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25 April 2016 - NW892

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Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Has she earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since her appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did she earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether her (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through her appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

  1. No (a) (b) (c) (d) Falls away
  2. No (a) (b) (c) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) Falls away

25 April 2016 - NW1146

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any sections of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998, have been officially suspended; if not, (a) why only certain aspects of the Act are currently being implemented, (b) why the demerit system is not currently being applied and (c) why the Act is being applied only in the particular geographic areas of Johannesburg and Pretoria; if so, (i) which sections and (ii) in terms of whith edition of the Government Gazette they have been so proclaimed?

Reply:

The original Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998 was published in Government Gazette 19257 of 11 September 1998 where-after it was amended as follows:

  • Act No. 22 of 1999, published in Government Gazette 19972 of 28 April 1999;
  • Act No. 24 of 2000, published in Government Gazette 21428 of 02 August 2000; and
  • Act No. 72 of 2002, published in Government Gazette 24577 of 20 February 2003.

There were no further amendment to the Act after the 2006 amendments. Refer to the attached document.

(a) When the AARTO pilot commenced in 2008 only certain sections of the Act were implemented to ensure that there is no discrimination between traffic offenders in the AARTO area and the remainder of the country.

(b) The allocation of demerit points to infringers in the AARTO area; as well the prescribed process following the accumulation of the maximum number of points resulting in the suspension and cancellation of documents, were regarded as being of a discriminatory nature and therefore not implemented.

(c) Recognising the complicated nature of AARTO in terms of its involvement of a multiplicity of role-players and the need to ensure seamless integration with various existing systems and procedures, the launch of the AARTO on a pilot phase in the jurisdictional areas of Tshwane and Johannesburg was aimed at testing the functionality of the full system, including the development of the National Contravention Register (NCR) on the National Traffic Information System (eNaTIS), and a great variety of forms, processes and procedures. During the pilot the roles and responsibilities of the various key stakeholders was also identified in providing an efficient and effective system. The implementation of the pilot also allowed for impact assessments to be conducted on all systems, identify any weaknesses and allow for the necessary enhancements to be made.

    (i) The sections of the Act that are applicable in the geographic areas of Johannesburg and Pretoria are the following : 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35; and

    (ii) In terms of Government Gazette No. 31198 of 1 July 2008 the above sections of the Act came into operation in the area of the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality on 1 July 2008 and in terms of Government Gazette No. 31197 of 1 July 2008 the above sections came into operation in the area of the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality on 1 November 2008.

25 April 2016 - NW1120

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 402 on 8 March 2016, what (a) is the deadline for the finalisation of the determination of the damages suffered by the plaintiff and (b) at what stage is Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The plaintiff’s claim has not been finalised as yet because PRASA still awaits the plaintiff to prove of damages to PRASA. Proving of damages is done by way of medical expert assessments, and PRASA is informed that this is underway and will be filed with PRASA and the Courts once completed. The process will culminate in a trial date and ultimately the matter will be settled.

(b) PRASA awaits the completion of the medical assessments and the filing of the matter for settlement in court.

25 April 2016 - NW1118

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 490 on 16 March 2016, what (a) steps is each entity reporting to her taking to implement the plans mentioned, (b) are the deadlines in this regard and (c)(i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms exist to monitor this process in each respective entity?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. The Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA) tracks progress against the Corporate Plan and where applicable will ensure alignment with the NATMAP.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. With reference to the National Transport Masterplan (NATMAP) and implementation thereof, ATNS is not in a position to answer the question as the plan is within the scope of the Department of Transport.
  2. Not applicable to ATNS.
  3. (i) Not Applicable to ATNS (ii) Not Applicable to ATNS and (iii) Not Applicable to ATNS.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. With reference to the SACAA reply on NATMAP on 16 March 2016, (a) (b) (c) (i) (ii) (iii) the SACAA confirmed that the question was not relevant to the SACAA and therefore no further action was taken.

Roads Branch Entities

(a) NATMAP is still in a process of being approved by Parliament. Upon approval, the Department of Transport will ensure that the Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans of the entities align with NATMAP.

(b) Upon approval of NATMAP, the interventions identified by the entities will be aligned to the following timeframes:

  • Short term: 5 years intervention
  • Medium term: 10 years intervention, and
  • Long term: 20 years or more interventions.

(c) (i) (ii) Entities will be required to submit their Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans in line

Pwith the interventions proposed on the NATMAP. Upon submission of these plans, the Department will ensure that implementation of NATMAP within the entities takes place as per the plans approved by the Minister.

The Department will monitor the performance of the entities based on the targets set in their Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) The short – medium term focus is on modernisation and renewal of the rail system. Many of these plans have already progressed significantly. Project management, monitoring and reporting mechanisms and structures are in place to ensure the successful implementation of these projects. These projects include:

  1. Rolling stock renewal
  2. Signaling renewal
  3. Station modernisation
  4. Depot modernisation
  5. Perway and Security Upgrades

(b) Deadlines / targets:

The deadlines and targets are aligned with the respective contracts especially those of a multi-year nature as well as capital programme allocation. The following targets for the multi-year projects as part of the PRASA Corporate plan and incorporated in the Shareholder Compact with the Minister of Transport:

Key Performance Area

Key Performance Indicators

Medium-term targets

 

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Delivering on the new Rolling Stock Programme

Train sets delivered and commissioned

From 11 -13 train sets accepted as per contract

From 4 - 5 train sets accepted as per contract

From 8 - 9 train sets accepted as per contract

Infrastructure Readiness

Traffic control centres completed

 

Completion of the buildings of 1-2 regions (Bellville, Durban)

Fully functional Traffic control systems (Gauteng, KZN and Western Cape)

 Infrastructure Readiness

Signal interlockings completed (Gauteng, KZN and Western Cape)

Between 11 - 14 Signal interlocking commissions completed

Between 33 - 44 signal interlocking commissions completed

Between 37 - 48 signal interlocking commissions completed

Infrastructure Readiness

Modernisation stations completed

Between 1 - 2 stations completed (Duff's Road and Phillipi or Oakmoor) as per contract.

Between 1 - 2 stations completed (Oakmoor,Phillipi) as per contract.

Between 3-5 stations completed.

 

Depot modernisation projects commencing, in construction and complete.

Alternative Test Facility at Wolmerton depot complete and handover to Gibela & Maintenance Facility at Wolmerton completed for 20 new production trains.

Commence Main depot construction at Braamfontein

Commence main depot construction at Salt River

Infrastructure Readiness

Track upgrade projects for 120km/h

Complete tender process for Track preparation for new Rolling Stock with placement of contract(s) for work.

Contract(s) for Track upgrade for modernisation commences

Contract(s) for Track upgrade for modernisation continues

As required by the PFMA and Treasury Regulations, PRASA reports to the Shareholder on a quarterly basis on the state of performance with reasons for variation and actions to improve performance

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The National Transport Master Plan (Natmap) has not been incorporated by the RSR.

Ports Regulator (PR)

Since the Ports Regulator is not aware that NATMAP has been approved by Cabinet for implementation and has not received any directive in this regard from Department of Transport, (a) there are no steps that were planned or have been taken to implement the NATMAP. (b) No deadlines have been set and (c) no processes and mechanism are in place to monitor it.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. As indicted in response to parliamentary question 490 previously, the DoT has indicated that the NATMAP is under review and SAMSA still awaits direction from the department in this regard.
  2. This has dependency on response to (a) above
  3. This has dependency on response to (a) above

25 April 2016 - NW1116

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the reasons for inviting tenders for the appointment of a panel of expert researchers on road safety engineering and road safety engineering related services to the Road Traffic Management Corporation for the period of three years (2) how does this differ from any other forums established for the same purpose; (3) what are the (a) terms of reference and (b) the commencement date of this panel?

Reply:

(1) The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) is mandated in terms of the RTMC Act, 20 of 1999, section 2(i) to stimulate research in road traffic related matters. Further, section 28(1)(f) of the RTMC Act requires the Shareholders Committee of the RTMC to consider the need for research and technical investigations relating to road traffic regulations, and take steps for research and investigations to be conducted. As a result various research topics need to be undertaken and aligned to the South African context for such to be applicable to the unique circumstances of South Africa. New topics based on problem statements are also identified and researched.

The RTMC identified the need for the establishment of a panel of experts in the field of research and related services which will focus on road safety aspects of South Africa. This envisaged panel of research expects will ensure that participation is widened as the Corporation will have a wider pool of expertise from which to commission research.

(2) These would be service providers to be called upon to from time to time to conduct research on specified topics. A forum such as the Road Safety Advisory Council has regular meetings, provides strategic advise and may even identify areas that required research.

(3)(a) The Terms of Reference are attached.

(3)(b) The advertised expression of interest will close on 05 May 2016. Treasury regulations and guidelines on bid process will be followed in the evaluation and adjudicating of the responses from various bidders as outlined in the Terms of Reference.

25 April 2016 - NW1031

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) When will the human factor analysis conducted by the Rail Safety Regulator of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa with regard to the Afro 4000 DC locomotives be completed and (b) what are the details of the process that will be followed should the specified analysis’ findings not comply with the desired criteria?

Reply:

a)  Iam told that the human factors assessments will be conducted by PRASA and submitted to the RSR. To date, the report has not been submitted to the RSR to review and approve.

b) The RSR process will identify, once completed, any Cab Design challenges (If any) and these will be submitted to the Operator to provide a comprehensive rectification plan. Once this plan is approved by the regulator, the Locomotive will then be approved to be deployed in full operation.

25 April 2016 - NW1030

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) When will the air quality assessment tests of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa’s Afro 4000 DC locomotives be completed so that it can be evaluated by the Rail Safety Regulator and (b) what are the details of the process that will be followed should the specified test findings not comply with the desired criteria?

Reply:

(a) I am informed that the tests were completed and a report was provided to the RSR on 12 April 2016.

(b) It is said that the report indicated safe levels of exposure for all areas where people could be exposed. This includes the safety of operating the AFRO 4000 in tunnels. There is no danger of exposure to harmful gases from the exhaust fumes.

25 April 2016 - NW1029

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) When will the maintenance plans for the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa’s (PRASA) Afro 4000 DC locomotives running on 25 KV lines be submitted to the Rail Safety Regulator (RSR) and (b) what are the reasons for the delay in submitting the specified plans to the RSR; (2) (a) why have maintenance contracts for PRASA’s Afro 4000 DC locomotives running on 25 KV lines not been submitted to the RSR yet and (b) when will the specified contracts be submitted to the RSR?

Reply:

1. (a) I am informed that the maintenance plans for the Afro 4000 were submitted to RSR and also explained in the form of a presentation to the RSR. The plans were submitted in October 2015 as part of the required compliance documentation.

(b) See above.

2. (a)It is further reported that the maintenance contracts have not been concluded as this process is awaiting the outcome of the current legal process.

(b)The finalisation of the maintenance contract for the Afro 4000 will depend on the outcome of the Legal Process.

25 April 2016 - NW1028

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Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Transport

What (i) is the planned launch date for the National Public Transport Regulator and (ii) are the (aa) timelines and (bb) time frames in this regard and (b) at what is the current status of this process?

Reply:

a) (i) 30 June 2016

(ii) (aa) and (bb) same as above

b) The Minister will gazette the opening of the National Public Transport Regulator for receiving applications for tourist transport services by May 2016. The date for receiving applications for interprovincial transport services will be phrased in at later stage.

25 April 2016 - NW1027

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the current status of the N3 De Beers Pass development between Keeversfontein and Warden in the Free State, (b) impact assessments have been conducted to date, (c) were the outcomes of each assessment respectively and (d) are the planned (i) timeframes and (ii) time lines for this project?

Reply:

a) Environmental studies were undertaken to obtain the environmental authorisation and water use licence (WULA), and reports have been submitted to the relevant authorities for decision-making.

b) Two environmental impact assessments (EIAs) have been undertaken to date; first one in 1998 and the second in 2010.

c) In 1999, the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, issued an environmental authorisation for the construction and upgrading of the N3 Toll Road from Heidelberg to Cedara, comprising two sections, (i) Cedara to Heidelberg and (ii) Keveersfontein to Warden (De Beers Pass section). The environmental authorisation was issued subject to certain conditions requiring further environmental investigations on the De Beers pass section.

The purpose of the second EIA was to investigate and address the conditions and related issues flowing from the 1999 authorisation that are specific to the De Beers Pass section. Particular focus of this second EIA is to mitigate the impact of the new road on the wetland resources. The final EIA Report was submitted to the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) on 24 March 2016, and the decision is pending. Estimated review period for decision-making by DEA is 120 days.

d) Further details with the N3 will be handled by the Department of Environmental Affairs. (i) and (ii) details will be available once the Department of Transport, SANRAL, Free State Government and PICC SIP2 engagement process is concluded.

Please note that the estimated time frame does not take into account the time that will be required to resolve any objections that may be lodged against the project.

25 April 2016 - NW785

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 164 on 29 February 2016, any investigations have been launched to ascertain why the specified payments to the SA Post Office (SAPO) did not take place; if not, why not; if so, (a) what were the outcomes of such investigation(s), (b) who was responsible for the non-payment of the SAPO account, (c) how was the specified person(s) censured and (d) what mechanisms have been put in place to prevent a repetition of such an event in the future?

Reply:

No investigation was oredered on the non-payment, due to the fact that the Department was disputing the validity of the contract.

 (a) Falls away;

 (b) Since the invoice were issued and directed to TASIMA they were responsible for the payment of the Post Office services;

 (c) Falls away;

  (d) It was agreed that the invoices for those service will be billed for the Department’s account, wherein the Department will henceforth settle all the Post Office’s invoice relating to the eNaTis.

25 April 2016 - NW1145

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to paragraph 3 of her reply to question 733 on 4 April 2016, she is referring to the suspension of the delivery of notices from the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) or the issuing authorities or both; (2) whether (a) from 1 January 2016, as she indicated, (b) from 17 March 2016, as the RTIA indicated by way of its notice, or (c) since October 2015, as was indicated in other sources, no notices are being issued; (3) (a) whether the lack of issuing notices is influencing the legality of the notices and (b) whether the issuing authorities and the RTIA, as applicable, will cancel the specified notices if they are found to be illegal; if not, (i) why the noncompliance with the provisions of the AARTO Act is not illegal, (ii) on the strength of which principles in the AARO Act or otherwise the notices will continue to remain valid and (iii) whether the validity continues ad infinitum, or whether there will come a point in time when they will indeed be unenforceable; if so, what are the relevant particulars; (4) whether notices that were issued in terms of section 17(1) of the AARTO Act and that do not conform to any of the requirements of the further subsections are still legal?

Reply:

 

  1. The suspension of delivery of notices was done by both the Road Traffic Infringement Agency as well as issuing authorities.
  2. The sending out of courtesy letters to South African Post Office for postage was suspended by the RTIA during the month of August 2015, and the suspension of postage of enforcement order notifications was effected in November 2015. The response on Parliamentary Question 733, indicated, as the question was making reference to 1 January, that since the said period no notice has been sent out.
  3. (a) According to the AARTO Regulations as well as speed prosecution guidelines issued on behalf of the prosecution services, an infringement notice must be served on the alleged infringer within 40 days from the date of the contravention, if the alleged infringer receives a notice later than the stipulated time frame, he or she may exercise one of the elective options such payment, if he or she admits guilt, submit a representation stating the non-compliance with time frames or elect to go to court, and (b) the issuing authorities may cancel notices that they feel were unjustly issued but in the case of the RTIA, the Act confers no powers to cancel notices unless when such a notice was disputed through submission of a representation; (i) where the non-compliance of the AARTO Act is proved then the necessary punitive measures are prescribed by the Act itself, (ii) the Act prescribes the procedures to be followed in order for a notice to be declared invalid or illegal, if such procedures and/or processes were not undertaken, the notice would still be active in the system until an issuing authority cancels such a notice or the alleged infringer challenges the notice by submitting a representation that if successful would be cancelled by the Representations Officer

adjudicating the matter, (iii) as indicated under the response on (ii) above the notices may only be cancelled by the issuing authorities or by a Representations Officer upon receipt of a representation challenging the notice.

4. The notices that were issued in terms of section 17(1) should comply with the prescribed processes if not, then the alleged infringer need to challenge such non-compliance in the prescribed manner by submitting a representation to the RTIA for adjudication.

 

25 April 2016 - NW1117

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What is the (i) total number of accidents that occurred in each province as a result of illegally converted minibus taxis (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016 and (ii) breakdown in terms of each category of accident that occurred in each month of the specified financial years and period, (b) how many persons have been (i) charged and (ii) arrested in this regard (c) what is being done to reduce the specified accidents, (d) what (i) processes, (ii) procedures and (iii) mechanisms exist to monitor the reduction of the specified accidents?

Reply:

(a) The RTMC does not have this kind of information. The information collected after each crash involving a minibus taxi reflect roadworthiness of the vehicle without determining whether it was legally or illegally converted.

(b) Not Applicable

(c) Not Applicable

(d) Not Applicable

25 April 2016 - NW1033

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Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) When was the tender for the collection of unpaid e-toll bills published, (b) to whom was the specified tender awarded, (c) what criteria had to be fulfilled, (d) what was the value of the specified tender and (e) what are the conditions of the specified tender; (2) whether any performance incentives are in place for the specified tender; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) how are the specified performance incentives monitored and (c) what are the conditions respectively?

Reply:

1. (a) SANRAL followed a tender process for the overall toll system design, build and operations thereof in 2009 in accordance with the SCM requirements at the time.

(b) Following this tender process, it appointed ETC Pty Ltd as the successful tenderer.

(c)This tender included the collection of outstanding e-Toll debt. This was revised to address the New Dispensation announced by the Deputy President, with specific reference to the 60% discount offering in respect of historic debt. ETC is therefore responsible for the collection of e-toll debt and may appoint parties to attend to this on their behalf. SANRAL only contracts (in terms of its Contract with ETC) with ETC and not directly with the 3rd party.

2. As stated, SANRAL only has an agreement with ETC Pty Ltd. There is therefore no "specified tender" by SANRAL in relation to the so called "unpaid e-toll bills" and in respect of which the question appears to be addressed. ETC is responsible for the collection of debt for the contract period. SANRAL appointed ETC in 2009, as explained above.

25 April 2016 - NW1032

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Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why has the water leakage problems experienced with the Gautrain project, particularly at the Rosebank station in Johannesburg, not yet been resolved, (b) when is it anticipated that the matter will be resolved, (c) what are the costs to date in this regard and (d)(i) who will bear the specified costs and (ii) why?

Reply:

(a) The portion of the Gautrain tunnel where the ingress of water is above specification and where Bombela have been ordered to carry out Tunnel Remedial Works in terms of an order of the Arbitration Federation of Southern Africa Tribunal is limited to a stretch of tunnel between Park Station and a shaft known as E2 some 2 km south of Rosebank. Bombela’s design of the Tunnel Remedial Works in this section necessary to comply with the Tribunal’s orders has reached an advanced stage. Bombela has however, in parallel, also decided to apply to the High Court to have the Tribunal’s orders to remedy the water ingress set aside. This opposing action of Bombela is currently delaying the implementation of the Tunnel Remedial Works.

(b) The matter is to be heard in the High Court on 6 and 7 June 2016. The resolution of the matter is dependent on the ruling of the Court. It is at this stage unclear how long the Court will take to make its ruling.

(c) There are no costs to date for the Province. Bombela’s cost related to the remedial works is unknown because Bombela is not obliged to make this information available to the Province.

(d) (i) Bombela must bear the costs.

     (ii) Bombela is obliged, in terms of the Tribunal’s Award, to remedy the tunnel water leakage problem between Park Station and Shaft E2, at its own cost.

25 April 2016 - NW1026

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a)(i) Who was invited to attend the National Road Safety Strategy Engagement Summit held on 12 March 2016 in Midrand, Gauteng, (ii) who did they represent and (b) what criteria was used to create the list of invitees; (2) what were the objectives of the specified summit; (3) were the objectives of the specified summit achieved; if so, how was this ascertained; (4) what did the specified summit cost by line item?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) Non-governmental organisations involved in road safety

(ii) They represented the youth, faith-based organizations, people living with disabilities and others who advocate for road safety.

(b) Involvement in road safety activities or advocacy

(2) To discuss the development of the National Road Safety Strategy for 2016 – 2020

(3) Inputs were received and consolidated in the draft strategy document.

(4) R396 098 for venue hire for 500 invited guests

25 April 2016 - NW988

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the R335 million paid by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) to a certain company (name furnished) for technological improvements was paid for technological improvements on all locomotives; if not, was the specified amount only paid for technological improvements on locomotives received to date; (2) why were the extra technological improvements not included in the original tender awarded to the specified company; (3) whether the additional technological improvements were sent to the Rail and Safety Regulator (RSR); if not, why not; if so, (a) what was the opinion of the RSR in this regard and (b) was the opinion of the RSR taken into account before the additional technological improvements were approved; (4) whether, with regard to the tender awarded to the specified company for the construction and supply of locomotives to PRASA, the RSR had insights into the tender specification before being finalised and published for bidding; if not, why not; if so, (a) at what stage was the RSR involved in the decision process regarding the purchase of the Afro 4000 locomotives and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

 

  1. The need for technological improvements to the Afro 4000 locomotives are subject to a High Court application under case number: 2015/422196.
  2. See response in 1 above.
  3. PRASA did not follow due process in respect of the AFRO 4000 project. Therefore, the RSR was not privy to information and decisions that were taken regarding additional technological improvements.
  4. The RSR was not involved nor had insight into the tender specification before it was finalised and published by PRASA.

(a) The RSR had no input in respect of the entire acquisition process and was not involved in the decision process regarding the acquisition of the Afro 4000.

(b) Forensic investigators have been appointed by the Board of Control of PRASA to conduct a detailed investigation. This discovery is set out in the High Court application referred to in (1).

25 April 2016 - NW987

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Has the Afro 4000 locomotive which derailed at Modderrivier south of Kimberley, Northern Cape, been removed; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the cost of damage to the derailed locomotive and (b) can the repairs be done in South Africa?

Reply:

Yes the Afro 4000 has been removed.

(a) The cost of the derailed locomotive is R50m.

(b) All components of the sub-systems on the Afro 4000 locomotive have local suppliers and/or agents. Therefore it is possible to be repaired in South Africa. Local capability for the body repairs of the Afro 4000 is yet to be determined. The details will be confirmed once the current legal process is resolved and the procurement process for the repairs can be finalized.

25 April 2016 - NW986

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How much of the Moloto road corridor has been transferred to the SA National Roads Agency in kilometres, (b) which sections have been transferred, (c) when was the transfer made and (d) what is the (i) total length and (ii) locality of the Moloto road corridor?

Reply:

(a) Approximately 92.4 kilometres has been transferred to SANRAL

(b) Section 2 in Mpumalanga Province (54.9 km) and Section 3 in Limpopo Province (37.5 km)

(c) Section 2 and 3 was transferred on 29th July 2015.

(d) (i) Total Length = 139.1 km

(ii) The R573 starts at Sefako Makgatho Drive (Pretoria North) and proceeds in north easterly direction through Gauteng Province, then passing through Moloto, Kwamhlanga, Tweefontein, Kwaggafontein in Mpumalanga Province and continuing up to Marble Hall in Limpopo Province.

25 April 2016 - NW883

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) Whether (a) the SA National Roads Agency and/or (b) its contractor, Electronic Toll Collections, followed a full tender process for the appointment of a certain company (name furnished) for collecting outstanding e-toll debt in Gauteng; if so, (2) whether the appointment of the specified company complied with the (a) Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, (b) Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, and (c) Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003; if not, (i) why not and (ii) wat are the further relevant particulars; if so, what are the further relevant particulars; (3) what is the structure for the remuneration to be paid to the specified company for the collection of arrears e-toll debt in respect of (a) fees, (b) commission and (c) any other form of remuneration; (4) whether there is an option to renew the contract of the specified company; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) for what period the specified company has been appointed?

Reply:

  1. SANRAL followed a tender process for the overall toll system design, build and operations thereof, in 2009. Following this tender process, it appointed ETC Pty Ltd as the successful tenderer. This tender included the collection of outstanding e-Toll debt. This was revised to address the New Dispensation announced by the Deputy President, with specific reference to the 60% discount offering in respect of historic debt. ETC is therefore responsible for the collection of e-toll debt and may appoint 3rd parties to attend to this on their behalf. SANRAL only contracts (in terms of its Contract with ETC) with ETC and not directly with the 3rd party.

(2) As stated above, SANRAL appointed ETC in terms of the SCM requirements at the time (2009). SANRAL did not procure services with 3rd parties for debt collection. SANRAL has complied with all the requisite legislation.

(3) SANRAL does not pay the "specified company" and is not aware of the arrangements between ETC and that entity. SANRAL's contractual obligation is to ETC.

(4) As stated, SANRAL only has an agreement with ETC. ETC is responsible for the collection of debt for the contract period.

(4) SANRAL appointed ETC in 2009, as explained above. The contract will finish for the operations of the Transaction Clearing House (TCH) and the Violation Processing Centre (VPC) components of the project after 5 years of toll collection operations (ie. December 2013 to December 2018) and for the roadside equipment, maintenance and Open Road Toll (ORT) back office operations, after 8 years of toll collection operations. The collection of outstanding debt is managed within the VPC component of the contract.

25 April 2016 - NW882

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) With reference to her answer to question 733 on 4 April 2016, why the Road Traffic Infringement Agency has not paid its account at the SA Post Office; (2) (a) what is the total outstanding amount payable and (b) when the account will be paid?

Reply:

  1. The SA Post office has not been paid by the Road Traffic Infringement Agency due a dispute between the Road Traffic Infringement Agency and SA Post office regarding proof of services rendered. SA Post office and Road Traffic Infringement Agency have been in discussions regarding the matter.
  2. (a) The total outstanding amount is R32 408 981.98

(b) The outstanding amount will be paid in 2 tranches. The 50% will be paid in April and the remaining 50% will be paid once the 2 parties have come to an agreement about the settlement amount.

25 April 2016 - NW954

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Transport

Has (a) she and/or (b) her Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a-ccc) Minister and Deputy Minister of Transport have never ever met with any member, employee or close associate of the Gupta Family at the Gutpta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or anywhere else since taking office.

12 April 2016 - NW678

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

How many persons were suspended with full pay in (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, excluding the Passenger Rail Agency of SA, in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years, (b) what amount was paid to each of the specified persons in each of the specified entities in each month in each of the specified financial years, (c) what were the reasons for (i) the suspensions, (ii) suspending the persons with full pay and (iii) the delays in resolving the suspensions in each case respectively and (d) what steps is she taking to resolve these suspensions?

Reply:

Department

a) How many persons have been suspended with full pay within (i) her department.

(aa) 2012/13 – None

(bb) 2013-14 – 1 X DDG for 10 months. The value for the duration is R983 851.49

(cc) 2014-15 financial years – Five (05) employees to the value of R1 015 228.91

  • 2 Deputy Directors-General (3 Months and 15 days)
  • 1 Director (3 months and 20 days)
  • 1 Deputy Director (3 months and 20 days)
  • 1 Assistant Director (4 months and 10 days)

(b) in each specified case, what (i) is the value of these payments for each month by her department

2013/2014 FINACIAL YEAR

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

MONTH

VALUE OF PAYMENTS

One employee

May 2013

R0

 

June

R77 356.42

 

July

R94 116.98

 

August

R94 116.98

 

September

R153 559.29

 

October

R94 116.98

 

November

R94 116.98

 

December

R94 116.98

 

January 2014

R94 116.98

 

February

R94 116.98

 

March

R94 116.98

TOTAL

R 983 851.49

2014/2015 FINACIAL YEAR

Employee 1

April 2014

R138 386.61

TOTAL

R138 386.61

   

Employee 2

July 2014

R118 521.91

 

August 2014

R124 311.78

 

September 2014

R53 130.51

TOTAL

 

R295 964.20

     

Employee 3

October 2014

R27 974.57

 

November 2014

R70 907.76

 

December

R70 907.76

 

January

R70 907.76

 

February

R23 312.74

TOTAL

 

R264 010.00

     

Employee 4

October 2014

R16 478.74

 

November 2014

R41 769.04

 

December 2014

R41 769.04

 

January 2015

R41 769.04

 

February 2015

R13 732.29

Total

 

R155 518.14

     

Employee 5

October 2014

R36 545.71

 

November 2014

R37 020.79

 

December 2014

R37 020.79

 

January 2015

R37 020.79

 

February 2015

R13 741.90

Total

 

R161 349.96

Grand Total – 2014/15

 

R1 015 228.91

(c) what were the reasons for (i) these suspensions,

The officials committed serious allegations of misconduct that warranted precautionary suspension.

(ii) reasons for suspending the persons with full pay

Precautionary suspension is always with full pay in terms of Chapter 7, clause 2(b) of the Senior Management Service Handbook and clause 7.2 of the Disciplinary Code and Procedure (Resolution 1 of 2003).

(iii) the delay in resolving the suspension in each case respectively

The complexity of the investigations is the cause of the delay.

(d) what steps is she taking to resolve these suspensions?

All the above-mentioned cases were resolved.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a)(ii) The Airports Company South Africa, placed employees under suspension with full pay pending investigation and possible disciplinary action during the financial years under review as follows:

(aa) 2012/13

During the period under review, nine (9) employees were placed under suspension with full pay for the average period of approximately three (3) months (92 days). The total value of the salaries paid to the nine (9) employees during the period under review for suspension with full pay amounted to R 286 889.90.

All cases were concluded, with outcomes reached within set timeframes of investigation, resolution and finalization of such matters.

(bb) 2013/14

During the financial year under review, nineteen (19) employees were placed on suspension with full pay for the average period of approximately three (3) months (95 days). The total amount of salaries paid to the nineteen (19) employees during the period of suspension under review amounted to R 880 462.11

All cases were concluded, with outcomes reached within set timeframes of investigation, resolution and finalization of such matters.

(cc) 2014/15

During the financial year under review, thirty four (34) employees were placed under suspension with full pay for the average period of below three (3) months (77 days). The total amount of salaries paid to the thirty four (34) employees during the period under review of suspension with full pay amounted to R 2 298 887.60

All cases were concluded, with outcomes reached within set timeframes for investigation, resolution and finalization of such matters.

(c)(i) and (ii) Reasons for suspension and disciplinary action during the requested review period

The reasons for suspensions to facilitate investigation and conclusion of matters during the period under review were many and varied as reflected in the list below:

  • Assault
  • Breach of policy
  • Collusion
  • Concealment of information
  • Damage to property
  • Desertion of post
  • Dishonesty
  • Embezzlement of funds
  • Forging of sick note
  • Fraud
  • Gross negligence and/or competence, violation of policy.
  • Illegal micro lending
  • Insubordination
  • Intimidation, abusive and insulting
  • Misrepresentation
  • Misuse of property
  • Non-disclosure of criminal record
  • Sleeping on duty
  • Tempering
  • Theft
  • Unacceptable conduct
  • Unauthorised conduct
  • Use of foul and insulting language

(iii) Conclusion of disciplinary action during the requested review period

All of the suspensions with full pay for the three (3) sets of financial years have been finalised and there were no delays in the investigation and finalisation of disciplinary processes. Outcomes of majority of the disciplinary processes mainly resulted in decisions of:

  • Dismissal
  • Acquittal and
  • Final written warnings

(d) Solution for the reduction of suspensions with full pay

A benchmark has been set for resolution of suspensions with full pay within a period of three (3) months. Suspension of employees with full pay will be used as an action of last resort in deserving cases of serious financial and criminal misconduct. While some suspensions with full pay may be longer than others, the average period of three months (3) will be the guiding principle.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (i) N/A (ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority suspensions are listed below for (aa) there were none, for 2012/13, (bb) there were none for 2013/14, and (cc) for 2014/15 as per table below. (ii) (aa) (bb) (iii) and (iv) are stated in the table below.

Name Department

No. of days suspended

Reasons for suspension

Payment value of suspension in rand per month

Delay and Reasons

Action taken to resolve the matters

Accident and Incident Investigation Division

90 days

Serious misconduct relating to misrepresentation of qualifications

R59,782.76 x3 months

R179.348.28

No delay*

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Air Safety Operations Division

90 days

Serious Misconduct unethical conduct when doing inspection and audit.

R70,654.22 x 3 months

R211,962.66

No delay*

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Air Safety Operations Division

90 days

Serious misconduct relating to conflict of interest and contravention of Civil Aviation Act, section 98.

R51,442.43 x 3 months

R154,327.29

No delay*

The employee resigned before the disciplinary hearing was held.

Air Safety Operations Division

14 days

Serious misconduct relating to conviction on criminal case.

N/A

No delay*

An internal disciplinary hearing was conducted and the charges against the employee were dismissed by the Chairperson of the hearing.

Air Safety Operations Division

120 days

Serious misconduct relating misrepresentation of flying experience.

R97,707.48 x 4 months

R390,829.92

Under the control of external investigations.

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Air Safety Operations Division

150 days

Serious misconduct relating to misrepresentation of qualifications.

R57,258.57 x 5 months

R286,292.85

Some delay experienced during festive holidays.

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Total

   

R1,222,761.00

   

Footnote: * means that the suspension was within the SACAA Disciplinary Management Policy.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

Department

Date Suspended

Date Suspension Uplifted Termination

Value of payment per month

Total of payment whilst on suspension

Reason for Suspension

Reason for Delay in resolving matter

What is being done to resolve

Reason for suspension with full pay

2012/2013

ATNS

25 September 2012

24 December 2012

R56 767.00

R163 307.00

KPMG Audit –

Whistle blowing matter

Matter was dealt with as expedient as possible taking the audit into consideration.

Matter concluded

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

31 August 2012

14 September 2012

R20 833.33

R10 575.00

Gross Insubordination

Non availability of internal qualified Chairman.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

25 September 2012

24 December 2012

R72 399.00

R211 618.00

KPMG Audit

Whistle blowing matter

Matter was dealt with as expedient as possible taking the audit into consideration.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

28 March 2013

1 August 2013

R153 333.00

R634 561.00

Gross Insubordination

External legal team appointed based on seniority.

Matter concluded.

Employee dismissed.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

2013/2014

ATNS

4 July 2013

5 September 2013

R128 808.00

R271 466.00

Gross dishonesty

External legal team appointed due to seniority of employee.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

13 March 2014

25 July 2014

R80 424.00

R357 004.00

Gross Insubordination

External legal team appointed due to the seniority of the employee.

Matter concluded

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

2014/2015

ATNS

16 May 2014

31 October 2015

R111 435.00

R1 950 958.07

Whistle Blower on allegations of racism, discrimination, intimidation and victimisation of black employees.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing finalised.

Matter Concluded. Employee resigned before finalization of disciplinary hearing.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

16 May 2014

25 September 2015

R94 350.00

R1 557 411.00

Whistle Blower on allegations of racism, discrimination, intimidation and victimisation of black employees.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing finalized.

 

Matter Concluded.

Employee dismissed.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

Ports Regulator of South Africa

The Ports Regulator has never suspended any of its employees since starting operations in 2007.

South African Maritime Safety Authority ( SAMSA)

  1. (ii)

Number of persons suspended

Number of months person suspended

Amount p/m

Reasons for suspension

Why Suspension with full pay?

Reasons for delays in resolving the matter

What are the Steps to resolve the matter?

2012-13

1

3 months

R69 141.49

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

CCMA process took long

Resolved

2013-14

1

1 month

R28 818.12

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

Hearing process

Resolved

2014-15

1

3 months

R70 616.58

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

Investigation

Matter referred to the Labour Court

1

6 months

R18 853.99

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

Sick leave by staff member & initiator

Matter resolved

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

ii. (aa) No persons were suspended during the 2012-13 reporting period.

ii. (cc) 2014/15 FINANCIAL YEAR

NO. OF PERSONS

REASONS FOR SUSPENSION

PERIOD OF SUSPENSION

MONEY PAID DURING SUSPENSION

1

Gross dishonesty, Financial misconduct, Insubordination and Breach of Duty of Trust.

Four months

R388, 700,96

1

Misconduct

One month

R42, 316

TOTAL

2

   

R431,016.96

(bb) 2013/14 FINANCIAL YEAR

NO. OF PERSONS

REASONS FOR SUSPENSION

PERIOD OF SUSPENSION

MONEY PAID DURING SUSPENSION

1

Misconduct

One month

R81, 433,50

1

Misconduct

Two months

R46, 474,64

TOTAL

2

   

R127, 908,14

(b)(iv) All the suspensions were conducted in compliance with the RSR’s Disciplinary Policy, which makes allowances for suspensions with full pay.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a)(ii) The CBRTA in the (aa) 2012-13 (bb), 2013-14 (cc) 14-15 financial years (b) suspended a total of eight (8) persons as outlined in the schedule of suspensions table listed below. (b) The amount was paid to each of the specified persons in each month in each of the specified financial years, (c) the reasons for (i) the suspensions and (iii) the delays in resolving the suspensions in each case respectively are all provided in the table below.

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

(c)(i) (ii)

Reason for suspension

(c)(iii) Delay in resolving these matters

(b) Monthly amount paid

HR Generalist

FY12/13

FY12/13

November 2012 - January 2013

Suspended for 65 days

Alleged Misconduct. Recruitment process not followed for appointment of new hires. Verbal offers of employment extended before requisite approval.

The matter was not delayed. The suspension was uplifted and an informal disciplinary hearing was conducted.

R 36,744

Chief Road Transport Inspector

FY12/13

FY13/14

February 2013 – April 2013

Suspended for 65 days

Alleged misconduct. Making use of employer's resources for personal benefit. Leave without authorisation

The matter was not delayed. Disciplinary hearing was conducted.

R 38,133

Senior Manager Human Resources

FY13/14

FY13/14

March 2013 – April 2013

Suspended for 43 days

Alleged Misconduct. Unprofessional conduct, fraudulently changing performance score, failure to carry out responsibilities with recruitment of Road Transport Inspectors

The matter was not delayed, the employee resigned pending disciplinary enquiry

R 66,371

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

(c)(i) (ii)

Reason for suspension

(c)(iii) Delay in resolving these matters

(b) Monthly amount paid

Senior Manager Law Enforcement

FY 13/14

FY 14 /

15

November 2013 – November 2014

Suspended for 260 days

Alleged misconduct. Gross Insubordination, unruly behaviour, gross negligence

Delays with investigations due to unavailability of witnesses due to work pressures as well as year-end closure.

Further delays with serving the employee with disciplinary hearing notice due to unavailability.

Postponement of disciplinary hearing on account of employee's request for more time to prepare.

First hearing adjourned on the basis of a technicality raised by the employee and his representative.

Still more delays for a few scheduled hearing dates due to unavailability of the employee's representative.

Eventually the case went to the CCMA for pre-dismissal arbitration.

The pre-dismissal arbitration was delayed among others due to ill health of the employee, unavailability of his representative, ill health of the Commissioner; interdict an application to the High Court by the employee.

The matter was settled on 3 November 2014.

R 75,467

Executive Manager: Human Resources & Administration

FY13/14

FY14/15

February 2014 - July 2014

Suspended for 108 days

Allegations of misconduct - Gross dereliction of duty, gross insubordination, and gross negligence

Matter delayed by changes to external investigators. Finally a settlement agreement was entered into

R 110,933

Executive Manager: Facilitation & Industry Development

FY14/15

FY14/15

May 2014 - November 2014

Suspended for 130 days

Allegations of misconduct - Gross insolence and undermining authority of superior

The matter was not delayed. After further investigations, the matter was partly heard. The employee requested a settlement agreement

R 131,098.50

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

(c)(i) (ii)

Reason for suspension

(c)(iii) Delay in resolving these matters

(b) Monthly amount paid

Senior Data Administrator

FY14/15

FY15/ 16

July 2014 – May 2015

Suspended for 216 days

Allegations of misconduct - Frequent late-coming, Repeated absence without permission, Abscondment/desertion, Gross insubordination

Suspension and hearing delayed on account of repeated failure by employee to respond to acknowledge receipt and/or to respond to disciplinary documentation, failure to attend the inquiry.

Unsuccessful use of the services of the Sheriff of the Court to serve documentation to employee.

1st hearing conducted in employee's absence which led to her dismissal.

Appeal chairperson granted that another hearing be conducted where she will be given an opportunity to state her case.

2nd hearing delayed due to unavailability of representative, ill-health of employee. Hearing finalised.

R 31,951

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

Reason for suspension

Delay in resolving these matters

Monthly amount paid

Senior Manager Information Technology

FY14/15

FY15/ 16

October 2014 – July 2015

Suspended for 216 days

Allegations of misconduct - Intended fraud.

Investigations into the alleged misconduct were lengthy and required extended time.

When suspension was uplifted with intention to pursue hearing, employee resigned.

R 79,679

(d)Mitigation against future costs related to employee suspensions:

The C-BRTA developed and adopted Management Guidelines for Employee Suspensions (as attached) that line management will now use when considering suspensions. The overall effect is that to date employee suspensions have become minimal and where there is a need to isolate an employee from operations while investigations are underway, the employee is placed in other non-related roles to best derive equitable value for the salary earned.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

  1. (ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF), who employs over 2500 people, suspended with full pay (aa) 9 employees in 2012-13, (bb) 20 employees in 2013-14, and (cc) 10 employees in the 2014-15 financial years,
  1. the value of the matters for each month in each financial year are:
 

(aa) 2012-13

(bb) 2013-14

(cc) 2014-15

April

R 76 000.00

R 160 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

May

R 45 000.00

R 215 000.00

R 465 000.00

       

June

R 85 000.00

R 255 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

July

R 85 000.00

R 245 000.00

R 450 000.00

       

August

R 75 000.00

R 225 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

September

R 90 000.00

R 125 000.00

R 550 000.00

       

October

R 55 000.00

R 100 000.00

R 550 000.00

       

November

R 30 000.00

R 205 000.00

R 430 000.00

       

December

R 58 000.00

R 175 000.00

R 320 000.00

       

January

R 92 000.00

R 200 000.00

R 130 000.00

       

February

R 70 000.00

R 300 000.00

R 130 000.00

       

March

R 70 000.00

R 420 000.00

R 130 000.00

  1. (i) the reasons for the suspensions, which relate to anything from misconduct to fraud, are to manage the risk of the employee to interfering with witnesses and/or evidence; where the continued presence of the employee presents a threat to life or property; or where the employee’s presence will have a disruptive effect on other employees, (ii) the CCMA and Labour Court generally consider suspension without pay an unfair labour practice, therefore the RAF Disciplinary Policy provides for the suspension of an employee on full pay in the aforementioned instances, (iii) delays in resolving the matters may be experienced due to any one or more reasons, including ongoing investigations that must be completed; the employee getting sick; CCMA referrals for unfair labour practices; and, requests for legal representation and determination, which if granted, impacts on the time taken to conclude hearings, and
  1. in order to resolve future matters the RAF is amending its Disciplinary Policy to curb the maximum period for which an employee may be suspended on full pay and requiring the employee be charged no later than one month after the suspension.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(ii) Road Traffic Management Corporation

(aa) 2012 - 2013 = five (5) employees

(bb) 2013 – 2014 = Five (5) Employees

(cc) 2014 – 2015 = One (1) Employees

  1. 2012-2013

Employee

Monthly salary

No. 1

R 18 421.39

No. 2

R 13 961.89

No. 3

R 10 815.07

No. 4

R 35 980.71

No.5

R 14 383.92

2013-2014

Employee

Monthly salary

No. 1

R 38 565.30

No. 2

R28 490.88

No. 3

R 35 256.08

No. 4

R 14 171.32

No.5

14 383.92

2014-2015

Employee

Monthly salary

No. 1

R 35 256.08

  1. (i) The reasons for the suspension were that the acts of misconduct were very serious and another reason was to conduct the investigation free from possible interference by the employees, in terms of paragraph 9.2 (i) & (ii) of the Disciplinary Code and Procedures of the Corporation

(ii) The suspension of this kind is with full pay in terms of paragraph 9.2 (b) of the Disciplinary Code and Procedures of the Corporation.

(iii) The delays were caused due to the investigation which took longer than we expected. Charges are informed by the Investigation report and therefore if finalization of the investigation delays, then the process of charging the employee/s delays.

(d). As soon as the employee is suspended, processes will be put in place to ensure that the investigation unfolds immediately without any delay. This will ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in the finalization of cases and suspensions.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

  1. (ii) Suspensions with Full Pay

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

None

None

1

  1. R 261 541.15 for the period September 2014 to February 2015

Gross salary per month:

September 2014- R39 401.44

October 2014- R39 401.44

November 2014- R39 401.44

December 2014- R39 401.44

January 2015- R64 533.97

February 2015- R39 401.44

  1. Reason for suspension
  1. Misconduct;
  2. The suspension was with full pay; and
  3. A lengthy disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was given a final written warning
  1. The disciplinary hearing concluded the process.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

None of the South African National Roads Agency (SOC) Ltd (SANRAL) staff members were suspended during the years under review

12 April 2016 - NW676

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) processes, (ii) mechanisms and (iii) procedures exist within (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her to ensure that outcomes achieved are aligned to the National Development Plan, (b) how is this being (i) monitored, (ii) measured and (iii) coordinated and (c) who are the champions for (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her respectively?

Reply:

Department

(a) (i) In July 2014, Cabinet adopted the 2014-2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) to be used as a comprehensive five-year implementation plan for the NDP 2030 vision and the commitments of the governing party’s Election Manifesto. This is the process through which all plans of Government institutions across the three spheres of Government are aligned to the NDP.

(ii) The MTSF is translated into the Ministers’ Delivery Agreement with the President of the Republic of South Africa. The DoT Strategic Plan 2015 – 2020 and Annual Performance Plans are aligned with the Minister’s Delivery Agreement in order to ensure that all MTSF deliverables are budgeted for and fully implemented and monitored.

(iii) The DoT developed internal Planning, Monitoring and Reporting Guidelines, as an instrument that aims to provide minimum requirements for the achievement of deliverables as outlined in the APP of the Department. The Department initiates its planning process in May of each financial year through programme planning sessions, with the involvement of Entities and Provinces. These engagements inform deliberations of the DoT Executive Committee Lekgotla that is followed by the Department-wide Strategic Planning session. The Strategic Plan and APP are then consolidated, costed and tabled in Parliament in line with the National Treasury Framework.

(b) (i) On a quarterly basis, reporting templates are circulated to every programme to provide progress reports on all APP targets. Reports are consolidated, analysed against a prescribed criteria and interrogated against relevant supporting documents to ensure usefullness, consistency and reliability of information.

Each programme has a branch coordinator who is responsible for coordination of reporting for the entire programme. Branch coordinators provide dedicated support to their respective programmes and ensure that reporting complies with the prescripts. Once compiled, reports are quality assured by Programme Managers and submitted to the Chief Directorate: Strategic Planning & Cluster Coordination for consolidation and analysis. The report then gets interrogated at the DoT Executive Committee (EXCO), chaired by the Accounting Officer and the Strategic Management Committee (SMC) chaired by the Deputy Minister.

(ii) Reports are compiled against the DoT Annual Performance Plan and submitted on a quarterly basis and are guided by the sequence of quarterly targets as per the approved Annual Performance Plan and the approved Technical Indicator Descriptions. At all times, the reported information is supported by admissible evidence as predetermined in the Technical Indicator Description table.

(iii) Internal coordination commences with the engagements at programme level through interactions between the Chief Directorate: Strategic Planning & Cluster Coordination and respective branches. Upon consolidation of inputs, the final report is interrogated and validated by the DoT Executive Committee for reporting at the Strategic Management Committee. The Audit Committee and the Portfolio Committee on Transport receive the reports in line with their respective oversight obligations. The Report is also submitted to the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME). The Department also participates in the Outcomes Technical Implementation Delivery and Data Forums for effective Outcomes implementation. At the end of the financial year, the department compiles an Annual Report. All reports mentioned above are posted in the DoT website for public consumption.

(c) (i) The champion is the Accounting Officer, supported by Programme Managers.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

    (a) Airports Company South Africa SOC Ltd (ACSA) strategy process is guided by the Minister of Transport’s vision, predetermined objectives and      goals which are underpinned by the National Development Plan.

   (bb) In response, ACSA has aligned its strategic objectives, outcomes, outputs, focus areas and strategic initiatives to the NDP. In turn, ACSA’s Corporate Plan outlines the predetermined objectives, key performance indicators and associated targets. ACSA applies the balanced scorecard philosophy, which directs and ensures that key performance indicators cover the breadth and spectrum of its business, people, society and environment.

   (b) (i) The performance monitoring process, within ACSA sits within the CEO’s Office – Strategic Planning Unit. The Group Manager: Strategic Planning is responsible for coordinating, measuring and monitoring the process.

      (ii) The key performance indicators and performance narrative are tracked and monitored monthly by the Executive Committee, and quarterly reviewed by the Board Audit and Risk Sub-Committee and subsequently, at Board level.

     (iii) Once approved, the quarterly report, as outlined in the PFMA, is submitted to the Department of Transport and Department of Treasury. Every quarter, after submitting the quarterly reports, the Department of Transport and ACSA meet to engage and discuss the company’s year to date (YTD) performance in relation to YTD Targets.

From an internal assurance perspective, the key performance indicators process, as it relates to performance against targets and the remedial action, are subject to a scheduled quarterly internal audit review and assurance process. The external auditor, currently the Auditor General, provides the external review and assurance of the SOC’s key performance indicators and annual performances.

(c) (ii) The Board of ACSA through the Chairman is the champion.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) ATNS is a schedule 2 state owned company incorporated in 1993 in terms of ATNS Company Act, Act 45 of 1993. Its mandate is to provide Air Traffic Management Solutions and associated services on behalf of the State in accordance with ICAO Standards, recommended practice as well as the South African Civil Aviation Regulations and Technical Standards.

(a) (i) and (iii) (bb) Processes and procedures

The development process of the three (3) year Corporate Plan is driven by the Departmental outcomes to demonstrate the entity’s contribution and support towards the national priorities as stipulated in the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and the National Development Plan (NDP).

  (a) (ii) (bb) Mechanism

The quarterly performance report is intended to provide feedback on the targets set in the Performance Agreement. The quarterly report is in a form of financial and non-financial performance indicators. Reporting on both financial and non-financial performance is important in measuring the performance of entities. While financial information (expenditure and revenue) is critical for determining the costs and efficiencies of programmes/objectives/activities, non-financial information is equally important for assessing progress towards predetermined performance targets.

The DoT has identified the following seven (7) key performance areas to assess progress towards ATNS achieving its targets.

  1. Transport Safety and Security
  2. Infrastructure Development and High-Level Investment Plan for Transport
  3. The Fight Against Fraud and Corruption
  4. Environmental Protection
  5. Training to Contribute to Job Creation
  6. Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment
  7. Employment Equity

(b) (i) The performance report is monitored on a quarterly basis.

(b) (ii) The Key Performance Indicators are measured and evaluated in accordance with the National Treasury performance management framework. This report is compiled and submitted to the DoT in accordance to the National Treasury Guidelines on the preparation of Quarterly Reports for Public Entities and Constitutional Institutions. Treasury Regulations 29.1.3(b) and 29.1.6(a)-(j) require public entities to report on a quarterly basis to their Executive Authority.

(b) (iii) The report is coordinated through the DoT Civil Aviation Oversight directorate.

  1. (i) The DoT Civil Aviation Branch is the champion for the department

(ii) The office of the CEO and Strategic Optimisation departments are champions at ATNS.

South African Civil Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) (ii) (iii)

(aa) N/A

(bb) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) as a Schedule 3A entity submits a five year Strategy and an Annual Performance Plan to the Department of Transport in compliance with the PFMA. The development process of the Strategy and APP ensures the alignment of the SACAA Strategic Objectives to both the National Development Plan and the Department of Transport Objectives and this alignment is clearly demonstrated in the same documents.

(b) (i) (ii) (iii) On an annual basis the various draft versions of the Strategy and APP are submitted three times to the Board and DoT during August, November and January of each year for approval. The APP includes a five year delivery plan and an annual quarterly delivery plan which incorporates SMART targets and this is monitored by submitting quarterly progress reports to the Board and ultimately to the Minister of Transport indicating what was achieved and how the SACAA plans on recovering on areas where there is non-delivery. On a quarterly basis the performance against targets is audited by the Internal Audit department and at the end of the financial year by the Auditor General. A portfolio of evidence is kept to prove achievement. An account of the annual performance is also included in the Annual Report of the SACAA which is submitted to Parliament during August/September each year.

(c) (i) N/A (ii) the champions of the process is the Director of Civil Aviation and the Board of the SACAA.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Given the RSR’s legislative mandate – to oversee, promote, enforce and monitor railway safety – its strategic objectives and respective outcomes contribute to the NDP’s broader social and economic development objectives and principles; assurance is provided for the safe conveyance of commuters and freight via rail. Alignment with the NDP’s broader objectives is ensured as follows:

(a) (i) (iii) Processes and procedures:

The RSR has regular engagement sessions with the DoT’s Rail Branch throughout each financial year when formulating its medium-term strategic framework (MTSF) and Annual Performance Plans (APP). As the Shareholder Department constructive input into the formulation of its outcomes-based MTSF and ensures that the entity contributes to the country’s NDP principles and objectives. Processes and procedures for input into the MTSF are contained in the RSR’s Guide for Strategy Development, which is PFMA compliant.

(a) (ii) Mechanisms:

DoT representation in the development of the RSR’s MTSF and Board approval of the MTSF.

(b) (i) Monitoring:

The DoT and the RSR’s Board monitors alignment. Quarterly organisational performance reports are quality controlled by the Board’s Audit and Risk Committee and presented to the Board for adoption. These reports are then submitted to the DoT for performance tracking. Annual and MTSF performance scores are compiled and submitted to the DoT where the former is used to track progress and the latter is used to assess the achievement of the entity’s strategic outcomes.

(b) (ii) Measurements:

Quarterly and annual organisational performance scores are used as measuring instruments. In addition, the annual State of Safety report is used as a tool to gauge the safety of the country’s railways and rail operations.

(b) (iii) The process is coordinated by the RSR’s Office of the CEO in collaboration with the DoT’s Rail Branch and the RSR’s Board Secretariat (with respect to Board input and guidance).

(c) (ii) The RSR’s Office of the CEO (wrt strategic targets and objectives) and Research Unit (wrt the State of Safety Report) within the Office of the COO.

Ports Regulator of SA (PRSA)

(a) (bb) The PRSA uses (i) the process of incorporating the NDP into the organisation’s Annual Performance Plan (APP) and its Strategic Plan via the (ii) mechanism of the MTSF which distils the first 5 year deliverables of the NDP into action items, as well as the Minister’s Performance agreement which she has shared with entities.

The DoT uses the (iii) procedure of Quarterly reporting on performance against APP targets, fulfilling:

(b) (i) monitoring by the department, in particular the Maritime Branch

(ii) measurement as overall percentage progress on the NDP aligned APP

(iii) detailed feedback by the Department to the entity on delivery progress on APP, thus effecting coordination.

(c) (ii) CEO and CFO

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. The Strategy and APP of the entity is aligned through an alignment matrix with the National Development Plan outcomes; the SONA 9 Point Plan and DoT Strategic objectives
  2. This is being monitored through quarterly management quality review actions; quarterly DoT oversight reporting documents to ensure APP alignment; annually through the Auditor General’s office to ensure the APP is delivering performance indicators and measures.
  3. The champion for SAMSA is the CEO Commander Tsietsi Mokhele.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) The process followed is as required by the PFMA in terms of the submission of the annual Corporate Plan of PRASA, a schedule 3B entity, with specific annual performance indicators and targets. The corporate plan with performance levels is presented to the Department and the Minister of Transport in February of each year. The performance levels agreed are incorporated into the Annual Shareholder Compact between the Board of PRASA and the Minister of Transport.

(b) As required by the PFMA and Treasury Regulations, PRASA reports to the Shareholder on a quarterly basis on the state of performance with reasons for variation and actions to improve performance.

(c) (ii) Chief Strategy Officer of PRASA: Mr Sipho Sithole

REPLY

(bb) Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a)(i)(ii)(iii) The Framework for Strategic and Annual Performance Plans guides the development of the medium term strategy and is set by the National Treasury. Therefore, (bb) the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA) and), within the jurisdiction of its mandate when developing its five year Strategy (such as the 2015-2020 Strategy) has five (5) strategic outcome goals that are aligned to the National Development Plan.

(b) Monitoring is done through the use of quarterly performance reporting, which is submitted to the National Department of Transport. The submitted quarterly performance is (ii) measured against the set targets as per the approved Annual Performance Plan.

(c) Executive Managers, the CEO and the Board are the champions for the CBRTA

(bb) Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a)(bb) To ensure that outcomes achieved by the Road Accident Fund (RAF) are aligned to the National Development Plan, the RAF’s

(i) processes, (ii) mechanisms and (iii) procedures are aligned to the Framework for Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans (the Framework) established by National Treasury to provide for: timeframes for the submission, tabling and reporting on Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans; clarification of the relationship between institutional plans, policy and budgets; details and definitions of key concepts and information to be reported on in specific sections of the Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans, placing the emphasis on performance information; and, templates that are used in drafting the Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans. Consequently, the strategic objectives and performance targets set out in the RAF’s Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans, are presented to the Department of Transport, and ties back to the National Development Plan,

(b) the outcomes achievement by the RAF in terms of its Annual Performance Plans are (i) monitored by the RAF’s Strategy, Risk and Compliance Department, Internal Audit Department and external auditors, and reported to the Board, the Department of Transport, the National Treasury and the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (ii) the outcomes are measured against the respective performance indicators set out in the approved RAF’s Annual Performance Plans, and (iii) the measurement of such outcomes are internally coordinated by the RAF’s Strategy, Risk and Compliance Department, and

(c)(ii) Executive Managers, the CEO and the Board are the champions for the RAF

 

(bb) Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC

  1. (i) The RTMC aligns its strategic planning cycle to the set National Treasury Guidelines and ensures that all applicable legislation and policies are taken into consideration during planning. Workshops are and review sessions are held to ensure alignment of RTMC strategic plans with the National Development Plan.

(ii) Standardised scorecards and performance reviews are used to as mechanisms and procedures to ensure that outcomes are aligned to the National Development Plan.

  1. (i) Monthly internal performance reviews and quarterly performance reports are used to monitor performance against set objectives.

(ii) Road Traffic Information is used to measure performance against set targets.

(iii) Quarterly reviews by the Management Committee and reports to the Board are used as coordinating mechanisms to ensure sustained alignment with the National Development Plan.

  1. (i) Executive Managers, the CEO and the Board are the champions for the RTMC

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA);

(a)(ii) the Minister has instructed the Department to engage with the entities and identify the overlapping areas of their functional responsibilities with a view to strengthening the operations of all entities and the policy mandate of the department.

(b)(i) the department is required to provide a report on the status of the overlaps, as well as recommendations for the required interventions by the end of the second quarter of the 2016/17 financial year.

(b)(ii) the envisaged timelines for implementing the short-term interventions are the end of the 2016/17 financial year. For the long-term interventions and permanent solutions which would require the legislative amendments to the various Acts, the timelines are the 2017/18 financial year. The process is being coordinated through the office of the Deputy Director General: Roads, Transport

(c) (ii)the champion in the Road Traffic Infringement Agency is the Registrar/Chief Executive Officer.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL

(a) SANRAL’s Board and Management are conscious of the need to ensure the achievement of the vision of the NDP through its operations. The Board directs SANRAL strategy to enable this. SANRAL’s 6 Strategic Outcome Oriented Goals are directly aligned to 8 of the 14 MTSF outcomes, the main one being Outcome 6: An efficient, competitive and responsive economic infrastructure network. SANRAL’s mandate of the management of the national road network is encapsulated in this outcome.

(b) Monitoring, Measurement and Coordination of Performance Information

SANRAL has identified 9 Strategic Objectives to achieve the Strategic Goals. Performance to achieve the strategic objectives is monitored, measured and reported in terms of SANRAL’s Performance Management Policy. The attainment of the strategic objectives is monitored through key performance indicators within every objective. The key performance indicators have targets which must be attained annually. This is documented in SANRAL’s Annual Performance Plan (APP), which is developed every year, approved by the Board and finally approved by the Minister of Transport.

Performance is reported quarterly in the case of the majority of key performance indicators. The remainder are reported semi-annually or annually, determined by the type of indicator. The performance report is submitted quarterly to the Minister, following approval by SANRAL’s Board. This is checked by the Public Entity Oversight division of the Roads Branch in the DoT and a report is provided to the Minister of Transport.

The final performance information at the end of each financial year is audited by the Auditor General (AG) and then published in the Annual Report. Interim reports may also be audited by internal audit or the AG.

(c) SANRAL: Company Secretary

12 April 2016 - NW680

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa has undertaken any (a) research and/or (b) cost analysis into the use of the locomotive manufacturers that Transnet SOC Ltd uses for the acquisition of new locomotives; if not, why not; if so, (i) what (aa) research and/or (bb) cost analysis were undertaken in this regard, (ii) by whom and (iii) what were the outcomes in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b) PRASA has not undertaken any specific research or cost analysis into the use of locomotive manufacturers that Transnet uses in the acquisition of new locomotives. PRASA will only embark on such exercise when it is ready to procure additional locomotives for the long-distance rail service and this will be done through a market engagement process with the locomotive manufactures.

(i)(aa)(bb) See above.

(ii) See above.

(iii) See above.

12 April 2016 - NW619

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Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

1)What is the reason why the roadworks to the R24, also called the P16/1, from Olifantsnek to Rustenburg were discontinued; (2) when (a) construction work to the road will be resumed and (b) is the planned completion date for the roadworks; (3) whether she will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

1. The R24 (P16/1) from km 12, 5 (Olifantshoek) to km 0.0 (Buiten ST, Rustenburg) was split into two sections. Section One km 0.0 to km 4.9 (Project One) and km 4.9 to km 12 ,5 (Project Two). These projects were procured approximately 24 months apart.

2(a) Project One was awarded to DIP Civils in April 2013. In February 2014 the pace of construction slowed down considerably and it was evident that the Contractor was experiencing some financial problems that led into the contractor seeking for a and entered into Business Rescue in April 2014. Unfortunately the Business Rescue was not successful and a new contractor was appointed together with the Liquidator in October 2014. This project is scheduled to be completed by end April 2016.

(b) The Second Project commenced in March 2015 and is scheduled to be completed in September 2017. Currently progress is on schedule.

(3) As part of government’s key delivery programme being implemented by SANRAL, the Minister has no plans to single out this programme through any form of statement on this road.

05 April 2016 - NW675

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

In line with the Budget Speech of the Minister of Finance, Mr Pravin Gordhan, delivered on 24 February 2016, (a) what steps is she taking to audit overlapping and duplicate functions of (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b) what are the (i) time frames and (ii) time lines in this regard, (c) how is the specified process being coordinated and (d) who are the champions for (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her respectively?

Reply:

Department

(a) what steps is she taking to audit overlapping and duplicate functions of (i) her department

She will apply the provisions of Chapter 3 of the Public Service Regulations which include: reviewing the organisational structure of the Department; engaging in human resource planning; establishing and maintaining an operations management framework; assessing human resource components and conducting the organisational functionality and productivity assessment.

(b) What are the (i) time frames and (ii) time lines in this regard?

All the stated activities will be done during the 2016/2017 financial year

(c) how is the specified process being coordinated

The activities will be coordinated by applying the tools, techniques and templates that were developed by the Department of Public Service and Administration. Various Committees and Task Teams will also be established to assist in driving he various activities.

(d) Who are the champions for (i) her department

Officials from the Chief Directorate: Human Resource Management and Development as well as other identified Departmental Officials

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

ACSA does not have overlapping or duplicate functions.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

There are no duplications or overlapping functions at ATNS.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The steps taken by the (i) N/A (ii) South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to reduce overlaps and address duplicate functions started in 2014, with the implementation of an Organisational Structure Review (OSR) project. The aim of this project was to improve organisational efficiencies and effectiveness by aligning the structure to the legislative mandate of the Regulator and to ensure that the Regulator meets the requirements of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). (b) (i) The project started in October 2014 (ii) and will be concluded on 31 March 2016. (c) The project was approved by the Board and featured in the Annual Performance Plan for two consecutive financial years. (d) The project is being led by the Executive Management Committee of the SACAA and quarterly progress reports are being tabled during Board meetings.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

  1. ii) The RSR audits the overlapping and duplication of functions by conducting periodic reviews of its policies, core and support business processes as well as organisational structure. The implementation of its ISO 9004 concordant QRAIL Management Quality System (MQS) is also a management tool that has been implemented to ensure process efficiency and quality.
  2. i) Operational, tactical and governance business processes are reviewed annually (by means of the MQS requirements) and policies are reviewed at least every two years.
  3. Reviews are coordinated and overseen by the Office of the CEO.
  4. Office of the CEO, Legal Services Department and the HR Department

Ports Regulator of SA( PRSA)

The Minister of Finance in his Budget Speech 2016, said: …where entities have overlapping mandates, rationalization options will be pursued. The merger of our housing DFIs is already in progress. There are entities with regulatory responsibilities where capacity should be combined.

In this regard, (even though there is no direct overlap between entities) the DOT is engaging with its various Regulatory entities with a view to establishment of a Single Transport Economic Regulator (STER), which has been previously been announced by the Minister of Transport

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. The minister has directed SAMSA to take steps to curtail activities in the maritime sector development which she deems covered by the Maritime Branch in the department of transport
  2. The time frame for the curtailment is 1 April 2016
  3. The specific process has been coordinated through the sign off process of the APP 2016/17
  4. The champion for SAMSA in this process sis the CEO Commander Tsietsi Mokhele.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

ii) PRASA does not believe there is overlapping areas or duplication between the PRASA mandate and the RSR or any other entity reporting to the Department of Transport. PRASA is an operator of rail services whereas the RSR is a regulator of rail transport covering all rail operators including Transnet and Gautrain.

i) Reporting by PRASA is based on the requirements of the PFMA on a quarterly and annual basis to the shareholder.

Reviews are coordinated and overseen by the Office of the Group CEO.

Office of the Group CEO

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency and Road Traffic Management Agency

(a)(ii) The establishment of a single police service is in terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa and affects the Department in relation to the traffic policing/law enforcement function of Agencies within the department. The Minister set up the Road Traffic Management Coordinating Committee (RTMCC), which is chaired by the CEO of RTMC to co-ordinate overlapping and or duplicate functions in the Road Transport/Traffic space.

The C-BRTA has a law enforcement function which is mandated by the Act but could be carried out by the RTMC in line with the realisation of a single police service. The process of migrating the C-BRTA Law Enforcement function (Road Transport Inspectorate) to RTMC has been initiated and is on the 2016/17 APP of the two entities.

(b)(i),(ii) The migration of the C-BRTA Law Enforcement function is planned for finalisation in financial year 2016/17 and the specific timelines will be established once the two Agencies have developed an implemention plan.

Road Accident Fund

In line with the Budget Speech of the Minister of Finance, Mr Pravin Gordhan, delivered on 24 February, (a)(ii) the Road Accident Fund (RAF) is not auditing overlapping and duplicate functions under its constituting Principal Act, as it is not its role, nor is it authorized to do so. The functions of the RAF were the subject of consideration by Cabinet who in 2011 approved the Policy Paper for the Road Accident Benefit Scheme (RABS). Based on the aforementioned Cabinet approved policy, the draft Road Accident Benefit Scheme Bill was developed by the Department of Transport and will see the functions of the RAF change when the RAF transitions to the new Road Accident Benefit Scheme Administrator, (b) (i) the time frames and (ii) timelines to legislate RABS is informed by the usual legislative processes, (c)(i) the process to legislate RABS is being coordinated by the Department of Transport’s Roads Branch, with the support of the Department of Transport’s Legal Directorate, and (d)(ii) the champion for the RAF is its Chief Strategy Officer

The South African National Roads Agency SOC Ltd

The South African National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL) is the sole entity mandated to maintain, develop and fund the national road network of South Africa. As such there are no overlapping or duplicated functions in any other public entity or department.

05 April 2016 - NW786

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How much will (i) the Passenger Rail Agency of SA and (ii) any other entity reporting to her spend on (aa) ticket purchases, (bb) sponsorships and (cc) any other expenses related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival to be held from 29 March to 2 April 2016 and (b) what are the reasons for such expenditure in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) Passenger Rail Agency of SA

(ii) any other entity reporting to her spend on

(aa) ticket purchases, R352 000.

(bb) sponsorships R4 180 000.

(cc) R290 000 for travel and accommodation for PRASA stakeholders.

(b) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa is the Official Transport Partner of the Cape Town International Jazz Festival as per the contract which was entered into during the 2014/15 Financial Year.

The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

(a)(ii)The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (aa) will not purchase any tickets (bb) nor will there be any sponsorships paid for by the Agency and (cc) no expenditure related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival will be incurred by the Agency during the said period.

The Road Accident Fund

(a)(ii)The Road Accident Fund (aa) will not purchase any tickets (bb) nor will there be any sponsorships paid for by the Agency and (cc) no expenditure related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival will be incurred by the Agency during the said period.

The Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(a)(ii)The Road Traffic Infringement Agency (aa) will not purchase any tickets (bb) nor will there be any sponsorships paid for by the Agency and (cc) no expenditure related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival will be incurred by the Agency during the said period.

The Road Traffic Management Corporation

(a)(ii)The Road Traffic Management Corporation (aa) will not purchase any tickets (bb) nor will there be any sponsorships paid for by the Agency and (cc) no expenditure related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival will be incurred by the Agency during the said period.

The South African National Roads Agency Limited

(a)(ii)The South African National Roads Agency Limited (aa) will not purchase any tickets (bb) nor will there be any sponsorships paid for by the Agency and (cc) no expenditure related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival will be incurred by the Agency during the said period.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

The Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited will not be spending any funds towards the Cape Town Jazz Festival to be held from 29 March to 2 April 2016.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

ATNS is not involved in / sponsoring any activities related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival. (i) N/A, (ii) Nil, (aa) None, (bb) None, (cc) None, N/A.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

In relation to question (a) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) (cc) (b) The South African Civil Aviation Authority did not purchase any tickets, or provide any form of sponsorship, or incur any expenses related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival.

South African Maritime Safety Authority ( SAMSA)

Has not made any expenditure related to the Cape Town Jazz Festival.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator will not sponsor directly or indirectly, financial or non-financial, any activities associated with the Cape Town Jazz Festival that will take place from March 2016 to April 2016.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The RSR will not be spending any money on the Cape Town Jazz Festival.

04 April 2016 - NW852

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Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total debt, including interest, of the SA National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) for the Gauteng Freeway Improvements Project to date; (2) (a) what total amount has SANRAL paid towards servicing the specified project to date and (b) what is the breakdown of payment towards capital debt and interest?

Reply:

  1. SANRAL’s toll portfolio had a debt, as at 31 March 2015, of R 46.4 billion (audited). This represents the total toll portfolio of over 3100km. GFIP, comprising a mere 201km of this portfolio, had an Initial Construction Cost (ICC) of R20billion when construction was completed in early 2011. Interest was capitalised until toll commencement in December 2013. The normal repayment period of road infrastructure projects are between 15 and 30 years, depending on the set tariff, traffic, maintenance and upgrades during that period. This is called the J-curve effect, where borrowing continues for a period of time until the projects’ net cash inflow exceeds debt servicing, after which it turns towards being positive. GFIP was forecasted to take approximately 22 years to turn positive, or when the full debt is repaid, given continuous maintenance of the road. This extended payback period is as a result of the low tariff and extensive discounts provided to commuters and public transport operators.
  2. See (1) above.

.

04 April 2016 - NW851

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Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether she has received any verbal or written communication from certain persons (name and details furnished) to scrap the e-tolling system in the past five months?

Reply:

The South African National Roads Agency Limited as an entity has not received any verbal or written communication from any persons to scrap the e-tolling system in the past five months.

.

.

04 April 2016 - NW789

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many summons have been issued each month for monies owed by motorists for e-tolls since the inception of the e-tolls system in Gauteng in December 2013, (b) what is the value of the specified monies outstanding, (c) how many cases have gone to court for each of the specified months and (d) how many motorists have paid monies owed after summons were issued without going to court?

Reply:

a) To date (21st March 2016) no summonses have been served;

b) Since no summonses were served at the time of the Honourable member’s question, the value is zero.

c) To date once case has gone to court. The person was found guilty on all charges related to the non-payment of toll and one charge of fraud. The judgement was that the guilty party had to pay all outstanding toll fees, in addition a fine of R20 000 was imposed, suspended for five years; and on the fraud charge; pay a fine of R20 000 or six months imprisonment. In addittion the guilty person had to do 200 hours community service.

d) Not applicable see (a) above. .

04 April 2016 - NW743

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Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Airports Company of South Africa still allows passengers to hand in their firearms when they are flying and to claim them again at their destination; if not, (a) when was the practice discontinued and (b) what is the reason for this; (2) Whether she will make a statement about the matter;

Reply:

  1. (a) & (b) The Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) still allows passengers to hand in their firearms when they are flying and to claim them again at their destinations. Within the precepts of the Airports Company Act (Act No. 44 of 1983) as amended, the National Key Point Act (Act No. 102 of 1980) and the Civil Aviation Act (Act No. 13 of 2009), ACSA as the responsible Airport Authority, shall authorise commercial licensed security companies and security companies contracted to the airline to handle, safe keep and transport the firearms onto ACSA’s premises in terms of the Firearms Control Act of 2000.

Passengers in possession of firearms are referred to the firearms desk controlled by commercial security company(s) contracted to the airlines at the respective destinations. Carrying of passengers firearms on board of an aircraft is the airline’s security responsibility, therefore it is legally required that airlines must have a Firearms Transportation License in terms of the Firearms Control Act 60 of 2000.

South African Airways (SAA) transports firearms to all destinations as per their flight schedule.

South African Express (SAX) and Airlink do not transport hand guns. This practice was stopped in March 2012. SAX and Airlink do transport hunting rifles for the purpose of tourism to East London, Port Elizabeth, George, Kimberley and Upington.

British Airways/Comair discontinued the service of handling of hand guns in August 2014. It was an airline decision to discontinue the services.

(2) No.

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04 April 2016 - NW733

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

When does she intend to enact the legislation pertaining to the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, (AARTO) Act 46 of 1998, nationwide; (2) Whether there are any courts that can already adjudicate AARTO transgressions; if not; if so, which courts in the provinces can adjudicate the AARTO transgressions; (3) whether any AARTO notices were sent to transgressors by mail since 1 January 2016: if not, what is the reason for the lack in delivery: if so, whether the notices were delivered by registered mail, ordinary mail or sent via secured mail?

Reply:

  1. Once the AARTO Amendment Bill which is currently in the Parliamentary process has been approved and promulgated, a date for the national roll-out will be determined.
  2. At this stage it is only the courts in the current AARTO jurisdictional area, which include the City of Tshwane and the City of Johannesburg, that can adjudicate AARTO transgressions. The reason being that these transgressions must be adjudicated at a court within the magisterial district in which the transgression was committed. Once AARTO is rolled out nationally, all courts in the various provinces must adjudicate on transgressions committed within their respective jurisdictional areas.
  3. No AARTO notices were sent to trangressors by mail, be it registered mail, ordinary mail or secure mail since 01 January 2016. The reason being that the procedures and processes within the South African Postal Services (SAPO) did not comply with the requirements according to which AARTO notices must be served and mail was not delivered within the required time frames. SAPO is in the process to modify their system and procedures in order to comply with the requirements, which should be completed and implemented in due course.

.

.

04 April 2016 - NW487

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

When will the Rural Transport Strategy be (a) finalised and (b) tabled in Parliament?

Reply:

a) The Department has a Rural Transport Strategy which was approved by Cabinet in 2007.

b) The Strategy is currently being reviewed and will be submitted to Cabinet in the next financial year (2016/2017

04 April 2016 - NW679

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 162 on 22 February 2016, how many of the specified persons on suspension at the Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) have been suspended for a period of (a) one month to a year, (b) one to two years, (c) two to three years and (d) more than three years; (2) (a) what is the nature of the intense investigations into misconduct cases at PRASA and (b) what mechanisms will be put in place to build capacity in this regard?

Reply:

(1)(a) 229 employees were suspended for 1 month to 12 months.

(1)(b) 3 employees were suspended for 1 year to 2 years.

(1)(c) 0 employees were suspended for 2 to 3 years.

(1)(d) 0 employees were suspended for more than 3 years.

2(a) Some investigations involve people who are external to PRASA who need to be interviewed and make statements. PRASA has no control as to their availability to assist in the investigations and some are difficult to trace. Some investigations cannot be concluded quickly because when the Investigators are about to close the investigation, new evidence comes up and such need to be followed up. Most of these investigations are a result of whistle-blowing and there is a process in dealing with such and the protection of whistle-blowers is of paramount importance.

2(b) Dedicated teams have been established to deal with investigations relating to employee misdemeanours and more personnel will be trained to do investigations. Some of the investigations can be done by line managers without only depending on the Investigators from Protection and Security Services. External resources that specialise in investigations (Private Investigators) will also be considered depending on the workload.

04 April 2016 - NW633

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

Is the infrastructure (details furnished) that is used in the issuing of driving licenses in all licensing stations across the country owned by her department or outsourced; (2) (a) which companies are contracted to provide the specified infrastructure, (b) when was each contract awarded and (c) for how much?

Reply:

  1. In accordance with the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No. 93 0f 1996) section 8 and 8A, only a Department of State shall operate a Driving License Testing Centre (DLTC) once it has been registered in the prescribed manner. In other words the operation of a Driving License Testig Centre may not be outsorced to private individuals or companies. Current Act amendments are underway to only allow a Provincial Department responsible for transport to operate a DLTC.

National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No. 93 of 1996) regulations 91 to 96 further determines the manner in which the MEC must deal with the applications for the registration of a DLTC, including the suspension or cancellation of the registration thereof. The MEC may, if he or she chooses, appoint a local authority to perform the functions on their behalf. Currently all the DLTC’s in the country except for the two mentioned further, are either operated by the respective Provincial Departments of Transport or a Local Municipality or Metros as determined by the MEC of the respective Province.

The South African Police Service (SAPS) currently also operates two DLTCs namely Bishop Lavis in the Western Cape and Benoni in Gauteng.

(2) (a) – (c)Not applicable. As stated above no private company is contracted to perform the DLTC function. The MEC of the Province may enter into service level agreements with the local authorities who perform the function on the MEC’s behalf. These Service Level Agreements are normally entered into for a three (3) year cycle, linked to the financial year and are related to the services that the DLTC renders on behalf of the Province.

04 April 2016 - NW788

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What criteria are used by the Airports Company of SA (ACSA) when (i) allocating retail space at airports and (ii) determining the size of retail space allocated to retailers, (b) what (i) analysis was undertaken at each airport to determine the type of businesses that were allocated retail spaces and (ii) were the outcomes of the analysis; (2) (a) what financial analyses reflecting historic outcomes were undertaken and (b) what were the outcomes of such analyses; (3) (a) what financial analyses reflecting predictive future outcomes were undertaken and (b) what were the outcomes of such analyses?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i)

As a policy, every retail store is awarded through an open, fair, equitable and transparent process. The award of retail leases through a tender process is subject to approval of the Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA) designated governance committees.

The principal determining factor in the provision of retail space relates to the passenger volumes which are considered over the medium to long term. An internationally accepted rule of thumb is that every one million passengers can support between 800 and 1000 square meters of retail space. This is however at best an average indicator as many other factors make each airport unique.

(a) (ii)

The size of retail space at the airport is determined in terms of the merchandise mix. Merchandise mix is defined into major concepts/categories such as core duty free, arts and craft, electronics, books, fashion apparel, foreign exchange, food and beverage. Each of these categories require different size retail stores ranging from large stores of over 1,000 sqms to very small stores of only 50 sqms.

(b) (i)

Market research is undertaken before each major retail expansion or reconfiguration project. Market research of current demand and trends at other successful airports coupled with the empirical evidence of successful historical performance would be utilised in determining the scope or range of products that should comprise the offer in any given area. An airport’s duty free area would feature mostly high-end products in line with the passenger profile, the legislative environment (mostly tax- and duty free) and the longer dwell time prevalent in these areas.

Whilst the above area only caters for passengers on airside, the landside offer must also cater for the non-passenger consumer which would include airport staff.

(b) (ii)

The outcome of this analysis will confirm that the exiting location and retail space is adequate or not. If not, a revised retail spatial plan together with the merchandise plan is agreed upon. If the retail space is deemed to be adequate, the merchandise plan is agreed upon based on the historical trading densities achieved.

2. (a)

The starting point is to understand the retail categories/concepts that underperform which are normally reflected in the turnover trading density per sqm achieved. Another indicator is based on rentals paid as a percentage of turnover which are higher than the concession rate. ACSA is also able to benchmark trading density performance on similar retail categories across its airports, or within zones in the airport. Rentals are set and turnover performance are different across differing retail categories/concepts but also influenced by the proximity of trading areas to the flow of passengers.

(b)

The tenant mix and merchandise plan are changed where the retail concept is not achieving the planned outcome. ACSA carefully considers failure of the concept against the operator’s poor performance which could be due to a store being located in the wrong area or sometimes having to many stores providing the same concept.

3. (a)

The drivers influencing retail turnovers are:

  • The disposal income predicted;
  • the current and forecast ZAR rate of exchange that influences input costs and propensity to spend;
  • the expected passenger traffic growth;
  • the impact of available and new retail space planned;
  • The impact of internal and external competition on the current and new retail concepts; and
  • Changes to duty free and other legislation.

Therefore, the above factors are considered in determining the appropriateness of the historic performance as a proxy for setting the future minimum rentals and reviewing the business plans presented by the bidders against these parameters.

(b)

The response to item 3 (a) influences the outcome. If retail concepts are not achieving the desired outcome for the operator or ACSA, these are substituted by better performing concepts and/or new concepts proposed by bidders. Sometimes minimum monthly rentals are revised lower in the new bid where the historic minimum rentals as a percentage of the trading density were bid too high, or not affordable or sustainable.

04 April 2016 - NW787

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the full details of the reasons that the construction of the Dunnottar train manufacturing facility in Ekurhuleni, Gauteng, has been delayed, (b) what financial losses have been experienced due to the delay in construction of the specified facility, (c) how have the financial losses incurred been recouped, if at all, and (d) (i) who has been censured in this regard and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) The construction of the Local Factory at Dunnottar Park, Ekurhuleni was delayed due to conditions arising from the requisite Environmental Authorization and obtaining a Water Use License for the site before commencement of the construction activities. Both causes of the delay were due to wetland area that surrounds the site. In August 2014, PRASA applied for the Environmental Authorization and the approval was granted by the Department of Environmental Affairs on the 27th March 2015. However, the approval was granted on condition that PRASA amend the factory site plans due to the wetland area that surrounds the site. PRASA and Gibela made the requisite adjustments and submitted the revised application to the Department of Environmental Affairs for the final approval. This final approval was received on the 17th August 2015.

PRASA was required to obtain a Water Use License before commencement of the construction. PRASA submitted an application to the Department of Water and Sanitation for the Water Use License (WUL) after the environmental authorization was granted. The original target date for obtaining the WUL was the 29th September 2015. However, PRASA obtained the WUL on the 1st December 2015.

b) As it currently stands, PRASA has not experienced any financial losses. In line with the contractual agreement, PRASA and Gibela are currently assessing the exact nature of the financial impact of the delay. PRASA and Gibela are undertaking a rigorous process to interrogate any claims of financial impact to the programme, including an independent audit of the claims. Once the assessment has been conducted and the necessary reviews completed, PRASA will notify all stakeholders of the status and nature of the claims.

c) As stated above, PRASA has not sustained any financial loses.

d) i) No censuring is required as the delay was beyond PRASA’s control and is managed though the provisions of the contract.

ii) On the 8th December 2015, PRASA provided Gibela with access to the Factory Site to commence construction. Gibela has since appointed Trencon (a black owned construction company, based in Ekurhuleni) to perform plant rescue and relocation, build a nursery and maintain rescued plants and Bulk Earth Works. The plant rescue and relocation was a key condition from the Environmental Authorization.

To date, Gibela has performed site setup for the first set of activities and have performed plant rescue. Furthermore, Bulk Earthworks commenced in mid-February 2016 and is expected to be completed by end of May 2016.

On the 4th March 2016, the Department of Transport, PRASA and Gibela lead by the Minister of Transport performed the Sod Turning for the Local Factory.

04 April 2016 - NW784

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How many comments have been received in response to her department’s call for comments on its National Rail Policy Green Paper, (b)(i) who and/or (ii) which organisations submitted comments, (c)(i) how are the comments being considered and (ii) by whom and (d)(i) what criteria are used to consider incorporating a comment in the final version of the specified policy and (ii) by when will such comments be incorporated into the final policy?

Reply:

a) Sixteen (16) formal written comments were received from stakeholders before the closing date indicated in the Government Gazette. These included Government Departments, State-Owned Entities & Agencies; the private sector, municipalities, and professionals (individually). It should also be noted that separate provincial consultations sessions were held, and inputs from these sessions were also considered.

b)(i)(ii) City of Cape town; Department of Environmental Affairs and Development Planning (Western Cape); Saldanha Bay Municipality; Department of Transport and Public Works (Western Cape); SALGA; Railway Safety Regulator; PRASA; Chambers of Mines; National Transport Forum; Transnet; Imana Development ; Rail Road Association; Sheltam Pty Ltd; EXXARO; NCT Forestry.

c)(i) Comments that were additions to the policy positions proposed in the Green Paper will be considered for inclusion in the draft White Paper on National Rail Policy. Comments for further work to be done were noted and are currently being investigated further. Bilateral are being held with organisations where clarity is being sort on comments submitted.

(ii)The Department consolidated and reviewed all comments submitted by stakeholders.

d)(i) All inputs submitted to the Department are considered valuable and has been considered in the development of the draft White Paper on National Rail Policy. The criteria for revision considers evidence-based policy positions, inputs that are plausible, without scientific evidence and policy views that are contrary to what the Green Paper proposed. Inputs are discussed with critical stakeholders to reach understanding and consensus on the policy positions where possible.

(ii) All inputs, pending the outcome of the investigation and engagement with critical stakeholders, where relevant, will be included in the draft White Paper by October 2016.

04 April 2016 - NW677

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with regard to officials who were suspended with full pay pending an investigation in her department, and were then found guilty, the specified individuals are required to repay the salaries earned whilst on suspension; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many of the specified officials have paid back the salaries earned whilst on suspension in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years, (b) on what terms were the salaries paid back in each case and (c) what amount was paid back by each of the specified individuals in each of the specified financial years?

Reply:

a) (i) 2012-13 : None (no employees were suspended)

a) (ii) 2013-14 : None

a) (iii) 2014-15 : None

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

Note: All officials were suspended with full pay as per Chapter 7, clause 2.7 of the SMS Handbook and clause 7.2.a. of the Disciplinary Code and Procedures (Resolution 1 of 2003) that prescribe that precautionary suspension is always with full pay.

04 April 2016 - NW691

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the current status of the Mabopane Transport Hub project in Pretoria, Gauteng, (b) how much has the project cost to date, (c) what are the reasons for the delays in completing the specified project and (d) when will the specified project be completed?

Reply:

The PRASA section of the Mabopane Transport Hub project is divided into two sub projects which are implemented by two different service providers. The two interlinked projects are outlined below;

i.The Bridge project, and

ii.The Concourse project

a) The current status of the two projects;

Bridge project: The contract was terminated on 01st April 2015 after matter had been taken to Arbitration as per clause 40 of the JBCC Contract. The Arbitrator determined in favor of PRASA and ruled that the Contractor had unlawfully suspended the works and walked off site without complying with the procedural and substantive requirements of the contract.

At the moment PRASA is in the process of resuscitating the project. What remains is the process of appointing a new contractor to finish the project. Currently the project stands at 70% completion. Major outstanding works remaining are parts of the roof, the link bridge over the railway lines, trading stalls, finishes and some remedial work on some structures constructed by previous contractor which were condemned by the consulting engineers and have to be demolished and rebuilt.

Concourse project: The project is 40% complete with the erection of the roof structure. Works on several platforms including platforms 5 and 6 are 100% complete and works on platform 7 and 8 which is the last platform have just commenced.

Progress on the concourse which focuses on ground floor demolitions, concrete works, brickwork and structural steel work is in progress. The roof structure is nearing completion and the mezzanine level steel structure is complete.

b) Project costs

Bridge project cost to date:

Item

Description

Value

Comments

1

Original Project Budget

R 197 818 781

Including VAT

2

Project Expenditure to date

R 143 736 161

Including VAT

Concourse project cost to date:

Item

Description

Value

Comments

1

Original Project Budget

R 199 605 421

Including VAT

2

Project Expenditure to date

R91 128 353

Including VAT

c) Reasons for the delays in completing the projects;

Bridge project: There were various reasons that delayed the project other than the process that led to termination.

  • Land issues around ERF 433, Mabopane which resulted in the redesigning of the bridge to avoid the eminent land issues,
  • Negotiations with traders associations, who refused to vacate the construction site until temporary trading structures were built for them,
  • Community members and structures who demanded to be employed directly by PRASA instead of the appointed Main Contractor and therefore often stopped the site works in protest, and
  • Strikes from workers demanding better remunerations than what the Main Contractor could offer.

Concourse project:

Item

Problem

1.

Employment opportunities & subcontracting demands from community resulting in protests and work stoppages

2.

Project scope change. Increase in time and project cost

d) When the project would be completed;

Bridge project: The project is expected to finish within 8 months from the date of site handover to the new contractor (once all the Supply Chain Management processes have been completed).

Concourse project: The project is expected to be complete by end December 2016

04 April 2016 - NW389

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) her department and (b) every entity reporting to her went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available

Reply:

a) The percentage of total procurement of (a) the Department that went to (i) SMME's was 3.21% and that went to (ii) Co-operatives was 0% for the period 1 April 2015 to 31 January 2016.

The percentage of appropriate categories of procurement of (a) the Department that went to
(i) SMME's was 44.58% and that went to (ii) Co-operatives was 0% for the period 1 April 2015 to
31 January 2016.

Notes for Minister:

  1. Department of Transport:
     

Percentage

Rands

         

Total procurement for the Department (1 April 2015 to 31 January 2016)

100.0%

361,768,433

         

Total procurement is made up as follows:

     
         

Large contracts (excluded from appropriate categories of procurement):

81.2%

293,910,526

- Tasima (Pty) Ltd

eNaTIS

33.5%

121,429,317

- Taxi Scrapping Agency (Pty) Ltd

Taxi Scrapping Administrator

22.3%

80,892,621

- Smit Amandla Marine (Pty) Ltd

Oil pollution prevention

9.0%

32,636,412

- Telkom SA Ltd

Watchkeeping services

8.9%

32,077,190

- Royal Haskoning Joint Venture (Pty) Ltd

S'Hamba Sonke

3.9%

13,975,443

- Aurecon South Africa (Pty) Ltd

National Transport Planning Databank and NATMAP 2050 Review

1.9%

6,890,551

- Full core Facilities Management

S'Hamba Sonke

1.7%

6,008,992

         

Exclusions from appropriate categories of procurement:

 

11.6%

41,775,203

- Bids invited via the State Tender Bulletin

   

7.8%

28,287,552

- Procurement of Government Forms from Government Printer

 

0.5%

1,643,052

- Advertisements via the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC)

0.6%

2,302,668

- Procurements via the State Information Technology Agency (SITA)

2.4%

8,516,731

- Procurements via Transversal Contracts

   

0.2%

785,781

- Training done by School of Government

   

0.1%

239,419

         

Appropriate categories of procurement for SMME's

100.00%

7.2%

26,082,704

Procured from enterprises that are:

     

 

SMME's:

 

44.58%

3.2%

11,628,255

Large

   

0.2%

614,803

Not classified (most may be SMME's)

   

3.8%

13,839,646

         

Total procurement

     

361,768,433

         

Notes:

       
         

Procurement from SMME's totaled R11,628,255 from 1 April 2015 to 31 January 2016. This amount represents 3.2% of the total amount of procurement over the period.

Procurement from appropriate categories of procurement totaled R26,082,704. Procurement from SMME's of R11,628,255 represents 44.58% of procurement from appropriate categories of procurement.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Response for the period 1 April – 31 January 2016.

  1. Airports Company South Africa
  2. (i) Percentage of Total Procurement awarded to SMMEs

Total Procurement Spend is R1 503 708 312

Total SMME Spend is R260 858 309 of total procurement spend to SMMEs is 17%

(ii) There was no spend for co-operatives for the period under review.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

The total procurement spend for SMME’s is:

Exempted Micro Enterprise (EMEs) – 13, 88%

Qualifying Small Enterprise (QSEs) – 15, 55%

Total: - 29, 21%

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. N/A

(b) The South African Civil Aviation Authority spent

(i) (ii) 67% of the budget on SMME’s and Cooperatives from 1 April 2015 to date. The SACAA procurement system does not provide the split between SMMEs and Cooperatives hence the combined response.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b)The C-BRTA percentage of procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), cooperatives, as well as township and rural enterprises from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available for:

(i) SMMEs: The C-BRTA procured 48% out of the total procurement from SMMEs from 1 April 2015 to date; and

(ii) Co-operatives: The C-BRTA did not procure any goods or services from Co-operatives from 1 April 2015 to date.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(b) From 1 April 2015 up to 31 December 2015, which is the latest date for which information is available, twenty five percent (25%) of the total procurement spend by the RAF) went to Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs), which enterprises include (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives. The RAF’s BBBEE Scorecard as it relates to procurement spend is directed at EMEs, a category of entity whose annual turnover is less than R 10 million. Consequently, the RAF does not have information available relating specifically to the procurement spend directed to SMME’s and co-operatives.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(b) The RTMC percentage of procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), cooperatives, as well as township and rural enterprises from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available for:

(i) SMMEs: The RTMC spent 53.41% of the total procurement expenditure of R122 262 984 .53

procured 48% out of the total procurement from SMMEs from 1 April 2015 to date; and

(ii) Co-operatives: The RTMC has not spent any money on co-operatives

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a) The RTIA percentage of procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), cooperatives, as well as township and rural enterprises from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available for:

(i) SMME’s – 29.2% of the total procurement

(ii) Co-operatives: The RTIA has not spent any money on co-operatives

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

  1. The SANRAL percentage of procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), cooperatives, as well as township and rural enterprises from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available for SANRAL has been promoting SMMEs and involving them in their projects since inception in 1998.
  1. As reported in the Annual Report for the financial year 2014/15, over 1600 SMMEs were involved in the various categories of works and suppliers. The value of their earnings was R 3.9 billion.
  2. In the current financial year to 31 December 2015, SANRAL has managed to maintain the number of SMMEs on its projects – over 1600. Their earnings to date are about R2.5 billion

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator has spent a total of 34.38% of its total procurement on SMME’s and co-operatives as follows:

(b) (i) SMME’s expenditure is 34.38%

(ii) No expenditure on co-operatives.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. Total Procurement spent is R89 983 653.68, spent on SMME is 28%
  2. No spent on Co-operatives

Passenger Rail of Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(b) (i) The spending figures for the period 01 April to 29 February 2016 are as follows:

Exempted Micro Enterprises: – R1 537 190 086 which is 23.5% of total procurement spending

Qualifying Small Enterprises: – R1 018 108 987 which is 17.6% of total procurement spending.

(The legislated minimum target in terms of the above is 15% of total procurement spending).

Black Suppliers: R2 719 641 138 which is 31% of total procurement spending

Black Women Owned Suppliers: R1 305 927 222 which is 18.2% of total procurement spending

(The legislated targets for the above are 40% and 12% respectively)

  1. (ii) PRASA is establishing capacity to work with the Co-operative sector. For the period April 2015 to 29 February 2016, PRASA has spent R15. 8 Million on Co-operatives.

Railway Safety Regulator (PRSA)

  1. The Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) has spent a total of 35.68% of its total procurement spend from 01st April 2015, to date which went to SMMEs.
  2. RSR has not spent anything towards co-operatives.

24 March 2016 - NW706

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA) has any plans in place to expand the (a) domestic and (b) international (i) passenger and (ii) cargo capacity of the Bram Fischer International Airport in Bloemfontein over the next 10 to 15 years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether marketing the specified airport as a (a) passenger and (b) logistics hub forms part of ACSA’s strategic medium- to long-term objectives; if not, why not; if so, in respect of each case (i) to which markets is it geared and (ii) what are the further relevant details of sector specific marketing; (3) whether any plans are underway to secure additional (a) passenger and (b) cargo flights both for the (i) domestic and (ii) international sectors at the specified airport over the medium-to-long term period; if not, why not; if so, in each case what are the relevant details; (4) whether any co-ordination to align the strategic objectives between (a) ACSA and (b) the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality exist to fully maximise the benefits of the massive investment into the Airport Node; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. Bram Fischer International Airport will be expanded based on traffic demand
  2. . At this stage there is no requirement for further expansion. This can however change at any time if the local conditions change.
  3. Bram Fischer International Airport is not seen as a logistics hub and is not marketed as such. The airport forms a critical link in the network of airports in South Africa but mainly for passenger traffic.
  4. Traffic growth to and from Bram Fischer will depend on the viability of the market and the ability of the airlines to obtain the required yields. Growth in the foreseeable future is limited.
  5. ACSA will definitely work closely with the Mangaung Municipality to maximize business benefit for both organizations by developing the airport precinct and surroundings in an optimal manner.

24 March 2016 - NW681

Profile picture: Majola, Mr F

Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) (a) When was a tender notice issued by her department for the installation of photovoltaic solar panels at the country’s regional airports, (b) who won the tender(s) and (c) what were the criteria that had to be met by the bidders to be awarded a tender; (2) (a) what is the value of the tenders that were awarded and (b) what are the (i) timelines and (ii) time frames of each tender that was awarded; (3) what (a) processes, procedures and mechanisms exist in terms of the (i) supply and (ii) installation of photovoltaic solar panels, (b)(i) research and/or (ii) analysis has been undertaken to demonstrate savings of any description once such technology is installed at the specified airports and (c) were the results in each case? NW796E

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (a) The tender notice was issued by ACSA Procurement on Sunday, 05 October 2014. The tender was advertised in the Sunday Times and on the CIDB website.

(b) VE Reticulation won the tender on an open tender process and

(c) The following criteria were compulsory;

  • Attendance of a compulsory site meeting
  • Bidders must have a minimum CIDB grading of 7EP or higher
  • Acceptance of ACSA Terms and conditions
  • Valid SARS tax clearance certificate

Other criteria used;

  • Functionality
  • Price & BBBEE

2. (a) The value of the tenders that were awarded was R 15, 503, 477.00.

      (b) The timelines were as follows:

       (c) Six month construction period and;

       (d) The tender was awarded on a six month construction period.

(3) (a)(i)(ii) Open tender process exists.

(b)(i)(ii) IRR and NPV calculations were done.

(c) George is currently the only plant in operation and all assumptions will be tested against actual power generations and saving achieved. The viability will be proven over the first year of operation.

23 March 2016 - NW483

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How are the various color schemes used for signage at the various airports determined, (b) what market research has been done in this regard, (c) how often has such research been conducted, (d) when was such research last conducted and (e) what were the outcomes?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) The various color schemes are determined by the international benchmark of all the signage for both navigational and disclaimer signage. The colors are then further explained on the actual signage and way finding guideline document.

(b) The research that was done in the initial stages of creating a signage philosophy that is easily recognizable by all passengers, was based on what was acceptable from an aviation regulation point of view in the international market. These standards were adopted to make sure that what is available in South Africa is available in any international airport in the world.

(c) The signage committee at the airports conducts a desktop, top line comparison of ACSA’s signage philosophy to that of international Airports around the world. The same philosophy that is used in South Africa is also used in the airports that ACSA is involved in building and maintaining. The company also works very close with the civil aviation authority to keep tabs on any regulatory changes on the signage philosophy.

(d) In 2013, the company made amendments to the signage guidelines based on international standards that were amended. These standards were as a result of comparison and benchmarking the ACSA signage philosophy and key international standards as outlined by the civil aviation authorities.

(e) The signage for smaller / regional airports were not visible enough and the size of fonts and specs needed to be changed.

  1. The new no smoking act: The signage was outdated and needed to include the actual act on it.
  2. Prohibition signage: The signs at the time did not have clear images / illustration of what the prohibition was for, this has since been changed.
  3. Prohibition signs: The signs that were on glass doors and walls were blank at the back. This has since been changed.

23 March 2016 - NW490

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) How is the National Transport Master Plan (Natmap) being incorporated into (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b)(i) how is the implementation of the Natmap being monitored and (ii) by whom and (c) what are the timelines and time frames in this regard?

Reply:

Department

(a) i) Incorporation of NATMAP into DOT plans

During the development of NATMAP 2050, an extensive consultation approach from the municipalities, provinces and agencies (bottom-up approach) was undertaken and that culminated into a product informed by plans from various stakeholders.

The NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report was submitted to the Cabinet on the 18th September 2013 and amongst others Cabinet approved that the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC) Management Committee (MANCO) and the Minister of Transport review the proposed NATMAP 2050. In line with the above Cabinet resolution, the Department has reviewed and updated the NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report and awaiting the Plan’s endorsement by PICC MANCO before it is resubmitted to Cabinet for approval.

NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update specifies outcomes and strategic objectives linked to key government policies that includes DOT Strategy amongst others. Its objectives will be delivered by linking key proposals with broader national policy areas, the MTSF 2014–2019, NDP 2030 and National Infrastructure Plan (NIP).

ii) Incorporation of NATMAP into Entities Plans

Based on the bottom-up approach that was adopted throughout the development process of NATMAP 2050, different implementing agencies will have to develop their own implementing plans in line with the interventions proposed on the Synopsis Update report. Upon submission of their strategic plans, the Minister will be ensure that implementation of NATMAP 2050 is finds a clear expression in their plans moving forward.

(b) i) Implementation Monitoring

The Department will regularly monitor the implementation of this Plan by engaging implementing agents in terms of getting the reports and serving on different fora or committees that will oversee the implementation of NATMAP 2050 interventions.

ii) By Whom

The Deputy Director General: Integrated Transport Planning will oversee the implementation process and supported by Chief Director: Macro Sector Planning and Director: Master Planning, Implementation and Review.

(c) Timelines

Interventions indicated on the draft NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update documents are categorised with the following timeframes:

1. Short term: 5 years (2015-2020)

2. Medium term: 10 years (2020-2030)

3. Long Term: 20 years (2020-2050)

It is worth noting that the Performance Agreement between the President and the Minister of Transport, says that by June 2016, the Integrated National Transport Plan should be developed and approved.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

a) (i) Not applicable to ACSA.

    (ii) NATMAP seeks to achieve “An integrated, smart and efficient transport system supporting a thriving economy that promotes sustainable economic growth, supports a healthier life style, provides safe and accessible mobility options, socially includes all communities and preserves the environment”. ACSA supports this vision by ensuring that the Airport Development Plans are aligned with relevant policies and through on-going stakeholder consultations.

  • NATMAP recommended the Aerotropolis concept as a means of promoting the integration of airport development with its surrounding land-uses.  At the OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA), ACSA and the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality have developed an Aerotropolis Master Plan including an implementation plan for the City of Ekurhuleni and ORTIA. The Plan was completed at the end of 2015 and implementation of catalyst projects has commenced.
  • At the Cape Town International Airport (CTIA), ACSA and the City of Cape Town are undertaking a study to determine the feasibility to pursue the Aerotropolis concept as a development strategy for the CTIA and surrounding area. This approach is also being considered in eThekwini for the King Shaka International Airport (KSIA), which includes the Dube Trade Port. The KZN Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs commissioned an Aerotropolis Master Plan Study, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2016.
  • The concept is also being explored at other ACSA airports, in particular in Bram Fisher International, East London and Port Elizabeth Airports through consultation with the respective Local Authorities.

b) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

c) ACSA is not in a position to respond to part (c) of the question.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a)(i) Not applicable to ATNS

(a)(ii) ATNS has been consulted by the DoT and has provided comments and input in respect of the National Airport Development Plan and National Civil Aviation Policy.

(b)(i) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

(b)(ii) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

(c) Not applicable to ATNS

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) Not applicable to SACAA

(ii) The National Transport Master Plan is not applicable to the South African Civil Aviation Authority

(b) N/A (i) N/A and (ii) N/A

(c) N/A

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a)(ii) There is good alignment between the Natmap and PRASA’s Strategic Plan (2012). Both plans identify short, medium and long term requirements through to the year 2050. The recent update of the Natmap 2050 Synopsis provided a further opportunity to strengthen and align the rail plan and requirements going forward.

Furthermore, PRASA’s Strategic Plan is incorporated in the company’s Corporate Plan focussing on the MTEF period (3-year) ahead. Key performance areas (KPAs) and milestones are identified in the plan. The KPAs are monitored and reported to the Department of Transport on a regular basis.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Natmap is not incorporated by the RSR.

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

The Ports Regulator has not received any directive in this regard from Department of Transport.

Roads Entities:

(a) (ii) The National Land Transport Strategic Framework 2015–2020 (NLTSF) which defines the strategies and policy intent of the Department of Transport with regard to integrated transport and land use planning country-wide over the five year period, incorporates the overarching objectives of Natmap along with National Development Plan 2030 Strategic Aims, Medium Term Strategic Framework (2014-2019) and transport oriented Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs) as identified by Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC).

Entities are expected to adopt the relevant intentions and guidance of the NLTSF and adjust it to local needs and circumstances. This will enable them to implement local planning intent interpreted and guided by national policy.

 

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

The National Transport Master Plan (NATMAP) provides an overarching integrated plan for the improved movement of people and freight in South Africa and as such informs and forms the basis for integrated planning within and across the various modes of transport. The South African Maritime Safety Authority is tasked with the mandates of:

  1. Ensuring the safety of life and property at sea
  2. To combat and prevent the pollution of the marine environment by ships 
  3. Promoting the Republic’s maritime interests 

SAMSA is therefore responsible for the efficient, safe, secure and environmentally sustainable movement of inbound and outbound seaborne freight through our national port infrastructure. To this end, SAMSA has aligned its plans towards realising the NATMAP vision by pursuing the following objectives and priority actions in line with other governmental plans:

a) Delivering an efficient, safe, secure and environmentally sustainable maritime transport system by

  • Protecting the environment;
  • Promoting safety and wellbeing; and
  • Infrastructure enhancement and management.

b) The socio economic development of South Africa’s maritime sector by undertaking the following: 

  • Grow the economy - this incorporates the pursuit of NATMAP priority actions of growing the economy fuelled by the marine transport development programme under the Operation Phakisa portfolio, specifically focusing on making better use of the maritime transport network, increasing its contribution to GDP and the creation of wealth for the country.
  • Freight integration - The promotion of developing a competitive integrated national supply chain perspective by working together across the freight transport value chain from Pit, Port to Market. 

23 March 2016 - NW691

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the current status of the Mabopane Transport Hub project in Pretoria, Gauteng, (b) how much has the project cost to date, (c) what are the reasons for the delays in completing the specified project and (d) when will the specified project be completed?

Reply:

The PRASA section of the Mabopane Transport Hub project is divided into two sub projects which are implemented by two different service providers. The two interlinked projects are outlined below;

  1. The Bridge project, and
  2. The Concourse project

a) The current status of the two projects;

Bridge project: The contract was terminated on 01st April 2015 after matter had been taken to Arbitration as per clause 40 of the JBCC Contract. The Arbitrator determined in favor of PRASA and ruled that the Contractor had unlawfully suspended the works and walked off site without complying with the procedural and substantive requirements of the contract.

At the moment PRASA is in the process of resuscitating the project. What remains is the process of appointing a new contractor to finish the project. Currently the project stands at 70% completion. Major outstanding works remaining are parts of the roof, the link bridge over the railway lines, trading stalls, finishes and some remedial work on some structures constructed by previous contractor which were condemned by the consulting engineers and have to be demolished and rebuilt.

Concourse project: The project is 40% complete with the erection of the roof structure. Works on several platforms including platforms 5 and 6 are 100% complete and works on platform 7 and 8 which is the last platform have just commenced.

Progress on the concourse which focuses on ground floor demolitions, concrete works, brickwork and structural steel work is in progress. The roof structure is nearing completion and the mezzanine level steel structure is complete.

b) Project costs

Bridge project cost to date:

Item

Description

Value

Comments

1

Original Project Budget

R 197 818 781

Including VAT

2

Project Expenditure to date

R 143 736 161

Including VAT

Concourse project cost to date:

Item

Description

Value

Comments

1

Original Project Budget

R 199 605 421

Including VAT

2

Project Expenditure to date

R91 128 353

Including VAT

c) Reasons for the delays in completing the projects;

Bridge project: There were various reasons that delayed the project other than the process that led to termination.

  • Land issues around ERF 433, Mabopane which resulted in the redesigning of the bridge to avoid the eminent land issues,
  • Negotiations with traders associations, who refused to vacate the construction site until temporary trading structures were built for them,
  • Community members and structures who demanded to be employed directly by PRASA instead of the appointed Main Contractor and therefore often stopped the site works in protest, and
  • Strikes from workers demanding better remunerations than what the Main Contractor could offer.

Concourse project:

Item

Problem

1.

Employment opportunities & subcontracting demands from community resulting in protests and work stoppages

2.

Project scope change. Increase in time and project cost

d) When the project would be completed;

Bridge project: The project is expected to finish within 8 months from the date of site handover to the new contractor (once all the Supply Chain Management processes have been completed).

Concourse project: The project is expected to be complete by end December 2016

23 March 2016 - NW416

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether her department is contributing in any way to the (a) acquisition of additional coaches for the Gautrain and/or (b) construction of an additional Gautrain depot; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details of how her department is contributing, (ii)(aa) time lines and (bb) time frames and (iii) conditions in this regard?

Reply:

(a) No. The Gautrain Rapid Rail Link was procured and implemented as a Public Private Partnership in terms of Treasury Regulation 16 of the Public Finance Management Act. The acquisition of the additional coached will be procured in term of the provisions of the Treasury Regulations and the Concession Agreement entered into between the Gauteng Provincial Government and the Bombela Concession Company.

(b) No. See above.

  1. N/A
  2. N/A

23 March 2016 - NW421

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) When will the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa’s report on its internal enquiry which was announced on 3 September 2015, be released, (b) who was tasked to lead the specified enquiry and (c) what was its terms of reference?

Reply:

(a) The investigation is ongoing and timeframes are dictated by legal processes.

(b) Werksmans Attorneys were appointed to lead the investigation.

(c) The focus of the investigation is based on the findings of the Auditor General in the financial statements of PRASA for the 2014/2015 financial year, and the Public Protector report titled ‘Derailed’.

16 March 2016 - NW490

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

How is the National Master Plan (Natmap) being incorporated into (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b)(i) how is the implementation of the Natmap being monitored and (ii) by whom and (c) what are the timelines and time frames in this regard?

Reply:

a) i) Incorporation of NATMAP into DOT plans

During the development of NATMAP 2050, an extensive consultation approach from the municipalities, provinces and agencies (bottom-up-approach) was undertaken and that culminated into a product informed by plans from various stakeholders.

The NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report was submitted to the Cabinet on the 18th September 2013 and amongst others Cabinet approved that the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC) Management Committee (MANCO) and the Minister of Transport review the proposed NATMAP 2050. In line with the above Cabinet resolution, the Department has review and updated the NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Report and awaiting the Plan’s endorsement by PICC MANCO before it is resubmitted to Cabinet for approval.

NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update specifies outcomes and strategic objectives linked to key government policies that include DOT Strategy amongst others. Its objective will be delivered by linking key proposal with broader national policy areas, the MTSF 2014-2019, NDP 2030 and National infrastructure Plan (NIP).

ii) Incorporation of NATMAP into Entities Plans

Based on the bottom-up approach that was adopted throughout the development process of NATMAP 2050,different implementing agencies will have to develop their own implementing plans in line with the intervention proposed on the Synopsis Update report. Upon submission of their strategic plans, the Minister will be ensure that implementation of NATMAP 2050 is finds a clear expression in their plans moving forward.

b) i) Implementation Monitoring

The Department will regularly monitor the implementation of this Plan by engaging implementing agents in terms of getting the report and serving on different for a or committees that will oversee the implementation of NATMAP 2050 interventions.

ii) By whom

The Branch: Integrated Transport Planning will oversee the implementation process and supported by Chief Director Macro Sector Planning and Director Master Planning,

c) Timelines

Interventions indicated on the draft NATMAP 2050 Synopsis Update documents are categorised with the following timeframes:

  1. Short term: 5 years (20152020)
  2. Medium term: 10 years (2020-2030)
  3. Long Term: 20 years (2020-2050)

It is worth noting that the Performance Agreement between the President and the Minister of Transport, says that by June 2016, the Integrated National Transport Plan should be developed and approved.