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19 April 2016 - NW936

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Has (a) she and/or (b) her Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a) No.

(b) No.

19 April 2016 - NW127

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 4179 on 14 December 2015, and with respect to his department’s post on his department’s official Facebook page on 12 December 2012, what was the nature of the relationship between the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and the Dambuza Community Development Trust (Dambuza) in respect of the project referred to in the specified post as the Ceta-Dambuza Community Trust Project; (2) did any other Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have a relationship similar to the relationship between CETA and Dambuza and/or any of its subsidiaries in the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which SETA(s) had such a relationship with Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary, (b) what amount did each specified SETA pay to Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary as a result of that relationship and (c) what services were rendered as a result of the respective relationship; (3) does each specified SETA have a record of (a) how many students were trained as a result of projects arising from the specified relationships, (b) the fields in which the students were trained and (c) the accredited authority that offered the specified training; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) did each specified SETA request information with respect to the identity of the (a) chief executive officer of the trust and (b) board members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

  1. This relationship was one of discretionary grant funding in line with CETA’s discretionary grant policy.

        2.1 AgriSeta did not disburse funds during the period under consideration, and

        2.2 As of 31 December 2015, an amount of R6, 568 929.26 was paid by CETA which includes disbursements and learner stipends.

(a) Name of SETA

(b) Line items paid

  1. Amount
  1. Programme

Construction Education and Training Authority

Learner Stipend

R1 581 840

Learnerships

 

Administration fees

R 236 200

 
 

Learning material

R 94 200

 
 

Facilitation

R140 500

 
 

Assessments

R46 500

 
 

Internal moderations

R6 700

 
 

Toolkit

R73 600

 
 

Consumables

R480 000

 
 

Protective clothing

R60 000

 
 

Learner Stipend

R1 147 017

Apprenticeships (First year)

 

Learning materials

R47 000

 
 

Administration fees (R300 X 12 months)

R257 400

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m X 4)

R172 000

 
 

Assessments (R500 X 2)

R0

 
 

Internal moderations (R350 X 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m X 8)

R 257 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 X 3 months)

R 150 400

 
 

Protective Clothing

R 56 400

 
 

Learner Stipend

R 1 045 650

Apprenticeships (Second year)

 

Learning Materials

R0

 
 

Administration (R300 x 12 months)

R 223 900

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m x 4)

R 142 500

 
 

Assessments (R500 x 2)

R0

 
 

Internal Moderations (R350 x 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m x 8)

R 232 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 x 3)

R0

 
 

Protective clothing

R 42 600

 

3. Yes, the information is tabulated below:

SETA

  1. Number of learners completed training
  1. Field of Study
  1. Accredited Authority

CETA

94

Leanerships

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

 

74

Apprenticeship: Bricklaying

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Plumbing)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Carpentry)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Masonry)

 

TOTAL

243

   

4. The due diligence undertaken in the ordinary course would reveal the details sought and more.

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 127 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 April 2016 - NW889

Profile picture: Matshobeni, Ms A

Matshobeni, Ms A to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

  1. (a) No

(b) No

(c) No

(d) No

(2)

 
  1. Spouse
  1. Children

(c ) Close family

(i) When

No

N/A

No

(ii)How much

No

N/A

No

(iii)Which Business

No

N/A

No

(iv)For what work ?

No

N/A

No

19 April 2016 - NW1016

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

Does his department intend to cut down on the number of its SA Tourism offices located abroad with a view to preventing duplication of services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which offices and (b) by what date?

Reply:

No, the department does not intend to cut down the number of SA Tourism offices.

  (a) SA Tourism continuously looks at adopting the most effective operating model in each market that allows for maximum spend in-market, on both the traveller and trade. This approach includes setting up physical country offices in core markets, the hub approach, operating virtual offices, and General Marketing Agencies (GMAs). Any office closures are considered on this principle.

  (b) South African Tourism’s physical office in Milan will be closed in the 2016/17 financial year to maximise marketing investments across the entire South Europe territory. The Italian market will be serviced through a virtual office reporting into South Europe Hub Office based in France.

18 April 2016 - NW962

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)(a) How many companies have invested in the Coega Industrial Development Zone (Coega IDZ) in Port Elizabeth in each year since its opening, (b) how many persons are employed by each of the specified companies, (c) what is the value of each investment and (d) what are the details of the incentives offered to each company; (2) how many (a) direct and (b) indirect jobs were created at the Coega IDZ (i) in the (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13, (cc) 2013-14, (dd) 2014-15 and (ee) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016?NW1091E

Reply:

(1)(a) Although the Coega IDZ was designated in 2002, it only began receiving investments in 2006. This was largely due to the fact that it took longer to set up the IDZ and also that some of the earmarked investments never materialised. Accordingly, the number of companies that have invested in the Coega IDZ in each year since its opening is as follows:

Year

Number of investors

2006

2

2007

1

2008

4

2009

2

2010

6

2011

1 plus 1 expansion

2012

3

2013

5 plus 1 expansion

2014

4

2015

4

TOTAL

33

(1)(b) Number of persons employed by each company:

The Coega IDZ has a total of 33 operational investments resulting in a total of 7 174 direct jobs in the zone. The average number of direct jobs per investment stands at 224,2 jobs per investment project. The lowest number of jobs in a single investment project is 9; while the largest number of jobs created in a single investment project is 1 783. (See Annexure “A” for ease of reference)

(1)(c) Value of investments

The Coega IDZ has a total of 33 operational investments resulting in a total investment value of over R6,4 billion. The biggest single investment in the zone is R3, 5 billion, while the smallest single investment is R5 million. The average value of investment per investment project currently stands at R183, 5 million.

(1)(d) Details of incentives offered to each company

According to our records, only 12 companies in the Coega IDZ received incentives from the dti and the details are as follows: (See Annexure A)

Company

MCEP

EIP

BPS

AIS

Agni Steels

 

R9, 473, 700.00

   

FAW

     

R 54,663,648.00

DCD WindTowers

 

R6, 442, 354.00

   

Coega Dairy

 

R13,784,340.00

   

Cape Concentrates

 

R6, 322, 266.00

   

Grupo Antolin

 

R7, 638, 991.00

   

Famous Brands

R1, 078, 256.00

     

WNS

   

R 87,293,326.00

 

Faurecia

 

R11,757,623.00

 

R 7, 971, 800.00

Rehau

     

R 49,883,773.00

Benteler

     

R17,715, 213.00

Inergy

     

R1, 771, 259.00

Q-Plus

     

R1, 181, 605.00

(2)(a) Number of direct jobs created at Coega IDZ during (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13, (cc) 2013-14, (dd) 2014-15 and (ee) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016 is as follows:

Year

Number of Direct Jobs

2011

1 138

2012

510

2013

1 154

2014

667

2015

152

TOTAL

3 621

(2)(b) Number of indirect jobs created at Coega IDZ during (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13, (cc) 2013-14, (dd) 2014-15 and (ee) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016?

The number of indirect jobs created through the Coega IDZ investments since 2011 is not available, as the department still has to commission an impact study of the SEZ Programme since 2011.

15 April 2016 - NW749

Profile picture: Mncwango, Mr MA

Mncwango, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the soldiers who are deployed in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park and the Kruger National Park, what are the set rules of engagement (a) if deployed soldiers should come face to face with poachers and (b) regarding the tracking of suspected poachers; (2) what distances along the fences and/or borders of the specified game parks do the soldiers patrol (a) during the day and (b) at night on duty; (3) whether an officer of higher rank is involved in each patrol in order to ensure that the specified soldiers carry out their duties?

Reply:

The questions raised here have potential to compromise the operational integrity of the SANDF with regard to force deployment; force movement and tactical planning.

It is however suffice to say that the SANDF deploys in the National Campaign against Rhino poaching in support of other government departments as part of its constitutional mandate.

15 April 2016 - NW808

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) How many Reserve Force members were employed in the SA National Defence Force in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) which of the specified members’ services were employed on a continuous basis (i) for six months or less, (ii) between six and twelve months, (iii) between 12 and 18 months, (iv) between 18 and 24 months, (v) between 24 and 30 months and (vi) between 30 and 36 months?

Reply:

The total number Reserves that were called-up up in the SA National Defence Force during the financial years 2012/2013, 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 is indicated in the table below:

CALL-UP CATEGORIES

(Months)

NUMBER OF MEMBERS CALLED-UP

(Individuals utilised)

 

FY 2012/2013-2014/2015

0-6

4 217

6-12

3 283

12-18

3 570

18-24

2 847

24-30

1 460

30-36

1 628

TOTAL

  1. 005
  1. Over the three year period, a total of 17 005 individuals were utilised as Reserves for SANDF activities as per the number per category.
  2. It must be appreciated that in each of these categories the numbers were not necessarily utilised continuously for that period.
  3. The number of individuals utilised continuously for the full 36 month cycle were minimal and that was restricted to members that were in critical specialised posts.

15 April 2016 - NW557

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to oral question 488 on 28 October 2015, there are any plans in place to reintegrate former SA Cape Corps (SACC) members into the SA National Defence Force; if not, (a) why not and (b) what alternative remedy will be considered in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what is the status of her department’s process to formally recognise the SACC as an official former military body and (b) by when is it expected to be finalised?

Reply:

At this stage nothing has changed, the integration process under the Termination of Integration Intake Act 2001 terminated on 31 March 2002.

15 April 2016 - NW750

Profile picture: Mncwango, Mr MA

Mncwango, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the soldiers who are deployed in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park and the Kruger National Park, who (a) has taken over the chain of command from a certain person (name and details furnished) in the Kruger National Park and (b) leads the military exercises in KwaZulu-Natal; (2) are the soldiers and rangers who are employed by the Government well-equipped to withstand a poacher’s bullet; (3) does the Government pay for life insurance for the specified soldiers and rangers who endanger their lives daily and who have families to care for; (4) (a) do the specified soldiers and rangers work from 8 am to 5 pm daily and (b) do they engage in any night patrols?

Reply:

The questions raised here have potential to compromise the operational integrity of the SANDF with regard to force deployment; force movement and tactical planning.

It is however suffice to say that the SANDF deploys in the National Campaign against Rhino poaching in support of other government departments as part of its constitutional mandate.

15 April 2016 - NW961

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department (a) has provided or (b) has plans in place to provide any support to the canola oil production project in Alexandria in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The department received an application that was assessed by the Agro Processing sector desk for the establishment of Canola Oil value chain in the Eastern Cape. The project did not meet the criteria for any incentive programme, therefore it was not considered.

15 April 2016 - NW891

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

  1. No. I have not earned any additional income from businesses, in particular business doing work for the Government, since appointment as Minister.

(a)(b)(c)(d) Falls away

(2) (a((b)(c) have not earned income from business, in particular business doing work for the Government, through my appointment as Minister.

(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) Falls away.

15 April 2016 - NW556

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether there has been (a) any agreement and/or (b) any meetings between her and the Amabutho Royal Defence Force; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) and (b) NO

15 April 2016 - NW143

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What is the (i) status and (ii) capacity of each provincial office of her department and (b) why was there an under spending on provincial offices in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) In each of the nine provinces, a Provincial Coordinator and Assistant have been appointed and they are placed in provinces. The challenge for the Department of Military Veterans (DMV) is the reliance on the Department of Public Works (DPW) for the procurement of office space. Since 2013 the DMV has been engaging with the DPW on office space.

In the interim, the DMV has submitted requests to various entities for the provision of office space. At present, the provincial coordinators are housed in various venues.

  • Eastern Cape: The Provincial Offices are currenlty housed at the East London City Hall
  • Free State: Temporarily housed in the DoD sick bay at Tempe Military Base in Bloemfontein
  • Gauteng: Temporarily housed at the DMV head office in Pretoria
  • KwaZulu-Natal: The Provincial Coordinators are housed in a very small office at the sickbay in Pietermaritzburg
  • Mpumalanga: Temporarily housed in an DoD military sick bay in Nelspruit
  • Limpopo: Temporarily housed at the military base in Polokwane
  • Northern Cape: Housed at the military base in Kimberley
  • North West: Provincial Offices are temporarily in the old Premier’s Offices,  Mafikeng
  • Western Cape: Office of the Director-General (10 floor, Parliament Towers, Plein Street, Cape Town)

The DPW has reported that office space has been now sourced and secured in Gauteng, Mpumalanga and North West Provinces. The DMV national Office will visit the spaces during April 2016 to assess compliance with the DMV specifications and to determine occupancy date. Once this has been established, the DMV will commence with providing additional human resources and required office resources at these offices. The DMV shall do the same in other provinces as space becomes available.

(b) The underspend on provincial offices in the 2014-15 financial year was a result of the lack of adequate capacity in provincial offices.

15 April 2016 - NW144

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)How does her department justify the poor achievement of targets in all of its programmes with regard to its budget expenditure of 91,7% in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) whether the lack of (a) competent and/or (b) professional staff members in her department impacted on these under-achievements for the specified financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)

 (a) Programme 1: Out of 14 targets planned, 10 targets were achieved and these constituted to 71% achievement. The department is at the moment fast tracking the recruitment process to ensure that all vacant funded posts are filled and the appointment the TSI to fast track and develop a turnaround strategy to ensure achievement of targets is still ongoing.

(b) Programme 2: Out of five targets planned, 2 targets were achieved which constituted to 40% achievement. The dependency of the department on other sister department to dispense benefits to Military Veterans (MVs) also creates a threat to achieve the targets as planned (like housing, education etc.).

(c) Programme 3: Out of six targets planned, 3 targets were achieved which constituted to 50% achievement. The department is in the process of serious engagements with identified Stakeholders to address this impasse of dispensing the benefits to the relevant bona fide MVs.

(2) As indicated previously, I have appointed a turn around team to assist the Department in setting in place systems to enable it to meet its service delivery targets. I am also in the process of filling vacancies in certain key positions within the Department. The DG and all DDG positions will be filled shortly and a new CFO recently assumed office.

15 April 2016 - NW502

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) (a) What are the details of the Service Level Agreement signed between her department and the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries to employ military veterans in the Elands Bay Infrastructure Improvement and Project Operational Phase of the Cederberg Fishing Infrastructure Development and Management Project on the West Coast in the Western Cape, (b)(i) what are the names of the military veterans who are employed in the specified project and (ii) to which former formations did they belong and (c) what are the relevant details of her department’s involvement in the specified project; (2) whether the specified military veterans (a) come from Elands Bay and (b) are verified on the National Military Veteran’s Database; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what are the further relevant details in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether her department requested an extension of employment for the specified military veterans working on the specified project; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The MOU is a broad based document and is not limited to the Elands Bay area. A key output of the MOU is for the provision of work and other economic opportunities for military veterans through DAFF.

The Cedarberg Fishing Infrastructure Development and Management Project (CFIDMP) is a separate project of DAFF and does not include the DMV. The DMV is aware that the service provider to the DAFF on the CFIDMP has been used to facilitate payment of the stipends for the military veterans on the anti-poaching project in the Hermanus area.

(b)

(i) A list of names is provided (REFER TO APPENDIX A)

(ii) The name list shows the former forces to which the project participants belonged. Two members have passed on since the beginning of the project and another has resigned from the project. Three members are dependants of military veterans

(c) The project in question predated the establishment of the DMV. Subsequent to the establishment of the DMV, the office of the Deputy Director-General: Empowerment and Stakeholder Management was called in to a meeting on the project to discuss challenges in employment the military veterans. Since the initial intervention, the Acting DDG:ESM was instrumental in assisting in developing a Memorandum of Understanding between the DMV and DAFF. The office of the Provincial Coordinator in the Western Cape has also been represented at meetings through the Assistant Provincial Coordinator.

Therefore, to date, the DMV has been represented by the Acting DDG and the Assistant Provincial Coordinator.

During the engagements with the process, it came to light that the military veterans on the project were requesting to be employed in the DAFF. At one point there were around 8 positions available within DAFF with the entire group requesting absorption onto DAFF staff. The various DDGs who have managed the project have repeatedly indiacted that the project is an EPWP initiative and as such, has a defined timeframe. However, the group was advised to establish a co-operative which could be considered as a possible service provider to provide the very services in anti-poaching that they currently provide to DAFF.

(1) The team did establish a co-operative and the DMV also submitted a letter of support for this business entity. The process was submitted to DAFF to consider taking on the group as a preferred service provider. As part of service offering, the DMV enlisted the assistance of the Chief Operating Officer of SANMVA to assist in training the group and incubating them since she had been part of the initial meetings with the group when the DMV became involved in the project in June 2013. The intervention did not yield much fruit.

The recently appointed DDG (DAFF) had also initiated a committee that would map out a strategy which would have guided the transition process that would have resulted in the co-operative taking on the programme as a fully fledged service provider. A meeting with this committee has been scheduled for 08 April 2016 in Cape Town to discuss the extension of the project to other coastal provinces.

The current project phase has been extended to 31July 2016.

(2)

  1. The group in the project come from various areas around the Cape Peninsula area including Hermanus, Langa and Bonteheuwel amongst others. DAFF has been providing transport for the team to get to work daily. None of the project members are from Elands Bay.
  1. A request for database verification has been submitted to the DMV military veterans database unit.
  1. It is noted that some of the group might not be bona fide military veterans. This matter has been constantly raised with the group. Therefore, the intention of the establishment of a cooperative was also to facilitate that whilst the military veterans would be catered for through the DMV support, those who are not military veterans could be retained as employees to the cooperative, to avoid depriving families of an income. This was noted because of the fact that the project had been initiated before the advent of the DMV and had been running for a while before the DMV was approached for assistance.

(3) The current employment has been extended to 31 July 2016 after discussions on the matter.

APPENDIX A (QUESTION 502)

NAMELIST FOR HERMANUS ANTI POACHING EMPLOYEES

MKMVA PROJECT PARTICIPANTS

No.

SURNAME

NAME

ID NUMBER

BIRTH DATE

ETHNIC GROUP

GENDER

CELL NO

FORCE NO

                 

1

Daweti

Siyabulela (Deceased)

7101255524084

25/01/1971

Black

Male

0780050504

95071981PV

2

De Vos

John Paul

6906115791081

11/06/1969

Coloured

Male

0795523000

0746329/9

3

Fihlani

Makhaya Douglas

7111015321084

01/11/1971

Black

Male

0785375087

10871887

4

Genu

Siviwe Abner

6501295647086

29/01/1965

Black

Male

0736528408

94975844PE

5

Gobo

Lulamile Frederick

6506185664083

18/06/1965

Black

Male

0734039336

 

6

Lonzi

Simphiwe

6708315496085

31/08/1967

Black

Male

0715109160

94096674PF

7

Mamani

Vuyani Moses

(Now with PRASA)

6803046225083

04/03/1968

Black

Male

0799822296

94672359

8

Mdlungu

Makhaselina

6504220711084

22/04/1965

Black

Female

0780294371

94075173P

9

Mvulana

Zongamele

(Now with PRASA)

6806035817083

03/06/1968

Black

Male

0788888020

94069739

10

November Mettler

Venessa

6904240171089

24/04/1969

Coloured

Female

0846221903

96072368

11

Snyman

Bonakele Michael

6911185733088

18/11/1969

Black

Male

0730082342

97652309

 

Sanqela

Patrick

6903076208080

07/03/1969

Black

Male

0736220313

98151822RFN

 

Martin

Amanda Beatrice

7303210288081

21/03/1973

Coloured

Female

0782217812

 
 

May

Ellen

7507040081082

04/07/1975

Coloured

Female

0796679223

 
   

 

           
 

Mfengwana

Dumisa August

5910165806089

16/10/1959

Black

Male

0736541174

 
 

Mkoko

Wankie Lesley

7610105632086

10/10/1976

Black

Male

0768899180

 
 

Mtimkulu

Simphiwe

7311035610086

03/11/1973

Black

Male

0835836924

 
 

Ndzabela

Lizo

7305245507088

24/05/1973

Black

Male

0733772601

 
 

Ngcime

Simon

6612166092086

16/12/1966

Black

Male

0833330887

 
 

Nokatywa

Nomonde

6311080300085

08/11/1963

Black

Female

0789389391

 
 

Snyman

Bonakele Micheal

6911185733088

18/11/1969

Black

Male

0730082342

 
 

Stofile

Howard

6509125388086

12/09/1965

Black

Male

0783866117

 
 

Xaga

Jamangile

6603255773082

25/03/1966

Black

Male

0731239688

 
 

Yola-Xundu

Nomalungisa

6405160675083

16/05/1964

Black

Female

0825364850

 
 

Arendse

Christine Cheryl

6506120771084

12/06/1965

Coloured

Female

0846270153

No F NO

 

Cader

Feroza

6907240081083

24/07/1969

Coloured

Female

0730256698

 
 

Deniels

Joan

7207260191089

26/07/1972

Coloured

Female

0837285117

 
 

Dayimani

Simon Mayibuye (MKMVA - Dependant)

8609076476086

07/09/1986

Black

Male

0732747611

 
 

Dunga

Joy

6811201111089

20/11/1968

Black

Female

0824245710

 
 

Fihlani

Makhaya Douglas

7111015321084

01/11/1971

Black

Male

0785375087

10871887

 

Flotman

Simon

6501225304089

22/01/1965

Black

Male

0735785912

 
 

Fransch

Donovan

7306125163083

12/06/1973

Coloured

Male

0736673403

 
 

Jonkers

Lilian

6912160574083

16/12/1969

Coloured

Female

0832662647

 
 

Kapa

Thabisa

7511260535082

26/11/1975

Black

Female

0837422401

 
 

Le Roux

David

7212025856083

02/12/1972

Coloured

Male

0745271093

 
 

Minnie

Mathews

6101245626080

24/01/1961

Black

Male

0833647122

 
 

Maphuza

Michael Nkululeko (MKMVA -Dependant)

8102285414083

28/02/1981

Black

Male

0797658003

 

APLA MEMBERS

No.

SURNAME

NAME

ID NUMBER

BIRTH DATE

ETHNIC GROUP

GENDER

CELL NO

FORCE NO

                 

1

Maduba

Siphiwo

6406235728089

23/06/1964

Black

Male

0732441041

 

2

Magwentshu

Nqaba (Dependant)

8008195620088

19/08/1980

Black

Male

0783617548

 

3

Ngqisha

Lindilekile

(Has exited)

7011165955089

16/11/1966

Black

Male

0735823214

 

4

Ntlabathi

Desmond

7005055603080

05/05/1970

Black

Male

0793993723

 

5

Ntsila

Ndoda

7312085350082

08/12/1973

Black

Male

0781353000

 

6

Qashani

Witness

7011115412082

11/11/1970

Black

Male

0732794308

 

7

Sidina

Mzoxolo Arthur (Deceased)

7104175549081

17/04/1971

Black

Male

0731288548

 
 

Smouse

Simon

6402095634087

09/02/1964

Black

Male

0785459964

 
 

Williams

Mzwamadoda

7503305412088

30/03/1975

Black

Male

0736242200

96845599

 

Madasi

Vuyisile

6911205896089

20/11/1969

Black

Male

0780782742

98001092

15 April 2016 - NW748

Profile picture: Mncwango, Mr MA

Mncwango, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) How many soldiers are deployed in the (i) Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park and (ii) Kruger National Park, (b) what are their duties in each specified game park, (c) how often are the specified soldiers deployed in such duties, (d) do the specified duties include night patrols and (e) how are the specified soldiers armed?

Reply:

The questions raised here have potential to compromise the operational integrity of the SANDF with regard to force deployment; force movement and tactical planning.

It is however suffice to say that the SANDF deploys in the National Campaign against Rhino poaching in support of other government departments as part of its constitutional mandate.

15 April 2016 - NW363

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) her department and (b) every entity reporting to her went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

1. The following percentage of the total procurement of (a) the Minister for Defence and Military Veterans department and (b) every entity reporting to her went to (i) SMME’s and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 to 26 February 2016 was 50.7%.

15 April 2016 - NW396

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether R 800 million was moved from the SA National Defence Force’s (SANDF) budget to pay Deloitte to do an audit of SANDF’s battle preparedness; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what were the (i) motivation and (ii) objectives of the specified audit, (b) why does the SANDF not have the capacity to perform the specified audit itself, (c) why was Deloitte contracted to perform the specified audit, (d) when did (i) she and (ii) her department approve the specified audit and (e) what procurement processes were followed before appointing the specified company; (2) whether there are any higher priorities for spending the funds instead of the specified audit, especially in the face of constant complaints that not enough funding is provided to among other things South Africa’s contribution to peacekeeping forces in Africa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details for prioritising the specified audit?

Reply:

It is hereby confirmed that no funding was provided nor was any payment made for the amount of RM800 to Deloitte.

15 April 2016 - NW471

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to her reply to question 3524 on 19 October 2015, and subsequent reports that the procurement of a new VIP jet by Armaments Corporation of SA for use by the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma, has commenced, (a) what is the status of this procurement process and (b) when will the (i) Joint Standing Committee on Defence and (ii) the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans be briefed by her on the progress made with the procurement process to date; (2) whether the procurement of the specified VIP jet will be funded from the Special Defence Account; if not, how will the specified jet be funded; if so, what steps will be taken to ensure that the specified VIP jet will be procured at the lowest possible cost given the country’s current dire economic situation; (3) how much (a) has been budgeted for the new VIP jet and (b) will it cost?

Reply:

The Department established a Task Team comprising relevant units of the department, the Airforce and Armscor to advise on the most viable and suitable acquisition option including cost implications thereof for this project.

The Task Team already issued public communication on the progress in this regard during a press briefing in November 2015.

15 April 2016 - NW809

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) How many SA National Defence Force Reserve Force members were employed at the Joint Tactical Headquarters in Mpumalanga in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) which of the specified members’ services were employed on a continuous basis (i) for six months or less, (ii) between six and twelve months, (iii) between 12 and 18 months, (iv) between 18 and 24 months, (v) between 24 and 30 months and (vi) between 30 and 36 months?NW928

Reply:

The total number Reserves that were called-up up at the Joint Tactical Headquarters and Ops Corona in Mpumalanga during the financial years 2012/2013, 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 is indicated in the table below:

CALL-UP CATEGORIES

(Months)

NUMBER OF MEMBERS CALLED-UP

(Individuals utilised)

 

FY 2012/2013-2014/2015

0-6

2 601

6-12

1 712

12-18

417

18-24

89

24-30

8

30-36

0

TOTAL

4 827

15 April 2016 - NW745

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether any theft of cables has taken place at the Sivermine Basis since 1 January 2011 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (a) when the theft occurred, (b) what was stolen during the theft, (c) what the cost of each theft was and (d) whether any transgressors have been apprehended in connections with each theft; (2) (a) for which periods communication from the land and at sea were cut off and (b) what measures have been instituted to prevent similar incidents; (3) whether she will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) Four incidents of Cable theft occurred in the Silvermine area between 2012 and 2013.

(b) General items comprising mainly copper, were stolen

(c) Items stolen were valued at approximately R50 000-00.

(d) In March 2013 four suspects were apprehended by SANPARKS personnel icw the copper theft at the upper antenna farm at Silvermine and handed to the Muizenberg SAPS. They were later released by the SAPS when it was discovered that were all minors.

2. (a) At no stage was communications from land and sea cut off due to these incidents.

(b) Fences have been repaired in the upper antenna area and are in the process of being replaced in the lower antenna area. A camera monitoring and speaker warning system has been installed in the upper antenna area. Vehicle patrols have been stepped up. The SAN is attempting to acquire a wide area Intruder Detection System to increase monitoring and reduce response times in order to prevent future incidents of this nature.

(3) No

15 April 2016 - NW744

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether any burglary has occurred at the Quarter Master at the Saldanha Military Base since 1 January 2011 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (a) when each burglary occurred, (b) what was stolen during each burglary, (c) what was the cost of each burglary and (d) whether any transgressors were caught; (2) whether she will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) Seventeen incidents of theft occurred at the Quarter Master at Saldanha Military Base between 2011 and 2016

(b) Items stolen comprise mainly clothing, IT equipment and fire extinguishers.

(c) Items stolen were valued at approximately R100 555.58

(d) Between 2011 and 2013 six civilians were apprehended and found guilty in the Vredenburg Magistrate’s court. Fourteen police investigations are not yet concluded.

2. No

15 April 2016 - NW541

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With regard to the SA National Defence Force members who were charged with various transgressions perpetrated while serving in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, (a) how many were initially charged with transgressions, (b) how many were found guilty and (c) what sentences were handed down in each case; (2) (a) how many dismissals were issued, and (b) how many of the specified dismissals were (i) accepted and/or (ii) appealed against by the specified soldiers; (3) of the dismissals appealed against by the specified soldiers what is the status of these appeal processes; and (4) were any of the specified dismissals found to be unfair; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

The SANDF has been deployed in the DRC since 2001 and it would need more time to provide feedback on PQ541 for this period to date. In the light hereof the response will be narrowed down to the FY2015/2016.

Question 1(a). 90 members have been charged for transgressions over this period.

Question 1(b). 08 members were found guilty at an Officers Commanding Disciplinary Hearing over this period.

Question 1(c). In each of the 08 cases the maximum fine of R600.00 were handed down.

Question 2(a). 46 members out of the remaining 82 members were administratively discharged in terms of the Defence Act, Act 42 of 2002. None of the remaining 36 members could be tried by a court of (senior) military judge due to the non- assignment of military judges.

Question 2(b)(i). The dismissed members have approached the High Court for reinstatement.

Question 2(b)(ii). 32 out of the 46 members that were administratively discharged have lodged an application to the High Court challenging their discharge.

Question 3. The matter was removed from the court roll due to incorrect serving and placement thereof.

Question 4. Fair procedure was followed by the Department.

 

15 April 2016 - NW807

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)When is she going to institute an investigation into alleged transgressions of the provisions of the Defence Act, Act 42 of 2002, in respect of the (a) criteria used to employ persons as members of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) Reserve Force and (b)(i) process and (ii) procedures involved in being employed as a SANDF Reserve Force member; (2) (a) why are only certain SANDF Reserve Force members employed while others are not afforded an opportunity, (b) why are SANDF Reserve Force members who are in service not rotated and (c) how is the period of employment as a Reserve Force member determined; (3) whether principles of fairness are implemented in the employment of the SANDF Reserve Force members, or is there good cause to believe that discrimination has been practiced in this regard; (4) whether SANDF Reserve Force members are allowed to apply for military veterans’ benefits while not being employed by the SANDF; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. At this stage there is no intention to launch an investigation.

2. (a) The Services are in control of the Reserves and call-ups are managed according to specific requirements over a specified period of time and for a particular number of people or particular rank requirements as determined by the Services and some Divisions within the structures of the Department of Defence. Such call-ups are largely controlled by the availability of financial resources.

(b) Rotation of Reserve Force members is encouraged at all times and the departmental policies do make provision for such in order to give members a fair opportunity to receive a call-up. This requirement is not always met accordingly due to budgetary constraints.

(c) The period of call-ups is determined according to the purpose and type of call-up, whether it is on a continuous or non- continuous basis and for the duration. The duration for external deployments is normally over 12 months and internal deployments over 6 months. In both cases, a period for pre- deployment training is also scheduled. Specialist skills are utilised according to departmental needs.

3. Reserve Force service is a voluntary service and the department always strives for the principles of fairness as a rule regarding Reserve Force utilisation. However, the current economic situation and the high unemployment rate place pressure on the unemployed Reserve Force member to become desperate for a call-up and would therefore always be regarded as not being treated fairly with no call-up. The Services do have a monitoring system in place to review Reserve Force utilisation on a quarterly basis.

4. According to policy requirements, Reserve Force members that are active in service are not allowed to be part of the Military Veterans and are not entitled to such benefits. The current practice is that members who would like to be registered on the Military Veterans Database in order to be entitled to the benefits thereof would officially request to resign from active Reserve Force service or be removed from the Reserve Force database.

15 April 2016 - NW137

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What are the (a) names of the members of the Ministerial Task Team appointed by her to effect a turnaround strategy for her department, (b)(i) terms of reference and (ii) time frames for the specified task team and (c) cost implications for employing the specified task team?

Reply:

(a)

  • Steering Committee
    • Mr S. Majombozi
    • Ms S. Rabkin
    • Mr S. Sokhela
    • Mr S. Hamilton
    • Lt Gen (Ret) J. Nkonyane
  • Resource Panel (part time)
    • Ms S. Hlapolosa
    • Mr T. Kubu
    • Mr U.Abrahamse
    • Brig Gen (Ret) M.R. Fihla
    • Ms N. Motlhatlhane"
    • Ms N. Mkwanazi
    • Maj Gen (Ret) K. Mokoape
    • Mr D. Nadison
    • Dr S. Zikalala

(b) The turn-around strategy is to focus on the following areas: procurement; organisational structure of the Department; financial accounting and the legislative mandate in addition it has various work streams which deal with rolling out of benefits to military veterans.

e.g. 1)health and education,; 2, Policy development; 3 Cleaning up of the database.

(ii) The task team has been established from 01 September 2015 to 31 December 2016.

(c) The Steering Committee is paid on the basis of meetings bases on National Treasury determination which is amended annually.

 

15 April 2016 - NW599

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)How many of the three submarines of the SA Navy are currently operational; (2) whether any of the submarines are currently in the dry dock for maintenance; if so, (a) which submarines, (b)(i) from which date in each case they have been in the dry dock and (ii) what is the reason for that in each case and (c) what is the cost of the maintenance work on each individual submarine; (3) whether she will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

1.  The three submarines are currently operational.

2. Not applicable

3. NO

14 April 2016 - NW832

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many students will be funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in 2016, in respect of (a) (i) first year studies, (ii) undergraduate studies other than in first year, and (iii) postgraduate studies and (b) historic debt, (c) students who were either partially funded or not funded at all in the past three years and (d) any other purpose; (2) (a) how many individual students will cumulatively be funded by NSFAS in any number of respects this year and (b) how many students who qualify for NSFAS does his department estimate will not receive funding this year, despite the increased budgetary allocations?

Reply:

1 (a) (i) and (ii) National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding for the 2016 academic year has been allocated to the universities to administer on NSFAS’s behalf. Universities administering NSFAS funding through the non-student centred model will apply guidelines provided by NSFAS through the NSFAS Rules and Regulation Handbook for the selection of students and determining the actual loan or bursary value to be awarded to a student.

First-year students and other undergraduate students will be funded through the DHET General Loan programme funding (R3.2 billion), DHET Teacher Education loan programme (R124.3 million), DHET Final Year loan programme for final year students only (R1.2 billion), the National Skills Fund (R800 million) and a range of smaller bursary programmes whose beneficiaries are selected by the funder.

Universities are concluding allocation processes and information on the number of students within categories in 2016 is not yet available.

(iii) One funding category is made available for postgraduate studies and therefore the number of students funded is limited. The allocation for the 2016

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 832 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 April 2016 - NW934

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a) and (b) (i) No

  1. Not applicable

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 934 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 April 2016 - NW478

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) Whether, with reference to the SA Social Security Agency’s (SASSA) awarding of a bid (details furnished) to appoint a certain company (name and details furnished) as a service provider to conduct forensic investigations, the SASSA Bid Adjudication Committee recommended that the specified company be appointed as the preferred service provider; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified company was the highest scoring bidder in terms of the National Treasury’s Implementation Guide: Preferential Procurement Regulations, 2011; if not, (a) why was the specified company awarded the bid and (b) what are (i) the names of the companies that scored higher in this regard and (ii) their respective scores; if so, what was the specified company’s score; (3) whether all necessary approvals were obtained from the Auditor-General before the appointment of the specified company as the preferred bidder; if not, why not; if so, on what date was such approval obtained? NW532E

Reply:

(1), (2) (a), (b), (i), (ii) and 3. This matter is sub judice.

14 April 2016 - NW203

Profile picture: Esterhuizen, Mr JA

Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

Whether his Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

(a) No, Ministry does not have frozen vacant positions

(b) N/A

(C) N/A

 

 

Approved/not approved

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-………………/………………/2016

14 April 2016 - NW90

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

Whether he has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019; if not, why not; if so, (a) which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement, (b) how many performance assessments has he undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed, (c) what progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF, (d) what are the key obstacles to implementation and (e) what is the plan to address such obstacles?

Reply:

There is a performance agreement in place that is binding on the Minister of Mineral Resources. This agreement has been signed with the President.

The Minister has recently been appointed and as a result has not done any assessment with the President.

 

Approved/not approved

Mr MJ Zwane

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-………………/………………/2016

12 April 2016 - NW589

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4264 on 21 December 2015, he has received the outstanding information from the Kannaland Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Kannaland Local Municipality. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW572

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4095 on 8 December 2015, the requested information has been received from the Tlokwe Local Municipality; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Tlokwe Local Municipalitie. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW341

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What measures are in place to ensure that each of the several hundred projects funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority is (a) compliant (i) with the correct procedures for approval and (ii) in the way it operates, (b) providing quality assured training of a high standard and (c) able to account for all of the funds it uses?

Reply:

a) The project allocation process is initiated by the Project Management Unit of the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA), which conducts a needs analysis, derived from the:

  • National Skills Development Strategy;
  • CETA Sector Skills Plan;
  • CETA five-year Strategic Plan;
  • CETA Annual Performance Plan; and
  • Service Level Agreements.

   (i) The grant allocation approval process is entirely transparent and meets the relevant supply chain management principles. The process involves the following:

  • Applications are made through the CETA online application tool;
  • Evaluations are done independently and recommendations are made to the CETA Board;
  • After approval by the CETA Board, the CETA issues an offer to contract with the successful applicant, which is subject to various conditions, including a due diligence exercise to determine the ability of the approved applicants to implement their proposed projects; and
  • CETA finally approves the relevant grants, only after applicants have satisfied CETA of its ability to implement their proposed projects.

The process that is followed in respect thereof ensures the integrity of the CETA’s project allocation.

  (ii) Since the 2011/12 financial year, all payments to successful applicants were made in accordance with the CETA’s performance based payment system, in terms of which:

  • Payments are made after submission and approval of compliant invoices and supporting documentation;
  • All payments can accordingly be traced back to costs incurred in respect of specific learners, in accordance with the supporting documentation which entities are required to submit prior to receiving payment;
  • The supporting information required before payments are made include, where applicable, learner attendance registers, proof of payment of stipends to learners and proof of receipt of learning materials received by the learners;
  • No advance payments are made to any entities;
  • As a consequence, entities who do not perform in accordance with their project planning will not receive their full grant allocation;
  • Payments are only made in respect of services rendered or expenses incurred; and
  • the CETA has strict invoicing processing compliance requirements in which payments are only made into approved bank accounts, or, in the instance of public entities, separate cost centres, allocated exclusively to the approved CETA project.

(b) Below are the three areas in which the CETA ensures quality:

  • Accountability and conformance to standards;
  • Maintaining and enhancing the quality of facilitation and learning by accredited Skills Development Providers; and
  • Quality enhancement and continually improving practitioners, assessors, moderators and staff.

(c) The following measures are implemented to ensure that CETA accounts for all funds utilised:

  • A commitment schedule, which is reviewed on a regular basis, is maintained;
  • Monthly management reports are reviewed by the Finance Committee;
  • Financial statements are prepared on a quarterly basis;
  • Annual financial statements are reviewed by the Audit Committee; and
  • Annual Financial Statements are audited by the Auditor-General who tests the accuracy, validity and completeness of financial information.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 341 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW641

Profile picture: Ntobongwana, Ms P

Ntobongwana, Ms P to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)With reference to her reply to question 163 on 18 June 2015 and in view of consistent and regular allegations of racism experienced by black employees at the SA National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), with the latest victim being a certain person (name and details furnished), what further steps does she intend to take to ensure that SANBI welcomes talented black persons; (2) whether her department has assessed the exit interviews of black employees who have left SANBI; if not, why not; if so, what steps has she taken with regard to the concerns that the specified persons have raised?

Reply:

(1) One of the key performance indicators (KPI) and targets in SANBI’s approved Corporate Strategic Plan is the development of black biodiversity professionals. By the year 2019/2020, SANBI’s target is to develop 140 black biodiversity professionals which is on track and consistently monitored and reported on.

  • Recently SANBI, together with partners in the biodiversity sector, has just included implementation of the Groen Sebenza Programme which is a pioneering and innovative initiative that has developed 854 young black biodiversity professionals.
  • Career ladders for scientists and horticulturists were introduced in order to attract, develop and retain black biodiversity professionals.
  • In addition, the following interventions are being implemented to ensure that our black scientists’ careers development paths are supported:

o Staff bursaries towards higher degrees;

o Scientific writing training courses;

o Studentships and Internships programmes;

o Mentorship/coaching; and

o Participation in workshops and conferences (local and international).

(2) The Board of Directors appointed by the Minister provides oversight to SANBI on all organisational matters including human related matters (NEMBA Section 13). The department through its governance protocol with its entities (including SANBI), provides support for the operationalisation of the business processes. In terms of the established governance practices, the current institutional arrangements suffice to enable SANBI to discharge its operational duties including the analysis of the outcomes of exit interviews. The specific matter of Mr Qwede is being addressed by SANBI Management and the department will address the same when it is raised through proper channels.

---ooOoo---

12 April 2016 - NW588

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4257 on 21 December 2015, he has received the outstanding information from the three specified municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available; if not, why not?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the remaining three Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW574

Profile picture: Topham , Mr B

Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4104 on 8 December 2015, the information has been received from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Tlokwe Local Municipalitie. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW953

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

Yes. By way of example, the Minister’s office in the last month received on average, 10 invitations and requests per day from a wide range of stakeholders. Some of these requests are for meetings to be held in the office, invitations to events at embassies, networking sessions organised by Chambers of Commerce, numerous speaking engagements and so forth. Stakeholders include owners of large businesses, Chief Executive Officers of multi-national corporations, Ministers, Ambassadors, labour formations and so on. In other words, the dti mandate dictates that the Minister of Trade and Industry interacts with a wide spectrum of prominent stakeholders who believe their businesses may benefit from the dti’s offerings and he does so, in a variety of settings.

In this light and in common with a number of politicians across the political divide, including the Premier of the Western Cape, Ms H Zille, the Minister responded positively to some invitations from the Gupta family, to attend various events.

On the few occasions that any conversations took place between the Minister and representatives of the family, the content was general and no specific projects were discussed. This is in line with the standard practice Minister adopts with stakeholders where any specific requests for incentives are referred to relevant decision-making structures for approval or rejection. The Ministry would then only consider intervening for the sake of efficiencies if there appear to be purely bureaucratic delays in bringing a process to its conclusion.

To the knowledge of the Ministry, approximately 6 years ago one meeting at the request of the Gupta family was held at the dti offices in Hatfield, Sunnyside attended by the Minister, dti officials and a Mr Gupta to discuss the company’s investment plans. The nature of the meeting was similar to innumerable meetings the Minister has held with potential investors, both foreign and domestic. In the event, no follow-up meetings were requested or held.

The Minister also accepted an invitation to attend the wedding of a Gupta family member as it potentially presented an unexpected but welcome opportunity to informally meet with his then Indian counter-part. Regrettably, the Minister did not in fact attend.

12 April 2016 - NW911

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work? NW1037E

Reply:

In terms of the rules applicable to Members of the Executive and Members of Parliament, Ministers have to disclose their Financial and/or business interests to both Parliament and the Presidency in compliance with the applicable ethics code. All financial interests of the member and family are disclosed annually. The Minister has always complied with these requirements.

Minister Davies has no interests in any businesses and none of the members of his family has had any business dealings with Government. The Minister is a Director of the Institute of African Alternatives, a non-profit organisation, for which he receives no remuneration.

 

12 April 2016 - NW793

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) Which Tshwane Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) stations currently serve Wards (i) 9, (ii) 12, (iii) 19, (iv) 20, (v) 21, (vi) 22 and (vii) 22 in the City of Tshwane and (b) how many (i) officers and (ii) operational vehicles are at each of the specified stations; (2) whether there are any plans to establish a TMPD station to serve the community of Winterveldt in the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore keep the Honourable Member updated on progress.

12 April 2016 - NW833

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) With reference to his reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, what are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) With reference to my reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, an update is provided on the costs of damage caused to property at North West University, University of Cape Town and University of the Free State resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016:

  • University of Stellenbosch – R352 000.00
  • North West University – R151 000 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Limpopo – R1 786 294.52
  • University of Johannesburg – R345 000.00
  • University of the Western Cape – R46 544 446.00
  • Walter Sisulu University – R351 287.19
  • Tshwane University of Technology – R5 073 747.73
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal – R82 000 000.00
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology – R689 850.14
  • University of Cape Town – R3 200 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Zululand – R 4 500 000.00
  • Rhodes University – R250 000.00
  • University of the Witwatersrand – R1 410 223.00
  • University of the Free State – R2 800 000.00 (updated)

Total cost: R300 302 848.58 (updated)

The following universities submitted damage reports, however they did not provide estimates of the cost of damage, which will be requested from them:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no/minor incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda;
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; and
  • University of Pretoria –graffiti on walls, which have been repainted.

(b) The universities have not confirmed from which university budgets these damages will be recovered. However, certain damages will be paid or recovered from insurance claims.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 833 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW425

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether The Presidency commissioned a background check on a certain person (name furnished), including whether the specified person has any previous criminal convictions; if so, (2) did it emerge that the specified person has a criminal record; if so, for which crimes had the specified person been convicted; (3) whether the specified person was sentenced to a prison term of one year or more without the option of a fine; if so, on what legal provision did The Presidency rely when it appointed the specified person to the Media Development and Diversity Agency Board?

Reply:

On 03 June 2015 the National Assembly recommended that I appoint Mr Ntenteni as a member of the MDDA board. Acting on the recommendation I the appointed Mr Ntenteni on 19 June 2015.

The security screening that we undertook later revealed that he was convicted of culpable homicide in 1998. Following the results of the security screening I requested the National Assembly on 07 December 2015 to initiate a process of checking if Mr Ntenteni is suitable to be a member of the board of the MDDA.

I will be guided be by the outcome of the parliamentary process in this matter.

12 April 2016 - NW538

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)(a) How many (i) natural and (ii) unnatural deaths of inmates have occurred in the past 12 months in the Kgoši Mampuru II Correctional Services facility in Pretoria, (b) when did each death occur and (c) what was the reason in each specified case; (2) whether any of the specified deaths were reported to the Judicial Inspectorate for Correctional Services (JICS); if not, why not in each case; if so, when was each case reported; (3) whether the JICS investigated any of the specified deaths; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) There were thirty three (33) reported cases of natural deaths

(1)(a)(ii) There were five (5) reported cases of unnatural deaths (known and unknown causes)

Information for (1)(b),(c)and (2) is reflected in the tables below:

(1)(b) Date of death

(1)(c) Reason of death

(2) Date reported to JICS –if not give reason

NATURAL DEATHS

2015.03.13

Respiratory Failure

2015.08.24

2015.04.09

Heart Problem

2016.02.23

2015.04.26

Respiratory Failure

2015.05.25

2015.05.11

Respiratory Failure

2015.05.17

2015.08.24

Nephrotic Syndrome

2015.08.27

2015.08.27

Broncho Pneumonia

2015.09.06.

2015.08.29

Acute Liver Failure

2015.08.30

2015.10.15

Respiratory Failure

2015.10.29

2015.11.20

Cardio Pulmonary Arrest

2015.12.13

2015.05.17.

Retro Viral Disease

2015.05.20

2015.05.26.

Plasma Blastic Lymphoma

2015.05.28

2015.06.08

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.24

2015.06.11

Idiopathic Thrombo Cytopenia

2015.06.17

2015.06.11

Kaposi Sarcoma

2015.06.17

2015.06.10

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.17

2016.01.29

Respiratory Failure

2016.01.29

2016.02.20

Opportunistic Infection /Diabetes

2016.03.07

2016.02.28

Electrolyte Imbalance

2016.02.28

2015.05.27

Epilepsy

Hypertension

Previous Cerebro vascular accident

2015.05.28

2015.11.10

Retro Viral Disease

2015.11.12

2015.11.13

Retro Viral Disease

2015.11.13

2015.12.08

Diabetes

Hypertension

Asthma

2015.02.09

2016.02.24

Hepatitis

2016.02.24

2015.09.09

Acute asthmatic attack

2015.09.09

2015.06.15

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.22

2015.06.16

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.18

2015.06.18

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.26

2015.07.06

Meningitis

2015.07.10

2015.07.26

Hypertension

2015.07.31

2015.09.01

Retro Viral Disease

2015.09.03

2015.09.13

Retro Viral Disease

2015.09.16

2015.11.30

Sepsis renal failure

2015.12.01

2016.01.19

Jaundice

2016.01.26

UNNATURAL DEATHS

2015.08.26

Suicide: Medication overdose

2015.08.27

2015.11.08

Unnatural: Post mortem outstanding. Death register number 1619/15: Steve Biko Forensic Pathology Laboratory

2015.11.08

2015.11.12

Assault: Inmate on Inmate: Stabbed in the heart

2015.11.12

2015.11.19

Suicide: Hanging

2015.11.19

2015.12.12

Stab wound of the chest.

Injury to the pulmonary artery.

Blood in the pericardial sack around the heart.

Massive haemothorax of the left chest cavity.

Superficial incised wounds of the right flank and back

2015.12.12

(3) The JICS does not investigate all deaths reported to it, due to lack of capacity; it does however follow a process to confirm that deaths did occur and this is done via the Independent Correctional Centre Visitor.

Natural Deaths – when a natural death is reported the Independent Correctional Centre Visitor will fill in a record of confirmation to confirm that the death has taken place.

Unnatural Deaths - when an unnatural death is reported the Independent Correctional Centre Visitor will be required to conduct an enquiry on the death and depending on the severity of the case it will then be referred to the JICS investigating unit to investigate

The last enquiry conducted was at Kgoši Mampuru Local in November 2015 where it was alleged that the inmate committed suicide by hanging himself. The Independent Correctional Centre Visitor did the enquiry and found that indeed the inmate had committed suicide by using his shoes laces and a piece of bed sheet as a rope.

12 April 2016 - NW587

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4256 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW582

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4186 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW839

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Are the qualifications of teachers verified with the SA Qualifications Authority (SAQA) prior to their appointment to teaching posts; if not, why not; if so, how many teachers (a) have had their qualifications verified by SAQA (i) in the (aa) 2011, (bb) 2012, (cc) 2013, (dd) 2014 and (ee) 2015 academic years and (ii) since 1 January 2016 and (b) how many were found to have misrepresented their qualifications during the specified academic years and period?

Reply:

There is no requirement for the verification of national teacher education qualifications of South African Citizens by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).

However, all teachers are required to submit their qualifications to education departments for evaluation to be employed in education. The policy on the Criteria for the Evaluation and Recognition for Qualifications for Employment in Education, former Department of Education, 2000, published in Notice No. 935, Government Gazette No. 21565 of 22 September, 2000 is in the process of being revised. This policy describes the process and procedures for the evaluation, approval and recognition of initial qualifications, advanced and postgraduate qualifications for employment in education and the assigning of Requirement Education Qualification Value (REQVs) to these qualifications.

The principal end users of this policy are evaluators of teacher qualifications in national and provincial departments of education and admissions officials at universities and higher education institutions that offer teacher education to ensure that teacher applicants are admitted to the correct and most appropriate qualification type and programme.

 

12 April 2016 - NW853

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Did the North West University Council approve the unauthorised and irregular expenditure of R10 million of university funds that happened under the watch of a certain person (name and details furnished) without investigation; (2) what are the details which led to the Council approving the specified expenditure in spite of the investigation?

Reply:

  1. Authorisation for the amount in question from the University Council was not required as Dr T Eloff, the former Vice-Chancellor, was authorised in terms of the delegations of authority of the North-West University (NWU), to approve all expenditure up to the value of R10 million. The Vice-Chancellor’s authorisation of the expenditure is therefore not deemed irregular or unauthorised.
  2. However, the current Vice-Chancellor, Professor ND Kgwadi, reported in the 2014 Annual Report that the public benefit trust, the North West Higher Education Trust (NWHET), which was established as a mechanism for receiving all philanthropic donations, was scrutinised in order to address a need to clarify the relationship between the NWU and the NWHET.

The University has also provided an update to the Department on the decisions made by Council following the inquiry initiated into alleged fraud by the former Vice-Chancellor.

The Council deliberated extensively on the matter at a meeting held on 19 June 2015 and resolved that:

  • The establishment of the North-West Higher Education Trust (NWHET) was an endowment fund with the aim of raising money by commercial investments for the North-West University and other selected higher education institutions in the North West Province;
  • Accepted that there had been no improper motive on the part of the former Vice-Chancellor, Dr Eloff, in approving a university donation of R10 million to the Trust;
  • Acknowledged that Dr Eloff consulted widely with responsible University officials regarding the viability and feasibility of the NWHET initiative;
  • Acknowledge that the Trust had been registered as such in accordance with legal requirements;
  • Recommend that all purported projects linked to, or evolving from the Trust, be terminated with immediate effect;
  • Steps be taken to recover the full amount of R10 million from the NWHET; and
  • The process according to which the amount of R10 million is to be recovered is still underway.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW709

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(a) On which of the specific grounds applicable under section 35 of the South African Police Service Act, Act 68 of 1995, as amended, was the former National Head of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, Mr Anwa Dramat, the subject of a section 35 discharge and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) Lieutenant General Dramat was discharged from the South African Police Service in terms of sect 35(b) of the SAPS Act (Act 68 of 1995)

(b) Further relevant details are as follows:

Lieutenant General Dramat through his lawyers requested the Minister of Police that he is desirous to vacate his post as the Head of the Directorate as provided for in Section 17DA (4)(b) of SAPS Amendment Act.

The Minister of Police allowed the request of the employee in terms of the powers conferred upon the Minister in terms of Sect 17DA (4)(b) to vacate his office earlier than the expiry of his tenure for reasons which the Minister deems sufficient.

The Lawyers of the Minister of Police and Lieutenant General Dramat’s Lawyers agreed that:

  • Lieutenant General Dramat be granted permission to vacate his Office with immediate effect.

12 April 2016 - NW718

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether Durban or any other city in the country is regarded as an environmental hotspot on account of (a) a lack of proper and adequate sanitation, (b) overexploitation and depletion of natural resources, (c) soil or beach erosion of one type or the other, (d) diminishing water availability and compromised water quality and (e) destruction of highly prized and unique eco-systems; if not, why not; if so, (i) which cities are regarded as environmental hotspots in respect of the aforementioned, (ii) what steps has the Government taken to address the specified problems proactively and aggressively in order to remedy the situation and (iii) what measure of success is being achieved in rectifying the specified problems?

Reply:

(a)

This needs to be responded to by the Department of Water and Sanitation.

(b) (i), (ii) and (iii)

Yes.

All cities can be considered environmental hotspots simply due to the density of people – this shear density of humanity means that cities are huge sinks for food, water, energy and other natural resources as well as being significant sources of waste, effluent, heat and atmospheric emissions (often mostly vehicle emissions). Nevertheless, in the Western and Eastern coastal regions of the South African ocean space, abalone and rock lobster are currently over-exploited and showing signs of depletion.

With this, it is estimated that over 50% of the world’s population now lives in cities and urban areas. These large communities provide both challenges and opportunities for environmentally-conscious developers, and there are distinct advantages to further defining and working towards the goals of sustainable cities. Humans are social creatures and thrive in urban spaces that foster social connections. Because of this, a shift to denser, urban living provides an outlet for social interaction and conditions under which humans can prosper. Thus, contrary to popular belief cities can be more environmentally sustainable than rural or suburban living. With people and resource located so close to one another, it is possible to save energy for transportation and mass transit systems, and resources such as food.

Operation Phakisa led by the Department of Environmental Affairs has key focus areas on Marine Protection Services and Governance that include key initiatives addressing over-exploitation and depletion of natural resources or marine living species. These include a network of 22 of Marine Protected Areas and Coordinated enforcement programmes.

The monitoring and evaluation of local authorities’ performance is the mandate of the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA).

(c) (i), (ii) and (iii)

Yes

The South African coastline currently has areas that are prone to soil and beach erosion, and these include Glentana, Oyster Bay, St Francis Bay, Langebaan and Milnerton. The Department of Environmental Affairs however, is in the process of conducting a National Coastal Assessment which will identify such hotspots.

(d) (i), (ii) and (iii)

Yes

Coastal cities by their nature are potential environmental hotspots with respect to water quality. As an example, some of recreational beaches in Durban have lost their Blue Flag status due to poor water quality. The department has tools whose aim is to assist the municipalities to better manage water quality.

(e) (i), (ii) and (iii)

Yes

All cities contain highly prized ecosystems which are eroded on account of the pressing needs of ever expanding cities to provide for housing and other land uses. However, most of the more advanced metropolitan areas and bigger cities entertain these pressures through proper land use planning. Conservation plans and other tools are in place to indicate where the environmental hotspots are located. Planning of infrastructure is taking these hotspots into consideration. Designing these cities consider environmental impacts and is dedicated to the minimization of the required inputs of energy, water and food, waste output and water pollution.

A number of conservation and legislative tools to ensure conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity have been developed and these include:

  • Bioregional Plans developed in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004). Bioregional Plans provide for integrated and coordinated biodiversity planning to ensure the monitoring of the conservation status of various components of South Africa’s biodiversity and promote biodiversity research. A number of Bioregional Plans exist such as in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan (Eastern Cape Province), the City of Cape Town (Western Cape Province), the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan and the West Rand District Municipality (Gauteng Province), the City of Tshwane (Gauteng Province), the Gert Sibanda (Mpumalanga Province) as well as the draft Bioregional Plan for the Waterberg District (Limpopo Province).
  • Biodiversity Management Plans for ecosystems are also made provision for in terms of the Biodiversity Act. These plans can be developed by any person, organisation or organ of state and are intended to ensure the long term persistence of an ecosystem that is of special concern. Management interventions put in place for landowners, resource users and other key stakeholders can impact positively on the functioning of the particular ecosystem. The department is in the process of developing the first Biodiversity Management Plan for an ecosystem which will be addressing threats to the Colbyn Valley Wetland and its associated sub-catchment (Hartebeesspruit River).

In addition to these biodiversity legislative tools, the government has taken steps towards local government support relating to the mainstreaming of environmental considerations into local government and such interventions undertaken include:

  • The Environment Sector Local Government Support Strategy. The strategy which is being implemented mainstreams relevant environmental priorities into local government. This came about from a need for a more coordinated and structured mechanism of dealing with sustainable environmental management in local government. The objectives of the strategy are to:
    • clarify the environmental sector mandate for local government support;
    • clarify the local government mandate for environmental management;
    • identify opportunities for streamlining and integrating the support initiatives of the environment sector with the local government development agenda;
    • identify gaps in cooperation with the local government sector;
    • rationalise municipal reporting requirements;
    • promote consistency and synergy in approach with provinces on local government support programmes (LGSPs); and
    • maximise the environmental sector’s relations with the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) the South African Cities Network (SACN) and COGTA as representative organs of local government.

The implementation of the strategy is done through the establishment and regular convening of the Local Government Task Team.

Government has also developed the National Framework for Biodiversity Mainstreaming in Local Authorities which sets out biodiversity specific considerations that should be mainstreamed into Local Authorities. The development of this framework was conducted through a series of Local Authority stakeholder workshops. Government recognises the need to implement this framework, an important intervention to strengthen support to Local Authorities towards mainstreaming biodiversity in Local Government.

In addition

The department has developed a proposed Strategic Integrated Project (SIP) known as
SIP 19: Ecological Infrastructure for Water Security. The proposed SIP 19 is the second water-related SIP and provides a framework for the integration of a number of impactful water-related ecological infrastructure investments and interventions into a coordinated, coherent and focused project specifically aimed at improving South Africa’s water resource quality and quantity. Thus, the purpose of SIP 19 is to make a significant contribution to the overall goal of ensuring a sustainable supply of fresh, healthy water to equitably meet South Africa’s social, economic and environmental water needs for current and future generations through the integrated implementation of projects within identified priority water catchments.

Although, the concept of ecological infrastructure is not very well known in traditional infrastructure sectors, the essential life-supporting and life-enhancing ecosystem goods and services that are generated by this infrastructure are universally experienced (for instance, nutrient dispersal and cycling; seed dispersal; food (such as seafood, fresh-water fish and game); crops; wild foods; spices; water; minerals; medicinal plants; pharmaceuticals; bio-chemicals; industrial products; energy (hydropower, biomass fuels); carbon sequestration and climate regulation; waste decomposition and detoxification; purification of water and air; crop pollination; pest and disease control; cultural, intellectual and spiritual inspiration; recreational experiences (including ecotourism) and scientific discovery).

Thus, as infrastructure is often broadly defined as the substructure or underlying foundation on which the continuance or growth of a community or state depends, similarly, ecological infrastructure is the networks of natural lands, working landscapes and other open spaces that are the substructure or underlying foundation on which the continuance or growth of ecosystem goods and services depends.

In terms of cities and the impact SIP 19 may have on cities like Durban, in recent years, a number of ecologists and economists have touted New York City's (NYC’s) efforts to preserve the Catskills watershed, one of three major basins from which the city obtains its water supply, as a key example of the benefits of effective watershed management.

New York City’s water supply system is still largely derived from surface water north of the metropolitan area with the Catskill and Delaware watersheds supplying 5.3 billion liters of safe, but unfiltered, drinking water to nearly half of the population. The reliable function and safety of this water supply was, and is, absolutely essential to the existence of NYC and is entirely based on the maintenance of ecological infrastructure. In terms of cost-effectiveness, although NYC invested $1.5 billion on watershed protection over 10 years they avoided at least $6 billion in capital costs and $300 million in annual operating costs if their ecological infrastructure was replaced by a traditional water treatment plant.

---ooOoo---

12 April 2016 - NW834

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a)What is the maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in the 2016-17 financial year, (b) (i) when was it determined, (ii) by what body was it determined, (iii) under what legislative or regulatory provision and (iv) how was it determined; (2) whether he will provide the document recording its determination to Mr Y Cassim; if not, why not; if so, by when; (3) what is the average expected cost of study at universities for the 2016 academic year?

Reply:

(1) (a) The maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to a university student in the 2016 academic year is R71 800.

(b) (i) and (ii) The maximum loan awarded from the DHET general fund for university students is determined annually and approved by the NSFAS Board as part of the allocations process each year. For the 2016 academic year, the maximum loan amount was approved by the Board in the third quarter of 2015/16 and communicated to institutions in December 2015.

(iii) The university loan amount is determined based on the provisions within the NSFAS Act 56 of 1999 under Sections 4(a) and 4(b), which specifies that it is the function of NSFAS “to allocate funds for loans and bursaries to eligible students; to develop criteria and conditions for the granting of loans and bursaries to eligible students in consultation with the Minister”. It is further provided for under Section 19(1) that “Loans and bursaries granted by the board may be subject to such conditions as it may determine, either generally or in respect to a particular loan or bursary”.

(iv) The maximum loan is calculated by taking into consideration factors such as the increase received from the national budget process and weighted average full cost of study at universities.

(2) An extract of the NSFAS Board meeting minutes of 25 November 2015 is attached.

(3) According to data received from universities, the average full cost of study across the 26 universities was R70 679.11 and weighted average full cost of study was R71 878.40. Based on the weighted average full cost of study, the maximum-capped award was determined as R71 800.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 834 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE: