Questions and Replies

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30 March 2021 - NW525

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes

(1) (b) Yes, The Application for Employee to Perform Other Remunerative Work in terms of Section 30 of the Public Service act; is valid for the period of twelve (12) months, thereafter the employee is expected to re-apply for new approval before he or she can continue to work again.

(1) (i)

Number of applications

Year

2

2014

2

2015

3

2016

10

2017

6

2018

9

2019

6

2020

Total = 38

(1)(ii)

Job / Work Categories

Year

Middle Management (2)

2014

Senior Management (1) and Middle Management (1)

2015

Middle Management (1), lower level (2)

2016

Senior Management (1) Middle Management (5) and lower level (Clerical) (3)

2017

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (3) and lower level (2)

2018

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (6), lower level (2)

2019

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (1) and lower level (1)

2020

(2) Yes

(2) (a) DPSA Directive/Guide on Managing of Other Remunerative Work in the Public Service;

(2)(b) According to HR Delegations: The Salary Level 1- 12 is considered and approved by the Director-General and the Salary Level 13 and above is considered and approved by the Minister

(2)(c) None

(2)(d) Not applicable

17 March 2021 - NW207

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the property situated at 265 Pasteur Road, Blackheath, Johannesburg, (a) which (i) division of SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL) and/or (ii) other entities reporting to him were responsible for selecting this site for operation and for signing the lease and (b) what is the period of the lease and total amount of rental being paid; (2) whether (a) SANRAL or (b) entities reporting to him are conducting any operations at 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so (3) whether the owners of the property are (a) employed by SANRAL and/or other divisions and/or entities of the Transport Department, (c) senior members of government and/or (d) former senior members of government; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case? NW210E

Reply:

1 (a) (i) SANRAL was not involved in selecting the site.

1 (a) (ii) SANRAL appointed service provider VEA Roads was responsible for selecting this site and entered into the lease agreement.

1 (b) Minimum lease period is 36 months with monthly lease of R20,000 per month.

2 (a) No operations conducted by SANRAL from 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg.

2 (b) No operations conducted by entities reporting to SANRAL from 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg.

SANRAL has no position in terms of operations form 266 Harley Rd Blackheath.

3 (a) According to SANRAL records the registered owner of the property is not employed by SANRAL and/or entities/Department of Transport

3 (b) (c)(d) Falls way

17 March 2021 - NW253

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Transport

What has he found to have been the impact of the relaxation of COVID-19 restrictions on public transport;

Reply:

(1) Since the move to alert level 3 public transport operators operating shorter trips were allowed to carry 100% of the loading capacity of their vehicles whereas for longer trips the permissible loading capacity remained at 70%. These relaxations were coupled with other mitigating factors such as the mandatory wearing of masks and allowing for ventilation. To this end there has been no indication that public transport has been the main contributor in the spread of the virus. This, therefore, implies that measures put in place when the carrying capacity restrictions were relaxed yielded positive results.

(2) The fact that public transport has thus far not been detected as the main contributor to the spread of the virus, is to a large extent proof that operators are generally complying with specified regulations.

 

02 March 2021 - NW500

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to his replies to questions 547 on 11 November 2020 and 687 on 3 April 2019, his department has withheld transfers; if not, why not; if so, (a) what amount has been withheld, (b) from what date were transfers withheld and (c) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Whether with reference to his replies to questions 547 on 11 November 2020 and 687 on 3 April 2019, his department has withheld transfers?

Yes, indeed the Department has withheld Ekurhuleni’s 2nd tranche transfer.

a) What amount has been withheld?

R200 million,

b) From what date were transfers withheld?

From 23 October 2020 to 25 November 2020.

c) What are the relevant details?

A tranche / quarterly transfer is conditional upon the progress or achievement of previously funded milestones. The Department as the Transferring Officer had to reschedule Ekurhuleni’s 2nd tranche transfer due to non-compliance with grant framework and allow enough time to the Ekurhuleni municipality to conduct applicable assessments in order to comply with the grant framework. The transfer deferred was rescheduled and paid on the 26th of November 2020, following the required compliance.

02 March 2021 - NW17

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has found that minibus taxis and flights that are allowed to operate at full capacity and thereby exposing passengers and travellers in close proximity to many hours of coughing, sneezing, talking and eating, do not pose a serious risk to the transmission of COVID-19; if not, what evidence does he rely on to make such concessions; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Public Transport

In terms of the Public Transport Directions published on the 22 July 2020 (Gazette No: 43538) loading capacity for long distance public transport travel is restricted to 70% whereas for any trip regarded as short distance a 100% capacity is allowed. Medical experts and professionals advised that the longer you are exposed to an infectious person the more likely you are to be exposed to the virus. This implies that encounters with an infectious person for a short time have a lesser risk of spreading the virus. It is for this reason that allowing closer contact of passengers (100% capacity) on shorter trips/period, coupled with other mitigating measures such as wearing of masks and sufficient ventilation, would not necessarily pose a higher risk of infection to passengers. It should also be emphasised that the wearing of masks is currently compulsory.

South African Civil Aviation Authority

The Minister of Transport has permitted aircraft to be filled to capacity except the two rows in the front or back of the cabin which must be kept open in case a suspected case is identified during flight.  This decision was taken following a risk assessment exercise and the implementation of a multi-layered approach to the prevention of the spread of the virus which includes amongst others:

  1. Mandatory wearing of masks throughout the flights by both crew and passengers except children under 5 years and those with documented medical exclusions.
  2. Screening at domestic & international airports upon entering the terminal building that include thermal scanners, questionnaires and visual inspections.
  3. Social Distancing throughout the journey.
  4. Contactless check-in and boarding procedures.
  5. Issuance of Directions and detailed guidelines on procedures to be followed by each operator customised to their individual operations.
  6. Disinfection of the aircraft before it enters service and in between trips.
  7. Training of Crew in the management of communicable diseases.
  8. Universal Precaution Kits on board.
  9. Mandatory PCR Testing & Antigen Testing of International Passengers.
  10. Management of medical waste in the cabin.
  11. Contact tracing mechanisms.
  12. Airlines/Charter Operators & Airports are required to submit procedures for approval by the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) in compliance to the Minister’s Directions and guidelines. The SACAA is responsible to monitor compliance.
  13. Public Education through media campaigns.
  14. Embarkation & Disembarkation procedures are implemented at airports during boarding and upon arrival.

In terms of the Aircraft itself, the following is applicable to modern aircraft and this is based on IATA, Airbus, Boeing & Embraer research.

Cabin Air Quality: The research conducted indicated the following findings:

  1. The risk of transmission in the modern cabin environment is low for a number of reasons: passengers face the same direction, seatbacks act as barriers, air flow is from the top to bottom, and the air is also very clean.
  2. There is a higher rate of air renewal than in other indoor facilities.
  3. The air in the aircraft cabin comprises of around 50% fresh air from outside the aircraft and 50% of HEPA filtered air. The air in the cabin is renewed 20-30 times an hour, once every 2-3 minutes and about 10 times more than most office buildings. Research has shown that the airflow in an aircraft (from ceiling to floor) is effective to prevent the droplet spread in the cabin.
  4. Modern jet aircraft are equipped with High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. These filters have similar performance to those used in hospital operating theatres and industrial clean rooms and these HEPA filters are 99.9+% effective at removing viruses, bacteria and fungi.
  5. The bacteria/virus removal efficiency rate of the HEPA filters onboard includes viruses such as SARS, which is similar to COVID-19.
  6. The guidelines issued by the Minister requires that airlines maintain appropriate ventilation during all phases of travel, including while the plane is on the ground.

Aircraft by their nature are confined spaces and for decades operators have relied on sophisticated air conditioning systems to filter out viruses that could be carried by passengers and these systems have proven to be effective in filtering out viruses and bacteria that could be exchanged on board an aircraft. Studies conducted by aircraft manufacturers and operators prove the effectiveness of these systems. Same have been recognised by international bodies regulating civil aviation world-wide.

02 March 2021 - NW287

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department exercises any oversight over municipal speed-calming policies to ensure that both the guidelines entailed in the specified policies as well as the actual implementation of the guidelines by municipalities conform to the national guidelines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department does not exercise any oversight over municipal speed calming policies that ensure that both the guidelines entailed in the specified policies, as well as the actual implementation of the guidelines by municipalities, conform to the national guidelines.

It is important to note that the local sphere of Government has by-laws that among other things guide the design and the implementation of the calming measures within the area of its jurisdiction.

Furthermore, The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

We believe that Municipalities will benefit from these guidelines if they make use of them.

02 March 2021 - NW64

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he has been informed that the roads in the agricultural town of Standerton in Mpumalanga are full of potholes and that this has persisted for quite some time now; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether his department has plans in place to address the persisting problem; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the plans be implemented?

Reply:

1. The Minister of Transport has been informed about the bad condition of roads within the town of Standerton in Mpumalanga Province. The Minister has also discovered that the mentioned roads fall within the jurisdiction of the local sphere of Government and they needed to be rehabilitated through the MIG funding made available by COGTA.

2. The Department is constantly engaging with all 44 Municipalities on road data collection so that municipalities can be able to prioritise the maintenance and rehabilitation of their road network using their MIG allocations from COGTA. The Department is of the view that the Standerton local Municipality has made plans as per assessment data they have received thus far.

Municipalities are also encouraged to enter into MOA with SANRAL to augment their technical skills where that is a challenge for their execution of road maintenance activities.

Furthermore, SANRAL through its routine maintenance contracts do daily route patrols of all national roads under SANRAL’s jurisdiction and identify, for example potholes that must be repaired within 48 hours.

We are made to understand that, the Mpumalanga Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport (PWRT) is aware of the poor condition of the Municipal roads in Standerton and was requested by the Local Municipality in question for certain municipal roads to be taken over by the Province. This transfer is encouraged.

02 March 2021 - NW497

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport:

With reference to his reply to question 1030 on 14 November 2019, (a) what are the reasons that the City of Ekurhuleni failed to meet the deadline of October 2019 in order to have 40 buses operating, (b) what action has his department taken with city for missing the deadline and (c) amount does the city spend on leasing each bus in each month

Reply:

a) Challenges experienced with the operationalisation of additional buses and services.

The City of Ekurhuleni reported that there were unforeseen delays with the issuing of new operating licences for buses at the Provincial Regulatory Entity (PRE). Without the operating licences the additional busses could not be introduced into the system.

This delay was further exacerbated by the closing of PRE offices during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Only applications for operating licence renewals were processed during the lockdown period.  The City had to intervene and request for a special dispensation for the processing of the BRT operator’s application for operating licences. 

It must also be noted that Ekurhuleni’s application for a rollover of over R100 million for the 2018/19 year was not approved by National Treasury even though the city appealed in January 2020. This led to a shortage of operational funding for the 19/20 financial year.

 

b) The Department of Transport supported the Ekurhuleni’s appeal regarding its 18/19 rollover. However, with this appeal being unsuccessful and with the challenge of COVID 19 from March 2020 and its impact on the Tembisa to OR Tambo International Airport route, the Department has accepted a delay and has instructed Ekurhuleni to fully ramp up the 40 bus service in the first half of 2021.

Failure to comply with this will see Ekurhuleni as a potential candidate for being suspended from the Public Transport Network Grant in the 2022 MTEF period.

Similar cautionary warnings have been given to several other cities as well.

c) The City of Ekurhuleni report that it is not spending any funds per month relating to the leasing of busses stated above. Initially some of the 40 buses were leased from early 2019 by Harambee operator KTVR Vehilce Operating Company (VOC) in order to augment the pilot service launch in late 2017.

By October 2019, the Harambee operator KTVR VOC had secured short term financing for the remainder of the 40 bus fleet that was not already procured

02 March 2021 - NW206

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) operations is the (i) SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL) and/or (ii) entities reporting to him conducting and/or have they conducted from the property at 265 Pasteur Road, Blackheath, Johannesburg, (b) total number of employees of SANRAL and the specified entities reporting to him work at the property, (c) were the reasons to use the specified property and (d) process was followed to contract with the owners of the property; (2) whether SANRAL and/or entities reporting to him have been informed that (a) activities at the property are in violation of the property zoning and (b) the buildings on the property are without plans and therefore illegal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) (i) SANRAL is conducting no operations from the property at 265 Pasteur Road.

1 (a) (ii) A service provider VEA Roads appointed by SANRAL for the Routine Road Maintenance Contract (NRA X.002-128-2019/1) of National Route N1 Section 19, N1 Section 20, N1 Section 21, N3 Section 12, N12 Section 18 & N17 Section 1 (Johannesburg Freeway RRM) is conducting its operations from 265 Pasteur Road and using it as site office for the Routine Road Maintenance contract. According to SANRAL Service Provider this property is registered as a business, as confirmed with the owner.

1 (b) No employees of SANRAL work at the property. For the SANRAL appointed service providers the following employees work at the property:

  • 6 x representing the Consulting Engineers of Ndodana/Oarona JV;
  • 3 x Employees from the Main Contractor (Vea Roads);
  • Security on-site

1 (c) The SANRAL appointed service provider indicated that they selected the property because it is:

  • Registered as a business.
  • Fully furnished as an office with network points, fibre installation etc.
  • Central locality of the property in relation to the project been administered from this property and easy access to the Gauteng Freeways.

1 (d) The SANRAL appointed service provider indicated that they contacted the property agent known as RAWSON, put down their requirements and this property was identified by RAWSON and a lease then entered into by service provider.

 

2 (a) SANRAL or any of its entities has not been informed that activities at the property are in violation of the property zoning.

2 (b) SANRAL or any of its entities has not been informed that buildings on the property are without plans and therefore illegal.

SANRAL has requested the service provider that is leasing the property to obtain written confirmation from the lessee with regard to relevant approvals regarding zoning and plans. Should there be any non-compliances, SANRAL will insist that the service provider ensures that they are rectified.

 

16 February 2021 - NW19

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the fact that airports facilitate tourism, boost trade and generate economic growth aviation, his department has put in place strategic interventions such as the Instrument Landing System, Microwave Landing System, Very High Frequency Omni-Directional Range, Standard Runway, Navigation Facilities and jet fuel and aviation gasoline (Avgas) to remedy the reported shortage of resources and basic operation facilities at the Mthatha Airport; if not, why not; if so, (a) what strategic interventions are in place to remedy the situation, as the shortage of jet fuel and Avgas negatively affects the Department of Health and the SA Police Service in the region, (b) by what date does he envisage the strategic interventions will be implemented, (c) how soon can the results be expected and (d) what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

Civil Aviation

The airport does not have an ILS (Instrument Landing System) as the terrain around the airport could cause problems with signals. The airport had an ILS test done by an independent Company that installs ILS and it was found not to be a site where an ILS can be installed. The airport has a GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) which is in use to aid aircraft to land at Mthatha Airport.

The airport does have a VOR (Very High Frequency Omni Range) but when the new runway was added to the airport by the National Department of Transport (DOT), DOT did not move this VOR as it was installed for use on the old runway as a let-down aid. In building the new runway the VOR was too far off centre line to be used as a let-down procedure. A new DVOR is planned for Mthatha Airport and it will be installed by Air Traffic Navigation Service (ATNS) when ATNS upgrades other VORs in South Africa. COVID-19 has delayed the procurement of such VORs but this will take place in the new financial year.

Mthatha Airport has one of the most modern runway lighting systems in the world and this includes approach lights, PAPI (Precision Approach Path Indicator) Approach lights, taxiway lights and edge lighting including marker boards for taxiways.

There is no fuelling at the airport for civilian use currently as the demand for such fuel is minimal. The airline that serves the airport does not require fuel and there are very few private flights to this airport. The South African Police Service (SAPS) have their own fuelling arrangements at the airport at the air wing site helipad. The Department of Defence has a similar arrangement where they fuel their own helicopters.

In 2018 the Eastern Cape Department of Transport advertised an Expression of Interest and received two responses. However, the responses were not up to the standard due to the fact that the aviation fuelling requirements are strictly regulated and not any one can operate such a facility. The Department is attempting to have a sole service provider appointed, who operates at the East London airport and has been operating for many years.

 

16 February 2021 - NW124

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has ever considered and/or is considering implementing a national framework that prescribes the design of speed humps instead of merely issuing guidelines that are malleable; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has the speed hump design manual published in 1998 and it needs updating to be in line with new developments within the built environments.

The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), as the lead agency on road safety, is responsible for chairing the National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) to look into among other priorities the updating of procedure manuals, including Road Safety manuals and design manuals. These manuals and guidelines are ratified at COTO before they get incorporated to Provincial Authorities Implementation guidelines.

The Department has since instructed the RTMC to prioritise the updating of National Guidelines for traffic calming for inclusion into Provincial Road Safety Authorities implementation guidelines.

Furthermore, the Provinces through their traffic engineering sections, do carry out design traffic calming measures eg. rumble strips, speed humps, delineators etc. to mitigate road fatal crashes and protect pedestrian traffic.

16 February 2021 - NW122

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming (details furnished) have been updated since it was last published in 1998; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The 1998 version of the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming have not been updated since they were published.

The National Guidelines for Traffic Calming together with the supplementary documents on the ‘Design and Implementation of Speed Humps’ and the ‘Design Guidelines for Mini-roundabouts’ have however remained the de facto main national reference documents for traffic calming. Given the holistic approach described in the document, some local authorities had adopted the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming as formal municipal policy as a whole, without any amendment whereas other municipalities opted to develop their own policies and standards for traffic calming.

The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

16 February 2021 - NW123

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Design and Implementation of Speed Humps: Supplement to the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming (details furnished) has been updated since it was last published in 1997; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Design and Implementation of Speed Humps: Supplement to the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming has not been updated since it was last published in 1997.

The National Guidelines for Traffic Calming 1998 together with the supplementary documents the ‘Design and Implementation of Speed Humps’ and the ‘Design Guidelines for Mini-roundabouts’ have remained the de facto main national reference documents for traffic calming. Given the holistic approach described in the document, some local authorities had adopted the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming as formal municipal policy as a whole, without any amendment whereas other municipalities opted to develop their own policies and standards for traffic calming.

The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

16 February 2021 - NW3

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What total number of truck drivers have been murdered in riot-related incidents (a) in each of the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years and (b) from 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) (a) what total number of the truck drivers in each specified financial year and time period were foreign persons and (b) from which countries did they originate in each case; (3) whether he will to make a statement on the matter, if not, why not, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The statistics on the persons allegedly murdered flowing from the torching of trucks are kept by the South African Police Service (SAPS). That being said, I humbly request that this question be re-directed to the Departments of Employment and Labour and the SAPS for a reason that the President established an Inter Ministerial Committee (IMC) under the leadership of the Department of Employment and Labour. It is worth noting that SAPS chairs the National JOINTS where security information is shared including such criminality that is taking place within the freight industry. It must also be noted that the Department of Transport initially led the Task Team prior to the establishment of the IMC. The then Minister of Transport, Dr B Nzimande officially handed over a report on this matter to then Minister of Labour on 15 April 2019.

The Minister of Employment and Labour, Hon. Nxesi is now leading this portfolio.

 

02 December 2020 - NW2838

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has been informed that settlements were paid immediately after being lodged by certain lawyers or legal firm (name furnished), but victims of road accidents were not paid and waited for more than 10 years to receive their money; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) was approached by the South African Police Services (SAPS) for information relating to its investigation into the alleged theft of trust funds by the legal firm (name furnished). The SAPS did not inform the RAF of a complaint, nor is the RAF aware of a complaint, relating to the early settlement by the RAF of claims lodged by the legal firm. In respect of the claim concerned, the claim was lodged with the RAF in 2013 and settled in 2018, which is certainly not indicative of early settlement. However, anyone with information in relation to the alleged early settlement of claims lodged by the legal firm is invited to contact the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation on 012 846 4590, or the RAF’s Forensic Investigation Department on 0800 005919. In the interim the RAF’s Forensic Investigation Department is investigating all matters lodged by the legal firm.

NW3662E

 

02 December 2020 - NW2603

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the August 2015 report by the former Public Protector, Adv T N Madonsela, titled Derailed, into malfeasance at the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, where she inter alia found a problem in the implementation of the supply chain management policy and also highlighted a problem with clause 11.3, he has found that the supply chain management policy has subsequently changed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of how the specified policy has changed?

Reply:

The Supply Chain Management Policy, February 2009, Clause 11.3 Bidding Methods, was subsequently changed twice to align to 217 of the constitution and all legislative prescripts. These were effected as the Supply Chain Management Policy, November 2018, driven by the Board of Control, and further enhanced through the current PRASA Supply Chain Management 2020 policy. This has embedded controls and standardized on how the organization executes its procurement activities across the business.

02 December 2020 - NW2816

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Lentit, Mr R to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he will furnish details of the proposals for the development and the associated investments for each specified proposal of more than 12 new harbours in the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Northern Cape and Western Cape, as stated in the Medium-Term Budget Policy speech; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The development and associated investment in Small Harbours is the mandate of the Department of Public Works. The Department of Transport as mandated by the Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy shall develop Regulatory Framework on the operating model, safety, security and marine environment protection.

 

02 December 2020 - NW2669

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that the Gautrain is a smart public transport mode maintaining a high level of operational efficiency, what (a) total amount of profit did the Gautrain make in the 2019-20 financial year, (b) were the operational and maintenance costs and (c) total amount will Phase 2 cost?

Reply:

a) The Gautrain is a Public Private Partnership between the Gauteng Provincial Government and a private sector consortium by the name of the Bombela Concession Company. In terms of this contract, the Gauteng Provincial Government does not make a financial profit from the project. Instead the Provincial Government maximizes the social and economic returns from having a well-run and efficient public transport system linking key economic nodes in Gauteng.

b) The operating and maintenance costs for the financial year ending March 2020 were R1,333 billion. During this period the revenue received from fare paying passengers and other sources such as advertising income totaled R971 million. There was an estimated R32 million loss of revenue in the month of March 2020 due to the reduced number of passengers travelling because of the Covid-19 pandemic. The shortfall was covered by the Patronage Guarantee paid by the Province of Gauteng as part of its ongoing contractual commitments in terms of the PPP agreement.

c) At this stage, the feasibility study for Phase 2 of the Gautrain is with the National Treasury and the estimated project costs can only be finalized once the input of Treasury is received and incorporated in the financial model.

01 December 2020 - NW2319

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, in light of a feasibility report of October 2014, with a directive that the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) should submit a Treasury Approval 1 (TA 1) application to the National Treasury for funding considerations which Prasa subsequently submitted to the National Treasury on 30 October 2014, the TA 1 was approved by the National Treasury; (2) (a) with reference to his reply to question 526 on 12 September 2019, who formed part of the Political Oversight Committee and (b) what is the name of the chairperson?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), submitted the Moloto Rail Corridor, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Treasury Approval 1 application to National Treasury for consideration, on 30 October 2014. On 3 December 2015, the Director General of National Treasury responded to the CEO of PRASA informing him that the Treasury Approval 1 application was not granted.

(2)(a) Membership of the Political Oversight Committee (POC) consisted of political representatives at the level of Minister/Member of the Executive Council/Executive Mayor and representatives from Departments, as follows:

  • Department of Economic Development;
  • Department of Finance or National Treasury;
  • Department of Trade and Industry;
  • Department of Water and Environmental Affairs;
  • Department of Rural Development & Land Reform
  • Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport;
  • Limpopo Department of Roads and Transport;
  • Mpumalanga Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport;
  • Nkangala District Municipality;
  • Sekhukhune District Municipality;
  • City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality;
  • Thembisile Hani Local Municipality
  • Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality
  • Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Committee (PICC) – Strategic Infrastructure Project 1 (SIP1) Coordinator

(2)(b) The Chairperson of the Political Oversight Committee was the Minister of Transport.

01 December 2020 - NW2429

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the processes and procedures of the SA Civil Aviation Authority that are in place to ensure that (a) all licensing and (b) operating conditions are met; (2) whether the specified processes and procedures were followed in the case of a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will furnish Mr T B Mabhena with the evidence that the specified processes and procedures were followed in the specified case; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The process for the approval of any aerodrome, inclusive of a heliport, is as follows:

a) The applicant applies to the SACAA by submitting an application form.

b) A preliminary/initial inspection is conducted by Inspectors from the SACAA, in this case comprising of an Infrastructure Inspector and a Flight Operations Inspector to assess the suitability of the proposed site for helicopter operations and a preliminary inspection report with recommendations is generated and forwarded to the applicant.

c) The application is published in Government Gazette (in this case Gazette #41871 of 12 September 2018) for public comment.

d) As soon as the recommendations have been implemented, the applicant forwards a request to the SACAA for a final inspection to be conducted.

e) The initial issue of the approval and restrictions thereof is subject to the applicant complying with the SACAA regulations as well as consideration of any public comments received through the publication process. (In this case there was no comments in relation to any environmental matter).

f) Licenses/approvals are issued for a period of up to 5 years, as provided for under the Civil Aviation Act, Act No 13 of 2009, and, during the interleading periods, compliance is monitored through surveillance inspections, as per international standard.

1. The specified process was followed with the Ultimate Heli application.

2. Third party information can only be released with the consent of the approval holder. The reports contain 3rd party proprietary and commercially sensitive information, is confidential in nature and may contain personal information, which was provided in confidence, and the SACAA does not have consent from the operator to release such.

01 December 2020 - NW2499

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Transport

On what date is it envisaged that his department will fix the MamelodiTsamaya Road in Tshwane that is riddled with potholes?

Reply:

I have taken note of the question from the Honourable Dr S SThembekwayo, and wish to confirm that the road in question is not part of the asset register of the national road network. As you may be aware that the planning, construction, maintenance and operations of all national roads are being managed by the South African National Roads Agency SOC Limited (SANRAL).

My department has made enquires and were informed by the City of Tshwane that the construction of road k54 between k22 (old Bronkhorstspruit road) and k69 (Hans Strijdom, approximately 6.8km) as well as a section of road d2561 from k54 to Tsamaya road in Mamelodi (approximately 2.2km), CONTRACT NO: DRT 91/06/2016. King Civils were appointed as a main contractor. Project commenced on 22 January 2018. The Contractor is responsible for the area in which the reported potholes are concentrated and are responsible for day to day maintenance until they complete the doubling of the stretch of road as per their contractual obligations.

The contractual completion date is 4 November 2020

This will be met, due to legal matters that must be resolved to address the illegal invasion of the road reserve.

01 December 2020 - NW2747

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department and/or the SA National Roads Agency has any plans to build roads in Phokwane in the Northern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

SANRAL jurisdiction is limited to the declared national road network of South Africa. In terms of vicinity of Phokwane in the Northern Cape, National Route N18 Section 1 from Warrenton to the NC/NW Border with a total length of 54,6 km, falls under SANRAL.

The following two major development and improvement projects for this portion of N18/1 has been approved in SANRAL MTEF budget:

  1. N18 Section 1: Warrenton - Vaal-Harts (27,0 km in length) – Magareng Local Municipality
  2. N18 Section 1: Vaal-Harts - NC/NW Border (27.6 km in length) - Phokwane Local Municipality.

For both projects the procurement of Engineering Services will commence during the 2021/22 financial year. The design period is scheduled for 2 years, with construction commencing during the second half of 2023. The scope of works for both projects entail the reconstruction of road pavement layers, the widening of the road width to at least 13,4 metres, construction of passing lanes, the upgrade of all major intersections and the provision of non-motorised transport infrastructure such as formalised footpaths/cycleways and public transport drop off and pick up facilities. As with all SANRAL projects, each of these projects will also incorporate a community development project that focus on priorities identified based on inputs from the community.

The estimate costs of the projects are approximately R920 million (R460 million each), with minimum of 30% of work going to sub-contractors. It is anticipated that these projects will bring much needed economic opportunities and improved road safety to the Local Municipalities and surrounds.

01 December 2020 - NW2271

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What total number of road accident claims that have been lodged against the Road Accident Fund have been awaiting settlement for more than (i) 10 years and (ii) five years, (b) on what date will the outstanding claims finally be settled and (c) what total amount would it take to settle all the claims?

Reply:

(a) The total number of road accident claims that have been lodged against the Road Accident Fund (RAF) and have been awaiting settlement, as at 9 October 2020, for more than (i) 10 years is 6 933 and (ii) five years is 39 214,

(b) the date on which the outstanding claims will finally be settled is unknown at this time due to the multitude of variables that are inherent in the adversarial, common-law, claims dispensation administered by the RAF, which variables include but are not limited to, delays attributable to claimants’ attorneys, amongst others, failing to locate the claimant in order to take instructions, failing to accept the RAF’s tender, failing to set the matter down for trial, failing to pursue the quantum aspect of the claim after a judgment has been obtained in respect of the merits (the liability aspect of the claim), failing to submit financial records or other substantiating evidence in support of a claim, and failing to submit actuarial reports in support of a claim; the non-availability of medical experts to assess claimants, compile reports and, or, testify in court; the failure by expert witnesses to agree on important aspects of the claim; the long lead time to obtain a trial date; and, the investigation by the RAF into potential fraudulent aspects of the claim; and

(c) although the aggregated total amount claimed in respect of the claims referred to in paragraphs (a)(i) and (ii) above is R49 985 029 061, the total amount it would take to settle (pay) all of the aforementioned claims is unknown at this time due to the multitude of variables that are inherent in the adversarial, common-law, claims dispensation administered by the RAF, which variables include but are not limited to, the claimant succeeding in proving the merits of the claim (where the claim was repudiated by the RAF); the apportionment of fault as determined by the court (where the percentage contributory negligence was in dispute, or where a third party was joined on the basis of his, her or its alleged contributory negligence); amendment by the claimant of the claimed amount based on, inter alia, fresh medico-legal or other expert reports, or new medico-legal or other expert reports, or new case law, or amendments to legislation; receipt by the claimant of a collateral benefit, which may qualify for deduction from the claimed amount; receipt by the claimant of an accelerated benefit, which may qualify for deduction from the claimed amount; determination by the Compensation Commissioner of the workman’s claim, which may qualify for deduction from the claimed amount; a change in the employment status of the claimant, which may have a bearing on the basis of calculation of the claimed amount; a change in the rehabilitation outcome of the claimant, which may have a bearing on the basis of calculation of the claimed amount; the death of the claimant, prior to settlement or the court order; as regards a claim for non-pecuniary loss, the timing of the death of the claimant, prior to, or after, close of pleadings, which may have a bearing on the right to, and calculation, of amount claimed in respect of non-pecuniary loss; settlement reached between the RAF and the claimant and, or, the sum awarded by the court; the outcome of appeals and reviews, in respect of orders by the lower courts; the application of the statutory limit on the quantum of claims for loss of support or loss of income; adjustments to the amount claimed to provide for inflation; the issuing by the RAF of an undertaking, instead of making payment of a lump-sum in respect of the costs of future medical expenses; and, where agreed, the payment of loss of income or loss of support in instalments.

20 November 2020 - NW2294

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What progress has been made with the upgrading of the Moloto Road (R573) which stretches from the Mpumalanga and/or Gauteng border, north of Pretoria to Marble Hall in Limpopo, specifically with regard to the (a) planning and design of upgrades, (b) completion of the required environmental impact assessments, (c) appointment of contractors to undertake the specified upgrades and (d) projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in each instance; (2) what (a) progress has also been made with the proposedMoloto rail link thatwould ease pressure on the road and (b) is the projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in this regard; (3) what total amount has been spent annually since the 2016-17 financial year onimpact studies and other professional services for the upgrade of the (a) Moloto Road and (b) proposed rail link; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1.a) Please see column 1 (a) in Table 1 below for planning and design status.

(b) The Environmental Impact Assessment process commenced in 2016 for Moloto Road Corridor and the Environmental Authorization was issued on 12/05/2017 (DEA Ref 14/12/16/3/1/162).

(c) Please see column 1 (c) in Table 1 below for status of contractor appointments.

(d) (i) Please see column 1 (d) (i) in Table 1 below for projected costs.

(d) (ii) Please see column 1 (d) (ii) in Table 1 below for projected timelines.

(2) (a) There has not been any progress on the proposed rail link project due to funding availability. The application for funding the Moloto Rail Project submitted to National Treasury in October 2014, in the form of a Treasury Approval (TA 1) was not approved. The subsequent request for funding submitted to National Treasury in 2017 under the Budget Facility for Infrastructure (BFI), was also not granted.

(b) Refer to (2) (a)

(c) Refer to (2) (a)

(3) (a) Please see Table 2 below for the SANRAL Moloto Road expenditure to date.

(b) No budget has been spent on the proposed Rail Project since the last feasibility study was completed in 2014.

(4)

Table 1: SANRAL R573 Road Projects

SANRAL Project

(Project Numbers)

SECTION & PROVINCE

1 (a) Planning and Design update

1 (c) Appointment of contractors

1(d)(i) projected cost

(Incl. VAT)

1(d)(ii) Timelines

Comments

R.573-010-2021/1

Stormvoel (km 0,0) to Baviaanspoort road (km 2,4)(Moepel road)

Design 95 % Completed

No

R423 million

December 2021 to May 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/1

Km 2,4 to km 4,0 (Interchange)

Design 90 % Completed

No

R488 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 4,0 to km 8,4 and PWV 2

Design 90 % Completed

No

R1 300 million

April 2022 to March 2025

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/1

Km 8,4 to km 18,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/2

Km 18,4 to km 28,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/2

Km 28,4 to km 37,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 37,4 to km 48,568

Design 80 % Completed

No

R600 million

December 2022 to November 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-020-2016/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

Yes

R105 million

Completed

4 intersections upgraded

R.573-020-2019/4

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R560 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R573-020-2019/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R346 million

April 2022 to October 2023

Finalising bridge designs.

R573-020-2019/2

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R197 million

June 2022 to June 2023

Covid19 delayed Resolution of the Kwamhlanga business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R573-020-2019/3

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R413 million

November 2021 to February 2023

Planning Pre-community resolution meeting and Community resolution meeting as part of land acquisition process.

R573-020-2019/5

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R406 million

March 2022 to June 2024

Resolution of the Kwaggafontein business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R.573-030-2016/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

Yes

R244 million

January 2017 to October 2021

The Contractor has since re-established the site after experiencing cashflow problems.

R.573-030-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R362 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R.573-023-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R405 million

January 2022 to June 2024

Covid19 delayed the Community Resolution meetings required to finalise the land acquisition process.

R.573-030-2019/2

Section 3 – Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R450 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Finalising the bridge designs.

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

20 November 2020 - NW2255

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the (a) recent unrest in Mpumalanga, particularly in the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality, Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality and Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality and (b) weeks-long protest at the Union Buildings by the specified communities demanding the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor, his department is still committed to the specified project, if so, (2) what total amount has his department budgeted for the (a) current financial year and (b) next two financial years for the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor; (3) whether he will commit to have a series of public meetings in the affected areas to give information regarding the (a) updated project time lines or time frames and (b) implementation, if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) On 30 October 2014, the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), submitted the Moloto Rail Corridor, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Treasury Approval 1 application to National Treasury for consideration. On 3 December 2015, the DirectorGeneral of National Treasury responded to the CEO of PRASA informing him that the Treasury Approval 1 application was not granted.

On 31 October 2017, the Department motivated funding through the National Treasury’s Budget Facility on Infrastructure (BFI) for the development of the Moloto Rail Corridor. On 5 April 2018, the Department received the outcome of the application indicating that the request for funding was not supported and that no funding will be made available to further develop a rapid rail solution because the exploration of non-transport solutions should be investigated in addition to transport solutions to comprehensively respond to corridor challenges.

(2) Please refer to response in (1)

(3) Seven (7) public engagements in the form of Imbizoshave been conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities. These were conducted as part of providing progress on the planned Moloto Rail Project, Road expansion project and the overall exposure of the service delivery by Government and the Department of Transport’s public entities. The last public engagement conducted with a purpose of providing information on the status of both the road and rail initiatives status was held on 5 June 2017.

With regard to the Moloto Road Project, SANRAL concluded 12 stakeholder engagements sessions prior to Covid-19 Lockdown, details listed in the table below. With the easing the COVID19 lockdown restrictions, SANRAL will be resuming the stakeholder engagements as planned or necessitated by events on the ground in project sites.

SANRAL Moloto Road Corridor Stakeholder Engagements

TYPE OF ENGAGEMENT

ROAD SECTION / TARGET AREA (COMMUNITY)

DATE

Stakeholder engagement: Taking SANRAL to Moloto

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

2 March 2018

Mpumalanga Youth Dialogue - Engagement

R573 Section 2 - KwaMhlanga

5 December 2018

Stakeholder Engagement - Taking SANRAL to Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

R573 Section 3- Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

30 May 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B

29 August 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

11 October 2019

Ministerial Event: Signing of MOU – Transfer of R573 Sec 1 to SANRAL

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

15 November 2019

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Kwaggafontein A & B

4 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mandlethu (Vlaklaagte No.1) &Mobhoko Village

5 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mzimkhulu

6 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Tweefontein E &Buhlebesiswe (Vlaklaagte No.2)

18 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Slovo, Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

10 March 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Stompo/Waalkraal B, Waalkraal A and Waalkraal Ext Villages

11 March 2020

19 November 2020 - NW2590

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total amount of (a) profit and (b) loss that the City of Ekurhuleni’s Bus Rapid Transit system has made since its inception?

Reply:

a) Profit – Internationally well performing mass public transport systems cover between 30% and 60% of operational costs. Only a few systems in dense Asian cities can cover a higher amount of direct operating costs. Given that Ekurhuleni is still in an unfinished pilot phase, which has witnessed delays in ramping up to envisaged 200 buses, the current fare box coverage of direct operating costs is disproportionally low.

Currently the city is yet to negotiate the final contract with the Bus Operating Company which they plan to conclude by July 2021. This final contract will include a market related profit margin for the Bus Operating Company.

b) Loss - From 2017/18 to 2019/20 financial years, the total operational deficit was approximately R290 million to June 2020, due to the fact as highlighted in (a) above that the pilot ramp up has been delayed, thus limiting the amount of fare revenue collected. Currently the city is covering the operational deficit.

19 November 2020 - NW1852

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the US$100 million loan that was approved by the African Development Bank under identity number P-ZA-D00-004 for the SA Commuter Transit Project on 18 October 2018, (a) in which provinces has the specified project been implemented to date, (b) of the 6700 small and medium enterprises that were flagged to benefit from the project, what number has actually benefitted, (c) what type of skills have been transferred and (d) who are the beneficiaries?

Reply:

Department of Transport does not have SA commuter Transit Project within their portfolio.

Therefore (a)(b) (c) (d) falls away.

19 November 2020 - NW2238

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, given that the Department of Community Safety and Transport Management in the North West Province is under section 100(1)(b) intervention, his department will be funding the establishment of the North West Public Transport Intervention Team; if not, what is the positon in this regard; if so, from which budget?

Reply:

No, the National Department of Transport will not be funding the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team. The National Department does not provide funding to the Provincial Department as a consequence of Section 100(1)(b) intervention.

19 November 2020 - NW2252

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since the North West Department of Community Safety and Transport has been placed under section 100(1)(b) intervention and one of the priorities for the intervention is to bring financial stability to the department, he approved the formation of a task team called the North West Public Transport Intervention Team that has since been reversed and will be re-established according to the North West MEC for Community Safety and Transport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister was informed by the MEC about the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team, as supported by the Provincial Executive Council and consent given by the Section 100 Inter-Ministerial Task Team (IMTT), as provided for in the Section 100 MOU signed by the Province and the IMTT. No approval was sought from the Minister. As indicated in the question, the process has since been reversed.

19 November 2020 - NW2427

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) follows up with routine inspections to ensure that regulations and equipment are operated in accordance with the stipulated regulations and licence conditions; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the last routine inspection undertaken at a certain company (name furnished), (b) what were the findings and (c) who were the inspectors; (2) what are the reasons that SACAA has allowed the specified company to operate for all the time without adhering to SACAA regulations?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

1. (a) The SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) does follow up with routine inspections as part of its mandate andan inspection on Ultimate Heli was conducted on 20 March 2019. A meeting was held with the operator on27 June 2019 regarding environmental complaintsfrom the Buccleuch residents.The last physical inspection was conducted on 23 October 2019 for compliance monitoring. In addition, a meeting was held with the operator on 24 January 2020,relating to continued operational compliance. Further interaction occurredvirtually during the lockdown period, in relation to compliance, as it was not possible to conduct physical oversight during lockdown. Physical inspections are now resumed during level 1 lockdown with a routine compliance inspection scheduled for Ultimate Heli for 28 October 2020.

(b)The facility was found to be compliant with requirements. Third party information can only be released with the consent of the approval holder. The reports contain 3rd party proprietary and commercially sensitive information, is confidential in nature and may contain personal information, which was provided in confidence, and the SACAA does not have consent from the operator to release such.

(c) The SACAA Inspectors were from the areas of Aviation Infrastructure and Flight Operations.

2. Ultimate Heli has been operating in accordance with the SACAA regulations and there is no evidence of the company not operating in compliance with regulations.

19 November 2020 - NW2428

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What evidence does the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) have that (a) all stakeholders were engaged in the process of the establishment of the central executive committee and (b) SACAA regulations have been followed and executed?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a)  There is no provision in the Regulations for the establishment of a “central executive committee” in relation to this operator.

During the approval process for Ultimate Heli, the following stakeholders were consulted:

  1. Johannesburg Metro,whose responsibility is the proper zoning and use of land in accordance with their restrictions, as mandated by the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA), Act 16 of 2013, as well as enforcement of environmental requirements in their areas of jurisdiction. No restrictions were imposed by the Metro.
  2. Grand Central Airport.
  3. The National Airspace Committee (NASCOM), comprising of industry stakeholders and associations including Airports Company of South Africa, Department of Transport, Department of Environmental Affairs Forestry and Fishing (DEFF), SA Airforce (SAAF), Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company (ATNS), etc.
  4. Waterfall property management.
  5. SA National Roads Agency (SANRAL).
  6. Johannesburg Roads Agency (JRA).

b) All Civil Aviation Regulations have been followed in certifying Ultimate Heli as an operator. Records are kept by the SACAA for all oversight activityon all operators.

02 November 2020 - NW2321

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What has the SACivil Aviation Authority done, except to attend a meeting on 27 June 2019 and issue an instruction almost a year later, to ensure that a certain company (name furnished) meets the conditions of their operating licence?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The SACAA maintains oversight over its license holders through annual inspections and, if required, additional surveillance. The SACAA has therefore conducted oversight audits on this operator as per the mandate of the Regulator.

The licence holder is currently in compliance with the conditions for which the operating certificate was issued, as contemplated inPart 139 of the Civil Aviation Regulations.

02 November 2020 - NW2307

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) was the reason that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) decided to disband their panel of 103 attorneys that was set up in 2014 and (b) is the new litigious model that the RAF will be following; (2) what total number of (a) in-house lawyers does the RAF currently have, (b) vacancies exist and (c) lawyers does the RAF intend to hire in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a) The reason the Road Accident Fund (RAF) decided to disband its panel of attorneys is because the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (the Act) provides that the RAF must pay compensation to road accident victims in accordance with the Act, which allows the RAF a period of 120 days from the date on which the claim is lodged to investigate its liability and to settle the claim. It is only in exceptional cases that litigation is contemplated, and it is not anticipated that the RAF would outsource its investigation of claims to an external panel of attorneys, as has been done. It is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopper on the RAF matters set down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in South Africa. RAF matters get settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. Moreover, the panel of attorneys and the RAF are regularly criticized for the manner in which they manage these outsourced claims. In a recent Judgment in Mpumalanga High Court in the matter of Mncube v RAF, Legodi JP said the following

“More than 90% of matters on our trial roll are the Road Accident Fund which is funded through public purse. One would have thought the parties and or legal practitioners in dealing with these matters, will be more expedient and professional. However, the contrary appears to be the case. This is despite continuous financial woes the Fund finds itself in.”

In the unreported judgment of Daniels and Others v Road Accident Fund and Others, Binns-Ward J, after reviewing 17 cases where the RAF was rebuked by various judges for their handling of claims and litigation, said the following:

A depressing feature of all of the aforementioned judgments is that they instance examples of cases in which the Fund must have incurred substantial legal expenses in taking to trial, or on appeal, claims which it had no basis to responsibly contest. In the context of the evidence before us that legal expenses constitute a very significant component of the Fund's overall expenditure, this is an aspect of the Fund's conduct which is demanding of conscientious attention by the responsible authorities…”.

Currently, the RAF owes claimants many billions of Rand in settled claims. It is however unable to pay these claimants and yet spends R10.6 billion on legal costs annually. By getting rid of the current operating model, with unaffordable panel of attorneys, and by adopting the new operating model the RAF could save substantial amounts in legal fees.

The RAF 2020-2025 Strategic Plan targets a 75% saving on legal costs over the five-year period, which will assist the RAF to pay claimants promptly from the anticipated saving. In addition, this new operating model will lead to very few RAF matters coming before courts, which will lessen the workload of the overworked judgesand (b) the new litigious model that the RAF is following seeks to capacitate its operations for Claim Handlers to investigate and settle claims, as opposed to outsourcing claims to a costly panel of attorneys, and by pursuing voluntary mediation, as opposed to expensive and protracted litigation, and where litigation cannot be avoided, referral of the matter to a salaried state attorney, as opposed to a private attorney;

(2) (a) the RAF currently has a total number of 62 attorneys to be seconded to the Office of the State Attorney to deal exclusively with RAF matters, (b) the further recruitment of additional attorneys will be informed by an analysis still be done on the ability of the current attorneys to deal efficiently with the current number of litigated matters, where triable disputes exists, and (c) the RAF aims to further recruit on an ongoing basis such additional attorneys informed by the number of litigated matters which requires representation in Court. The number of attorneys to be recruited in the 2020 – 21 financial year is unknown at this stage.

02 November 2020 - NW2254

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Of the R30 million adjusted budget for the procurement of personal protective equipment (PPEs) to support taxi ranks, (a) what amount of that budget was paid to the service providers and (b)(i) what are the relevant details of exactly what items were bought, (ii) how was it distributed, (iii) which taxi ranks received the PPEs and (iv) is there an acknowledgement of receipt?

Reply:

a) What amount of the budget was paid to the service providers, and

An amount of R30 055 626, 16

b) (i) What are the relevant details of exactly what items were bought,

Procurement of PPE’s for Public Transport Industry – Type of PPE’s and Cost

GOODS

ITEMS

AMOUNT

Public Transport: Activation at Taxi Ranks

Mask Surgical, Gloves - Surgical, Sanitisers, Disinfectants, SanitiserRefils, Disinfectant Wipes, Non-contact Infrared Temperature Scanners

R141 940,00

Public Transport: Round 1 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters

Mask Surgical, Gloves - Surgical, Sanitisers empty refillable bottles, Disinfectants,SanitiserRefils, Disinfectant refill, Disposable Protective Wear, Fogging Machines

R12 142 082,38

Public Transport: Round 2 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters (Multiple Award)

Sanitisers empty refillable bottles, Disinfectant refill, Disposable Protective Wear, Fogging Machines, Mask Surgical, Disinfectant Spray, SanitiserRefils

R12 589 210.03

PT: Assistance to DBE by providing Sanitisers and Disinfectant to Scholar Transport

Disinfectant refillable bottle, Disinfectant Refils, Gloves-Surgical, Sanitiser refillable bottle, SanitiserRefils

R5 182 393.75

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON PPE

R30 055 626,16

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON PPE – TRANSPORT SECTOR

R30 055 626,16

(ii) How was it distributed?

The PPEs were distributed proportionally among provinces based on the number of taxi vehicles registered and issued with valid Operating License in each province. See attached tables A and B.

TABLE A: TAXI INDUSTRY

Note: Deliveries Round 1 completed - 20/04/2020 Deliveries Round 2 completed - 19/05/2020

ITEM

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION

TOTAL QUANTITY DELIVERED

 

GP

KZN

WC

MP

L

FS

NW

EC

NC

 

PENDO-FOG machine to disinfect surfaces and taxis

per item

3

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

19

Taxi Disinfectant Spray Bottle

2 units per taxi rank x 300

170

167

161

109

117

117

117

117

117

1192

Disinfectant refill for taxis

2 x 20 litres per rank x 300

173

169

163

111

119

119

119

119

119

1211

Sanitizers 1 litre bottles for each taxi for use by driver and passengers

per item

16247

15750

24210

16650

16650

15900

16650

16900

14300

153257

Sanitisers 20 litre refill

20 litre

451

302

336

253

253

252

253

286

223

2609

PPE suits for Marshalls

per item

130

126

126

100

106

103

106

106

96

999

Masks

per item

98000

78890

78840

54940

54940

58890

54940

55700

44900

580040

Gloves

box of 100

1060

851

60

928

928

815

828

860

760

7090

TABLE B: SCHOLAR TRANSPORT

Note: Deliveries completed by 05/06/2020

ITEM

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION

TOTAL QUANTITY DELIVERED

 

GP

KZN

WC

MP

L

FS

NW

EC

NC

 

Sanitizers 1 litre bottles for use by driver and passengers

per item

500

133

209

153

180

310

137

757

121

2500

Sanitisers 10 litre refill

10 litre refill

757

85

500

133

180

153

137

121

209

2275

Disinfectant litre bottle for Transport

per item

500

133

209

153

180

79

137

757

121

2269

Disinfectant 20 litre refill

20 litre refill

500

133

209

153

180

79

137

757

121

2269

Gloves for drivers

box of 100

757

90

500

133

180

153

137

121

209

2280

(iii) Which taxi ranks received the PPEs, and

The PPEs were received by the Provincial Representatives who then distributed them in the different taxi ranks within the Provinces.

(iv) Is there an acknowledgement of receipt?

The Provincial Representatives received and acknowledged receipt of the PPEs.

02 November 2020 - NW2308

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) are the reasons that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ignored the court order by Judge Wendy Hughes on 1 June 2020 to retain the lawyers for six more months and (b) plans are in place to assist with clients’ claims during the specified time period; (2) (a) how does the RAF intend to source more state attorneys, (b) what are the timelines and (c) why has the RAF chosen to take the specified route and move away from the previous approach; (3) whether the specified change that the RAF has embarked on will be more cost-effective for the specified entity; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) details of the costing and (b) further relevant details; (4) what has been the total cost to the RAF to have the panel of 103 attorneys disbanded?

Reply:

1. (a) The reasons that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ignored the court order by Judge Wendy Hughes on 1 June 2020 to retain the lawyers for six more months was that the RAF launched an appeal against the order, which appeal has the legal effect of suspending the operation of the order. However, the Applicants then brought an application in terms of section 18(3) of the Superior Courts Act, 2013 for the order to be implemented pending the outcome of the petition to the Supreme Court of Appeal, which application was granted by the Judge, but was subsequently set aside by a full bench of the Court,following an appeal by the RAF in terms of section 18(4) of the Act; and (b) the RAF has put plans in place, as required by section 4(1)(b)of the RAF Act, to assist with clients’ claims by investigating and settling the matters returned by its former panel of attorneys and inviting plaintiff attorneys to block settlement meetings, where the RAF purposefully pursues the settlement of matters that are capable of settlement, and by referring disputes for voluntary mediation through a pilot project. Majority of these matters were litigated unnecessary as they are capable of settlement. This approach is beneficial to the claimants as they no longer need to wait for future trial dates in order to have their claims settled but rather settled earlier;

2. (a) the RAF intends to source more state attorneysthrough its usual recruitment processes and this will be informed by the volume of work (number of litigated matters where there are triable disputes) versus the reasonable number of attorneys required to attend to such matter efficiently; (b) with a timeline for the initial targeted number set for the end of the current financial year and (c) the RAF has chosen the specified route to move away from the previous approach because the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (the Act) provides that the RAF must pay compensation to road accident victims in accordance with the Act, which allows the RAF a period of 120 days from the date on which the claim is lodged to investigate its liability and to settle the claim. It is only in exceptional cases that litigation is contemplated, and it is not anticipated that the RAF would outsource its investigation of claims to an external panel of attorneys, as has been done. It is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopper on the RAF matters set down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in South Africa. RAF matters get settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. Moreover, the panel of attorneys and the RAF are regularly criticized for the manner in which they manage these outsourced claims. In a recent Judgment in Mpumalanga High Court in the matter of Mncube v RAF, Legodi JP said the following

“More than 90% of matters on our trial roll are the Road Accident Fund which is funded through public purse. One would have thought the parties and or legal practitioners in dealing with these matters, will be more expedient and professional. However, the contrary appears to be the case. This is despite continuous financial woes the Fund finds itself in.”

In the unreported judgment of Daniels and Others v Road Accident Fund and Others, Binns-Ward J, after reviewing 17 cases where the RAF was rebuked by various judges for their handling of claims and litigation, said the following:

“A depressing feature of all of the aforementioned judgments is that they instance examples of cases in which the Fund must have incurred substantial legal expenses in taking to trial, or on appeal, claims which it had no basis to responsibly contest. In the context of the evidence before us that legal expenses constitute a very significant component of the Fund's overall expenditure, this is an aspect of the Fund's conduct which is demanding of conscientious attention by the responsible authorities…”.

Currently, the RAF owes claimants many billions of Rand in settled claims. It is however unable to pay these claimants and yet spends R10.6 billion on legal costs annually. By getting rid of the current operating model, with unaffordable panel of attorneys, and by adopting the new operating model the RAF could save substantial amounts in legal fees. The RAF 2020-2025 Strategic Plan targets a 75% saving on legal costs over the five-year period, which will assist the RAF to pay claimants promptly from the anticipated saving. In addition, this new operating model will lead to very few RAF matters coming before courts, which will lessen the workload of the overworked judges;

(3) it is foreseen that the change will be substantially more cost-effective for the RAF (a) by reverting to an operating model which gives effect to section 4(1)(b) of the RAF Act, where the RAF capacitates its Operations (claims) Department for Claim Handlers to investigate and settle claims, as opposed to outsourcing claims to a costlypanel of attorneys, and by pursuing voluntary mediation, as opposed to expensive and protracted litigation, through which significant savings in legal cost can be achieved and (b) where litigation cannot be avoided, referral of the matter to a salaried state attorney, as opposed to a private attorney, will achieve further savings. In terms of the previous model, any attendance by an attorney on a particular litigated matter resulted in a charge of approximately R 292,50 per quarter of an hour and with RAF litigation being handled by the office of the State Attorneys, such attendances will no longer attract any fees;

(4) the service level agreements concluded between the RAF and its former panel of attorneys expired due to effluxion of time on 31 May 2020 following amendments which were made to the Service Level Agreement which was due to expire in November 2019. Of significance with the amendment is that a provision which allowed for making copies on handover of files was amended. The provision of copying costs was going to result in legal costs of R 1, 3 Billion at any time when the RAF changes the panel of attorneys. The total cost to the RAF to have the panel of attorneys disbanded is unknown, as it is a function of the difference between the R 3.6 billion approximately spent by the RAF annually on its former panel of attorneys, and the cost of the implementation of the new operating model, which is expected to achieve substantial savings on legal cost, as alluded to in the earlier response to the prior question.

02 November 2020 - NW2270

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the Public Protector’s report on the illegal conversion of the panel vans into Toyota Quantum 16-seater passenger minibus taxis, which confirmed the allegations levelled against his department and other organs of the State, on what date will he take action against the SA Bureau of Standards, National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications, Management Information Base, Toyota South Africa and all the financial institutions involved in this corruption?

Reply:

In the report on “Illegal Conversion of Toyota Quantum Panel Vans into Minibus Taxis” (Report No 37 of 2018/19), the Public Protector issued remedial action that must be implemented by the Minister of Transport. In terms of the report, the appropriate steps that the Minister is instructed to take urgently is to engage all affected stakeholders to ensure that these vehicles are removed from the roads. There is no suggestion or directive in the PP Report for the Minister to act against any of the entities mentioned above. However, the Minister is forging ahead engaging these stakeholders as directed in the PP Report to find a permanent solution.

02 November 2020 - NW2320

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the fact that a certain company (name furnished) failed to establish the Environmental Consultative Committee as directed and has contravened section 139.02.11 (1) of the Civil Aviation Regulations (details furnished), sanctions have been imposed on the specified company for the contravention of the regulation; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The establishment of an Environmental Consultative Committee (ECC) is not a default regulatory requirement and only becomes a legal requirement when the Director of Civil Aviation (DCA) issues an instruction to that effect. The license holder was therefore not in contravention with the regulation before the issuance of such an instruction, on 04 June 2020. Such an instruction by the DCA, is issued when environmental matters at an aerodrome does not get resolved through other means and it becomes necessary for the license holder to establish a formal consultative structure with interested parties in the area to resolve environmental matters.

02 November 2020 - NW2393

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What criteria will he use in appointing the next board of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa to prevent what was experienced with the previous board?

Reply:

The composition of the Board of control of PRASA is provided in Section 24 of the Legal Succession to the South African Transport Services Act, 1989 (Act No. 9 of 1989). Section 24(1) empowers the Minister to appointment a Board of Control of eleven (11) Members.

The criteria for appointing the Board of Control is as follows:

a) Publication of an advert in the Media calling for nomination of persons to serve as Members of the Board of Control of PRASA.

b) Shortlisting of nominated persons.

c) Recommendation for appointment of suitable candidates.

d) Request Cabinet approval for appointment of recommended candidates.

e) Once Cabinet approves/supports the recommendations, the Minister will appoint the approved candidates.

f) The candidates will be given appointment letters and will be inducted and resume their duties.

02 November 2020 - NW2394

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What amount did his department budget for the maintenance of the roads from Maphumulo in the iLembe region in KwaZulu-Natal joining Glendale, Jimu, and Mvozane to Tongaat and Mazibuko, to the Mvoti pedestrian bridge, which has been under construction for six years, and which gets flooded during the winter season, making the roads dangerous and difficult to use; (2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the construction of the roads will be completed?

Reply:

It was assumed that the following projects are the one that they are refering to as they are the only two projects that have challenges on site with stoppages by poor perfomance of the same contractor which is Tekeweni Civils,

1. Backround information on P711 (Upgrade Project)

Main Road 711 is situated within the Ilembe District in KZN and commences at km 0,000 at the intersection with P104 and ends at km 33.49 at the intersection with P20/1 (R74). The last 4.11 kilometres of the road has a blacktop surface while the remainder of the road is gravel. The route closely follows the existing alignment in a north to south direction intersecting with a number of district and local access roads. In addition, the route also serves a large population, approximately nine secondary and primary schools, three crèches, two health facilities including the Mtandeni Hospital, four places of worship (viz. churches) as well as agricultural lands. The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Transport has elected to upgrade the entire gravel section of Main Road 711 to a blacktop standard together with seven major structures in order to enable safer and greater travel between the towns of Maphumulo, Stanger, the King Shaka International Airport and the Dube Tradeport.

Projeced budget Expenditure & Output

Financial Year

Budget Required on Construction

Budget Required on Design

Km Outputs

Major Structures

Persons days

Jobs created

Training

               

2020/21

R 37 259 436.00

R6 227 491.50

5

3

2440

18

10

2021/22

R 65 620 951.20

R7 599 328.80

5

3

5640

30

10

2022/23

R 44 982 268.20

R4 432 941.80

4.08

1

3670

23

10

Sub Total

R 147 862 655.00

R18 259 762.10

5

7

11750

71

10

Grand Total

R 331 987 483.90

R112 441 022.83

29.08

8

65674

1433

10

The general project information is as follows:

GENERAL PROJECT INFORMATION

Extent of Project (Region)

Mtandeni to Maphumulo– (King Shaka)

Project Description (Technical, Social, Developmental)

To upgrade the corridor between Maphumulo and Stanger/ Tongaat and the DubeTradeport. To facilitate the development in the area

Latest Total Project Budget Estimate

R 444 428 506.73

Total No of kms of Project

29.080 kms

Start Date (Design year)

October 2010

Start Date (Construction year)

July 2011

Anticipated construction completion

July 2022

( 1) Backround information on P100 (Upgrade Projects)

P100 will be designed from km 15+400 to the end at km 45+192, at the uMzinyathi River Bridge. The existing portion of the route requiring upgrading extends from the Mdloti River Bridge in the north to the uMzinyathi River Bridge in the south. The proposed alignment closely follows the existing alignment, with both horizontal and vertical realignments proposed to meet the minimum geometric standards required. The road has been classified as a Secondary Road (SR), catering for medium to long distance movements between primary roads, towns and agricultural areas. The design and construction of uMzinyathi River Bridge will include the realignment of the bridge, use of the existing structure as a temporary deviation, construction of a new bridge and the removal of the existing bridge.

Projected budget expenditure & output

Financial Year

Budget Required on Construction

Budget Required on Design

Km Outputs

Major Structures

Persons days

Jobs created

 

             

Training

2020/21

R64 570 445.25

R6 410 593.35

3.78

2

2960

22

10

2021/22

R16 267 597.85

R4 273 728.90

0.412

1

990

45

10

Sub Total

R80 838 043.10

R10 684 322.25

4.192

3

3950

67

0

Grand Total

R473 451 595.16

R97 583 990.24

34.42

12

164 567

3673

10

The general project information is as follows:

GENERAL PROJECT INFORMATION

Extent of Project (Region)

Ndwedwe to Inanda

Project Description (Technical, Social, Developmental)

Type 3: Secondary Road. 6.5m wide, 2-lane, black-topped surfaced road, traversing generally mountainous terrain with climbing and passing lanes due to percentage of heavies. Highly urbanized for a portion, catalyst for development due to proximity to Inanda, Ntuzuma&KwaMashu, Development potential for opening agricultural areas and access to schools, clinics and housing.

Latest Total Project Budget Estimate

R 571 035 585.41

Total Length of Project

29.72 km

Start Date (Design year)

2001

Start Date (Construction year)

April 2003

Anticipated Construction Completion Date

March 2022

(2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long and

The construction of this road takes so long due to the following challenges:

Challenges

Remedial Measures

The contractor’s slow rate of progress

The contractor was issued with two contractual notifications highlighting slow rate progress. The contractor has not increased productivity therefore, this contract is currently following the termination process within the department. The annual contract ZNT4198 has been planned and submitted to the department for approval, should the current contract be terminated, in order to complete the remaining works on P711 between Km 9.080 to Km 14.080.

The unmarked grave sites within the road reserve

Ongoing consultation with local community members

The relocation of ilembe water main affects approximately 1,2km of the existing road.

The contractor has been instructed to provide a programme of works in order to complete the relocation.

Community Protests due to non-payment to sub-contractors by the main contractor

Ongoing engagement with the main contractor and community at PLC and special meetings.

(2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long?

The construction of this road takes so long due to the following challenges:

Challenges

Remedial Measures

The contractor’s slow rate of progress

The Contractor was issued with two contractual notifications highlighting slow rate progress. The contractor has not increased productivity therefore, this contract is currently following the Termination process within the Department. The annual contract ZNT4198 has been planned and submitted to the Department for approval, should the current contract be Terminated, in order to complete the remaining works on P100.

The relocation of external services within the road reserve

Ongoing consultation with external service providers

Community Protests due to non-payment to sub-contractors by the main contractor

Ongoing engagement with the main contractor and community at PLC and special meetings.

The maximisation of CPG opportunities in a contract that does not have a CPG allocation due to the tender being advertised in 2015 and engagement with the respective local business forums

This is being addressed through PLC meetings and ongoing discussions with the contractor.

26 October 2020 - NW1847

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the extent of the damage done to the rail network in Cape Town, (b) will be the total cost to his department to fix the damages and restore rail operations in Cape Town and (c) steps, besides building fences and employing security guards, have been taken by his department to prevent vandalism to infrastructure in future?

Reply:

a) The Damage to the Cape Town Rail Network Infrastructure is currently at a point where electric trains cannot run in some of the corridors. The following corridors in particular are extremely impacted by acts of sabotage and criminality:

  • Langa –Bonteheuwel-Sarepta-Bellville,
  • Bonteheuwel – Kaptensklip, and
  • Bonteheuwel –Chris Hani.

b) The total cost to repair and upgrade the affected corridor is in excess of R1.8billion

c) PRASA will be putting the following measures in place to complement the security solution:

  • Installation of motion detectors and Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) surveillance to be monitored by security,
  • Replacing the conventional Overhead Traction Equipment (OHTE) Copper Catenary with a Tiger Wire(Aluminum),
  • The conventional Train Detection Equipment (Track Circuits) will be replaced by New Train Detection Technology (Axle Counter) which mainly uses Optic Fibre for Data Transmission,
  • Replacement of Telecoms Copper Coax Cables with Optic Fiber,
  • Installation of Reinforced Concrete Steel on Track Side Equipment,
  • Closing Underground Cable Trenches with Concrete, and
  • Installation of Vandal proof Covers on Points Machines.

26 October 2020 - NW2057

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the announcement by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) of the insourcing of 3 000 security guards, with the subsequent exclusion of many persons who provided services to Prasa but did not meet the requirement of having a Matric certificate, including job losses at Prasa, as the workers were effectively disqualified for the positions that were advertised as they do not meet the specified requirement, (a) why has Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) experience and expertise accumulated over time not been considered in this case and (b) what total number of security guards who were providing services to Prasa have been left out of the insourcing drive?

Reply:

a) The minimum requirement for the advertised posts was a matric qualification and as such only applicants who possessed matric at the time of application were considered. Acquisition of RPL is the responsibility of an applicant to obtain through the assessment of their existing qualification (if any) and experience through SAQA.

b) PRASA has no knowledge of people that were left out of the insourcing drive. PRASA Human Capital Management gathers statistics of applicants, in other words no special applications were done for private security,all people for external adverts were treated as applicants.

26 October 2020 - NW2058

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the intention of the SA National Roads Agency to roll out road infrastructure projects, in particular the 278 projects that have been advertised and the 200 additional road infrastructure projects across the nine provinces, what (a) total number of the specified road infrastructure projects are rural road upgrades and (b) are the names of the villages that will benefit from the projects?

Reply:

a) As SANRAL is responsible for the National Road network which links cities and towns nationally, most of the national road network is rural, as a result most of SANRAL road projects are located in rural areas. Of the 278 projects (Total for Consultants and Contractors), that have been advertised at time of article for calendar year 2020, 77 projects were for financial year 2019/20 and 201 for financial year 2020/21. For financial year 2020/21 thereremained at time of article a further 200 projects (Total for Consultants and Contractors) to be advertised, resulting in a total of 401 projects for 2020/21 financial year. Of these, 318are located in rural Local Municipal Areas and thus directly related to maintenance and upgrade of the SANRAL National Road network in these rural areas.

b) Due to the linear nature of national road projects they typically traverse one or more local municipalities at a time, with the majority of theprojects beings outside village boundaries. As such a single SANRAL project will provide opportunities for multiple villages located within the relevant local municipalities traversed by the SANRAL project. The local municipalities in which the 401 projects to be advertised for 2020/21 financial year are located are summarised in the attached Table.

Municipality

No Projects

Total Metro/Rural

0.3

Buffalo City

3

83

City Of Cape Town

10

 

City of eThekwini

31

 

City Of Johannesburg

13

 

City Of Tshwane

4

 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

10

 

Mangaung Local Municipality

6

 

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality

6

 

Albert Luthuli Local Municipal

1

318

Alfred Nzo District Municipali

2

 

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

2

 

Amahlati Local Municipality

1

 

Amatole District Municipality

1

 

Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality

1

 

Beaufort West Local Municipality

3

 

Big Five Hlabisa Local Municipality

1

 

Bitou Local Municipality

2

 

Blouberg Local Municipality

1

 

Blue Crane Route Local Municipality

3

 

Bojanala Platinum District Municipality

3

 

Bophirima District Municipality

2

 

Breede River/Winelands Local Municipality

4

 

Camdeboo Local Municipality

1

 

Capricorn District Municipality

2

 

Cederberg Local Municipality

1

 

Central Karoo District Municipality

1

 

Chris Hani District Municipality

5

 

Dihlabeng Local Municipality

1

 

Ditsobotla Local Municipality

1

 

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

3

 

Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality

4

 

Drakenstein Local Municipality

1

 

Elias Motsoaledi Local Municip

3

 

Elundini Local Municipality

2

 

Emalahleni Local Municipality

3

 

Emnambithi-Ladysmith Local Mun

3

 

Enoch Mgijima Local Municipali

2

 

Enthanjeni Local Municipality

3

 

eThekwini Municipality

1

 

Fetakgomo Local Municipality

3

 

Gariep Local Municipality

2

 

Ga-Segonyana Cross Boundary Lo

2

 

George Local Municipality

5

 

GertSibande District Municipality

4

 

Govan Mbeki Local Municipality

3

 

Great Kei Local Municipality

1

 

Greater Groblersdal Cross Boun

5

 

Greater Tubatse Cross Boundary

3

 

Greater Tzaneen Local Municipa

3

 

Hantam Local Municipality

3

 

Hessequa Local Municipality

2

 

Hibiscus Coast Local Municipal

1

 

Hlabisa Local Municipality

1

 

Ilembe District Municipality

3

 

Ingquza Local Municipality

2

 

IntsikaYethu Local Municipality

1

 

InxubaYethemba Local Municipality

1

 

Joe Gqabi District Municipalit

1

 

John TaoloGaetsewe District M

2

 

Kai Carib Local Municipality

2

 

Kamiesberg Local Municipality

2

 

Kgalagadi Cross Boundary Distr

2

 

KgetlengRivier Local Municipa

1

 

KharaHais Local Municipality

1

 

King SabataDalindyebo Local M

3

 

Klerksdorp Local Municipality

1

 

Knysna Local Municipality

2

 

Kopanong Local Municipality

2

 

Kouga Local Municipality

1

 

Kwadukuza Local Municipality

3

 

Laingsburg Local Municipality

2

 

Lejweleputswa District Municipality

5

 

Lekwa Local Municipality

2

 

Lepele-Nkumpi Local Municipali

1

 

Lephalale Local Municipality

1

 

Lesedi Local Municipality

2

 

Local Municipality Of Madibeng

1

 

Mafikeng Local Municipality

2

 

Makana Local Municipality

1

 

Makhado Local Municipality

1

 

Maletswai Local Municipality

1

 

Maluti A Phofung Local Municip

1

 

Maquassi Hills Local Municipal

1

 

Masilonyana Local Municipality

4

 

Matjhabeng Local Municipality

3

 

Mbhashe Local Municipality

1

 

Mbizana Local Municipality

1

 

Mbombela Local Municipality

6

 

Mbonambi Local Municipality

1

 

Merafong City Cross Boundary L

1

 

Mkhondo Local Municipality

1

 

Mnquma Local Municipality

3

 

Modimolle Local Municipality

4

 

Mogalakwena Local Municipality

6

 

Molemole Local Municipality

1

 

Mookgopong Local Municipality

1

 

Moqhaka Local Municipality

4

 

Mossel Bay Local Municipality

4

 

Motheo District Municipality

1

 

Mtubatuba Local Municipality

2

 

Musina Local Municipality

1

 

Nama Khoi Local Municipality

2

 

Ndlambe Local Municipality

2

 

Newcastle Local Municipality

2

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema District M

1

 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality

1

 

Ngquza Hill Local Municipality

1

 

Ngwathe Local Municipality

1

 

Nkomazi Local Municipality

1

 

Nsukaligwa Local Municipality

1

 

O.R.Tambo District Municipality

2

 

Polokwane Local Municipality

4

 

Port St Johns Local Municipality

3

 

Potchefstroom Local Municipality

1

 

Ray Nkonyeni Local Municipalit

3

 

Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipal

1

 

Richmond Local Municipality

1

 

Rustenburg Local Municipality

2

 

Sakhisizwe Local Municipality

3

 

Senqu Local Municipality

1

 

Setsoto Local Municipality

1

 

Sisonke District Municipality

1

 

Siyancuma Local Municipality

1

 

Siyanda District Municipality

3

 

Sol Plaatjie Local Municipalit

6

 

Steve Tshwete Local Municipali

1

 

Sunday'S River Valley Local Mu

5

 

Swartland Local Municipality

1

 

Swellendam Local Municipality

1

 

ThabaChweu Local Municipality

1

 

Thabazimbi Local Municipality

2

 

Thabo Mofutsanyane District Mu

1

 

The Big Five False Bay Local M

1

 

The Kwadukuza Local Municipali

1

 

The Msunduzi Local Municipalit

2

 

Theewaterskloof Local Municipality

1

 

Thembisile Local Municipality

3

 

Tsantsabane Local Municipality

2

 

Ubuntu Local Municipality

2

 

Ugu District Municipality

9

 

Umgungundlovu District Municipality

6

 

Umhlabuyalingana Local Municipality

1

 

Umhlathuze Local Municipality

3

 

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

3

 

Umsobomvu Local Municipality

7

 

Umtshezi Local Municipality

1

 

Umzimvubu Local Municipality

1

 

Umzinyathi District Municipali

1

 

Uphongolo Local Municipality

3

 

Uthukela District Municipality

1

 

Uthungulu District Municipalit

2

 

Ventersdorp Local Municipality

2

 

Vhembe District Municipality

2

 

Walter Sisulu Local Municipali

1

 

West Coast District Municipali

3

 

Xhariep District Municipality

3

 

Z F Mgcawu District Municipali

1

 

Zululand District Municipality

1

 

Grand Total

401

401

26 October 2020 - NW1951

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Why does he keep on spending taxpayers’ money on Autopax and Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), given that out of a fleet of 555 Autopax buses only 131 buses are operating and that PRASA did not have money to pay its employees in January 2020, whilst some of its competitors are delivering a good service and have been making a profit for years?

Reply:

One of the main objects of PRASA’s business, provided for in the Legal Succession Act of South African Transport Services (“SATS” Act of 1989 as amended), is to provide for long haul passenger bus services within, to and from the Republic in terms of the principles set out in section 4 of the National Land Transport Transition Act, 2000 (Act No. 22 of 2000).

The strategic role for Autopax is in the provision of long distance travel to passengers that are currently stranded and isolated from mainstream long distance public transport routes. There is a known demand for mobility from rural and poorer communities for affordable regional transport links as these communities are held to ransom by service providers that charges exorbitant fees at times of the payment of social pensions benefits and visits to healthcare facilities.

The majority of Autopax’s competitors only serve lucrative high passenger demand routes and have sustainable capital replacement programmes.The recapitalisation of the Autopax bus fleet is a priorityfor PRASA and has been disrupted by the COVID 19 pandemic, as buses were planned to be repaired/rebuilt with major units repaired/replaced, such as engines, gearboxes and differentials.

01 October 2020 - NW2040

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What measures have been undertaken to replace SA Civil Aviation Authority’s Calibration Cessna Citation aircraft which crashed in January 2020; (2) whether there are any South African aviation companies that have both the aircraft and pilot’s skills that will ensure accurate calibration of the Republic’s main airports; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) were any of the specified companies approached to provide a quote on instrumentation calibration at any major airport; if not, why not; if so, on what date will operations commence?

Reply:

1. The SACAA went on an open tender to procure the services of a service provider who can provide calibration services to the SACAA FIU clients.The tender was advertised on 19 February 2020 and ultimately closed on 17 March 2020. A service provider was appointed according to the PFMA requirements and they commenced work on 22 August 2020. The permanent replacement has been halted for about 12 months due to financial constraints as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

2. As far as the SACAA is aware there is no service provider for flight calibration in South Africa other than the SACAA FIU, neither is there an aircraft in South Africa that is fitted with a flight inspection system.Flight Inspection requires specific flight profiles to enable specific tests to certify a landing system, these flight profiles are not common to general flying procedures and requires specific pilot training as the flight profiles are done at very low levels. Unless a South African pilot is conducting the same type of flying overseas, the SACAA is not aware that there are any SA pilots who are current on flight calibration flying at the moment.

3. The SACAA advertised an open tender and there was more than one SA company who participated in the tender. A South African company was eventually appointed even though they are using an aircraft and crew from Europe. The operations with the flight calibration service provider started on the 22 August 2020 and continuing.

01 October 2020 - NW1957

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Considering the need for social distancing to prevent the spread of Covid-19, (a) how are social distancing measures enforced on aircraft and (b) what measures are in place to prevent the spread of the coronavirus on aircraft?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a) The front and back rowsof the aircraft are left open to ensure that if a suspected case is picked up on board the passenger will be isolated during flight. The 1,5 – 2metre social distancing is not applied inside the aircraft because the new generation aircraft are fitted withsophisticated air filters calledHigh-Efficiency-Particulate Air Filters / Arrestors (HEPA) which cleans the air in the aircraft every 3 minutes and purifies the air circulation with 99,99% efficiency. These filters have been proven through tests to provide air that meets the standards set for theatres in hospitals. This is a much higher rate of flow than people experience in other indoor environments and means that passengers are provided with about 80 times as much air as they need to breathe.

b) Additional risk mitigation measures are well articulated in the guidelines / protocols that were issued by the Minister of Transport and which are implemented by all air operators including airports. These protocols start as passengers arrive and enter the airport terminal building, to when the passengersaboard the aircraft and until they arrive at the destination. These measures include among others the following:

  • Screening of passengers as they enter the terminal building;
  • Compulsory wearing of masks;
  • Filling in of health declarations and collecting information for contact tracing purposes;
  • Markings of airport floors ensuring social distancing;
  • Regular sanitising and washing of hands and disinfection of all touchpoints e.g. check in counters, boarding, baggage trolleys, security check points etc.;
  • Self-service and contactless check-in and boarding processes;
  • Staggered boarding and disembarkation of passengers;
  • Compulsory wearing of masks on board an aircraft and throughout the journey;
  • Limited movement on board an aircraft;
  • On-board magazines distribution discontinued;
  • Pre-packaged meals where they are served;
  • Aircraft are disinfected before each flight, amongst others.

01 October 2020 - NW2012

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total headcount of security personnel employed by companies that are currently providing security services to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa?

Reply:

The current headcount of security personnel employed by companies contracted by PRASA to provide security services is as follows:

#

Company

Complements

1

ComweziSecurity Services (62 Metrorail and 34 Main Line Passenger Services)

96

2

Chippa Training Academy (Company did not return to sites following the termination in April 2020)

157

3

Sechaba Security Services

268

4

Supreme Security Services

200

5

ChumaSecurity Services

200

Total

921

01 October 2020 - NW2014

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What are details of the criteria used by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa to absorb the existing security personnel?

Reply:

PRASA has a Recruitment and Selection policy which amongst other things details the minimum qualifications, experience and skills for advertised positions. It is also important to note that this was not an automatic absorption of security personnel, but a thorough, comprehensive and rigorous recruitment and selection process to identify fit for purpose security personnel.

In this regard, the minimum educational criteria was a Matric certificate or NQF Level 4 equivalent as well as minimum Grade C PSIRA registration. Other minimum requirements included clear criminal record with no pending cases, 6 months security operation experience, medically fit and clean bill of health. The candidates were also required to participate in physical activities including completing a 2.4 km run within a specified time frame.

01 October 2020 - NW2092

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether a tender process has been followed in order to replace the SA Civil Aviation Authority’s calibration Cessna Citation aircraft that crashed in January 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the closing date of the tender and (b) where was the tender advertised; (2) whether a successful bidder has been selected; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who is the successful bidder and (b) what are the details of experience of the successful bidder in terms of (i) qualifications and (ii) calibration equipment for aircrafts?

Reply:

1. South African Civil Aviation Authority has followed a tender process for the replacement of the Cessna Citation Aircraft that crashed in January 2020.Three separate tender bids were issued.

(a) irst tender was advertised on the 13 July 2018 and closed on the 10 August 2018

Second tender was advertised on the 12 April 2019 and closed on the 10 May 2019 and

Third tender was advertised on the 01 November 2019 and closed on the 22 November 2020.

(b) The tenders were advertised as follows:

  • First and Second tender - SACAA website and National Treasury e-Tender Portal.
  • Third tender - SACAA website, National Treasury e-Tender Portal and Tender Tiger (International Advertising portal).

2. Whether a successful bidder was selected:

(a)

  • The first tender was cancelled as none of the bidders met the functionality requirements of the bid;
  • The second tender was also cancelled as none of the bidders met the functionality requirements;
  • The third tender was also cancelled as the price for the successful bidder for a second-hand used aircraft was more expensive than a brand-new aircraft from the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). After engagements with the National Treasury (NT), SACAA received approval from NT to acquire a new aircraft directly from the OEM manufacturer.

b) (i)

National Treasury approved that SACAA can purchase a new aircraft directly from the OEM as it is more cost effective than the tendered price for a used aircraft.

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and SACAA’s financial position a Board decision was taken to delay the acquisition of the Aircraft until the next financial year.

No contract has been concluded with the OEM as yet.

b) (ii)

A separate tender will be issued for the calibration equipment and the process of the calibration is underway.

01 October 2020 - NW2063

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) total amount has been spent by his department on Covid-19-related expenditure, (b) services was the specified money used for and (c)(i) were the names of the service providers and (ii) process was used to choose the specified service providers?

Reply:

(a) The Department has spent a total of R31 342 694,01, to date.

(b)

DESCRIPTION

SERVICE PROVIDER

PROCESS FOLLOWED

(b)

(c)(i)

(c)(ii)

Public Transport: Activation at Taxi Ranks

Moloko Family Holdings

Competitive Quote Process

Public Transport: Round 1 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters

C Squared Consumer

Emergency procurement in terms of Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021 and Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017. Competitive Quote Process

Public Transport: Round 2 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters (Multiple Award)

C Squared Consumer
Ecko-Green
Mistralog

Emergency procurement in terms of Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021 and Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017. Competitive Quote Process

Ministry: Outreach and DLTC's: Face Shields and Sanitizers(Multiple Award)

Cherry Pickles
Morerishi Travel

Competitive Quote Process

PT: Assistance to DBE by providing Sanitizers and Disinfectant to Scholar Transport(Multiple Award)

Maputha Ba Africa
Atlas Paints

Emergency procurement in terms of Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021 and Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017. Competitive Quote Process

COO: PPE for DOT officials/internal use

Way 2 Go It Solutions

Competitive Quote Process

COO: PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

Mistralog
Hamisa
Amet
Ecko-Green

Competitive Quote Process

COO: PPE for DOT officials/internal use

Tshwane Running Shop

Competitive Quote Process

Disinfecting of Forum Building

Rimone Wako Mzantsi
C Squared Consumer
I Riai Trading

Competitive Quote Process

01 October 2020 - NW2041

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to airport approach instrumentation and calibration, what (a) is the current grade status of each (i) airport and (ii) runway in the Republic, (b) are the details of the changes in the grading of each (i) airport and (ii) runway since 1 January 2020 and (c) is the due date of the next grading of each specified runway? NW2603E

Reply:

a) The current grade status of each (i) airport and (ii) runway in the Republic:

AIRPORT

RUNWAY

ILS CATEGORY

O.R.Tambo International Airport

RWY 03L

CAT II

 

RWY 21R

CAT II

 

RWY 03R

CAT II

 

RWY 03L

CAT II

Cape Town International Airport

RWY 01

CAT IIIB

 

RWY 19

CAT II

King Shaka International Airport

RWY 06

CAT II

 

RWY 24

CAT II

Port Elizabeth International Airport

RWY 08

CAT II

 

RWY 26

CAT II

East London Airport

RWY 11

CAT I

 

RWY 29

CAT I

George Airport

RWY 11

CAT I

 

RWY 29

CAT II

b) Details of the changes in the grading of each (i) airport and (ii) runway since 1 January 2020:

AIRPORT

RUNWAY

RUNWAY STATUS SINCE 1 JANUARY 2020

CURRENT STATUS

O.R.Tambo International Airport

RWY 03L

CAT II

CAT II

 

RWY 21R

CAT II

CAT II

 

RWY 03R

CAT II non available from 10 Aug to 23 Aug 2020

CAT II

 

RWY 03L

CAT II non available from 10 Aug to 23 Aug 2020

CAT II

Cape Town International Airport

RWY 01

Downgraded from CAT IIIB to CAT II from 14 Feb 2020 to 13 Aug 2020.

Non available from 13 Aug to 26 Aug 2020

CAT IIIB

 

RWY 19

CAT II non available from 13 Aug to 26 Aug 2020.

CAT II

King Shaka International Airport

RWY 06

CAT II non available from 29 April 2020.

In process of being flight calibrated by SACAA

 

RWY 24

CAT II non available from 2 July 2020.

In the process of being flight calibrated by SACAA

Port Elizabeth International Airport

RWY 08

CAT II non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

 

RWY

CAT II non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

East London Airport

RWY 11

CAT I non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

 

RWY 29

CAT I non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

George Airport

RWY 11

CAT I non available from 10 Jul 2020 to 29 Aug 2020.

CAT I

 

RWY 29

CAT II non available from 10 Jul 2020 to Aug 29 Aug 2020.

CAT II

(c) Due date of the next grading of each specified runway? NW2603E

ILS calibrations are valid for 180 days. Next scheduled flight calibration dates are available from SACAA.