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07 June 2016 - NW1508

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. (a and b)

The Department of Environmental Affairs was never approached by any political party for funding in the following financial years since 1 April 2016:

  1. 2013-2014,
  2. 2014-2015, and
  3. 2015-2016.

(2) (a and b)

No funding was provided by the Department of Environmental Affairs to any political party for the following financial years since 1 April 2016:

  1. 2013-2014,
  2. 2014-2015, and
  3. 2015-2016.

Appropriated funds are meant for the execution of activities related to the mandate of the Department.

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07 June 2016 - NW1643

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

On what legal grounds is the SA National Roads Agency Ltd (SANRAL) of the opinion that all metrology instruments of the Gauteng e-tolling system comply fully with the requirements of the Legal Metrology Act, Act 9 of 2014 and the Trade Metrology Act, Act 77 of 1973, despite the fact that the Chief Executive Officer of the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications has indicated that SANRAL is not in compliance?

Reply:

As the honourable member is aware, the GFIP e-toll system basically uses camera images and dedicated short range communications equipment. In the case of the camera equipment installed on the GFIP system, this equipment complies with the technical requirements of SANS 1795, Part 5 on data capturing and recording devices for road traffic law enforcement.

With regard to the legislation referred to, there are currently no technical regulations published under the Legal Metrology Act which e-tolling must comply with. In the absence of specific technical regulations, this matter is being handled by the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) in terms of Section 22(2)(c) of the Legal Metrology Act, 9 of 2014.

The CEO of the NRCS is required to set requirements and conditions for use of the equipment in terms of Section 22(2) (c) of the Legal Metrology Act. The NRCS and SANRAL are addressing these requirements which will apply as an interim measure until technical regulations are published under the legislation. The Legal Metrology Act allows for interim measures to be used.

Additional information for the Minister:

The CEO of the NRCS also clarified this position in a letter to the Freedom Front Plus and this letter was made available to the public sometime last year. Unfortunately the contents of the letter are being mis-interpreted to cause confusion. The Legal Metrology Act allows for interim measures to be used.

In its letter of 4 March 2016 to the Freedom Front Plus, the NRCS clarifies the above and states the following:

" As there are currently no technical regulations which set out the specific requirements that the measuring instruments are to meet, compliance or non-compliance could not be established by the NATIONAL Regulator and hence there is no criminal prosecution taken against SANRAL at this stage. However, should non-compliance issues arise or be detected once interim measures are in place, enforcement measures will be applied as [provided for in the Legal Metrology Act."

07 June 2016 - NW1543

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) In 2015-16 financial year:

(i) The department has spent R2 621 268,44

(ii) iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority R 103 920,00

(iii) South African National Botanical Institute R 919 216,00

(iv) South African National Parks R6 552 099,12

(v) South African Weather Service R 604 241,60

(b) In the 2016-17 financial year:

(i) The department has budgeted for R 1 000 000,00

(ii) iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority R 116 000,00

(iii) South African National Botanical Institute R 1 086 396,00

(iv) South African National Parks R10 397 441,09

(v) South African Weather Service R 630 000,00

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07 June 2016 - NW1401

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

The NYDA is running the following programs:

  • Business Support Services – Voucher Programme
  • Market Linkages
  • Mentorship
  • Grant Programme
  • Entrepreneurship Development Programme
  • Cooperative Governance Training
  • Business Registration Service

R50, 3m is allocated for all the Economic Development Programmes.

The Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) does not run dedicated development programmes but it does encourage SMMEs to register on its supplier database and endeavours to utilise these companies where possible when procuring goods and services.

Statistics South Africa does not run any development programme for small business.  However, it gathers data and collates such data into statistical information that would certainly be of use to small business.  A dedicated survey for the self-employed is periodically conducted to inform what takes place in the informal sector.

07 June 2016 - NW1610

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(1)How many written submissions were received on the proposed amendments to the Price Preference System on the Exportation of Ferrous and Non-ferrous Waste and Scrap Metals published in Government Gazette notice R.1211 on 11 December 2015; (2) whether any oral submissions have been heard by the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) on the proposed amendments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the names of the stakeholders that were invited by ITAC to make oral submissions and (b) what was the gist of their submissions in each case?

Reply:

1.I am advised that a total number of 73 entities responded with written comments to the proposed amendments to the Price Preference System (PPS) on the Exportation of Ferrous and Non-ferrous Waste and Scrap Metals published in Government Gazette notice R.1211 on 11 December 2015.

(2) (a) Oral submissions have been heard by the Commission (ITAC) and were
made by the following entities:

  • Metal Recyclers Association (MRA).
  • Recycling Association of South Africa (RASA).
  • Non Ferrous Metal Industries Association of SA (NFMIA) and the Aluminium Federation of SA (AFSA) in a combined presentation.
  • SA Institute of Foundrymen (SAIF).

(2)(b) In the light of the fact that the process of evaluating the amendments is still underway it would not be appropriate to divulge the specific content of the oral submissions, save to say that in general, NFMIA, AFSA and SAIF were in support whereas the MRA and RASA objected to the amendments.

-END-

07 June 2016 - NW1468

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the full relevant details of the (a) meetings, (b) other activities and (c) achievements of the National Anti-Corruption Forum in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

(a) No meetings have been held during the (i) 2013/2014, (ii) 2014/2015 and (iii) 2015/2016 financial years.

(b) No activities have been held during the (i) 2013/2014, (ii) 2014/2015 and (iii) 2015/2016 financial years.

(c) No National Anti-Corruption Forum (NACF) achievements have been reported on for the financial years (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16.

07 June 2016 - NW1465

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Police

(1)How many (a) foreign tourists and (b) foreigners who live in South Africa have been the (i) victims and (ii) perpetrators of crimes in each specified year in the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015; (2) what was the nature of the crime where (a) offences were committed and (b) persons were victims?

Reply:

Due to the nature of the information required, an extension of time is hereby requested to enable us to provide an accurate and comprehensive response.

07 June 2016 - NW1391

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether (a) her department and (b) all entities reporting to her are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) Yes

(b) Yes, however, the participation of small business enterprises and cooperatives is advanced through public employment programmes.

(i) & (ii) The Department of Environmental Affairs provides opportunities through different programmes and entities, and is specifically responsible for the EPWP with it’s 14 different programmes through which it has provided opportunities for people through SMMEs and cooperatives.

The Programmes are listed as follow:

  • Working for Water
  • Working for Wetlands
  • Working for Ecosystems
  • Working for Forests
  • Working for Energy (Biomass)
  • Eco-Furniture Programme
  • Working on Fire
  • Working on Waste
  • Working for the Coast
  • Working for Land
  • Greening & Open Space Management
  • People & Parks
  • Wildlife Economy
  • Youth Environmental Service

All fourteen of the EP programmes are designed to secure outcomes that have high returns on investment, over and above the Full-Time Equivalent jobs and Work Opportunities. The contractors and participants are all trained, skilled and empowered to do this work.

South African National Parks (SANParks) is in part, part of the EPWP implementation, and implements a develpment programme for small contractors or businesses. It also supports additional small businesses as part of the Infrastructure Programme.

Further opportunities are being sought through the Chemical and Waste Branch on the Recycling Enterprise Support Programme (RESP).

(aa) Programmes target to support 2,369 SMMEs for 2016/17.

SANParks implements EPWP projects in all national parks, buffer zone areas and some provincial nature reserves. For the 2016/17, the projects will support 501 small contractors, including training and contractor development. As part of the Infrastructure Programme in Kruger National Park, 14 small construction contractors are mentored for civil, building and electrical works.

The iSimagaliso enterprise programme is in its 7th year. It supports 182 small businesses. Businesses receive formal training and ongoing mentoring via a virtual business hub. The small business also qualify to apply for grant funding from the programme. R6.8million has been paid on in grant funds to 88 small businesses.

(bb) The department has budgeted an estimated amount of R 1.2 billion for the 2016/17 financial year which will be procured using SMMEs.

The amount budgeted for the small contractors in the EPWP programme under SANParks is R166 million. An estimated amount of R58.8 million was budgeted for the small construction contactors in Kruger National Park.

Through the Waste Management Bureau, an approximate amount of 11 million is set aside for the Recycling Enterprise Support Programme (RESP) initiative.

For iSimangaliso, the amount that has been budgeted for this year is R1.2m.

(cc) Throught the 14 different programmes, a minimum of 1519 SMMEs, 46524 Work Opportunities and 23 467 Full Time Equivalents will be created in 2016/17, a further 140 temporary jobs will be created and supported in the Kruger construction programme.

It is also envisaged that a 150 jobs will be created through the Recycling Enterprise Support Programme.

For iSimangaliso, it is anticipated that the development programmes run by iSimangaliso will create approximately 2000 jobs in this financial year

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07 June 2016 - NW1536

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture”

1. What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2015-17 financial year? (NW1707E)

Reply:

(a) The amount spend on advertising in the 2015-2016 financial year

(i) Department’s adverts

Advert on Bursaries (Non-Employees)

119,738.70

Advert: Promotional Items

854,365.00

Advert: Marketing

5,689,523.85

Advert: Recruitment

754,885.76

Advert: Tenders

390,327.24

Total spent

R7 808,840.55

 

(ii) Public Entities

I have 27 entities reporting to me, to compile this information it will take time, but as soon as it is collated I will forward the necessary information to the Honourable Member.

(b) Amount budgeted for Advertising 2016/17 financial year

(i) Department 9.2 million

07 June 2016 - NW1230

Profile picture: Mahlangu, Mr JL

Mahlangu, Mr JL to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources:

With regards to the evaluation of safety at Lily Mine in Mpumalanga South Africa, the world and the community members of Mpumalanga were shocked with the incident that occurred in Lilly Mine in Nkomazi Mpumalanga where 3 mine workers went down 80m into a sink hole. The communities across the country shared a hope and anxiety of the families and miners at Lily Mine that are distraught. In your recent media and public announcement you made the point that it will take between 6 to 8 months for the rescue team to reach the container. Up to the date “The families of Mnisi, Mazibuko and Nyerende are still in our prayers and we trust that the emotional and psychological support they are receiving will assist them to cope with the traumatic experience.

Reply:

The question is:-

  1. Whether the department was aware that the container office was actually located in such a dangerous location.

A formal investigation is underway in terms of the legal provisions and will assist in identifying the underlying causes of the accident. On completion of investigation, recommendations will be made to prevent similar accidents.

   2. Is it your expectation the mine would have known that the container is in a dangerous location.

The above-mentioned formal investigation will assist in identifying the underlying causes of the accident.

   3. Has your department conducted assessment on other mines in the country to determine that no such dangers await other mineworkers?

The mine inspections and audits are continuously being conducted with the aim of preventing harm on the mineworkers.

In a case where sub-standard condition, act or non compliance to the provisions of the Mine Health and Safety Act is observed during a mine inspection or audit, appropriate actions are immediately taken to remedy such conditions.

  4. If yes which mines? If not why not?

The mine inspections and audits are conducted at all the operating mines.

  5.  Do we have assurance that such or similar accident will not revisit the country

We endeavor to prevent mine accidents from occurring and lessons learnt from the above-mentioned investigation will be used to improve safety in the mining sector.

   6.  Does the country have requisite skills to deal with disasters of this nature?

South Africa has the requisite skills to deal with disasters at mines and our country’s Mine Rescues Services (MRS) assisted in the Chile Mine disaster in which 33 trapped mine workers were rescued successful after 69 days.

  7. If yes where is it located, and why do we find ourselves in this situation like it is at Lily Mine where it will take close to a year to reach the container where miners are trapped?

At the Mine Rescue Services of South Africa. The rescue operations have not been abandoned but options which will ensure safe rescue operations are being pursued. This is as a result of the deterioration of ground conditions at the mine.

  8. If not why don’t we have such capacity?

South Africa has the requisite skills and capacity.

  9. Who is thus responsible for the situation that we find ourselves in?

The accident investigation will assist in identifying the underlying causes of the accident.

 

 

Approved/not approved

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-………………/………………/2016

07 June 2016 - NW1082

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Khoza, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) Has any of her senior officials met with certain persons (names furnished) during the period 1 January 2009 up to 31 December 2015 and (b) has any of the entities reporting to her awarded any contracts to Sahara Holdings, Comair, Oakbay Investments, Islandsite Investments, Afripalm Horizons Stakes, The New Age Media, JIC Mining Services and Vusizwe Media in the specified period; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) is the amount of each specified contract?

Reply:

Question a.

a. DOD personnel did engage with COMAIR with respect to the requirements listed in paragraph.

(b.) No senior officials were involved in this regard.

b (i.) The DOD (SA Air Force) awarded two (2) contracts to "COMAIR LTD" (V32C9) during the specific period in question for the following requirements.

• 2012: for the training of four (4) members on Flight Dispatchers Course to the value of R134 976,00.

• 2014: for CSIR skills training for SA Air Force members to the value of R28 500,00.

07 June 2016 - NW1601

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any policies have been put in place to ensure that employees from (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her undergo advanced driving courses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) how many employees from (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her have undergone advanced driving courses in the (aa) 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years, (b) what were the costs in this regard and (c) what criteria were used to select employees to undergo the specified courses?

Reply:

Department

(1) (a) No employees within the Department underwent advanced driving courses. The Department does not have a plan for employees to attend such courses.

(1) (b)

(2) (a) (i) (aa) 2013 – 14 – None

(2) (a) (i) (bb) 2014 – 15 – None

(2) (a) (i) (cc) 2015 – 16 – None

(2) (b) Not applicable

(2) (c ) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (b) None of the ACSA Corporate office drivers or employees has attended advanced driving courses. ACSA intends sending all drivers for an advance driving course in the current financial year.

(2) Please refer to response provided in 1 (b) above.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. (b) As per ATNS Technical Services instructions, all ATNS Technical Support staff attend an advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course on an annual basis. This is typically a 2 day training course where participants receive both theoretical and practical training.

(2) (a) (ii) None

(aa) 2013-14: 134 Technical Staff members approximately R 108, 540-00

(bb) 2014-15: 132 Technical Staff members approximately R112, 860-00

(cc) 2015-16: 130 Technical Staff members approximately R117, 000-00

(b) For the 2015-2016 financial year the typical cost of a 2 day advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course was R900 per person.

(c) All ATNS staff members, who are required to drive to remote communications, navigation or surveillance sites as part of their routine work activities, are required to attend an advanced 4 X 4 drivers training course.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (b) The nature of the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s (SACAA) mandate and duties undertaken by its employees does not warrant them to undergo advanced driving courses.

       2. (a) (i) N/A (ii) None (aa) None, (bb) None and (cc) None, (b) N/A (c) N/A.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(1) (b) At SANRAL all project managers that had to travel officially to construction sites underwent advance driving courses up to November 2013. This has since been stopped due to the National Treasury cost containment measures published in November 2013.

(2) (a)(ii)(aa) For SANRAL our 2 survey vehicle drivers was send on advance truck driving course (bb) None, and (cc) None,

(b) R4 050-00 per driver

(c) Required by the truck manufacturer that supplied the truck for the survey vehicle as part of the warranty agreement.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

1. (b) The C-BRTA does not have any policies in place to ensure that employees undergo through advanced driving courses. While the C-BRTA is aware that advanced driving courses will contribute to road safety, due to financial contraints no advanced driving training has been rolled out to employees. We however continue to work with other stakeholders in the road transport industry for collaborative partnerships with a view to promote road safety.

2. (a) (ii) (aa) 2013-14 None

(bb) 2014-15 None and (cc) None in 2015-16 financial years

(b) No costs were incurred as no advanced driving courses were offered.

(c) Not applicable as no employees were offered the advanced driving training in the 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years, those that would have undergone would have done so in their personal capacity.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

1. (b) The RAF has not put policies in place to ensure that employees undergo advanced driving courses; the RAF has however arranged for defensive driver training which included four employees);

2. (a)(ii) (aa) None

(bb) None, and (cc) Four (4)

(b) the cost related to the four employees attendance of the defensive driving course was R 4 200 (VAT inclusive), and

(c) no criteria applied specifically to the employees’ selection for enrolment for the defensive driving course

.

Road Traffic Management Corporations (RTMC)

1. (b) The RTMC does not have a policy that compels employees to undergo advanced driving courses. However the RTMC realized the importance of such training for members of the National Traffic Police and has included such practical training as a module in the training of National Traffic Officers.

2. (aa) In 2013-14 six (6) employees

(bb) in 2014-15, 184 employees and (cc) 2015-16 None employee undertook advanced driver training.

(b) R90 222

(c) Training was provided as part of the up-skilling of National Traffic Officers.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

1. (b) The RTIA does not have a policy that compels employees to undergo advanced driving courses. However, The entity’s approved HR strategy seeks to place Road Safety at the core of organisational culture and as such driver behaviour programmes including advanced driving training will be implemented

2. (a) (aa) 2013-14 – None

(bb) 2014-15 – None , and (cc) 2015-16 – None

(b) N/A

  1. N/A

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

1. (b) The current fleet policy is silent on driver training and advanced driving. However, the company is in the process of reviewing its fleet policy and driver training is included in as follows:-

“All drivers/officials will be evaluated at regular intervals and training will be undertaken to ensure that they comply with the legislated laws”.

2. No employee of PRASA has undergone advanced drive training.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

(1). The Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) does not have a policy in place that ensures employees undergo advanced driving course. The nature of the work done does not require driving skills. The majority of our work is done within the railway environment.

(2) Not applicable. Refer to 1 above.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(a) There is currently no policy for advance training.

(b) None of the employees have gone through advance training courses. Advanced Driving Courses were not budgeted for in the previous financial years.

None of the employees have done advance driving courses.

Ports Regulator of South Africa

  1. (b) The Ports Regulator has not spent any funds to train and develop employees for advanced driving lessons. This is because the job requirements for all Ports Regulator employees do not require employees to utilise advanced driving skills.
  2. (a) (ii) No employee of the Ports Regulator has undergone advanced driving courses in (aa) 2013/14, (bb) 2014/15 and (cc) 2015/16. (b) not applicable, (c) not applicable

07 June 2016 - NW965

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, since his reply to oral question 123 on 15 September 2014, he has taken any action to further investigate the findings of the Pikoli report, released in March 2013, into corruption in the Integrated Public Transport Plan in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the municipality:

The Pikoli report was considered by Counsel (Adv Ronassen), who provided legal opinion to the effect that the report was nothing else but a precursor to a full scale investigation. In light of the above, the full scale investigation is currently being conducted by the National Treasury.

07 June 2016 - NW1433

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Police

(1)Whether the detective division at the Kempton Park Police Station in Gauteng received any new vehicles in the 2015-16 financial year; if so, how many did they receive; (2) (a) what is the total number of vehicles the specified detective division currently has, (b) how many are in working order and (c) on what date were the vehicles that have broken down sent to the mechanical workshop; (3) (a) how many detectives are there currently at the specified police station, (b) how many of the specified detectives have (i) attended and (ii) passed the detective course and (c) how many dockets is each detective currently investigating; (4) when will the detectives at the specified police station receive additional vehicles in order to ensure the specified police station complies with the national ratio of number of detectives to vehicles?

Reply:

(1) Yes, Kempton Park Detective Service received two (2) vehicles during the 2015/2016 financial year.

(2) (a) Kempton Park Detective Service currently have 25 vehicles.

(b) 25 vehicles are in working order.

(c) Not applicable.

(3) (a) There are 67 detectives currently at Kempton Park Detective Service.

(b) (i) 42 detectives attended a detective course.

(ii) 42 passed the detective course.

(c) Each Investigating Officer has an average of 200 dockets.

(4) The allocation of vehicles for the 2016/2017 financial year has not been finalised yet.

07 June 2016 - NW1135

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the latest available statistics, (a) how many (i) nonprofit and privately run (aa) drug and (bb) alcohol rehabilitation facilities are there in the country and (b) how many persons can each specified facility accomodate?

Reply:

(a)

    (i) There are currently 73 nonprofit / privately run alcohol and drug rehabilitation facilities

(b) For capacity of each centre, see attached annexure

07 June 2016 - NW1302

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

What progress has been made to date with each of the specific recommendations made by the SA Human Rights Commission report (details furnished) of October 2013, into the Child Protection Register?

Reply:

Progress made to date with each of the specific recommendations made by the SA Human Rights Commission report (details furnished) of October 2013, into the Child Protection Register, is as follows:

1. Recommendation 11.1: The DSD is required to put in place urgent measures accurately and fully populated with available information. This recommendation is made on the basis that the DSD has demonstrated a capacity to increase the capturing of data on Part B of the CPR by more than 1000% since the date of the Commission’s initial request in September 2012.to this end, the Commission therefore requests that:

11.1.1: The updated CPR is submitted to it within the next 4 months for the period commencing 2012 to date.” Pg. 45

1.1. Progress

  • Two progress reports on updated CPR were submitted in 2014 and 2015 respectively. The third report is still being prepared for submission. The Register has now been updated to a record of 904 names on persons found unsuitable to work with children.
  • DSD has continued to hold bi-lateral meetings with Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) where implementation issues are discussed. Meetings have been held with court officials and Chief magistrates to inform them about their obligations regarding the Register.
  • The efforts of obtaining information on persons found unsuitable to work with children from forums such as the South African Social Services Professional Council (SACE) has not been successful. DSD has written to SACE requesting compliance with Section 120 (1) (c) of the Children’s Act, Act (No. 38 of 2005).

2. Recommendation 11.2:

“The DSD is required to conduct an urgent and comprehensive audit of challenges and needs across relevant business units to inform its needs, within the next 3(three) months. A report of the audit is to be provided to the Commission on completion thereof.’’ Pg 45

2.1. Progress

The department has conducted an internal audit on the implementation of the register). The report covers the period from 01 June 2013 to 31 July 2014. A key finding is lack of adequate capacity for the effective implementation of the Register. The report made recommendations that must be implemented during the 2015/16 financial year. The department has, thereafter, successfully secured R6, 5million to capacitate the CPR unit. The grant is for a period of three years for the appointment of staff and purchase equipment. Contract staff have been appointed as follows:

  • 10 Data capturers
  • 8 Registry clerks
  • 6 social workers
  • 1 Administration officer

Data capturers and registry clerks have assumed their duties on the 16/02/2016. The administration officer was absorbed when her previous contract expired. Social workers were only interviewed on 23/02/2016 and Human Resource is currently awaiting the security clearance from the National Intelligence Agency.

The human and financial capacity acquired will enable the department to focus on consultations with the courts and fora to ensure that the Register is properly updated to prevent unsuitable persons from working with children.

3. Recommendation 11.6:

In light of the pending review of the Act, the Commission recommends that the DSD as the leading department in this regard, consult on possible reforms to the Act with a view to increasing practical efficiencies, accuracy and accessibility. In this regard section 120(4) of the Act could be considered for reform directed at reducing the administrative burden currently being experienced by the Courts by allowing Courts to deem a person unsuitable to work with children upon the relevant conviction in criminal proceedings:

(4) In criminal proceedings a person must be found (DEEMED) unsuitable to work with children-

(a) On conviction of murder, attempted murder, rape, indecent assault or assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm with regard to a child;

The recommended amendment may address the need for a second and separate administrative finding of unsuitability from having to be made, allowing the names of persons so convicted to be added to the CPR without the requirement of an unsuitability finding”. Pg.45

3.1. Progress:

The status of progress with the Amendment Bill tabled in Parliament.

The draft Bill was submitted to the SPCHD Technical Working Group on 17 February 2015 and to the SPCHD Cabinet Committee on 24 February 2015 and both Committees granted approval for its introduction to Parliament. It was then introduced to the National Assembly and is currently before the Portfolio Committee on Social Development as the Children’s Amendment Bill 13 of 2015.

Among other things, the Bill seeks to amend section 120 of the Children’s Act to provide that persons convicted of certain offences against children be automatically deemed unsuitable to work with children.

The Portfolio Committee conducted public hearings, and held several briefing meeting with relevant stakeholders. The process is at an advanced stage and the Bill is awaiting adoption by the Committee. Thereafter, it will be passed in the National Assembly and be referred to the National Council of Provinces for consideration by the Select Committee on Social Services.

4. The Commission further requested additional information to form part of the progress report as outlined below:

4.1. Status and copy of the draft policy document on the possible merger of the CPR and National Register for Sex Offenders

The portfolio committee on Social Development and Justice mandated the departments of Social Development (DSD) and Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) to look into the possibility of merging the two registers for the purpose of addressing the perceived duplication and related costs, and thereafter provide the following:

  • report on the possible options that are available to address the duplication between the National Child Protection Register and the National Register for Sex Offenders;
  • make recommendations; and
  • obtain policy guidance from the Minister of Social Development and the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services.

The registers were established under different legislative mandates which require the respective departments to establish and maintain them. The legislative mandates are as follows:

  • NCPR: Children’s Act (No. 38 of 2005).
  • NRSO: Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act (No. 32 of 2007).

The CPR provides for the protection of all children against all forms of abuse which include the physical, sexual, emotional and deliberate neglect (as stipulated in terms of Part A of the Register) and to ensure that offenders are prevented from working with these children (as stipulated in terms of Part B of the Register). The offenders are not limited to a criminal procedure, but include civil proceedings conducted in family courts including children’s courts. The Act further provide for Forums such as SACE to make findings of unsuitability on such offenders following disciplinary proceedings. The CPR, therefore, provides a wider scope of protection for all children irrespective of the type of offence committed and the nature of disability of that child.

The NRSO on the other hand, is a register on offenders convicted of sexual offences against children and persons with mental disabilities of all ages.

To comply with the portfolio committee mandate, therefore, both DSD and DoJ&CD have completed a report which is currently receiving the attention of respective Ministers. The report has identified three options for purposes of supporting amendment of legislation in order to merge the NCPR and the NRSO into one single Register.

4.2. Progress in respect of improvements to the information technology supporting the CPR programme

The information technology is currently redeveloping the electronic systems to integrate them on a single platform. The system is also being redeveloped to link with other systems within the Integrated Justice System (IJS) which include DoJ&CD, South African Police Service, Home Affairs, Correctional Services and National Prosecuting Authority which are vital for the electronic integration of information to the CPR.

6. CONCLUSION

DSD will continue to update the Commission regarding the implementation of the CPR in terms of the recommendations as stipulated in the Commission’s report.

07 June 2016 - NW1131

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How many officers are currently employed by each of the metropolitan police department?

Reply:

(1) The following response is based on the information provided by eThekwini, Cape Town Metropolitan municipalities and Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs. Mangaung and Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan municipalities indicated that they do not have a Metropolitan Police departments. Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality has Security and Traffic Services which has about 600 employees. Buffalo City did not meet the deadline for submission of responses. However, the municipality has been requested to respond accordingly. The information will be delivered to the honourable member as soon as it is received.

(2) The number of officers are currently employed by each of the metropolitan police departments are provided below:

Metropolitan Municipality

Number of officers are currently employed each of the metropolitan police department

eThekwini

1866 officers

Cape Town

557 officers

Ekurhuleni

1375 officers

Johannesburg

3017 officers

Tshwane

3815 officers

Mangaung

No applicable

Nelson Mandela Bay

No applicable

by

07 June 2016 - NW1363

Profile picture: Mahlangu, Mr JL

Mahlangu, Mr JL to ask the MR J L MAHLANGU (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF ARTS AND CULTURE:

(1) Whether he is aware (a) of the existence of a provincial heritage site, Canteen Kopje, in the Northern Cape, which is of archeological and heritage significance and is facing imminent destruction, (b) that research at the specified site began in the mid-20th century and has been on-going since 1997 (c) that various excavations in a number of locations at the site have revealed tools dating back 2,3 million years to the three phases of the Acheulean hand axe, Middle and Later Stone Age occupations, a Tswana/!Kora occupation relating closely to local communities and the remains of historic activities, (d) that a mining permit was issued in 2014 and the SA Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) successfully acquired a Cease Works Order which was lifted in March 2016 after which work by a diamond mining company commenced on 16 March 2016, (e) that the current mining programme will, conservatively estimated, destroy up to 40% of the heritage site, (f) that the fenced-off area includes the excavation areas of the University of the Witwatersrand and of Toronto and the area developed for tourism, (g) that no heritage impact assessment or archaeological impact assessment was conducted and the mining company does not have a heritage permit, which is in contravention of the National Heritage Resources Act, Act 25 of 1999, (h) that there is a conservation management plan for the site and (i) that our country has a constitutional, legal and moral obligation and responsibility to preserve and protect the heritage resources and resources with archaeological significance; if so, what steps does he intend to take to ensure the protection and preservation of the specified heritage resources; (2) in view of the lapses in adhering to the specified Act, what steps will SAHRA take to ensure that the specified heritage is preserved; (3) are there any other site(s) in the country facing a similar threat; if so, can he give the assurance that his department will support the heritage resources and protect them against the threat posed by mining and others?

Reply:

1.Yes, (a) I am aware of a heritage site called Canteen Kopje, a declared Provincial Heritage Site, located on Portion 9 of West Commonage 687, in the Barkley West District of the Northern Cape.

(b) The site was first declared as a National Monument on 29 January 1948 in terms of section 8 of the Natural and Historical Monuments, Relics and Antiquities Act, 1934. Under the current heritage act, the site enjoys protection at a provincial level.

(c) Although it is true that the significance of site was well known during the mid-20th century, local and international interest in the site waned during the second half of the 20th century. The site has been the focus of renewed research interest from the 1990s partly fuelled by significant steps forward in scientific methods, which allows for greater understanding of the formation of the site. Although the scientific work focuses on the behaviour of our earliest human ancestors, the site also contains important information about extant communities and the history and legacy of diamond mining in South Africa. Although the date of this occurrence is not known recent research by SAHRA indicates that Canteen Kopje may be the oldest known archaeological occurrence in South Africa.

(d) The Department of Mineral Resources issued a mining permit to Ms Jacky M. Wesi for Portion 5 of West Commonage, Barkley West in October 2014. Furthermore, a cease works order was issued to prevent the unnecessary destruction of significant heritage resources without the required mitigatory measures in place to prevent the undocumented destruction of such resources.

(e) The information provided to the heritage authorities and SAHRA, in particular, did not indicate that up to forty percent of the site would be mined,

(f) and specifically excluding the areas of current research by the Universities of Witwatersrand and Toronto. Similarly, according to the information provided the mining would have occurred outside the boundaries of the declared Provincial Heritage Site.

(g) This permit was issued without prior consultation with the appropriate heritage authorities. The heritage significance of the site and the provisions of the NHRA were communicated to relevant stakeholders.

(h) Yes I am aware of a Conservation Management plan for the site.

(i) Section 8 of the National Heritage Resources Act (Act 25 of 1999) promotes a three-tier system of Heritage Resources Management, in which national functions are the responsibility of the South African Heritage Resources Agency; provincial functions are the responsibility of the provincial heritage authority, and local level functions are the responsibility of local authorities.

2. A recent final court interdict granted by the Kimberley High Court has prevented any further mining on the declared site of Canteen Kopje. Although it is currently protected as a Provincial Heritage Site, SAHRA has initiated an administrative process to re-examine the grading of the site to possible Grade 1 status

3. To ensure that heritage resources are afforded the protection that it deserves it is important that the provisions of the NHRA are fully implemented. This means ensuring the provincial heritage authorities and local authorities are capacitated and adequately resourced. Currently, there are only three fully functioning provincial authorities ensuring compliance with the provisions of the NHRA. This means that the potential exists for the unwanted destruction of significant heritage resources.

07 June 2016 - NW1239

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What are the (i) circumstances and (ii) time lines that led to the Public Service Commission (PSC) head office currently being based in temporary office accommodation, (b) what is the term of the lease for the current offices and (c) when is the PSC expected to move into more suitable office accommodation; (2) (a) what was the once-off cost to relocate the PSC to its current temporary office accommodation, including the costs (i)(aa) to move office furniture, (bb) to install computer networks and (cc) to refurbish office space, (ii) of estate agents and (iii) any other relevant expenditure in this regard, (b) what is the total current monthly cost of the rental of the temporary office accommodation, including all levies and costs related to parking bays and (c) how does this expenditure compare to the monthly rental of the PSC’s previous office accommodation; (3) what would the monthly costs have been if the PSC moved to the office accommodation identified by the Department of Public Works?

Reply:

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent Constitutional body, and its budget is appropriated via the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

1(a)(i) The Public Service Commission, forwarded a request to the Department of Public Works (DPW) on 29 October 2010 for the extension of the lease agreement for a period of five (5) years as the building (Commission House in Arcadia, Pretoria) was still suitable and met the requirements of the PSC. The PSC experienced challenges with the renewal process.

Seeing that there were delays with the renewal of the lease as well as the fact that the PSC had reached the optimal occupancy of the building, the PSC requested the DPW to procure alternative office accommodation in July 2012.

In order to allow the DPW to commence with the procurement process of the alternative accommodation, the PSC agreed that the lease agreement be renewed for a further period of eighteen (18) months to ensure that PSC relocates into the new alternative office building on 1 April 2014.

A building was identified as suitable alternative accommodation for the PSC and a lease agreement was signed. However, during tenant installation process there were concerns raised by the PSC e.g. additional costs to be borne by the PSC relating to tenant installation. This resulted in the process being suspended by the DPW. Due to the dispute, the PSC did not take occupation of the building.

The PSC forwarded another request to DPW in June 2015, after receiving notice to vacate Commission House, to commence with the sourcing alternative accommodation.

1(a) (ii) The PSC requested DPW on 1 June 2015 to re-advertise the bid as the PSC was notified of the refurbishment of the building (Commission House) taking into account that the building was supposed to be already vacant then (the PSC was supposed to have vacated the building in 2014).

(b) The term of the lease for the current offices is for a period of 24 months, with an exit clause after 18 months.

(c) The PSC has requested DPW to source permanent accommodation. The process will be completed by no later than January 2017.

2(a) The PSC paid R1.2 million once off costs towards the relocation to temporary accommodation (Absa Towers) for IT network infrastructure.

2(i)(aa) The PSC did not incur costs to move furniture. The Department of Public Works absorbed 50% of the relocation costs and the current landlord paid 50%.

2(i)(bb) The PSC paid R1.2 million for IT network infrastructure costs.

2(i)(cc) The PSC did not incur costs for refurbishing office space. The costs were covered by the tenant installation allowance paid by the landlord.

2(ii) The PSC did not pay estate agents fees.

2(iii) There is no other expenditure that was incurred.

2(b) The total current monthly cost of the rental of the temporary office accommodation is R1 407 312.79 for 8907 square metres.

2(c) The rental for the previous office accommodation was R523 087.00 per month for 6533.75 square metres. The rental for previous accommodation was not market related as ever since the PSC took occupation of the building in 1997, the ownership of the building changed 4 times without the annual rental escalation affected. The current monthly rental expenditure is high compare to the previous monthly expenditure on office accommodation.

(3) The monthly costs would have been lower if the PSC would have moved to the office accommodation identified by the Department of Public Works

The monthly rental for the office accommodation identified by the DPW would have been R 1 361 352.36 for 8907 square metres including parking.

07 June 2016 - NW1611

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(a) How many officials from his department attended the 2016 World Economic Forum on Africa that was held in Kigali, Rwanda, from 11 May 2016 to 13 May 2016, as part of the South African delegation and (b) what were (i) the names of the attendees and (ii) their formal designations or positions in Government?

Reply:

One official, Dr Molefe Pule, Chief of Staff in the Ministry of Economic Development, accompanied me to Kigali, Rwanda for the World Economic Forum Africa.

-END-

07 June 2016 - NW536

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the ministerial speech delivered on the occasion of the debate on the Budget Vote of his department on 13 May 2015, and specifically to the creation of a pool of labour relations specialists and a team of legal experts from the Department of Justice and Correctional Services to deal with the backlog of disciplinary cases following Cabinet’s approval, what are the full details of (a) the pool of labour relations and legal experts formed after Cabinet’s decision, (b) the backlog of disciplinary cases with which they were intended to deal and (c) the progress made to date in addressing the specified backlog?

Reply:

On 09 September 2014 Cabinet approved the establishment of an internal pool of legal experts and labour relations specialists to deal with the backlog cases of precautionary suspensions in the public service. The DPSA has established a pool of panellists to deal with the backlog of precautionary suspension cases in the public service.

(a) The pool comprises 298 expert investigators, departmental representatives and presiding officers to ensure that the value chain is expedited in an optimal manner. Departments and provinces request assistance on their backlog cases from the DPSA.

(b) According the national and provincial statistical report of September 2014 to 31 March 2016 the total number of the backlog of precautionary suspension cases for national departments and provinces referred to DPSA is 687. The total breakdown consist of 291 cases for the provinces and 396 for the national departments.

(c) The progress made since the inception of the project is the resolution of 384 precautionary backlog cases. The total breakdown of the resolved cases consist of 57 for provinces and 327 for national departments. The percentage for the resolved cases is 56%. Members of the pool are allocated cases on a rotational basis so as to achieve an even spread of cases amongst panellists.

07 June 2016 - NW1639

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her department’s Fourth Quarter Performance Report 2015-16 presented to the Portfolio Committee on Transport on 17 May 2016, what are the reasons for underspending on the (a)(i) Moloto Development Corridor, (ii) National Railway Safety Regulator Amendment Bill [B 32B-2008] and (iii) National Rail Safety Strategy project budget line items under Programme 3 and (b)(i) establishment of the Appeals Committee and (ii) amendment of the Civil Aviation Act, Act 13 of 2009 budget line items under Programme 5?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department completed the feasibility study on the Moloto Development Corridor in September 2014. PRASA submitted the Treasury Approval 1 (TA1) application to National Treasury at the end of October 2014. National Treasury only responded in December 2016. The allocated budget provided for an Option Analysis to be undertaken on the establishment of an appropriate structure to manage and oversee the implementation of the Moloto Rail Development Corridor. As a result of the protracted response by National Treasury and the fact that it was not supportive of the Moloto Rail Development Corridor, the Department did not occur expenditure.

(ii) The reasons underspending on the National Railway Safety Amendment Bill was due to delays in the procurement processes in securing a suitable service provider with the appropriate technical expertise to assist the Department. The service provider was appointed in October 2016.

(iii) The reasons for underspending on the National Railway Safety Strategy is a result of scarce skill related to railway safety expertise within the transport sector. A Request for Proposal was advertised in July (Bid Number DOT/04/2015/RT), however, by closing date, the Department did not received any bids. The tender was re-advertise and a service provider was appointed in January 2016.

(b) (i) The Appeals Committee is operational since 2010. An amount of R 1,45 million was provided for the remuneration of Committee Members. Committee Members are remunerated in terms of Section 123(1) of the Civil Aviation Act, 2009 and in line with the Minister of Finance’s approved Service Benefit Packages for Office Bearers. The need for the Committee to meet is guided by the number and complexity of appeals lodged by Appellants against decisions taken by the Director of Civil Aviation of the South African Civil Aviation Authority. Thirty seven (37) meetings were held in 2015/16 where eight (8) appeals were considered. The allocated amount for this project has been reduced to R 0, 803 million in the 2016/17 financial year.

(ii) Provision has been made in the 2015/16 financial year for and amount of R 1,0 million for the appointment of a specialised legal service provider to draft the Civil Aviation Amendment Bill. There was an urgent need to amend the Civil Aviation Act, 2009, to ensure compliance with international standards and practices set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). A decision, in line with Government’s Cost Saving Initiatives, has been taken to draft the amendments internally by officials in the Department. This has resulted in the under-expenditure as reported under Programme 5.

07 June 2016 - NW1134

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the latest available statistics, (a) how many state-run drug rehabilitation centres are there, (b) where are the specified centres located, (c) how many persons can each specified centre accommodate and (d) how many patients are currently in state-run drug rehabilitation centres?

Reply:

(a) There are currently nine (9) state run treatment centers in the country. The location; capacity and current number of service users in these treatment centers is as follows:

 

Name of treatment centre

(b)

Location

(c)

Capacity

(d)

Current number of service users

Dr Fabian and Florence Ribeiro

Zonderwater Correctional Centre, Cullinan, Gauteng

300

136 (113 adults and 23 children)

Swartfontein

White River, Mpumalanga

75

52 (adults)

Newland Park

Newlands West, KZN

100

36 (26 adults and 10 children)

Madadeni

Madadeni, KZN

80

24 adults)

Khanyani

Newcastle, KZN

24

8 (children)

Witrand

Potchefstroom, North West

18

11(9 adults and 2 children)

De Novo

Kraaifontein, Western Cape

90

86 (70 adult males and 16 children)

Kensington

Maitland, Western Cape

40

40 (adults)

Ernest Malgas

New Brighton, Eastern Cape

38

21 (children)

07 June 2016 - NW1253

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2984 on 22 September 2015, he has received the requested information yet; if not, why not; if so, by when will this information be communicated?

Reply:

The information was provided by uMshwathi Local Municipality and approved by Minister P Gordhan):

  (1) Yes, it was owned by the former Development Services Board (DSB) in 1994 – 1995.

    (a) It was transferred to Air Health Committee, then the Health Committee became Cool Air TLC in 1996 – 2000. In December 2000, the Cool Air TLC was amalgamated into uMshwathi Municipality.

   (b) There were four areas that were controlled by Development Services Board-Dalton, Cool Air, Wartburg and New Hanover, that were converted into Health Committees and the assets from DSB were handed over to these Health Committees.

  (2) The arrangements for Cool Air Secondary School is for them to book the hall in advance at no cost to the school.

 

07 June 2016 - NW1640

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Why did KwaZulu-Natal request a rollover of its Provincial Road Maintenance Grant and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) According to our records which are contained in the Infrastructure Reporting Model (IRM), Kwazulu Natal Province have sent their allocation for Provincial Roads Maintenance Grants (PRMG) though the department as the Transferring National Officer (TNO), have withheld the fourth tranche payment.

(b) The Department is engaging with the province together with National Treasury to rectify expenditure as reported on IRM while we are awaiting response from National Treasury for the approval of rollover funds withheld. Note that Provincial Treasuries manage rollover funds on behalf of National Treasury.

07 June 2016 - NW1502

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Ms B S Masango (DA) to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

(1) Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) The DAC has not been approached by any political party for funding in the 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16 and to date in the 2016/17 financial years;

(2) The DAC has not provided any form of funding to any political party in the 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16 and to date in the 2016/17 financial years.

07 June 2016 - NW1470

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to Commitment 8 contained in the 3rd South African Open Government Partnership Country Action Plan, 2016 to 2018, an inter-departmental committee responsible for developing, implementing and reporting on the country’s implementation and/or action plan has been put in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the development of the country’s implementation and/or action plan has commenced; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes. On 26 October 2015, Cabinet approved the establishment of the inter-departmental committee on beneficial ownership. The committee was set up at the inaugural meeting of the committee held on 27 February 2016. It is constituted by the following institutions and government departments convened by the Department of Public Service and Administration:

 (a) National Treasury (NT);

 (b) Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC);

(c) Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA);

(d) South African Revenue Service (SARS):

(e) South African Police Service (SAPS):

(f) National Prosecuting Authority (NPA);

(g) Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (Doi & CD);

(h) Department of Trade and Industry (DTI);

(i) Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC);

(j) Department of Social Development (DSD);

(k) Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO);

(l) State Security Agency (SSA);

(m) National Intelligence Coordinating Committee (NICOC);

(n) South African Reserve Bank (SARB);

(o) Financial Services Board (FSB);

(p) Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE);

(q) Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB);

(r) Law Society of South Africa (LSSA);

(s) National Gambling Board (NGB); and

(t) Independent Regulatory Board of Auditors (IRBA)

(2) Yes. Development of the country’s implementation and/or action plan has commenced, the committee is currently finalising the draft action plan. The draft action plan is derived from the G20 High Level Principles endorsed by Cabinet in October 2015, which sets-out the required actions to be undertaken by the Government of the Republic of South Africa.

07 June 2016 - NW396

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether R 800 million was moved from the SA National Defence Force’s (SANDF) budget to pay Deloitte to do an audit of SANDF’s battle preparedness; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what were the (i) motivation and (ii) objectives of the specified audit, (b) why does the SANDF not have the capacity to perform the specified audit itself, (c) why was Deloitte contracted to perform the specified audit, (d) when did (i) she and (ii) her department approve the specified audit and (e) what procurement processes were followed before appointing the specified company; (2) whether there are any higher priorities for spending the funds instead of the specified audit, especially in the face of constant complaints that not enough funding is provided to among other things South Africa’s contribution to peacekeeping forces in Africa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details for prioritising the specified audit?

Reply:

Question 1.

a.(i) According to the Department of Defence's records, the Department has not concluded any audit contract with Deloitte to the value of R800 million. However, Deloitte was contracted to perform a Through Life Capability Management (TLCM) study over four years at a cost of R230 million. This requirement is a resultant of phase 1 of the TLCM Project conducted during 2013/14 in the Chief of Logistics environment. The results of TLCM phase 1 reflected that the DOD is not on par

with international standards in terms of TLCM best practice. The DOD/Armscor Acquisition, Technology Development processes and the objectives of the RESTRICTED 2 National Defence Industry Council (NDIC) were not part of the C Log study, a requirement therefore existed to align the above mentioned aspects with both international TLCM standards as well as the Defence Review 2015.

Question 2.

The TLCM project is a high priority exercise since it will ultimately contribute to a cost effective SANDF and is not at the cost of other current priorities

07 June 2016 - NW1252

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2735 on 25 August 2015, he has received the requested information yet; if not, why not; if so, by when will this information be communicated?

Reply:

The response below is based on information received from the Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality (as approved by Minister P Gordhan on 3rd Sep 2015)

 (a) The municipality allocated a total amount of R156 million for Zone Plans, i.e. block sum allocations to each ward, in the 2014-15 budget.

(b) (i) The funds allocated to each ward are utilized for the implementation of small projects that are identified by Councilors in consultation with ward residents. (ii) Wards benefiting have been reduced to 78 wards that have less developed municipal infrastructure and the budget allocation for each ward varies depending on the project identified. The 25 wards that were excluded are highly developed and have all the necessary municipal services.

(c) The quested information still needs to be discussed first at Council level as it relates to the 2014/15 financial year’s budget, which ended on 31 July 2015.

07 June 2016 - NW298

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a municipal public accounts committee; if not, why not; if so, (a) is the committee chaired by a member of the opposition, (b) what is the name of the chairperson, (c) are meetings of the committee open to the public and (d) how are the specified meetings advertised?

Reply:

The responses below were received from the metropolitan municipalities:

All the Metropolitan Municipalities stated that they have a Municipal Public Accounts Committees.

The table below illustrates the responses to question (a), (b), (c) and (d) as per municipality.

Attached please find here: Table

 

07 June 2016 - NW705

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)How much did it cost to fund each district municipality to fulfil its mandates in the (a)(i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14 and (iv) 2014-15 municipal financial years and (b) since 1 July 2015; (2) whether, with reference to the budget speech delivered by the Minister of Finance, Mr Pravin Gordhan, on 24 February 2016, measures will be implemented to curb expenditure by each district municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any studies have been conducted to determine the viability of maintaining each district municipality whose entire income comes from the national fiscus; if not, why not; if so, what were the outcomes

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

07 June 2016 - NW1242

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the report produced by the Public Service Commission, entitled Assessment of the Implementation of Policy Framework on the Appointment of Ministerial Staff in National and Provincial Departments, dated May 2014, what are the details of the action taken to date to address each of the 14 recommendations at the end of the specified report?

Reply:

The details of the action taken to date to address each of the 14 Recommendations are attached herewith below as Annexure A. These details were compiled by the Public Service Commission, after consultation with the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA), which is the custodian of the Ministerial Handbook and all Human Resource Management (HRM) prescripts in the Public Service. Furthermore, the National School of Government (NSG) was also consulted.

These details illustrate that the Department of Public Service and Administration has made significant progress towards implementation of the Recommendations made by the Public Service Commission. The National School of Government has made noticeable preparatory work to roll-out implementation of the executive development programme, and plans are also under way to develop other targeted training programmes.

ANNEXURE A: Progress n implementation of each of the 14 Recommendations made in the Report - Assessment of the Implementation of Policy Framework on the Appointment of Ministerial Staff in National and Provincial Departments

No.

RECOMMENDATION FROM PSC

PROGRESS REPORT

1

The DPSA should develop a focused policy framework that will regulate the employment practices of persons who provide support and serve in EAs' offices

Amended Public Service Regulations and other prescripts regulate the employment practices of persons appointed in the offices of Executive Authorities. It covers the recruitment process, nature of appointment, allowance payable, termination of services and other employment conditions. According to the

2

All SMS levels in Ministries irrespective of the method of recruitment (headhunting or advertising) must be subjected to proper selection processes (i.e. interviews and competency assessment) and for any identified competency gap, a developmental plan must be put in place to address the gap. This plan must be developed in consultation with the person concerned and be managed by the Director-General or Head of Department.

According to the Public Service Regulations, all members of the SMS appointed in offices of EAs are supposed to be subjected to proper recruitment and selections processes and the performance management and development system for SMS. In addition, the Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum Entry Requirements for SMS, which came into effect on 01 April 2015, also applies to all SMS members in the offices of EAs. SMS members should meet the minimum qualification and experience requirements prior to appointment.

The challenge is that there are still many incidences of non-compliance with prescripts, as such, the DPSA has undertaken to conduct targeted support for departments during the 2016/17 financial year.

3.

The Director-General or Head of Department has to provide "primary advisory" support to the EA due to the resources (e.g. research experts, etc.) he/she manages in the department, an administrative reporting line to the Director-General or Head of Department must be enforced for the Chief of Staff.

According to the DPSA, this is the current practice as Chiefs of Staff report to their respective Heads of Department on all administrative matters.

4

Compulsory induction, orientation/training on the functions performed in Ministries, the relationship between the Ministry and the department, the protocols of being a sessional employee and the benefits thereof and how to support the Minister with political responsibilities should be conducted with staff working in the EAs' offices, either at departmental level or coordinated by the National School of Government (NSG) or the DPSA. The current and/or previous competent and experienced Chief of Staff should be part of the training team and assist in this regard.

It is expected that the orientation of staff working in Ministries would be conducted by respective departments. The extent of implementation for such orientation programmes has not been validated.

The generic orientation course for staff in Ministries has not been developed yet. Its development has been prioritised by the NSG. Consultations with relevant stakeholders are expected to commence during the 2016/17 financial year.

5

There should be a dedicated course for Chiefs of Staff and a forum to share experiences and to professionalise this strategic role. There should be a way of career-pathing for experienced Chiefs of Staff.

The course for Chiefs of Staff has not been developed yet. Its development has been prioritised by the NSG. Consultations with relevant stakeholders are expected to commence during the 2016/17 financial year.

6

A Legislation based Compliance Framework for

Ministries should be developed by the DPSA.

Government has adopted the Management Performance Assessment Tool (MPAT) to track and report on compliance to relevant legislation by departments.

7

The DPSA should review the organisational structures of Ministries according to the size and responsibility of the Ministry.

The DPSA has developed a revised generic organisational structure for Offices of EAs and Deputy Ministers as part of the process of amending the Ministerial Handbook.

The concern is that the revised Ministerial Handbook has not been approved by Cabinet, as such, the generic organisational structures are not implemented.

It is therefore important for the Minister for Public Service and Administration to fast-track the approval of the revised Ministerial Handbook.

8

Uniform job profiles and descriptions should be enforced for Chiefs of Staff across the Public Service. Key competencies and minimum qualifications for the position of Chief of Staff must be well-defined. This will help to guide the selection and appointment process and Ministers must be informed of and adhere to this guide. Uniform job profiles should be developed for the rest of the staff in EAs' offices.

The DPSA has developed, as part of the generic organisational structures, clearly defined purpose and functions per post in the offices of EAs.

However, the extent of implementation of the uniform job description remains questionable due to the non-approval of the revised Ministerial Handbook.

With respect to SMS positions in ministerial Office, the DPSA through the Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training days and Minimum entry requirements for SMS has set the minimum qualification and experience requirement for appointment in the office of the EA at an SMS level.

The challenge is that there are still many incidences of non-compliance with prescripts and compliance with the Directive has not been assessed.

9

80% of the positions in Ministries should be permanent and be part of organograms of departments.

The DPSA proposed uniform organisational structures for Ministerial Offices does recommend that a percentage of posts in the Offices of EAs should be permanent. These are all the administrative positions, which turn to be in the majority

Implementation of this will be assessed once the revised Ministerial Handbook has been approved and is being implemented by departments.

10

An orientation and support programme for Cabinet Ministers/Premiers/Members of Executive Council (MECs) and Directors-General/Heads of Department should be developed and it must be compulsory for new EAs and DGs/HoDs to attend at the beginning of every term of government and when a need arises due to reshuffling. There must be a separate session for EAs and DGs first and thereafter a joint session. Also the advisors need to have an orientation programme.

At the start of each term of administration, the Presidency organizes anorientation programme for Executive Authorities (EAs) and the DPSA is invited to make presentations on the Roles and Responsibilities of the EA in relation to the Public Service Act and Regulations, and also presents on the Ministerial Handbook. However, there is no targeted training provided after reshuffling.

     

11

There should be a probation period for staff appointed in Ministries and that period should take into consideration the nature of Ministries and the limited time available to follow the probation period regulations that are cumbersome to release a person who is not performing or fitting in the culture of the Ministry.

In terms of the Public Service Regulations, all appointments, longer than 12 months, are subject to a probationary period. This requirement includes appointments in Ministries

However, there are instances of non¬compliance — the magnitude of which has not been established. Hence implementation of the revised Ministerial Handbook will also serve as an instrument to address such incidences.

12

The DPSA should continue to give guidance and assistance in the development and implementation of turnaround strategies and restructuring processes.

The DPSA continues to play this role, based on requests received from departments.

It must however be stated that Executive Authorities have the power to decide on their turnaround strategies and organisational structures. All what the DPSA can do is to provide guidance.

13

The DPSA should develop a database of employees with working experience in Ministries who could not be absorbed by departments for purposes of redeployment.

All permanently employed employees are accommodated in the relevant department upon exit of the EA.

There is no provision within the Public Service to absorb employees employed in Ministries linked to the term of office of EAs. Where employees who are linked to the EAs term of office are transferred to or absorbed by the department, this practice will considered to be irregular and should as such be corrected in line with the applicable prescripts.

14

The DPSA should enforce the developed benchmark job descriptions and evaluations for posts in EAs' offices to ensure consistency throughout the Public Service.

In developing the draft generic organisational structures for Ministries, all posts were job evaluated with clearly defined job purpose and functions

Once approved, implementation of these job descriptions, alongside the revised generic organizational structures will ensure consistency.

06 June 2016 - NW1210

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

What total amount in rands will be paid to each member of the (a) men’s, (b) women’s and (c) under 23 national soccer teams as daily allowances and/or stipends for the duration of their stay in camp during their preparations for the qualifying matches for the 2016 Rio Olympics?

Reply:

Awaiting information from SAFA.the information is not readily available.

06 June 2016 - NW1292

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether any action is being taken against (a) the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) (i) officials and/or (ii) board members, both current and previously employed, as well as (b) service providers contracted by USAASA to manage the evaluation of all bidding companies and the allocation of shares of orders placed for set-top boxes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has received the final forensic report on the Supply Chain Management process of STBs and related accessories from the National Treasury, and is currently studying the findings and recommendations. It is too early to speculate whether there has been any wrongdoing on the part of the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa’s officials and/or board members, as well as service providers contracted to manage the evaluation of all bidding companies.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1562

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

We are still gathering data from entities and information is not readily available

06 June 2016 - NW1294

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) What is the current status of discussions about the requirement of households to have a current SA Broadcasting Corporation TV Licence in order to receive government-subsidised set-top boxes and (b) with whom are these discussions being held; (2) are amendments to (a) the Broadcasting Act, Act 4 of 1999 and/or (b) any other regulatory mechanism(s) being contemplated to alleviate the legal obligation of the specified households from requiring valid TV licences before receiving government-subsidised set-top boxes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The qualifying criteria issued by the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) requires that for poor TV owning households to qualify for free set-top-boxes they must have a valid TV license. However, a TV license is not compulsory to purchase a STB. The license requirement is proving to be an obstacle in the registration of the qualifying TV households and ultimately on the distribution of set-top-boxes. Therefore, Department of Communications (DoC) sought to address this as a matter of urgency.

Resultantly, a decision was made, together with the SABC management, to delink TV license requirement from the Set-Top-Box registration process. It is my considered view that by delinking the TV license requirement, registration of the qualifying TV households and ultimately on the distribution of set-top-boxes will enable the indigent households in the SKA area to benefit from the government subsidy.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1547

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

The information is tabulated hereunder:

 

Department of Home Affairs (DHA) Response

DHA Response

 
  1. Budget spend on Advertising in 2015/16
  1. Advertising Budget for 2016/17

(i)

R 10 882 439.95

R 5 654 000.00

 

Government Printing Works (GPW) Response

GPW Response

(ii)

R 519 812.27

R 774 000. 00

 

Electoral Commission of South Africa (IEC) response

IEC Response

(ii)

R 58 894 341.54

R 36 040 255.00

06 June 2016 - NW1541

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) Details of spending for the department and its entities for the 2015/16 financial year will be available once audited, and included in the 2015/16 annual reports to be tabled in parliament during 2016.

(b) Below is the department’s and entities budgeted advertising spending for the 2016/17 financial year:

Department /Entity

2016/17 Advertising budget

Economic Development Department

R 5 124 000.00

IDC

R 23 000 000.00

Competition Commission

R 1 363 091.00

ITAC

R 283 541.00

Competition Tribunal

R 32 087.00

-END-

06 June 2016 - NW1288

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Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether the report of the enquiry she commissioned from the National Treasury into the set-top box supply chain processes of the Universal Service and Access Agency of SA has been completed; if not, (a) what is the current status of the specified enquiry and (b) when will the report be published; if so, (i) what actions did the specified report recommend and (ii) what steps, if any, has she taken based on the findings of the specified report?

Reply:

(a) The investigation commissioned from the National Treasury into the supply chain process of the Universal Service and Access Agency of SA has been completed.

(b) The report will be published once the department has studied the report.

(i) The Department is currently studying the investigation report in order to understand the recommendations.

(ii) The Department is currently studying the investigation report and recommendations in order to take necessary steps.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1594

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Which units within the (i) SA Navy and (ii) SA Air Force are responsible for patrolling the country’s exclusive economic zones, (b) how many patrol (i) vessels and (ii) aircraft are available to patrol the country’s waters and (c) how often do the specified (i) vessels and (ii) aircraft patrol the country’s waters; (2) whether, with reference to recent reports that Chinese trawlers are illegally fishing in South Africa’s waters along the Eastern Cape coastline within our exclusive economic zone, any patrols of the country’s exclusive economic zone have been undertaken in response to any allegedly irregular behaviour by Chinese fishing trawlers (a) in (i) 2011, (ii) 2012, (iii) 2013, (iv) 2014 and (v) 2015 and (b) since 1 January 2016; if not, why not; if so, when did the specified patrols take place?

Reply:

The information required relates to the strength of the SA Navy and SAAF, and impacts on matters of National Security and can only be divulged in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence.

06 June 2016 - NW1053

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What number of district and provincial officials in each province have been trained in her department’s Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support (SIAS) policy, (b) in which schools has the specified policy been rolled out and (c) what was the cost of the roll-out in each case; (2) (a) which full-service schools in each district of each province benefited from the R11,2 million worth of assistive devices and (b) what was the nature of the assistive devices? (3) (a) in which of the districts in each province were the 1 880 district officials and 16 127 teachers from-full service schools trained in Curriculum Differentiation, (b) what was the (i) duration and (ii) expenditure of the training in each case and (c) what number of officials and teachers still need to be trained; (4) (a) in which of the districts in each province were the 740 district officials and 546 teachers from full-service schools orientated in Guidelines for Full-Service Schools, (b) what was the (i) duration and (ii) expenditure of the training in each case and (c) what number of officials and teachers still need to be trained?

Reply:

1. (a) The number of district and provincial officials in each province who have been trained in the Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support (SIAS) Policy, (b) the number of schools that have been trained and the (c) cost of roll-out are as follows:

Province

1(a) Provincial Officials

Trained

1(a) Districts Officials

Trained

1(b) Number of

Schools*

1(c) Cost of

Roll-out

EC

15

116

382

R350 000

FS

15

127

323

R996 019

GP

69

219

695

R2 000 000

KZN

12

32

180

R300 000

LP

14

50

200

1 day training, incurring no costs

MP

17

140

140

R478 000

NC

14

137

131

R80 000

NW

15

100

110

R302 218

WC

15

100

115

R350 000

TOTAL

186

1021

2276

R4 856 237

Source: Information obtained from Provincial Education Departments in April 2016

The names of schools in which the SIAS Policy has been rolled out are not available at this stage for all provinces.

2 (a) Information on the full-service schools in each province that have benefitted from the R11,2 million worth of assistive devices procured nationally and (b) the nature of the assistive devices procured is attached as Annexure A. The names of schools that were supplied and of the districts in which they are situated are not available for all provinces at this stage.

(3)(a) The number of districts in each province where the 1 880 district officials and 16 127 teachers from full-service schools have been trained in Curriculum Differentiation in 2014/15 (b) the (i) duration and (ii) expenditure of the training in each case and (c) the number of officials and teachers who still need to be trained are as follows:

Province

a) Number of Districts

i) Duration

ii) Expenditure

c) District Officials still to be trained

Trained

c) Teachers still to trained

EC

22

2 Days

R350 000

28

65

FS

5

2 Days

R966 000

50

3270

GP*

15

Information not made available

Information not made available

Information not made available

Information not made available

KZN

12

1-2 days

R450 000

917

LP

5

1 Day

Nil

179

64

MP

4

2 days

R450 000

All relevant officials

All educators of Foundation Phase to FET should be trained by 2019

NC

5

1 day

R24 000

6000

NW

4

2 Days

Not Provided

50

400

WC

8

2 Days

Not Provided

All relevant officials

All school based support teams

Source: Information obtained from Provincial Education Departments in April 2016

* Gauteng Department of Education (GDE) concluded training in curriculum differentiation of district officials, educators and SMT members in all Full service Schools in 2014. Training in curriculum differentiation for 2016 is aligned to the SIAS training for all schools.

(4)(a) The districts in each province where the 740 district officials and 546 teachers from full-service schools nationally were orientated in Guidelines for Full-Service Schools, (b) the (i) duration and (ii) expenditure of the training in each case and (c) the number of officials and teachers still to be trained are as follows:

Province

a) Districts Trained

b (i) Duration

b) ii) Expenditure

c) Number of Officials to be trained

c) Number of Teachers to be trained

EC*

5

2 days

Information not made available

induction of new staff as needed

FS

6

8 Hours

Information not made available

None

3518

GP*

15

2 days

Information not made available

None

none

KZN

12

1 day

R300 000

917

LP

5

1 day

Information not made available

179

64

MP

4

2 days

Information not made available

140

NC

5

2 days

R56 000

200

NW

4

1 day

Information not made available

50

400

WC

8

1 day

Information not made available

induction of new staff as needed

Source: Information obtained from Provincial Education Departments in April 2016

* Gauteng and Eastern Cape Provinces concluded training of district officials, educators and SMT members in The Guidelines for Full service Schools in 2014. District-based Support Teams will conduct follow-up training and induction of new staff on an ongoing basis as part of their core function to support Full-Service Schools.

ANNEXURE A - QUESTION 1053

2 (a) The full-service schools in each district of each province that benefited from the R11,2 million worth of assistive devices and (b) the nature of the assistive devices provided (the names of all schools and districts are not available for all provinces at this stage):

Eastern Cape

(a) 30 Full Service Schools received assistive technology in 2015\16.

(b) 30 Laptops, Learner Profiler, Clicker 7 and Text Help Read and Write, Tobii S32 Scan and Touch.

Gauteng

(a) 123 Schools received specialised LTSM in 2016.

Free State

(a) Information not available at this stage.

(b) Information not available at this stage.

KwaZulu-Natal

(a) All 101 Full Service Schools have been allocated funding for procurement of assistive devices.

(b) Most schools procured hearing aids, AAC equipment and material, speech and physical disability equipment.

Limpopo

(a) No budget was provided for Full Service Schools.

(b) No assistive devices were procured.

Mpumalanga

(a) A total of 42 Full-Service Schools received ICT Equipment. The budget spent was R756 000.

(b) The devices procured for full-service schools per district are as follows:

NO

DISTRICT

CIRCUITS

EMIS

SCHOOL NAME

ITEM

QTY

ITEM

QTY

ITEM

QTY

1

Bohlabela

Casteel

8000 34890

M.O Mashego

Printer

1

Computer

1

Plasma

1

2

Bohlabela

Cottondale

8000 34914

Madile

Plasma

1

 

 

 

 

3

Bohlabela

Lehukwe

8000 35007

Mhlaba-Khosa

Computer

1

 

 

 

 

4

Bohlabela

Manyeleti

8000 35043

Samson Sibuyi

DVD Recorders

1

 

 

 

 

5

Bohlabela

Mariti

8000 35059

Lapishe

Printer

1

Computer

1

 

 

6

Bohlabela

Mashishing

8000 12658

Marambane

DVD Recorders

1

Printer

1

Computer

1

7

Bohlabela

Mkhuhlu

8000 35097

Londhindha

DVD Recorders

1

 

 

 

 

8

Bohlabela

Ximhungwe

8000 35199

Magudu

DVD Recorders

1

 

 

 

 

9

Bohlabela

Sabie

8000 04754

Glory Hill

Projector

1

 

 

 

 

10

Bohlabela

Thulamahashi

800035164

Mpikisano

Projector

1

 

 

 

 

11

Bohlabela

Maviljan

8000 35081

Diphaswa

Printer

1

Computer

1

 

 

12

Ehlanzeni

Lubombo

80004713

Gogo Mhlanga

Computer

1

Printer

1

Plasma

1

13

Ehlanzeni

Lubombo

800015784

Mshengu

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

14

Ehlanzeni

Mgwenya

800010116

Lekazi

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

15

Ehlanzeni

Nelspruit

800022764

Tekwane

Computer

1

Printer

1

 

 

16

Ehlanzeni

Nelspruit

800007112

John Mdluli

Projector

1

 

 

 

 

17

Ehlanzeni

Nkomazi East

800020743

Siboshwa

Computer

1

Printer

1

 

 

18

Ehlanzeni

Nkomazi West

800030429

Magcekeni

Computer

1

 

 

 

 

19

Ehlanzeni

Sikhulile

8000 15818

Msogwaba

Computer

1

Printer

1

Plasma

1

20

Ehlanzeni

White River

8000 24661

Victory Park

Projector

1

 

 

 

 

21

Gert Sibande

Ermelo 1

8000 26468

Wesselton

Projetor

1

 

 

 

 

22

Gert Sibande

Ermelo 2

8000 02375

Davel

Computer

1

Printer

1

Plasma

1

23

Gert Sibande

Stan East

8000 22756

Tegwan’s Nest

Computer

1

Printer

1

Plasma

1

24

Gert Sibande

Stan West

8000 10488

Lindilanga

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

25

Gert Sibande

Highveld Ridge East

8000 10389

Lifalethu

Projetor

1

 

 

 

 

26

Gert Sibande

Highveld Ridge West

8000 18002

Petrus Maziya

Computer

1

Printer

1

 

 

27

Gert Sibande

Bethal

8000 22939

Thandanani

Computer

1

Computer

1

 

 

28

Gert Sibande

Badplaas

8000 23846

Tsatsimfundvo

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

29

Gert Sibande

Mpuluzi

8000 21287

Siphumelele

Computer

1

 

 

 

 

30

Gert Sibande

Ermelo 1

800004218

Father Charles

DVD

1

Laptop

1

 

 

31

Nkangala

Kwagga West

8000 11460

Magaduzela

Computer

1

 

 

 

 

322

Nkangala

Kwagga East

8000 06864

Kwakwari

Printer

1

Computer

1

Plasma

1

33

Nkangala

Tweefontein South

8000 22020

Somarobogo

DVD

1

Laptop

1

 

 

34

Nkangala

KwaMhlanga South West

8000 19331

Retang

Computer

1

 

 

 

 

35

Nkangala

Libangeni

8000 03558

Emfundweni

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

36

Nkangala

Marapyane

8000 2066

Sibisi

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

37

Nkangala

Mmametlhake

8000 12112

Maloka

Printer

1

Computer

1

Plasma

1

38

Nkangala

Nokaneng

8000 07419

Katjibane

Printer

1

Computer

1

 

 

39

Nkangala

Weltevrede

8000 01792

Buthelani

Printer

1

Computer

1

 

 

40

Nkangala

Waterval Boven

8000 3166

Ebhudlweni

Projector

1

 

 

 

 

41

Nkangala

Witbank 2

8000 07021

Jeremia Mdaka

DVD

1

 

 

 

 

42

Nkangala

Witbank 1

8000 1-069

Phakama

Projector

1

 

 

 

 

One Full-Service School of Ehlanzeni District; Bukhosibetfu also received materials to support the introduction of SASL CAPS (minimum resource pack) amounting to R258 000. The Minimum Resource Pack includes the following:

• Laptop with webcam and DVD player/recorder

• Software for editing, e.g. Photo Shop

• Memory stick or external hard drive

• Whiteboard

• Video/DVD recorder/Data Projector

• Rewritable DVDs for recording

• Digital camera

• A range of SASL materials/texts ,e.g. DVDs/picture books

• Memory stick

Northern Cape

(a) No full-service schools received assistive devices.

(b) The only devices that were procured were the Minimum Resource packs ordered for the schools that are introducing SASL.

North West

(a) 16 Full Service Schools were supplied for an amount of R8,429,400

(b) The devices included audio visual libraries, Cami software and Language kits.

Western Cape

(a) Six full-service/inclusive schools in two districts, namely West Coast and Overberg, were supplied.

(b) Eight assistive devices loan centres were established in each of the 8 districts. A range of assistive devices is available on request to other special and ordinary schools, mainly f

06 June 2016 - NW1345

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) What amount has the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) spent on advertising vacant positions since 1 June 2014, (b) how have the specified vacant positions been advertised, (c) how many interviews for the specified vacant positions have been held and (d) who conducted the specified interviews in each case; (2)(a) how many applications have been received for the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) vacancy at the MDDA since 1 June 2014, (b) how many of the specified applicants were interviewed and (c) will she make the specified applicants’ curriculum vitae along with reasons why they were deemed unfit to fill the specified position available to the Portfolio Committee on Communications?

Reply:

(1) (a) The amount the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) spent on advertising vacant positions since 1 June 2014 equals R169,056.11.

(b) The specified vacant positions have been advertised via the print press and the MDDA website as follows:

  • 11th May 2014 (City Press): (Project Officer: Community Media, Project Officer: Research, Training & Development, Communication & Branding Manager.)
  • 5th September 2014 (Independent Newspapers) – (CEO, Supply Chain Manager, Finance Disbursement Officer, Legal & Contracts Manager)
  • 10th June 2015 (Times Media, The Star Workplace) – (SCM Officer, Communications & Branding Manager, Project Officer: Research & Training and Development, IT Specialist, HR & Corporate Services Manager, Finance Administration Officer, Programme Manager: Research & Training Development.)
  • 20th January 2016 (Independent Newspaper) for advertising of 5 x positions: (Internal Audit Manager, Receptionist, Company Secretary, Legal & Contracts Manager, Stakeholder & Special Projects Coordinator, Communications & Marketing Officer. Chairperson of the Internal Audit & Risk Committee, IT Advisory Committee Member.)
  • 10th April 2016 (Media 24) for advertising of 17 x positions: (CEO, CFO, HR & Corporate & Services Manager, Project Director & Strategy, Policy Monitoring & Evaluation Director , Finance Manager, Finance Administration Officer, Executive Secretary, Risk Specialist, Knowledge Management Coordinator, Internal Officer, HR Officer, Research & Capacity Building Manager, Research & Capacity Building Coordinator, Legal & Compliance Officer, Projects Manager: Broadcasting and Digital Media Coordinator.)
  • 10th May 2016 (Media 24) - (2 x Audit and Risk Committee Members)

(c) The number of interviews for the specified vacant positions which have been held is as follows:

  • Project Officer: Community Media x 1
  • Project Officer: Research, Training & Development / Research & Capacity Building Coordinator x 1
  • Communication & Branding Manager x 1
  • CEO x 1
  • Supply Chain Manager x 1
  • Finance Disbursement Officer x 1
  • Legal & Contracts Manager x1
  • SCM Officer x1
  • IT Specialist x 1
  • HR & Corporate Services Manager (None)
  • Finance Administration Officer x 1
  • Programme Manager: Research & Training Development / Research & Capacity Building Manager (None)
  • Internal Audit Manager (None)
  • Receptionist (None)
  • Company Secretary (None)
  • Communications & Marketing Officer (None)
  • Chairperson of the Internal Audit & Risk Committee x 1
  • IT Advisory Committee Member x 1
  • CFO (None)
  • Project Director (None)
  • Strategy, Policy Monitoring & Evaluation Director (None)
  • Finance Manager (None)
  • Executive Secretary (None)
  • Risk Specialist (None)
  • Knowledge Management Coordinator (None)
  • Internal Audit Officer x 1
  • HR Officer (None)
  • Legal & Compliance Officer (None)
  • Projects Manager: Broadcasting (None)
  • Digital Media Coordinator (None)
  • Audit and Risk Committee Members (None)

(d) The people conducting the specified interviews in each case is as follows:

  • PO: Community Media – Talifhani Khubana, Lesego Mashishi, Mpho Leshabane
  • Internal Audit Officer: Mshiyeni Gungqisa, Duduzile Phungwayo, SNG representative-Brian Changamire
  • PO: Research, Training & Development: Manana Stone, Lesego Mashishi, Lindinkosi Ndibongo
  • SCM Officer: Lindinkosi Ndibongo, Thandiwe Kgatshe, Clarinda Simpson
  • IT Manager: Lindinkosi Ndibongo, Thandiwe Kgatshe
  • Communication & Branding Manager: Thembelihle Sibeko, Lindinkosi Ndibongo, Thandiwe Kgatshe
  • Finance Disbursement Officer: Talifhani Khubana, Lesego Mashishi, Lindinkosi Ndibongo

(2) (a) Ten (10) applications have been received for the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) vacancy at the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(b) Four (4) of the specified applicants were interviewed.

(c) Seven candidates were shortlisted while the others did make it through the shortlisting phase due to lack of competencies. Four candidates were shortlisted for the interviews and did not perform well. The candidate who scored the highest did so consistently on the total assessment of the 11 tested competencies: Community media knowledge, Broadcast media environment, Advances in Technology, Compliance, Project Monitoring & Evaluation, Risk Management, People Management, Stakeholder Management, Policy Formulation, Regulation and Service Operation, Presentation of Case Study and Background Review. This candidate was subsequently made an offer which was later withdrawn on an out of court settlement basis between the MDDA and the candidate.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1290

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What is the reason for the lack of funding for the dual illumination period and (b) how will this process now be funded?

Reply:

(a) Government has made available part of the funding for dual illumination through the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services (DTPS) allocation of R100m (R87.7m net of VAT) out of the R140m net of VAT required per annum. There are attempts to engage National Treasury through the DTPS and DoC to see if Sentech can reallocate some funds towards digital migration to cover dual illumination costs.

(b) The decision not to allocate the funding for DTT Dual Illumination expenditure was taken within the constraints of the National Budget and continuous discussions with all relevant stakeholders including Cabinet and the National Treasury will be pursued to find a sustainable solution to the shortfall. The Digital Migration project is critical for the country and Dual Illumination is an essential part of this process.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1293

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) What is the current cost estimate of (i) producing and (ii) installing 5,2 million (aa) set-top boxes and (bb) antennae and/or satellite dishes, (b) what funding has already been allocated by the National Treasury for these purposes, (c) where will these funds be drawn from and (d) over what time frame; (2)  from where will any extra funding needed to produce and install the specified set-top boxes and antennae and/or satellite dishes be sourced; (3) have these funds been secured to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) (a) what amount has been paid to the (i) producers and (ii) suppliers of the (aa) set-top boxes, (bb) antennae and (cc) satellite suppliers and installers as at 31 March 2016, (b) in each specified case please provide a detailed breakdown of the payments made to each producer and/or supplier and (c) over what timeframe?

Reply:

(1) (a) National Treasury has appropriated R2.5 billion for the procurement and supply 5 million set-top-boxes to poor television owning households in South Africa.

(b) National Treasury has already allocated R2.251.554.000 ( R2.2 billion)

(c) These funds have been allocated from the Universal Service and Access Funds.

(d) The allocation in (b) above is for the current financial year (2016/17) which includes the rollover from the previous years.

(2)      There are ongoing engagements with National Treasury regarding the extra funding that might be required.

(3)        No, extra funds have not yet been secured.

(4)       (a)    All payments for manufacturers and installers during the 2015/16 financial year were made during the 4th quarter:

            (aa) Set-Top-Boxes:

             CZ R49,600,474.00

            Leratadima R680,984.00

            Bua               R0

           (bb) Antennae

           Temic          R499,833.00

           QEC              R17,770.00

           (cc) Satellite Dishes

           Ellis              R8,834,200.00

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1427

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Police

(1)Whether the detective division at the Norkem Park Police Station in Gauteng received any new vehicles in the 2015-16 financial year; if so, how many did they receive; (2) (a) what is the total number of vehicles the specified detective division currently has, (b) how many are in working order and (c) on what date were the vehicles that have broken down sent to the mechanical workshop; (3) (a) how many detectives are there currently at the specified police station, (b) how many of the specified detectives have (i) attended and (ii) passed the detective course and (c) how many dockets is each detective currently investigating; (4) when will the detectives at the specified police station receive additional vehicles in order to ensure the specified police station complies with the national ratio of number of detectives to vehicles?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the detective service at Norkem Park Police Station received two (2) vehicles during the 2015/2016 financial year.

(2) (a) Norkem Park Detective Service currently have 15 vehicles.

(b) 13 vehicles are in working order.

(c) The vehicles were sent to the mechanical workshop on the following dates:

(1) 24 April 2016

(2) 22 March 2016

(3) (a) There are 34 detectives currently at Norkem Park Detective Service.

(b) (i) 19 detectives attended a detective course.

(ii) 19 passed the detective course.

(c) Each Investigating Officer has an average of 81 dockets.

(4) The station already has sufficient vehicles according to the national ratio.

06 June 2016 - NW1348

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) How many staff members have left the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) since the previous Chief Executive Officer, Mr Lumko Mtimde, left the MDDA in June 2014;(2) (a) how many MDDA staff members have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014, (b) what are the (i) names of the staff members investigated and (ii) reasons in each case, (c) by whom were the staff members investigated, (d) how many were found guilty and (e) what were the charges in each case; (3) whether any of the disciplinary investigations against any of the specified staff members were carried out without following proper procedures which resulted in their resignations before processes could be completed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she will make all supporting documents of the specified investigations available; if not, why not; if so, by when; (5) what type of information disseminated by a MDDA staff member will result in disciplinary investigations given that the MDDA is a public entity and must be open and transparent?

Reply:

(1) The staff members who have left the MDDA since the previous Chief Executive Officer, Mr Lumko Mtimde, totals 11.

(2) (a) No MDDA staff members have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(b) (i) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(ii) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(c) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(d) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(e) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(3) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(4) Not applicable as no staff have been investigated on disciplinary grounds by the acting senior management of the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

(5) Any information that might bring the Agency into disrepute, which is disseminated by a MDDA staff member will result in disciplinary investigations given that the MDDA is a public entity and must be open and transparent.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW1291

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) Why have letters been sent to two certain successful set-top box tender winners (names furnished) asking them to verify that they qualify in terms of certain tenders (details furnished) to produce their allocation of set-top boxes, (b) what is the current status of the interactions with the specified companies and (c) what further action is she contemplating in this regard; (2) will the process of evaluating bidders for the supply of set-top boxes according to the specified tenders be re-opened; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Universal Service and Access Agency for South Africa (USAASA), which is the entity charged with the responsibility of managing the production and installation of set top boxes, informed me that, it has never sent any letters to Leratadima and Bua regarding the matters raised in this question.

(b) N/A

(b) The tendering process will not be re-opened because it was an open process.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

06 June 2016 - NW935

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a-b)(aa-cc) In the course of our official duties and since taking office neither I nor the Deputy Minister have knowingly held any official meetings with persons who are, or who are associates of or employees of any persons whose surname or family name is Gupta, (although we do not claim to know all employees nor all associates of persons whose surname or family name is Gupta). However, this response should not be construed to mean that we have not been introduced to persons in question, for instance, in relation to our promotional and communications work for the Department of Home Affairs, whilst appearing at ANN7/SABC 2 Breakfast briefings, and attending various events and functions where such persons may have been in attendance together with various other persons in relation to which it is not expected that minutes or attendance is recorded.

(ccc) Not applicable in view of the answers given above.

06 June 2016 - NW835

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) (a) How many schools across the country have introduced Mandarin as an optional subject since the start of the 2016 school year, (b) (i) what is the name of each specified school and (ii) which province is it situated in and (c) how many schools does her department envisage will offer Mandarin as an optional subject in the next five academic years and (d) which schools are eanarked to introduce Mandarin in the next five academic years; (2) (a) with reference to her reply to question 3645 on 19 October 2015, how many Chinese teachers have been brought to South Africa to teach Mandarin in our schools to date, (b) what was the cost of (i) relocating the specified teachers and (ii) paying their salaries and (c) is this cost borne by (i) her department, (ii) the Provincial Government concerned or (iii) another source in each case providing the relevant details; (3) how many South African teachers (a) are currently qualified to teach Mandarin, (b) will be trained to teach Mandarin in the next five academic years and (c) will be sent to China to learn how to teach Mandarin in the specified period? NW954E

Reply:

(a) Forty three Schools (43).
(b) (i)

Please find here: Province & Schools

06 June 2016 - NW1379

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunication and Postal Services

(1)   With reference to his reply to question 983 on 21 April 2016, (a) what are the detailed reasons why the Road Traffic Infringement Agency owes R39 374 828,78 to the SA Post Office for more than 120 days and (b) what steps are being taken to recover the specified outstanding amount; (2) Whether any interest is being charged on the specified outstanding amount; if not, why not; if so, what (a) amount of interest has been incurred on the specified outstanding amount to date and (b) are the further relevant details? NW1527E

Reply:

SAPO has advised me as follows:

1. (a) The reason why the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) owes the South African (SAPO) R39, 374, 828.78 for more than 120 days is due to the dispute over service level as a result of the prolonged and illegal strike that paralyzed operations.

(b) On 08 April 2016, the SAPO GCEO and RTIA CEO/Administrator held a meeting in which a technical committee consisting of the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), Tshwane Metro Police Department (TMPD), Johannesburg Metro Police Department (JMPD) and the Road Traffic infringement Agency (RTIA), was established to resolve payments and other strike related issues. The committee meets on a weekly basis to discuss progress and outstanding matters.

2. (a) Interest charged on outstanding amount in September 2014 was R2, 242.22, and in March 2015 was 2,969.66. Since then, interest has been suppressed due to the dispute declared by RTIA and JMPD.

(b) Therefore, there are no further details at this stage.