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10 December 2015 - NW4087

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is being done to address the lower than expected voter turnout in future national elections and particularly in the upcoming 2016 local government elections?

Reply:

It is the duty of the political parties to ensure that their voters turn out to vote on Election Day.

 

10 December 2015 - NW3063

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) How does (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her define red tape and (b) what (i) specific interventions and/or (ii) systems have been implemented to (aa) identify and (bb) reduce red tape in (aaa) her department and (bbb) the entities reporting to her?

Reply:

(a) My understanding of red tape is that it is bureaucratic delays in the administration processes that impede and hamper service delivery. We have simplified all business processes for the work of my Department in order to have swifter turnaround times for example, processing of water use licenses. We have reduced the turnaround times for decision makers with regards to Supply chain processes for bid evaluation and bid adjudication processes.

Refer below for response from Entities:

NO.

NAME OF ENTITY

RESPONSE

1.

Amatola Water

(a)(ii) Amatola Water Board defines red tape as “official routine or procedure marked by excessive complexity which results in delay or inaction”

(b)(i)(ii); (aa); (bb) & (bbb) Amatola Water Board has governing structures internally that ensure an effective and efficient decision making process that reduces red-tape. The governing structures of Amatola Water Board have policies and procedures to give guidance and, to maintain sound control environment. Amatola Water Board is an active stakeholder that participates in various water sector forums and committees that are lead by Department of Water and Sanitation which are aimed at reducing the decision lag processes (e.g. DG’s Forum, PROWAF, SAAWU). The Shareholders Compact (SHC) which serves an agreement between the Water Board and Minister of Water and Sanitation is aligned to the corporate objectives of the water board. This SHC creates a common space for understanding and execution of strategy. The SHC also forms part of the performance system and monitoring is on a quarterly basis in order to take an immediate corrective action against adverse performance results.

2.

Bloem Water

(a) (i) N/A (ii)Legal mandate by Executive Authority, which is the Board appointed by the Minister, following the Delegation of authority to CE and further to staff.

(b)(i) (ii) (aa)(bb)This includes Policies approved and procedures implemented to function in such a way to minimise and reduce processes, costs and red tape.

(aaa) (bbb)N/A

3.

Lepelle Northern Water

  1. (ii)Red Tape- excessive bureaucracy or adherence to official rules and formalities.
  1. (i) (ii) (aa)(bb) Our internal processes do not have red tape challenges.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

4.

Magalies Water

(a)(ii)Red tape is defined in Magalies Water within the context of normal managerial functions. This is such that management activities are executed in a certain sequence which follows planning within a formal authority of hierarchical decision making.

(b)(i)-(ii)A materiality and significance framework and the Delegations of Authority

(aa)-(bb)-(aaa) N/A (bbb)The above instruments do neither identify nor reduce red tape but facilitate effective decision making processes within the organisation. The materiality and significance framework facilitate decisions on material transactions by the Board and on significant transactions by the Minister of Water and Sanitation. The delegations of authority facilitate internal decision making processes at various managerial levels.

5.

Mhlathuze Water

(a) (i) N/A (ii) Our understanding of the word “red tape” is that it is a term used to describe excessive regulation that hinders timeous action or decision-making.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) MW has recently reviewed its business processes in order to streamline all its processes for effective delivery of services. MW policies are reviewed regularly to ensure that they are still effective and relevant in achieving service delivery.

(aaa)N/A

(bbb)It should however be noted that statutory compliance takes precedence over internal processes, policies and procedures.

6.

Overberg Water

(a) (i) N/A (ii) Overberg Water is not experiencing any red tape in our engagement within and with the external stakeholders.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) N/A

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

7.

Rand Water

(a) (ii) There is no definition of red tape in terms of the law.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb)To improve efficiencies within Rand Water’s Supply Chain Management we are continuously reviewing our systems and policies and currently participating in the review of the Preferential Procurement Act in order to improve economic transformation and participation of previously disadvantages entities in the business of Rand Water.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

8.

Sedibeng Water

a) (i) N/A (Applicable to the department)

(ii) Red tape is when processes to approve and authorize activities of the entity are held hostage due to long authorization and approval processes.

(b) (i) The necessary processes are still undertaken as per the prescripts of the legislation and business best practices, however business processes mapping was undertaken to respond to the legislation, policies and procedure are defined to enable business efficiencies.

(ii) Systems implemented to identify red tape are

(aa) The time taken to authorize transactions is checked against the target set to authorize and process; the level of authorization required in terms of the delegated authority; the number of people who hold the requisite authority to transact (bb) reduce red tape in: (aaa) N/A (Applicable to the department) (bbb) A shared services model and automation of the business processes systems was implemented. Reviewing the delegation of authority to allow back up and acting positions taking into account the level of understanding on accountability.

9.

Umgeni Water

a) (i) N/A (ii) Red tape is when processes to approve and authorize activities of the entity are held hostage due to long authorization and approval processes.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) Umgeni Water has developed systems of internal control that include approved policies and an articulate delegation of powers framework. The framework gives appropriate officials powers to implement decisions at various and appropriate levels.

(aaa) N/A (bbb) These systems assist the organisation to quickly dispatch resources and make business decisions without having to wait for executive and accounting authority meetings. However the accounting authority exercises appropriate oversight on decisions taken by management / officials.

10.

Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority

(a) (i) N/A (ii) TCTA is a service provider to other water management institutions.  It does not regulate (i.e. grant permission to an organisation /individual to carry out an activity) or provide a service over which it has a monopoly to others electricity water etc.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) (aaa) (bbb) N/A The questions are, therefore, not of relevance to TCTA.

11.

Water Research Commission

(a) (ii) Definition of Red Tape. The term red tape is not used.

(b) (i) The WRC has had no specific interventions or (ii) systems implemented.

The WRC has a fairly efficient deal flow system with our research management system and while we continuously seek improvement, we have had no complaints about unnecessary red tape. The legislative requirements and regulations that apply to the WRC have been effectively integrated into the operations to ensure smooth process flows.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

12.

Inkomati CMA

(a)(ii) Red tape is defined as complicated official rules and regulations, especially when these are considered unnecessary: excessive bureaucracy

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) Not for the entities to respond to.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

13.

Breede-Gouritz CMA

(a) (i) N/A (ii) The BGCMA defines red tape as excessive impediments that require compliance and conformity to formal rules either in terms of established rules within the organization, policy, compliance register, regulations, Treasury Instructions or applicable legislation. These impediments can prevent the BGCMA from making a timeous decision.

(b)(i) If it is a rule or policy the BGCMA applies either a deviation route having obtained the necessary approvals but if it is the legislation there is strict compliance.

(ii)The performance process flow and compliance register define and identify areas of compliance plus the extent required to implement those.

(bb) Depending on the nature of red tape, relevant officials are given specific delegations and if it is a governance issue the Board or the Minister is approached.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

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10 December 2015 - NW3928

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether any funds allocated to the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape in the 2015-16 financial year in terms of any form of grant funding from her department have been utilised for activities or programmes or purposes for which they were not intended; if not, what is her department’s position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case in terms of the (a) amount and (b) purpose for which the funds were utilised; (2) whether her department has a policy that prohibits the misuse of grant funding intended for human settlements purposes; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps will she take in this regard; (3) whether she will make a statement on this matter?

Reply:

(1) Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCMM) was allocated R713.1 million for the 2015/16 financial year and R285.3 million was transferred to the municipality on the 9th of July 2015. The municipality spent an amount of R69.1 million on Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) programmes as outlined in the table below as at 30 September 2015. The National Department of Human Settlements is therefore not aware of any funds allocated to BCMM in the 2015-16 financial year that have been utilised for activities or programmes or purposes for which they were not intended.

The departmental information is that the funds were budgeted and spent for the purposes which are illustrated below as at 30 September 2015:

 

(2) The department has utilises the USDG Framework and Division of Revenue Act No.1 of 2015 to regulate the use of its grants. The Grant Framework and the USDG Policy clearly outlines and guides municipalities on the scope of the utilisation of the USDG and this includes:

  • Increase in bulk infrastructure capacity
  • Increase in the basic services to poor households, specifically in informal settlements, including water, sanitation, electricity, refuse removal and transport access
  • Increase in land provision for informal settlement upgrading, subsidy housing, or mixed use development in support of catalytic projects
  • Increase in access to socio-economic amenities
  • Improved dwelling unit densities within an improved spatial integration framework

The Division of the Revenue Act Section 17 (1) states that “despite anything to the contrary in any other legislation, an allocation referred to in Schedules 4 to 7 may only be utilised for the purpose stipulated in the Schedule concerned and in accordance with the applicable framework section”. Section 18(1) states that “a transferring officer may withhold the transfer of a schedule 4 or 5 allocation or any portion thereof, for a period not exceeding 30 days if (a) the province or municipality does not comply with any provision of this Act.

It is to be noted that in terms of relevant procedure, the Auditor-General also audits expenditure and application of grants by Provinces and Municipalities and these reports are provided to the Department and will be used take corrective action if there is misuse of the grants.

The Department through its Financial and Monitoring and Evaluation units also undertake quarterly visits as well as quarter review sessions with municipalities and provinces, and these also present the Department with an early warning opportunity if there is inappropriate use of grants.

(3) No. However, the Honourable member is encouraged to provide me with details regarding his area of concern.

10 December 2015 - NW4197

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether, since 1 January 2014, he has received a certain offender’s (Details furnished) parole request file from his department’s Correctional Services Parole Board (CSPB) chairperson; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether he has considered the specified offender’s request for parole; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date(s) and (b) what were the outcomes; (3) why did (a) he and/or (b) his department’s CSPB deny the specified offender’s previous requests for parole during the period 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2013, even though the specified offender (i) qualified for parole after serving 13 years and four months of the imposed life sentence which commenced in 1999 and (ii) completed all the requisite programmes?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board considered the mentioned offender and his profile report was received by Head Office during September 2015 and submitted it to the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS). As soon as the recommendation of the NCCS is available, it will be submitted to the Minister for consideration.

(2)(a) & (b) See (1) above.

(3)(a)&(b) The offender was not denied to be considered for possible parole placement by the (a) Minister and (b) Correctional Supervision and Parole Board.

(3)(i) & (ii) Parole applications are submitted in accordance with and in compliance to section 42(2) (d) of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, as amended. Amongst others, during the said period the offender did not participate in Victim Offender Dialogue and the Department in collaboration with the offender was in the process of tracing his victims. Furthermore, his support system was also not positively confirmed.

10 December 2015 - NW3204

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether Cage Africa has appealed to the Government to grant (a) political asylum and (b) a new home to Guantanamo Bay detainees; if so, what are the details of the (i) appeal and (ii) financial implications for (aa) her (sic) department and (bb) the Government?

Reply:

The Department of Home Affairs does not have information about this alleged appeal. A request from an organisation such as Cage Africa to the South African government should follow proper channels and be submitted through the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO).

10 December 2015 - NW4036

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)With reference to her reply to question 864 on 12 September 2014, (a) how much of the R20 billion has been recovered through civil claims to date and (b) what amount has been recovered from each specified party; (2) how many (a) individuals in total and (b) government officials (i) are still being investigated and (ii) have already been successfully prosecuted; (3) how many investigations into the 59 suspect housing contracts or projects (a) have been completed and (b) are still ongoing?

Reply:

(1) I wish to advise the Honourable member that the legal responsibility for recovering monies belonging to government and which have been misappropriated lies with the heads of the provincial departments affected. This recovery can be done once an investigation has established legal liability on the part of the relevant contractors and officials. The details that the Honourable member seeks cannot be provided at this stage because the SIU submits its reports to the President in terms of the SIU Act. My department has not received a copy of the reports. A proper assessment will be conducted once the full reports have been received. In the meantime, the SIU has advised my department that an estimated amount of R747 530 961. 75 has been identified by the SIU as the amount that can be considered by the affected provincial departments recoverable from the liable contractors and/or officials. The SIU further advises that those departments have been informed of their options regarding these matters.

(2) (a) The SIU advises that it has referred a total of thirty-two (32) cases against implicated individuals and/or entities, that are not state owned entities or employed by the state, to law enforcement agencies, for criminal investigation and possible prosecution. It does not have further details of progress in that regard

(b) (i) & (ii) The SIU has further referred a total of thirty-five (35) cases against implicated government officials to law enforcement agencies, for criminal investigation and possible prosecution.

(3) (a) The SIU has further advised that it has finalised 30 investigations in respect of 91 low cost housing projects.

(b) One investigation in respect of a subsidised housing project in the Western Cape has not yet been completed, as the services of a Quantity Surveyor has had to be procured to conduct a value-for-money exercise in respect of this subsidised housing project, to complete the investigation report.

10 December 2015 - NW4066

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he or the National Treasury has written to national and provincial departments in the course of 2015 to settle their respective outstanding accounts with municipalities immediately so that their cash flow could be facilitated; if not, why not; if so, (a) which defaulting departments were written to, (b) what was the outstanding amount in each case, (c) for what duration was the account outstanding, (d) which of the defaulting departments had fully settled with the municipalities as at 31 October 2015 and (e) which of the defaulting departments is he taking action against for not complying with his instruction?

Reply:

Yes, the National Treasury has formally written to all national and provincial departments who have outstanding debts with municipalities. Please note that the notification was done through a letter by the Director-General: National Treasury who wrote to all Directors-General on 21 July 2015 conveying the message and I reiterated the matter with correspondence on 13 August 2015 to all the executive authorities alerting them of the arrears owed to municipalities.

It is important to understand that the process of addressing these unsettled accounts is being co-ordinated through the President’s Co-ordinating Council (PCC), where Premiers of provinces, Cabinet Ministers, and Accounting Officers of departments have committed to directly address the issue and give regular feedback to the PCC. The written communication from the National Treasury to departments and provinces is part of this high-level process.

The Section 71 of Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) report for June 2015 shows that various departments owed municipalities as per the table below.

Table 1: Age analysis of debt owed to municipalities by National Departments

Section 71 of Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) for June 2015 see the link: http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW4066-151210TABLE.docx

Section 71 of Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) for June 2015 see the link: http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW4066-151210TABLE.docx

(a) All departments listed above were written to by the Minister of Finance on 13 August 2015.

(b) At the time of writing, the following debts were owed to municipalities by national departments amounted to R1.7 billion and provinces owed R2.5 billion.

(c) In addition, the report shows that a majority of the debt has been outstanding for more than 90 days.

(d) The Department of Public Works has initiated a process to verify the outstanding amounts owed by government in order to resolve problems with contested bills. This process is being undertaken to ensure that all outstanding amounts reported by municipalities are legitimately due by the named departments and to correct any undue errors. This process of verification is a work-in-progress and the outcome is not yet available. The report will also indicate a more accurate picture of progress made with payments of outstanding amounts by departments and province.

(e) Once the outcome of the work done by Public Works is made available, this will inform the actions to be taken.

10 December 2015 - NW4198

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)(a) What is the minimum period that an offender sentenced to life imprisonment before 30 September 2004 has to serve before becoming eligible for parole and (b) which (i) section of (ii) which Correctional Services Act is relied upon in this regard; 2) whether a certain offender (details furnished) who is incarcerated at the Qalakabusha Correctional Centre in KwaZulu-Natal is eligible for placement on parole; if not, why not; if so, 3) whether he has received any applications for parole from the specified offender; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) whether he considered the specified offender’s application for parole; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the outcome?

Reply:

(1)(a) According to the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998 offenders sentenced to life incarceration before 1 October 2004 had to serve a minimum detention period of 20 years before being eligible for consideration for placement on parole. However, on 15 July 2011 the North Gauteng High Court handed down a judgment in the Van Wyk case which had the effect to change the minimum detention period for offenders sentenced to life incarceration before 1 October 2004 prior to them being eligible for consideration for placement on parole. The implication was that the previous credit system was also applicable to those offenders sentenced to life sentences from 1 August 1993 up to 30 September 2004 and after allocation of the maximum number of credits advanced their consideration dates from 20 years to 13 years and 4 months.

(1)(b)(i) & (ii) Section 63 of the Correctional Services Act, Act 8 of 1959; and section 136 of the Correctional Services Act, No 111 of 1998 determines the minimum periods of sentence that must be served before consideration may be given for possible placement.

(2) The mentioned offender was sentenced to life imprisonment on 11 January 2002 and is eligible for consideration for possible parole. However, parole applications are submitted in accordance with and in compliance to section 42(2) (d) of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, as amended. As soon as the requirements of the aforementioned section are complied with, the Case Management Committee will submit the profile report to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board (CSPB). The CSPB will then make a submission to the National Council for Correctional Services for a recommendation to the Minister.

(3) See (2) above

(4) See (2) above

10 December 2015 - NW4196

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with reference to the latest round of the redeterminations of municipal boundaries initiated by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in 2015, (a) the specified Minister and/or (b) the Chairperson of the Municipal Demarcation Board made a specific request to the National Treasury to undertake a comprehensive research study to determine the financial sustainability and viability of the proposed amalgamations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) on what date was the specified studies requested by the specified persons, (ii) on what date was the completed study returned to the specified persons and (iii) what were the recommendations in each case; (2) whether the specified study also investigated the (a) institutional viability and (b) envisaged improvements in the municipal governance of the municipalities earmarked for proposed amalgamations; if not, why not; if so, what were the recommendations in each case?

Reply:

  1. The Chairperson of the Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB) wrote to the Minister of Finance on 16 March 2015 requesting the National Treasury to provide the MDB with inputs on a number of matters including a definition of municipal viability, indicators to measure viability and an analysis of the potential impact of each of the proposed boundary re-determinations.

In reply to the specific questions asked:

(i) No date was specified for the requested information to be provided to the MDB.

(ii) The Municipal Demarcation Board published notices in provincial gazettes in early July 2015 formally announcing the details of proposed re-demarcations that they were consulting on. The National Treasury conducted a thorough analysis of these proposals and the Minister of Finance wrote to the Chairperson of the MDB on 6 August 2015 to provide the Board with the information requested.

(iii) National Treasury did not make recommendations to the MDB. The inputs submitted provided information on the affected municipalities and analysis about potential impacts of the proposed boundary redeterminations, noting that in advance of the actual implementation of the proposals it is not possible to know with certainty what the impact will be. This information was provided, at the request of the MDB, to contribute further to the information on which the Board made its decisions.

2. The report compiled by the National Treasury and submitted to the MDB explored a number of different aspects of municipal viability that could be affected by boundary redeterminations. These included financial viability, institutional viability, economic viability and service delivery viability. Again, no recommendations were made to the MDB.

09 December 2015 - NW4241

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

What has been the total cost to date for litigation in all legal actions instituted against a certain person (name and details furnished) by the SA Police Service?

Reply:

The total costs incurred to date amounts to R1 717 351-52 calculated as follows:

Disciplinary hearing R1 088 193-54

Review of the disciplinary hearing (SAPS) R 226 062-00

Review of the arbitration (Maj Gen Booysen) R 403 095-98

TOTAL R1 717 351-52

09 December 2015 - NW4247

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

With regard to visible policing at the Tembisa South Police Station in Gauteng, (a) how many sectors are there, (b) which geographical area does each sector cover, (c) what is the population of each sector and (d) how many visible (i) policing vehicles and (ii) police officers have been allocated to each sector?

Reply:

(a) Three (3) sectors.

(b) SECTOR 1: (Township), Jiyana, Isivana, Isishjetweni, Ibaxa, Welamlambo, Ethafeni

SECTOR 2: (Informal Settlement) Vusimuzi and hostels, Vusimuzi squatter camp, Enhlanzeni,Tembisa Plaza, Thiteng and Tembisa Taxi Rank, Mpho and Lekaneng.

SECTOR 3: (Township) Moedi, Khatamping, Endayini, Umnonjaneni, Esiqongweni, Entshonalanga, Umthambeka Ext 5, Umfuyaneni.

(c) The total population of Tembisa South policing area is 111 926. The population figures per sector is not available.

(d)

Police vehicles (i)

Police officers (ii)

03

06

 

09 December 2015 - NW4245

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Police

Whether an investigation was conducted by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation into a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) details, (b) current status and (c) outcomes of the investigation as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

There are no records of any investigation pertaining specifically to the entity in question at any of the DPCI Components.

09 December 2015 - NW4248

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

How is visible policing conducted in the Vusi Musi informal settlement in Tembisa, Gauteng, where there are no roads?

Reply:

Visible policing in Vusimusi informal settlement is usually conducted by means of foot patrol mostly during the weekends. The 4 X 4 double cabs are also utilized to patrol the area.

08 December 2015 - NW4138

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What were the key findings of the Industrial Development Corporation’s pre-feasibility study for a new low-cost iron and steel facility based on available low-cost resources in the country?

Reply:

A pre-feasibility study (“PFS”) was conducted by the IDC in August 2012.

The key findings of the PFS include:

  • A new low cost iron and steel plant with annual capacity of 2.5 million tons based on low cost iron ore and coal resources in South Africa, is viable.
  • The preferred process route would be the Rotary Hearth Furnace (“RHF”) technology. The primary advantage of this technology is that it does not require coking coal and subsequently has the lowest operating cost. The downside is the high capital cost of an RHF project and relative high electricity consumption.
  • The second best option is Blast Furnace (“BF”) technology. Although it is the most proven route worldwide for iron making, it requires coking coal which is not currently available in South Africa and was therefore considered second best to RHF.
  • Beneficiation of the magnetite could be done at a facility at Phalaborwa.
  • Middelburg would be a suitable location (and significantly better than Phalaborwa) based on availability of coal, raw material transport logistics, infrastructure including water, rail and electricity as well as proximity to inland domestic market.

After the PFS was concluded, IDC embarked on a process to find a strategic equity partner which led to the Memorandum of Understanding executed with China’s Hebei Iron & Steel Group (HBIS) in September 2014.

HBIS’s participation is conditional upon using their core competence which is based on BF technology as well as to increase the target size of the project to 5mtpa of which a substantial portion will be exported, to other Sub-Saharan African markets. The BF process necessitates the use of coking coal that would need to be imported (possibly from Mozambique). The capacity change, new markets identified and raw material import requirements may put an inland site such as Middelburg at a competitive disadvantage. Therefore, they are considering a coastal site as an alternative.

HBIS and IDC are currently conducting additional prefeasibility studies to assess the economic viability of BF technology, increased size and the project location. Depending on the outcome of these additional prefeasibility studies, a detailed feasibility study will be conducted before a final investment decision is made.

-END-

08 December 2015 - NW4054

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 2 450 military veterans who accessed training and skills development and (b) to which of the former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4064

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

Whether the medium-term strategic framework that was adopted for the period 2009 to 2014 has been fully evaluated to determine whether (a) the capacity of the detective and forensic services has been enhanced, (b) the population has been mobilised against crime, (c) the number of serious and violent crimes has been reduced by 4% to 7% each year, (d) women and children are protected from those who perpetrated crimes against them and (e) corruption in the public and private sectors was eliminated; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Due to the nature of the information that is required, SAPS is not able to provide the full details within the given time frame as the information is not readily available. A request is hereby made for an extension of time in order for SAPS to provide quality and correct information as soon as it is received.

08 December 2015 - NW3861

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What is the reason why several medals have been handed over to the Military Shop in Pretoria to be sold to the public; (2) (a) which types of medal and (b) how many of each type of medal have been handed over to the specified shop; (3) who gave the authority for the specified medals to be sold; (4) whether any steps are being considered against the relevant person; if not, why not; if so, what steps; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The SANDF is not aware of any Military Shop in Pretoria that sells military medals. The SANDF remains the custodian of all the South African military medals.

 

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4115

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any budget has been (a) prepared, (b) tabled and (c) adopted by the Ethekwini Municipal Council for the 2022 Commonwealth Games; if not, how was it possible for the City of Durban to bid for the specified project; if so, (i) what are the funding implications for the specified municipality and (ii) how will the specified municipality raise the necessary funds?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4146

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James, Dr WG to ask the Minister of Health

(a) On what date was each contractor paid for the (i) removal and (ii) disposal of medical waste at each state (aa) hospital, (bb) clinic and (cc) laboratory per province (aaa) in the (aaaa) 2013-14 and (bbbb) 2014-15 financial years and (bbb) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) in each case, what amount (i) was each contractor paid and (i) is currently outstanding?

Reply:

  1. Payments to contractors for the removal and disposal of waste to state hospitals and clinics is collated in Annexure A by province and by payment date. Facility data is not provided as service providers cover a range of facilities and are remunerated as such. Where specific payment dates are not available an annual cost is provided. Departments of Health in provinces do not deal with the disposal of laboratory waste.
  1. The amounts paid to contractors and outstanding amounts for the financial years 2013-14; 2014-2015 and from 1 April to October/November 2015 are also outlined in Annexure A.

END.

08 December 2015 - NW4090

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)For each metropolitan municipality, what (a) amount was spent on legal fees in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) was this amount spent on; (2) whether any of the officials employed by the specified municipalities are lawyers that have been removed from the roll; if so, (a) what is their current role at each of the specified municipalities and (b) why were they employed?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4089

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a closed circuit television network; if not, why not; if so, how many cameras are (a) on the network and (b) currently active?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4111

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any forensic (a) audits and/or (b) reports have been generated for the Thabazimbi Local Municipality in Limpopo since 2004; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what action will he take in this regard; if so, in each case, what were the findings of the specified (aa) audits and/or (bb) reports; (2) whether the specified (a) audits and/or (b) reports were tabled before the council of the specified municipality; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (i) when were the (aa) audits and/or (bb) reports tabled and (ii) what actions were taken in this regard; (3) whether any disciplinary action was taken against any persons, parties and/or organisations implicated in the specified audits and/or reports; if not, (a) why not and (b) what action will he take in this regard; if so, what were the outcomes of the disciplinary action taken in each case?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Thabazimbi Local Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4130

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1)What are the details of the process followed to appoint a lead agency for the rollout of broadband services to the eight district municipalities that are the first phase of SA Connect; (2) (a) what are the criteria used to determine the (i) role and (ii) capabilities of the lead agency and (b) when will the appointment of the specified agency be announced?

Reply:

  1. The Lead Entity has not been appointed yet because the Department is following due process.

(2)(a)(i) Current infrastructure roll-out is fragmented, it leads to duplication of efforts and resources, and also focuses on urban areas. Additionally, the roll-out of parallel and competing networks especially in rural areas is considered not feasible or viable because of the socio-economic profile of the rural areas and demand for services. The criteria for designating a Lead Entity took into consideration the extent of fibre infrastructure in the country and the national network scope and scale that can be leveraged to reduce the cost and distances to connect facilities to existing infrastructure. Furthermore, the entity should have the capacity to coordinate other State-Owned Entities (SOEs) in order to leverage and efficiently use State assets and investments to expedite broadband roll-out, particularly in rural areas, in a cost effective manner.

(ii) Refer to (i) above

(b) The appointment of the Lead Agency will be announced once the appointment process has been finalised.

08 December 2015 - NW4053

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the nine military veterans whose houses were rescued from repossession by the banks and (b) to which of the former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

The information can be processed through the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans in the new year, as the beneficiaries names are considered confidential.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4108

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Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What amount was spent on (a) catering and (b) entertainment by the Tlokwe City Local Municipality in the North West (i) in the 2014-2015 financial year and (ii) since 1 July 2015?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Tlokwe Local Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4092

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, for each metropolitan municipality, any municipal official or councillor undertook any international travel (a) in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) since 1 July 2015; if so, (i) what was the purpose of each trip, (ii) who undertook each trip and (iii) what was the total cost of each trip including (aa) flights and (bb) accommodation?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3775

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has been actively promoting the concept of the African Renaissance with a view to ensuring, as former president, Mr Thabo Mbeki, had observed, that the African upper echelons do not remain as a mere parasite on the rest of society, who continue to enjoy self-endowed mandates to define and use their political power in a manner that keeps Africa at the periphery of the world economy, poor, underdeveloped and incapable of development, if not. Why not; if so, how has he and the Government pushed forward the ideals of the African Renaissance and (b) what outcome has he and the Government achieved in relation thereto since 2009?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will be aware that African stability, development and prosperity have been the bedrock of the ANC-led government since the dawn of our democracy in 1994.

We continue this trajectory by committing to various AU programmes, with the following discernible examples:

  1. Peace, Security and Stability: On 08 November 2015, I presided over the closing ceremony of the Amani Africa Field Training Exercise held in Lohatla, Northern Cape, whose main objective was to test the ‘Rapid Deployment Capacity’ (RDC) of the African Standby Force. The success of this Exercise points to the Continent’s readiness to expeditiously provide solutions to some of our instability challenges.

What was most gratifying about Amani Africa was the fact that Southern African Development Community (SADC), the East African Standby Force, North Africa Regional Command, Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Volunteering Nations of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises (ACIRC), all participated in this historic exercise. Amani Africa is a practical headway that has been made to ensure stability, which is indispensable to continental development. The Honorable Member will also recall the swiftness with which SADC addressed the recent challenges in Lesotho.

 

2. NEPAD: As the Honourable Member will know, NEPAD has been one of the corner stones of the African Renaissance. The initiative is anchored on our collective determination to extricate ourselves and the Continent from underdevelopment and exclusion in a globalising world. It is a call for a new relationship based on domestic, continental and global partnerships to address under-development, founded on the realisation of common interest, obligations, commitments, benefit and equality.

NEPAD has a number of key programmes, one of which is infrastructure development. The Continent continues to make progress in this regard through the implementation of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) and the Presidential Infrastructure Championing Initiative (PICI) chaired by South Africa, and spearheaded by seven dedicated Heads of State and Government. PICI is part of PIDA, serving as an initiative to bring political leadership to bear, to fast-track the implementation of important projects from the PIDA Priority Action Plan by identifying and dealing with blockages, missing links and choke-points.

For example, under PICI, progress is being made in closing the missing link of the trans-Saharan highway project covering 4500 kilometres between Algeria and Nigeria and $40 million has been secured towards its continued construction. It is expected to be completed in 2016. The optic fibre component of the same project has seen substantial progress, with the completion of 60% of the project. The ICT Broadband Fibre Optic Network Linking Neighbouring States project, championed by Rwanda, has been completed. Egypt recently held the first Steering Committee meeting of the footprint states of the Navigational route between Lake Victoria and the Mediterranean Sea. Construction on the Grand Inga project is due to begin soon. The Dakar Financing Summit in June 2014 prioritized 16 PIDA projects for exposure to private and institutional investors.

With an infrastructure deficit of about USD 92 billion per year, NEPAD is making every effort to highlight this very important challenge. In light of this, at its annual meeting in May 2014, the African Development Bank launched the Africa50 initiative in order to mobilise USD 100 billion for regional infrastructure projects, focusing on addressing the key part of the project cycle that is project preparation. There are several projects in this regard, so this is by no means an exhaustible list.

3. APRM:

The APRM derives from NEPAD and its aim is to foster and promote good political, economic, social and corporate governance in Africa by encouraging Member States to adopt international best practice, which should eventually translate into political stability, economic growth, sustainable development and sub-regional and continental economic integration. South Africa is committed to advancing, nationally and continentally, the objectives of the APRM.

South Africa acceded to the APRM in March 2003 and was reviewed in July 2005. This resulted in the release of the Country Review Reports in 2007 and its’ National Programme of Action .South Africa tabled its First Report on the Implementation of the Programme of Action in January 2009. The second such Report was tabled in January 2011, with the Third Report being tabled in January 2014. South Africa will soon enter the second Peer Review phase.

Membership of the APRM has risen to 35 and 17 countries have been reviewed to date. This is an utterly unique system of self-assessment in the world in terms of its transparency and extent, and the underlying benefits cannot be overstated in terms of the shaping of national development discourse and providing models of best practice on key cross-cutting issues.

4. CAADP AND OTHER PROGRAMMES:

Another key priority for African development is agriculture, as reflected in the AU/NEPAD Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP). CAADP is one of NEPAD’s most successful programmes and has been key to driving development on the Continent and responding to poverty, hunger and joblessness. CAADP ensures that the great commodity that we have, arable agricultural land, is used for the benefit of all Africans.

In this regard, 52 states have been engaged in CAADP related interventions, 40 have received direct support under CAADP, 40 have signed CAADP national compacts, 30 National Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans have been developed and reviewed, at least 8 countries have met the 10% of budget target, and 4 RECs have developed their own regional compacts. Ten countries have registered more than 6% annual growth in agriculture.

5. PARTNERSHIPS:

The role of international partners is to help scale up and accelerate our own efforts. Therefore, South Africa continues to play a leading role in engaging Africa’s Strategic Multilateral Partnerships, such as FOCAC, TICAD, Africa-EU, Africa India, Africa-Korea, Africa-Arab, Africa-South America, NAASP, and Africa-Turkey going forward. One of the key NEPAD principles is “New partnerships within Africa and with the international community”. It is for this reason that all of the Partnerships have been constructed on the understanding that engagement with Africa is to be done within the framework of NEPAD, as the socio-economic development programme of the AU, with the aim of assisting in the achievement of AU/NEPAD objectives and programmes.

South Africa continues to play a key role in the review of all of Africa’s partnerships with the North and the South, being conducted by the AU PRC Sub-Committee on Multilateral Cooperation.

South Africa is Co-Chair with China of FOCAC until 2018 and we have hosted a very successful FOCAC Summit in Johannesburg on 4-5 December 2015.

President Xi Jinping of China announced a development partnership with Africa worth $60 billion, accompanied by a 10 point plan focusing on areas that are key priorities for development in the continent. We look forward to taking the win-win cooperation further as the African continent as it holds great promise for the renewal of the African continent economically. This occurred on the backdrop of a very successful India-Africa Summit.

08 December 2015 - NW4112

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any water tankers were purchased by the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (a) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 June 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, (aa) how many water tankers were purchased in each specified financial year, (bb) what was the total cost of the specified tankers purchased and (cc) who supplied the specified vehicles; (2) whether he has found that the specified purchases represents a fair market price for the specified vehicles; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Province and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3753

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Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Government intends to encourage an independent mediation process in respect of disputes with other parties, opposition parties included, as first recourse in order to find amicable resolution so that matters of dispute do not have to be referred to Courts for adjudication; if not, why not; if so, what steps does the Government intend to take in this regard.

Reply:

The general principle is that all political and other disputes should be resolved through discussion, negotiation, mediation, and other forms of non-adversarial dispute resolution mechanisms. We should only resort to the courts when these channels have failed. Parties should refrain from using the courts to resolve political disputes. Parliament has various mechanisms in place to resolve disputes between parties in terms of its Rules, and all parties should make optimal use of those Rules to resolve disputes.

08 December 2015 - NW4104

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the proposed (a) operational expenditure and (b) capital expenditure of the Tlokwe City Local Municipality in the North West on services to informal settlements in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

This information has been requested from Tlokwe Local Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4061

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

Whether his department is now ready to (a) produce the draft White Paper on National Integrated Information Communication Technology Policy, (b) gazette the National e-Strategy and (c) make a statement on the continued financial viability of the SA Post Office without assistance from the Government; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) The National Integrated ICT Policy White Paper will be tabled in Cabinet for approval by the end of the financial year.

b) The Department intends to gazette the draft National e-Strategy before the end of the financial year.

c) SAPO currently needs financial assistance from Government.

SAPO has been given a guarantee of R1.67 billion in the past financial year and R2.5 billion in the current financial year. The Post Office uses these guarantees to raise cash from the financial markets.

Moving forward SAPO's Strategic Turnaround Plan (STP) has been developed and approved by Cabinet. Its effective implementation requires effective leadership and funding. As part of supporting SAPO's turnaround, the Department has recognised the need to stabilise SAPO's leadership. The board and the Group CEO have been appointed. To date, there has been more focus on the implementation of cost cutting initiatives. There is currently a need to implement revenue generation initiatives and these require funding. Effective implementation of the STP will enable the entity to be economically viable.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4093

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)For each of the metropolitan municipalities, (a) how many officials are currently on suspension and (b) for each suspended official, (i) what is the position of the specified official, (ii) what is the reason for the suspension, (iii) for how long has each specified official been suspended and (iv) what has been their total remuneration during the period of suspension; (2) whether any severance packages were paid to any municipal officials; if so, for each specified official, (a) who was the official, (b) why was the severance package paid, (c) for how long was the specified official employed by each of the specified municipalities and (d) what was the total amount of the severance package?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3983

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is he aware of any universities which are at risk of being unable to pay their debts between now and the end of the 2016-17 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in respect of each specified university, (a) why is this the case, (b) what is the projected budget deficit in the (i) 2015-16 and (ii) 2016-17 financial years and (c) what steps will he take to prevent any possible liquidations from happening; 2) has (a) he or (b) his predecessors ever provided bailouts to universities; if so, (i) when, (ii) to which institutions and (iii) what amounts were paid in each case; 3) does he expect that it will be necessary to provide bailouts to any universities in the (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17 financial years; if so, (i) why, (ii) to which institutions, (iii) when and (iv) what amount will each bailout be?

Reply:

1.Yes.

(a) In November 2015, the University of Fort Hare (UFH) informed the Department that it has continued to experience financial strain and requested approval to utilise R35 million of its earmarked infrastructure grant to enable short-term relief. Approval was granted and the University must reimburse this amount from its subsidy in April 2016. This will not negatively impact on the progress of projects.

(b) Operating deficits are projected for UFH in the 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years.

(c) The University was requested to provide a turnaround strategy to manage the cash flow constraints and bring it onto a sound financial footing.

2. The Department does not provide bailouts to universities. The Annual Ministerial Statement on University Funding deals with the funding instruments to steer the university sector, and is issued in accordance with the requirements of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act 101 of 1997 as amended) and the funding framework for universities (Government Gazette, No 25824 of 9 December 2003). All universities are funded as explained in this statement.

3. No. As indicated, the allocation of the total funding available to universities is articulated in the approved Annual Ministerial Statement on University Funding. The 2014 statement for the 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years is available on the Departmental website.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3983 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 December 2015 - NW3853

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)     Whether he intends to initiate a scientific investigation(s) to ascertain (a) why South Africans are prone to arson, vandalism and violence when they participate in protest action and (b) what the different spheres of Government need to do to alleviate the anger of the South African population and therefore curb the destruction related to protest actions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether he will make a statement on how the Government is planning to prevent and discourage protesters from routinely resorting to arson, vandalism and violence during a protest action?

Reply:

  1. The widespread incidents of violence and destruction of property during protests is a cause for major concern. I have spoken about this matter many times in public platforms. The violence in our society is inherited from the violence perpetrated during the apartheid system and the violence response it engendered.

There are studies that have been undertaken to understand factors that contribute to a culture of violence in our society. Some of the studies have been undertaken by organisations outside government. Others have been commissioned by government itself. For instance, a few years ago the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security Cluster contracted the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation to undertake research on the violent nature of crime in South Africa.

The critical step that we need to take is not so much to commission more studies because there is already some research that has been undertaken. What is important is taking steps to turn the tide against violent protests and the destruction of property.

2. There are various important initiatives government will implement to address the matter next year. These include educating society about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. This education campaign about rights and responsibilities of citizenship is important considering that next year (2016) will be the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution of the Republic by former President Nelson Mandela. It will also be the 40th anniversary of 16 June 1976 student uprisings.

Studies show that violence in our society affects mostly women and children. Government will use the year 2016, which is the 60th anniversary of the Women’s March to the Union Buildings to mobilise society against violence that is committed against women and children.

Other measures will be announced in due course.

08 December 2015 - NW3717

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, given (a) the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 3509 on 22 September 2015 and (b) his statements on 15 September 2015 during his foreign policy briefing confirming the invitation of a Sudanese delegation to the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan has been (i) invited to and/or (ii) confirmed his attendance at the FOCC Summit to be held in Johannesburg in December 2015?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of Sudan did not attend the Forum of China-Africa Cooperation Summit, (FOCAC).

08 December 2015 - NW4088

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to each metropolitan municipality’s 2015-16 budget, what is the proposed (a) operational and (b) capital expenditure on services to informal settlements?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3953

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) With reference to the Auditor-General’s note in the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) 2014-15 Annual Report that a specific vendor was overpaid by R 2 million, what is the (a) name of this vendor, (b) nature of the service that the vendor rendered and (c) reason for overpayment; (2) Whether the overpaid moneys have been recovered since the findings were made by the Auditor-General in the SABC’s 2014-15 Annual Report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) King James Advertising

(b) Advertising

(c) Quoted amounts for retainer fees and invoiced amounts did not correspond, invoiced amounts were much higher than quoted amounts

(2) The matter is being investigated

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

08 December 2015 - NW4213

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What has been the demand for electricity in each month since March 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

In responding to the question the assumption is made that the Honourable Member is referring to daily maximum demand. The table below indicates the customer daily energy demand from 1 March 2015 to 29 November 2015.

Date

Customer Demand

MWh

2015/03/01

615 989

2015/03/02

669 051

2015/03/03

674 638

2015/03/04

675 675

2015/03/05

678 546

2015/03/06

678 138

2015/03/07

644 353

2015/03/08

622 464

2015/03/09

677 087

2015/03/10

685 801

2015/03/11

687 776

2015/03/12

688 292

2015/03/13

689 000

2015/03/14

650 059

2015/03/15

625 750

2015/03/16

677 776

2015/03/17

684 592

2015/03/18

686 001

2015/03/19

687 755

2015/03/20

682 914

2015/03/21

644 010

2015/03/22

630 664

2015/03/23

683 404

2015/03/24

687 956

2015/03/25

685 945

2015/03/26

690 873

2015/03/27

669 502

2015/03/28

632 650

2015/03/29

608 103

2015/03/30

661 626

2015/03/31

669 967

2015/04/01

668 627

2015/04/02

651 398

2015/04/03

594 235

2015/04/04

590 128

2015/04/05

579 514

2015/04/06

589 727

2015/04/07

655 740

2015/04/08

666 176

2015/04/09

672 502

2015/04/10

672 108

2015/04/11

637 678

2015/04/12

619 241

2015/04/13

663 577

2015/04/14

677 597

2015/04/15

677 271

2015/04/16

679 907

2015/04/17

671 634

2015/04/18

645 426

2015/04/19

630 322

2015/04/20

669 247

2015/04/21

679 860

2015/04/22

683 606

2015/04/23

679 504

2015/04/24

680 109

2015/04/25

635 071

2015/04/26

611 130

2015/04/27

624 250

2015/04/28

666 329

2015/04/29

668 547

2015/04/30

663 547

2015/05/01

617 955

2015/05/02

612 217

2015/05/03

617 004

2015/05/04

662 729

2015/05/05

679 554

2015/05/06

675 633

2015/05/07

686 368

2015/05/08

683 972

2015/05/09

653 427

2015/05/10

630 569

2015/05/11

680 763

2015/05/12

684 688

2015/05/13

683 584

2015/05/14

683 452

2015/05/15

680 843

2015/05/16

652 459

2015/05/17

627 987

2015/05/18

672 777

2015/05/19

682 316

2015/05/20

680 819

2015/05/21

684 597

2015/05/22

678 270

2015/05/23

649 686

2015/05/24

636 941

2015/05/25

680 562

2015/05/26

691 093

2015/05/27

689 785

2015/05/28

687 883

2015/05/29

678 297

2015/05/30

636 299

2015/05/31

624 217

2015/06/01

663 832

2015/06/02

678 966

2015/06/03

687 834

2015/06/04

699 092

2015/06/05

702 533

2015/06/06

677 867

2015/06/07

653 802

2015/06/08

694 948

2015/06/09

703 928

2015/06/10

716 499

2015/06/11

716 836

2015/06/12

714 953

2015/06/13

661 765

2015/06/14

640 077

2015/06/15

673 059

2015/06/16

650 032

2015/06/17

706 515

2015/06/18

711 768

2015/06/19

705 245

2015/06/20

669 921

2015/06/21

650 940

2015/06/22

697 149

2015/06/23

706 460

2015/06/24

706 658

2015/06/25

706 221

2015/06/26

697 005

2015/06/27

672 992

2015/06/28

651 838

2015/06/29

688 460

2015/06/30

698 407

2015/07/01

692 949

2015/07/02

693 312

2015/07/03

690 260

2015/07/04

653 354

2015/07/05

637 854

2015/07/06

679 880

2015/07/07

698 275

2015/07/08

692 722

2015/07/09

686 403

2015/07/10

682 469

2015/07/11

655 458

2015/07/12

635 239

2015/07/13

685 843

2015/07/14

698 754

2015/07/15

695 409

2015/07/16

691 166

2015/07/17

696 565

2015/07/18

660 855

2015/07/19

646 471

2015/07/20

683 527

2015/07/21

690 396

2015/07/22

699 851

2015/07/23

708 383

2015/07/24

701 131

2015/07/25

670 257

2015/07/26

651 721

2015/07/27

694 919

2015/07/28

700 715

2015/07/29

704 311

2015/07/30

698 663

2015/07/31

703 594

2015/08/01

661 007

2015/08/02

636 444

2015/08/03

682 407

2015/08/04

689 477

2015/08/05

692 994

2015/08/06

690 907

2015/08/07

678 144

2015/08/08

638 883

2015/08/09

614 219

2015/08/10

628 776

2015/08/11

681 094

2015/08/12

685 460

2015/08/13

679 649

2015/08/14

677 149

2015/08/15

634 823

2015/08/16

607 120

2015/08/17

652 403

2015/08/18

660 354

2015/08/19

657 677

2015/08/20

657 116

2015/08/21

647 200

2015/08/22

617 489

2015/08/23

604 102

2015/08/24

644 647

2015/08/25

645 891

2015/08/26

646 045

2015/08/27

644 655

2015/08/28

634 684

2015/08/29

601 424

2015/08/30

591 426

2015/08/31

632 223

2015/09/01

669 042

2015/09/02

676 263

2015/09/03

682 373

2015/09/04

700 260

2015/09/05

661 441

2015/09/06

636 233

2015/09/07

675 372

2015/09/08

687 079

2015/09/09

677 477

2015/09/10

678 821

2015/09/11

678 059

2015/09/12

653 847

2015/09/13

629 895

2015/09/14

670 489

2015/09/15

679 680

2015/09/16

675 104

2015/09/17

676 985

2015/09/18

682 142

2015/09/19

653 659

2015/09/20

637 410

2015/09/21

688 762

2015/09/22

683 341

2015/09/23

673 321

2015/09/24

633 573

2015/09/25

650 464

2015/09/26

629 960

2015/09/27

617 185

2015/09/28

661 945

2015/09/29

675 770

2015/09/30

675 378

2015/10/01

662 080

2015/10/02

665 036

2015/10/03

630 343

2015/10/04

611 024

2015/10/05

658 813

2015/10/06

669 966

2015/10/07

670 396

2015/10/08

668 657

2015/10/09

670 214

2015/10/10

633 378

2015/10/11

615 977

2015/10/12

662 540

2015/10/13

671 910

2015/10/14

673 013

2015/10/15

667 974

2015/10/16

666 560

2015/10/17

633 974

2015/10/18

608 772

2015/10/19

660 891

2015/10/20

666 228

2015/10/21

668 833

2015/10/22

673 724

2015/10/23

665 720

2015/10/24

629 230

2015/10/25

608 906

2015/10/26

660 869

2015/10/27

664 197

2015/10/28

669 483

2015/10/29

674 863

2015/10/30

668 504

2015/10/31

627 524

2015/11/01

604 362

2015/11/02

645 209

2015/11/03

656 034

2015/11/04

653 911

2015/11/05

659 857

2015/11/06

659 962

2015/11/07

628 519

2015/11/08

609 244

2015/11/09

664 576

2015/11/10

666 367

2015/11/11

671 344

2015/11/12

676 683

2015/11/13

673 616

2015/11/14

632 639

2015/11/15

603 480

2015/11/16

652 420

2015/11/17

654 575

2015/11/18

655 851

2015/11/19

642 153

2015/11/20

645 569

2015/11/21

610 940

2015/11/22

588 569

2015/11/23

641 785

2015/11/24

660 352

2015/11/25

665 091

2015/11/26

663 060

2015/11/27

657 316

2015/11/28

615 845

2015/11/29

607 541

08 December 2015 - NW4059

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to various replies received from her predecessors pertaining to the movement of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, and all relevant operational planning requirements (details furnished) and with reference to her replies to question 1221 on 9 June 2015, question 1941 on 9 June 2015 and question 3510 on 20 October 2015, on what basis is she refusing to provide the requested information in each case, since former ministers did provide similar detailed information when it was requested; (2) whether she submitted the specified information requested through a parliamentary channel that protects such security sensitive information; if not, why not; if so, in each case, on what date? NW4930E

Reply:

  1. I am not going to provide security sensitive information about the movement of the President
  2. No

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW3832

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What percentage of the Media Development and Diversity Agency funding is allocated to (i) print media and (ii) electronic media per annum and (b) what is the reason for giving any of the specified categories more funding as compared to others?

Reply:

(a) Subject to sub-regulation (2), of Section 22 of the MDDA Act 14 of 2002, funds contemplated in section 15(2)(a) of the Act must be allocated by the Board in accordance with the following percentages:

  • Community media projects: at least 60%
  • Small Commercial media projects: at least 25%
  • Research projects: 5%

(b) The reason for giving community media projects more funding is informed by Regulations in terms of Section 22 of the Media Development and Diversity Agency Act of 2002, as enacted in the Government Gazette No. 22570 of 10 October 2003.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2015 - NW3766

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Public Works

(a) How many contractors from the previously disadvantaged communities have upgraded from grade one to grade two and (b) how many such contractors have upgraded to grade 9?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

a) In terms of the question “How many contractors from the previously disadvantaged communities have upgraded from grade 1 to grade 2”, the response is as follows:

A total of 928 registration upgrades from grade one to grade two have been recorded in the General Building (GB) Class of Works over the past 10-year period from 1 October 2005 to 31 September 2015.

A total of 620 registration upgrades from grade 1 to grade 2 have been recorded in the Civil Engineering (CE) Class of Works over the same period.

Note that many contractors are registered in more than one Class of Works. The number of upgrades is not disaggregated by ownership, but Grade 1 is almost entirely black-owned.

b) In response to the question “How many such [Grade 1] contractors have upgraded to Grade 9”, the response is as follows:

No contractor has upgraded from Grade 1 to Grade 9 over the past 10 years.

However, it is worth pointing out that 38 General Building and Civil Engineering registration upgrades have occurred from Grades 4 to 8 to Grade 9 within the 10 year period.

__________________________________________________________________

08 December 2015 - NW3905

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, subsequent to his declaration of 2011 as the year of job creation followed by the announcement of several initiatives to boost job creation, including the setting up of a R9 billion jobs fund, the Government has achieved any significant milestones towards creating five million jobs by 2020 and bringing the unemployment rate down to 15% as it had set out to do; if not, why not; if so,(a) has half that target been reached in half the time that was allocated to achieve that goal and (b) have decent jobs indeed been created on an incremental basis annually?

Reply:

a) Yes, there has been progress in job creation in the South African economy, although the unemployment rate remains unacceptably high.

The most recent Quarterly Labour Force Survey released by Statistics SA puts total employment in September 2015 at 15 828 000. This is an increase of some 2 500 000 over the September 2011 QLFS estimate of 13 318 000 employed persons. It should be noted, however, that a new Master Sample based on the 2011 census data was introduced in 2015, and Statistics SA therefore cautions that year-on-year changes should be interpreted with care. Notwithstanding this caution, the data indicate that if the rate of increase in employment over the past years is continued over the period ahead, approximately 5 million jobs will be created by 2020.

It is also apparent from the QLFS data that the rate of increase in the labour force has exceeded the rate of job creation, and so the unemployment rate has remained broadly unchanged. In September 2011 the estimated rate of unemployment was 25.7 per cent, and in September 2015 it was 25.5 per cent.

b) With respect to the question whether decent jobs have been created on an incremental basis annually, Government is mindful that wages are low and employment opportunities are irregular in some parts of the economy. Between 2011 and 2015, formal non-agricultural employment increased by approximately 1.5 million. In the September 2015 QLFS, informal sector work accounts for 2.7 million jobs, agriculture employment is 900 000 and private households account for 1.28 million jobs. These are important and sizeable shares of the employment total, and working conditions are varied in these sectors.

Programmes and policy initiatives that are aimed at improving conditions amongst lower-income workers include sectoral wage determinations by the Minister of Labour, investment in training and skills development and small enterprise support programmes. Government’s main direct contribution to the expansion of job opportunities is through the Expanded Public Works Programme and the Community Work Programme, and the youth employment incentive has been introduced to encourage firms to create work opportunities for first-time young work seekers.

The objective of the Jobs Fund is to support innovative approaches to employment creation and work seeker support, thereby contributing to evidence and learning about effective employment initiatives and strategies. The Jobs Fund aims to create 150 000 sustainable jobs and will contribute to evidence-based policy making.

To date the Jobs Fund has issued 5 calls for proposals, and approved 108 project applications of which 85 are currently being implemented. R5.6 billion in grants has been committed to the 108 projects. These project partners have committed R7.9 billion in matched funding. To date R2.78 billion in grants have been disbursed to implementing projects and R4.2 billion in matched funding has already been leveraged from these partners. The 85 projects being currently implemented have to date created 60 675 new permanent jobs and an additional 30 358 persons have been placed in vacant positions on a permanent basis. 16 124 short term jobs have been created, 13 291 persons completed internships and 128 196 persons has received work readiness/technical training.

Most of the jobs created have been entry level jobs for which the salary ranges between the sectoral minimum wage and R3500. Most of those employed are youth in their first jobs. Jobs have also been created in the salary cohort of R3500- R8800 with a few jobs created at salary levels in excess of R8000 per month. Jobs are evidenced through the submission of contracts of employment and payroll amongst others.

08 December 2015 - NW4157

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any councillors and/or municipal officials that owe any rates and/or taxes to the Mbombela Local Municipality may benefit from any incentive schemes that are designed to incentivise poor rate payers to pay 50% less of the outstanding amounts they owe; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has found that it is ethical to benefit from such a scheme when a person (a) is currently employed in the finance department and/or (b) is a councillor that could have known that such a scheme was to be presented to the specified municipality’s Council and that it would ultimately be adopted by the majority; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what steps will he take against the Members of the Mayoral Committee for allegedly indicating to the specified Council that resolutions were passed indicating that councillors and municipal officials were able to benefit from such a scheme despite the resolutions making no mention of said officials; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will instigate an investigation into the alleged breaching of the specified legislation in the specified municipality; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Mbombela Local Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

The Honorable Member should provide CoGTA with any concrete information in his possession that could assist in any investigation – which will be initiated if there is a prima facie basis in existence.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4051

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 1 803 military veterans who were provided with healthcare cards and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW3381

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James, Dr WG to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to his reply to question 443 on 26 May 2015, what amount was (a) claimed for medical negligence from and (b) eventually paid out by (i) his department and (ii) each provincial department of health (aa) in the (aaa) 2011-12, (bbb) 2012-13, (ccc) 2013-14 and (ddd) 2014-15 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2015; (2) what amount was budgeted for litigation by (a) his department and (b) each provincial department of health for the 2015-16 financial year; (3) in respect of each province, what are the five most common complaints for which compensation was claimed in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (4) (a) which 10 hospitals had the highest number of claims against them and (b) for each hospital (i) how many claims were made against each one and (ii) what total amount was paid out for each specified claim in the 2014-15 financial year; (5) whether he has a plan to address the high number of medical negligence claims in the country; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

National Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (i) - Nil

(2) R7 299 000.00

Western Cape Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (ii)
 

CLAIMED

PAID OUT

2011-12

R38 065 710.00

R15 900 800.00

2012-13

R16 577 812.00

R6 197 147.05

2013-14

R156 742 059.90

R22 587 000.00

2014-15

R66 537 807.64

R17 311 080.30

(2) R71 401 million

(3)

Year

Top 5 most common

  1. 2013-14

Neonatal encephalopathy

Delayed diagnosis of illnesses

Maternal / labour complications

Failure to diagnose and treat

  1. 2014-15

Neonatal encephalopathy

Maternal /labour complications

Failure to diagnose and treat

(4)

Hospital

Number of claims

How much paid in 2014-15

Groote Schuur

3

R775 000.00

Tygerberg

3

R790 000.00

Mowbray Maternity

2

R836 600.00

Worcester

2

R4 867 615.00

Karl Bremer

1

R200 000.00

Hanna Coetzee clinic

1

R1 227 660.00

Retreat MOU

1

R220 000.00

Clanwilliam

1

R100 000.00

Delft CHC/Tygerberg

1

R7 829 205.30

IdasValley clinic

1

R45 000.00

False Bay

1

R200 000.00

Paarl

1

R220 000.00

Eastern Cape Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (ii)

Financial Year

Amount Claimed

Amount paid

2011/2012

R331 728 678.64

R25 336 038.35

2012/2013

R393 108 094.28

R44 743 495.84

2013/2014

R198 207 500.00

R49 513 I08.93

2014/2015

Information not furnished

Information not furnished

Since 1 April 2015

R2 304 490 306.10

R147 861 438.84

(2) The Eastern Cape Department of Health does not allocate a budget for legal claims settlements, however when a settlement obligation arises from a medico legal claim, funds are reprioritized from within the departmental allocation to pay for such obligation.

(3) In the Eastern Cape, for both years, the 5 most common complaints for which compensation was claimed were:

• Obstetrics and gynaecology;

• Paediatrics;

• Orthopaedics;

• Trauma; and

• Family medicine.

(4) The top 10 litigated hospitals in the Eastern Cape and corresponding claims paid in 20 14/ 15 is presented in the table below as follows:

NO

NAME OF INSTITUTION

NUMBER

OF CLAIMS

2014/15

AMOUNTS

CLAIMED

(not finalised) these matters are still active and pending, as they are not settled)

AMOUNTS PAID

1

Butterworth Hospital

86

R278 042 265.00

RO.OO

2

Frere Hospital

56

Rl87 245 594.10

RO.OO

3

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

41

R88 572 625.00

RO.OO

4

Dora Nginza Hospital

39

R193 951 117.00

RO.OO

5

Mthatha General Hospital

48

R217 625 555.44

RO.OO

6

All Saints Hospital

19

R171 363 625.00

RO.OO

7

Nelson Mandela Academic

Hospital

32

R123 279 284.00

R8 000 000.00

8

Bedford Orthopaedic

Hospital

14

R5 425 000.00

RO.OO

9

St Barnabas Hospital

13

R45 050 000.00

RO.OO

10

Livingstone Hospital

12

R20 30I 325.52

RO.OO

  1. The following interventions are being implemented in the Eastern Cape to address the high number of medico legal claims in the province:

• The department held a medico legal summit and invited all affected role players to look at ways of managing medical litigations in the province;

• The department is finalizing the appointment of the Medical Ombudsman for the Province;

• The department is also appointing a panel of medical legal experts to assist with preparation for the cases before they appear in court, and in same terms strengthening its legal representation; and

• The department is continuously strengthening the quality of health care services and ensuring adequate retention of patient records; including direct interventions focused specifically in management of medico legal trends.

KwaZulu-Natal Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (ii)

Financial Year

No of new matters received

Amount Claimed

No of matters settled

Amount paid

2011/2012

81

R326 342 322.68

30

R41 357 533.80

2012/2013

165

R992 272 280.20

28

R49 400 941.94

2013/2014

309

R1 596 517 823.74

49

R123 885 303.21

2014/2015

404

R3 046 136 920.80

61

R212 851 030.87

2015/2016 (as at 11

September 2015)

194

R1 456 528 457.00

17

R68 852 267.54

(2) The Department has not budgeted for litigation matters, as it is difficult to predict possible liabilities.

(3)

Year

Top 5 most common

  1. 2013-14

Obstetrics and gynaecology

Paediatrics

Surgery

Orthopaedics

Misdiagnosis

  1. 2014-15

Obstetrics and gynaecology

Paediatrics

Surgery

Orthopaedics

General (refers to claims to cover non medical errors resulting in litigation against the Department ranging from maintenance, security & operational issues)

(4)

District

Hospital

No.

of claims

2014/15

Amounts paid

eThekwini District

Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

121

 
 

Addington Hospital

77

 
 

King Edward VIII Hospital

69

 

Amajuba District

Mahatma Ghandi Memorial Hospital

69

 
 

Charles Johnson Memorial Hospital

68

 
 

Inkosi Luthuli Central Hospital

34

 
 

Total amount paid for eThekwini District

 

R85 704 607.21

uMgungundlovu District

Edendale Hospital

44

 
 

Northdale Hospital

44

 
 

Total amount paid for uMgungundlovu District

 

R10 796 165.80

Ugu District

Port Shepstone Hospital

34

 
 

Total amount paid for Ugu District

 

R1 375 000.00

Amajuba District

Madadeni Hospital

34

RO.OO

 

Total amount paid for Amajuba District

 

R67 714.83

The Department is planning a Medico-Legal Summit to discuss and address the Medical negligence claims in the Province.

Mpumalanga Department of Health

(1) (a) and (b) (ii)

The following table represents the amounts claimed for medical negligence:

Financial Year

Amount Claimed for medical negligence

2011/2012

R131 538 785.00

2012/2013

R93 194 265.00

2013/2014

R95 375 306.00

2014/2015

R 562 210 541.00

April 2015 to June 2015

R130 536 500

TOTAL

R1 012 855 397.00

(b) The amounts paid out for claimed medical negligence, in Mpumalanga is listed as follows:

(aaa) During the 2011/12 financial year, a total number of eight (8) medical negligence claims were paid at a cost of R5 056 370.00.

(bbb) During the 2012/13 financial year, a total number of three (3) medical negligence claims were paid at a cost of R220 000.00.

(ccc) During the 2013/14 financial year, a total number of nine (9) medical negligence claims were paid at a cost of R44 193 741.66.

(ddd) During the 2014/15 financial year, a total number of five (5) medical negligence claims were paid at a cost of R2 773 768.00

(bb) For the period April 2015 to August 2015, the department has paid three (3) medical negligence claims at a cost of R10 099 248.63.

(2) The Mpumalanga Department of Health has been allocated with a budget of R22 212 000.00 for claims against the state and R34 737 000 for legal fees, that are paid to state attorneys and private attorneys.

(3) The most common complaints in Mpumalanga for which compensation was claimed in 2013/14 and 2014/15 financial years, were obstetric cases due to birth injuries where period of labour has been prolonged and resulted in the child suffering from cerebral palsy and orthopaedic cases as a result of motor vehicle accidents.

(4) (a) The Top Ten hospitals in Mpumalanga with highest claims in 2014/15, are:

• Tinswalo Hospital

• Matikwana Hospi

• Themba Hospital

• Mapulaneng

• KwaMhlanga Hospital

• Witbank Hospital

• Rob Ferreira Hospital

• Shongwe Hospital

• Sabie Hospital

• Evander Hospital

(i) Number of claims made against them

• Tinswalo Hospital

13

• Matikwane Hospital

13

• Themba Hospital

12

• Mapulaneng Hospital

07

• KwaMhlanga Hospital

04

• Witbank Hospital

04

• Rob Ferreira Hospital

04

• Shongwe Hospitals

03

•-- Sabie Hospital -­

03

• Evander Hospital

02

(ii) Total amount paid out of each specified claim in 2014/15

• Tinswalo Hospital None

• Matikwane Hospital None

• Themba Hospital None

• Mapulaneng Hospital None

• Kwa Mhlanga Hospital R430 000.00

• Witbank Hospital R2 411 432.00

• Rob Ferreira Hospital None

• Shongwe Hospitals None

• Sabie Hospital None

• Evander Hospital None

Free State Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (ii)
 

CLAIMED

PAID OUT

2011-12

R39 201 030.30

R5 473 097.00

2012-13

R145 406 892.00

R2 935 534.00

2013-14

R177 408 892.65

R673 373.00

2014-15

R322 449 863.07

R15 090 000.00

2015-

R259 771 498.92

R12 725 427.59

(2) R10 000 000.00 was budgeted for the 2015/2016 financial year.

(3)

Year

Top 5 most common

  1. 2013-14

Cerebral Palsy

Botched Operations

Misdiagnosis leading to complications

Perforation of uterus during delivery

  1. 2014-15

Cerebral Palsy

Botched Operations

Misdiagnosis leading to complications

Perforation of uterus during delivery

(4)

Hospital

Number of claims

Pelonomi Hospital

9

Bongani Hospital

8

Thebe

5

Universitas

4

Fezi Ngubentombi

3

Boitumelo

3

Manapo

2

Elizabeth Ross

2

Botshabelo

1

No payments have been made yet, all matters still pending.

(5) A medico legal expert panel, consisting of medical doctors from various medical disciplines has been appointed. One of their responsibilities is to draft a Litigation Prevention Strategy, the strategy is still a in a draft format.

Limpopo Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (ii)
 

CLAIMED

PAID OUT

2011-12

R161 228 792.79

R11 394 831.08

2012-13

R130 155 032.44

R4 114 165.00

2013-14

R299 181 456.14

R22 033 040.50

2014-15

R656 940 666.77

R31 364 817.07

  1. The budget and revenue unit make availability of the funds for payments on claims against the State and litigation matters.
  1. The most common complaints that the department receives:
  • Loss of a child during labour/delivery
  • Foreign objects left inside the patients after the operation
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Maternal death
  • Amputations
  1. (a) The Limpopo province is divided is divide into 5(five) districts namely; Mopani, Capricorn, Waterberg, Sekhukhune & Vhembe District. The hospitals that have a large number of cases are as follows:
  • Philadelphia
  • Polokwane
  • Maphutha Malatji
  • Mankweng
  • Nkhensani
  • Sekororo
  • Seshego
  • Malamulele
  • Tshilidzini
  • Letaba

 

(b) (i) This are the claims that have been made against each hospital for the financial year 2014/15 are:

  • Philadelphia = 12
  • Polokwane = 12
  • Mapjutha Malatji= 09
  • Mankweng = 08
  • Nkhensani = 07
  • Sekororo = 06
  • Seshego = 04
  • Malamulele = 04
  • Tshilidzini = 03
  • Letaba = 03

 

(ii) For the financial year 2014/2015 the Department has paid R23 805 262.72

  1. In respect of Limpopo Province the Department of Health has established a specialized unit which is the Medico Legal unit separate from the Legal Services unit which functions includes:
  • Identification of overt claims, potential claims and monitoring of medical negligence cases,
  • Consultation with state attorney,
  • Rebuttal of claims,
  • Settlement of claims and
  • Closure of cases.

North West Department of Health

  1. (a) and (b) (ii)
 

CLAIMED

PAID OUT

2011-12

R733 602.57

R753 602.57

2012-13

R144 470 255.72

R7 899 232.50

2013-14

R207 601 325.00

R12 959 528.18

2014-15

R499 577 250.00

R19 978 582.00

Since April 2015

R142 886 250.00

Nil

(2) R5 409 525.00

(3) Most common complaint that the Department receives:

Obstetric complications

END.

08 December 2015 - NW4113

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What transitional arrangements were put in place in the (a) Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality and (b) Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality respectively to facilitate the transfer of assets from their former district municipalities to the new Metros; (2) whether such arrangements are still in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any backlog of assets still remains to be transferred; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each of the specified Metros, what (a) is the nature, (b) is the value of the assets to be transferred and (c) are the relevant reasons why the specified transfers have not yet taken place?

Reply:

This information has been requested from these two metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4139

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(1)With regard to the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Industrial Development Corporation and China’s Hebei Iron & Steel Group in September 2015, (a) what were the terms of reference of the feasibility study for a greenfield steel plant, (b) what is the total estimated cost of the plant, (c) how many metric tons of steel is the plant expected to produce annually and (d) how many jobs is the plant expected to create; 2) whether the specified feasibility study has been completed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Memorandum of Understanding was executed in September 2014.

a) The terms of reference include undertaking and completing a pre-feasibility study (“PFS”) for a new low cost steel production facility in South Africa (the “Project”) that will meet international environmental compliant standards using raw materials that are locally and regionally available. The envisage Project had to be a profitable low cost producer of a broad spectrum of steel products required by the South African and Sub-Saharan markets

Furthermore, it envisages the establishment of a down-stream industrial park to process some of the steel products to finished goods for domestic and export markets.

b) The estimated total capital outlay of the envisage plant is USD 5 billion which is R70 billion at R14/$. The Project will be funded partly with debt (up to 60%) and partly with equity (40%). The objective of the IDC is to play a catalytical role in the establishment of the facility and not to have a controlling interest in the project.

c) The plant will be designed to have a capacity of 5 million tons of steel per annum. During the detailed feasibility study, consideration will be given to the option to build the Project in two phases of approximately 2.5 million tons each.

d) The labour force to construct the Project is estimated to peak at around 11000 and construction will span over a period of at least 42 months. The operational labour requirement for the Project is estimated at 3 500.

An earlier pre-feasibility study was completed, based on the use of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (“RHF”) technology. Since Hebei seeks to use a different technology, further pre-feasibility studies will be conducted. For details of the earlier pre-feasibility study outcomes, the attention of the Honourable Member is drawn to the reply submitted to Parliamentary Question 4138.

-END-

08 December 2015 - NW4005

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the diplomatic visit to the Republic of Cuba in October 2015 by the Deputy President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, South African Ambassador to Cuba Ms Naphtalie Manana‚ Deputy Ministers Mr L T Landers‚ Mr M E Surty‚ Dr M J Phaahla‚ Mr G G Oliphant‚ Ms P Tshwete and Mr K B Manamela, what was the (a) traveling cost for (i) each member of the specified delegation and (ii) their support staff and (b) breakdown of these costs in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Defence was not involved in the travel arrangements for the diplomatic visit to the Republic of Cuba by the Deputy President, Mr C Ramaphosa, and his entourage during the month of October 2015.

Please refer your question to the Presidency.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4050

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 6 795 military veterans who were provided access to healthcare and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4132

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Police

(1)Whether the SA Police Service have received any claims for post-traumatic stress for incidents on duty since the Casualty Commissioner has classified it as a health condition; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how many such claims have been received and (b) were successfully processed; (2) whether a certain person (name and details furnished) recently received a promotion due to the specified person’s health condition; if not, (a) why not and (b) why was the promotion withdrawn; if so, (i) on what date and (ii) what is the specified person’s current rank; (3) whether there is an ongoing investigation into the promotion of the specified person; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the status of the investigation and (b) when is it expected to be finalised?

Reply:

Due to the nature of the information that is required, SAPS is not able to provide the full details within the given time frame as some information is still being processed. A request is hereby made for an extension of time in order to SAPS to provide quality and correct information as soon as it is ready.