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02 June 2016 - NW1567

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

Department

(a) (1) In the financial year 2015-16, the Department spent an amount of R10 382m on marketing and advertising. This amount includes spending on marketing and advertising in the print and electronic media, such as radio and television, outdoor advertising, Departmental campaigns such as the Easter and Festive Season Road Safety and the October Transport Month campaigns and various other events that the Department implemented.

(b) (1) In the 2016-17 financial year, the Department has budgeted an amount of R16 867m. This budget will be used for marketing and advertising in print and electronic media, including radio and television, outdoor advertising, Departmental campaigns including the Easter and Festive Season Road Safety and the October Transport Month campaigns and various other events that the Department will implement.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. (i) N/A; (ii) an amount of R5.6 million was spent on advertising in the 2015/2016 financial year.
  2. (i) N/A; (ii) an amount of R12.2 million is budgeted for advertising in the 2016/2017 financial year.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. (i) N/A; (ii) 2015-2016 amount spend R 6, 033,114
  2. (i) N/A; (ii) 2016-2017 amount budgeted R 3, 676, 480

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) N/A; (ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority spend R1 352 711.74 on advertising during the 2015-16 financial year and

(b) (i) N/A (ii) and has budgeted R3 333 300.00 for advertising during the 2016-17 financial year.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a) (ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) spent R 29,927,823 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R 30,000,000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a) (ii) The RTMC spent R 29,927,823 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R 30,000,000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(a) (ii) The RTIA spent R R 4.3mil on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R R 6.4milfor advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

The SANRAL spent R176 529 857 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) (ii) has budgeted R175 000 000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(b) (i) The Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) did not spend on advertising in the financial years 2015-16.

(ii) The Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) did not allocate budget for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The RSR spent R213 240.34 on advertising during 2015-16 financial year, and an amount of R600 000 has been budgeted for the 2016-17 financial year.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA spent on R5.6 million advertising and awareness programmes in the 2015/16 financial year and the budget for 2016/17 financial year is R4.4 million.

Ports Regulator (PR)

  1. (ii) The Ports Regulator spent R 49 476.15 in the 2015/16 financial year, (b) the budget for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year is R 98 758.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA did not spend on adverting in the 2015/16 financial year due to cost containment measures. No budget has been allocated to advertising for the 2016/17 financial year due to the same reason.

02 June 2016 - NW948

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Social Development

Has (a) she and/or (b) her Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

I have not met with any member, employee or close associate of the Gupta family or attended any meeting with the specified persons at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or anywhere else since taking office.

 

02 June 2016 - NW1415

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether (a) her department and (b) all entities reporting to her are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

Department

(a) 

(b) 

(c)

(d) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(i) ACSA does run a development programme for small businesses.

(ii) ACSA does not have a development programme for Cooperatives. It is not part of the current Small Enterprise Development (SED) strategy.

(aa) ACSA has an annual Enterprise and Supplier Development funding programme which is aimed at empowering and assisting start-up businesses, emerging and small businesses. The programme also provide support in the form of mentoring and coaching, book keeping, tax, business acumen skills, tendering and contracting.

(bb) The fund value is R15 million.

(cc) About 70 jobs have been created through this programme.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(b) ( i) & (ii) ATNS has the Enterprise Development Programme in place which covers small businesses and co-operatives in the aviation space.

(aa) ATNS has a structured Enterprise and Supplier Development programme to address the lack of black suppliers in the aviation’s Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) domain. Through this structured programme, ATNS is currently developing twenty Black Owned Engineering Suppliers, preparing them to participate in the CNS space. A Gap Analysis Audit was conducted to identify gaps; currently ATNS is conducting training to close identified gaps.

(bb) In terms of the budget, 1% and 2% of the Net profit after Tax is channeled towards Enterprise Development and Supplier Development respectively.

(cc) once these gaps are closed, these Suppliers will stand a chance of getting business which will enhance job creating opportunities.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) Not applicable. (b) (i); (ii); and (aa) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA), a Level 2 B-BBEE contributor, is running a skills development programme for businesses affiliated to the South African Network for Women in Transport (SANWIT). The programme focuses on providing training to women who are running businesses focused on the transport sector. The training is centred on aspects of effective bidding and supply chain management procedures. The initial training took place in March 2016 in Gauteng, and it is being rolled out country-wide as per the dates below.

Province

Date

Gauteng

16 March 2016

Eastern Cape

30 June 2016

Mpumalanga

6 July 2016

Limpopo

8 July 2016

Western Cape

20 July 2016

Northern Cape

26 July 2016

Free State

28 July 2016

North West

11 August 2016

KwaZulu-Natal

16 August 2016

(bb), and (cc) The total amount of spend on the programme is R478, 305.98. In addition, 88% of the SACAA’s budget was spent on Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) companies. During the 2016 - 17 financial year, the SACAA will be introducing a procedure that will track the number of jobs created and supported as a result of its initiatives and budget spend.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

(b)(i) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) has a unit that specifically focuses on developing the cross-border road transport with a view to empower the industry to maximize business opportunities. The unit has implemented an Entrepreneurship and Business Development Programme that is specifically designed for majority of cross-border permit holders who fall within the small, medium and micro enterprises (SMME) category. The programme supports SMMEs in the cross-border passenger operations by providing training interventions that will improve their business operations. The following training programmes have been offered:

  • Financially Management;
  • Business Planning;
  • Business Management;
  • Leadership Skills;
  • Entrepreneurial Competencies;
  • Risk awareness and financial implications in business; and
  • Understanding of legal, regulatory and tax imperatives as they relate to financial matters.

(ii) The C-BRTA has established two cooperatives for the previously disadvantaged individuals. This pilot project sought to determine the feasibility of empowering targeted groups to enter the cross-border road transport market.

(aa) One cooperative was established for women and the other for youth aspiring to enter the cross-border market. The C-BRTA carried the cost of registration of the cooperatives, identification of business opportunities related to cross-border operations, and determining the feasibility of identified opportunities. Cooperatives were assisted with the development of business and marketing plans in preparation for operations

Road Accident Fund

The (b) Road Accident Fund (RAF) is not running specific development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; however, both small businesses and co-operatives fall within the category of Exempted Micro Enterprises (EME’s) and as such are specifically provided for in the RAF’s BBBEE Scorecard, with 26% of the RAF’s procurement spend from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016 going to EME’s; questions (aa), (bb) and (cc) are not applicable.

Road Traffic Management Corporation

(b) The RTMC does not run a development programme for (i) small business and (ii) co-operatives because small business development is not the RTMC mandate

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

(a) N/A

(b) RTIA

(i) Yes and

(ii) Yes;

(aa) RTIA has set up Enterprise Development Unit to provide access and ease of use of the Agency’s programmes by communities while assisting in creating job opportunities and enterprises in line with its commitment to the National Development Plan. The appointed enterprises will perform the extended services of the Agency. The programme further seeks to support and develop SMME’s and Cooperatives through structured programme of mentoring and incubation. A conducive environment will be created for such businesses to develop, flourish and grow into big businesses.

(bb) An amount of R60 million has been budgeted for the 2016/17 financial year.

South African National Roads Agency Limited

(i)(aa) SANRAL has an empowerment programme for SMMEs and Historically Disadvantaged contractors, consultants, and suppliers etc. – targeted enterprises – mainly through the award of contracts on national road projects. This is particularly driven through the Routine Road Maintenance projects and Community Development projects on the national road network. During 2015/16, 2052 SMMEs and Historically Disadvantaged companies worked for SANRAL, with a total expenditure of R3.5 billion.

For 2016/17:

(bb) Estimated budget for such empowerment and development programmes: R4.2 billion.

Estimated number of SMMEs and HD companies to benefit: 2 436

(cc) Estimated number of jobs to be created: 10 154 (All estimates are based on actuals for 2015/16 and approved budget for 2016/17)

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

(b) Small businesses? Yes SAMSA is running such a programme in the form of an initiative called Black Youth and Women in the Maritime sector.

(aa) The programme aims to empower participation of black youths and women in the opportunities that exist in the maritime sector.

(bb) The initiative will have to seek partnerships to raise the funding for the work because part of the entities budget for the initiates was reduced. It is captured in our APP 2016-17 as a non-budget item.

(cc) The number of jobs that will be delivered given the constraints in budget will be further estimated.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(b) Yes PRASA supports Small Businesses and Co-operatives

(aa) PRASA has targeted and focused on increasing it’s spend on Women Owned Businesses and bringing them into broad railway environment. PRASA spent R1.4 Billion on Women owned companies in the 2015/16 Financial Year. PRASA has budgeted R1.2 billion for Women Owned Entities in the 2016/17 financial year

PRASA has a programme which focuses on Co-operatives cleaning its railway stations – for the 2015/16 financial year R12 million was spent on this programme, and 420 people participated in 61 Co-operatives for the 16/17 to 17/18 Financial Years – R51 Million will be spent on this programme.

(bb) PRASA has prioritized Youth Owned, Military veteran owned companies in its Corporate Plan for the 2016/17 Financial Year and spending will be increased for such entities.

Ports Regulator (PR)

(b) The Ports Regulator does not run any direct development programmes for (i) small business and (ii) co-operatives for the 2016/17 financial year. It must be noted that for procurement purposes, the Ports Regulator sets a target for procurement from certain suppliers with a specific BBBEE rating to achieve government objectives. Also through our Regulation business processes, efforts are being made to ensure that small businesses do benefit from tariff adjustments.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

RSR does not have development programs for small businesses or co-operatives due to the nature of our business. The RSR encourages the use of previously disadvantaged Engineering companies to support our investigation and technology audits. 

01 June 2016 - NW1569

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The department spent R4, 477,235 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year.

(ii) Not applicable

(b) (i) The department has budgeted R1, 603,000 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

(ii) Not applicable

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

01 June 2016 - NW1336

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) How many (i) principals, (ii) deputy principals, (iii) heads of departments and (iv) educators involved in special needs education have resigned from their respective posts in each province in (aa) 2011, (bb) 2012, (cc) 2013, (dd) 2014 and (ee) 2015, (b) how many of the specified positions are still vacant and (c) by what date does she envision that the specified vacancies will be filled; (2) (a) how many of the specified vacancies are being filled by staff on an acting basis in each case and (b) what are the financial implications in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) How many (i) principals, (ii) deputy principals, (iii) heads of departments and (iv) educators involved in special needs education have resigned from their respective posts in each province in (aa) 2011, (bb) 2012, (cc) 2013, (dd) 2014 and (ee) 2015, (b) how many of the specified positions are still vacant and (c) by what date does she envision that the specified vacancies will be filled

(1) (a),(b) and (c)The Department does not currently have the information as specified in the question. The information has been requested from the Provincial Education Departments and will be provided as soon as it is received.

2. (a) how many of the specified vacancies are being filled by staff on an acting basis in each case and (b) what are the financial implications in each case?

(2) (a) Acting appointments are made in promotional posts that are critical and mainly the Principal and the head of department posts. An indication of which posts are filled by staff on acting basis will be made once the information of vacancies is received from the province.

(b) It must also be noted that acting appointments are made in funded posts and thus acting allowances are paid accordingly in line with the remuneration level of the relevant post. There are therefore no additional financial implications incurred.

01 June 2016 - NW1534

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Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case;

Reply:

  1. Not applicable.
  2. Not applicable.

 

 

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date………………………..

01 June 2016 - NW1442

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 839 on 12 April 2016, (a) when was the process started to revise the policy on the Criteria for the Evaluation and Recognition for Qualifications for Employment in Education, former Department of Education, 2000, published in Notice No. 935, Government Gazette No. 21565 of 22 September 2000, and (b) on what date does her department envisage that the specified revision will be completed?

Reply:

(a) The process to revise the policy on the Criteria for the Evaluation and Recognition for Qualifications for Employment in Education, former Department of Education, 2000, published in Notice No. 935, Government Gazette No. 21565 of 22 September, 2000 started during March 2015.

(b) It is envisaged that the process will be completed by 31 October 2016.

 

01 June 2016 - NW1565

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) R 2 673 358.61 (Department of Tourism)

(ii) R 417 031 499.00 (SA Tourism)

(b) (i) R 6 500 000.00 (Department of Tourism)

(ii) R 313 124 285.00 (SA Tourism)

 

01 June 2016 - NW1175

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) How many records of voters with valid physical addresses appeared on the final voters’ roll of the local government elections in (a) 2001, (b) 2006 and (c) 2011; (2) how many records of voters with valid physical addresses (a) appeared on the final voters’ roll of the (i) provincial and (ii) national elections in (aa) 2004, (bb) 2009 and (cc) 2014 and (b) appear on the most recently updated voters’ roll for the 2016 local government elections; (3) whether there has been any reduction in the number of records of voters with valid physical addresses since 2004; if so, (4) has any of the specified records been (a) lost and/or (b) destroyed due to fire, floods and/or any other reason; if so, (i) how many and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Electoral Commission did not keep a record of the number of valid

physical addresses on the final voters’ roll for the local government elections in 2001, 2006 and 2011.

(2) The Electoral Commission did not keep a record of the number of valid physical addresses on the final voters’ roll for the provincial and national elections in 2004, 2009 and 2014 elections. Following the Constitutional Court judgment in Kham on 30 November 2015, the Electoral Commission for the first time ahead of both registration weekend held in March and April 2016, produced a voters’ roll with addresses and requested registered voters to confirm or correct their address details on the voters’ roll. Following the last voter registration weekend in April 2016 the status of addresses on the voters’ roll is as follows on the table below:

Category

Number of Voters Affected

Voters with Addresses and REC AS

14,174,525

Potentially Incomplete Addresses

6,635,458

No Addresses

5,491,430

Grand Total

26,301,413

The different categories used in the table are as follows:

(a-b) The “complete addresses category includes only those voters who have a complete conventional urban address with at least the following four line-items: street number, street name, suburb and town. The reason this category is defined in such narrow terms is because only addresses that meet all four of these requirements is definitely a complete address. It is accordingly the only assumption that can be fed into the database to obtain a definite figure of complete addresses. However, in response to the Kham Judgment, this category also included recent transaction during the Reg 1 and Reg 2 weekends and the category was expanded to include those who had submitted sufficient particulars in terms of the REC AS forms.

The “no addressescategory includes voters in respect of whom no physical residential address is captured. This includes: (i) voters whose Rec 1 forms have been lost; (ii) voters who have left the address section in the Rec 1 form blank or have indicated that they have no formal residential address (e.g. by writing the words “N/A” or “none” in the address section); and (iii) voters who have provided only a postal address.

The “potentially incomplete addresses category is all the remaining addresses. Many, and possibly the vast majority, of these addresses are complete for the purposes of s 16(3). But it is impossible to determine whether they are complete by making general assumptions (for input into the database) without examining these addresses individually.

(3) As the records of the number of valid addresses were not kept it is impossible to make a determination of a reduction or increase. However since the decision of the Constitutional Court in Kham over 4 million addresses and sufficient particularities have been obtain from voters.

(4) Some REC 1 forms have been lost over the years as a result of mishaps and unexpected events – with REC 1 forms being lost in transit (as they move from voting/counting stations to local IEC offices to provincial warehouses) or damaged in storage. The IEC has not kept a catalogue of these incidents. Some of the incidents include the following:

(a) During 2001, flooding at a warehouse used by the IEC for storage of some of its records in eThekwini metropolitan municipality, KwaZulu-Natal destroyed a number of REC 1 forms dated 1998 and 1999.

(b)(i-ii) In Msinga local municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, the REC1 forms for the period 1998 to 2008 were erroneously discarded by a removal company when the IEC vacated a rented storage facility. This was discovered during the 2010/2011 bulk scanning project.

- A fire broke out at a Metrofile (Pty) Ltd warehouse in Pinetown, KwaZulu-Natal province on the night of 11 October 2013, where the IEC stored some of its records. This fire did not, however, result in any loss of voter data as the REC 1 forms destroyed in the fire had already been scanned and captured.

- On 15 November 2013, about 1,500 REC 1 forms were destroyed by fire during the unrest in the Metsimaholo Municipality, Free State.

- The Sol Plaatjie municipal electoral office in the Northern Cape was flooded in February 2014. This resulted in the loss of approximately 15,000 REC 1 forms.

- In March 2015, 3,900 REC 1 forms were destroyed by fire during community protests in the Mantsopa Municipality in the Free State.

01 June 2016 - NW1261

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her reply to question 835 on 20 April 2016, (a) who will pay for the costs of training the 100 South African teachers to be trained in Mandarin in each year for the next five years and (b) what amount has been budgeted for the training in each specified year; (2) (a) who will pay for the 100 South African teachers to travel to China in each year for the next five years for purposes of methodological and cultural enrichment and (b) what amount has been budgeted for this purpose in each specified year; (3) (a) what criteria will be used to select the 100 South African teachers for Mandarin training, (b) will the specified teachers already be proficient in Mandarin and (c) how long will it take for the specified teachers to be (i) proficient in Mandarin and (ii) able to teach Mandarin; (4) (a) what criteria will be used to select the 500 schools at which Mandarin will be rolled out in the next five years, (b) who will pay the salaries of Mandarin teachers at the specified schools, (c) how many learners currently take Mandarin as a second additional language in each province and (d) will action be taken against any selected school if they refuse to offer Mandarin; (5) has her department undertaken any empirical studies to ascertain the demand for Mandarin as a second additional language at schools; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings of each such study?

Reply:

1) (a) The People’s Republic of China will pay for the training.

(b) This information has not been made available to the Department of Basic Education as the budget is located with the People’s Republic of China.

2) (a) The People’s Republic of China will fund the tuition fees and accommodation. However, the flights will be borne by each participant.

(b) This information has not been made available to the Department of Basic Education as the budget is located with the People’s Republic of China.

3) (a) The basic criteria are proficiency in Mandarin, a University qualification and pedagogical versatility.

(b) Yes, the proficiency level of teachers is one of the crietria for participation in the training.

(c) (i) Teachers selected for participation in the course must satisfy the minimum level of proficiency as dictated by the Chinese language authorities. Their participation in the course should assist to improve proficiency levels.

(ii) Once these candidates have completed the course and have passed the Mandarin proficiency test at a specified level, they will be able to teach Mandarin.

4) (a) It is envisaged that the five hundred schools will be recruited on a voluntary basis.

(b) Salaries will be paid by the People’s Republic of China.

(c) Currently the learner statistics that are available are as follows:

PROVINCE

LEARNER NUMBERS

Eastern Cape

136

Gauteng

602

Western Cape

249

KwaZulu-Natal

13

Source: Information provided by Provincial Education Departments

Note: The current statistics are tentative and will be reviewed during the survey that will be conducted by the Department of Basic Education, in collaboration with the Chinese advisor.

(d) The selection of schools is on a voluntary basis. Hence it is not envisaged that there will be refusal from schools to participate.

(5) There are no studies conducted as yet, but the Department of Basic Education is working with the Chinese advisor to conduct a survey on the demand for Mandarin in schools.

01 June 2016 - NW1394

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) and (b) Yes

(i) Development programmes for small businesses:

(aa) Name of programme

(bb) Amount budgeted

(cc) Number of jobs to be created by the programme

Various skills development programmes relevant to small businesses (i.e. Learnerships, Bursaries, Skills Programmes, Artisanship, RPL and Internships funding)

Refer to the attached Annexure A

R 889 993 987

13 967 Beneficiaries trained

The interventions from Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are not directly linked to job creation. The interventions are planned for small businesses and therefore the number of beneficiaries reported is based on the number individuals planned to be trained.

(ii) Development programmes for cooperatives:

(aa) Name of programme

(bb) Amount budgeted

(cc) Number of jobs to be created by the programme

Various skills development programmes relevant to cooperatives (i.e. Learnerships, Bursaries, Skills Programmes, Artisanship, Adult Education and Training, RPL and Internships funding)

Refer to the attached Annexure A

R180 597 667

4 498 Beneficiaries trained

The interventions from Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are not directly linked to job creation. The interventions are planned for cooperatives and therefore the number of beneficiaries reported is based on the number individuals planned to be trained.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1394 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 June 2016 - NW1098

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How many applications from educators were found to be fraudulent in each (a) province and (b) district in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

The verification of qualifications for employment is done by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) and districts. No fraudulent applications were reported to the Department of Basic Education (DBE) by provinces and districts in the financial years indicated, namely (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15.

01 June 2016 - NW1443

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) How many (i) principals and (ii) deputy principals at schools for learners with special educational needs (LSEN) signed up in each district of each province for the 2013 Continuing Professional Teacher Development (CPTD) cohort and (b) of the specified teachers completed the 3-year cohort; (2) (a) how many (i) principals and (ii) deputy principals at LSEN schools did not sign up for the specified CPTD cohort and (b) what action has been taken to ensure that the specified teachers do sign up and complete the 3-year cohort; (3) how many educators who are foreign nationals (a) are teaching at LSEN schools in each district in each province, (b) are in possession of SA Council for Educators certificates, (c) have an SA Qualifications Authority evaluation certificate and (d) have an SA Police Service clearance to teach in the country?

Reply:

(1) (a) How many (i) principals and (ii) deputy principals at schools for learners with special educational needs (LSEN) signed up in each district of each province for the 2013 Continuing Professional Teacher Development (CPTD) cohort and (b) of the specified teachers completed the 3-year cohort;

(1) ((a) (i) (ii) 506 (67.7%) Principals and Deputy Principals that have been signed up into the South African Council of Educators (SACE) Continuing Professional Teacher Development (CPTD) management system.

(b) There is no policy position on the matter. However, the Council has taken a decision that there will be no consequences for the first six (6) years on educators who have not reached the 150 points in the three (3) year cycle; instead the focus will be on investigating the reasons for non–participation, and recommendations on consequences for non-participation will be based on such findings.

(2) (a) How many (i) principals and (ii) deputy principals at LSEN schools did not sign up for the specified CPTD cohort and (b) what action has been taken to ensure that the specified teachers do sign up and complete the 3-year cohort;

(2) (a) (i) (ii) 241 Principals and Deputy Principals at schools LSEN did not sign up for the specified CPTD cohort.

(b) Since the system was started in 2013, the first cycle would be completed by the end of this financial year.

(3) How many educators who are foreign nationals (a) are teaching at LSEN schools in each district in each province, (b) are in possession of SA Council for Educators certificates, (c) have an SA Qualifications Authority evaluation certificate and (d) have an SA Police Service clearance to teach in the country?

3 (a) The number of foreigners employed in LSEN schools according PERSAL as at 31 March 2016, is as follows:

PROVINCE

REGION DESCRIPTION

NUMBER OF FOREIGN EDUCATORS

EASTERN CAPE

GRAHAMSTOWN

1

GAUTENG

EN: EKURHULENI NORTH INSTITUTION

3

GAUTENG

GE: GAUTENG EAST INSTITUTIONS

1

GAUTENG

GW: GAUTENG WEST INSTITUTIONS

7

GAUTENG

JC: JOHANNESBURG CENTRAL INSTITUTIONS

11

GAUTENG

JE: JOHANNESBURG EAST INSTITUTIONS

2

GAUTENG

JN: JOHANNESBURG NORTH INSTITUTIONS

1

GAUTENG

JS: JOHANNESBURG SOUTH INSTITUTIONS

6

GAUTENG

TS: TSHWANE SOUTH INSTITUTIONS

2

GAUTENG

TW: TSHWANE WEST INSTITUTIONS

1

KWAZULU-NATAL

DURBAN CENTRAL CIRCUIT MANAGEMENT

1

KWAZULU-NATAL

DURBAN NORTH-WEST CIRCUIT MANAGEMENT

1

KWAZULU-NATAL

PHUMELELA CIRCUIT MANAGEMENT

1

KWAZULU-NATAL

UBUMBANO CIRCUIT MANAGEMENT

1

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

BOCHUM WEST CIRCUIT OFFICE

1

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

MVUDI CIRCUIT OFFICE

2

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

SOUTPANSBERG EAST CIRCUIT OFFICE

2

NORTH WEST

GREATER DELAREYVILLE AREA OFFICE (DR RSM)

2

NORTH WEST

LETLHABILE AREA OFFICE (BOJANALA)

1

NORTH WEST

MADIBENG AREA OFFICE (BOJANALA)

1

NORTH WEST

MAQUASSI HILLS AREA OFFICE (DR KK)

1

NORTH WEST

MOSES KOTANE EAST AREA OFFICE (BOJ)

2

NORTHERN CAPE

FRANCIS BAARD

1

WESTERN CAPE

METRO SOUTH EDUCATION DISTRICT

1

TOTAL

 

53

(b) All educators who teach at public schools are registered with the South African Council of Educators (SACE) and are issued with the SACE certificate. This is a pre-requisite for appointment.

(c) All foreigners applying for a work permit in South Africa must, as a requirement, have their qualifications evaluated by the SA Qualifications Authority (SAQA). This is done as part of the process to apply for a work permit. In addition to the SAQA evaluation, the qualifications of foreign educators who wish to be employed in public schools are further evaluated by the employing provinces in order to be assigned a Relative Education Qualification Value (REQV). The REQV is primarily used to determine whether or not the qualification complies with the minimum qualification requirements as regulated in the Personnel Administration Measures.

(d) The South African Police Service clearance is part of the process of application for the work permit. Therefore, the police clearance does not form part of the requirements at the level of the employing entity accepted as having been submitted as part of the requirement for issuing of the work permit.

01 June 2016 - NW1535

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

DAFF

(a)(i) DAFF spent R1 533 061 on advertising in the 2015/16 financial year and

(b)(i) DAFF budgeted R8 110 100 for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

ARC

The ARC spent R4.5 million on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted R4 million for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

MLRF

The MLRF spent R3 337 315.19 on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted an amount of R5 886 344 for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

PPECB

The PPECB spent R353 066 on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted an amount of R310 000 for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

OBP

The OBP spent R3.5 million on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted an amount of R3.5 million for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

NCERA

The NCERA Farms spent R112-00 on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted an amount of R5 000-00 for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

NAMC

The NAMC spent R99 253.98 on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted an amount of R82 992.00 for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

01 June 2016 - NW1097

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How many (a) applications from educators were vetted and (b) qualifications were verified in each (i) province and (ii) district in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

The verification of qualifications for employment is done by provinces and districts. No fraudulent applications were reported to the Department of Basic Education by Provincial Education Departments or Districts in the financial years indicated, namely (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15.

01 June 2016 - NW529

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the current status of the proposal to reintroduce school inspectors?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education established the National Education Evaluation and Development Unit (NEEDU) to put in place a countrywide credible and holistic performance review system, which focuses systemically on the state of teaching and learning in classrooms, and on the monitoring, administration and support functions at school, provincial and national levels. This is a semi-autonomous entity that focuses on an objective and holistic assessment of what is happening in the system. The Department has also strengthened its capacity to assess/evaluate/inspect the performance of schools by ensuring that adequate numbers of appropriately qualified officials are appointed at the circuit management and subject advisory levels. Neither the NEEDU or the district officials mentioned above are known as ‘inspectors’ because the role of ‘inspecting’ schools has been coupled with development and support, where this is found to be necessary. The function of ‘school inspectors’ therefore already exists and continues to be strengthened through the review and strengthening of recruitment procedures to ensure the appointment of the right people for these roles.

01 June 2016 - NW658

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the details of the schools in the Graaff-Reinet education district that the Eastern Cape Department of Education intends to close by the end of the (a) 2016, (b) 2017 and (c) 2018 academic years, including in each case (i) the reason for closure and (ii) the envisaged alternative school for the current learners of each affected school?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Eastern Cape Department of Education and will be provided as a soon as it is received.

31 May 2016 - NW1371

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

1. Whether any further requests for drought relief assistance were received from provinces since his reply to question 3982 on 25 November 2015; if so, (a) which provinces requested the specified assistance, (b) on what dates and (c) what amount has been requested by each specified province; 2. whether any additional drought relief assistance funding has been made available to (a) (i) the North West, (ii) the Free State, (iii) Mpumalanga, (iv) Limpopo and/or (v) KwaZulu-Natal and/or (b) any additional provinces since his reply to the specified question; if not, why not; if so, (aa) what amounts of additional drought relief assistance funding was made available in each case and (bb) on what dates; 3. what is the detailed breakdown of the expenditure of R226 million that was prioritised by his department to assist small-scale and subsistence farmers; 4. whether any further funding to assist small-scale and subsistence farmers with fodder and livestock water has been made available since his reply to the specified question; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes; all affected provinces have submitted requests for funding to the department. DAFF has submitted the requests to the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) for further processing to the National Treasury. The requests have been received from all provinces. Refer to the table below:

PROVINCE

PROVINCIAL FUNDING REQUESTS

REQUEST FOR FUNDING DATES

Free State

R 102 500 000.00

September 2015

Kwa -Zulu Natal

R 142 000 000.00

April 2015

Limpopo

R 105 000 000.00

September 2015

Mpumalanga

R 71 000 000.00

July 2015

North West

R 3 400 000 000.00

August 2015

Northern Cape

R 163 000 000.00

April 2016

Gauteng

R 140 000 000.00

December 2015

Eastern Cape

R 239 100 000.00

December 2015

Western Cape

R 88 000 000.00

March 2016

Total

4 450 600 000.00

 

(2) No; these request are still being processed by the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC).

(3) The breakdown of expenditure for the reprioritised R226 million is tabulated hereunder.

PROVINCE

Total reprioritized CASP

CASP Updated adjustment

CASP Expenditure

Free State

R30 663 000.00

R29 000 000.00

R29 000 000.00

Gauteng

R15 186 000.00

R 12 846 000.00

R 12 800 000.00

KwaZulu Natal

R22 489 000.00

R 45 000 000.00

R 45 000 000.00

Limpopo

R28 391000.00

R 51 000 000.00

R 51 000 000.00

Mpumalanga

R25 610 000.00

R 33 622 000.00

R 33 600 000.00

Northern Cape

R24 748 000.00

R 14 600 000.00

R 14 600 000.00

North West

R37 982 000.00

R 25 000 000.00

R 23 800 000.00

Western Cape

R12 390 000.00

R 6 000 000.00

R 00.00

Eastern Cape

R29 476 000.00

R 40 600 000.00

R 40 600 000.00

Total

R226 935 000.00

R257 668 000.00

R250 400 000.00

   

(4) There was no further funding requested except in the 2015/16 financial year whereby DAFF and the PDAs made available a total of R257 million through CASP and Illima/ letsema Programmes for emergency drought relief and the R124 million from provincial Equitable Share an additional amount of R63 million was further allocated by the provinces such as Eastern Cape; Kwa Zulu Natal; Limpopo and Free State from their equitable share.

31 May 2016 - NW1511

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department was not approached by any political party for any form of funding during the years mentioned.

(b) Not applicable.

2. (a) The Department did not provide any form of funding to any political parties during the years mentioned.

(b) No form of funding was provided to political parties since1 April 2016.

In terms of the Public Finance Management Act (Section 39), the Department ensures that its expenditure is in accordance with the Vote of the Department and main divisions, and therefore the funding of any political party will not be allowed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1511 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1546

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department of Higher Education and Training spent R3 144 493.49 on advertising in the 2015/16 financial year.

(b) (i) The Department of Higher Education and Training has budgeted an amount of R3.689 million for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year.

(a)(ii) and (b)(ii) The following public entities reported the amounts spent in the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted in the 2016/17 financial year on advertising:

(a) Public Entity

(a)(ii) Amount spent on advertising in the 2015/16 financial year

(b)(ii) Amount budgeted for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

1. BANKSETA

R438 782.00

R1 500 000.00

2. CHE

R70 715 .00

R0

3. FASSET

R837 566.27

R1 477 383.60

4. FPM SETA

R 293 936.10

R 280 000.00

5. FOODBEV

R767.000.00

R1 265 000.00

6. HWSETA

R1 100 000.00

R1 381 000.00

7. INSETA

R154 081.91

R120 000.00

8. MERSETA

R1 900 059.00

R2 241 648.00

9. NSF

R4 696 30.00

R5 275 000.00

10. PSETA

R 256 284.92

R120 000.00

11. QCTO

R331 000.00

R500 000.00

12. SAQA

R1 516 528.30

R628 900.00

13. SERVICES SETA

R2 701 710.00

R1 548 000.00

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR –GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1546APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1383

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) cooperatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016/17 financial year? NW1531E

Reply:

Small business and cooperative development function in the department resides within the sub-programme of Cooperatives and Rural Enterprise Development whose mandate is to facilitate and support the development of businesses to ensure transformation of the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors. This is done by implementing the following support programmes:

1. Cooperative development

1.1 Facilitate establishment of Commodity Based Cooperatives

Through the cooperative development programme, smallholder farmers are clustered into commodity based cooperatives for collective sourcing of inputs and marketing of their products. This intervention is geared towards assisting smallholder farmers maximise their outputs through collective efforts. The commodity based approach results in vertical integration of smallholder producers through their primary cooperatives along the value chain as an approach to improve access to markets, productivity, efficiencies and competitiveness. The result is the creation of enterprises which pool resources (products, savings), to engage in bulk purchasing, wholesaling on behalf of the affiliated producer cooperatives, to reduce transaction costs, to penetrate new markets, to benefit from economies of scale.

Budget: R 4 965 000, 00 has been budgeted for this activity for operational purposes.

1.2 Support cooperatives with training

Supporting cooperatives with training and capacity building aims at transferring entrepreneurial aptitudes of personal motivation, initiative, innovation, problem solving tendencies and risk taking as some of the core elements of entrepreneurship. This strengthens cooperatives and ensures that they are geared towards contributing to Departmental objectives of food security, job creation and economic growth.

In order to improve operational efficiency and managerial agility in cooperatives a number of training and capacity building programmes have been developed and are currently used to support small scale farmer cooperatives. The following are the core support programmes to assist small businesses and cooperatives to build capacity and drive efficiency and all of them are accredited by AgriSETA.

1.2.1 Farmtogether Agricultural Cooperative Training Programme

This intervention is aimed at assisting cooperatives in the sector to integrate into the broader South African context by addressing a range of skills that include governance, business skills and making business choices. Specific intervention areas include record keeping, financial management, conflict management, enterprise evaluation, production planning, making business choices, constitution and other regulatory frameworks.

1.2.2 Business planning development

The business plan guideline is a capacity building tool developed to equip enterprises with skills that will enable them to gain understanding of the agribusiness planning processes. The tool further guide farmers/entrepreneurs to develop his/her own business plan and better understand the business Aids in applying business principles and contributes to best practices. It contains information on the various elements of the business. The tool is comprehensive yet simple and can be used by both farmers and officials.

1.2.3 Agribusiness Appraisal Tool.

This is a diagnostic tool used to determine or identify business strengths and weaknesses and recommend alternative solutions to drive efficiencies in SMME’s and cooperatives in the sector. The main objective is to support cooperatives and other enterprises to achieve excellence in their businesses. Farmers are exposed to conducting self assessment of their enterprises using the tool and in the process assisted to develop action plans to address identified areas of weaknesses while maximising on their strengths.

Budget: R 9728 000, 00 has been budgeted for this activity for operational purposes.

2. Business Development (Incubation)

As part of the department’s efforts to develop businesses in the sector, a Cooperation agreement was entered into between the department (DAFF), Limpopo Department of Agriculture (LDA) and the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA). The purpose of this agreement is to provide integrated support interventions through incubation to farmers in the Nwanedi irrigation scheme in Limpopo. Intervention areas targeted include entrepreneurial and technical skills such as development of bankable business plans, linkages to markets, production plans linked to market requirements, linkages to financial institutions, management skills support and mentorship, market conceptualisation, negotiation skills and production processes.

An incubator (Timbali Technology Incubator) has been appointed as the project manager and 50 farmers are participating in the project. Limpopo Department of Agriculture has a responsibility in terms of the agreement to provide the necessary infrastructure to support the farmers and ensure the success of the project while DAFF transfer the funds to ensure that incubation of the selected farmers takes place. This project is now in its second phase and has seen a total of 1576 jobs created with a combined annual turnover of over six million rands. Participating farmers have been linked to markets such as Tiger Brands (tomatoes), Technoserve, Rhodes (jam tomatoes); NTK (sugar Beans) Woolworths and Freshmark (gooseberries) DUP and Wol market in Tshwane (vegetables). The second phase of this project comes to an end in 2017/18.

Budget: R 1 825 000, 00 (One million eight hundred and twenty five thousand rands) has been budgeted as a transfer to the incubator through the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA).

4. Financial Support (AgriBEE Fund)

The AgriBEE Fund was conceptualized as a support intervention to enable participation of businesses owned by Africans, previously excluded from mainstream economic activities. The objectives of the Fund are to promote the entry and participation of black people in the entire agriculture, forestry and fisheries value chains, through provision of funding for equity deals (acquisition of Interests/shareholding) in economically and financially viable sector entities and enterprise development (value addition and agro-processing) to the people who were previously marginalized to participate in the economy thus, ensuring an increase in the number of black people who own, manage and control sustainable enterprises in the sector.

Budget: R 38 232 000, 00 (Thirty eight million two hundred and thirty two thousand rands) has been allocated for the 2016/17 financial year.

31 May 2016 - NW1372

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

1. With reference to his reply to question 4175 on 14 December 2015, (a) what criteria were used to establish which farmers would receive drought relief through the drought relief fund in each province, (b) how many farmers were assisted through the specified fund in each province and (c) what was the average amount of assistance provided to each of the specified farmers 2. Which provinces are still identified as drought disaster areas 3. Whether any additional funding has been requested from the National Treasury to assist his department in providing drought relief; if not, why not; if so, how much additional funding was (a) requested from and (b) granted by the National Treasury? NW1520E

Reply:

1. a) The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) has developed a Framework meant to give direction to all provinces on the implementation of assistance being provided in the event of a disaster occurrence. In terms of that framework, farmers are classified into three categories namely Small scale (farmer who owns 30 or less LSU); Subsistence (farmer who owns 31 to 50 LSUs) and Commercial (farmer who owns 51 and more LSU). Due to the insufficiency of funds to cater for all farmers, they were prioritised by provinces based on the impact of the drought conditions.

   b) According to records at our disposal, farmers assisted to date were as follows: Free State (FS) (3 418), KwaZulu Natal (KZN) (8 300), Limpopo (LP) (22 524), Mpumalanga (MP) (10 670,) North West (NW) (21 383), Northern Cape (NC) (2 108), Gauteng (GP) P (1150), Eastern Cape (EC) (8 025) and Western Cape (WC) (885).

    c) The average amount of assistance differs because it depends on the provincial allocation and the number of farmers to be assisted as well as number of livestock affected.

2. The South African Weather services (SAWS) forecasted normal to below normal rainfall for winter season throughout the country and that indicates that all provinces are still experiencing dry conditions with declarations still in force in all six declared provinces and municipalities in the Eastern and Western Cape. It should also be noted that the recent showers received throughout the country were a relief to the farming communities.

3.No, DAFF has submitted the original requests to the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) for further processing to the National Treasury to assist farmers affected by drought throughout the country. While waiting for the response DAFF and provinces have prioritised funds for drought assistance further into the 2016/17 financial year from their grants and equitable share allocations.

31 May 2016 - NW1563

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of State Security

What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) The State Security Agency (SSA) has spent approximately R63 000.00 on advertising in the 2015-2016 financial year.

The SSA has no budget for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year. Advertising of tenders will be done through E-Tendering system as provided by National Treasury

31 May 2016 - NW1232

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Mchunu, Ms S to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether he can outline how his department aims to achieve the target of producing 30 000 artisans as the National Development Plan states that by 2030 the post school education should be producing the specified number of artisans; (2) whether the colleges have the capacity to produce the required number of artisans annually; if not, what steps has his department taken to assist the specified colleges; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The average number of apprentices successfully completing training and becoming qualified artisans over the past four years from 2012/13 to 2015/16 is 15 000 qualified artisans. This average has to double to 30 000 qualified artisans by the year 2030.

The all-embracing strategy to reach this target is as follows:

  • The capturing of artisan learner data has improved with the establishment of the National Artisan Development Support Centre at Ekurhuleni East Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College. With the use of this call centre facility, the Department is able to centrally collect, analyse and report on artisan registration and completion rates from Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) and INDLELA.
  • The artisan learner grant has been standardised to R150 000 per artisan learner across all SETAs with effect from 1 April 2016. Previously this grant was differentiated and did not fully serve artisan training, and was increased from R139 350 to R150 000.
  • The Department is developing a dual system of apprenticeship training with the assistance from German and Swiss authorities, which will assist in standardising the trade curriculum content, and improve monitoring and evaluation of what artisans are trained in, based on the Trade and Occupations Qualifications developed by the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO). The deployment of the dual apprenticeship training system to all accredited training centres is earmarked for 1 April 2018.
  • INDLELA, which serves as the only public trade test centre in the country, is being improved through a recapitalisation project funded by SETAs. The project entails modernising trade testing equipment and workshops to meet present industrial standards. For the 2016/17 financial year, the Services SETA and Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport SETA (CATHSSETA) have contributed a combined amount of R10 million, whilst other SETAs will contribute during the subsequent years.
  • The “Decade of the Artisan” campaign, which was declared in 2014 after a successful “Year of the Artisan” campaign, is a successful public campaign visiting all provinces and engaging with learners and educators in schools to promote and encourage students to choose artisanship as a career. This campaign also engages employers and persuades them to open training spaces for apprentices in their workplaces.
  • Presently, the Department is developing a Trade Test Improvement Strategy aimed at improving both the quality and throughput of artisan training. Public comments have been received and the Department is working towards finalising the strategy for implementation on 1 April 2018.
  • The Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning (ARPL) pilot has been completed. This pilot was aimed at empowering assistant artisans who previously did not have any formal qualifications as artisans. The ARPL guideline being compiled will serve as a formal instrument to evaluate the experience of assistant artisans and will be available to all training sectors by 1 April 2018.
  • There are other comprehensive interventions on artisan quality assurance, audit, accreditation of training centres, and registration of assessors and moderators, which is performed through the National Artisan Moderation Body (NAMB).

2. TVET colleges do have the capacity to provide theoretical training for the required number of artisans. However, it must be noted that artisan training does not rely on colleges alone, but more importantly on the workplace-learning component. The number of workplaces that needs to be secured is therefore critical to meet these numbers.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1232 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1498

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What amount did (a) her department and/or (b) any relevant entity reporting to her spend on releasing the tolling newsletter in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

Department

(a) The Department itself did not directly spend any amount on releasing the tolling newsletter in any of the three financial years indicated as (i), (ii) and (iii).

Civil Aviation Entities

The Civil aviation entities were not involved with the tolling newsletter. This Parliamentary Question is therefore not applicable to them.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA did not spend any amounts towards the tolling newsletter.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(b) The Ports Regulator did not spend any funds on releasing the tolling newsletter in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

RSR did not spend/ report on releasing the tolling newsletter in the financial years: 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(b) SANRAL has not published the Tolling Newsletter in the years referred to by the Honourable Member, that is (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15, and (iii) 2015-16 and therefore no money was spent on it.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

PRASA has not spent any amount on releasing the tolling newsletters.

31 May 2016 - NW1373

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many (a) student loans, (b) bursaries and (c) scholarships did the National Student Financial Aid Scheme allocate in each financial year since its inception in 2000; (2) (a) how many of the specified student loans were converted into bursaries in each of the specified financial years, (b) what is the value of the loans that were converted and (c) why were the specified loans converted to bursaries; (3) (a) how many of the specified student loans were written off in each of the specified financial years, (b) what is the value of the loans that were written off and (c) why were the specified loans written off?

Reply:

1. The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) awards loans and bursaries.

1 (a) The table below contains the number and value of NSFAS loans awarded in each year.

Year

Loan Count

Loan Amount

2000

83 251

R 510 829 288.31

2001

93 532

R 635 091 084.88

2002

99 873

R 733 474 559.16

2003

112 264

R 893 672 471.50

2004

113 615

R 984 527 910.26

2005

122 617

R 1 214 620 227.23

2006

124 593

R 1 379 965 435.06

2007

140 147

R 1 682 353 956.38

2008

143 952

R 2 117 714 766.07

2009

162 503

R 2 818 220 031.70

2010

180 894

R 3 343 869 489.05

2011

212 133

R 4 561 359 562.01

2012

232 178

R 5 871 489 880.57

2013

195 665

R 4 774 601 486.18

2014

183 031

R 4 728 234 783.76

2015

205 420

R 4 850 127 272.07

Total

2 405 668

R 41 100 152 204.19

1 (b) The table below contains the total number and value of bursaries awarded each year.

Bursaries are made up of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college bursaries and university bursaries.

Year

Number

Bursary Amount

2000

72 037

R 149 943 786.82

2001

80 512

R 183 680 420.53

2002

86 146

R 213 087 777.41

2003

96 552

R 254 137 455.18

2004

98 732

R 302 106 088.28

2005

106 772

R 371 955 209.82

2006

108 294

R 411 287 523.42

2007

125 436

R 600 662 493.20

2008

155 376

R 852 722 463.49

2009

193 394

R 1 244 985 229.22

2010

212 709

R 1 500 872 028.17

2011

291 613

R 1 958 764 735.02

2012

298 149

R 2 722 954 813.27

2013

153 561

R 1 167 494 176.01

2014

333 675

R 4 118 642 032.98

2015

311 811

R 4 359 490 749.00

Total

2 724 769

R 20 412 786 981.82

2 (a) and (b) The table below shows the number and value of loans that were converted to bursaries in each year.

Year

  1. Number
  1. Amount

2000

68 458

R 149 288 662.92

2001

76 380

R 186 408 596.40

2002

81 891

R 215 272 969.58

2003

92 040

R 258 980 651.84

2004

93 630

R 310 057 061.77

2005

100 697

R 355 264 477.79

2006

98 836

R 374 521 400.27

2007

100 445

R 422 391 156.18

2008

102 188

R 522 126 444.81

2009

113 037

R 604 648 198.34

2010

122 474

R 725 761 024.53

2011

144 582

R 1 093 215 271.78

2012

146 249

R 1 275 849 187.29

2013

177 430

R 1 800 387 465.35

2014

169 722

R 1 815 074 609.61

2015

141 972

R 1 963 029 274.43

Total

1 830 031

R 12 072 276 452.89

(c) Loans are converted based on the rules of the funder. The rules stipulate that if a student has passed a certain percentage of their registered subjects then a percentage will be converted into a bursary. The normal conversion allows for up to 40% of the loan amount to be converted into a bursary based on the percentage of subjects passed, pro-rated if a lesser number of subjects are passed. For the Department of Higher Education and Training Final Year fund, if all subjects are passed, 100% of the final year loan is converted into a bursary, otherwise the 60:40 ratio is applied.

(3) (a) (b) and (c)

The loan debt amount written off is set out in the table below and are predominantly for deceased debtors and non-paying loans with a balance of R50.00 or less. In prior years, loans for deceased debtors were only written off when NSFAS was notified by their next of kin. Since 2015, NSFAS only writes off loans for deceased debtors based on information received from the Department of Home Affairs.

Year

  1. Number
  1. Amount

2000

266

R 1 575 172.13

2001

302

R 1 992 523.09

2002

214

R 1 618 224.47

2003

667

R 5 304 588.99

2004

451

R 4 108 980.18

2005

581

R 5 378 213.24

2006

400

R 4 347 938.06

2007

4 598

R 37 355 518.26

2008

358

R 4 379 246.49

2009

396

R 5 168 735.02

2010

276

R 4 078 341.64

2011

230

R 3 688 087.89

2012

130

R 2 714 623.67

2013

944

R 9 040 112.78

2014

9 613

R 807 969.46

2015

63 327

R 340 479 537.95

Total

82 753

R 432 037 813.32

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1373 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 May 2016 - NW1265

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) Whether his department received permission from the National Treasury to enter into the visa processing tender with VFS; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) who signed the visa processing contract with VFS and (b) on what date was the specified contract signed; (3) whether VFS is (a) linked to and/or (b) part owned by (i) any member of and/or (ii) any subsidiary company linked to the Gupta family; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No, because in the Department’s view the permission of Treasury was not required in such a case. This matter is the subject of litigation and is before the courts.

It should be pointed out however that the Department followed National Treasury Regulations and the relevant legislative provisions in awarding the tender. National Treasury was supplied with the Department’s procurement plan for the financial year 2013/2014 on 30 April 2013. This plan included inter alia, outsourcing VISA application services in South Africa. The contract was procured through Departmental bid / tender processes. A tender was advertised in the Tender Bulletin No. 2762 on 22 February 2013 in compliance with National Treasury Regulations.

While the term ‘visa processing’ is understood to be used loosely by the Member, it is important to point out that VFS Global does not process South African visas – it receives and transmits South African visa applications to the Department for adjudication and where relevant, visa production.

(2)(a) The contract was signed by the Director-General: Mr Mkuseli Apleni.

(2)(b) 05 September 2013.

(3)(a)(bi-ii) The VFS Company with which the Department has a contract is not to our knowledge, linked to and/or partly owned by any member of or subsidiary company belonging to the Gupta family.

The Department entered into a contract with VFS Global, which operates through its registered entity, VFS Visa Processing (South Africa) Proprietary Ltd, which is a subsidiary of VFS Worldwide Holdings Ltd that is registered in Mauritius, and the ultimate beneficiary owner of VF Worldwide Holdings Ltd is Kuoni Travel Holdings Ltd, registered in Zurich, Switzerland. According to VFS documentation and organisational structure, in Africa VFS Global operates in 10 countries through its registered corporate entities.

30 May 2016 - NW1389

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) Economic Development Department

The Economic Development Department (EDD) has from time to time supported different initiatives initiated through the IDC, sefa, and other departments such as Department of Small Business Development and Trade and Industry.

1. EDD, jointly with the IDC manages the Agro Processing Competitive Fund (APCF) which support small agro-processing businesses and corporates

Funding to R250 million was made available by National Treasury in April 2011 following the fine imposed by the Competition Commission on the Bread Cartel. For the period between 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2016, the APCF achieved the following:

  • Loans approved (interest free) : R201 425 701
  • Funds disbursed : R186 277 970
  • Write-offs : Nil
  • Number of jobs created (inception) : 2 401
  • Jobs created in 2016-17 financial year : this will be known after the expiry of the period
  • IDC co-investment : R223 885 641

2. The department conducted research on township based enterprises in Gauteng that have received funding from state owned funding institutions such as IDC, NEF and sefa. The purpose of the research was to determine the levels of impact of DFI funding to township enterprises. For 2016/17 financial year, the department may expand this research survey to cover one or two additional provinces.

3. As part of the Township Economy work, EDD is piloting a project of spaza shop development project which aims at re-establishing a network of more than 25 spaza shops in Mamelodi. Sefa is considering the application to recapitalize such spaza shops.

(b) IDC

The IDC advises that, over the last 20 years, more than 70% of the number and 18% of the value of IDC funding approvals pertained to small and medium enterprises. The IDC realised that empowerment could not be exclusively driven by its focus on funding large projects, and that SMEs, inclusive of black entrepreneurs, had to increasingly participate in all sectors of the economy, which have been dominated in most instances by very large players. The IDC has also directly promoted black empowerment through the development of a credible and strong SME sector.

In addition the IDC has spearheaded the establishment and support of development agencies at a local level to facilitate economic development within municipalities as an approach for identifying and supporting opportunities generating jobs and wealth in communities through the employment of local mechanisms and strategies; and, the leveraging of local resources, assets and capabilities. IDC provides funds for institutional and opportunity development.

Through the Social Enterprise Fund the IDC continues to support social enterprises throughout the country. Social enterprises are businesses with social missions and trade to tackle social and environmental problems, and improve the lives of people and communities, often the most vulnerable. The legal form that many of these social enterprises take often include cooperatives. Under this programme, IDC finds, funds and supports social enterprises, as well as to those organisations providing support to this sector.

The Spatial/Special Intervention Fund, which aims to address the socio-economic and developmental needs of targeted, largely marginalised, areas through public, private and community partnerships, has resulted in many innovative and impactful initiatives. These initiatives include the establishment of business development support organisations for small businesses and pursuing inclusive business approaches with supplier linkages into retailers and corporates.

The IDC is one of three founding partners of Startup Nations South Africa (SuNSA), focused on advancing the national agenda for entrepreneurship and the creation of sustainable startups and small businesses which can contribute to the economic and social development of South Africa meaningfully. SuNSA works very closely with an international network of entrepreneurship capacity development experts to advance the local entrepreneurship movement. This programme supports entrepreneurs through providing training, peer networking events and linking them to potential investors and clients; and further endeavors, through research, make inputs into policy impacting on enterprise development

IDC also has a well-defined Business Support Programme that seeks to offer both pre- and post-investment support to entrepreneurs in respect of its general business mandate. Not only is this programme aimed at making applications investment-ready, but also ensures their sustainability post approval. There is a deliberate focus in support of youth, women and Black Industrialists. The funding in relation to this programme operates on a shared basis.

An amount of R50m is specifically earmarked for the above-mentioned programmes of Agency Development and Support, Social enterprises and Spatial/Special Interventions. The IDC uses these funds as a catalyst to “pump-prime” the participation and crowding in of other funders and partners. The IDC endeavors to support and include small businesses in all aspects of its normal operations and activities too, which is difficult to quantify and business support is provided on a case-by-case basis.

Jobs created are highly dependent on the nature (sector, location, etc) of each particular application. Having said that, the IDC endeavors through the above-mentioned funds/programmes, to create a 1000 jobs with the budgeted R50m.

SuNSA operates on co-funding basis and IDC’s contribution is R1m per annum, as well as accomodating the Project Management function.

-END-

27 May 2016 - NW1530

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) No

(ii) No

(iii) No

(b) Not applicable

(2) (a) (i) No

(ii) No

(iii) No

(b)The Department of Tourism does not make provision for gifts, donations or sponsorships in its Estimate of National Expenditure. Any requests from any organisation is dealt with in accordance with Treasury Regulation 21.1.1 in that gifts, donations or sponsorships can only be approved if they are in the interest of the state.

27 May 2016 - NW1398

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Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

I wish to inform the Honourable Member that I have been informed that:-

    (a) Neither the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development nor the Office of the Chief Justice; nor

     (b) The National Prosecuting Authority, Legal Aid Board South Africa or the Special Investigating Unit, are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives, because this is not the core function of the Departments and/or entities involved.

The Departments and entities involved, are supporting the programmes and initiatives such as the Central Supplier Database (CSD) at present being developed and implemented by the National Treasury, the Department of Trade and Industry as well as the Department of Small Business Development.

(a) Department of Correctional Services through the services of the Directorate Skills Development does not directly run development programmes.

(b) and (ii) small businesses and co-operatives focus is on the development of incarcerated offenders through various skills in the following categories:

- Technical Vocational Education and Training Programme e.g N-Courses & NCV Programmes.

- Occupational Skills Training Programmes, e.g. welding, woodwork, computer skills, entrepreneurship and electrical programmes.

(aa) The Directorate Skills Development provides the above skills development programmes to offenders and also as its mandate ensures that skilled offenders are empowered on entrepreneurial skills so that they can create employment opportunities through small business ventures upon release.

Since the Department does not have the capacity to provide the afore-mentioned entrepreneurial skills to offenders, the Department collaborates with external state agencies such as Small Enterprises Development Agency (SEDA), National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) and the National Skills Funds (NSF) for assistance.

(bb) No budget is specifically allocated for entrepreneurship programmes, hence the above initiative of collaboration with other external stakeholders.

(cc) There is no specific target set to create jobs as the mandate of Skills Development is mainly to provide offenders with needs - based programmes and interventions to facilitate their rehabilitation and personal development.

The Department had previously identified a need for partnering with the Small Enterprises Development Agency (Seda) which is the agency of the Department of Small Business Development in order to train and offer support through its business support officers to offenders participating in Skills Development programmes, Production Workshops and Agriculture and Maintenance programmes in order to ensure that they (i.e. offenders) are exposed to business opportunities and are able to start planning for their own small business enterprises to be pursued upon release.

In preparation for this initiative the Department consulted SEDA in this regard. Hence SEDA conducted an Entrepreneurship Training Workshop during October 2016 which resulted in a total of 16 officials from all regions trained as Entrepreneurs Ambassadors so as to can facilitate future SMME related programmes in the interest of offenders. Furthermore during the period September 2014 and March 2015 a total of 50 offenders in KZN were trained on the Empretec Entrepreneurship Training pilot training in DCS (22 offenders from New Castle Management Area and 28 from Ekuseni Youth Centre).

In light of the above, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has agreed in principle to participate in the SMME awareness campaign and capacity building sessions particularly to those offenders who are due to be released as well as those who participate in Skills Development Programmes. Although a formal MoU between DCS and DSBD has not been finalised, the Department is planning to co-host a National Exhibition and an SMME Campaign for offenders in 2016/2017 financial year.

27 May 2016 - NW1542

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Energy

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) Advertising Expenditure 2015/16

(i). R13 784 600.67

(ii). R15 266 653

(b) Budget Allocation 2016/17

(i) R7 612 000.00

(ii). R 21 623 007

27 May 2016 - NW1460

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the finalisation of the investigation of the Special Investigating Unit in Midvaal, Presidential Proclamation No. R.33 2011, when (a) will the National Prosecuting Authority give consideration to the prosecution of the specified individuals and (b) will arrests resulting from the findings of the specified investigation be made?

Reply:

The matter has just been received by the NPA during May 2016. The SIU investigation has uncovered evidence that points to the commission of criminal offences by the individuals named in the report. However, the matter must be referred to the police for further investigation and any decision whether or not to prosecute can only be made after such investigations are finalised.

Accordingly the response to the question is as follows:

   (a) Any decision regarding the prosecution or otherwise of the specified individuals can only be taken after the finalisation of the police investigations; and

   (b) Similarly any decision as to the arrest or otherwise in the matter can only be taken after police investigations have been finalised.

27 May 2016 - NW1451

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether a certain person (Mr JT Mokwa – inmate 94351831) who initially was incarcerated for a 17-year sentence in 1994, in Kimberley in the Northern Cape, is eligible for release; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the further relevant details; if so, (i) why is the specified person still incarcerated at the specified facility given that the specified person has now served 21 years, (ii) by when can the specified person expect to be released and (iii) what prerequisites for release must the specified person still fulfil?

Reply:

(a) Yes, as at date of receipt of question (13 May 2016) the offender in question was already released on 16 April 2016.

(b) (i)(ii)(iii) Not applicable.

27 May 2016 - NW1015

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1)Whether the abandoned quarry situated in the heart of Heidedal in Bloemfontein in the Free State, which was once mined by a certain company (name furnished), received a closure certificate; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified quarry is in the process of rehabilitation; if not, why not; if so, (a) what has been done to date in the rehabilitation process, (b) when will it be completed and (c) what amount has been set aside for the rehabilitation process of the specified quarry; (3) whether any safety precautions have been put in place at the specified quarry; if not, why not; if so, what safety precautions have been put in place; (4) whether any concerns with regard to safety of the quarry were reported to his department since 5 April 2015; if so, what (a) was the content of such concerns that were communicated, (b) was his response in each case and (c) is being done to make the quarry safe? NW1147E

Reply:

1. Yes. The Company lodged an application for a closure certificate in terms of section 12 of the Minerals Act and the closure certificate was issued on the 06th of December 2006.

(2)(a) As a closure certificate was issued, there are no rehabilitation activities taking place on the quarry area.

(b) The complaint lodged to the Department lead to the investigation which confirms that there is a need to work further on the area to address issues of concern and a meeting will be held during the second week of May 2016 to ensure that urgent steps are taken to address the rehabilitation of this abandoned quarry.

(c) The amount is not known at this stage and will only be known after the abovementioned meeting and concomitant site inspections.

3. Yes, warnings signs were put around the quarry and the safety trench were dig.

4. (a) Yes. A complaint was received from the Volksblaad. The complaint was about rehabilitation, safety of the people living in Heidedal and surrounding areas from the dangers associated with an unfenced and abandoned mining site, drowning of community members and various serious crimes been committed over the area.

(b) The site inspection was conducted as a response to the complaint. The complainant was advised that further investigations will be conducted and the outcome will be communicated.

(c) The investigation is being conducted which include consultation with the Department of Water and Sanitation, the Mangaung Municipality or the town council and the land owner. The outcome of the investigation will determine cause of action to be taken.

 

Approved/not approved

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-………………/………………/2016

27 May 2016 - NW1507

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Energy

(1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) (i). No

(ii) No

(iii) No

(b) No

(2)(a) (i) No

(ii) No

(iii) No

(b) No

27 May 2016 - NW1475

Profile picture: Mackay, Mr G

Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Energy

(1)(a) How many renewable energy projects are currently implemented in the Northern Cape and (b) what are the further relevant details in each case with regard to (i) the nature of the project, (ii) the municipality affected, (iii) the time frame(s) and (iv) how many job opportunities is each project expected to create; (2) Whether any renewable energy projects are being planned for future implementation in the Northern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) 51 projects of the 102 projects awarded in the Large (Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme) and Smalls ( Small Projects IPP Procurement Programme ) are in the Northern Cape.

(b) (i) The Majority of projects located in the Northern Cape are Solar PV which account for 31 of 51 projects ,followed by 12 Onshore Wind, 7 CSP and 1 Small Hydro. The Province has the best solar radiation levels in the country and hence the high number of Solar PV and CSP in the Province.

(ii) The 51 projects in the Northern Cape are spread across 17 municipalities indicated in the table below:

Municipality

No. of projects

Sol Plaatjie

 

2

Gamagara

 

3

Joe Morolong

 

2

Khâi-Ma

 

5

Hantam

 

3

Karoo-Hoogland

 

3

Nama Khoi

1

Siyancuma

 

3

Siyathemba

 

5

Emthanjeni

 

8

Renosterberg

 

1

Umsobomvu

 

1

Ubuntu

 

2

Kai!Garib

 

2

!Kheis

 

1

Khara Hais

 

6

Tsantsabane

 

3

(iii) 20 out of the 51 projects are already operating and exporting energy into the National Grid with the remaining projects expected to be connected to the grid by December 2018.

(iv) The 51 projects located in the Northern Cape are expected to yield 66 000 job-years during the construction (23 000) and operation phases (43 000). (A job-year is calculated on the basis of total Person Months for the Construction Measurement Period and the Operating Measurement Period).

2) The Northern Cape has great renewable energy resources and has garnered the most interest by bidders. The one impediment to the development of the Northern Cape involves the grid as it is severely constrained. The Department is working with Eskom to identify solutions to unlock the grid constraints which will allow for further development of projects in the Northern Cape.

26 May 2016 - NW1093

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works

With reference to the supposed non-security additions at the homestead of the President, Mr J G Zuma, in Nkandla, did his department, at any stage, ask for an explanation why the Security Cluster ordered (a) a swimming pool, (b) a chicken run, (c) a cattle kraal, (d) the shop, (e) air conditioning, and any of the other non-security related upgrades at the private home of the President, Mr J G Zuma; if not, why not: if so, are there any letters which could be provided as proof in this regard?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works:

In November 2012, I established a Task Team to investigate the matter of the security upgrades at the private residence of the President of the Republic, located in Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal Province. The Task Team investigated the above matter and requested an explanation for the items highlighted in this Parliamentary question. The explanation obtained from South African Police Service (SAPS) officials on these items is as follows:

(a) Swimming Pool

The SAPS explained that one of the hazards raised by the assessment was the possible outbreak of fire on or near the premises as most of the structures have thatched roofs and are close to each other. In order to eliminate or minimise potential risks and due to water supply, which was erratic, the SAPS requested a structure that could store 45 000 litres of water.

The idea of a swimming pool or fire pool was based on the advice of the mechanical engineering team that a structure which can contain 45 000 litres of water was needed and a swimming pool or fire pool was the most viable option.

(b) A Chicken Run

The explanation by the SAPS was that the chicken run was constructed within the cattle kraal. It was created as a replacement to a number of building block structures that were scattered around some of the main dwellings which were, according to the security assessments, obstructions and potential hiding areas for intruders. The reason for the relocation of these loose structures to a dedicated area was to improve the security on site.

(c) A Cattle Kraal and Culvert

According to the security personnel, when the security assessments were conducted and as part of the security, sensitive electronic equipment was recommended to be installed on the fence. False alarms, as well as damage to the fence and electronic equipment could be caused by the movement of cattle.

Secondly, due to the location of the kraal next to the entrance used by people, thereby posing a potential risk in the high security area, a decision was therefore taken to move the cattle kraal to a dedicated area and a culvert be erected to prevent the cattle from disturbing and damaging the electronic equipment and the fence.

(d) The Shop

The tuck shop existed long before the President was inaugurated and was located within the President’s homestead. Due to the security risk posed by the movement of people from outside the homestead into the high security area and taking into account previous incidents of criminality that took place at the homestead, the tuck shop had to be relocated from within the premises and erected at the perimeter of the premises.

(e) Air Conditioning

The air conditioners were installed in certain rooms of the main house, the clinic, guard houses and the security tunnel, in line with the security risk assessment. The assessment recommended that bullet proof windows be installed in certain rooms of the President’s private residence and such windows had an impact of high temperatures in the rooms and could not be opened. As a result and in order to minimize the adverse effect that the bullet proof windows would have, air conditioners were installed.

The above items were not contained in the documents, but the explanation was provided to the Task Team. This explanation is contained in the Task Team Report as an explanatory note.

________________________________________________________________________

26 May 2016 - NW1382

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a)What are the reasons for naturalised citizens being prevented from applying for new Smart ID cards at this stage, (b) what plans are in place to allow naturalised citizens to apply for the specified cards in the future and (c) by what date does he envisage that naturalised citizens will be allowed to apply for the specified cards?

Reply:

(a-b) The naturalised citizens will be allowed to apply for the new Smart ID cards on completion of the National Identification System which would enable the online validation of the naturalisation certificates. Currently the certificates are validated manually.

(c) The date to allow naturalised citizens to apply for Smart ID Cards will be determined once the National Identification System is implemented.

26 May 2016 - NW1251

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Public Works

With reference to the statements he made during his department’s Budget Vote on 20 April 2016, (a) how many cases of corruption in the Expanded Public Works Programme opportunities in the City of Cape Town, specifically in Khayelitsha, is he aware of and (b) how many criminal cases has he opened in this regard?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

In my concluding speech in the National Assembly debate on Budget Vote No. 11 (Public Works), held on Wednesday, 20 April 2016, I responded, amongst other things, to the Honourable Kohler-Barnard’s claim to have twenty-four affidavits from individuals alleging they had been refused Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) jobs, because they did not have African National Congress (ANC) membership cards. The Honourable Kohler-Barnard said that it took her one phone call to obtain the affidavits. The Honourable Kohler-Barnard also said that the Auditor-General is questioning the data of Department of Public Works, because of inadequate records and deficiencies.

This was the double context in which I referred to Khayelitsha. The Auditor-General has indeed raised questions about EPWP data, much of it in regard to under-reporting to the Department of Public Works’ central data system from local project sites. In the case of Khayelitsha, the Auditor-General found that 52 claimed participants in Khayelitsha had not been reported to the Department of Public Works’ central EPWP recording system.

In regard to allegations of partisan recruitment of participants for EPWP projects, I am on record of repeatedly speaking out against this abuse. The Department has issued guidelines on participant selection, emphasising the importance of transparency and non-partisanship. It was also for this reason that I instructed my Departmental officials to follow up on the 24 affidavits provided by the Honourable Kohler Barnard. Unfortunately, these affidavits proved to be worthless. They appear to be in three batches, with each batch written by the same hand and with word-for-word, identical general allegations made. The dates, locations, and names on which three ANC Councillors allegedly refused potential beneficiaries EPWP jobs are not provided.

I am not claiming that these abuses did not occur, however, it is my experience that in Municipalities controlled by different political parties, those community members who are aligned to another party, often believe, rightfully or not, that they have been excluded from EPWP projects. This has been our experience in both ANC and DA-controlled Municipalities, including in the City of Cape Town. It is important that as politicians we both condemn partisan manipulation of EPWP projects, as well as refrain from fanning partisan, but ungrounded rumours.

In specific response to the Honourable Macpherson’s question:

(a) There are a number of shortcomings in EPWP projects in the City of Cape Town, including in Khayelitsha, relating to data capturing and the portfolio of evidence for participation in EPWP projects, as noted by the Auditor-General. We are working collegially with our colleagues in the City of Cape Town, just as we are doing with other public bodies, to address these matters. I am pleased to say, however, that currently no cases of corruption in EPWP projects in the City of Cape Town have been reported to the Department of Public Works.

(b) Therefore, no criminal cases in this regard have been opened.

________________________________________________________________________

26 May 2016 - NW713

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Ms D Kohler (DA) asked the Minister of Public Works

(1) (a) How many properties in terms of (i) land and (ii) any other specified form of property are currently owned by his department in each province, (b) by which department is each of the specified properties occupied and (c) how many of the specified properties are leased to each specified department in each province; (2) (a) what is the rental amount payable by each of the specified departments on a monthly basis in each province and (b) how is the rental amount determined in each case; (3) of the total number of properties owned by his department, (a) how many buildings are currently not being (i) leased or (ii) otherwise utilised in each province and (b) what (i) rates, (ii) taxes and (iii) utilities are payable each month on each of the specified properties in each province; (4) how much land is currently not being (a) leased or (b) otherwise utilised in each province?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works:

(1) (a) (i) The Department of Public Works (DPW) is custodian of 31,310 land parcels as at end of March 2016. Please refer to Annexure 1(a) (i) for the detailed list per province.

(ii) The DPW is custodian of 95,587 buildings and other improvements. Please refer to Annexure 1(a) (i) for the detailed list per province.

(b) Government User Departments and other entities occupy properties under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works. Please refer to Annexure 1(a)(i) for the detailed list per User Department.

(c) 93,648 State-owned buildings on 18,267 land parcels are leased out to User departments and other entities. Please refer to Annexure 1(a)(i) for the detailed list per province.

(2) (a) The Department of Public Works issues quarterly invoices in advance to 26 national Government departments as per devolved budget, which is equivalent to R324,501,155.00 per month.

While it is possible to indicate how much each Department is currently paying, it is not possible to aggregate the information down per facility or per province, as the amount is paid at the National level.

Client Department

Monthly R’

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

7,194,961

Arts and Culture

2,927,866

Communications

72,912

Correctional Services

80,945,700

Defence and Military Veterans

76,259,000

Environmental Affairs

1,469,968

GCIS

2,348

Health

1,136,584

Health (Civitas)

6,747,110

Higher Education

61,012

Home Affairs

3,507,473

Human Settlements

37,211

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

30,000

Justice and Constitutional Development

28,887,083

Labour

4,121,270

Mineral Resources

227,787

National Treasury

426,574

Public Service and Admin

21,622

Rural Development and Land Reform

2,243,767

SA Police Service

95,563,167

SA Revenue Service

2,415,808

Social Development

39,724

Sport and Recreation

838

Statistics SA

259,603

Trade and Industry

2,682

Water Affairs

9,899,088

TOTAL

324,501,155

(b) The purpose of accommodation charges, whilst engendering the culture of total cost of accommodation within User departments, is to collect enough revenue, at a minimum, to maintain the entity’s portfolio at a specific conditionality level.

The current rates charged for State-owned accommodation are based on the original calculations of 2005 when accommodation budgets were devolved to User departments.

In calculating the baseline information, the Department of Public Works (DPW) considered the different facility types in its property portfolio. It was not possible to calculate this amount on a per-property basis owing to the magnitude of the portfolio and the property-specific information that was not available at that time. This was done for all facility types, which resulted in different rates proposed per facility type. The average rate was calculated at R23.74/m2.

Although the average rate per facility was R23.74/m2, the DPW could only devolve the funds it had in its Maintenance and Property Rates budgets baseline. The distribution of funds per User department had to be scaled down to fit into this baseline and was reduced on a pro-rata basis. The average of R23.74/m2 was reduced to R4.74/m2 at inception and has escalated to an approximate current amount of R16.00/m².

The amount devolved (and subsequently charged back) was not enough to cover the self-sustainable target level. As part of the devolution framework, it was indicated that the entity would have to receive at least a 15% growth on this amount to reach the desired funding level by 2017. At that point, it would be possible to maintain properties at their current level. During the time lapse from 2006 to 2017, the portfolio would further deteriorate except where specific intervention took place. This is referred to as “backlog maintenance”, which would be funded separately.

The above-mentioned devolution and charge-back methodology is being reviewed currently so as to align with the operationalisation of the Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE).

(3) (a) (i) and (ii)

1,939 buildings are currently not being utilised nor leased. Please refer to Annexure 1(a)(i) for detail per province.

(b) (i) and (ii)

Payable rates and taxes are treated as one expenditure item by municipalities and the DPW therefore treats payable rates and taxes as one expenditure item.

A total amount of R3,983,937.52, on average, is currently payable monthly on municipal rates and taxes through all regional offices in all provinces. Attached please find Annexure 3(b)(i) for detail per province in relation to unutilised properties.

(iii)

A total amount of R1,058,541.66, on average, is currently payable monthly on State-owned properties for municipal services through all regional offices in all the provinces. Attached, please see Annexure 3(b)(ii) for detail per province in relation to unutilised properties.

4. (a) and (b)

There are 13,043 unutilised land parcels under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works. Please refer to Annexure 1(a)(i) for detail per province.

________________________________________________________________________

26 May 2016 - NW1407

Profile picture: Ross, Mr DC

Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

Whether (a) her department and (b) entities reporting to her are running development programmes for (i) small businesses (ii)) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?”

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Science and Technology (DST) prefers to utilise the entities in the innovation and science system to execute specific interventions. In this instance the DST does not have its own development programme for SMMEs:

(i) No

(ii) No

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

1. (b) Entities responses are provided in the table below:

Entity

(i)

(ii)

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf)

No

No

The running of development programmes does not fall within the mandate of ASSAf.

N/A

N/A

Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

No

No

The running of development programmes does not fall within the mandate of HSRC.

N/A

N/A

National Research Foundation (NRF)

Yes

No

Square Kilometre Array (SKA) South Africa, a business unit of the NRF and NMC Civils have partnered with Absa in an Enterprise and Supply chain Development (ESD) initiative to develop small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the Northern Cape. This programme will enable qualifying SMEs to obtain funding from Absa so that they can provide services and goods to NMC Civils in the 80km road project.

Approximately R34,5 million

There are potentially 34 Companies in Northern Cape to benefit from this initiative assuming they meet the criteria.

South African National Space Agency (SANSA)

Yes

No

The satellite development programme that is currently being pursued by SANSA, under the support of the Department of Science and Technology, has an industry development and localisation initiative in it. As part of the satellite development programme all contracts established include an element of industry development and localization. To this end, there are four small businesses currently being sub-contracted as part of the broader satellite development programme.

To date the satellite programme has invested R 5 944 687 with the said four small businesses.

Small businesses account for indirect jobs. 46 direct technical jobs and 7 support staff at Denel Spaceteq. Skills development for 7 students with a target of over 20 students by the end of the programme.

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

See Annexure A

Technology Innovation Agency

 

 

Annexure A

COUNCIL FOR SCIENTIFIC INDUSTRIAL AND RESEACH (CSIR)

  1. (b)(i) Yes

(ii) No

Development Programme 1

(aa) The Bio-manufacturing Industry Development Centre (BIDC). The BIDC supports SMMEs through the prototyping and scale-up phases of product development, assists them to do market acceptance testing and to launch products in the market. The companies remain the sole owners of their innovations and retain absolute control over their future in terms of value add and partnerships. The BIDC helps to lower the cost and barriers that inhibit innovative enterprises from translating their inventions into market-ready products.

The BIDC’s support for SMMEs is through the development of bio-based manufacturing processes and products. Enterprises that are incubated at the BIDC have access to ready-to-use bio-manufacturing facilities, support in research and development laboratories as well as access to experts in the fields of agro-processing and bio-processing product development and scale-up.

Currently the BIDC is supporting 19 enterprises of which 16 are owned by black entrepreneurs, including 10 black women-owned enterprises. To date, 33 products with applications in the cosmetics, nutrition and biotechnology industries have been developed and transferred to the enterprises. The programme has resulted in 105 permanent jobs being created, the majority of which are within the enterprises and their value chains, while an additional 165 temporary jobs have also been created. At least 54 interns have received training in the BIDC vocational learning programme in order to provide the bio-manufacturing sector with a skilled workforce.

(bb) R12, 5 million.

(cc) 75 permanent jobs and six interns.

Development Programme 2

(aa) Ultrasonic Broken Rail Detector (UBRD) System. The UBRD system was co-developed by CSIR and Armscor's Institute for Maritime Technology using public funds from CSIR, Transnet Freight Rail (TFR) and DST. This world-first technology system helps prevent derailment of heavy freight trains by detecting broken railway lines in real-time and alerting the TFR control centre. The system currently protects 860 km of the Sishen-Saldanha iron ore export line and is installed on critical sections (bridges & tunnels) of the coal export line. The system will soon be licensed to a South African company for local manufacturing and international business development.

(bb) R1.75 million.

(cc) Approximately 40 to 70 jobs are projected to be created. The number of jobs created will depend on the success of international sales and could be in high technology manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution.

Development Programme 3

(aa) Umbiflow. Umbiflow is a medical ultrasound system that operates off a standard computer, and conducts an assessment of the blood flow between mother and child whilst in the womb. It uses this information to assess if the fetus is likely to be receiving insufficient nutrition for growth and allows medical staff to intervene. The intention is to reduce the high still birth rate experienced in developing nations and, by permitting the measurement to be done at clinic level, to reduce unnecessary referral of mothers to higher levels of care. The system is currently in a clinical trial in Gauteng, Tshwane district and will be licensed to an SMME in the medical sector during 2016-17.

(bb) R7 million.

(cc) approximately five to eight permanent jobs are projected to be created.

Development Programme 4

(aa) Micro-Enterprise Media Engine (MEME) Platform. This is an ultra-low cost scalable mobile Internet Television platform that enables media production SMMEs to own the means of global (export) distribution while retaining the Intellectual Property rights to their content. The platform was developed at the CSIR. It is globally competitive in its ability to distribute live television with integrated social media interaction to even the remotest rural areas of emerging economies on mobile devices without any break-up of the stream (no video buffering). The technique is patented in China, Russia, Nigeria, East and Southern Africa, USA and UK. The intention is create the opportunity to build a new emerging economy-to-emerging economy (E2E) mobile television industry that will draw the media talent of South African youth exiting film schools into a growing local media SMME space by widening the audience reach and negating the cost of traditional television broadcasting infrastructure requirements (satellite, etc.). It is currently licensed to five SMMEs to pilot for one (1) year before it will be opened to the entire South African media industry in 2017. It is further being integrated into the curriculum of a local film school.

(bb) R11.1 million. (EU-General Budget Support).

(cc) Four film school students, four full-time media employees, seven full-time technology employees plus approximately 25 jobs/workers across the five pilot SMMEs, during the pilot period.

Development Programme 5

(aa) Establishment of a cashmere fibre industry in the Eastern Cape (EC). The CSIR has developed a cashmere processing know-how to produce yarns and would like to commercialize the results of their research. The venture involves training farmers on how to harvest cashmere fibre, and the establishment of a production facility that will process the harvested cashmere fibre in readiness for manufacture of garments. With the assistance of the Jobs Fund funding, the initial objective of the project was to establish a cashmere fibre industry in the country, in particular the Eastern Cape. The key objectives of the project, as supported by the Jobs Fund include:

  • To empower traditional goat farmers by generating income from under coat down fibre that grows on traditional goats during winter;
  • Train the goat owners on how to harvest the cashmere fibre;
  • Establish the production facilities (cleaning and processing of cashmere fibre), thus creating permanent jobs;
  • Establish a market for the cashmere fibre; and
  • Establishment of the foundation for full economic beneficiation of indigenous goats found in the province.

(bb) R7 million was allocated from October 2013 until March 2016. R400 000.00 allocated for the 2016-17 financial year.

(cc) Four jobs are projected.

Development Programme 6

(aa) Enterprise Creation for Development (ECD). A CSIR implementation business area with a development mandate, which assists both the public and private sectors to implement enterprise development activities. These activities include opportunity identification, opportunity assessment and packaging, enterprise support programmes, and capacity building for local economic development (LED). Industry sectors targeted include manufacturing, agro-processing, green economy, ICT and built environment. ECD focuses on the application of technology to address underdevelopment. In the previous year, ECD was involved in the development and support of 10 pilot projects and 12 enterprises.

  • Feasibility studies for four incubator programmes were undertaken.
  • ECD was involved in conducting feasibility studies and developing business plans for 2 industrial parks, eight (8) agri-parks, and one (1) agro-processing hub. In addition, the business area was involved in the establishment of a Business Processing Outsourcing Park.
  • In terms of technology transfer, 21 mature technologies and four (4) new technologies were transferred.

(bb) ECD activities are funded by national, provincial and local government, international agencies, private corporate social investment initiatives, and foundations, on a project-by-project basis.

(cc) The number of jobs that will be created or retained by enterprises as a result of the CSIR’s intervention during the 2016-17, is unknown at this stage.

Development Programme 7

(aa) Technology Localisation Programme (TLP) (implemented by the Technology Localisation Implementation Unit {TLIU}). The TLP is aimed at increasing South Africa’s domestic productive capacity. The programme provides funding and technology support to enable more local firms to supply goods to state-owned entities (SOEs). The support assists individual firms and targeted sectors to get access to technology resulting in increased capability, competitiveness and new processes or products.

(bb) R105 million invested since 2011.

(cc) the impact of the programme since its inception is as follows:

  • 147 firms have benefited from the Technology Assistance Packages (TAPs) with 20 of them landing contracts to the value of R162m.
  • 250 students have benefited from internship opportunities offered through this programme with 45% getting permanent jobs.
  • TAPs resulted in the local production of twenty items which were previously imported.
  • 187 jobs were created due to the implementation of Technology Assistance Packages (TAPs).

Development Programme 8

(aa) The Photonics Prototyping Facility (PPF). The Photonics Prototyping Facility (PPF), hosted at the CSIR National Laser Centre, provides the necessary infrastructure, skills and networks needed to facilitate the development of prototypes that are well-aligned to market-needs for the realisation of Photonics-based products and devices. It will also develop expertise (amongst PPF staff, students and interns) in the area of prototyping, product development and stakeholder engagement. Ultimately this will lead to new Photonics products that will be used to improve the competitiveness of the existing industry and for new and emerging industries to be formed resulting in job creation.

(bb) To-date the following funds have been secured:

R 11.4 million (DST- High End Infrastructure (HEI))

R 9 million (DST- Industrial Innovation Partnership Fund (IIPF))

R 13.4 million (CSIR)

(cc) One permanent, full-time position for an operations manager and approximately four positions for interns. As the programme gains traction, additional jobs will be created by interns being placed in industry, employment of new interns and the creation of new jobs in existing industries or SMMEs via new product offerings.

Development Programme 9

(aa) Defence Transformative Enterprise Development (DEFTED) Programme. The Department of Defence (DOD) runs the DEFTED programme through the CSIR. The aim of the project is to address the defence industry transformation challenges through the development of black industrialists in the defence industry. The DEFTED program will support the defence sector black industrialists and entrepreneurs with technical Human Capital Development (HCD), Technology Development (TD) and Enterprise Development (ED).

(bb) R50.4 million has been budgeted for the 2016-17 financial year.

(cc) 30 jobs.

TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION AGENCY (TIA)

  1. (b)(i) Yes.

(ii) No.

Development Programme 1

(aa) AgriViro (Pty) Ltd. Development of novel biological control technologies for the control of pests in economically important horticultural crops.

(bb) R1, 175,729.00

(cc) five.

Development Programme 2

(aa) NemaBio (Pty) Ltd. Development of entomophathogenic nematodes as biological control agents for the control of pest in horticultural crops.

(bb) R86,5429.00

(cc) one.

Development Programme 3

(aa) Beonics (Pty) Ltd. Development of poultry feed additive and nutraceutical as an antibiotic replacement alternative from honry propolis

(bb) R 4,620,000.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 4

(aa) Enzyme Technologies (Pty) Ltd. Enzyme technologies is implementing a project to extract bromelain enzyme from waste pineapple stumps, for animal health pharmaceutical application. It is in our Bio-pharmaceutical & pharmaceutical focus area/ programme

(bb) R 2,887,560.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 5

(aa) GR Active. TIA funds the University of Pretoria to develop an extraction process for a bioactive that will be produced from a plant that is indigenous to South Africa. The bioactive will be produced in a manufacturing facility that will be established in Mamelodi, Tshwane. It is anticipated that a Cooperative will be established by the Mamelodi based Mothong Trust, which will be responsible for production. Mothong Trust is part of the GR Active consortium. The project is in the Complementary Medicine & IKS Focus Area/ programme. IKS stands for Indigenous Knowledge Systems.

(bb) R 6,935,515.00

(cc) one.

Development Programme 6

(aa) BioDx (Pty) Ltd. BioDx (Pty) Ltd has developed a process for production of an environmentally sustainable biocide for industrial as well as cosmetics application. The project is at commercialization stage and is focussed on demonstrating the technology at client facilities for potential uptake. It is in the complementary medicine & IKS focus area/ programme.

(bb) R 1,269,896.00

(cc) seven.

 

Development Programme 7

(aa) CPT Pharma (Pty) Ltd. CPT Pharma (Pty) Ltd is currently establishing a pilot plant for development and improvement of generic processes for 4 active pharmaceutical ingredients for human health and animal health applications. It is in Bio-Pharmaceuticals & Pharmaceuticals focus area/ programme.

(bb) R 1,086,000.00

(cc) one.

Development Programme 8

(aa) Afriplex (Pty) Ltd. Afriplex is developing a complementary medicine for the treatment of prostate cancer. The complementary medicine is extracted from a plant that is indigenous to South Africa and has been used for generations by local communities. The project is in the Complementary Medicine & IKS focus area/ programme.

(bb) R 2,455,393.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 9

(aa) Altis Biologics (Pty) Ltd. Altis is developing a product that is extracted from porcine bone for the treatment of bone fractures. Although the active ingredient is a biological product, the product is classified as a medical device due to delivery mechanism. The project is therefore in the Medical Devices & Diagnostics focus area/ programme. The project is in the Complementary Medicine & IKS focus area/ programme.

(bb) R 2,455,393.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 10

(aa) Settec. System for monitoring early settling of solids in slurry pipes.

(bb) R 316,178.75

(cc) one.

Development Programme 11

(aa) Green Iron Technology. Processing of waste iron ore for application in steel industry.

(bb) R 900,000.00

(cc) Four.

Development Programme 12

(aa) Zargun. Zargun Separation of Zirconium isotopes for the nuclear sector.

(bb) R 6,301,739.00

(cc) Three.

Development Programme 13

(aa) CMTI Consulting. Development of ultra low bed mining equipment.

(bb) R 5,989,734.33

(cc) Four.

Development Programme 14

(aa) Arc Aqua. Development of the core technology improvement of the software for remote reporting, high voltage power supply system, turbine generator and development of additional applications to the core technology, industrial overhead, end of hose and integrated unit.

(bb) R 2,900,000.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 15

(aa) Rubber Nano. To develop a production ready "ZR6" additive for use in the OEM tyre manufacturing industry.

(bb) R 660,000.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 16

(aa) Fibrelux. Fibrelux is a wool diameter measuring device for the wool farming industry.

(bb) R 560,000.00

(cc) 10.

Development Programme 17

(aa) Welcore. Weldcore is a novel sampling technique developed by NMMU. This technique allows for the removal of representative core sample in situ from safety critical structures as well as repair of the weld site using an innovative welding technique FTSW.

(bb) R 11,000,000.00

(cc) 10.

Development Programme 18

(aa) mLab Mobile Apps Support. The programme has been developed to stimulate the emergence of mobile apps based innovation business. Often these businesses that are created by young people with tertiary education qualifications but are not in employment, education or training systems. It is a feeder platform for significant innovation projects that can be funded through the TIA technology development fund.

(bb) R 2,500,000.00

(cc) 30.

Development Programme 19

(aa) Balancell (Pty) Ltd. Balancell is a technology business specialising in battery management electronics for medium to large scale batteries of all chemistries. Its battery management systems provide insight into the stored energy of a battery pack and improve its reliability and efficiency.

(bb) R 2,000,000.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 20

(aa) Impact Free Water (Pty) Ltd. The project use Wave Energy Reverse Osmosis technology for desalination of seawater to produce bottled drinking water and electricity.

(bb) R 500,000.00

(cc) 0 - Project at a technology development stage.

Development Programme 21

(aa) DST has established the Technology Station Programme (TSP) aiming at offering technology based support to SMME. The programme is managed by TIA and hosted by Universities of technologies. The technology Stations provide access to specialist knowledge and equipment. There are currently 18 stations with national footprint and are sector focused as follows:

Manufacturing Cluster

  • TUT: Electronics & Electrical Engineering, including ICT
  • VUT: Product Prototyping, materials, processing technologies
  • NMMU: Mechanical System Technologies & Automotive components;
  • DUT: Fibrous Reinforced & Molded Plastics
  • CUT: Rapid Prototyping & Product Development
  • CPUT: Adaptronics
  • UJ: Light Metals Casting & Foundry technology
  • TUT: TDM (IAT) Transfer, Training & Adv Manufacturing
  • SUN: TDM (IAT) design, analysis & Adv Manufacturing
  • WSU (IAT): Design, Tooling, Dies, Mould making

Agro-Processing, Chemical, Other Cluster

  • CPUT: Agro Food Processing
  • UL: Agrifood Processing
  • TUT: Chemistry & Chemical engineering
  • NMMU: Petrochemicals, Bio-downstream chemicals
  • MUT: Chemistry & Chemical Engineering
  • UJ: Process, Energy, Environments
  • VUT: Panel-beating, spray-painting
  • CPUT: Clothing and Textile Technologies

(bb) In the financial year 2016/17

  • TIA budget allocation R34,511 million
  • Additional grant from DST R37,739 million
  • Additional grant from DST to scale up the TSP R33 million

(cc) The impact of the programme for the financial year 2015/16 is as follows:

  • A total of 103 interns participated in the interns Programme
  • A total of 10 interns have received employment
  • 2154 SMMEs received technology based support from the programme
  • 27 knowledge innovation products supported through the stations support activities, and 58 product/prototype developed
  • 20 full functional prototypes completed and 33 youth funded projects currently at various TS for support with products designs, CAD/CAM and quality improvements

25 May 2016 - NW1390

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether (a) her department and (b) all entities reporting to her are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a)_(i) Yes

(aa)

Province

IeC Site

Construction

Permanent

Total

Limpopo

Ngwaabe

-

16

16

Mpumalanga

Bushbuckridge

15

10

25

Limpopo

Mutale

03

02

05

Limpopo

Thulamela

03

02

05

Mpumalanga

Tweefontein

03

05

08

Eastern Cape

Qamata

15

10

25

Total

 

39

45

84

(bb). The Integrated Energy Centres (IeCs) programme is a private public partnership where oil companies fund the infrastructure development to establish a retail service station in remote rural areas. Therefore, the Department does not allocate funding for IeCs.

(cc). In 2016/17 financial year a total number of 84 employment opportunities composed of contract and permanent jobs will be created through IeCs. The jobs created both short term and some permanent for the operational phase. The short term /contract jobs are created during construction phase of the projects and permanent jobs are in the operational phase.

Entities

(b) (i) Yes

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

Under the REEEP programme, there is a project which is called the Switch Africa Green Project which is aimed at increasing awareness, uptake and successful implementation of Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP) practices and sustainable energy opportunities for SMME's in the agriculture food value chains and waste sector in SA. The programme provides training and capacity building and runs until October 2017.

EU budget. US$ 249,999.99 of which SoE portion is US$ 82,100.

150 Jobs

Under the Energy Efficiency programme, the project is the M&V incubation which is referred to as the CMVP Training and Company SAAS Accreditation Programme. The aim is to register a maximum of 15 SMMEs or businesses with the Energy Training Foundation to study in Certified Measurement and Verification for period of a week and they would then be expected to undertake examinations. The candidates who pass would be accredited with SANAS. Accredited service providers would conduct M&V with regards to 12L applications. The costs for accreditation will be incurred by SANEDI until 2020.

R 690 000

More than 10 SMME companies are likely to benefit.

NECSA and its Subsidiaries has planned to spend 2% of net profit after tax (NPAT) on Supplier Development and 1% of NPAT on Enterprise Development. The focus is on more than 51% Black (women and youth) owned companies that are EME’s (Turnover of less than R 10m) and QSE’s (turnover more than R 10m and less than R 50m).

2% of NPAT for Supplier Development (R 2 158 069) and 1% of NPAT on Enterprise Development

( R 1 079 034)

20 New Jobs

(b) (ii) Yes

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

SOLTRAIN Phase II

A programme that implements solar water heater installation training and systems testing.

Collaborative project with GIZ to develop SARETEC training centre

Approximately €150 000

R695 000

40 Jobs

The programme creates skills for jobs and should skill up to 100 people in different spheres during the year.

The Working for Energy Programme is intended to create skills and temporary jobs primarily among youth, women and people with disabilities. Based on expected mass roll out, the programme is able to create cooperatives and SMME’s that are able to implement, expand, operate and maintain these systems especially in biomass to energy arena. While the programme will create a limited number of jobs, it is not possible to create sustainable SMME’s or cooperatives since it is unfunded for the current Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF).

0

0

25 May 2016 - NW1461

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)    Whether Mr S.Shane was appointed as a director and chairperson of Transnet’s Board of Directors; if so, (a) why was he appointed to the specified positions, (b) what are the qualifications that make the specified person suitable for apppointment to the specified positions, (c) what process was followed for appointing the specified person to the specified positions and (d) whether the specified person’s connection to the Gupta family played any part in the appointment; (2) Whether the specified person is a trustee and chairperson of the board of trustees of the Transnet Pension Fund and the Transnet Second Defined Benefit Fund; if so, (a) why was the specified person appointed to the specified positions, (b) what are the qualifications that make the specified person suitable for appointment to the specified positions, (c) what process was followed in appointing the specified person to the specified positions and (d) whether the specified person’s connection with the Gupta family played any part in the appointment?

Reply:

(1). Mr Stanley David Shane was appointed to the Transnet Board on 14 December 2014 as a Non-Executive Director, on a three year term, subject to annual review. Mr Shane is not appointed as Chairperson of the Board, nor has he acted in the position to date. In terms of Board Committee membership, Mr Shane serves as member and Chairperson of the Board’s Acquisition and Disposal’s Committee, and member of the Remuneration, Social and Ethics Committee.

(a) Mr Shane possesses financial and economic competencies and business acumen.

(b) Mr Shane holds a B.Com degree (Finance) from the University of Witwatersrand obtained in 1993, completed the Regulatory Examinations at the Financial Services Board in 2012 and has been a Member of the South African Institute of Stockbrokers since 1996. He has extensive experience in Investment Banking, capital raising, insurance and structuring.

(c) The appointment of Board members is regulated by the Memorandum of Incorporation (MOI) of each State Owned Company and is the purview of the Shareholder Representative, after consultation with Cabinet. The Department is guided by a board appointment methodology which sets out the process of sourcing potential candidates for the appointment to Boards. Persons are found to be suitable by virtue of their qualifications, expertise, skills and experience.

(d) It is not known what connection Mr Shane has to the Gupta family, nor was this the reason for his appointment to the Transnet Board.

(2) Yes, he is a Trustee and the Chairperson of the Boards of Trustees of the Transnet Second Defined Benefit Fund and Transport Pension Fund.

(a) His academic qualifications and experience in economics and investment banking made him suitable for appointment.

(b) See 2(a) above.

(c) He was appointed by the Board of Transnet which is normal practice when Employer Trustees are appointed to these two Funds.

(d) The appointment is based on academic qualifications, experience and ability.

 

25 May 2016 - NW1342

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) (a) How many residents are receiving electricity from Eskom in each suburb of Soweto, Gauteng, and (b) how many of these residents are paying for the services rendered by Eskom; (2) whether there are any plans to waive debts owed by residents of Soweto to Eskom for services rendered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any agreements have been signed with the City of Johannesburg to take over the supply of electricity to Soweto through City Power; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) 180 000 customers receive electricity from Eskom in Soweto, however, this translates into more residents which Eskom is not in a position to quantify (as more people reside in a given home). Eskom keeps customer data per customer category and network, and it would take a while for this to be provided per suburb.

(b) Of the 180 000 customers, our current payment levels are at 48% average for the current financial year to date, compared to an average of 40% in the previous financial year. Eskom has replaced 40 000 old meters of which 18 000 customers are on prepaid already and buying electricity and the balance is being converted to prepaid daily. The programme of installing the meters is continuing and plans are to convert all customers to prepaid within five years.

(2) Yes, Eskom has an incentive programme in place where customers converted to prepaid meters are monitored over a period of three years to establish if the behaviour of buying electricity becomes entrenched. Writing off the historical debt is considered if good behaviour is sustained during the monitoring period. Each customer is dealt with on an individual basis.

(3) No. There are no agreements in place for the City of JHB to take over Eskom Soweto supply areas. Eskom works very closely with the Municipality to address the issue of non-payment and the rolling out of the prepaid meters. Engagements with the community are conducted with the support of the leadership of the Municipality and alignment on issues such as dealing with the poor and debt issues are continuously discussed and agreed upon.

 

25 May 2016 - NW1493

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What was the value of trade between South Africa and the Kingdom of Norway in (a) nominal and (b) real terms in the (i) 1994-95 and (ii) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

(a) (i) The value of trade between South Africa and the Kingdom of Norway in the nominal terms for the financial year 1994-1995 was R581, 697,918.

(ii) The value of trade between South Africa and the Kingdom of Norway in the nominal terms for the financial year 2015-2016 was R2 710 584 082.

(b) (i) The value of trade between South Africa and the Kingdom of Norway in the real terms for the financial year 1994-1995 was R529, 634, 816.

(ii) The value of trade between South Africa and the Kingdom of Norway in the real terms for the financial year 2015-2016 was R2, 467, 981 501.

25 May 2016 - NW1518

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

No.

25 May 2016 - NW1566

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a)(i)

The department spending on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year was R21 million. This comprised mainly of expenditure for marketing and promoting the dti in newspapers, radio stations and on television.

(b)(i)

The department has budgeted R32 million for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year. This comprises mainly of projected expenditure for marketing the dti products and offerings. Advertisements may also be placed for recruitment and tenders.

Response from the Entities

Entity

(a)(ii)

(b)(ii)

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

R 586 000.00

R 16 600 000.00

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R 5 512 000.00

R 6 550 000.00

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

R 1 607 603.00

R 3 950 000.00

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

R 89 850.35

R 80 000.00

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

R 7 106 591.00

R 9 834 642.00

National Gambling Board (NGB)

R 61 396.02

R 55 000.00

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

R 43 000 000.00

R 23 000 000.00

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

R 585 441.90

R 1 554 000.00

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

R 5 023 486. 00

R 6 122 454.00

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

R 150 000.00

R 6 917 100.00

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

R 110 623.00

R 130 000.00

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

R 3 859 990.28

R 1 989 000.00

Companies Tribunal (CT)

R 875 206.00

R 887 950.00

25 May 2016 - NW1474

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in the light of his statement on 21 April 2016, (details furnished) any Ministers held talks with banks in order to find a lasting solution to the dispute with Oakbay Investments (Pty) Ltd; if not, why not; if so, in respect of each specified meeting with each specified bank, (a) what is the name of the bank, (b) on what date did the meeting take place, (c) what is the (i) name and (ii) designation of each Minister who was present, (d) what is the (i) name and (ii) designation of each bank employee who was present and (e) what was the outcome of each specified meeting?

Reply:

The Ministers who were mandated by the Cabinet as reflected on the Cabinet Statement have not yet reported back to the Cabinet.

25 May 2016 - NW1552

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a)What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

i)Dept

 

a)2015/16

b) 2016/17

 

DMR

R455 563.39

R2 160 000

   

a)2015/16

b)2016/17

ii)Entities

CGS

R1 698 000

R1 900 000

 

MINTEK

R2 023 534

R2 864 050

 

SDT

R455 701.79

R430 460

 

SADPMR

R903 844

R809 725

 

MHSC

R1 157 940.94

R1 120 000

Approved/not approved

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/ 2016

25 May 2016 - NW1531

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?NW1702E

Reply:

(1) (a) (i)(ii)(iii) (b)

the dti was not approached by any political party for any form of funding in the 2013-14; 2014-15; 2015-16 and since April 2016.

(2)(a) (i) (ii) (iii) (b)

The department has not provided any form of funding to any political party in the 2013-14; 2014-15; 2015-16 and since April 2016.