the past three financial years, and

(bb) since 1 April 2018;

(b) Not applicable, refer to (a)

(c) Not applicable, refer to (a)

(d) Not applicable, refer to (a)

 

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) No amount was borrowed by PRASA from any entity in the People’s Republic of China,

(aa) in any of the past three financial years, and

(bb) since 1 April 2018;

(b) Not applicable, refer to (a)

(c) Not applicable, refer to (a)

(d) Not applicable, refer to (a)

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(ii) The Ports Regulator does not have borrowing powers in terms of legislation and has not borrowed from any institution in the past and has no plans to borrow in the medium term.

(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

Not Applicable as no amounts were borrowed from any entity in the People’s Republic of China

15 November 2018 - NW3194

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) (a) What are the names of the railway train stations that are not being used, (b) what is the overall number of stations that are no longer in use, (c) on what date was each station decommissioned, (d) why were the stations decommissioned in each case and (e) what are the stations being used for currently; (2) What (a) plans are in place to link the Durban-North railway track to the King Shaka International Airport considering the short distance between the two, (b) are the time frames, milestones and deadlines in this regard, (c) feasibility studies have been undertaken in this regard and (d) were the results of the studies?

Reply:

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

PRASA Railway Train Station

Number

Date not being used

Reason for not being used

Current use

Ireagh

1

2010

Train service rationalised

None

Rolle

1

2010

Train service rationalised

None

Cottondale

1

2010

Train service rationalised

None

Acornhoek

1

2010

Train service rationalised

None

Hoedspruit

1

2010

Train service rationalised

Restaurant Lease

Zeerust

1

2015

Train service rationalised

None

Vryburg

1

2015

Train service rationalised

None

Total

7

     

Note: The above information only reflects PRASA properties. All these stations were identified for transfer with Main Line Passenger Service in 2009 from Transnet. These stations are on the Kaapmuiden-Hoedspruit line or Johannesburg-Mafikeng-Kimberley line. Stations not in use is not the same as being decommissioned.

2. (a) The option to link King Shaka International Airport (KISA) via the existing North Coast Rail

Corridor was considered along with other rail alignment options during earlier planning activities because of its proximity to KSIA. It was however not preferred, because such a service would result in lengthy journey times and inability to compete effectively with other modes of transport.

(b) As mentioned in (a), the option of linking to the North Coast Rail Corridor was not preferred. In addition, the passenger demand for such a service in the short term, is considered relatively low from a passenger rail perspective. A road-based feeder service from Verulam and/or Tongaat stations is considered more viable in the short term to provide access to KISA from the North Coast Line.

In the medium term, a more direct rail connection to KISA, with potential of linking to current and new growth areas in the northern section of eThekwini, is considered more viable.

(c) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa concluded a conceptual planning study in 2015 around potential rail linkages to KISA and surrounds.

(d) The outcome of the study in 2015 is in support of (2)(b).

15 November 2018 - NW3195

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the details of the (a) role of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) in the construction of the Vereeniging taxi rank, (b) budget (i) set aside and (ii) spent to date by Prasa for the specified construction, (c)(i) name and (ii) company registration number of each service provider contracted for the construction project, (d) current status of the construction of the taxi rank and (e) completion date of the project; (2) Whether Prasa lodged any disputes with any of the service providers; if so, what (a) are the details of the disputes and (b) action did Prasa take to resolve the disputes in each case; (3) Whether any disputes lodged by Prasa with any of the service providers are still unresolved; if so, (a) why and (b) by what date will the unresolved disputes be resolved?

Reply:

  1. (a) VEREENIGING INTERMODAL PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITY

CONTRACT NUMBER DRT: 24/07/2013

PRASA appointed the consulting engineers (AECOM/Khuthele Projects (AECOM)) to execute designs for the following:

  • Vereeniging Station
  • Commercial development around Vereeniging Station
  • Vereeniging Intermodal Facility

(b) (i) PRASA has set aside R15 million for the fees of the project. The fees include for the following:

  • Professional Services for Stages 1 to 6;
  • Environmental studies
  • Occupational Health and Safety; and
  • Specialised professional services (e.g. Geotech, etc.)

(ii) The amount spent to date is R13,508,685-00, being for designs and construction supervision, as well as Occupational Health and Safety monitoring for the Intermodal Facility.

(c) (i) The main contractor appointed by the Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport ( GDRT) for the construction works, is Moreteng Investments CC.

(ii) GDRT Contractor: Moreteng Investments CC

Registration number: 2005/004671/07

Sub-Contractor: FlyBrotherSA CC

Registration number: 2010/133800/23

PRASA Consultant: AECOM/Khuthele Projects Pty (Ltd)

Registration number: 2010/013644/07

(d) The works are currently ongoing and are measured at 83% progress. However, due to contractual disputes between GDRT and the contractor, the works have been suspended since 7 September 2018.

(e) The completion date will only be known once the contractor is back on site.

2 (a) PRASA has not lodged any dispute with a service provider.

(b) Not applicable.

3. (a) Not applicable as no disputes were lodged by PRASA.

(b) Not applicable as no disputes were lodged by PRASA.

08 November 2018 - NW3132

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since he served in Cabinet, he (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of his department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i)I was never influenced by any person and/or (ii) nor influenced any of the department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and (cc) acknowledges to have met the close associates of the Gupta family during the SABC/TNA morning breakfast shows where I was a guest on the shows.

08 November 2018 - NW3027

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) With regard to the repatriation of the remains of South Africans killed in the collapse of the church in Lagos, Nigeria, run by Pastor T B Joshua, in September 2014, (a) which company was awarded the tender in this regard, (b) what were the objectives and targets of the tender, (c) what was the value of the tender, (d) who awarded the tender, (e) what process was followed in the procurement of services and (f) what were the outcomes of the tender; (2) has he found that there were any irregularities with regard to the tender process and/or outcomes of the tender; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Imvubu Aviation Services Pty (Ltd)

(b) The initial specifications by the Department of Transport (DOT) was for two Antonov 124 cargo planes and one passenger aircraft plane. However, only one Antonov 124 was commissioned and paid. The Antonov’s were identified to transport mortuary trucks, other light support vehicles, equipment including tents, luggage etc. and 10xPAX to Lagos, and to additionally to this original cargo, include the remains identified for repatriation on the return to South Africa.

The passenger aircraft was identified to transport a maximum of 100 passengers.

(c) The total amount paid was R16 448 200.00 for one Antonov 124 cargo plane

(d) Mr Mawethu Vilana, acting Director-General, Department of Transport, in his capacity as Accounting Officer approved the award.

(e) Approval to deviate from inviting tenders was granted by the Accounting Officer in terms of Section 16A6.4 of the Treasury Regulations.

Following an Inter-Ministerial Committee and a Health Cluster Technical Team meeting, specifications were drafted as determined by the SA Military Health Services (SAMHS) and the Department of Health (SG/D MH OPS/R/311/2/15 dated 2 October 2014).

Numerous aviation service providers were approached and six quotations for each of the initial requirements were received (2 x Antonov and 1 x Passenger Aircraft). Three companies were disqualified due to non-tax compliance, incorrect specifications etc.

The qualifying bids were:

a) 2 x Antonov 124

Service Provider

BEE Score

Cost per Item

Total Cost

Rank

HCR Ilanga Aviation Solutions

8

1 755 600 USD

(R 19 438 900)

3 511 200 USD

(R 38 877 800)

3

SRS Aviation

8

1 601 607 USD

(R17 938 000)

3 203 214 USD

(R 35 876 000)

2

Imvubu Aviation Services

8

1 485 500 USD

(R16 448 200)

2 971 000 USD

(R 32 896 400)

1

b) 1 x Passenger Aircraft

Service Provider

BEE Score

Total Cost

Rank

HCR Ilanga Aviation Solutions

8

268 923 USD

(R2 977 650)

3

SRS Aviation

8

131 650 USD

(R1 457 700)

1

Imvubu Aviation Services

8

215 883 USD

(R2 390 360)

2

*USD/ZAR exchange rate used on 18 October 2014 during evaluation calculated at R 11.0725.

The approved requirement was reduced to one Antonov 124 and an official order to that effect was issued on 5 November 2014 for R 16 448 200.00.

(f) The initial specifications by DOT was for two Antonov 124 cargo planes and one passenger aircraft plane. However, due to numerous factors, including cost, only one Antonov 124 was approved and paid by the DOT.

The Antonov 124 was tasked to transport eight vehicles and specialized equipment to Lagos to assist in the repatriation of the remains of South Africans and to return with said remains, vehicles and equipment.

Amongst the eight vehicles transported were four Forensic Pathology Trucks from the Department of Health that are specifically designed to handle bodies in disaster situations.

Nigerian authorities officially handed over positively identified mortal remains of seventy-four South Africans to Minister Radebe at the Sam Ethnan Air Force Base, Ikeja, Lagos State, Nigeria on Saturday 15 November 2014.

The Antonov 124 departed from Nigeria on the evening of Saturday 15 November 2014 and arrived home in South Africa on the morning of Sunday 16 November 2014. A formal reception ceremony was hosted on Sunday 16 November 2014 at the Air Force Base Waterkloof to receive the remains of the South Africans who had perished.

(2) No irregularities were found.

08 November 2018 - NW3045

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What plans did he put in place to remedy the (a) financial, (b) administrative and (c) governance difficulties currently being experienced by the Road Accident Fund?

Reply:

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) has put the following plans in place to remedy the (a) financial,

In the longer term the design of the system of road accident compensation must change to address the fact that the existing system is unaffordable, with income not matching expenditure. To this end the RABS Bill, which is currently before the Portfolio Committee on Transport, will address the future financial viability of road accident compensation by ensuring a balance between funding and benefits. In the interim, the RAF has implemented a Cash Management Strategy to ensure that available funding is distributed in an equitable and fair manner. This has since evolved to cash management in the ordinary course of business, which is reviewed in response to the business environment. The RAF ensures that it communicates with service providers to ensure they are kept abreast of developments where necessary. The RAF seeks to ensure that any funds that are not committed due to general savings or delays in procurement, are allocated to the settlement of claims, where possible. The RAF has engaged with stakeholders such as National Treasury and the Department of Transport to ensure awareness, to present status updates and to seek solutions. In addition, the RAF has sought to implement measures to minimize the interruption caused by attachments of the RAF’s bank accounts.

(b) administrative and

The existing system of road accident compensation is administratively complex. Fault has to be proven and benefits are not defined, which results in delays in establishing liability and the quantification of claims, often resulting in disputes and protracted litigation, in which the intermediaries have a direct and substantial financial interest. The RABS Bill addresses the shortcomings by, inter alia, providing for defined benefits, on a no-fault basis, paid directly to beneficiaries, in a structured manner, ensuring wider cover, especially to the poor. The RABS Bill further seeks to reduce the administrative complexity inherent in the current system which will see less involvement by intermediaries and more money reaching the intended beneficiaries of the system.

In the interim, the RAF addresses improved administration through, inter alia, the RAF’s Annual Performance Plan for the 2018 - 2019 financial year, which addresses the RAF’s administrative challenges by, amongst others, providing for: initiatives aligned to efficient processing of claims; initiatives aligned to providing accessible services: initiatives aligned to effective financial management; initiatives aligned to optimising ICT functionality; initiatives aligned to improving people management; initiatives aligned to RAF transformation; and initiatives aligned to an assured control environment.

(c) governance difficulties currently being experienced by the Road Accident Fund

The previous Board was dissolved by the Minister of Transport and an Interim Board was appointed to address governance challenges. The process to appoint a permanent Board has commenced. The process to appoint a CEO re-commenced two months ago.

08 November 2018 - NW3095

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the awarding of a contract by his department to a certain company VNA consulting engineers in KwaZulu-Natal in 2017, what (a) are the terms of reference of the contract, (b) goods and services (i) will be delivered and (ii) have been delivered to date, (c) is the duration of the contract, (d) is the value of the contract in Rand and (e) are the details of the supply chain and/or tender processes followed in awarding the contract?

Reply:

The Department of Transport has no access to the contractual issues and Supply Chain Management Process of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Transport. The Honourable Member may re- direct the Question the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Transport in Kwa-Zulu Natal, Honourable Mxolisi Kaunda.

Therefore Question (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) fall away.

08 November 2018 - NW3043

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he can give an indication regarding the number of claims that have become prescribed in the hands of the Road Accident Fund since 1 January 2000 for each month of each year according to (a) percentage and (b) absolute numbers from the year 2000 up to and including the latest statistics for 2018; (2) what are the overall reasons for the prescription of the claims in each month; (3) given the prescriptions that take place, what does he intend to do in order to stop this malpractice, especially against the background of the establishment of the Road Accident Benefit Scheme (RABS) Bill according to which the fund/scheme will act as an adjudicator of benefits and a benefit manager?

Reply:

  1. Statistics on direct claims lodged prior to December 2012 are not available, as stand-alone direct claims units were only established throughout the Road Accident Fund (RAF) during the 2012 -2013 financial year. From December 2012, statistics on direct claims were were reported on separately from other claims. The following information regarding the number of claims that have become prescribed in the hands of the RAF (claims lodged and, or, prosecuted personally by a claimant who elected not to use the services of an attorney or elected to terminate the services of their attorney) since 1 December 2012 for each month of each year according to (a) percentage and (b) absolute numbers (total) from the year 2012 up to and including the latest statistics for 2018;

Financial Year

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

January

February

March

Total

2012/13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

2

3

7

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14%

14%

29%

43%

100%

2013/14

6

3

1

3

9

10

2,066

8

2

1

664

121

2,894

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

0.1%

0.3%

0.3%

71%

0.3%

0.1%

0%

23%

4%

100%

2014/15

1

14

4

2

1,716

3,974

178

-

-

36

201

112

6,238

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

28%

64%

3%

0.0%

0.0%

1%

3%

2%

100%

2015/16

4

2

3

13

7

6

38

39

7

32

14

3

168

% of total% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

2%

1%

2%

8%

4%

4%

23%

23%

4%

19%

8%

2%

100%

2016/17

7

60

21

16

77

5

18

5

6

3

1

6

225

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

3%

27%

9%

7%

34%

2%

8%

2%

3%

1%

0.4%

3%

100%

2017/18

3

3

22

272

8

12

4

7

4

3

5

1

344

% of the total of claims prescribed during the year

1%

1%

6%

79%

2%

3%

1%

2%

1%

1%

1%

0%

100%

2018/19*

3

3

44

53

10

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

162

% of the total of claims prescribed during the period

2%

2%

27%

33%

6%

30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

100%

2) the overall reasons, amongst others, for the prescription of the claims in each month, are claims that prescribed in the following circumstances: while awaiting the judgment in the case of Mvumvu and Others v The Minister of Transport and the RAF (Case CCT 67/10); awaiting the completion of medico-legal reports by medical experts; delays in obtaining confirmation of appointments for assessments for medico-legal reports; delays in obtaining completed medical reports from hospitals; awaiting necessary information from claimants or service providers; files not sent to Regions by consultants prior to prescription of the claim; administrative issues such as incorrect registration, miscommunication between the regions; where direct claimants have subsequently elected to instruct an attorney and summons is not issued before prescription and where claimants failed to provide correct contact information, or contact information subsequently changed and the claimant failed to inform the RAF;

3) The RAF has implemented a Direct Claims Policy with effect from 15 February 2016. The purpose of the Direct Claims Management Policy, amongst others, is to regulate the internal management of Direct Claims to ensure that the rights of Unrepresented Claimants are protected; to ensure that the risks to the RAF are managed; and finally, to manage conflicts of interest that may arise. The Direct Claims Policy provides for consequence management in the event of non-compliance.

08 November 2018 - NW3041

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he can give an indication of the expected and actually realized income regarding the Gauteng e-toll system for each month from 31 December 2013 to date; (2) what type of road user made payments through corporate and individual road users for each month during the same period respectively; (3) what number of e-tags that are recorded have been activated and deactivated for each month during the same period; 4) what is the total (a) amount of legal costs spent on issuing summonses to road users thus far and (b) outstanding debt to the e-toll system for each month of the specified period; (5) whether any consideration is given to reissue summonses; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount has been budgeted for this, (b) what number of persons or institutions will be sued in this regard and (c) on what date will this take place?

Reply:

  1. Please see Table 1 below for the expected (forecast) versus realized (actual) income.
  2. Payments are made by an account holder who assumes responsibility to pay the account for the registered vehicles, which can be an individual, a corporate, or a combination. The person/entity that sets up the account does not complete a “field” to indicate if it is a corporate or individual user. As a result, the SANRAL toll system does not record whether a vehicle is registered (or owned) by an individual or a corporate user and the information requested cannot be directly extracted from the toll system. Should more details be required the Member of Parliament is welcome to visit SANRAL Head Office in Pretoria.
  3. Table 2 below provides, for each month, the number of tags that have been activated and deactivated from December 2013 to date. The table does not reflect the tags registered prior to the December 2013 date, such as the tags that were already in use on the Bakwena route. Tags are deactivated for various reasons, which include the following:
  • Movement of tag to a new vehicle
  • Movement of vehicles and tags between accounts, e.g. Public Entity and Key accounts
  • Deregistrations, etc

Table 1: GFIP expected (forecast) versus realized (actual) income

Table 2: e-Tag Activations versus Deactivations

Year

Month

Tags Activated

Tags Deactivated

2013

December

348382

22667

 

 

 

 

2014

January

165030

23480

 

February

112086

18424

 

March

87814

18731

 

April

70082

17578

 

May

62602

18419

 

June

65643

19330

 

July

51642

19357

 

August

40810

18739

 

September

34834

22980

 

October

31604

17940

 

November

25614

17144

 

December

18833

12155

 

 

 

 

2015

January

24856

17406

 

February

22443

15280

 

March

21656

16827

 

April

18924

15425

 

May

22663

17850

 

June

29217

17329

 

July

36139

19312

 

August

30274

21768

 

September

30685

19336

 

October

32080

18070

 

November

24631

15287

 

December

18624

12945

 

 

 

 

2016

January

29676

16615

 

February

30536

16897

 

March

31193

20179

 

April

29310

19458

 

May

34520

21343

 

June

28130

19711

 

July

32300

16475

 

August

27270

16852

 

September

28881

20350

 

October

30733

16361

 

November

26566

59163

 

December

21566

84980

 

 

 

 

2017

January

30497

17699

 

February

29186

16936

 

March

28355

28654

 

April

19699

17387

 

May

24736

18799

 

June

24399

16537

 

July

29388

17478

 

August

29138

17409

 

September

26645

16760

 

October

31358

17295

 

November

29733

15409

 

December

21410

12567

 

 

 

 

2018

January

29016

19675

 

February

28005

16357

 

March

21786

18216

 

April

21571

16997

 

May

22334

20042

 

June

24091

14923

 

July

29719

16678

 

August

26140

16107

 

September

27454

15749

 

October

31005

16733

4. (a)The Contractor (ETC) incurred R4,6m on legal fees up to August 2018.

(b) The Accounting Policy of SANRAL, which is in line with IFRS, determines that the impairment assessment is done on an annual basis. As such the trade receivables balance is calculated, audited and published annually. Table 3 below reflects the audited trade receivables for the requested financial years:

Financial Year

Toll debtors (R’million)

2018

10 840.4

2017

8 798.4

2016

6 620.1

2015

4 935.3

2014

951.3

   
   

Table 3

5. SANRAL’s toll operator is not re-issuing summonses. The summonses that have already been issued will be amended to include new debt (if required) but will not require re-issuing. Therefore, we respond as follows:

a) Not applicable as the re-issuing summonses is not required.

b) Not applicable refer to a).

c) Not applicable refer to a).

08 November 2018 - NW2928

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by (aa) his department and (bb) each entity reporting to him (aaa) in the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018 and (ii) is the name of each company or contractor and (b) what amount is each employee paid?

Reply:

Department

Financial period

Number of employees outsourced from private companies and/or contractors

Name of Company

Amount employee was paid

2015/2016

2

(i) Affirmative Portfolios

(ii) Akasia Personnel Consultants

(i) R112 532.80

(ii) R1 095 863.44

2016/2017

1

Akasia Personnel Consultants

R977 300.01

2017/2018

1

Akasia Personnel Consultants

R833 395.47

1 April 2018 to date

0

none

none

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

The question requesting information about those employees that are paid by ACSA but were insourced from private companies by ACSA, has reference.

Airports Company South Africa confirms that there are no employees on the payroll of the company

that we have insourced from external private companies. This means there are no employees on our

payroll who were outsourced to Airports Company South Africa by private companies.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS)

(aa) N/A

(bb) ATNS doesn’t have any employees that have been outsourced from private companies.

ATNS has 29 employees currently employed on a Fixed Term Contract

(aaa) 2017/2018 financial year: 15

2016/2017 financial year: 21

2015/2016 financial year: 10

(bbb) 2018/2019 YTD: 35

(ii) N/A

(b)

Employee Number

     

Position Description

Cost to Company (A)

1

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

2

     

Regional Director: Africa

R 2 044 720,00

3

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

4

     

ATCO2: KN

R 772 357,00

5

     

ATCO3: EL

R 918 493,00

6

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

7

     

Administrator: L & D

R 245 067,00

8

     

Specialist: Operational System

R 1 176 329,90

9

     

Project Manager: Business Mark

R 760 000,00

10

     

ATCO3: CT

R 918 493,00

11

     

Billing Contracts Administrator

R 398 329,91

12

     

Billing Contracts Administrator

R 377 122,78

13

     

Administrator: Foreign Billing

R 377 122,78

14

     

Accounts Payable Administrator

R 350 042,47

15

     

Chief Executive Officer

R 4 261 269,00

16

     

Manager: Finance

R 969 680,00

17

     

Assistant: Company Secretary

R 780 000,00

18

     

Consultant: HR (Bruma & ATA)

R 1 195 955,00

19

     

Executive: Human Capital

R 2 073 000,00

20

     

Security Guard

R 143 253,03

21

     

Secretary: Departmental IT

R 293 582,00

22

     

Accountant: Fixed Assets & Pro

R 620 595,00

23

     

ATCO3: CT

R 918 493,00

24

     

ATCO1: PM

R 515 662,00

25

     

ATCO1: LE

R 497 476,00

26

     

ATCO3: PE

R 918 493,00

27

     

Instructor: Air Traffic Services

R 918 493,00

28

     

ATCO3: JS

R 831 994,00

 

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) A total of 18 employees using 9 different companies have been outsourced from private companies (bb) by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (aaa) over the past three years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018. (ii) The names of each of the companies used and (b) the related amounts are listed below:

List of Outsourced Employees

Cross Border Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a) The (i) (bb) Cross-Border Road Transport Agency did not have employees that were outsourced from private companies and/or contractors in the past three financial years.

(bbb) In September 2018, two (2) employees were supplied by (ii) Nyalu Communication to provide cleaning services. The company quoted an amount of R13,000 for the service to be rendered by the two cleaners per month for a period of three (3) months. (ii) Not applicable.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

The (a)(i)(bb) Road Accident Fund (RAF) outsourced[1] a total of (aaa) 68 employees in the past three financial years, and (bbb) 8 employees since 1 April 2018, and (ii) the name of each private company or contractor is:

  1. AC Consulting
  2. Affirmative Portfolios
  3. Astute Advisory
  4. Core Focus
  5. Dalitso
  6. Deloitte
  7. DNS
  8. EOH
  9. Human Communications
  10. Impela Alliance
  11. Investong Group
  12. KPMG
  13. Morvest Human Capital Management
  14. Moshitoa
  15. Nexus Forensics
  16. Ntirho Human Capital
  17. Phaki Personnel
  18. Price Waterhouse Coopers
  19. Resolve
  20. Teleresources
  21. Toro Human Capital

(b) the amount that each employee is, or was, paid is not known to the RAF in those instances where the salary payment to the employee is, or was, made by the private company or contractor, and, in those instances where the RAF made, or makes, the salary payment to the employee the RAF is prevented from divulging this information which constitutes personal information of the employee in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, No. 2 of 2000.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

  1. One (1)

(aa) One (1)

(bb) One (1)

(aaa) None

(bbb) One (1)

(ii) Thapelo Kharametsane Attorneys R42 000

Road Traffic Management Corporation Agency (RTMC)

See table below for response

Cleaning Services

       

Answer to aaa)

Financial

Period

Answer a)

Total Nr. of employees

Answer to a)(ii)

Name of Contractor

Answer to b)

Average

Annual Cost per Employee

Location

Comment

2015/16

9

Samagaba Cleaning Services

R46 902,80

Head Office

Contract Ended 31 August 2017

           

2016/17

9

Samagaba Cleaning Services

R54 355,57

Head Office

Contract Ended 31 August 2017

           

2017/18

8

JR 209 (Blue Star Trading)

R35 591,24

Head Office

Contract start date is 01 September 2017 and was ended 31 May 2018.

All cleaning personnel were absorbed.

2017/18

10

Global Cleaning services

R83 234,84

Natis Offices

Contract Commenced 06 April 2017 and was ended 31 March 2018.

All cleaning employees were absorbed.

           

2018/19

8

JR 209

R35 591,24

Head Office

Contract start date is 01 September 2017 and was ended 31 May 2018.

All cleaning personnel were absorbed.

Security Services

Answer to aaa)

Financial

Period

Answer a)

Total Nr. of employees

Answer to a)(ii)

Name of Contractor

Answer to b)

Average

Annual Cost per Employee

Location

Comment

2015/16

8

Vimba Security

R135 554,02

Head Office

Contract ended 31 March 2017

           

2016/17

8

Vimba Security

R135 554,02

Head Office

Contract ended 31 March 2017

           

2017/18

8

Royal Security

R155 967, 83

Head Office

Contract ended 31 July 2017

2017/18

8

JR 209

R150 945,32

Head Office

Contract still in place

2017/18

16

Mafoko Security

R185 674,62

Natis Office

Contract still in place

2017/18

20

Eldna Security

R99 749,10

Boekenhout Traffic College

Contract still in place

           

2018/19

8

JR 209

R150 945,32

Head Office

Contract still in place

2018/19

16

Mafoko Security

R185 674,62

Natis Office

Contract still in place

2018/19

20

Eldna Security

R99 749,10

Boekenhout Traffic College

Contract still in place

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

RESPONSE TO PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NUMBER: 2928

Question

Response

What is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors

31

By his department

Not applicable

Each entity reporting to him?

SAMSA

In the past three financial years?

2016 - 27, 2017 - 1 and 2018 - 3

Since 1 April 2018

 2

What is the name of each company or contractor?

  • Legadima Personnel
  • Sanda HR Solutions
  • Intrinsic
  • Isiwe Chartered Accountants
  • FD Centre
  • Manpower
  • Only the Best
  • Talent Guru
  • The Prestige Cleaning Services
  • Mamchira Projects
  • Business System Services
  • Lunobo Cleaning Construction
  • Advance Cleaning

What amount is each employee paid?

  • Legadima Personnel - 411,776.09
  • Sanda HR Solutions - 358,316.75
  • Intrinsic - 158,609.74
  • Isiwe Chartered Accountants - 249,600.00
  • FD Centre - 1,194,214.11
  • Manpower - 257,964.90
  • Only the Best - 157,865.36
  • Talent Guru - 515,605.50
  • The Prestige Cleaning Services - 553,001.24
  • Mamchira Projects - 59,865.35
  • Business System Services - 63,880.20
  • Lunobo Cleaning Construction - 85,959.89
  • Advance Cleaning - 77,463.44

Railway Safety Regulator

(bb) The Railway Safety Regulator does not make use of any outsourced employees.

(aaa) (bbb)(ii)(b) Falls away

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa

  1. (i) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) does not make use of outsourced employees. PRASA would, through Supply Chain Management processes, sources service to be provided such as security services, where labour is part of the overall cost. These service providers have the employees assigned to PRASA in their books and on their payroll.

(aaa) 2015/16 2,963

2016/17 2,977

2017/18 2,361

(bbb) 2018/19 2,980

PRASA furthermore supports SMME’s and Co-operatives where communities are empowered through station cleaning and horticulture services. For the current year 593 job opportunities have been created. A list of these co-operatives is also provided.

(ii) Security Companies

 

Company

 

Sinqobile Equestrian

Futuris Guarding Systems

Hlanganani Protection Services

Changing Tides Security

Vusa Isizwe Security Services

Vimtsire Protection Services

Royal Security

Enlightened Security

Afri-Guard

R1

Supreme Operations

Comwezi

Chippa

Sechaba

Chuma

Illiso

Ilanga Security

Ibhubesi Security

Enlightened

Royal Security

Ilanga

Enlightened

Comwezi

Vusa-Isiswe

Scheme Security

WorldWatch

Advanced Detachment

Co-Operatives for Station Cleaning and Horticulture

Mantswe Akgakala Le Motewana

Nithandane Makhosikazi

Bokamoso Cleaning Primary Cooperative

The Tabernace Porimary Cooperative

Uzwano Cooperative Limited

Pro Knit Primary Cooperative

Masego Trading Cooperative

Phakamani Mzontsundu Primary Cooperative

Mphempe Ya lapisa Cooperative

Eich Women in Public Transport Cooperative

Mantswe Akgakala Le Motewana

Masego Trading Cooperative

Ikakgeng Cooperative

Phambili bomama

Masiyasiya

Parents Power

Orange Farm Cultural Cooperative

Uthando Cooperative

Bakubung Cooperative

Kgalaletstang Cooperative

Hamisi Cooperative

Lethokuhle Cooperative

Likhothwayo

Hamisi Cooperative

Nan Primary Cooperative

Eich Women in Public Transport Cooperative

Neo Entle Cooperative

Mocheko Cooperative

Mashudu Cooperative

Sediba-Sa Lefa Multi-Purpose Co-operative

Pfaranani Primary Co-operative

Susavusiwana Co-operative

Bright Mind Co-operative

Predianet Construction and Projects Co-operative

Tirisano Multi-Purpose Co-operative

Dedicated Collegues Co-op

Hardworkers co-op

Cabangusebenze co-op

Anny main primary co-op

Izinkwezeli co -operative ltd

Rainbow primary co-op

Blossen co-operative ltd

Umshanelo wakwazulu co-op

Snade co-op ltd

Majiya multipurpose co-op

Abamtoti womens co-op

C-nesipho primary co-op

Cikizisa construction @farming co-op

Wayforward primary co-op

Ezasenanda trading co-op

Isizanathi primary co-op

Silindokuhle co-op

KwaMashu progress

Inkotha yedube co-op

Sibambene co-op

Asibonge farming co-op

Abasadi primary co-op

Sanelisiwe co-op

Czwesonke farming co-op

Mlonyeni primary co-op

Elohim primary co-op

Ntandokuhle trading

Abaphikeleli co-op

Mzansi wethu co-op

Kathuthuyasi primary co-op

Khaya thingo co-op

Beauty Petros primary co-op

Grace co-op

Nozibele nonkulomo livestock

Barack co-op

BNNZ primary co-op

Sihamba phambili primary co-op

Amangwazi co-op

Iintokozoeh cleaning co-op

Thondolubanzi primary co-op

Khehlengane primary co-op

Sandile co-op

Abundance co-op

Magaye trading Enterprise

Nkeshezane Trading Enterprise

Manthuli Transport PTY Ltd

Lion Primary Co-op

Yolitha Productions Co-op

Unako Primary Co-operative Limited

Lithemba Projects Co-operative

Lukhanyo Primary Co-operative

Khanyisa Services Primary

  1. The contracts with suppliers require that they pay legislated rates for the industry and in case of security the PSIRA rates.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. (i) (bb) The Ports Regulator of South Africa did not outsource from any private companies

or contractors in the past three financial years.

(aaa) (bbb)(ii)(b) Falls away

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

Financial Year (aaa)(bbb)

Total Amount paid by SANRAL (a)(i)

Total Number of Employees (i)

Name of outsourcing company(ii)

Name of each Employee (b)

Amount paid to each employee (b)

 

2015/16

R624 808.74

36

1.G Lison Personnel

Employee 1

R893.76

 

 

 

 


2.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 2

R351.12

 

 

 

 

3.Kelly

Employee 3

R8 474.76

 

 

 

 

4.MPC

Employee 4

R5 894.36

 

 

 

 

5.Ikamva

Employee 5

R2 616.62

 

 

 

 

6.Affirmative portfolios

Employee 6

R134 488.71

 

 

 

 

7.Adcorp Workforce

Employee 7

R408.18

 

 

 

 

8.Azola Human Capital

Employee 8

R478.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 9

R913.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 10

R284.49

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 11

R194.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 12

R155.50

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 13

R291.56

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R194.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R395.81

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R240.31

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 17

R816.36

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 18

R602.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 19

R252.68

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 20

R2 163.70

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 21

R8 790.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 22

R12 004.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 23

R14 593.50

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 24

R2 433.97

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 25

R539.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 26

R191.83

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 27

R946.10

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 28

R540.63

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 29

R71 224.98

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 30

R660.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 31

R6 489.45

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 32

R9 234.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 33

R5 171.04

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 34

R2 052.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 35

R640.47

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 36

R329 184.63

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016/17

R1 206 712.67

70

1.Afrizan Tes

Employee 1

R906.30

 

 

 

 

2.G Lison Personnel

Employee 2

R2 797.01

 

 

 

 

3.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 3

R14 180.44

 

 

 

 

4.Pakanyo Trading

Employee 4

R1 436.40

 

 

 

 

5.Tasiso Consulting

Employee 5

R2 049.75

 

 

 

 

6.Kelly

Employee 6

R2 335.60

 

 

 

 

7.MPC

Employee 7

R346.13

 

 

 

 

8.Ikamva

Employee 8

R3 155.42

 

 

 

 

9.Affirmative portfolios

Employee 9

R159 318.46

 

 

 

 

9.Adcorp Workforce

Employee 10

R1 457.78

 

 

 

 

10.Azola Human Capital

Employee 11

R4 351.85

 

 

 

 

11.Dante personnel

Employee 12

R8 600.93

 

 

 

 

12.Morvest Human Capital Management

Employee 13

R4 646.51

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R330.43

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R137 822.58

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R4 817.93

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 17

R325.13

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 18

R193.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 19

R602.55

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 20

R5 646.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 21

R816.35

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 22

R41 511.48

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 23

R2 896.12

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 24

R26 527.59

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 25

R158 624.99

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 26

R325.13

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 27

R1 091.07

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 28

R116.62

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 29

R349.87

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 30

R4 753.75

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 31

R9 781.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 32

R28 343.25

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 33

R444.60

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 34

R437.76

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 35

R611.33

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 36

R296.51

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 37

R296.51

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 38

R1 423.29

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 39

R524.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 40

R6 862.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 41

R1 918.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 42

R179.85

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 43

R755.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 44

R2 170.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 45

R878.53

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 46

R1 025.84

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 47

R120 983.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 48

R15 985.85

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 49

R5 423.21

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 50

R14 741.27

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 51

R93 476.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 52

R45 262.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 53

R5 833.63

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 54

R8 947.39

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 55

R1 094.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 56

R2 187.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 57

R2 736.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 58

R12 852.43

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 59

R8 421.41

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 60

R7 978.18

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 61

R8 421.41

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 62

R9 307.87

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 63

R8 421.41

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 64

R4 432.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 65

R3 989.09

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 66

R3 989.09

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 67

R4 432.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 68

R4 432.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 69

R510.06

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 70

R164 572.55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017/18

R1 403 483.71

53

1.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 1

R1 178.76

 

 

 

 

2.Phanda Personnel

Employee 2

R1 157.10

 

 

 

 

3.Ricoware

Employee 3

R410.40

 

 

 

 

4.Tasiso Consulting

Employee 4

R23 942.40

 

 

 

 

5.Kelly

Employee 5

R312.25

 

 

 

 

6.MPC

Employee 6

R1 405.11

 

 

 

 

7.Ikamva

Employee 7

R6 574.56

 

 

 

 

8.Adcorp Workforce

Employee 8

R1 484.28

 

 

 

 

9.Dante personnel

Employee 9

R1 987.88

 

 

 

 

10.ETS Professionals

Employee 10

R38 255.20

 

 

 

 

11.Morvest Human Capital Management

Employee 11

R38 875.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 12

R568.98

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 13

R410 569.08

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R98 952.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R6 574.56

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R6 574.56

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 17

R44 104.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 18

R1 313.28

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 19

R17 896.32

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 20

R12 044.75

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 21

R276.19

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 22

R103 745.53

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 23

R1 893.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 24

R1 657.13

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 25

R463.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 26

R631.29

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 27

R1 893.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 28

R37 344.37

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 29

R21 378.69

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 30

R26 926.17

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 31

R496.24

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 32

R82 753.12

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 33

R959.40

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 34

R5 602.66

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 35

R477.22

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 36

R7 888.16

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 37

R12 483.30

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 38

R6 710.86

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 39

R4 651.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 40

R1 574.42

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 41

R2 907.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 42

R43 436.05

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 43

R45 209.66

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 44

R6 205.25

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 45

R6 205.25

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 46

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 47

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 48

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 49

R443.23

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 50

R6 669.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 51

R51 300.00

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 52

R195 856.77

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 53

R9 933.32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018/19

R105 923.90

16

1.Masibambane Recruitment

Employee 1

R5 423.00

 

 

 

 

2.Phanda Personnel

Employee 2

R833.75

 

 

 

 

3.Kelly

Employee 3

R37 918.40

 

 

 

 

4.Khulisa connection

Employee 4

R5 301.00

 

 

 

 

5.MPC

Employee 5

R5 888.00

 

 

 

 

6.Izilamani group

Employee 6

R3 312.00

 

 

 

 

7.Warrior Talent Holdings

Employee 7

R4 554.00

 

 

 

 

8.Adcorp workforce

Employee 8

R21 576.30

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 9

R310.50

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 10

R1 231.20

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 11

R3 817.54

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 12

R1 527.02

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 13

R10 337.94

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 14

R2 646.83

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 15

R554.24

 

 

 

 

 

Employee 16

R692.18

 

Total

R3 340 929.02

175

   

R3 340 929.02

 
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

05 November 2018 - NW2676

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What number of status reports were (i) requested by the Railway Safety Regulator from the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) and (ii) issued by Prasa in each month (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) from 1 January 2018 to date, (b) what number of maintenance reports were (i) requested and (ii) issued, (c) what number of other reports were (i) requested and (ii) issued and (d) what were the reasons in each instance where reports were (i) not issued or (ii) issued late?

Reply:

  1. Reports are requested in line with the Safety Management System (SMS) and this entails one (1) report per year. Reports are submitted per discipline, i.e. Perway, Level Crossings, Stations, Electrical, Signalling and Telecoms. The status of the submission is outlined as per the attached annexure.
  1. See attached annexure
  2. See attached annexure

(aa) See attached annexure

(bb) For 2018/19, information was not available or PRASA Rail was awaiting Regional inputs. The Railway Safety Regulator has advised that reports would be submitted by 30 September 2018.

  1. (i) & (ii) See attached annexure
  1. (i) & (ii) See attached annexure
  1. (i) & (ii) Reports were requested. However, due to PRASA’s internal challenges with a lack of continuity in various areas, reports were not submitted. Furthermore, it should be noted, for the same reason that PRASA is lagging in providing the RSR with the requested information, the RSR has now made the reports requirement of the safety permit which was recently issued to PRASA.

PERWAY

No.

(aa)

Year

(a)(i)

No. status reports requested by RSR (per Discipline)

(a)(ii)

Report Issued by PRASA

(d)(i) & (ii)

Comments report not issued or late submission

(b)(i)

No. Maintenance reports requested by RSR

(b)(ii)

Report Issues by PRASA

Comments report not issued or late submission

(c)(i)

Other Report

General Comment

1.

2013/14

16

12

No historical records

4

4

n/a

n/a

n/a

2.

2014/15

16

12

No historical records

4

4

n/a

n/a

n/a

3.

2015/16

16

12

No historical records

4

4

n/a

n/a

n/a

4

2016/17

16

15

No historical records

4

4

n/a

n/a

n/a

5.

2017/18

16

15

Awaiting info ration from regions

4

4

n/a

n/a

n/a

LEVEL CROSSINGS

No.

(aa)

Year

(a)(i)

No. status reports requested by RSR (per Discipline)

(a)(ii)

Report Issued by PRASA

(d)(i) & (ii)

Comments report not issued or late submission

(b)(i)

No. Maintenance reports requested by RSR

(b)(ii)

Report Issues by PRASA

Comments report not issued or late submission

(c)(i)

Other Report

General Comment

1.

2013/14

12

4

No records

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

2.

2014/15

12

4

No records

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

3.

2015/16

12

4

No records

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

4

2016/17

12

4

No records

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

5.

2017/18

12

7

Awaiting information from Regional offices

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

STATIONS

No.

(aa)

Year

(a)(i)

No. status reports requested by RSR (per Discipline)

(a)(ii)

Report Issued by PRASA

(d)(i) & (ii)

Comments report not issued or late submission

(b)(i)

No. Maintenance reports requested by RSR

(b)(ii)

Report Issues by PRASA

Comments report not issued or late submission

(c)(i)

Other Report

General Comment

1.

2013/14

4

0

Not yet available

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

2.

2014/15

4

0

Not yet available

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

3.

2015/16

4

0

Not yet available

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

4.

2016/17

4

0

Not yet available

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

5.

2017/18

4

0

Not yet available

4

4

n/a

n/a

 

ELECTRICAL

No.

(aa)

Year

(a)(i)

No. status reports requested by RSR (per Discipline)

(a)(ii)

Report Issued by PRASA

(d)(i) & (ii)

Comments report not issued or late submission

(b)(i)

No. Maintenance reports requested by RSR

(b)(ii)

Report Issues by PRASA

Comments report not issued or late submission

(c)(i)

Other Report

General Comment

1.

2013/14

8

0

Asset information not available yet/Historical info not available

8

2

Substations Information not yet available from Regions

n/a

 

2.

2014/15

8

0

Asset information not available yet/Historical info not available

8

3

Substations Information not yet available from Regions

n/a

 

3.

2015/16

8

0

Asset information not available ye/Historical info not available

8

2

Substations Information not yet available from Regions

n/a

 

4.

2016/17

8

1

Asset information not available yet//Historical info not available

8

2

Substations Information not yet available from Regions

n/a

 

5.

2017/18

8

2

Asset information not available yet

8

4

Substations Information not yet available from Regions

n/a

 

SIGNALLING

No.

(aa)

Year

(a)(i)

No. status reports requested by RSR (per Discipline)

(a)(ii)

Report Issued by PRASA

(d)(i) & (ii)

Comments report not issued or late submission

(b)(i)

No. Maintenance reports requested by RSR

(b)(ii)

Report Issues by PRASA

Comments report not issued or late submission

(c)(i)

Other Report

General Comment

1.

2013/14

4

4

n/a

4

3

Information not available from the Regions

n/a

 

2.

2014/15

4

4

n/a

4

3

Information not available from the Regions

n/a

 

3.

2015/16

4

4

n/a

4

3

Information not available from the Regions

n/a

 

4

2016/17

4

4

n/a

4

3

Information not available from the Regions

n/a

 

5.

2017/18

4

4

n/a

4

3

Information not available from the Regions

n/a

 

TELECOMS

No.

(aa)

Year

(a)(i)

No. status reports requested by RSR (per Discipline)

(a)(ii)

Report Issued by PRASA

(d)(i) & (ii)

Comments report not issued or late submission

(b)(i)

No. Maintenance reports requested by RSR

(b)(ii)

Report Issues by PRASA

Comments report not issued or late submission

(c)(i)

Other Report

General Comment

1.

2013/14

4

0

Historical records not available

4

1

Historical records not available

n/a

 

2.

2014/15

4

0

Historical records not available

4

1

Historical records not available

n/a

 

3.

2015/16

4

0

Historical records not available

4

3

Information not available

n/a

 

4

2016/17

4

0

Historical records not available

4

3

Information not available

n/a

 

5.

2017/18

4

4

n/a

4

3

Information not available

n/a

 

05 November 2018 - NW3032

Profile picture: Shackleton, Mr MS

Shackleton, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the debate on Vote 35 - Transport, Appropriation Bill in Parliament on 18 May 2018, (a) what training and skills transfer programmes to small enterprises does the SA National Roads Agency Ltd offer, (b) what (i) programmes and (ii) number of the specified programmes have been offered in the past three financial years, (c)(i) how are the small enterprises identified to whom such programmes are offered and (ii) how is the success of such programmes ascertained and (d) what amounts have been (i) budgeted and (ii) actually spent on the specified programmes in the past three financial years?

Reply:

  1. What training and skills transfer programmes to small enterprises does the SA National Roads Agency Ltd offer?

SANRAL offers the following skills transfer programmes:

1. Conventional Projects

  • All conventional projects make provision for the utilization of SMMEs (As per the PPPFA regulations of 2011 and 2017).
  • All conventional projects make provision for the general, entrepreneurial and technical training of these SMMEs.
  • Following a training needs assessment, SMMEs are provided with SAQA and CETA accredited, NQF level 2 to 4 training.

2. Routine Road Maintenance Projects

  • RRM projects are management contracts and the main contractor, depending on its B-BBEE status, sub-lets 40% to 80% of the work to SMMEs. These contracts may also be considered contractor incubator projects.
  • RRM projects makes provision for the general, entrepreneurial and technical training of these SMMEs.
  • Following a training needs assessment, SMMEs are provided with SAQA and CETA accredited, NQF level 2 to 4 training.
  • Full time mentors are provided on the projects to assist and guide the SMME’s.
  • Depending on various project factors, many of these training programmes consists of Full Learnerships, where SMMEs obtain a formal SAQA accredited qualification on successful completion of the training.

3. Community Development (CD) Projects

  • CD projects are training programmes where SANRAL contracts with a Construction Manager who subcontracts SMMEs to construct 90% of the work. These may also be considered contractor incubation projects.
  • SMMES are provided with SAQA and CETA accredited, NQF level 2 to 4 training, and usually consists of Full Learnership where SMMEs obtain a formal SAQA accredited Qualification.
  • SMMEs receives theoretical training, which is followed by practical training and the subsequent construction of the work under the mentorship of the Construction Manager.

b) What:

i) Programmes and

All the programmes mentioned in response to question (a) above have been offered continuously over the past three (2016/2017, 2017/2018) financial years.

ii) Number of programmes offered in the past three financial years.

In addition to SANRAL’s conventional and RRM projects (80 in number), 83 Community Development projects were initiated over the past three (2016/2017, 2017/2018) financial years and are in various project stages (2015/2016, 2016/2017, 2017/2018).

c) How:

are the small enterprises identified to whom such programmes are offered and?

  •  

a) Where many SMMEs are available, use is made of tests called the Learning Ability Battery (LAB) of tests to select the best candidates. These tests assess the candidates’ literacy, numeracy and entrepreneurial ability. This technique is mainly used on projects in large urban areas such as Tshwane.

b) Following a resource audit and liaison with the Project Liaison Committee, Targeted Enterprises are identified from the Designated Groups from the vicinity of the project as per the PPPFA regulations in the rural areas.

  •  

c) Provision for the utilisation and development of SMMEs is allowed for in all SANRAL contract documents and project types.

ii) is the success of such programmes ascertained and

a) SANRAL keeps record of every SMME that is contracted or sub-contracted on SANRAL projects.

b) SANRAL can thus track on how many contracts a specific SMME worked on, over what period, and monitor growth of the SMME by its ascension up the CIDB grades where the lowest grade is 1 (entry level) and the highest grade is 9.

This is the measure of success used by SANRAL. The programmes are however not without challenges and SANRAL’s new transformation policy seeks to address some of the shortcomings that have been identified in previous interventions.

d) (i) Budgeted and

a) Training is a component of conventional, RRM and CD projects and varies between 0,1% and 2% of the contract value, depending on the project category.

b) Skills transfer (coaching, mentoring and guidance) are budgeted in several items which forms part of a contract and is not reported separately.

c) Note that the value of the work done by SMMEs and is not included in a. and b. mentioned above.

i) Actually, spent on the specified programmes in the past three financial years?

a) Actual spent on training only in the past three (2016/2017, 2017/2018, 2018/2019 – to date) financial years is as follows:

 

IT IS Table 4

IT IS Table 1

IT IS Table 3

Year

No. of SMMEs Employed

(CIDB 1 – 6)

Value of SMME Work

(CIDB 1 – 6)

No. of SMMEs Employed

(Total)

Value of SMME Work

(Total)

No. of Trainees

No. of Courses

Rand Value

2015/2016

518

R 1 422 552 987

2 070

R 2 244 367 775

4 668*

7 075

R 13 658 275

2016/2017

561

R 1 654 903 707

1 658

R 2 371 048 028

4 737*

9 461

R 23 750 185

2017/2018

793

R 2 238 679 556

2 064

R 3 287 650 418

3 532*

7 000

R 21 522 928

         

* Includes SMME owners, employees and labourers.

The figures in this table are generated on 24/10/2018.

01 November 2018 - NW2596

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Is the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (Sanral) receiving funding from the National Treasury for the N2 Wild Coast toll road; if so, what amount; (2) is Sanral borrowing funds for the N2 Wild Coast toll road; if so, (a) from whom, (b) what amount will be borrowed and (c) what will be the toll charged on the specified toll road?

Reply:

1. Yes, since 2011 the upgrading of the existing sections of the N2 Wild Coast project between East London and Port St Johns via Mthatha has been funded through SANRAL MTEF budget allocation. In the current SANRAL MTEF allocation an amount of R2.055 billion has been specifically earmarked for N2 Wild Coast project.

2. No, all the funding for the upgrading of existing portions of the route as well as the initial construction costs of the greenfield section are being funded from SANRAL MTEF budget allocation. As per the Hybrid funding model toll funding will only be utilised for future maintenance, operations and upgrading.

(a) No funds have been borrowed at present,

(b) The amount to be borrowed will be finalised as part of the public Intent to Toll process to be initiated within next 6 months,

(c) Toll charged will be determined as part of public Intent to Toll process to be initiated within next 6 months.