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12 May 2022 - NW1456

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the Government is subsidising the taxi industry in terms of the exorbitant increase in the petrol price; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what total amount each month; (2) whether the subsidy is adjusted every month to accommodate the increase in the petrol price; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the actual formula used?

Reply:

1. Subsidised public transport services are currently provided on a contract basis where government contracts with operators to provide scheduled services in a particular route in terms of the relevant integrated transport plan and in alignment with applicable legislation. These contracts are designed in terms of demand to enable effective utilisation of funds. As a result, the Department is not subsiding the taxi industry due to their operating model. The Department is developing a Public Transport Subsidy Policy that will guide the distribution of subsidies in line with demand, where the right mode would be utilised for the right volumes.

2. There are no monthly adjustments done as there is no subsidy provided for the taxi industry as indicated in 1 above.

12 May 2022 - NW1413

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether R102 Speranza Road in Malanganeni, Umdoni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal falls within the mandate of his department; if not, which sphere of government is responsible for the specified road; if so, by what date is it envisaged that a bridge will be built on R102 Speranza Road?

Reply:

No, this road does not fall under the mandate of SANRAL.

The Provincial KwaZulu-Natal Department of Transport has confirmed this is part of their road network and its named P2-2. The Province is aware of the sink hole that needs to be addressed as part of the exercise to repair the roads damaged from the recent floods that occurred in April 2022 and is in the process of the appointment of service providers to do remedial works for the various road infrastructure projects, including the above work.

06 May 2022 - NW1280

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the offshore bunkering operation in Algoa Bay, what (a) number of (i) litres of oil have been spilled since the operation commenced, (ii) ships have docked alongside the bunkering ship since the operation commenced and (iii) people are directly employed as a result of the bunkering operation, (b) are the total (i) fines issued and (ii) costs recovered in terms of the Marine Pollution (Control and Civil Liability) Act 6 of 1981, and (c) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

With reference to:

(a) number of

(i) Litres: Between 1000 to 1200 litres of oil have been spilled from 3 oil spills, out of a total 6.8 billion litres of oil transferred, since the operations commenced in 2016.

(ii) Ships have docked alongside the bunkering ship since the operation commenced: A total of 6191 ships have conducted bunkering operations in Algoa Bay since 2016.

(iii) People are directly employed as a result of the bunkering operation:

a.There are three (3) Barge operators employing a total of 119 seafarers of which 9 are South African seafarers and the remainder foreign seafarers, on oil tankers;

b. Off Port Limit Operators (OPL) have grown from 5 to 9 operators, employing 32 South African office staff;

c. OPL boats servicing the bunker calling ships, grew from 5 to 16 offshore launches, employing 44 South African crew;

d. Ship Agents have grown from 16 to 25 Ship Agents;

e. Ship Chandlers have grown from 2 to 6 Ship Chandlers providing stores, spares and victuals to bunker calling ships; and

f. Diving Companies have grown from 1 to 4 Dive companies.

(b) are the total

(i) Fines issued: A total of R 1 880 000 in Admissions of Contravention (Fines) was issued for the 3 oil spills as reported.

(ii) Costs recovered in terms of the Marine Pollution: All costs with respect to oil spills are covered by the vessel owners’ insurers as prescribed by the Marine Pollution (Control and Civil Liability) Act 6 of 1981.

and (c) are the further relevant details?

(i) Only 1 out of the 3 oil tankers used for bunkering are registered on the South African flag – It has been indicated that this is due to the South African shipping tax regime currently in place which makes the local SA flag unattractive to ship owners;

(ii) Some 13 158 seafarers have transited in Algoa Bay from ships calling for bunkers, indirectly benefitting the local maritime industry and tourism through hotel stays, airport transfers, air travel, local retail and entertainment industry and contributing to the local economy;

(iii) Bunker calling ships also receive spares and stores while in Algoa Bay;

(iv) Specialised OEM marine spares are airfreighted to South Africa, benefitting the local freight industry;

(v) Ship technical repairs are also completed onboard while these ships are in Algoa Bay using local marine companies and technicians;

(vi) Two (2) additional South African operators have expressed interest to commence with bunkering operations in Algoa Bay, however the local moratorium have prevented these companies from starting operations;

(vii) LNG Operators have expressed interest in conducting LNG ship to ship transfers offshore in Algoa Bay.

06 May 2022 - NW1239

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Transport

What plans have been put in place by his department to repair the N12 in Klerksdorp, especially in the central business district, which is filled with potholes?

Reply:

The N12 section, which runs through the central business district of Klerksdorp and various other towns, are under the jurisdiction of the North-West Province. It has now been agreed between the Department of Transport, North-West Province and SANRAL that in the short-term SANRAL will be appointed by the North-West Province as the Implementing Agent to address the condition of the N12, including through Klerksdorp. SANRAL has completed a condition assessment of the affected N12 sections, identified the repair work required and is finalising arrangements to start with the required works within the next 2 weeks.

It has further been agreed that over the medium-term these remaining parts of the N12, within towns, including Klerksdorp, will be transferred to SANRAL as national roads.

06 May 2022 - NW1238

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Transport

What measures has his department taken to ensure that it regularly maintains the road which connects Wolmaransstad and Schweizer-Reneke and that potholes are fixed?

Reply:

The North West Department of Public Works and Roads has appointed two contractors for the repair works. The one contractor has started works from Schweizer-Reneke side and the other one has started works from Wolmaransstad side.

06 May 2022 - NW1227

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Transport

Following the widely reported incidences of taxi violence in the Western Cape which took place in 2021, what steps has his department taken to ensure that the taxi industry in the province resolves its grievances through peaceful means?

Reply:

The following steps were undertaken by the Minister of Transport, Mr Mbalula and the MEC Mitchell, Department of Roads and Transport to ensure that the taxi industry in the province resolves its grievances through peaceful means:

1. An Agreement between Cape Organisation for Democratic Taxi Association (CODETA) and Cape Amalgamated Taxi Association (CATA) was signed after both parties met with the Minister and the MEC. Both parties pledged to cooperate and resolve their grievances through peaceful means. The signed Agreement included the following:

a) That all legal Operating License holders for routes should be allowed to operate the routes authorised by their license without any disturbances;

b) All routes will be monitored and action will be taken against associations and individual operating license holders who are in breach of the instruction;

c) Affected municipalities would be requested to place a moratorium on the issuance of new operating licenses and applications for additional authorities on all affected routes whilst also rationalising the services;

d) Where there is a need for additional services, operating licenses will be apportioned in accordance with the arbitration award;

e) The Department of Transport and Public Works will meet with the arbitrator to expedite the arbitration process and to issue an award within the shortest possible timeframe;

f) The Registrar’s Office will continue with the section 7(A)(20) inquiry to deal with the possible violations of the Code of Conduct and Standard Constitution and to deal with the issue of floor crossing as well as to determine if the affected associations are still properly constituted in terms of applicable legal prescripts. The Registrar’s Office will make recommendations to the PRE in respect of actions against affected operated operating license holders;

g) All affected routes operated by two associations will be closed for all minibus-taxi operations for a period to be determined by the MEC and the affected operating licenses will be suspended using the provisions of section 91 of the National Land Transport Act (NLTA) in the event of any further acts of violence.

h) Any other taxi associations found to be involved in or promoting violence will similarly be suspended or deregistered by following the prescribed processes;

i) Any associations that henceforth affiliates to a region or so called “mother body” outside of its geographical will be suspended by the Registrar’s Office in line with the SANTACO National Constitution;

j) The Department of Transport and Public Works will request the SAPS to open an inquiry in terms of the Prevention of Organised Crime Act to investigate the on-going violence and to prioritise reported cases;

k) Law enforcement capacity and deployment will be reviewed and strengthened in the affected areas to ensure enforcement of all laws without fear or favour;

l) Any allegations of corrupt activities or clear acts of favouritism on the part of law enforcement or regulatory officials will be investigated based on evidence submitted by complainants.

 

06 May 2022 - NW1167

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of economic sabotage cases has his department discovered, which were executed by (a) individual persons and (b) organised crime syndicates with regard to the damage and/or vandalism of train stations and/or rail infrastructure?

Reply:

There are no crimes classified as economic sabotage. The Crime Administration System (CAS) of the South African Police Service (SAPS) has no crime category called Economic Sabotage. All crimes are categorized under Criminal Matters Amendment Act, No. 18 of 2015, which has introduced a new offence that deals with all Essential Infrastructure related crimes to underscore the seriousness of the crime committed. Section 3(1) of the Amendment Act creates a new offence (not catered for in the Second-hand Goods Act 2009) in terms of which:

1. …any person is guilty of an offence it he unlawfully and intentionally

(a) tampers with, damages or destroys essential infrastructure; or

(b) colludes with or assists another person in the commission, performance or carrying out of activity referred to in paragraph (a), and who knows of ought reasonable to have known or suspected that it is essential infrastructure, is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a period of imprisonment no exceeding 30 years or, in the case of a corporate body as contemplated in section 332(2) of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977, a fine not exceeding R100 million.

All criminal incidents of this nature are reported to SAPS who process the information/matters in terms of their own internal protocols.

06 May 2022 - NW1212

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with regard to Operation Ziveze and his statement to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on 22 March 2022, that the operation had uncovered 3 000 ghost workers receiving salaries in the system at the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, the specified list had been sent to the Department of Public Service and Administration to investigation to investigate if any of the ghost workers are employed elsewhere in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) on what date was the chief financial officer instructed to stop payments to the ghost workers; (3) what steps have been implemented by his department to recover the salaries and/or monies from the various bank accounts of the recipients?

Reply:

(1) The final list of ghost workers has not been sent to the Department of Public Service and Administration yet, due to internal processes not yet finalised. The processes include verifying when the individual was loaded on to the payroll system, the bank account used and who loaded the individual on the system.

PRASA is still in a process of auditing and confirming the unidentified individuals.

(2) The Group Chief Financial Officer has not been instructed to lock the salaries yet until the verification process by internal audit has been completed. This is to protect the credibility of the process by ensuring that the company does not close salaries of active employees who are on duly authorised absence from work, i.e. on leave, sick leave (short/long term), suspension, maternity leave and employees working outside the cities.

The organisation is following the authorizations and other details on the system before blocking access, consequence managing and reporting this matter to the law enforcement agencies and other state agencies for further interventions.

(3) There are planned processes, dependent on the internal audit process being finalised. Only then will other processes of locking salaries, reporting to SIU/Hawks to attach and recover on behalf of PRASA commence.

06 May 2022 - NW1260

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of claims against the Road Accident Fund (a) have been recorded from 1 January 2015 to date, (b) have been paid in the specified period in each province and (c) are still outstanding?

Reply:

The number of claims (personal claims and supplier claims combined) against the Road Accident Fund (RAF) (a) registered from 1 January 2015 to 31 March 2022 is 1,571,647, (b) in the specified period a total of 1,034,930 (66%) claims have been paid (capital); payment has been requested but has not yet been paid (RNYP) in respect of 10,184 (0.6%) claims; 197,180 (12.5%) claims were repudiated; 48,429 (3.1%) claims were flagged as duplicate claims and, or, objected to; 3,418 (0.2%) claims were finalised without a capital payment; and 1,840 (0.1%) claims were finalised with undertaking certificates but with no capital paid to date; which claim statistics is broken down per RAF regional office as follows:

(c) and 275,666 (17.5%) claims remain on an open claims status with no capital paid or requested to date.

21 April 2022 - NW1174

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Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) are the reasons that it takes the online system more than 30 days to confirm appointment for the renewal of driving licences in Gauteng and (b) measures has he put in place to ensure that the efficiency of this system is improved?

Reply:

The Queue campaign is only applicable to Gauteng and can be used by the public to register to be allocated a slot at their preferred DLTCs instead of visiting the website repeatedly to check for slot availability. The 30 days is the maximum period. The average time to allocate a slot is 7-14 days.

In the event where the public needs an urgent booking, the online system allows for direct bookings at any DLTCs with availability.

b) The major constraint of the booking system is the lack of capacity at traditional DLTCs. The Minister launched 2 DLTCs that operate 7 days a week from 7 to 9pm which has increased available capacity by 50%.

21 April 2022 - NW893

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

(a)

(i) The National Department of Transport has recorded one sexual harassment case.

The perpetrator is alleged to have on several occasions made unwelcome and in appropriate sexual remarks to his supervisor by means of Cell phones SMS. The Victim, Supervisor alleged that she warned the perpetrator of her discomfort of the remarks made by the perpetrator and the perpetrator did not stop sending inappropriate SMS remarks. The victim then reported the perpetrator to the employer.

The employee is placed on precautionary suspension pending the finalisation of the matter. The hearing was set down on the 10th of March 2022, however, it was postponed due to unavailability of the Union Representative.

The hearing will proceed on 08 April 2022 for hearing.

(ii) The total number of recorded sexual assault is Nil

(aa) Nil

(bb) One

(b) (i) Nil (ii) Nil (iii) One

(c) Nil

21 April 2022 - NW902

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with regard to a series of media reports, Werksmans Attorneys are no longer representing the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) in the appeal matter against Siyangena Technologies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what alternative arrangements have been made; (2) whether the PRASA Board Chairperson, Mr Leonard Ramatlakane, is facilitating settlement talks; if so, what (a) is the motivation for the settlement, in light of the fact that a court of law has already found in favour of PRASA and the Supreme Court of Appeal is likely to do so again and (b) new evidence has come to light that could possibly be motivating PRASA’s change of position on this matter?

Reply:

(1) Werkmans Attorneys are not representing PRASA in the Siyangena Technologies matter. PRASA received a formal notification from Werkmans Attorneys that it took a business decision to withdraw from representing PRASA in all legal matters it was handling on behalf of PRASA. It further informed PRASA that they will hand over all the files of PRASA and will release them as they get paid. PRASA has been paying Werkmans Attorneys since the correspondence. Werkmans Attorneys, like other creditors, are owed by PRASA and based on PRASA’s cashflow, will continue to pay what is outstanding. PRASA has a panel of attorneys from which a law firm has been identified to represent PRASA in the matter.

With regards to the Siyangena Technologies matter which is serving at the Supreme Court of Appeal, both parties to the litigation have already submitted their papers and PRASA is not prejudiced by the withdrawal of Werkmans Attorneys. The new law firm has been furnished with the files and papers for the case.

(2) The PRASA Board Chairperson is not facilitating settlement talks. The matter is still before the Supreme Court of Appeal.

(a) The High Court in North Gauteng, in their judgement, explicitly states that whilst the contract was deemed irregular, PRASA and Siyangena Technologies needed to determine the compensation value of the work and once same is reached, this should also be made an order of the court.

  • Despite the above, Siyangena Technologies appealed the decision.
  • Whilst the appeal remains pending, Siyangena Technologies wrote to PRASA, reminding them of the outcomes of the court on the determination exercise and reminded PRASA of this outstanding matter, hence the letter to the Chairperson of the Board.
  • The Chairperson of the Board correctly referred the matter to the Group CEO to engage with it and advise the Board, hence the meeting by PRASA management with Siyangena Technologies.
  • At the meeting Siyangena Technologies, over and above the issue of determination, proposed consideration for a discussion on the possible resolution on the matter outside litigation.

(b) PRASA is not aware of any new evidence.

21 April 2022 - NW1025

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the rail network that has grinded to a halt in the Eastern Cape, with carriages having been standing idle since 7 January 2022 and the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa citing operational challenges such as theft and vandalism as the reason, and given that a similar situation persists in Cape Town in the Western Cape where trains are also standing still following the problems caused by power-cuts to a major power sub-station, what has his department done to mitigate the effects of the failing rail infrastructure on business operations; (2) whether his department has intervened with a solid action plan to secure power supply to ensure that trains continue operating in spite of power cuts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

1. Eastern Cape Region - The rail infrastructure in the Eastern Cape is owned and protected by Transnet and as such PRASA utilises this infrastructure by agreement with Transnet. The East London rail corridor cannot be operated using PRASA owned electrical locomotives as the Overhead Electrical Traction power is not available due to vandalism and theft.

PRASA continues to engage with Transnet on recovering and rehabilitating the network. In addition, PRASA is in process of temporary leasing diesel locomotives from the market while pursuing long-term solution to acquire shunting diesel locomotives to mitigate the risk of Transnet locomotives withdrawal and leasing arrangements. The engagement has been escalated to the level of the CEOs at both organisations.

Western Cape Region - On 8 March 2022 an ESKOM Traction substation supplying power for the running of Trains in Cape Town in Western Cape was vandalised resulting in the interruption of train service in Cape Town. Eskom responded and repaired damaged equipment and cables and the power supply was restored the following day, on 9 March 2022. PRASA, working in collaboration with ESKOM, has since deployed additional security personnel to guard this important power supply node (and other vulnerable hotspots) for the trains in the Western Cape.

(2) Eastern Cape Region - PRASA is intervening with a number of options, the short term being to hire diesel locomotives fit for this purpose to operate both the East London and Gqeberha corridors. In the long term, as part of its initial rolling stock procurement program, PRASA is planning to provide the Eastern Cape with the new fleet of trains as an integral part of its overall rolling stock replacement program.

Western Cape Region - PRASA, ESKOM and TRANSNET have set up Security Response actions as a means to bring better collaboration and resources to secure the SOEs infrastructure against vandalism.

PRASA has further deployed security in the network to safeguard critical installations, substations, relay rooms and hotspots areas.

There is a process underway for substations and relay rooms to be installed with “target hardening army spec” security fencing, CCTV surveillance and alarm systems for intruder detection.

21 April 2022 - NW1026

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Following the recent operational issues at the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), in respect of which the United National Transport Union has noted a few concerns and chief among them being that commuters bear the brunt of the inconsistencies and inactivity of trains, (a) what (i) are the reasons that PRASA has not paid Transnet for the diesel locomotives and (ii) amount has been allocated to boost security on trains and train stations and (b) how has his department intervened at PRASA to ensure that the staff is not unduly affected by the issues with trains being inoperative?

Reply:

(a) (i) PRASA was paying for the locomotives through a separate agreement from the main agreements. However, Transnet chose to withdraw the locomotives as a result of the R2,3 billion in operational debt owed to it by PRASA. This is therefore Transnet’s choice to disable passenger rail with the withdrawal of these locomotives. The reason for the large outstanding balance due to Transnet is as a result of the inequitable split of assets and incorrect funding model at the original separation of the two entities. The separation saw Transnet charging PRASA along commercial lines whilst its funding model did not cater for this arrangement, resulting in a large underfunding of passenger rail.

(ii) A special allocation of R900 million was provided by National Treasury to assist with security over and above the general security budget of R1,1 billion allocated to PRASA. Although all of this special allocation was expected to be spent on further securing passengers and stations, R500 million of this had to be spent on asset protection during the riots and for the validity period of the Hlope judgement, none of which was budgeted for or expected. The balance of R400 million in addition to the general security budget is being used to protect passengers and assets.

(b) PRASA continues to pay its staff during the period of the pandemic and resulted in PRASA being in a far better position to continue working harder on its mandate towards bring the ten (10) corridors into operations.

21 April 2022 - NW1160

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What total amount has been paid by his department to municipalities for the purpose of establishing and operating bus rapid transit (BRT) infrastructure and services since the inception of the grant funding; (2) (a) which municipalities have received such support and (b) what amount has each municipality received to date; (3) to what extent has each of the municipalities concerned been able to establish fully operational BRT services?

Reply:

1) A total of R 71, 307 billion was a consolidated amount allocated to municipalities participating in the PTNG programme from the financial year 2008/09 to the current 2021/22 up to March 2022.

It should be noted that since inception and up to 2010/11 the grant allocations amounting to R 9, 033 billion were initially expended on preparations for the 2009 Confederations Cup and World Cup 2010 projects.

2) The table below indicates the names of municipalities(a) and amount disbursed to each municipality to date (b).

3. The Department is promoting an incremental approach when implementing this programme, not a wall-to-wall network approach. To date, 6 municipalities are operating their pilot phases of Integrated Public Transport Networks and planning expansion to other areas. These municipalities are the Cape Town, Johannesburg, Tshwane, Ekurhuleni, George, and Nelson Mandela Bay.

The other 4 municipalities are at an advanced stage in launching their pilot phases. These are Polokwane, Mangaung, Rustenburg and eThekwini. It should be noted that 3 municipalities were suspended from the programme for 3 years. These are Msunduzi, Mbombela, and Buffalo City. The Department together with National Treasury is finalising the readmission criteria for the suspended municipalities.

19 April 2022 - NW1171

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether his department has any plans to promote collaboration with different arts and cultural organisations to guide and mentor them on issues of investments and development in order to sustain their wellbeing; if not, what are the challenges in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, my Department has plans to promote collaboration with different arts and culture organisations. One such, being the Debut Programme, an initiative of the Department in partnership with Business and Arts South Africa (BASA (NPC), with over one hundred and sixty (160) private sector/corporate members.

BASA's purpose is to attract corporate sector investment, through financial or in-kind support of the arts and culture organizations, as well as individual artists, within South Africa

It seeks to develop emerging artists from rural and peri-urban communities towards launching their creative business ventures. The Programme provides them with knowledge, skills, funding, networking opportunities and mentoring support, and helps them leverage their artistic talent into agile, sustainable, and profitable enterprises.

Since its inception in July 2017, one hundred and forty-two (142) participants, graduated from the programme. Most of the participants identified as African, the majority are identified as male, and most (42.4%) were aged between 25 and 29.

One hundred and twenty (120) participants also launched their businesses online and have officially opened for business, which demonstrates the investment that the department has done through this incubator programme.

05 April 2022 - NW736

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the reasons that his department never completed the Cape Town Foreshore Freeway Bridge, also known as the Unfinished Bridge, which has remained unfinished for the past 40 years; (2) whether, in light of the fact that the unfinished highway has occasionally been utilised as a set for television and movie shoots and also for parking during the 2010 FIFA World Cup, his department intends to complete the bridge; if not, why not; if so, by what date is it envisaged the bridges will be completed?

Reply:

1. The Foreshore Freeway is a City road and the original plan was to implement it in phases. When the time came for building the missing portion of the Foreshore Freeway, the predicted traffic for the commencement date of construction had not materialised. A decision was taken to postpone the completion of the Foreshore Freeway until a later date when the traffic had increased to the levels that could justify the completion. Since that date, the emphasis then changed from road building to promoting public Transport and the completion of the freeway was not prioritized above improving public transport. Since then the City being able to afford the completion of the freeway has been a challenge. The current predicted cost of completing the Foreshore Freeway is in the order of R1.808billion.

2. It is certainly the City’s desire to complete the Foreshore Freeway but for this to happen will require a partnership between all three spheres of government. The anticipated duration of the completion of the |Foreshore Freeway project is 9 years including the review of the conceptual design, detailed design, construction tender documents preparation as well as construction. The earliest the Foreshore Freeway could be completed and open to the public would be in the 2030/2031 City financial year provided budget is secured timeously.

05 April 2022 - NW966

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the latest (a) plans and (b) timelines for the construction of the N2/T2 bypass through Somerset West to Sir Lowry’s Pass by the SA National Roads Agency Limited?

Reply:

a) The consulting engineering service providers are finalising the required detail plans and construction tender documents, subject to finalisation of various outstanding matters such as land acquisition.

b) Based on the current SANRAL planning and timelines as submitted and already considered by the City of Cape Town (CoCT), SANRAL can only commence with road construction when in possession of a ‘vacant road reserve’, which for now is planned for the period January 2025 to July 2025, as per the two planned construction sections. It must be emphasized that the conclusion of the land acquisition by the CoCT and the securing of all development rights to enable the alternative land procured to be developed into integrated townships, is on the “critical path” that will determine the timeline for the N2 Construction Projects. This aspect is complex, and the consents required in terms of the Planning and Environmental Laws are not within the control of SANRAL and the CoCT.

05 April 2022 - NW967

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the construction of the N2/T2 bypass through Somerset West to Sir Lowry’s Pass, (a) what are the details of the plans of the SA National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) to resettle the people who are currently occupying and living on the SANRAL land, (b) where will the people be relocated and (c) by what date is it envisaged that the people will be resettled?

Reply:

SANRAL and the City of Cape Town (CoCT) signed an Implementation Protocol (IP) in terms of section 35(1) of the Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act, 2005 (Act No. 13 of 2005) ("IRFA"), in Dec 2020. This IP is a codification of the Constitutional obligation placed upon all organs of the state to cooperate with one another when embarking on major projects that will draw on the resources of two or more such organs of the state. It also allows for the exercising of statutory powers by both parties in a coordinated manner.

The IP sets out in detail the role and responsibilities of each party thereto.

In this instance, the statutory function or the provision of a service, depends on the participation of organs of state in different governments who must co-ordinate their actions. This has been done as it would be in the best interest of both the CoCT and SANRAL to construct the N2 through Somerset West, thus positively impacting the economy of Western Cape Province and that of the country. This initiative by SANRAL is accordingly in the national and local public interest.

In brief, the IP requires that SANRAL would design and construct the proposed extension of the 13 km of Greenfields N2, amongst others, whereas the CoCT would be responsible for the procurement of alternative land suitable for housing, take transfer of such alternate land, procure all necessary development rights and to develop such land to enable the main relocations and other relocations of the informal settlements within the N2 Road Reserve to be effected in keeping with the N2 Project Timeline.

The IP established an Intergovernmental Forum (the IgF) which consists of delegated management officials from both SANRAL and the CoCT. Both parties provide the alternating chairperson for the “IgF”. Various work plans have been prepared and adopted by the IgF which set out all the tasks relating to the full spectrum of the IP in support of the N2 Project. There are but two outstanding work plans which are currently being finalised. These work plans, inter alia, are geared and detailed to the extent that the projected timelines for the both the construction of the N2 Project and the relocation of all occupants from the road reserve is achieved. The CoCT has identified various land parcels for the main relocation and is currently finalising the acquisition thereof. Once this process is finalised a more detailed timeline for the main relocation will be submitted to the IgF for approval and adoption.

Once all work plans are approved and adopted by the IgF, each party is bound to these and the timeframes that flow therefrom. In terms of the IP, the IgF is empowered to intervene and seek higher authority and assistance to ensure any risk of “slippages” are addressed before they are realised. In this regard the IgF will also shortly be required to consider and adopt a full “Risk Register” that will guide the whole process under the IP. Further the IP will also be requested to consider, adopt and manage a joint communication strategy that will ensure there is a unified approach to all aspects of communication both with the communities settled in the N2 Road Reserve, the wider community of Somerset West and the greater CoCT Community. .

The work plan for project timelines will be submitted to the next IgF meeting on the 17 May 2022. At this point the provisional timeline is for the main relocation to commence from September 2024 and be concluded by December 2026. This will be in a phased manner allowing the affected section of the N2 Project to commence from July 2025.

Based on the current SANRAL planning and timelines as submitted and already considered by the CoCT, SANRAL must be able to commence with road construction when in possession of “a vacant road reserve “by the fourth quarter of 2024/2025”, as per the two planned construction sections.

It must be emphasized that the conclusion of the land acquisition by the CoCT and the procurement of all development rights to enable the alternative land procured to be developed into integrated townships, is on the “critical path” that will determine the timeline for the N2 Project construction activities. This aspect is complex, and the consents required in terms of the Planning and Environmental Laws are not within the control of SANRAL and the CoCT.

05 April 2022 - NW965

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) On what date did he (i) depart South Africa and (ii) land in Ukraine, (b) for what period was he in Ukraine, (c) who did he meet with in Ukraine, (d) what were the total costs to his department for his trip to Ukraine and (e) what were the objectives of his trip to Ukraine; (2) whether he received signed and written approval from the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, for his trip to Ukraine; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Ministry has never travelled to Ukraine and is therefore not in a position to respond this question.

05 April 2022 - NW1038

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has quantified the damage caused to the road infrastructure by the recent heavy rains; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the extent of the damage and (b) on what date will his department begin with the repair work?

Reply:

The Department of Transport and various other Departments are working closely with the Department of Cooperative Governance (DoCG) and the National Disaster Management Center (NDMC), the designated government body responsible for handling of natural disasters taking place in South Africa.

The NDMC received incident reports from various provinces and shared same with affected sector departments for support coordination and intervention measures.

Relevant structures were activated in all affected provinces through the coordination of Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs) for activation of provincial response plans as well as coordination of reports by organs of state and relevant stakeholders. This was done in line with the 2021/22 National Summer Seasonal Contingency Plan.

All PDMCs and some Sector Departments also submitted their Summer Seasonal Plans. The NDMC activated and coordinates the National Joint Flood Operational Committee (NJFCC) that constitutes all relevant organs of state for preparedness measures, contingency arrangements and intervention measures

a) Based on the initial assessments conducted by provincial road authorities, the extent of the damages is estimated at R11 919 909 965 in the various provinces.

Province

District Municipalities

No of Local Municipalities

  Assessments Estimated Cost

     

Reprioritisation

Shortfall

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman, Joe Gqabi, Amathole and OR Tambo

27

Not Quantified

 

R1 469 393 770

Free State

Lejweleputswa, Xhariep, Fezile Dabi, Mangaung and Thabo Mofutsanyana

 

Not Quantified

R504 400 000

Kwa-Zulu Natal

eThekwini Metro, Ugu, iLembe, Umgungundlovu, Amajuba, Harry Gwala Uthukela and uMzinyathi,

32

Not Quantified

 

 R2 794 650 801

Limpopo

Capricorn, Sekhukhune, Waterberg, Vhembe and Mopani

22

R29 370 000

 R2 021 780 000

Mpumalanga

Bohlabela, Ehlanzeni, Gert Sibande and District Nkangala District

16

R4 000 000

R157 600 000

North west

Dr. Kenneth Kaunda, Bojanala, Ngaka Modiri Molema and Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati 

10

R99 300 000

 

 R4 632 900 560

Northern Cape

Francees Baard, John Taolo Gaetsewe, Namaqua, ZF Mgawu and Pixley ka Seme

 

0

R309 814 834

Grand Total

   

R132 670 000

R11 919 909 965

Table 1: Estimated Cost of Flood Damages

b) The restoration works of infrastructure will be planned, scheduled and undertaken based on the inspections and assessments. Officials from the Department shall assist the teams to conduct the detailed site inspections and assessments (already in progress) as per details provide below:

Province

District / Region

Roads / Sites

Date

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Ladysmith, Durban, Pietermaritzburg

D2502, D91, P40, P549, P205/2, P213, D96

10-11 March 2022

Eastern Cape

Amathole, Alfred Nzo, Sarah Baartman, Joe Gqabi, OR Tambo, Chris Hani

DR08047, DR08403, DR08044, DR08331, DR08346, DR2764

16-17 March 2022

Free State

Lejweleputswa, Thabo Mofutsanyana, Mangaung, Fezile Dabi, Xhariep

S556, S570, S118, S571, P8/1

24-24 March 2022

Mpumalanga

Nkangala, Bohlabela, Gert Sibande, Ehlanzeni

D1175, D957, D2685, D1604, D2950, D1604, P77/2

29-31 March 2022

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati, Ngaka Modri Molema, Bojanala, Dr Kennet Kaunda

D141, P34/2, P48/1, D171, D970

5-6 April 2022

Limpopo

Capricon, Sekhukhune Waterberg, Vhembe, Mopani

D3830, D3749, D3653

9-11 April 2022

Table 2: Details of Inspections and Assessments

In the case of the National Route R61 at Tsomo junction between Ngcobo and Cofimvaba in the Chris Hani District Municipality, the repairs were completed by SANRAL and this road officially opened to motorists on the 28 February 2022.

In case of provincial and municipal roads, the implementation of emergency repairs works was activated by the various road authorities to the affected road infrastructure that falls within their respective areas of jurisdiction.

It must be noted that:

  • In terms of the Disaster Management Act No 57 of 2002, when a disaster occurs:
    • the cost of repairing or replacing public sector infrastructure should be borne by the organ of state responsible for the maintenance of such infrastructure.
    • any financial assistance provided by a national, provincial or municipal organ of state must be in accordance with the national disaster management framework and any applicable post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation policy of the relevant sphere of government
  • as storms continue to cause floods in some areas, the road authorities continues to assess and intervene by repairing damages to restore access, including temporary bypasses and alternative routing for continued access to basic amenities and socio-economic facilities.
  • the reconstruction and rehabilitation to infrastructure damaged by floods, including road infrastructure will depend on the approval of budget reprioritisation and allocation of additional funds by the NDMC and National Treasury;
  • National Government shall assist provinces through the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG) and municipalities through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), as allowable with the provisions of these grant frameworks in terms of the Divisional of Revenue Act (DORA);
  • discussions are taking place at the Inter-Governmental Committee on Disaster Management (ICDM) and the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC)’s Disaster Operations Centre (DOC) remains activated to coordinate and facilitate the implementation of focused intervention and response measures including the monitoring and reporting of summer-related incidents and declared disasters;
  • The Department shall comply with any policy changes approved by ICDM.

05 April 2022 - NW785

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport in Port Elizabeth, the Airports Company South Africa has (a) completed the review of the precinct plan announced in the 2018-19 financial year and (b) developed a plan to upgrade the airport infrastructure to increase capacity; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details of the plan, including dates of commencement and completion, (ii) relevant details of the successes achieved as a result of the Airport Airlift Project and (iii) any further, relevant details?

Reply:

“Whether, with reference to the Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport in Port Elizabeth, the Airports Company South Africa has:

a) completed the review of the precinct plan announced in the 2018-19 financial year;

Yes

b) developed a plan to upgrade the airport infrastructure to increase capacity; if not, why not; if so, what are they?

No. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic impact, passenger traffic demand declined with more than 80% over the entire ACSA airport system. Passenger traffic at Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport decreased from approximately 1.7 million passengers in the 2019/2020 FY to approximately 400 000 passengers in the 2020/21 FY. As a result of low traffic volumes and ACSA’s financial position (-R2.6 billion loss in 2020/21) it was decided to suspend all capacity projects, including the Development Plans for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport. The business strategy was refocused on critical refurbishments and replacements and, all capacity projects had to be deferred. ACSA continues to monitor traffic and intends to re-initiate capacity projects of this nature in line with passenger demand.(i) relevant details of the plan, including dates of commencement and completion, See Sections 2-4, for the approach, capacity projects, and detailed process followed.

1. Background and Context

The development of Airports in the ACSA group is guided by a hierarchy of plans at a macro and micro level. At a macro level, development is guided by the Airport Master Plans followed by Precinct Plans, where precinct plans focus on specific areas or precincts as identified in the Airport Master Plan, e.g., terminal precinct, cargo precinct. etc. On a micro level, development plans focus on a specific infrastructure, e.g., passenger terminal, parking area, etc., within a specific precinct.

For the purpose of this response, the focus will be placed on the Landside Terminal Precinct Plan and the Development Plans for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport. The Precinct Plans do not identify specific infrastructure projects to increase capacity, but the Development Plans respond directly to interventions to increase capacity in line with traffic demand.

The Airports Company South Africa commenced with the development of a Landside Terminal Precinct Plan/Urban Design Framework for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport in the 2019/20 financial year and successfully completed the Precinct Plan in the 2020/21 financial year. The study area for the Precinct Plan consists of the landside terminal precinct area as identified in the Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport Master Plan.

The primary focus of the Precinct Plan was to ensure clear linkages of the precinct with the land uses in the airport’s adjoining and surrounding areas to create a fully integrated precinct in the urban context.

The main purpose of the Precinct Plan is to determine sustainable land use and to define a development strategy, based on the commercial development potential of the airport property that is not required for core aviation uses. This is in accordance with ACSA’s strategic objective of generating non-regulated revenue/non-aeronautical revenue.

The process to arrive at the Precinct Plan consisted of the following phases, each with associated deliverables:

  • Phase 1: Inception / Scoping Report
  • Phase 2: Data Collection and Consolidation
  • Phase 3: Future Conceptualisation and Objectives
  • Phase 4: Conceptual Design Framework
  • Phase 5: Final Precinct Plan / Framework

2. Development Plans - Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport

Two major projects for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport were planned to commence during the 2019 to 2023 Permission Period i.e., Terminal Re-development and Landside Parking. The details of these projects or developments at the time (pre-Covid-19) are indicated below:

Project Name:

terminal Development

PrOJECT CATEGORY

New Capacity

Project Motivation

The terminal was last renovated in 2009. The renovations took the overall capacity of the terminal to 2 Million Annual Passengers (MAP) with limitations on the departure lounge, concourses, and queuing areas. The 2 MAP overall capacity was expected to be reached by 2019.

Project Scope/Description

The cost estimate of R 10 million at this stage only consisted of initial fees to initiate design development. Construction or implementation of the development was not included in the estimated cost. The fees were also to be utilised to finalise scoping.

It was envisaged that the eventual terminal development will entail the demolition of a part of the existing terminal and reconstruction of a new building on the existing site. The new building was to have double the footprint of the existing terminal. Passenger loading bridges were to be introduced.

PROJECT BENEFITS

This terminal development project was targeted at addressing the current constraints at the time and to provide additional capacity to meet future demand. Benefits included improvement of the ASQ score for the airport along with the IATA Levels of Service (LOS). An additional 2 MAP capacity was also anticipated.

ASSOCIATED Opex/NON-AERO REVENUE

This was going to be determined once the scope was finalised and it was going to be realised once the development of the terminal was complete.

Project Cost

The full project cost was estimated at R 1,2 billion, however only R 10 million was required for this Permssion period to commence with the intial design development.

PrOJECT TIMELINES

The design was to commence in 2023. The terminal development was estimated to be completed by 2026.

Project Name:

PARKING

PrOJECT CATEGORY

New Capacity

Project Motivation

The demand for car rental bays was expected to exceed the current allocation. The airport has sufficient bays to meet the overall demand, however, the allocation between car rental and public parking needed to be re-assigned.

Project Scope/Description

This project entails re-organising and optimising the existing parking. The boundary between car rental and public parking was to be relocated, with parking re-assigned between car rental and public parking. The ingress and egress layout were intended to be re-organised in-line with the parking reassignment.

PROJECT BENEFITS

This project was aimed at improving utilisation of the existing parking facilities and to optimise utilisation of the landside.

ASSOCIATED Opex/NON-AERO REVENUE

Parking revenues were to be generated for the reallocation of public and car rental bays.

Project Cost

The project was estimated to cost R 17 million.

PrOJECT TIMELINES

The project was planned for completion in 2022.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic impact, passenger traffic demand declined with more than 80% over the entire ACSA airport system. Passenger traffic at Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport decreased from approximately 1.7 million passengers in the 2019/2020 FY to approximately 400 000 passengers in the 2020/21 FY. As a result of low traffic volumes and ACSA’s financial position (-R2.6 billion loss in 2020/21) it was decided to suspend all capacity projects including the Development Plans for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport mentioned above. The business strategy was focussed on critical refurbishments and replacements, therefore, all capacity projects had to be deferred. ACSA continues to monitor traffic and intends to re-initiate capacity projects of this nature in line with passenger demand.

(ii) relevant details of the successes achieved as a result of the Airport Airlift Project;

(iii) any further, relevant details?”

3. Airport Airlift Project

The Nelson Mandela Bay Airlift project is a collaboration between Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, Airports Company of South Africa, Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism, and the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber.

The main objective of the project is to increase the number of tourists to Gqeberha, to stimulate economic growth for the city and region.

The key strategic pillars for the project are:

  • Improving airlift – by partnering with airlines to develop new air routes whilst maintaining and expanding existing routes at Chief Dawid Stuurman Airport.
  • Collaborative destination marketing – to create/stimulate demand and drive inbound tourist arrivals into the city and region.

Other objectives are to:

  • increase our market share of tourists.
  • inspire travellers and change perceptions regarding Nelson Mandela Bay.
  • increase awareness and positivity for the destination.
  • increase searches and engagement on our destination marketing channels.

Progress to date:

  • The development of an Airline Incentive Framework/Policy, which has been included in the City’s Investment Incentive Policy. An incentive programme is vital to mitigate the risk in the early stages of a new airline operation and thereby ensuring the sustainability of route development opportunities.
  • Partnership with Mango Airlines to increase airlift between Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport and Lanseria in 2019.
  • Partnership with Cemair to develop direct routes between Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport to Braam Fischer International Airport and King Phalo Airport.
  • Development of a route pipeline, with targeted routes earmarked for development.

05 April 2022 - NW782

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has been informed of any assessment conducted by the Financial and Fiscal Commission on the capability of (a) municipalities and/or (b) other organs of the State to implement the provisions of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 4 of 2019; if not, will he request such an assessment to be done; if so, what (i) are the details of the assessment, (ii) are the findings of the specified assessment and (iii) is his response to the assessment?

Reply:

1. (a) No

(b) No

The Minister of Transport will not ask for the capability assessment to be conducted;

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

04 April 2022 - NW339

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) Whether any intergovernmental assessment has been done to determine the ability and/or preparedness of municipalities to implement the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998 (AARTO); if so, what are the details of such an assessment; if not, (2) whether he, on his own or in collaboration with other members of the Cabinet, will request that such an assessment be done; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date? NW350E

Reply:

1. Yes, intergovernmental assessment to determine the ability and/or preparedness of municipalities to implement the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998 (AARTO) has been conducted from 2015/16 Financial Year with the most recent readiness assessment completed in the current financial year 2021/22.

The readiness assessments were conducted in all 9 (nine) provinces and covered 213 Metro/Municipal jurisdictions. The readiness assessment scope sought to establish the following:

1.1 Whether an issuing authority has an issuing authority code and user group office code as per NaTIS system;

1.2 Whether all key actors have been trained i.e. law enforcement, data capturers and cashiers;

1.3 Whether the requisite IT equipment has been installed;

1.4 Whether all the SLAs between IAs and SAPO, GPW & RTIA are in place(this relates to printing and posting as well as the availability of stationery);

1.5 Whether all actors are registered on the system;

1.6 Whether Back Office and Camera enforcement system is managed by the IA or an external service provider; and

1.7 Whether the service provider is linked to National Contraventions Register (to establish whether the service provider is AARTO ready).

2. My Department in the process of rolling out AARTO engaged with the MEC’s for Transport and Community Safety and Minister of Justice & Correctional Services requesting their concurrence in the promulgation of the AARTO regulations. All MEC’s within the Road Transport Management portfolio with the exception of Western Cape provided their concurrence to the Department to proceed with the envisaged National AARTO rollout.

Furthermore, there is already a National AARTO National Steering Committee comprising of the Provinces and Municipalities tasked with monitoring the readiness to implement AARTO, I will look at that report and should the need arise to engage the MEC’s on the provincial readiness before the final implementation.

31 March 2022 - NW819

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts andCulture

(1).With reference to the Public Protector’s report about his department wasting funds on fighting Makeba trustees, (a) who gave his department the mandate to fight litigation and (b) on whose behalf was his department meant to fight the matter; (2). whether the litigation was budgeted for; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, from which budget item did the money come?

Reply:

As responded in question 818. The status quo remains.

25 March 2022 - NW722

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the recent spate of violence and killings seen in the taxi industry, his department has disbursed the COVID-19 Taxi Relief Fund in a manner that was specifically engineered to prevent any issues of conflict, given the violent history of the taxi industry; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

The transport sector, across the world, experienced massive ridership drop due to the pandemic brought about by the Coronavirus (Covid-19). This followed stringent measures imposed by many countries to mitigate and curb the spread of the virus. Some of these measures included restrictions in the movement of people through lockdowns as well as encouragement for people to work from home.

In South Africa, the taxi industry bore the brunt of these measures. Initially, taxis were permitted to carry only 50% of their licensed vehicle capacity and this was later increased to 70% when the lockdown restrictions were eased. The industry also had to contend with increased cost of procuring cleaning disinfectant materials for vehicles and sanitisers for passengers. The net effect of all these to the industry has been a declining revenue base and an increase in costs, which left many operators struggling to stay financially afloat.

In response, the Department secured once off ex gratia relief funds to the value of R1,135 billion to assist operators to mitigate the effect of Covid-19. The relief scheme is not intended to compensate for loss of income and was provided in terms of the Disaster Management Act.

The Taxi Relief Fund was approved as relief to operators from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

25 March 2022 - NW614

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the reasons that his department has not provided bus stations in townships to serve as shelters for commuters of the bus rapid transit Go George similar to those in suburban areas and (b) does his department have any plans to build such waiting shelters?

Reply:

(a) What are the reasons that his department has not provided bus stations in townships to serve as shelters for commuters of the bus rapid transit Go George similar to those in suburban areas?

The GO GEORGE public transport service does not differentiate between suburban and township areas, but rather between urban, peri-urban and rural contexts. In terms of this context, all urban areas in the Municipal area are accommodated in the same manner, using a phased infrastructure approach in areas where the bus service is implemented. This phased infrastructure approach includes the provision of stops, followed by the addition of shelters and other infrastructure as the service settles and the chosen routing and user patterns stabilise adequately.

These shelters are provided based on a warrant system, which considers several aspects and provides a priority weighting of which stops require shelters as budget becomes available. This weighting includes elements such as the number of passengers using a specific stop, the number of intersecting bus routes at that stop, pedestrian safety and exposure to the elements. The warrant also provides an indication of the size of shelter required.

(b) Does his department have any plans to build such waiting shelters?

At this point in time, the service has not yet been implemented in Thembalethu (Township) but the routes covering Thembalethu are in the planning and design process. Bus stops are currently being planned along these routes and once the service is implemented, shelters will be placed at the stops in a phased manner, based on budget availability and the outcomes of the afore-mentioned warrant weighting system.

24 March 2022 - NW287

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Given that taxi operators were promised a taxi subsidy which would be implemented by April 2021 and yet almost a year later not a single taxi has received the specified subsidy, by what date will the taxi subsidy be implemented?

Reply:

The Department is expediting the finalisation of the public transport subsidy policy that proposes specific measures that will be implemented in the short, medium and long term. The policy document makes recommendations for the subsidisation of the taxi industry. The Department is preparing the policy draft for submission to Cabinet for approval to embark on stakeholder consultation.

 

24 March 2022 - NW710

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that globally the automotive future is looking increasingly electric due to growing regulatory moves, including forthcoming bans on sales of internal combustion engine vehicles and ongoing improvements in battery and charging technology (details furnished), (a) how will the trend toward electric mobility play out in the Republic’s transport industry and (b) what are the opportunities and challenges associated with the Republic’s electric transport future?

Reply:

a) The Department of Transport developed the Green Transport Strategy (GTS), which was approved in 2018. The GTS establishes the national environmental policy directive for the transportation sector. It begins by identifying the transportation sector as the fastest-growing source of SA's GHG emissions, with road transport being the primary source, and emphasizes the importance of transitioning to an accessible, cost-reflective, and affordable low carbon transportation system. The Strategy considers a variety of policy interventions that could significantly reduce "GHG emissions and other environmental impacts from the transportation sector by 5% by 2050, thereby promoting economic growth and inclusive development."

The GTS also makes provision for discussing the outlook for green transport technologies in its implementation pillars. Implementation Theme no 8. specifies the following actions: i) Reduce the carbon footprint and over-reliance of petroleum-based fuels, by decarbonizing the transport sector, ii) Promote the use of alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or biogas, and liquid biofuels, and iii) Promote and facilitate the uptake of electric, hybrid-electric, and fuel cell powered vehicles.

The policy statements from the GTS in its implementation themes as well as in its strategic pillars, have afforded the transport sector clear directives from the Department of Transport, as our predominant goal is to decarbonise the transport sector, and reduce the over-reliance on petroleum-based fuel in the sector, by promoting and encouraging the mass uptake of green transport technologies, including the mass uptake of electric vehicles.

Since the adoption of the GTS, and especially since the issue of electro-mobility is cross-cutting, the Department has been working in conjunction with other Departments such as DTIC (Department of Trade, Industry and Competition) on their work regarding automotive industry, specifically regarding new and efficient vehicle technologies.

Amongst the challenges identified were the, (i) range anxiety among consumers that became key in discussions around electric vehicles. Although this has dramatically been alleviated with the recent provisioning and upgrade of over two hundred charging stations throughout the country, it still remains a key challenge which we are constantly engaging among one another as government departments to resolve. (ii) The issue of the constrained power grid from ESKOM that also becomes a challenge for the overall uptake with a key issue of how these vehicles will be recharged should a major power outage should occur, or even during the regular load shedding intervals. There is also the issue of market stimulations of offering monetary incentives that other countries have incorporated into their ideals for the mass uptake of electric vehicles. The incentives can be offered to both the consumers and the manufacturers as was done in the areas around the EU such as Sweden, or Norway.

b) The Department is are also very cognisant however to the challenges that will occur for this shift in vehicle technology to occur, especially if it would be “mass uptake”.. The first challenge is that the tax regime (import duties) for electric vehicles in South Africa has created a situation of barrier to trade. Compared with the around 18% import duty currently added to the price of a vehicle with an internal combustion engine landing in South Africa, an all-electric vehicle is taxed by up to 25%, Thus pushing the electric vehicle out of the typical affordability market also puts the electric car into being classified as luxury, irrespective of the type, or model of the car. The import duties are currently being imposed by the Department of Trade Industry and Competition.

In the past rigorous, engagements between the two Departments, DOT and DTIC has occurred, on how to sufficiently manage the issues surrounding the import duties and how they are becoming a market barrier for the technological switch within the transport sector. To date the DTIC has developed a “Green Paper on New Energy Efficient Vehicles” which has the purpose of establishing a clear policy foundation that will enable the country to coordinate a long-term strategy that will position South Africa at the forefront of advanced vehicle manufacturing as well as advanced vehicle-component manufacturing. The strategy is complemented by a consumption leg, and a focus on increasing competitiveness in the global race to transition from the internal combustion engine era into electro-mobility solutions and technologies, and to help develop a roadmap to the local production of electric vehicles.

There are also efforts to build electric vehicles in SA, to keep our auto industry at the cutting edge of new market developments and to maintain our export capacity for key markets such as the EU and UK, whom have both set new targets and deadlines to reduce the number of fossil fuel reliant vehicles on their roads. We need charging infrastructure – and must expand beyond the existing two hundred charging points for electric vehicles in SA using the agreed SABS standards.

The ever-pressing issue of fiscal and non-fiscal incentives also becomes a challenge when dealing with making the electro-mobility market appealing to the consumer. The DTIC currently offers manufacturing incentives to OEMS’s in the country through their Automotive Incentive Scheme: the AIS provides for a non-taxable cash grant of 20% of the value of qualifying investment in productive assets for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and 25% of the value of qualifying investment in productive assets for component manufacturers and tooling companies, as approved by the DTIC: However, while these incentives are appreciated, they seem to be inadequate in ensuring that electric vehicles are competitively priced within the domestic market for both manufacturing of these vehicles and selling of the vehicles domestically.

The policy developments within each and between both the DOT and DTIC have created a shift as the country creates an enabling electro-mobility space. This new space within the vehicle industry will need intensive support from both the local OEM’s and government to ensure that there is seamless entry to the EV market throughout the whole value chain of electro-mobility. With the base of policy directive from the GTS and follow-up policy directive from the Auto Green Paper, there is a clear policy will form government regarding the uptake and implementation of EV’s within the South African car market.

24 March 2022 - NW865

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) him, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of his department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

 

Minister (i)

Deputy Minister (ii)

Department (iii)

Catering (a)

63,270

27,170

5,301,157

Entertainment (b)

56,535

20,292

350,045

Accommodation (c)

549,363

214,495

27,793,537

14 March 2022 - NW539

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) price and (e) purchase date of each vehicle purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

(i) Minister Vehicles Mr Fikile Mbalula, MP

(a)Make

(b)Model

(c)Year of Manufacture

(d)Price

(e)Purchase Date

Office

Order Date

Comments

Mercedes Benz

Benz

2017

984,990.00

12/07/2017

Pretoria

28/06/2017

Returned for Disposal

BMW

5 Series Sedan

2021

748,624.04

27/01/2022

Pretoria

29/11/2021

 

Toyota

Fortuner

2017

557,927.65

28/04/2017

Cape Town

15/ 02/2017

 

 

(ii)Deputy Minister Hon. Sindisiwe Chikunga, MP

 

 

 

 

 

(a)Make

(b)Model

(c)Year of Manufacturer

(d)Price

(e)Purchase Date

 

Office

Order date

Comments

BMW

X5

2017

924,146,24

12/05/2017

 

Pretoria

12/05/2017

 

Jaguar

XJ

2017

800,000.00

31/03/2017

 

Cape Town

29/03/2017

 

14 March 2022 - NW395

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to (a) the incident where an empty Transnet Freight Rail (TFR) Blue train derailed at the Union Station Loop in Germiston on Sunday, 7 November 2021 and (b) two Blue train coaches derailing within the Salvokop Blue Train train-yard in January 2022, the TFR has provided any proactive internal incident and/or accident report for the two derailments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Railway Safety Regulator has received reports with regards to (a) the incident where an empty Transnet Freight Rail (TFR) Blue train derailed at the Union Station Loop in Germiston on Sunday, 7 November 2021 and (b) two Blue Train coaches derailing within the Salvokop Blue Train train-yard in January 2022.

The reports are currently being reviewed by the Railway Safety Regulator.

14 March 2022 - NW506

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

In view of the announcement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that Government will provide the private sector with access to Transnet’s freight rail network from April 2022, on what date will the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) provide the private sector with access to its passenger rail network and allow the private sector to manage and operate key routes in every province and city as it is clear that Prasa is unable to do so themselves?

Reply:

There is currently no determined date for Prasa to allow private sector access and operation of key routes. The Department of Transport is currently finalising the White Paper on National Rail Policy which pronounces on concessioning of commuter rail as an alternate method of delivery for rail services. Once approved by Cabinet , Prasa will implement the policy provisions.

14 March 2022 - NW394

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to (a) the incident where an empty Transnet Freight Rail Blue train derailed at the Union Station Loop in Germiston on Sunday, 7 November 2021 and (b) two Blue train coaches derailing within the Salvokop Blue Train train-yard in January 2022, the Railway Safety Regulator can guarantee the safety of the public on these blue train coaches; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the safety permits are still valid and in place; if not, why not; if so, on what date is it anticipated that the permits will be reviewed?

Reply:

1. Operators are required to investigate all occurrences and report them to the Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) in terms of section 38 of the National Railway Safety Regulator Act, 2002. The type of investigations the RSR conducts is where occurrences result in any of the following:

(i) Multiple (more than 1) injury or fatality in any occurrence category.

(ii) Significant damage to property including assets.

(iii) Significant environmental damage.

(iv) Any occurrences on the network which may attract media attention or may give rise to a possible evacuation of a community or part thereof, occurrences which may affect the normal public road usage or an injury/death to a public figure.

a) On 7 November 2021, at approximately 00h35 it was reported that Transnet Blue train that was staged at Union station had run away and derailed at SCAW SA siding. The RSR responded to the occurrence site to determine facts which contributed to the derailment.

Transnet Freight Rail has indicated that they are conducting a Board of Inquiry (BOI) into the cause of the derailment to establish facts surrounding the occurrence and develop recommendations aimed at reducing the recurrence of the occurrence.

b) On 16 January 2022 at 11h18 it was reported that A Blue train derailed during shunting at the TFR yard in Pretoria at 11h00. No injuries were sustained, no impact on assets and operations.

This occurrence does not meet the requirements for RSR to respond to site in accordance with the RSR procedures. Since it did not result in fatalities and/or injuries to operators’ employees, members of the public, and passengers. There were no injuries sustained and no impact to asset and operations as a result of this occurrence.

2. Transnet has one safety permit; the safety permit expires on 30 June 2022. Following a request from Transnet to submit their safety application in May month, their safety permit will be extended to expire in August 2022.

11 March 2022 - NW15

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

In respect of road works in KwaZulu-Natal in the 2020-21 financial year, what (a) total number of contractors received contracts from (i) the SA National Roads Agency and (ii) his department, (b) are the names of the specified contractors, (c) are the relevant details of the work that each contract entailed, (d) are the roads on which the work took place and (e) is the date of completion for each contract?

Reply:

(a)(i)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

Number

Name of Contractor

Type of work

National Route

Estimated Completion Date

1

Geomech Africa (Pty) Ltd

GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING SERVICES FOR THE UPGRADING OF NATIONAL ROUTE 2 BETWEEN UMTENTWENI INTERCHANGE (SECTION 22, KM 34.8) AND HIBBERDENE INTERCHANGE (SECTION 23, KM 5.3)

N2

June 2021

 

Geomech Africa (Pty) Ltd

GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING SERVICES FOR THE UPGRADE OF NATIONAL ROUTE 2, SECTION 32 FROM PONGOLA (KM 30.80) TO THE MPUMALANGA BORDER (KM 70.16)

N2

June 2021

 

Geomech Africa (Pty) Ltd

GEOTECHNICAL DRILLING INVESTIGATION FOR THE DESIGN OF THE UPGRADE TO NATIONAL ROUTE 2 SECTION 24 AND SECTION 25 BETWEEN LOVU RIVER (KM 12.0) AND UMLAAS CANAL (KM 2.7)

N2

October 2021

2

Leomat Construction (Pty) Ltd

WIDENING OF NATIONAL ROUTE R22 SECTION 5, THROUGH KWANGWANASE TOWN

R22

June 2023

3

Martin & East (Pty) Ltd

MANUFACTURE OF A TEMPORARY VEHICLE RESTRAINT CONCRETE BARRIER SYSTEM FOR THE UPGRADING OF NATIONAL ROUTES 2 AND 3 IN THE EASTERN REGION

N2 & N3

April 2023

4

Raubex Construction (Pty) Ltd

THE UPGRADE OF NATIONAL ROUTE 3, SECTION 2 FROM DARDANELLES (KM 26.6) TO LYNNFIELD PARK (KM 30.6)

N3

June 2024

 

Raubex Construction (Pty) Ltd

THE UPGRADE TO NATIONAL ROUTE 3, SECTION 2, FROM CATO RIDGE (KM 20,2) TO DARDANELLES (KM 26,6).

N3

April 2025

 

Raubex Construction (Pty) Ltd

THE UPGRADING OF NATIONAL ROUTE 2 FROM KWAMASHU INTERCHANGE, SECTION 25 (KM 28.6) TO UMDLOTI RIVER BRIDGE, SECTION 26 (KM 14.0)

N2

December 2025

5

Raubex KZN (Pty) Ltd

PERIODIC MAINTENANCE OF THE NATIONAL ROUTE N2, BETWEEN SECTION 21, IZINGOLWENI (KM 101.1) AND SECTION 22, MURCHISON (KM 18.4)

N2

June 2022

 

Raubex KZN (Pty) Ltd

PERIODIC MAINTENANCE OF NATIONAL ROUTE 2 SECTION 22 FROM MTAMVUNA RIVER

(KM 0.00) TO KANDANDLOVU (KM 12.40) - Package 1

N2

April 2022

 

Raubex KZN (Pty) Ltd

PERIODIC MAINTENANCE OF NATIONAL ROUTE 2 SECTION 22 FROM KANDANDLOVU

(KM 12.40) TO MBIZANA RIVER (KM 24.00) - Package 2

N2

April 2022

 

Raubex KZN (Pty) Ltd

RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SLOW LANE ON NATIONAL ROUTE 3 SECTION 3 FROM SANCTUARY ROAD INTERCHANGE (KM 15.2) TO LINK ROAD (KM 21.2)

N3

August 2022

6

Rumdel Construction Cape (Pty) Ltd

THE UPGRADE TO NATIONAL ROUTE 3, SECTIONS 2 AND 3 FROM LYNNFIELD PARK (KM30.6) TO ASHBURTON (KM0.8)

N3

January 2025

7

Tau Pele Construction (Pty) Ltd

PERIODIC MAINTENANCE ON NATIONAL ROUTE 2, SECTION 29 FROM EMPANGENI T-JUNCTION (km 13.00) TO km 28.80

N2

July 2022

 

Tau Pele Construction (Pty) Ltd

PERIODIC MAINTENANCE ON NATIONAL ROUTE 2, SECTION 29 FROM km 28.8 TO ETEZA WEIGHBRIDGE (km 44.6)  - Package 2

N2

July 2022

8

Telegenix Trading 799 (Pty) Ltd

MOOI RIVER TRAFFIC CONTROL CENTRE OPERATIONS

N3

May 2026

9

Trench and Blasting (Pty) Ltd

THE PROVISION OF CRUSHED AGGREGATE FROM THE RCL 9 QUARRY FOR THE UPGRADE OF THE N3 BETWEEN CATO RIDGE TO NEW ENGLAND ROAD

N3

August 2026

10

Triamic Construction (Pty) Ltd

CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW KOKSTAD INTERCHANGE AND TRAFFIC CONTROL CENTRE ON NATIONAL ROUTE 2, SECTION 21 (KM 6.4)

N2

November 2023

11 March 2022 - NW136

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)In view of the oversight visit to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa’s Head Office in Gauteng undertaken by the Standing Committee on Public Accounts recently to deal with issues pertaining to their outstanding audit and troubled audit history, and in view of the Board’s ongoing instability over recent years with the current Board not meeting the requirements of the Legal Succession to the Transport Services Act, Act 9 of 1989, as there are ongoing vacant positions, (a) what is the current situation in this regard and (b) how does he intend to fill the vacant positions; (2) what has he found are the ramifications on the decision-making powers of the current Board given that they do not meet the requirements of the Legal Succession to the Transport Services Act, Act 9 of 1989?

Reply:

1 The Board of Control of PRASA is governed by section 24 of the Legal Succession to the South African Transport Services Act, 1989 (Act No. 9 of 1989) which provides that –

“(1) the affairs of the Corporation shall be managed by a Board of Control of not more than 11 members including the chairman, who shall be appointed and dismissed by the Minister.

(2) At least-

(a) one of the members of the Board of Control shall be an officer in the Department of Transport;

(b) one of the members of the Board of Control shall be an officer in the Department of Finance;

(c) one of the members of the Board of Control shall be nominated by the South African Local Government Association recognised in terms of section 2 (1) (a) of the Organised Local Government Act, 1997 (Act 52 of 1997);

(d) three of the members of the Board of Control shall have expertise and experience in the management of a private sector enterprise.”

(a) There are currently nine Board members, with only two vacancies

(b) The two vacancies have been advertised through a mass advertisement for all Transport entities, and the process of filling the positions is underway.

(2) The Board of Control of PRASA does quorate with the 9 members as the Act requires not more than 11 members rather than 11 members. What will cause the Board of Control not to quorate will be vacancies emanating from non-compliance with section 24 (2) of the Act, of which the 2 vacancies mentioned above are not related to the provisions of section 24(2).

 

11 March 2022 - NW262

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Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) measures has his department put in place to monitor the usage of the Komatipoort bridge as a parking spot for trucks transporting chrome over weekends and (b) has he found to be the possible dangers to the road caused by this practice?

Reply:

a) The Department of Transport and /or its Entities do not manage road traffic at the mouth of the border, it falls within the Nkomazi Local Municipality jurisdiction supported by the Mpumalanga Department of Public Works in line with Schedule 5 Part B of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. However, the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) supports and contributes to the unimpeded flow of goods and passengers between South Africa and her neighbouring states through its law enforcement arm.

b) Since the Department of Transport and or its entities does not monitor traffic as stipulated above it has not done surveys to ascertain the impact of this practice. However, such a practice can contribute to the bridge collapse, congestion, reduction of efficiencies, lack of compliance to road traffic regulations and does not promote road safety.

Looking into the future, the C-BRTA is in a process of implementing a pilot, with the South African Revenue Service (SARS), on an Operator Compliance Accreditation System (OCAS) and Authorised Economic Operator (AEO). This pilot will fast-track accredited trucks to cross the border with limited interventions from border stakeholders. Furthermore, the C-BRTA is also in a process of negotiating with other government and private stakeholders regarding the implementation of a new electronic Queue Management system that will allow trucks to the border to be allocated designated time slots, the electronic queue management system will also be implemented together with a holding facility closer to the mouth of the border as there is no parking space along the corridor for such truck volumes. If trucks arrive at the border before their allocated time slots, they will then be allocated numbers on arrival and be released when called by border authorities to cross. These measures will alleviate congestion at the border and eliminate the possible utilisation of the Komatipoort Bridge as a parking space for trucks.

11 March 2022 - NW385

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, following the Inter-Ministerial Committee meeting he hosted together with the Minister of Employment and Labour, the Minister of Police, the Minister of Home Affairs with representatives of the trucking industry, including other engagements related to the meeting, there has been a successful outcome of the resolutions taken in the meeting which fall under the mandate of his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, although the issue relates to a large extent to employment and labour portfolio and the impasse plays itself on the public road, my Department has taken upon itself to actively participate in resolving the matter. My Department is currently in the process of amending its regulations to ensure that it supports the legal framework that Employment and Labour operates with regard to the acknowledgement of the driver documentation for the purposes of driving in the Republic.

My Department has established a Task Team of all the stakeholders within the transport sector, wherein issues that needs to be resolved are being presented and interventions developed. To this end there is some consensus with all the Stakeholders on those issues and they are currently being dealt with.

 

11 March 2022 - NW363

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has any plans in place to undertake heavy rehabilitation of the R74 within the Uthukela District Municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether he will furnish Mr R A Lees with the details of the (a) section and/or sections of the R74 that will be a part of the heavy rehabilitation, (b)(i) start and (ii) end dates for the heavy rehabilitation for the various stages of work on the R74, (c) the extent of work to be undertaken and (d)(i) start date and (ii) extent of maintenance work to be undertaken prior to the heavy rehabilitation work being undertaken given the dangerous conditions of potholes and road collapses along the R74; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the KZN Department of Transport has a plan to undertake the heavy rehabilitation of R74 known as P11 and will be executed utilising the EPC approach (Engineer, Procure and Construct).

2. a) The sections for the rehabilitation of R74 will be from 10.00 km to 33.00 km only.

b) Work of the section for heavy rehabilitation will start at the beginning of 2022/23 financial year and is expected to be completed at the end of 2022/23 financial year.

c) Prior to the heavy rehabilitation ,the province is planning to undertake the following maintenance activities, that is:-

  • Design and construct of pavement layers that include sub base layer, base layer and wearing course
  • Road markings and installation of road studs
  • Construction of fixing of the drainage, and
  • Reinstating the damaged road signs and guardrails.

d) (i) All maintenance activities will start in June 2022 and are expected to be completed by December 2022.

(ii) Considering the dangerous condition of the road, especially potholed during the rainy season, the department will continue with preventative maintenance such as pothole fixing using internal maintenance team until this section of road (10.00 km to 33.00 km) is rehabilitated.

11 March 2022 - NW337

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he and/or his department shared information with provincial governments about the implementation of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998, (AARTO) since 1 January 2021; if not, why not; if so, (a) what was the substance of the specified information and (b) on what date was the information disseminated; (2) Whether he and/or his department received any substantive responses from provinces in response to such information; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Minister and the Department of Transport did share information with provincial governments about the implementation of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, 1998 (Act No 46 of 1998)

(a) Minister of Transport through the Entity issued a Letter “LINKING OF SAPS OFFICERS TO ISSUING AUTHORITIES” dated 14 January 2021. The substance of the correspondence clarified the linking of the SAPS to the local traffic authorities.

The Minister of Transport issued a circular on “AARTO ROLL-OUT FROM 01 JULY 2021” as pronounced. The aforesaid circular is dated 9 July 2021. Was forwarded to all provinces.

The Minister further through the Entity facilitated virtual meetings with the all provinces regarding the AARTO Rollout. The engagements further presented the following:

  • AARTO Master Implementation Plan;
  • AARTO Readiness assessments;
  • System Deployments and NaTIS Connectivity;
  • AARTO Training for Law Enforcement & Back-Office Staff;
  • AARTO Service outlets to be deployed per province;
  • Signing of MoU’s between stakeholders to give effect to the rollout;

(SAPO & GPW issues)

  • AARTO Education and Awareness Campaigns;
  • Monitoring & Evaluation of the AARTO Implementation.

The virtual consultation dates with provinces were as followed:

Schedule of AARTO Meetings with HoDs in Provinces

Province

Meeting Date

Eastern Cape

09 March 2021

Mpumalanga

16 March 2021

North West

16 March 2021

Free State

17 March 2021

Limpopo

30 March 2021

KZN

19 April 2021

NC & WC

No confirmation of availability was received as requested

Gauteng

Currently implementing AARTO

August 2021 schedule of meetings held with Provincial Management

Province

Date

MP

17 August 2021

LP

17 August 2021

WC

19 August 2021

EC

19 August 2021

KZN

19 August 2021

GP

20 August 2021

NC

20 August 2021

FS

20 August 2021

NW

25 August 2021

September 2021 schedule of meetings held with Provincial Management

PROVINCE

DATE

FS

02 September 2021

GP

08 September 2021

MP

13 September 2021

LP

13 September 2021

WC

14 September 2021

EC

14 September 2021

KZN

14 September 2021

NC

16 September 2021

NW

16 September 2021

(b) The Minister & the Department of Transport have established an AARTO National Steering Committee (ANSC) that convenes quarterly for AARTO Stakeholders to engage on matters of mutual interest in the implementation of AARTO. The ANSC is preceded by technical support committees before the main committee could convene. The following are dates and issues deliberated upon in the ANSC:

ITEM

DATE

ANSC

28 January 2021

ANSC

29 March 2021

ANSC

11 June 2021

Special ANSC

14 July 2021

ANSC

24 August 2021

ANSC

28 September 2021

ANSC

17 February 2022

ANSC Issues:

The following are standard agenda items discussed at the ANSC:

  • Feedback on Executive Directives & Shareholder Engagements
  • AMIP/ Draft AARTO roll out plan and related updates
  • AARTO IT equipment deployment report
  • System enhancement update
  • Technical support committee reports
  • Municipal Monitoring and Oversight Sub-Committee/ SALGA Engagements
  • Provincial AARTO Coordinating Committee meeting feedbacks

2. The Minister & the Department through its Entity received the following substantive responses from the Western Cape in response to information shared, all stating that the province will not be ready to implement of AARTO by 01 October 2021and further raised the following concerns:

2.1. The RTIA Capacity to implement AARTO

2.2. Lack of meaningful consultation;

2.3 The issues around the AARTO Regulations and the need to review AARTO legislation;

2.4. Delays in Training;

2.5. The challenges around the successful rates of representations;

2.6. Transparency in reporting; and

2.7. Absence of an implementation report in the two jurisdictions where AARTO was piloted.

2.8 The province further requested the Entity, the RTMC and the Department to accommodate the e-force interface for the province since the province was already using smart law enforcement, which request is still under discussions;

11 March 2022 - NW320

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the details of the surveys conducted by (a) his department and (b) the SA National Roads Agency Limited on the state of roads in the Uthukela District Municipality from 1 October 2021 to 31 December 2021; (2) whether he will furnish Mr R A Lees with copies of the survey reports; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Transport’s mandate relates to the monitoring of adherence to Committee of Transport Officials (COTO) requirements with regard to condition surveys performed by the SA National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) and the various Provincial Authorities. Therefore, the Department of Transport does not conduct its own condition surveys. (Department to verify response)

(b) As per COTO requirements, road condition surveys are required to be performed at least once after every 2 years for Class 1 roads. For the 69.1 km of National Roads (Class 1) under SANRAL administration in Uthukela District Municipality, the road condition surveys were performed on 9 October 2021 and 3 November 2021. For the 229 carriageway km (both directions) of National Roads (Class 1) under N3TC administration the road condition surveys were performed between 23 and 26 September 2021.

In addition to the above road condition surveys, both SANRAL and N3TC also perform daily route patrols to monitor for any accident damage, broken fences, flood damage, potholes, etc. and then issue appropriate job instructions for repairs to appointed service providers.

2. The outcome of the automated road condition surveys performed with road condition survey vehicles for the National Road sections in Uthukela District Municipality is summarised in Table 1 below for each km of National Road. The condition parameters measured include:

a) Roughness (m/km) - Measures smooth ride and wear and tear on vehicles and cargo.

b) Ruth Depth (mm) - Measures accumulation of surface water in wheel tracks and risk of vehicle aquaplaning

c) Texture Depth (mm) - Measures friction for safer wet weather travel at speeds exceeding 60km/h

d) Stuctural Strength – Measures structural strength to withstand the axle loads been applied.

e) Overall Condition Index – Weighted combination of the above condition parameters on a scale of 0 to 100, where 100 is perfect

11 March 2022 - NW319

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) are the relevant details of the plan regarding the mooted R90,00 temporary driving licence card fee and (b) measures are in place for persons who cannot afford to pay the specified amount; (2) whether there is a plan to subsidise citizens who cannot afford the amount; if not, why not; if so, how will the subsidy process be implemented? NW330E

Reply:

(1) What (a) are the relevant details of the plan regarding the mooted R90,00 temporary driving licence card fee and (b) measures are in place for persons who cannot afford to pay the specified amount;

The Temporary Driving Licence (TDL) Fees vary from Province to Province and that is from R54 to R94. It is Government plan to standardise the TLD fees so that the TDL holders can remain within their Provinces for service. All motoring public who have vehicles and are driving are encouraged to renew their driving licenses before end of March 2022.

(2) whether there is a plan to subsidise citizens who cannot afford the amount; if not, why not; if so, how will the subsidy process be implemented? NW330E

The Honourable Minister has expressed a desire to engage with the Shareholder’s Committee to offer a bouquet of incentives to encourage the public to comply before deadline. At present there is no subsidy for the people who cannot afford to pay for the TDL.

 

11 March 2022 - NW318

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether there is any ongoing process to enable the digital driving licence cards to come into operation; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date is it envisaged that the cards will come to operation and (b) what are the milestones of the process thus far?

Reply:

The Department of Transport has plans to introduce the digital driving licence card in 2024/25 financial year. This project is the responsibility of the Driving Licence Card Account (DLCA) which is the trading entity responsible for the production of driving licence cards in South Africa. The introduction of the digital driving licence (commonly referred as the eDL) will be preceded by the introduction of the new driving licence card which is set to be launched in October 2023.

The design for the new driving licence card has been completed and is undergoing process for cabinet approval.

11 March 2022 - NW202

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What number of supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him for more than (aa) 30 days, (bb) 60 days, (cc) 90 days and (dd) 120 days, (b) what is the total amount outstanding in each case and (c) by what date is it envisaged that the outstanding amounts will be settled?

Reply:

(a) Department

Invoice Age Analysis

Number of Invoices

Total Amount (b)

More than 30 days (aa)

29

R 71,851.69

More than 60 days (bb)

13

R 35,607.16

More than 90 days (cc)

0

R 0.00

More than 120 days (dd)

223

R 1,187,235.53

Total

265

R 1,294,694.38

(c) The invoices more than 30 days and 60 days will be paid within the next 30 days. The invoices more than 120 days are disputed Phakisa invoices. A final offer was accepted by the supplier and once the supplier provides the new invoices, it will be paid.

Airport of South Africa (ACSA)

     

Days

 Amount

 Number of Invoices

               120

18 770 475,26

499

                 90

1 267 884,84

25

                 60

2 791 207,73

20

                 30

5 280 488,09

56

Current

38 047 207,76

118

Total

66 157 263,68

718

As a response to the Covid-19 pandemic, ACSA undertook a rental reprieve process for its tenants by giving out credit notes for the rental owed, amounting to R2,8 billion. In addition, the traffic volumes decline significantly reduced ACSA’s total revenues in the last two financial years. For the financial year ended 31 March 2021, revenues declined by about 80% i.e., from R7,2 billion to R2,2 billion, and this has led to decreased cashflows. ACSA engaged its suppliers for relaxed payment terms where possible, particularly among the bigger suppliers, leading to days average creditor days exceeding 30 days.

The monthly payment to suppliers averages R150m to R200m. Invoices for which there are no queries are paid on a monthly. Invoices older than 30 days are those wherein there are queries with the suppliers pertaining to contractual matters pertaining to scope of works/goods delivered, timing and budgets/fees.

Air Transporting Navigating System ( ATNS)

Based on 31st January 2022 age analysis

   

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

(dd)

 
 

Current Period

31 - 60 Days

61 - 90 Days

90 - 120 Days

120 Days and over

Total

 

R

R

R

R

R

R

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a) No. of invoices

101

57

48

35

390

631

 

16%

9%

8%

6%

62%

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(b) Total Amount

12,197,617

4,155,346

5,927,040

1,665,189

3,775,262

27,720,453

 

44%

15%

21%

6%

14%

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total No. of suppliers

 

 

 

 

 

150

(c) All suppliers where there are no disputes will be paid in 30 days

Cross Board Transport Agency( CBRTA

a) There are eleven (11) supplier invoices that currently remain unpaid at (b) Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) and are shown in the table below.

(a)

(aa) – (dd)

(b)

(c)

Total number of invoices

Period of non-payment

Amount Outstanding

Envisaged date on which amount will be paid

2

180 days

R127 123.89

The Service Provider has invoiced us incorrectly. They have agreed to re-invoice and once we receive the updated invoices, payment will be processed. The envisaged payment date is 28 February 2022.

9

90 days

R63 357.97

The Agency has raised a dispute with the service provider regarding the billed amounts. Disputed amounts will be settled once engagements are concluded. The envisaged payment date is 28 February 2022.

11

 

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(a)(ii) SANRAL has 5 outstanding invoices, which are older than 30 days. The age analysis of the creditors is indicated in the Table below.

Age

Number of invoices

 

(b) Value

(R)

Reason

  1. > 30 days

1

 

1 268 262.99

Rejected by bank due to banking details incorrectly supplied

  1. > 60 days

1

 

1 738.00

 
  1. > 90 days
       
  1. > 120 days

3

 

12 405.80

 

TOTAL

5

 

1 282 406.79

 

b) The invoices will be paid immediately, once the vendor has supplied the correct banking details, as verified by the bank. SANRAL has a payment run twice a week.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a)(ii) The number

of supplier

invoices that

currently remain

unpaid by the

Road Accident

Fund for more

than

(aa) 30 days,

is

(bb) 60 days, is

(cc) 90 days,

is

and (dd) 120

days, is

 

33

109

65

170

b) the total

amount

outstanding in

each case is

R2,196,378.25

R5,921,095.21

R2,647,942.17

R11,881,697.38

and (c) the processing for payment of the outstanding amounts is an ongoing process, which

is subject to certain challenges, including, unresolved queries relating to suppliers’ invoice

details; suppliers’ change of banking details; disputes with suppliers on services or goods

provided; and a lengthy and labour-intensive process involved in perusing itemised legal

invoices, per item of cost incurred, having regard to different rates allowed per item.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

A) We have 8 invoices that are unpaid, please see table below:

Except for the one service provider, SAPO, all other invoices will be paid within 14 days and they are still within 30 day.

There is currently a dispute that is being resolved with SAPO, invoice to be paid within 7 days.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

a) What number of supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by

(ii) each entity reporting to him for more than

(aa) 30 days =0,

(bb) 60 days = 2,

(cc) 90 days = 3 and

(dd) 120 days = 4,

(b) what is the total amount outstanding in each case and

(aa) 30 days =0,

(bb) 60 days = R121 034.52,

(cc) 90 days = R117 134.56 and

(dd) 120 days = R25 136.72

(c) by what date is it envisaged that the outstanding amounts will be settled?

(aa) 30 days =Not applicable,

(bb) 60 days = January 2022,

(cc) 90 days = January 2022 and

(dd) 120 days = under dispute

Drivers Licence Card Agency (DLCA)

(aa) 0

(bb) 0

(cc) 0

(dd) As at 10 February 2022, the DLCA has one invoice that remains unpaid for longer than 120 days, the invoice was received in February 2021. However, the DLCA has paid the portion of the invoice that was not disputed. The other portion is still under dispute.

(c) By 31 March 2022 after the legal dispute is resolved.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

a) (i) Not applicable

(ii) (aa) 48

(bb) 10

(cc) 16

(dd) Included above, system ages up to 90+ days

b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) (aa) R95 043.21

(bb) R2 819.35

(cc) R205 930.79

(dd) Included above, system ages up to 90+ days

c) All outstanding invoices are planned to be settled in February 2022.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(a)(ii) The Ports Regulator does not have any invoices that are outstanding for more than (aa) 30, (bb) 60, (cc) 90 or (120) days. The Ports Regulator has systems and processes in place to ensure that all invoices are paid within average of 14 to 21 days after the receipt of the invoice from supplier with no required amendments. This was further confirmed by the Auditor General during the 2020/2021 financial year audit.

(b) N/A

(c ) N/A

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Number of invoices outstanding

Number of invoice outstanding

(aa)

30 days

(bb)

60 days

(cc)

90 days

(dd)

120 days

3

0

0

6

a) The total amount outstanding in each case is:

Period outstanding

Amount

30 days

R179,591-23

60 days

R0

90 days

R0

120 days

R19,923,304-65

b) The date envisaged for the outstanding amounts to be settled is:

Period outstanding

Amount

Envisaged date of payment

Notes

30 days

R179,591-23

28 February 2022

-

60 days

R0

Not applicable

-

90 days

R0

Not applicable

-

120 days

R1,855,767-89

31 March 2022

-

 

R16,264,306-26

Unknown

The amount is being disputed and payment date is therefore unknown.

 

R1,696,738-74

Unknown

The amount is being disputed and payment date is therefore unknown.

 

R106,491-76

31 March 2022

-

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(ii) The SACAA currently has (aa) zero 30 days outstanding invoices (bb) zero 60 days outstanding invoices and (dd) only has one invoice outstanding as per the creditors age analysis that is in 120 days (b) amounting to R33 741. (c) The invoice is currently in dispute and will be paid once the dispute is resolved.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

Number of invoices outstanding

c) The total amount outstanding in each case is:

Please refer to table above in (a).

d) It is impossible to specify the date on which the outstanding amounts will be settled given the current situation that PRASA finds itself in, especially with the OPEX.

  • The total group debt amounts to R4,8 billion, with OPEX accounting for 92% of this debt.
  • Most of the debt, 53%, is owed to Transnet, with other suppliers constituting 39% and municipalities a further 8%.
  • PRASA is currently not able to pay its debt as they become due with most of its debt being in excess of 180 days.
  • Only invoices over 180 days will be settled monthly except for payroll, critical suppliers (i.e. ICT, security, municipal rates, etc.), statutory items, insurance related claims, legal disbursements and court orders.

08 March 2022 - NW174

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he and/or his department ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

No such correspondence was ever received by the Department of Transport.

Matters of recruitment, selection appointment and placement of CEOs and Board Chairperson and Board Members of State Entities as well as Director General of Departments are governed by respective legislative and regulatory prescript as applicable in the Public Sector.

The Department of Transport ensures full compliance with all such laws, regulations and process

(a)(b) (c) Not applicable

08 March 2022 - NW563

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department quantified the extent of potholes in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of the extent of the problem and (b) total amount would it cost the department to fix all the potholes?

Reply:

Background

The department of Transport has made an assessment on the condition of road network in South Africa based on the road condition data available from the various road authorities, which is summarised for paved roads in Table 1 and for gravel roads in Table 2 below.