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27 September 2017 - NW2905

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities, in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Reply:

Department

Note: Amounts are as at 30 June 2017

(i) Department

(a) Breakdown

(b) Valuation

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

Beyond 12 months

           

Current Assets

         

Cash and cash equivalents

28,000

28,000

     

Advances paid:

         

Department of International Relations and Cooperation

2,697,000

   

2,697,000

 

Northern Cape Provincial Government

631,000

     

631,000

Government Communications and Information Services

360,000

   

18,000

342,000

Prepayments:

         

Taxi scrapping

3,641,000

3,641,000

     

Claims recoverable:

         

National Departments

949,000

     

949,000

Provincial Departments

102,000

   

63,000

39,000

Public Entities

7,649,000

   

3,598,000

4,051,000

Recoverable expenditure:

         

Salary overpayments

206,000

   

206,000

 

Staff debt

810,000

   

213,000

597,000

Other debtors

522,000

   

320,000

202,000

           

Non-current assets

         

Investments:

         

Shares and other equity:

         

(aa) Listed

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

(bb) Unlisted:

         

(aaa) Directly held:

         

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa Ltd.

4,248,259,000

     

4,248,259,000

Airports Company Ltd.

559,492,000

     

559,492,000

Air Traffic and Navigational Services Company Ltd.

190,646,000

     

190,646,000

S.A. National Roads Agency Ltd.

1,091,044,000

     

1,091,044,000

(ii) Department

(b) Breakdown

  1. Valuation

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

Beyond 12 months

           

Movable Tangible Capital Assets:

         

Transport assets

5,934,000

   

2,282,000

3,652,000

Computer equipment

99,104,000

   

4,890,000

94,214,000

Furniture and office equipment

31,508,000

   

2,286,000

29,222,000

Other machinery and equipment

5,094,000

   

1,366,000

3,728,000

Intangible Capital Assets:

         

Software

65,255,000

     

65,255,000

eNaTIS software

254,648,000

     

254,648,000

           

(bbb) Indirectly held

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Immovable Tangible Capital Assets

         

Mthatha Airport

353,434,000

     

353,434,000

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by

(i) her department and

(ii) each entity reporting to her according to

(aa) listed assets

(aaa) directly held and

(bbb) indirectly held and

(bb) unlisted investments

(aaa) directly held and

(bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities,

in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Herewith the breakdown requested. From the next page.

Detail per line:

Property and equipment

Investment property

Intangible assets

Investments in subsidiaries

Investment in joint ventures

Investments in associates

Other non-current assets

Inventories

Trade receivables

Investments

ROAD TRAFFIC INFRINGEMENT AGENCY (RTIA)

(ii) RTIA

(a) breakdown of and

(b) valuation for

current held by between 6-12 months

Receivables R57 769 725

Cash and cash equivalents R176 978 094

non-current assets held by beyond 12 months

Furniture & Fittings R1 606 205

Motor Vehicles R1 812 823

Office Equipment R1 115 502

IT Equipment R1 586 750

Leasehold Improvements R20 284

(aa) listed assets

(aaa) directly held There are none

(bbb) indirectly held: There are none

(bb) unlisted investments:

(aaa) directly held There are none

(bbb) indirectly held:

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(ii) The detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by (ii) the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) directly held and (bbb) There are no assets that are indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) directly held and broken down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months are highlighted in the table below. (bbb) There are no investments indirectly held.

ROAD ACCIDENT FUND (RAF)

(ii) The below table provides a (a) breakdown of the current assets and non-current assets and investments held by the Road Accident Fund as at 31 August 2017:

(aa) listed assets:

(aaa) directly held:

0-3 months:

3-6 months:

6-12 months:

Beyond 12 months:

(b) valuation:

   

None

 

(bbb) indirectly held:

None

(bb) unlisted investments:

(aaa) direcly held:

Short-term call deposits

None

None

None

R 1,430 038

   

Rent-a-captive insurance

None

None

None

R 107, 24

 

(bbb) indirectly held:

None

ROAD TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT CORPORATION (RTMC)

Valuation of current assets

Valuation of non-current assets

Valuation of investments

Listed assets

Unlisted investments

N/A. The RTMC has not conducted any valuation of assets.

N/A. The RTMC has not conducted any valuation of assets.

N/A. The RTMC doesn’t have investments

N/A. The RTMC doesn’t have listed investment

N/A. The RTMC doesn’t have unlisted investment

         

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL ROADS AGENCY LIMITED (SANRAL)

ii) SANRAL’s Non-current and Current assets as per the Annual Report 2016 is as follows:

   

2016

2015

 

R’000

R’000

     

Non-current assets

317 047 850

310 441 492

 

Property, Plant and Equipment

315 293 978

308 819 013

 

Investment Property

1 404 075

1 318 565

 

Intangible assets

60 704

44 009

 

Investments

289 093

259 905

       

Current assets

17 808 351

14 926 180

 

Trade and Other receivables

7 661 333

4 967 164

 

Investments

636 814

452 605

 

Non-current assets held for sale

20 096

26 971

 

Cash and cash equivalents

9 490 108

9 479 440

       

Total assets

334 856 201

325 367 672

(aa) Listed investments

SANRAL only invests in listed bonds, which was R636 814 000 for 2016, which are current assets included above and are held for trading.

(aa) Unlisted investments

SANRAL has a Capped Insurance receivable of R289 093 000 for 2016, with a 12 month term, which is a non-current asset included above.

For a further breakdown of the information the member is invited to peruse the Annual Report as stated above or visit SANRAL offices.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) Breakdown and (b) valuation of non-current and current assets, held by (ii) PRASA as below:

(aa) PRASA does not have listed assets

(aaa) directly held or

(bbb) indirectly held.

(bb) PRASA does not have unlisted investments

(aaa) directly held

(bbb) indirectly held

Timeframes as indicated above.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

  1. Breakdown and (b) valuation of non-current and current assets held by (ii) Railway Safety Regulator as below

March 2017 unaudited figures

Non-current assets

37,873,539

Property, plant and Equipment

26,970,909

Intangible assets

10,965,630

Current assets

11,300,085

Trade Receivables

10,146,526

Prepayments

562,065

Staff Debt

291,454

Cash and cash equivalent

300,040

 

 

Total Assets 49,173,624

(aa) The Railway Safety Regulator does not have listed assets

(aaa) directly held or

(bbb) indirectly held

(bb) The Railway Safety Regulator does not have unlisted assets

(aaa) directly held

(bbb) indirectly held, in each case breaking the current assets down by

0-3 months R8,881,478

3-6 months R2,418,607

6-12 months Not applicable

beyond 12 months Not Applicable

South Africa Maritime Safety Authority ( SAMSA)

SOUTH AFRICAN MARITIME AUTHORITY

CURRENT AND NON-CURRENT ASSETS

   

Description

(R'000)

 

 

0 to 3 Months

68 684

3 to 6 Months

6 082

6 to 12 Months

2 262

Beyond 12 Months

33 677

TOTAL

110 705

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(a) (ii) Breakdown of assets, (b) (ii) Valuation of current and non-current assets as at 30/06/2017

Current assets

 

Amount (R) 000

 

Receivables

37

 

Cash and Cash equivalents

16 110

     

Non-current assets

   
 

Property, plant and equipment

954

 

Intangible assets

38

(b) (ii) Valuation of Investments: (held with Standard bank as at 30/06/2017):

R 15 880 256 (included in Cash and Cash equivalents above) which is in terms of the Treasury Regulations to invest surplus funds. There are no other investments held by the Regulator

(aa) No listed assets

(bb) as above – with Standard bank

27 September 2017 - NW2800

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to his answer to question 2618 on 7 September 2017, how the closure of the roads adjoining O R Tambo International Airport will address the problems and offences mentioned in the reply; 2) whether any scientific study has been undertaken in this regard; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what grounds is the decision based; if so, (i) what are the relevant and (ii) where can die study be obtained for scrutiny; (3) whether the study includes an environmental impact study and traffic impact study; if not, why not; (4) whether attention has been given to the impact that the decision will have on traffic flow, particularly the bottleneck that could be caused and that could result in a traffic tailback as far as the R21 freeway; (5) what are the mitigating steps that the relevant authorities will take regarding the (a) traffic flow, (b) deprivation of the comfort in respect of the embarcation and disembarcation of flight passengers, (c) deprivation of the loading and unloading area of parking operators en destruction of their businesses, (d) disadvantagement and/or destruction of any other businesses that depend on the use of the relevant roads and (e) air pollution of queuing cars that have to travel along the side roads of the Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA), including gas emission pollution inside the ACSA parking buildings?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(1) Restricting public access to the upper and lower roadways will prevent vehicles from gaining easy access to the terminal building, this is measure to enhance security and reduce opportunitistic criminal activities. A case in point was experioenced on the 21st October 2016, when the airport experienced an armed robbery at 09h30, opposite the KFC outlet. This incident occured inside the main passenger terminal building, wherein armed men accosted a staff member from one of the retail stores whilst enroute to bank the takings of the previous evening. The staff member concerned was accompanied by two private security officers whose responsibility was to ptotect the movement of cash. The armed robbers ovepowered the private security officers and dashed off with the suitacse. A get away car was awaiting the criminals outside Piece a Piazza on the upper frontage road. The get away car was parked at the front door of the terminal which enabled the robbers to get away without any difficulity.

The risk of having an improvised explosive device detonated close to the terminal building which may result in a significant disruption to the airport and to the economy is a threat that must be take into consideration, noting the vulnerability of airports on Landside.

Restricted access of the airport frontage roads will further assist the poorly resourced law enforcement agencies with effective managemnt and reduction of illegal touting activities which takes place on a daily basis opn the airport’s frontage roadways. The illeagl touters will be easily identifiable and better managed by all law enforcement agencies.

Restricted access of frontage roads at O.R. Tambo Intrenational Airport is further informed by Amendment 15 to Annex 17 of International Civil Aviation Organisatioon (ICAO) which states that “ this amendment includes a definition of behaviour in relation to the implementation of security controls. It also includes new/revised provisons on Landside Security, behviour detection, innovation in aviation security amd Man-Portable Air Defence Systems (MANPADS).” Annex 17 is attched to this response for ease of reference.

The amendment was adopted on 23rd November 2016, effective on 3rd April 2017 and applicable from 3rd August 2017.

(2). (a) An internal assessment was done by the airport’s industrial engineers as a preliminary study to establish traffic patterns and vehicle counts. This is not a scientific study.

b) The restriction is necessitated by the safety and security requirements and in the interest of the airport users and its employees.

(1) the assessment considered vehicle counts using the roadway in 10 minute intervals during the peak hours in the month of June 2017.

(11) The preliminary traffic analysis is an internal document of the Airports Company of South Africa.

(3) An environmental impact assessment is not required as no major infrastructure changes are being proposed.

(4) whether attention has been given to the impact that the decision will have on traffic flow, particularly the bottleneck that could be caused and that could result in a traffic tailback as far as the R21 freeway;

Currently the traffic already backs up towards the freeway during peak time. We do not foresee this to be exacerbated. The current behavior of the users of the frontage roadways results in severe congestion due to some users parking for extended periods of time thereby preventing other users easy access.

(5) what are the mitigating steps that the relevant authorities will take regarding the (a) traffic flow, (b) deprivation of the comfort in respect of the embarcation and disembarcation of flight passengers, (c) deprivation of the loading and unloading area of parking operators en destruction of their businesses, (d) disadvantagement and/or destruction of any other businesses that depend on the use of the relevant roads and (e) air pollution of queuing cars that have to travel along the side roads of the Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA), including gas emission pollution inside the ACSA parking buildings?

a) ACSA cannot comment on behalf of the ‘relevant authorities’

b) Embarkation and disembarkation can take place in the multi story parking facilities at the airport. This will be of greater comfort and will enhance the safety of passengers.

c) All pick ups and drop off can take place in the multi story parking facility at the airport. the Airports Company of South Africa will embark on fair and transparent process with entities wanting to do business on its property.

d) The use of the public roadway to conduct one’s private businesse will require formal approval from the relevant authorities. Public users that use the airport frontage roaway as a throughfare can use alternate roads instead of the roadways alongside the terminal building.

e) The side roads are opened air roadways that will not be adversely impacted. We do not forsee that there will be an increase in air polution due to the restrcted access of the frontage roaways.

Our parking facilities comply with the design requirements as approved by the relevant municipality. Our parking facilities are not roadways and have to be used a parking facility. Owners of vehicles will be required to switch off their engines once parked.

 

20 September 2017 - NW2762

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has entered into any agreements with the Ivory Coast; if so, (a) what agreements have been entered into, (b) on what dates (i) were the specified agreements signed and (ii) do they take effect, (c) what mechanisms exist to monitor the agreements, (d) what budgets have been allocated in this regard and (e) what resources, including human resources, have been (i) allocated and (ii) provided?

Reply:

a) Currently, the Department of Transport does not have any agreement with the Ivory Coast

b) (i) (ii) (c) (d) (e) (i) (ii) Falls away

19 September 2017 - NW2761

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) steps is he taking to ensure that intimidation of taxi e-hailing company drivers ceases, (b) has been done to date to resolve any concerns expressed by any of the parties and (c) measures are planned for the future in this regard?

Reply:

a) On the 19th July 2017 I met with the Minister of Police and the Acting National Commissioner and his team to discuss the state of affairs between the metered taxis and /app-based operators and to propose a more focussed enforcement strategy.

In addition, I met with the MEC for Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport and the MMC’s of the relevant metropolitan municipalities on the 24th July 2017.

Furthermore, I met with the Gauteng Metered Taxi Council, the Concerned Metered Taxi Operators and the app-based operators on the 27th July 2017 in Midrand.

I also arranged a walk-about programme on 11th September 2017 in Sandton to sensitize operators that they must abide by the prescripts of the law which requires them to have a valid operating licence and that there will be no compromise on law enforcement.

b) See a) above.

c) The issues raised by the metered taxi and app-based operators are being addressed in the National Land Transport Amendment Bill which is before the Portfolio Committee on Transport.

19 September 2017 - NW2692

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications has already developed specifications for the instruments of the e-tolling system in Gauteng; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what legal basis are the instruments currently being applied; if, so, (2) Whether the instruments have already been tested regarding compliance with the specifications; if so, where can the report be found

Reply:

1. Interim requirements have been developed and accepted by the acting CEO of the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications in accordance with Section 22 (2) (c) of the Legal Metrology Act. The remainder of the question is therefore not applicable.

2. The system is currently undergoing type approval evaluation in accordance with the interim requirements.

19 September 2017 - NW2787

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with regard to the calverts that allow water from the Edenvale area to flow under the N3 highway in Gauteng, any assessment has been done since the flood in November 2016 to determine if their diameters are sufficient to allow water to flow freely under the highway without causing the water to dam up and flood the area; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the findings of the assessment and (b) what (i) are the current diameters of the above calverts and (ii) should they be and (iii) would the cost be of increasing the calverts under the N3 highway?

Reply:

During the late afternoon of 9 November 2016 flash flooding resulted in sections of the national road network in Gauteng being flooded. SANRAL initiated an investigation by a Specialist Engineering Company for the meteorological, hydrological and hydraulic assessment of the R24/N12, Linksfield and Gillooly’s interchanges to understand the underlying causes of the flooding. A final report was tabled on 12 September 2017 by the investigating Specialist.

The report reflects on the event of 9 November 2016 and explored reasons for the flooding which occurred at specifically three sites (see Figure 1):

  • R24/N12 interchange
  • Linksfield Road interchange
  • Gillooly’s Interchange