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14 May 2018 - NW385

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

What has been his position with regard to information obtained by the Head of the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (details furnished) implicating senior police officers in directing SA Police Service funding for use in the processes of a certain political organisation?

Reply:

The matter is still under investigation. IPID is still awaiting the provision of documents by SAPS.

 

Approved by

MR. RJ McBride

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: IPID
DATE: 2018-05-04


Reply to question 385 Approved I Not Approved


MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date; 2018-05-10

14 May 2018 - NW886

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Police

Does his department offer any specific training programmes for police officers who are involved in investigations of crimes that occur at schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Police Service (SAPS), provides training to all members who are involved in the investigation of crimes. There are no specific training programmes for crimes that occur at schools. However, there are learning programmes which focus on the investigation of specific crimes. These programmes are as follows:

~ Basic Crime Investigative Practice.

~ Basic Drug Investigation Course.

~ Sexual Offences Course for investigating officers.

~ Resolving of Crime Skills Programme.

~ Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences (FCS) Course.


In addition, the following learning programmes target Forensic Social Workers, who deal with offences involving children:

~ Statement taking from a child.

~ Introducing the child witness.

~ Preparing children for court.

~ Sexual Offender in Child Abuse cases.

~ Forensic Social Work Report Writing.

~ Sexual Offences Legislation.


Reply to question 886 recommend

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date:
09-04-2018
 

Reply to question 886 approved/not approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date:
10/05/2018

14 May 2018 - NW1302

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the reply to question 745 on 18 April 2018, on what basis does Rajesh Tony Gupta have two active passports that were issued on the same day?

Reply:

Chapter 2, Section 2 (5) of the South African Passports Act Regulations 4 of 1994, states that under certain circumstances a second South African passport may be issued, notwithstanding the fact that the holder thereof is in possession of another valid South African passport and regulation 3 shall apply mutatis mutandis thereto; wherein regulation 3 refers to a normal application for a South African passport.

Mr Rajesh Tony Gupta requested two active passports by virtue of the fact that he was verified at the time that he was indeed a frequent traveller with two already full passports, hence applied for two Maxi passports. It has to be highlighted that under normal circumstances all urgent applications are processed through Head Office however it does occur that some passport applications run through the system without human intervention and are printed within a day, and this occurred in this instance.

These two passports were applied for on 03 November 2017 and printed on 03 November 2017, and they were dispatched to the relevant office of application on 06 November 2017 with subsequent collection that only took place on 09 November 2017.

 

11 May 2018 - NW1119

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

(1)        Whether his department provided any form of assistance to co-operatives in each of the past five financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (a) name of the co-operative, (b) total number of members of the co-operative, (c) type of co-operative, (d) service that the co-operative delivers, (e) physical address of the co-operative, (f) type of assistance provided to the co-operative and (g) current status of the co-operative; (2) whether any of the specified co-operatives will require additional assistance from his department in future; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

RESPONSE FOR QUESTION 1119/NW1212E (1)

The Department supports cooperatives within the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sector through various financial and non-financial means. In the past five years the following number of cooperatives has been supported:

  • 518 cooperatives were supported with training using the Farmtogether Agricultural Cooperatives Training programme to improve internal operational efficiencies, productivity and enhance competitiveness
  • 334 cooperatives were supported with Agribusiness planning skills to deepen their understanding of business planning within the Agribusiness context and to be able to draft their own business plans.
  • 251 cooperatives were assisted to conduct diagnostic assessments on their businesses in order to identify business strengths and weaknesses and recommend alternative solutions to drive efficiencies within the cooperative. The enterprises are exposed to conducting self-assessment, in the process are assisted to develop action plans to address identified weakness areas while maximising on their strengths
  • 81 cooperatives were assisted to develop action plans to address identified areas of weaknesses.
  • 194 cooperatives were supported financially with grants through the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme-CASP and Ilima/Letsema as well as with production inputs loans through the Micro Agricultural Finance Institutions of South Africa (MAFISA).

In the process, a total of 7145 smallholder farmers have been assisted in the past five years by the department.

A comprehensive list of cooperatives with the variables asked for is attached as Annexure 1.

RESPONSE FOR QUESTION 1119/NW1212E (2)

Annual assessments of cooperatives performed by the department indicate that generally, the level of viability and sustainability of cooperatives in the sector is very low. Some of the contributing factors include heavy reliance on grant funding and inability to access financial support from mainstream financial institutions. Access to sustainable markets has been found to be a challenge as well. On a regular basis DAFF perform diagnostic assessments on cooperatives assist them to upscale, improve productivity, efficiency and competitiveness.

11 May 2018 - NW1065

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he was aware or has been informed of negotiations and any agreement between certain parties (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) Whether these negotiations influenced the decision making processes of his department in this matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

1. No, the Minister of Home Affairs was not aware or informed of negotiations between the parties mentioned by the Honourable Member.

2. Not applicable.

11 May 2018 - NW1144

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of work permits have been granted to foreigners employed by a certain media entity (name furnished), (b) are the names of the individuals, (c) is the date of each (i) application and (ii) approval and (d) were the motivating reasons for granting of the permits in each case?

Reply:

The Visa Adjudication System (VAS) is not designed to keep statistics according to company names. The system keeps records of applicants’ details in a unique identification code, commonly known as a reference number. Only through these details would the Department be in a position to retrieve the original application and explain each decision.

11 May 2018 - NW1177

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With regard to his reply to question 2714 on 16 January 2017, (a) what steps will he take to ensure that the correct authority within his department actually carries out the instructions of the court and (b) by what date?

Reply:

The Judge will only grant an order/deliver judgment after considering the application or evidence, depending on the nature of the proceedings. In Civil Matters, the order will be made available to all parties after it has been granted. It is the responsibility of the party seeking the relief to ensure that the order is enforced.

Therefore, the Office of the Chief Justice is not the correct authority to implement the court order. The reply to question 2714 of 16 January 2017 still stands.

11 May 2018 - NW987

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

How much land does (a) her department and (b) the entities reporting to her (i) own, (ii) have exclusive rights to and/or (iii) lease from the State to (aa) use and/or (bb) occupy?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) and (ii) I have been advised that the Department leases two land parcels from the Department of Public Works, namely 460 Soutpansberg Road, Pretoria on which the O R Tambo building (DIRCO Head Office) is situated as well as land in Matroosberg Avenue, Waterkloof, Pretoria, on which the Johnny Makatini diplomatic guest house is situated.

(b)(i)(ii) & (iii) None.

11 May 2018 - NW1188

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)What is the (a) total economic revenue generated by the predator breeding industry in South Africa (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018; and (b) detailed breakdown of the (i) income generated through (aa) tourism activities, (bb) hunting activities, including the sale of predators to other hunting facilities and (cc) bone sales; and (ii) tax revenue contributed by the predator breeding industry to the National Revenue Fund in each of the specified financial years; and (2) what number of job opportunities were (a) created and (b) sustained by the predator breeding industry in each of the specified financial years?

Reply:

1 (a) and (b)

There is currently no universally agreed figure on the total economic revenue generated by the predator breeding industry in South Africa. However, the recent International Journal of biodiversity and conservation as appearing on the academic journal of the Northwest University by Peet Van der Merwe et al, 2017, purported that the lion breeders alone contribute R500 million annually to South African economy in each of the past three financial years: According to information supplied by Provincial Conservation Management Authorities, It is estimated that an amount of R110 729 285.00 was generated from hunting activities during 2016 and R180 967 456.00 during 2015 respectively. The information for 2017 hunting activities will only be available after the end of June 2018. Please note that at the National level we do not have statistics. Such stats are compiled by Provincial nature conservation authorities on an annual basis.

Information on tourism activities, including the sale of predators to other hunting facilities; bone sales; and tax revenue contributed by the predator breeding industry to the National Revenue Fund in each of the specified financial years, is not available to the Department of Environemntal Affairs at the moment, but may be available to the Provincial Coservation Managemnt Authorities.

(2) The Department does not have, at its disposal, data on the number of job opportunities (a) created and (b) sustained by the predator breeding industry in each of the specified financial years; however, the same study by Van der Merwe et al, 2017, indicated that a total of 1 162 jobs are sustained in the economy due to lion breeding activities alone. Cadman (2009) indicated that 900 people are employed in the lion breeding industry alone.

---ooOoo---

11 May 2018 - NW875

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the (a) detailed breakdown of the amounts budgeted for each of South Africa’s foreign missions for the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii) 2020-21 financial years and (b)(i) total number and (ii) breakdown of (aa) South African and (bb) foreign staff employed at each of the specified foreign missions?

Reply:

(a) The detailed breakdown of amounts budgeted for South Africa’s is appended as Annexure A.

The total budget for South Africa’s foreign missions are follows:

(i) for 2018/19 is R 3,257 billion;

(ii) for 2019/20 is R 3,259 billion; and

(iii) for 2020/21 is R3,272 billion.

(b) (i) Total number of South Africans employed at the foreign missions is 721.

(ii) (aa) Breakdown of South Africans employed at foreign missions is enclosed as Annexure B

(ii) (bb) Breakdown of foreign staff employed at foreign missions is 1,754 (Breakdown is enclosed as Annexure C)

ANNEXURE A

AFRICA MISSIONS

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Addis Ababa

65,448,452

65,965,802

66,886,122

Brazzaville

21,743,514

22,076,436

22,628,394

Libreville

18,030,950

18,099,324

17,739,617

Malabo

16,295,156

16,162,067

16,162,067

N'Djamena

11,659,682

11,681,474

11,723,676

Sao Tome

7,963,321

7,996,080

8,134,959

Yaounde

18,643,719

18,693,001

18,290,684

Antananarivo

16,013,058

16,571,664

17,125,717

Asmara

13,493,665

13,556,122

13,713,500

Bujumbura

18,789,212

18,545,654

18,573,654

Juba

19,759,796

19,422,928

19,423,460

Kampala

20,399,875

21,269,837

21,331,354

Khartoum

18,394,560

18,431,140

18,464,086

Kigali

16,834,812

17,117,843

17,168,976

Moroni

10,050,827

10,289,888

10,367,426

Nairobi

29,866,933

30,378,707

30,917,736

Port Louis

18,428,686

18,363,842

18,254,815

Algiers

24,156,322

23,678,220

23,685,259

Cairo

19,649,700

19,068,382

19,141,789

Nouakchott

12,921,658

13,125,182

13,226,634

Rabat

9,936,120

9,976,742

10,027,056

Tunis

12,238,968

12,166,252

12,222,784

Dar Es Salaam

19,538,796

19,579,519

19,624,576

Gaborone

22,009,402

21,163,185

21,163,185

Harare

32,003,734

31,567,060

31,709,510

Kinshasa

35,703,922

35,489,293

33,838,934

Lilongwe

15,686,079

15,716,289

15,815,431

Luanda

76,090,371

76,684,286

76,894,365

Lubumbashi

14,758,221

15,007,421

15,007,421

Lusaka

18,315,188

16,947,388

18,308,188

Maputo

28,514,973

27,979,260

27,539,872

Maseru

11,378,650

11,439,087

11,565,846

Mbabane

11,216,408

11,211,519

11,211,519

Windhoek

10,512,153

10,624,542

10,751,893

Abidjan

20,960,709

20,818,184

21,722,002

Abuja

39,357,926

38,529,758

40,621,483

Accra

30,815,609

32,044,291

33,385,958

Bamako

16,469,662

16,500,445

16,642,298

Bissau

12,939,151

13,001,979

13,081,528

Conakry

17,000,201

16,907,559

16,910,019

Cotonou

13,406,293

13,410,862

13,489,362

Dakar

21,850,296

22,512,558

21,415,679

Lagos

32,175,224

32,094,584

32,094,584

Monrovia

14,439,253

14,529,036

14,548,691

Niamey

8,363,871

8,420,146

8,449,981

Ouagadougou

16,959,722

16,297,151

16,438,398

Total

961,184,800

961,111,991

967,440,489

Asia and Middle East missions

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Abu Dhabi

10,841,048

10,937,138

10,926,401

Amman

16,296,200

16,526,036

16,400,047

Astana

16,223,809

15,502,289

16,486,196

Bang Kok

21,722,911

21,477,142

22,382,827

Beijing

70,873,281

72,134,337

73,409,771

Canberra

32,834,685

32,946,689

32,552,631

Colombo

14,574,294

14,805,824

14,491,697

Doha

18,241,443

18,296,702

18,441,120

Hanoi

21,441,804

21,461,444

21,461,444

Hong Kong

19,861,315

19,904,108

19,401,059

Islamabad

17,685,020

17,759,382

16,354,220

Jakarta

25,113,274

25,098,678

25,307,632

Jeddah

8,596,278

8,410,929

8,423,117

Kuala Lumpur

9,171,004

9,163,864

9,095,417

Kuwait City

16,738,531

16,024,258

16,106,856

Manila

17,211,704

18,126,989

18,775,756

Dubai

15,031,246

15,163,604

15,117,480

Mumbai

21,241,119

21,306,402

21,358,905

Muscat

17,720,696

17,761,954

18,614,050

New Dehli

28,765,631

28,913,256

29,090,577

Ramallah

21,210,091

20,667,694

18,629,520

Riyadh

14,678,876

14,599,218

14,765,230

Seoul

38,388,294

37,925,104

38,811,654

Shanghai

29,607,788

29,282,114

29,730,301

Singapore

36,826,439

36,432,296

36,568,988

Suva

8,696,661

9,027,530

8,937,993

Tapei

13,899,355

14,311,657

13,287,098

Tehran

24,406,123

24,414,237

24,661,973

Tel Aviv

30,659,693

30,291,010

30,388,706

Tokyo

45,634,239

45,199,627

45,497,875

Wellington

16,246,007

16,499,829

16,485,321

Damascus

18,125,383

18,012,894

18,028,904

Total

718,564,241

718,384,234

719,990,766

       

Europe missions

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Ankara

29,058,786

29,312,357

29,498,489

Athens

21,710,559

21,574,788

21,198,982

Berlin

61,104,978

61,009,095

61,248,122

Berne

45,579,539

45,015,139

44,369,023

Bucharest

14,969,620

15,009,985

15,331,694

Budapest

16,669,430

16,670,121

17,061,170

Brussels

68,540,721

67,570,508

67,653,372

Copenhagen

14,743,170

14,829,168

14,825,395

Dublin

27,318,940

27,512,364

27,531,518

Geneva

114,708,407

114,796,880

115,895,328

Helsinki

25,294,802

25,290,702

25,696,630

Holy See

10,898,846

10,877,415

10,980,863

Kiev

14,738,735

14,777,168

16,690,035

Lisbon

21,165,272

20,949,858

20,050,229

London

102,301,285

103,957,485

104,270,348

Madrid

23,551,180

23,494,660

23,475,820

Milan

22,108,003

21,921,498

21,914,796

Moscow and Minsk

63,171,863

63,411,486

63,411,486

Munich

26,947,137

26,922,139

27,032,527

Oslo

23,988,339

23,958,868

24,526,650

Paris

67,745,121

70,787,764

71,052,597

Prague

14,874,059

14,921,690

14,956,510

Rome

40,726,682

40,922,084

40,873,087

Sofia

13,937,650

13,937,650

13,937,650

Stockholm

16,303,498

16,420,111

16,413,421

The Hague

37,529,032

38,081,701

37,733,595

Vienna

65,345,645

65,413,328

65,567,078

Warsaw

1,218,973

1,214,082

1,204,621

Total

1,006,250,274

1,010,560,094

1,014,401,035

AMERICA MISSIONS

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Brasilia

43,233,297

41,845,389

42,740,377

Buenos Aires

19,096,453

19,013,144

19,144,761

Caracas

26,624,604

26,676,590

26,719,159

Chicago

32,287,611

32,930,398

33,272,584

Havana

23,524,447

23,620,348

22,996,769

Kingston

21,645,055

20,940,663

20,751,758

Lima

17,615,757

17,730,366

17,860,147

Los Angels

32,569,433

32,563,017

32,368,172

Mexico City

23,086,238

23,322,908

23,627,744

New York (CG)

80,715,627

81,610,227

81,920,663

New York (UN)

67,547,621

67,335,045

67,559,087

Ottawa

21,671,829

20,659,346

18,471,775

Port Of Spain

16,319,913

16,441,931

16,098,028

Santiago

26,895,207

25,917,856

26,051,350

Sao Paulo

28,821,013

29,109,831

29,397,671

Toronto

20,233,045

20,254,863

20,665,382

Washington

69,212,150

69,847,162

70,515,312

Total

571,099,301

569,819,085

570,160,739

Grand Total

3,257,098,616

3,259,875,405

3,271,993,030

       

ANNEXURE B

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS: AFRICA MISSIONS

 

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Abidjan

5

Abuja

8

Accra

6

Addis Ababa

19

Algiers

6

Antananarivo

4

Asmara

3

Bamako

5

Bangui

3

Bissau

3

Brazzaville

4

Bujumbura

5

Cairo

7

Conakry

5

Cotonou

4

Dakar

6

Dar Es Salaam

6

Gaborone

8

Harare

7

Juba

4

Kampala

6

Khartoum

5

Kigali

5

Kinshasa

10

Lagos

7

Libreville

5

Lilongwe

5

Luanda

8

Lubumbashi

4

Lusaka

6

Malabo

2

Maputo

9

Maseru

6

Mbabane

5

   

Monrovia

5

Moroni

4

Nairobi

8

N'djamena

4

Niamey

3

Nouakchott

4

Ouagadougou

4

Port Louis

4

Rabat

4

Sao Tome

3

Tunis

4

Windhoek

6

Yaounde

5

Total

259

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS: ASIA AND MIDDLE EAST MISSIONS

 

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Abu Dhabi

4

Amman

4

Astana

4

Bangkok

5

Beijing

12

Canberra

6

Colombo

4

Damascus

4

Doha

4

Dubai

6

Hanoi

5

Hong Kong

4

Islamabad

5

Jakarta

6

Jeddah

4

Kuala Lumpur

6

Kuwait City

4

Manila

4

Mumbai

6

Muscat

4

New Delhi

12

Ramallah

4

Riyadh

6

Seoul

5

Shanghai

5

Singapore

8

Suva

3

Taipei

4

Tehran

4

Tel Aviv

4

Tokyo

8

Wellington

5

Total

169

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS : AMERICAS MISSIONS

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Brasilia

10

Buenos Aires

4

Caracas

4

Chicago

4

Havana

6

Kingston

4

Lima

4

Los Angeles

5

Mexico City

5

New York (CG)

5

New York (UN)

19

Ottawa

7

Port Of Spain

3

Santiago

4

Sao Paulo

4

Toronto

4

Washington

16

Total

108

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS: EUROPE MISSIONS

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Ankara

6

Athens

5

Berlin

11

Berne

5

Brussels

11

Bucharest

4

Budapest

5

Copenhagen

4

Dublin

4

Geneva

13

Helsinki

4

Kyiv

3

Lisbon

5

London

16

Madrid

4

Milan

4

Moscow and Minsk

12

Munich

6

Oslo

4

Paris

10

Prague

4

Rome

8

Sofia

4

Stockholm

5

The Hague

7

Holy See

2

Vienna

14

Warsaw

5

Total

185

Grand Total

721

ANNEXURE C

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION: AFRICA MISSIONS

 

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Abidjan

16

Abuja

24

Accra

15

Addis Ababa

71

Algiers

16

Antananarivo

12

Asmara

6

Bamako

10

Bangui

0

Bissau

13

Brazzaville

16

Bujumbura

11

Cairo

21

Conakry

8

Cotonou

9

Dakar

14

Dar Es Salaam

13

Gaborone

19

Harare

20

Juba

6

Kampala

15

Khartoum

12

Kigali

16

Kinshasa

25

Lagos

11

Libreville

10

Lilongwe

15

Luanda

23

Lubumbashi

12

Lusaka

13

Malabo

17

Maputo

41

Maseru

11

Mbabane

13

Monrovia

11

Moroni

10

Nairobi

20

N'djamena

6

Niamey

5

Nouakchott

9

Ouagadougou

10

Port Louis

11

Rabat

9

Sao Tome

4

Tunis

10

Windhoek

16

Yaounde

9

Total

684

   

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION : ASIA AND MIDDLE EAST MISSIONS

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Abu Dhabi

8

Amman

8

Astana

12

Bangkok

13

Beijing

23

Canberra

17

Colombo

9

Damascus

7

Doha

7

Dubai

10

Hanoi

14

Hong Kong

9

Islamabad

18

Jakarta

10

Jeddah

10

Kuala Lumpur

11

Kuwait City

10

Manila

8

Mumbai

15

Muscat

9

New Delhi

22

Ramallah

9

Riyadh

18

Seoul

14

Shanghai

13

Singapore

9

Suva

5

Taipei

13

Tehran

13

Tel Aviv

13

Tokyo

21

Wellington

6

Total

384

   

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION : AMERICAS MISSIONS

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Brasilia

25

Buenos Aires

10

Caracas

9

Chicago

11

Havana

31

Kingston

7

Lima

11

Los Angeles

9

Mexico City

14

New York (Cg)

22

New York (Un)

12

Ottawa

12

Port Of Spain

6

Santiago

10

Sao Paulo

12

Toronto

7

Washington

35

Total

243

 

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION : EUROPE MISSIONS

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Ankara

14

Athens

12

Berlin

33

Berne

13

Brussels

36

Bucharest

7

Budapest

10

Copenhagen

9

Dublin

11

Geneva

17

Helsinki

10

Kyiv

10

Lisbon

13

London

48

Madrid

15

Milan

9

Moscow

21

Munich

11

Oslo

7

Paris

29

Prague

11

Rome

19

Sofia

9

Stockholm

9

The Hague

18

The Holy See

4

Vienna

26

Warsaw

12

Total

443

Grand Total

1754

11 May 2018 - NW1280

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) With regard to the project undertaken by the SA Law Commission in 1998 at the behest of the former President, Mr Nelson R Mandela, into end-of-life-decisions that, following extensive consultation, resulted in the compilation of a draft Bill on end-of-life-decsions that was presented to the executive, but never acted upon, why was the specified draft Bill never processed any further; (2) whether he intends to revise and re-introduce the draft Bill; if not, why not?

Reply:

1.. The South African Law Commission (as it then was) submitted its report on euthanasia and artificial preservation of life (which included the Bill on end of life decisions) to the former Minister of Justice, AM Omar, in terms of section 7(1) of the South African Law Commission Act, 1973. He, in turn, referred the report to the then Minister of Health, Dr NCD Zuma, for her attention on 15 June 1999.

Minister Omar’s recommendation to the Minister of Health reads as follows:

“The sections of the Bill dealing with the cessation of treatment, palliative care and living wills are of vital importance to the medical profession and patients and I realise that their enactment should not be unnecessarily delayed. However, in order to ensure public participation on the question whether provision should be made for active euthanasia and if so, on what basis, I would like to recommend for your consideration that an appropriate ad-hoc select committee of Parliament be appointed to consider the issue of active euthanasia as set out in section 5 of the Bill.”

2. No, this matter is within the competence of the Minister of Health.

10 May 2018 - NW1215

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the cash tender for the payment of grants by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA), (a) by what date will she and/or SASSA announce which company has been successful in tendering for this service, (b) did Cash Paymaster Services (CPS) tender again to provide this service to the State and (c) what was the nature of the dispute G24 raised during the tender process; (2) will she consider taking steps against all those in her department who have been part and parcel of a process to ignore the Constitutional Court rulings against her department for entering into an unlawful contract with CPS and thereby creating an environment in which CPS was favoured; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The cash payment tender process has been suspended pending investigation into various concerns raised. The final decision on the status of the tender will be determined, by no later than 11 May 2018.

(b) Since the tender process is not yet finalised, information about bidders cannot be made public.

(c) The concerns raised are about the accuracy and completeness of the statistical information (numbers of beneficiaries paid per pay point), needed to prepare a credible costing model.

(2) We are not aware of any persons or officials in the department who have been part and parcel of a process to ignore the Constitutional Court rulings against the department, however any evidence to the contrary will be considered. Suffice to state that the rulings of the Constitutional Court will be met.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

10 May 2018 - NW1111

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(1) What (a) number of consulting firms or companies are currently contracted by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her and (b) (i) is the name of each consultant, (ii) are the relevant details of the service provided in each case and (iii)is the (aa) start date, (bb) time period, (cc) monetary value in Rands of each individual who signed off on each contract? NW1203E

Reply:

(1) The information we have is unverified. I will provide details once the information is available.

10 May 2018 - NW572

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(1) Does her department have a working relationship with Mr Melusi Ntuli, who invented a chargeless electric engine, which is 100% green technology, if so, (a) what are the details of the specified relationship, (b) how is her department assisting him in developing and making prototypes of this invention and (c) what amount of funding has her department allocated towards this project? NW640E

Reply:

(1) Does her department have a working relationship with Mr Melusi Ntuli, who invented a chargeless electric engine, which is 100% green technology, if not why not?

The department established the Grassroots Innovation Programme as a means to improve access and participation in the national system of innovation. This programme specifically targets innovators who are not part of formal institutions of innovation nor have access to formal facilities critical for their innovative solutions. The department appointed the Technology Localization Implementation Unit (TLIU), of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) as an implementing agent of the Grassroots Innovation Programme. When Mr. Ntuli approached the department requesting assistance with the development of his invention in 2016, the department swiftly responded and advised him to enroll in the Grassroots Innovation Programme. As this programme was implemented by the CSIR's TLIU, all participants of this programme entered into a contractual relationship with the CSIR. Mr. Ntuli duly signed a contract on 24 April 2016. The contractual relationship between Mr. Ntuli and the CSIR was terminated at Mr. Ntuli's insistence. The termination was finalized by 21 July 2017.

Prior to voluntarily terminating the contractual relationship which effectively ended his participation as a beneficiary of the Grassroots Innovation Programme, Mr. Ntuli was receiving prototype design assistance from the Durban University of Technology; had been provided with computer aided design equipment; had been profiled nationally and participated at the India Festival of Innovation, a platform intended to assist innovators to market and profile their innovations in India.

(2) if so, (a) what are the details of the specified relationship?

Since Mr. Ntuli's insistence of terminating the contractual relationship, there is no longer a relationship between him and the department. The department in its communication with indicating him that he is still . welcome to participate in the Grassroots Innovation Programme within its existing terms and conditions.

(b) how is her department assisting him in developing and making prototypes of his invention?

The Grassroots Innovation Programmes funds prototype development, technical training e.g. machining and tooling, computer aided design, markets and profiles innovation to raise awareness, etc. It does not fund accommodation costs nor does it pay stipends.

(c) what amount of funding has her department allocated towards his project.

The assistance granted by the programme to Mr. Ntuli is valued at R205 096.00 and covered the payment for prototype development, design and machining expertise, provision of management development support and training as well as marketing and profiling his innovation. This amount excludes the costs of CSIR and DST staff who assisted Mr. Ntuli in the development of his networks and for marketing his innovation.
 

09 May 2018 - NW750

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) Does Grindrod have a banking licence, (b)(i) is the specified bank foreign or locally owned and (ii) what are the full details of the owners of the bank and (c) what are the names of the shareholders of the bank?

Reply:

a) Yes. According to the Prudential Authority at the South African Reserve Bank (Prudential Authority), Grindrod Bank has a banking licence in terms of the Banks Act, and that the banking licence was issued in December 2006.

b) We cannot confirm whether a company is locally or foreign owned, particularly if it is listed and / or its ultimate owners (or shareholders) are listed or their identity not explicitly identified (eg hidden via structuring). What we can confirm is whether the company is domiciled in South Africa or not, and if listed, where its primary listing is. In this instance, the Prudential Authority has confirmed that the company is domiciled in South Africa. In addition, whilst Grindrod Bank is not listed, its majority shareholder (Grindrod Limited) is listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange.

c) The Prudential Authority furthermore confirmed that Grindrod Bank is 96.55% owned by Grindrod Limited and 3.45% owned by Amber Bay Investments (Pty) Ltd.

09 May 2018 - NW380

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What number of cases between state legal advisors acting as representatives of the State on all three levels of government and the public were (a) settled and (b) brought into question as arrangements made without sufficient power of attorney since 1 January 2010; (2) (a) what number of cases were settled in (i) his department and (ii) each provincial department in total respectively since 1 January 2010 and (b) what was the total amount for each year from 2010?

Reply:

1. I wish to request the Honourable Member of Parliament to please clarify what specific information, the MP requires in this regard. The Office of the Chief State Law Adviser provides legal opinions to the National Executive and National Departments, as to the constitutionality and legality of draft Bills and international legal agreements. The Offices of the various State Attorneys act as Attorney of Record for the National Executive as well as National Government Departments.

If the terminology of “state legal advisors” is interpreted as “state attorney”, I am further informed that if the interpretation of the question is to mean “where the state attorney settled the matter without a power of attorney from the client Department”, that the Offices of the State Attorney do not keep such detailed statistics as these matters are kept in general with the statistics of settled matters. If the information is to be sought now, the Office of the Acting Chief Litigation Officer would have to request the various State Attorneys’ Offices to search their files individually as far back as 2010, which would mean an enormous amount of human resources and time would have to be expended in the search, as some of the files have already been closed and archived.

2. (a) (i) I am informed that the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) does not have a readily available database from 2010 until the current financial year in respect to the number of cases settled by the DoJ&CD. However, the information on the amounts claimed and settled is provided in Table B below.

(ii) Table A below provides details of the total number of cases that were settled for each provincial department during the 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18 financial years:

TABLE A: Number of cases settled: Provincial Departments

Province

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Eastern Cape

62

36

11

Free State

42

28

5

Gauteng

342

251

105

Kwa-Zulu Natal

386

412

119

Limpopo

27

14

7

Northern Cape

2

3

1

North West

28

15

4

Western Cape

80

28

2

Grand Total

969

787

254

(b) Tables C below provide details of the total amounts settled for each provincial department.

(i) TABLE B: Total amount claimed and finalised by the DoJ&CD during the 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Amount Claimed

Amount Finalised

Amount Claimed

Amount Finalised

Amount Claimed

Amount Finalised

R 3 647 779 462

R 3 698 400

R 6 987 912 594

R 1 072 417

R 7 077 064 221

R 4 622 146

(ii) TABLE C: Total amounts settled: Provincial Departments for the 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18 financial years

Province

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Eastern Cape

R 31 862 260

R 62 168 730

R 92 646 921

Free State

R 1 734 752

R 3 711 829

R 236 593

Gauteng

R 337 926 657

R 58 104 197

R 86 649 443

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R 27 295 033

R 195 124 853

R 169 469 778

Limpopo

R 6 529 173

R 1 357 058

R 235 325

Northern Cape

R 17 264

R 234 900

R 120 000

North West

R 24 149 652

R 25 157 373

R 6 071 163

Western Cape

R 24 235 753

R 1 495 369

R 12 500 000

Grand Total

R 453 750 543

R 347 354 311

R 367 929 223

Note:

The Province of Mpumalanga does not have a State Attorney’s Office. The Provincial Government of Mpumalanga is assisted by the State Attorney Office in Pretoria.

09 May 2018 - NW1207

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any provincial departments of agriculture awarded any contracts to a certain company Kamsherai in each of the past five financial years; if so, (i)(aa) where and (bb) for what purpose was each contract awarded and (ii) what was the (aa) tender number, (bb) monetary value and (cc) time period of each contract that was awarded in each specified financial year?

Reply:

DAFF

(a) No award was made by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries to Kamsherai

(b) Not applicable.

(i)(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

(ii)(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

(cc) Not applicable.

GAUTENG AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

No payments have been made to Kamsherai in the past five financial years.

WESTERN CAPE

No payments have been made to Kamsherai in the past five financial years.

NORTHERN CAPE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

No payments have been made to Kamsherai in the past five financial years.

EASTERN CAPE – No response

KZN – No response

LIMPOPO – No response

NORTH WEST – No response

MPUMALANGA – No response

FREE STATE – No response

 

09 May 2018 - NW344

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(a)      What is the total amount that was (i) budgeted for and (ii) spent on his private office (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2017 and (b) what was the (i) remuneration, (11) salary level, (iii) job title , (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office in each of the specified periods?

Reply:

All appointments in the Office of the Minister were effected in terms of Chapter 8 of the Ministerial Handbook and in accordance with Chapter 1, Part VII, Paragraph C.1B of the former Public Service Regulations, 2001 and Chapter 4, Part 4, Regulation 66 of the new Public Service Regulations, 2016 which came into effect on 1 August 2016.

Chapter 8 of the Ministerial Handbook does not provide guidelines in terms of the salary levels of core staff in the Ministry and leaves such discretion to executive authorities. The salary levels of remuneration of the staff in the Ministry were effected in terms of Chapter1, Part V, Paragraph C.3 of the former Public Service Regulations, 2001. This provision was, however amended with Regulation 44 of the newly promulgated Public Service Regulations, 2016, which came into effect on 1 August 2016.

The updated post establishment is attached.

(a)(i),(ii) and (aa)

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

(i) Budget

(R’000)

(ii) Expenditure

(R’000)

(i)Budget

(R’000)

(ii)Expenditure

(R’000)

(i)Budget

(R’000)

(ii)Expenditure

(R’000)

25 272

24 594

24 342

24 336

24 439

26 378

(bb)

Since 1 April 2017

(i) Budget

(R’000)

(ii) Expenditure

(R’000)

27 181

20 678

(b)(i),(ii),(iii),(iv) and (v)

2014/2015

Remuneration

Salary level

Job title

Qualification

Job description

(Benchmarked job descriptions from DPSA attached)

Appointment date

R 1 219 737.00

15

*Chief of Staff

Masters degree in Public Management and Development

Attached

2013/02/06 - 2014/09/17

Now placed as

Director: ICT Special Projects Coordinator

R 1 201 713.00

15

*Chief of Staff

Primary Teachers Diploma

Attached

2014/09/18 -2015/08/31

Now placed as Food Security & Agrarian Reform Coordinator (Branch: FSAR)

R 988 152.00

14

Media Liaison Officer

MA

Attached

2014/07/01 -

2015/08/18

Placed as Director: Communication Services (CPT)

Contract expired 2017/06/30

R 988 152.00

14

Parliamentary Officer

BA

Attached

2014/07/01 - 2017/06/30

Contract expired

R 630 822.00

12

Administrative/ Private Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2014/07/22

to date

R 278 979.00

12

Assistant Appointments & Administrative Secretary

National Diploma

Attached

2012/11/01 - 2016/06/30

Resigned

R 227 802.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (PTA)

Grade 8

Attached

2001/11/01

to date

R 227 802.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (CPT)

Grade 12

Attached

2006/12/13

to date

R 532 278.00

11

Senior Registry Clerk

B. Admin

Attached

2009/10/02

to date

R 183 438.00

7

Driver/Messenger

Grade 6

Attached

1992/08/12

to date

R 1 201 713.00

15

Special Adviser

Masters degree in Governance and Political Transformation

 

2014/07/02 to date

R 1 201 713.00

15

Special Adviser

Diploma in Fine and Commercial Arts

 

2014/07/02 to date

R 1 742 751.00

16

** Special Adviser

B. Ed

 

2011/01/01 - 2014/06/30

Contract expired

R 1 570 254.00

16

** Special Adviser

Grade 12

 

2012/11/01 - 2014/06/30

Contract expired

* Different periods of appointment in same financial year.

** Special Advisers to the former Minister in the 2014/2015 financial year.

2015/2016

Remuneration

Salary level

Job title

Qualification

Job description (Benchmarked job descriptions from DPSA attached)

Appointment date

R1267 806.00

15

*Chief of Staff

Primary Teachers Diploma

Attached

2014/09/18 -2015/08/31

Now placed as Food Security & Agrarian Reform Coordinator (Branch: FSAR)

R1299501.00

15

*Chief of Staff

B. Sc

Attached

2015/09/03 - 2016/05/31

Resigned

R1068 564.00

14

*Media Liaison Officer

BA Corporate Communications

Attached

2015/08/24

to date

R1042 500.00

14

*Media Liaison Officer

MA

Attached

2014/07/01 - 2015/08/18

Placed as Director: Communication Services (CPT)

Contract expired 2017/06/30

R1068 564.00

14

Parliamentary Officer

BA

Attached

2014/07/01 - 2017/06/30

Contract expiry

R 674 979.00

12

Administrative Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2014/07/22

to date

R1068 564.00

14

Administrative/ Private Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2015/08/24 -

2017/07/31

Now placed as

Deputy Director: Executive Implementation & Secretariat Support

R 674 979.00

12

Assistant Appointments & Administrative Secretary

National Diploma

Attached

2012/11/01 - 2016/06/30

Resigned

R 243 747.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (PTA)

Grade 8

Attached

2001/11/01

to date

R 243 747.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (CPT)

Grade 12

 

2006/12/13

to date

R 612 822.00

11

Senior Registry Clerk

B. Admin

Attached

2009/10/02

to date

R 196 278.00

7

Driver/Messenger

Grade 6

Attached

1992.08.12

to date

R1299 501.00

15

Special Adviser

Masters degree in Governance and Political Transformation

 

2014/07/02

to date

R1299 501.00

15

Special Adviser

Diploma in Fine and Commercial Arts

 

2014/07/02

to date

* Different periods of appointment in same financial year.

2016/2017

Remuneration

Salary level

Job title

Qualification

Job description

(Benchmarked job descriptions from DPSA attached

Appointment date

R 1 299 501.00

15

Chief of Staff

B. Sc

Attached

2015/09/03 - 2016/05/31

Resigned

R 1 068 564.00

14

Media Liaison Officer

BA Corporate Communications

Attached

2015/08/24

to date

R 1 068 564.00

14

Parliamentary Officer

BA

Attached

2014/07/01 - 2017/06/30

Contract expiry

R 898 743.00

13

Administrative Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2014/07/22

to date

R 1 068 564.00

14

Administrative/ Private Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2015/08/24 -

2017/07/31

Now placed as

Deputy Director: Executive Implementation & Secretariat Support

R 726 276.00

12

*Assistant Appointments & Administrative Secretary

BA (Hons), HED (undergraduate), Postgraduate Diploma: Management

Attached

2016/07/25

to date

R 726 276.00

12

*Assistant Appointments & Administrative Secretary

National Diploma

Attached

2012/11/01 - 2016/06/30

Resigned

R 262 272.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (PTA)

Grade 8

Attached

2001/11/01

to date

R 262 272.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (CPT)

Grade 12

Attached

2006/12/13

to date

R 612 822.00

11

Senior Registry Clerk

B. Admin

Attached

2009/10/02

to date

R 211 194.00

7

Driver/Messenger

Grade 6

Attached

1992.08.12

to date

R 1 299 501.00

15

Special Adviser

Masters degree in Governance and Political Transformation

 

2014/07/02

to date

R 1 299 501.00

15

Special Adviser

Diploma in Fine and Commercial Arts

 

2014/07/02 to date

* Different periods of appointment in same financial year.

Since 1 April 2017

Remuneration

Salary level

Job title

Qualification

Job description

(Benchmarked job descriptions from DPSA attached

Appointment date

R 1 127 334.00

14

Chief of Staff

Master of Arts

Attached

2017/04/01

to date

R 1 068 564.00

14

Media Liaison Officer

BA Corporate Communications

Attached

2015/08/24

to date

R 948 174.00

13

*Parliamentary Officer

Bachelor of Arts

Attached

2017/10/01

R 1 127 334.00

14

*Parliamentary Officer

BA

Attached

2014/07/01 - 2017/06/30

Contract expiry

R 948 174.00

13

Administrative Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2014/07/22

to date

R 1 127 334.00

14

Administrative/ Private Secretary

Grade 12

Attached

2015/08/24 -

2017/07/31

Now placed as

Deputy Director: Executive Implementation & Secretariat Support

R 779 295.00

12

Assistant Appointments & Administrative Secretary

BA (Hons), HED (undergraduate), Postgraduate Diploma: Management

Attached

2016/07/25

to date

R 281 418.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (PTA)

Grade 8

Attached

2001/11/01

R 281 418.00

8

Secretary/Receptionist (CPT)

Grade 12

Attached

2006/12/13

to date

R 657 558.00

11

Senior Registry Clerk

B. Admin

Attached

2009/10/02

R 226 611.00

7

Driver/Messenger

Grade 6

Attached

199/08/12

to date

R 1 370 973.00

15

Special Adviser

Masters degree in Governance and Political Transformation

 

2014/07/02

to date

R 1 370 973.00

15

Special Adviser

Diploma in Fine and Commercial Arts

 

2014/07/02

to date

** Different periods of appointment in same financial year.

09 May 2018 - NW1063

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Finance

In view of his recent remarks regarding a number of cities that are on the brink of collapse (details furnished), (a) which cities was he referring to, (b) what are the root causes of their imminent collapse and (c) what steps does he propose should be taken to avert the collapse of each city?

Reply:

a) The statement made by the Minister of Finance during the Executive Leadership course was not referring to any specific Metropolitan, Intermediate City or municipalities. The Minister was speaking in general based on the National Treasury’s broad observation over time with regard to financial management challenges which if not properly addressed could lead to collapse as evidenced by the experience of other cities elsewhere.

b) It is well known that a number of municipalities face significant governance, service delivery and financial challenges. These are often related, and the National Treasury has repeatedly emphasized that governance challenges are the most common underlying driver of service delivery and financial challenges.

The National Treasury does have concerns about the performance of some municipalities with respect to governance, institutional, financial health and service delivery, some of which are not able to pay creditors and are struggling to pay for bulk water and electricity.

The National Treasury publishes detailed information on all municipalities in its annual report on the state of local government finances and financial management, the latest report will soon be released. The report does identify those municipalities that are in financial distress, there were 95 municipalities in financial distress in 2016/17 report. Although these municipalities are cause for immediate concern, it should be noted that all of our municipalities – including metropolitan municipalities - have significant room to improve performance on many of the indicators tracked in the state of local government finances and financial management.

c) National and Provincial governments provide extensive support to all municipalities in terms of section 154 of the Constitution. Details of these support measures are also provided in the state of local government finances report. More recently, the adoption of the Integrated Urban Development Framework (IUDF) has led to greater coordination and focussing of support to different categories of municipalities, in order to enable them to respond more effectively to their development challenges and align their performance with our national development goals. With the IUDF, the Cities Support Programme, which is coordinated by the National Treasury, are working closely with our metropolitan municipalities. The Department of Cooperative Governance has begun to rollout out a complementary programme for Intermediate Cities, while the design of a small towns programme is being finalised in consultation with the SA Local Government Association. These programmes strongly complement the systemic support and reform programmes such as Back to Basics (B2B) and Municipal Financial Management reforms.

The National Treasury and the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) are collaborating to prioritise municipalities that are in financial distress and failing to deliver services for support and intervention to restore them to sustainability, working in collaboration with provinces.

The previous Minister of Finance during his Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS) in October 2017, recognised the municipal financial management challenges experienced and announced the introduction of a funding mechanism to support the recovery plans for municipalities that face a financial crisis, as provided for in section 139(5) of The Constitution. The DoRA published in February 2018 provides a brief background to the proposed funding mechanism namely, the Municipal Restructuring Grant (MRG).

The purpose of this grant, as described in the DoRA, is “to be a short term intervention that will fund the turnaround of struggling municipalities”. This will provide some financial relief to municipalities that require financial support to improve their current situation. It is important to note that this grant allocation is not intended to fund the complete financial recovery plan but rather to contribute to the implementation of corrective action that demonstrates sufficient alignment to NT’s “game changers” referred to previously in this document.

09 May 2018 - NW1209

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

(1) Whether his department conducts tests for listeriosis in live animals; if so, (a) what procedures are followed and (b) has there been any additional testing instituted due to the latest listeriosis outbreak; (2) (a) what is considered to be a safe level of listeriosis on (i) live animals and (ii) animal products and (b) what standards are used in each case; (3) what (a) has been the economic impact of the latest listeriosis outbreak in the agricultural sector and (b) steps have been taken by his department to limit the potential job losses in this regard?

Reply:

(1) Whether his department conducts tests for listeriosis in live animals; if so, (a) what procedures are followed and (b) has there been any additional testing instituted due to the latest listeriosis outbreak;

Listeriosis is not a disease listed as either a notifiable or controlled in terms of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984). The Department therefore has no official programme for monitoring its occurrence and no tests are conducted on live animals. Listeria monocytogenes is ubiquitous, and it is usually found in soil, water, decaying vegetation, and many farm animals and other domestic and wild animals can harbour the bacterium. The organisms do not normally make animals sick. The listing of the disease is currently limited to human illnesses.

DAFF has introduced additional testing for Listeria on imported mechanically deboned meat (MDM) at the ports of entry.

The Department will however support any industry driven programmes provided it has a clear and scientific plan with the contingency measures outlined should a farm test positive.

(2) (a) what is considered to be a safe level of listeriosis on (i) live animals and (ii) animal products and (b) what standards are used in each case;

2 (a) (i) There is no limit for the amount of Listeria monocytogenes in live animals.

2 (a) (ii) There is no limit for the amount of listeria monocytogenes in raw meat.

(b) The standard used is the “Guidelines on the application of general principles of food hygiene to the control of Listeria Monocytogenes in foods (CAC/GL 61 – 2007)” issued by the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

The enumeration of listeria in food is limited to ready to eat (RTE) products (Processed meats in this case) and not live animals and raw non ready to eat products. It is generally assumed that non ready to eat products (including meat) will not be consumed raw and the cooking process with kill the listeria organism. Listeria is very liable to heat and is destroyed at temperatures around 600C.

The presence of listeria in raw meat at primary processing (abattoirs) and on farms is a process hygiene criteria. This means that its presence indicates inadequate hygiene and therefore the action to be taken is to institute intensive cleaning of the premises. This is different to a food safety criteria as in ready to eat products in which the presence of listeria must be responded to by withdrawal of the food from the food chain.

(3)       what (a) has been the economic impact of the latest listeriosis outbreak in the agricultural sector and (b) steps have been taken by his department to limit the potential job losses in this regard?                                                         

a) The economic impact of this disease has not been documented in South Africa, however the cost of eradicating the listeriosis would be “substantial”. This is particularly true if the source is water, an abattoir or food processing plant. The quarterly economic overview to be released around June is expected to reflect economic impact the disease had and continue to have in the country. This will be on a range of key economic variables, particularly domestic sales on related products and export sales. The bigger impact is that all the SADC countries (Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia and Botswana) who buy processed meat from South Africa have banned South African exports affecting the economic performance negatively. The impact on Tiger Brands and Rainbow Foods will be highly negative (as their share price has apparently gone down), including employment, level and pattern of consumption, production and so on. This will be reflected in the next Economic Overview analysis in June 2018, as most of these figures are not yet available.

b) The department has not taken direct steps to limit potential job losses as a result of listeriosis outbreak. However, the Department of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries (DAFF) has undertaken in collaboration with the Department of Health; the Department of Trade and Industry to address the outbreak of Listeriosis The outbreak and subsequent spreading of listeriosis contamination will likely not lead to short-term job losses, however, if they end up having to close the factory all together, that will have an impact on jobs.

09 May 2018 - NW971

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

How much land does (a) his department and (b) the entities reporting to him (i) own, (ii) have exclusive rights to and/or (iii) lease from the State to (aa) use and/or (bb) occupy?

Reply:

a) (i) The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) does not own land.

(ii) DAFF administers land on behalf of the Department of Public Works to preserve the land’s agricultural potential. The land administered are in all the 9 provinces.

GAUTENG - (6488.8419ha)

KWAZULU NATAL – (6794.6304ha)

MPUMALANGA – (4058.6147ha)

LIMPOPO – (3967.2156ha)

NORTHERN CAPE - (11715.7721ha)

EASTERN CAPE – (4415.2687ha)

NORTH WEST – (9788.393 ha)

FREE STATE – (6521.4947ha)

WESTERN CAPE - (19481.9748ha)

Each land has its size and all combined is 73232.1959 hectares for all the 9 provinces.

(iii) DAFF leases the properties mainly for agricultural activities such as livestock grazing and some for planting of crops.

(b) (i) The Agricultural Research Centre which is an entity reporting to the Minister for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries owns 16 755.5119 hectares.

(ii) The ARC has no exclusive rights on land.

(iii) The ARC does not lease land from the state.

09 May 2018 - NW1060

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) With regard to the undertaking to provide free sanitary pads to indigent school girls made during the state of the nation address on 9 February 2012, what is the total (a) number of free sanitary pads that have been distributed in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) since 9 February 2012 to date, (b)(i) number of schools where the free sanitary pads were distributed and (ii) of these schools, how many are (aa) primary and (bb) high schools and (c) amount that Government is paying for each pad; (2) what are the (a) reasons that the programme is only being rolled out in KZN and (b) timeframes for ensuring that the programme is rolled out in other provinces?

Reply:

The DBE does not provide sanitary towels to schools and neither has such provision been budgeted for. Education stakeholders and partners in the business sector are being lobbied to consider supporting this undertaking within their available means and resources. The Honourable Member is advised to request the information directly from the province concerned.

09 May 2018 - NW1306

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1)       What number of commercial agricultural farms (a) did South Africa have in 1994 and (b) does the country have currently; (2) has the total number of commercial farms declined; if so, what is the (a) cause of the decline and (b) average size of these commercial farms?

Reply:

1. a) South Africa had 57 980 farming units in 1993 as reported by Statistics South Africa in Census of Agriculture of 1993.

a) The current farming units is reported in Census of Agriculture of 2007 being 39 965 farming units.

Item

Year

 

2007 Census

2002 Survey

1993 Census

Farming Units

39 965

45 818

57 980

(2) The number of commercial farming units declined substantially from 1993 to 2007 by 31%.

a) The reasons why number of farms has decreased overtime are the following:

  • Agricultural production pre - 1994 was subsidised (prices received by farmers were guaranteed) and post – 1994 when subsidies fell away, a lot of smaller farming units could not survive as they were not ‘profitable’ any longer.
  • Smaller farms have been bought over by large commercial farms (consolidation), to improve economies of scale.
  • Urbanisation;
  • Large farms were been bought over by mining companies.

b) The question on the average size of a farm was asked in the Survey 2002 but there was poor response rate on the question because of the sensitive nature of the question. Poorly answered questions from both Census/Survey are not reported on because the results will be skewed.

08 May 2018 - NW1076

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1009 on 12 April 2018, (a) what amount of the provincial department’s budget is returned to it by schools who have teaching vacancies and therefore do not require the allocated teacher salary budget and (b) for each school, what (i) number of posts is vacant, (ii) number of learners are at the school and (iii) is the monetary value of the funding returned?

Reply:

a) The budget for teacher salaries or compensation is not allocated to individual schools. A basket of posts is determined at Provincial Education Department (PED) level and such posts are then distributed to schools through the post provisioning model. In the event of underspending, funds are returned to the provincial Treasury.

b) Vacancies at schools occur throughout the year due to natural attrition. Post Level 1 (PL1) vacancies are generally filled as soon as they occur. Promotional posts (Principal, Deputy Principal and Head of Department) are advertised in terms of the regulations and are filled as soon as practically possible, usually within 3-6 months. However, acting appointments are made as soon as vacancies occur.

(i) The Department does not routinely track every vacancy, but receives and reports on the total number of vacancies on a quarterly basis.

(ii) As indicated in (i) above, the Department does not track school level detail regarding vacancies.

(iii) As indicated in (a) above the budget for compensation of educators is not allocated to schools.

08 May 2018 - NW1075

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 164 on 28 February 2018, why has she referred the question to KwaZulu-Natal education department, given that the person referred to in the original question is located in the Eastern Cape, and wrote matric in the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

Referring the question to KwaZulu–Natal National Education Department was erroneous. The question was forwarded to the Eastern Cape Provincial Education Department, and the response has been received.

The candidate has been resulted by the Eastern Cape Education Department and the certificate has been printed by Umalusi, and couriered to the Alphendale Secondary School in East London.

08 May 2018 - NW1067

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) amount has been spent per annum over the past 10 years on teachers’ salaries as a percentage of her department’s operational spend and (b) is the percentage spend on each pupil per annum in the specified period?

Reply:

(a) The expenditure on Compensation of employees per annum for all Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) is reflected in the Table below, however this includes the compensation for the teachers as well as office based staff. The split per teachers and non-educators have been requested from the PEDs and will be provided as soon as received.

 

FINANCIAL YEARS

Compensation of Employees in R'Billion

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

69 710

84 006

99 253

109 854

122 138

129 856

139 178

146 253

153 193

164 869

177 514

Non Compensation of Employees costs in R'Billion

18 588

23 535

27 035

28 400

34 439

36 304

37 831

40 602

43 947

46 799

47 708

Percentage of compensation of Employees to total costs

79%

78%

79%

79%

78%

78%

78%

78%

78%

78%

79%

Source: DBE Annual Report.

(b) The Department of Basic Education has requested the information from all PEDs on the percentage spent on each pupil per annum over the past 10 years. The responses will be forwarded as soon as the DBE receives them.

08 May 2018 - NW433

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)whether the Isivivani Senior Secondary School in the Chris Hani District in the Eastern Cape has been earmarked for rationalisation; if not, on what date will this decision be communicated to the stakeholders of the school; if so, on what date will the rationalisation be implemented; (2) whether the specified school will be closed down; if so, (a) to which alternative school(s) will the learners be sent and (b) will (i) scholar transport and/or (ii) boarding facilities be provided to the learners affected by the school’s closure; if not, (3) whether the specified school will be merged; if so, (a) with which other school will the specified school be merged, (b) what is the address of the school with which the school will be merged and (c) will (i) scholar transport and/or (ii) boarding facilities be provided to the learners affected by the schools’ merger; (4) what are the details of all contractors appointed to (a) provide scholar transport to and/or (b) build boarding facilities for the affected learners?

Reply:

The matter falls within the competence and purview of the Eastern Cape and the Honourable member is urged to request the information through the Provincial legislature. However, the Department of Basic Education have requested the information from Eastern Cape Provincial Education Department (EC PED). The information will be forwarded as soon as received from EC PED.

08 May 2018 - NW1007

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools in each province do not have libraries and (b) what amount of funding is required to build libraries in all schools?

Reply:

PROVINCE

PRIMARY SCHOOLS

HIGH SCHOOLS

Eastern Cape

3 083

1 854

Free State

581

157

Gauteng

586

175

KwaZulu -Natal

3 001

1 393

Limpopo

2 384

1 198

Mpumalanga

1 041

344

North West

837

276

Northern Cape

244

129

Western Cape

257

20

Total

12 014

5 546

b) An estimated amount of R 28 billion is required to build libraries in all schools without libraries. It should however, be noted that some schools use corner libraries, mobile libraries, container libraries and community libraries. The above figures only refer to brick and mortar libraries.

08 May 2018 - NW1175

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the claiming of concessions from her department, what amount was (a) requested and (b) actually paid in the (i) 2016 and (ii) 2017 academic years for each school in the (aa) Edenvale, (bb) Tembisa and (cc) Kempton Park school districts?

Reply:

The response below was sourced from Gauteng Department of Education

(a)

(a) (i)

2016 academic year = R38 127 838.10

(aa) Edenvale- R13 903 691.86

(bb)Tembisa-0

(cc) Kempton Park-R24 224 146.24

(a) (ii)

2017 academic year = The schools will apply by the 30th June 2018 and payment is due on or before 15th November 2018. Therefore the amount can only be determined after the payment has been made

(b)

(b) (i)

2016 academic year = R594 190.01

(ii)(aa) Edenvile-R159 758.09

(ii)(bb) Tembisa-O

(iv)(cc) Kempton Park-R434 431.92

(b) (ii)

2017 academic year = The schools will apply by the 30th June 2018 and payment is due on or before 15th November 2018. Therefore the amount can only be determined after the payment has been made

08 May 2018 - NW1191

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of cases of (a) fraud and (b) theft committed by (i) educators and (ii) support staff have been reported in each district in each province (aa) in each of the past three academic years and (bb) since 1 January 2018?

Reply:

The question is relevant to the provincial administration since it is the responsibility of the employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act is the Head of the Provincial Education Department. The honourable member is encouraged to request the relevant information directly from the Provinces.

08 May 2018 - NW1195

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Social Development to question 884 on 10 April 2018, the Child Protection Register contains any names of individuals who were found to be unfit to work with children during disciplinary hearings; if not, why not; if so, what number of names appear on the register?

Reply:

The honourable member is encouraged to request the relevant information directly from the Department of Social Development.

08 May 2018 - NW995

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

How much land does (a) her department and (b) the entities reporting to her (i) own, (ii) have exclusive rights to and/or (iii) lease from the State to (aa) use and/or (bb) occupy?”

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD)

  1. The DSBD does not own any land;
  2. The DSBD does not have any exclusive rights to any land; and
  3. The Department also does not lease any land from the State:

(aa)&(bb) Not applicable since the Department does not own any land nor lease land.

  1. The Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA)
  2. SEDA does not own land;
  3. SEDA does not have any exclusive rights to any land; and
  4. SEDA does not lease from the State:

(aa)&(bb) Not applicable.

  1. The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA)
  2. 367 713 m²
  3. 367 713 m²
  4. 5 054 m² - North West Development Corporation SOC Ltd:

(aa) SEFA letting to SMMEs / tenants.

(bb) Occupied by tenants only.

08 May 2018 - NW1176

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 287 on 16 March 2017, has the Gauteng Department provided the information; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the Gauteng Department of Education has provided the requested information. Please find attached NA 287.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 287

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 24/02/2017

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2017

287. Mr M R Bara (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Has her department undertaken studies to determine the total number of children who live in the Greenstone residential area in Johannesburg, which borders Edenvale in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality; if not, (a) why not and (b) what informed the decision of her department not to build any schools in the specified area; if so, what are the details of the study? NW306E

Response

Yes, a study has been conducted. The study showed that schools around the area are populated by children from Tembisa, and Alexandra. Here are schools that cater for children from Tembisa and Alexandra:

a) Nobel Primary School – This school is about 2km away from the area in question and is populated by learners from Tembisa and Alexandra and these learners are transported privately by parents to schools;

Eastlyn Primary School - This school is also about 3km away from the area in question and is populated by learners from Tembisa and Alexandra and these learners are transported privately by parents to schools; and

Edenglen Primary School - This school is also about 3km away from the area in question and is populated by learners from Tembisa and Alexandra and these learners are transported privately by parents to schools.

b) The parents of the learners residing at Greenstone apparently are not interested in these public schools or have already been assisted with accommodation at other schools. Schools in this area are therefore capable of assisting the population of learners that may need space.

If additional schools are required, these should preferably be constructed in Tembisa and Alexandra.

08 May 2018 - NW1049

Profile picture: Dudley, Ms C

Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she (a) has been informed of the alleged irregularities taking place at Glenardle Junior Primary School in the district of Umlazi (details furnished) and (b) will investigate the matter?

Reply:

This matter has been referred to the Kwa-Zulu Department of Education for more information and a response will be furnished as soon as the Province has responded.

08 May 2018 - NW1093

Profile picture: Mente, Ms NV

Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of consulting firms or companies are currently contracted by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her and (b)(i) is the name of each consultant, (ii) are the relevant details of the service provided in each case and (iii) is the (aa) start date, (bb) time period, (cc) monetary value in Rands of each contract and (dd) name and position of each individual who signed off on each contract?

Reply:

(a)(i) There are no consulting firms or companies currently contracted by the Department.

SACE

(a)(ii)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)(aa)

(b)(iii)(bb)

(b)(iii)(cc)

(b)(iii)(dd)

1

SITA

Maintenance and hosting of IT Services

August 2015

3 years

R 987 541.12

Mr Morris Mapindani, Chief Financial Officer

1

Bradforce Security and Projects Developments

Security Services

August 2017

1 year

R 103 200

Mr Morris Mapindani, Chief Financial Officer

Umalusi

(a)(ii)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)(aa)

(b)(iii)(bb)

(b)(iii)(cc)

(b)(iii)(dd)

1

BIG Business Innovations Group

Internal Audit

1 April 2017

3 years

R 1 920 629.00

Dr MS Rakometsi, Chief Financial Officer

2

Nexis SAB&T

External Audit

1 April 2017

3 year

R 1 501 044.00

Dr MS Rakometsi, Chief Financial Officer

08 May 2018 - NW667

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Why does her department’s outstanding account with the Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality amounting to R11,4 million remain unpaid, (b) what is the reason for the arrears, (c) by what date will this account be settled in full and (d) what is the (i) amount owed by her department to each municipality in Limpopo and (ii) total amount of days in arrears of each amount owed?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has written a letter to Limpopo Provincial Education Department (PED) to request a response to the question raised above as DBE does not have the required information. The DBE will forward the response from the PED as soon as the information is received. It is suggested that the request be made through the Provincial Legislature in Limpopo.

07 May 2018 - NW147

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What are the (a) details and (b) levels of service providers and/or contractors from which (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her procured services in the past five financial years; (2) what (a) service was provided by each service provider and/or contractor and (b) amount was each service provider and/or contractor paid; (3) (a) what is the total number of service providers that are black-owned entities, (b) what contract was each of the black-owned entities awarded and (c) what amount was each black-owned entity paid

Reply:

All responses are based on information received from DPE Corporate Management, Alexkor, Denel, Eskom, SAFCOL, Transnet and SAX, respectively.

DPE:

The details of the service providers and /or contractors procured by the department in the past five years are provided in Annexure 1 (A to E).

ALEXKOR:

 

NAME OF CONTRACTOR    

RANK

SERVICE PROVIDER

AMOUNT PAID

(1)(b)

(1)(b)

(2)(a)

(2)(b)

1. RSV ENCO CONSULTING PTY LTD

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

CONSULTANTS

R 2 350 847.00

2. MYEZO ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

CONSULTANTS

R14 598 836.00

3. FINFIVE PLACEMENT

QUALIFYING SMALL ENTERPRISE (QSE)

CONSULTANTS

R 7 326 897.00

4. LITHA COMMUNICATIONS

 

QUALIFYING SMALL ENTERPRISE (QSE)

CONSULTANTS

R 1 116 170.00

5. MACNYONI DIGITAL (PTY) LTD

 

QUALIFYING SMALL ENTERPRISE (QSE)

CONSULTANTS

R     798 391.00

 

6. ARENKWE TRADING AND PROJECTS

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

 

CONSULTANTS

R    792 180.00

7. RICHTERSVELD ENVIRONMENTAL REHABILITATION COMP

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R    666 833.00

8. MAX SMEIMAN AND ASSOCIATES

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS(SCM)

R    572 400.00

9. FUGRO AIRBORNE SURVEYS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R    465 349.00

10. KIMOPAX

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     457 191.00

11. GEOVITTO (PTY) LTD

12.

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     425 288.00

13. MSOMIPUISANO

EXEMPT MICRO ENTERPRISE (EME)

CONSULTANTS

R     539 710.00

14. MADAUTSHA SOLUTIONS INC

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     351 600.00

15. GM DAVIES

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     273 883.00

16. LANDELAHNI BUSINESS LEADERS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     250 000.00

17. VBKOM CONSULTING ENGINEERS (PTY) LTD

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     238 801.00

18. TACTUS ADVISORY SERVICES

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     212 000.00

19. CONCEPT RISK SOUTIONS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R     174 692.00

20. MOMENTUM

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

CONSULTANTS

R   444 637.00

21. CARBONART

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R   111 035.00

22. MEK DRILLING

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R   109 550.00

23. GBB CONSULTING AND PROJECTS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R   100 000.00

24. WITHERS ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

 

 

CONSULTANTS

R   151 239.00

25. SITE PLAN CONSULTANTS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

CONSULTANTS

R  138 560.00

26.CRS TECHNOLOGIES PTY LTD

 

QUALIFYING SMALL ENTERPRISE (QSE)

CONSULTANTS

R   137 831.00

27. WEBBER WENTZEL ATTORNEYS

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

LEGAL SERVICES

R3 980 586.00

28. MESSINA INC

EXEMPT MICRO ENTERPRISE (EME)

LEGAL SERVICES

R1 103 507.00

29. KAPDI TWALA ATTORNEYS

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

LEGAL SERVICES

R1 555 148.00

30. MKHABELA HUNTLEY ADEKEYE INC

 

QUALIFYING SMALL ENTERPRISE (QSE)

LEGAL SERVICES

R  156 595.00

31. NINGIZA HORNER INC. ATTORNEYS

 

EXEMPT MICRO ENTERPRISE (EME)

LEGAL SERVICES

R  322 609.00

32. NCUBE INCORPORATED ATTORNEYS

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R   116 550.00

33. ARENKWE TRADINGAND PROJECTS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R    792 180.00

34. NORTON ROSE FULBRIGHT

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R  365 374.00

35. DUNCAN KORABIE ATTORNEYS

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R  892 212.00

36. LADY JUSTICE

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R  270 350.00

37. DUNCAN & ROTHMAN

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R  100 000.00

38. GEORGE WHITEHEAD ATTORNEYS& CONV

 

NO BEE CERTIFICATE

LEGAL SERVICES

R  289 503.00

39. OUTSOURCED RISK AND COMPLIANCE ASSESSMENT

 

QUALIFYING SMALL ENTERPRISE (QSE)

AUDIT SERVICES

R2 488 328.00

39NEXIA SAB & T

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

AUDIT SERVICES

R2 287 860.00

40.PRICEWATERHOUSE COOPERS

 

GENERIC SCORECARD

AUDIT SERVICES

R1 677 421.00

 

BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDERS

CONTRACT AWARDED TO BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDERS

HOW MUCH WAS EACH BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDER PAID

(3)(a)

(3)(b)

(3)(c)

CONSULTANTS

1. RSV ENCO CONSULTING PTY LTD

CONDUCT A DUE DILIGENCE STUDY ON A MINING COMPANY

R  2 350 847.00

2. MYEZO ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE

UPDATE OF REHABILITATION LIABILITY

R14 598 836.00

3. MACNYONI DIGITAL (PTY) LTD

IT SERVICES

R     798 391.00

 

4. MSOMIPUISANO

PRINTING/ IT SERVICES

R     366 610.00

5. LITHA COMMUNICATIONS

MARKETING SERVICES

R 1 116 170.00

AUDIT SERVICES

1. OUTSOURCED RISK AND COMPLIANCE ASSESSMENT

INTERNAL AUDIT SERVICES

R2 488 328.00

2. NEXIA SAB & T

 

EXTERNAL AUDIT SERVICES

R2 287 860.00

3. PRICEWATERHOUSE COOPERS

EXTERNAL AUDIT SERVICES

 

R1 677 421.00

LEGAL SERVICES

1. MESSINA INC

 

LEGAL SERVICES

R1 103 507.00

2. KAPDI TWALA ATTORNEYS

LEGAL SERVICES

R1 555 148.00

3. MKHABELA HUNTLEY ADEKEYE INC

 

LEGAL SERVICES

R  156 595.00

4. NINGIZA HORNER INC. ATTORNEYS

 

LEGAL SERVICES

R  322 609.00

5. NCUBE INCORPORATED ATTORNEYS

 

LEGAL SERVICES

R   116 550.00

 

DENEL:

 

NAME OF CONTRACTOR    

RANK

SERVICE PROVIDER

AMOUNT PAID

(1)(b)

(1)(b)

(2)(a)

(2)(b)

1. PRONEX ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT

QSE

 ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R 30 514 820.82

2. UMJIKELO RECRUITMENT SERVICES (PTY) LTD

EME

 RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 R 27 082 959.95

3. SAAB GRINTEK DEFENCE (PTY) LTD T/A SUPPORT AND SERVICES

Generic

ELECTRONIC

 R 25 290 943.55

4. INNOWORXX MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD

EME

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 R 24 761 429.78

5. QMUZIK TECHNOLOGIES (PTY) LTD

Generic

STANDARD SOFTWARE

 R23 632 834.33

6. BOKAMOSO ASSET MANAGEMENT T/A AIH

QSE

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 19 167 836.99

7.DYNAMIC INSIGHT (PTY) LTD

EME

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 R19 089 799.06

8.NGENA DESIGN SPACE (PTY) LTD

QSE

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R 15 141 990.57

9.SIZWE NTSALUBA GOBODO INC.

Generic

 AUDITING/CONSULTING SERVICES

 R13 857 096.06

10.Cernofon CC

 

EME

 

 TECHNICAL ADVISORS

 

 R11 271 473.71

 

11.DELOITTE & TOUCHE

Generic

 AUDITING/CONSULTING SERVICES

 R   7 865 560.68

12.VERILINE (PTY) LTD

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R   7 023 682.00

13. PRODUCT ONE SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD

Generic

ENGINEERING SOFTWARE LICENSES

 R   6 682 350.07

14.TRINERGY BUSINESS SOLUTIONS                                  

QSE

SAP Consultant

R 6 174 720.00

15. STORM TECHNOLOGIES (PTY) LTD

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R 6 082 196.50

16. HIGHVELD PFS

Generic

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 R    5 290 190.50

17. LUFTHANSA CONSULTING GMBH

 QSE

SARA MARKET STUDY (RFT15-004) BY LUFTHANSA CONSULTING.  PAYM

 R 5 010 428.00

18.ARIOGENIX (PTY) LTD

QSE

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R   4 759 908.48

19.DESERT WOLF CONSULTING LTD

QSE

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 

 R4 635 498.91

20.ATTERBURY BIRD AND ANIMAL CLINIC CC

EME

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R  4 335 584.17

21. APULUM SYSTEMS AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R  4 305 068.00

22.LESIBA DESIGN SERVICES

EME

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 R 4 278 484.00

23. ONISTEP (Pty) Ltd  T/A

QSE

AGENCY PERSONNEL

 R4 234 586.92

 

24. DUOTRONIC SYSTEMS

QSE

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 4 005 250.00

25. RAND MUTUAL ASSURANCE COMPANY

Generic

 INSURANCE EMPLOYER EMPLOYEE

 R3 624 504.32

26. CNC JARRARD LOGISTIC AND GENERAL ENTERPRISE CC

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R3 484 368.95

27. ERGONOMICS TECHNOLOGIES, A DIVISION OF ARMSCOR DEFENCE INSTITUTES

Generic

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R3 375 619.64

28.JAMES KEMP LOGISTICS

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R 3 350 894.00

30.ORESTIZEST (PTY) LTD T/A INGALEC

EME

 ENGINEERING SOFTWARE LICENSES

 R  3 201 814.05

31.KWINANA & ASSOCIATES

QSE

 FINANCIAL SERVICES

 R 3 041 166.00

32. EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS

Generic

 RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 R  3 001 873.84

33. PRODIMEN RESEARCH CONSULTANTS

EME

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERVICES

 R 2 991 880.00

34.WALOG TRAINING DEVELOPMENT

EME

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 2 523 024.34

35.OPTILOG (Pty) Ltd

 QSE

 ERP & LOGISTIC SUPPORT

 R 2 518 458.32

36. EOH HOLDINGS                                   

Generic

SAP Consultant

 R 2 278 062.75

37. CSIR

LRG

 RESEARCH

 R2 200 505.09

38. LERUMO

LRG

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R  2 114 704.02

39. ALTECH MULTIMEDIA INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD

LRG

 ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R 1 898 319.00

40. GO2 TECHNOLOGIES (Pty) Ltd

EME

ERP SUPPORT

 R  1 626 900.00

41. ESTEQ DESIGN (PTY) LTD

QSE

 ENGINEERING SOFTWARE LICENSES

 R  1 336 955.18

42. TR MOORE

QSE

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY CONSULTANTS

 R 1 294 000.00

43. NUVICOM CC

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R 1 157 468.00

44. SATRENO CONSULTING (PTY) LTD                          

Generic

SAP Consultant

 R 1 072 000.00

45. IBM SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD

LRG

 ENGINEERING SOFTWARE LICENSES

 R  823 799.62

46. INDABA TRADING (PTY) LTD

EME

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R    803 265.35

47. HYDRO-POL FARMING CC

EME

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

 R  704 350.00

48. ELECTRONIC DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT

EME

STANDARD SOFTWARE

 R 667 125.00

49. RTSS CONSULTANTS CC

EME

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R  665 390.00

50. EON CONSULTING (PTY) LTD

Generic

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

 

 R 656 040.00

51. Technopark Personnel Group T/A

Generic

 RECRUITING

 R  608 966.23

52.DR. B MOODLEY

EME

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R  596 603.05

53. STRUCTURAL TESTING AND ENVIRONMENTAL SIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES

EME

ENGINEERING SOFTWARE LICENSES

 R 595 500.00

54. LJM Oosthuizen  CA (SA)

EME

 AUDITING SERVICES

 R591 562.50

55. ADAMS AND  ADAMS

Generic

LEGAL SERVICES

 R 554 449.37

56.GEOGRAFIESE,ELEKTRONIESE& OPTIESE STELSELS (EDMS) BPK

EME

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 534 289.36

57.ITGO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (PTY) LTD

EME

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 517 648.33

58.ARCO –IRIS WORKERS

EME

 SERVICE BROKER

 R   504 196.37

 

 

 

BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDERS

CONTRACT AWARDED TO BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDERS

HOW MUCH WAS EACH BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDER PAID

(3)(a)

(3)(b)

(3)(c)

1. UMJIKELO RECRUITMENT SERVICES (PTY) LTD

 RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

R27 082 959.95

2. INNOWORXX MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

R24 761 429.78

3. BOKAMOSO ASSET MANAGEMENT T/A AIH

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

R19 167 836.99

4. DYNAMIC INSIGHT (PTY) LTD

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

R19 089 799.06

5. SIZWE NTSALUBA GOBODO INC.

AUDITING SERVICES/CONSULTING

R13 857 096.06

6. Cernofon CC

TECHNICAL ADVISORS

R11 271 473.71

7. TRINERGY BUSINESS SOLUTIONS

SAP CONSULTANT

R6 174 702.00

8. ARIOGENIX (PTY) LTD

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

R4 759 908.48

9.LESIBA DESIGN SERVICES

RECRUITMENT PLACEMENT AGENCIES

R4 278 484.00

10. ONISTEP (Pty) Ltd  T/A

 AGENCY PERSONNEL

R4 234 586.92

11.ORESTIZEST (PTY) LTD T/A INGALEC

 ENGINEERING SOFTWARE LICENSES

R3 201 814.05

12. KWINANA AND ASSOCIATES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

R3 041 166.00

13. OPTILOG PTY LTD

 ERP AND LOGISTICS SUPPORT

R2 518 458.32

14. ALTECH MULTIMEDIA INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD

 ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

R1 898 319.00

15. INDABA TRADING (PTY) LTD

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R  803 265.35

16. DR. B MOODLEY

 OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 596 603.05

17. ITGO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (PTY) LTD

OTHER CONSULTING SERVICES

 R 517 648.33

18. ARCO –IRIS WORKERS

 SERVICE BROKER

 R 504 196.37

 

 

 

SAFCOL :

 

SAFCOL has more than 3000 suppliers that it conducts business with. The Information Technology system that SAFCOL utilises cannot provide the information in the format that it has been requested.

 

Given the limited timeframe provided to respond to Parliamentary Questions, it was not possible to manually arrange the information in the required format and still meet the deadline. In that regard only information relating to the procurement of Professional services is provided. The completeness of this list cannot be guaranteed due to the limited timeframe and level of effort required to reconcile the information.

 

SAFCOL has interpreted “Ranks” to mean BBBEE Level of service provider. “Black Owned” companies are companies that have more than 50% black ownership.

   

 

 

 

 

SAFCOL :

 

SAFCOL has more than 3000 suppliers that it conducts business with. The Information Technology system that SAFCOL utilises cannot provide the information in the format that it has been requested.

 

Given the limited timeframe provided to respond to Parliamentary Questions, it was not possible to manually arrange the information in the required format and still meet the deadline. In that regard only information relating to the procurement of Professional services is provided. The completeness of this list cannot be guaranteed due to the limited timeframe and level of effort required to reconcile the information.

 

SAFCOL has interpreted “Ranks” to mean BBBEE Level of service provider. “Black Owned” companies are companies that have more than 50% black ownership.

 

 

NAME OF CONTRACTOR    

RANK

SERVICE PROVIDER

AMOUNT PAID

(1)(b)

(1)(b)

(2)(a)

(2)(b)

CSIR

Level 1

Professional Services

 R             437,323.14

Quality Engineering CM Erasmus

Level 4

Professional Services

 R             348,900.99

SGS South Africa (Pty)Ltd

Level 6

Professional Services

 R         1,096,720.52

Indigo Kulani Group (Pty) Ltd

Level 1

Professional Services

 R             673,697.25

Phakama Consulting (PhakamaTrdg Ent.t/a)

Level 1

Professional Services

 R             896,204.25

Malambule Business Consulting Pty Ltd

Level 1

Professional Services

 R               12,420.00

Work Dynamics Pty Ltd

Level 2

Professional Services

 R             133,665.00

Economistscosa

Level 4

Professional Services

 R             826,500.00

Crickmay & Associates (Pty)Ltd

Level 1

Professional Services

 R             417,643.76

Entsika Consulting Services (Pty) Ltd

Level 1

Professional Services

 R             535,580.33

Ladz Trading CC

Level 3

Professional Services

 R             888,316.04

Productivity SA

Level 5

Professional Services

 R             208,663.64

Analytical Risk Management(2RM Security)

Level 3

Audit Services

 R       12,368,311.56

Auditor General of South Africa

Level 3

Audit Services

 R       21,551,905.70

Deloitte

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         2,946,248.50

Grant  Thornton PS Advisory

Level 2

Audit Services

 R             958,273.38

KPMG

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         1,745,767.09

Manuel & Ass Corp Forensic Prac Pty Ltd

Level 1

Audit Services

 R             309,045.93

Mazars JHB

Level 2

Audit Services

 R             408,716.76

Nexus Forensic Services (Pty)Ltd

Level 2

Audit Services

 R               98,325.00

Ngubane and Company

Level 3

Audit Services

 R             383,922.00

Nkonki Incorporated

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         1,358,553.93

Phandahanu Forensics

Level 2

Audit Services

 R             236,870.63

Price Waterhouse Coopers

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         2,892,050.07

Qhubeka Forensic Services (PTY) LTD

Level 2

Audit Services

 R             233,034.90

SAB And T Chartered Accountants(Nexia)

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         2,214,997.20

Sekelaxabiso Pty Ltd

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         2,249,996.97

SizweNtsaluboGobodo

Level 2

Audit Services

 R         1,200,544.26

NOSA (Pty) Ltd

Level 6

Audit Services

 R         1,772,426.36

Alexander Forbes Risk Services(Pty)Ltd

Level 2

Risk Services

 R               89,490.00

Working on Fire ( Commercial)

Level 2

Risk Services

 R             327,758.83

G I B Insurance Brokers (Pty)Ltd

Level 3

Risk Services

 R       11,920,686.70

Credit Guarantee

Level 3

Risk Services

 R       20,309,282.75

Gildenhuys Lessing Malatji Attorneys

Level 2

Legal Services

 R             269,864.56

Morajane du Plessis Attorneys

Level 4

Legal Services

 R         8,973,695.70

Roestoff and Kruse Attorneys

Level 4

Legal Services

 R         4,510,033.46

Werksmans Inc t/a Werksmans Attorneys

Level 3

Legal Services

 R         5,461,422.76

Masephule Dinga  Inc Commercial

Level 1

Legal Services

 R               46,891.79

Motalane Kgariya Incorporate

Level 3

Legal Services

 R         1,442,819.61

Sekati Monyane Attorneys

Level 1

Legal Services

 R               82,453.48

Paul Lundie & Associates CC

Level 4

Legal Services

 R               70,169.96

PJ Strydom t/a Strydom Attorneys

Level 4

Legal Services

 R             334,122.06

Luleka and Associates

Level 3

Legal Services

 R             311,256.00

Imbewu Sustainability Legal Specialists

Level 4

Legal Services

 R                  2,508.00

Dentons S.A t/a KapdiTwala Inc

Level 1

Legal Services

 R         1,016,375.27

           

 

BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDERS

CONTRACT AWARDED TO BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDERS

HOW MUCH WAS EACH BLACK-OWNED SERVICE PROVIDER PAID

(3)(a)

(3)(b)

(3)(c)

Gildenhuys Lessing Malatji Attorneys

 R             269,864.56

 R               269,864.56

Dentons S.A t/a KapdiTwala Inc

 R         1,016,375.27

 R            1,016,375.27

Luleka and Associates

 R             311,256.00

 R               311,256.00

Sekati Monyane Attorneys

 R               82,453.48

 R                 82,453.48

Motalane Kgariya Incorporate

 R         1,442,819.61

 R            1,442,819.61

Masephule Dinga  Inc Commercial

 R               46,891.79

 R                 46,891.79

Analytical Risk Management(2RM Security)

 R       12,368,311.56

 R         12,368,311.56

Grant  Thornton PS Advisory

 R             958,273.38

 R               958,273.38

Manuel & Ass Corp Forensic Prac Pty Ltd

 R             309,045.93

 R               309,045.93

Nexus Forensic Services (Pty)Ltd

 R               98,325.00

 R                 98,325.00

Ngubane and Company

 R             383,922.00

 R               383,922.00

Nkonki Incorporated

 R         1,358,553.93

 R            1,358,553.93

Phandahanu Forensics

 R             236,870.63

 R               236,870.63

Qhubeka Forensic Services (PTY) LTD

 R             233,034.90

 R               233,034.90

SAB And T Chartered Accountants(Nexia)

 R         2,214,997.20

 R            2,214,997.20

Sekelaxabiso Pty Ltd

 R         2,249,996.97

 R            2,249,996.97

SizweNtsaluboGobodo

 R         1,200,544.26

 R            1,200,544.26

Indigo Kulani Group (Pty) Ltd

 R             673,697.25

 R               673,697.25

Phakama Consulting (PhakamaTrdg Ent.t/a)

 R             896,204.25

 R               896,204.25

Malambule Business Consulting Pty Ltd

 R               12,420.00

 R                 12,420.00

Work Dynamics Pty Ltd

 R             133,665.00

 R               133,665.00

Entsika Consulting Services (Pty) Ltd

 R             535,580.33

 R               535,580.33

Ladz Trading CC

 R             888,316.04

 R               888,316.04

Productivity SA

 R             208,663.64

 R               208,663.64

CSIR

 R             437,323.14

 R               487,703.84

 

SAX:

This response is according to information received from the SA Express:

 

 

YEAR

TOTAL SPEND

TOTAL NUMBER

OF SUPPLIERS

B-BBEE

SUPPLIERS

LOCAL SPEND

NAME OF SERVICES

2013/2014

2,062,586,980.84

628

36

1,867,276,356.33

2014/2015

2,019,911,792.59

659

42

1,789,492,764.35

2015/2016

1,747,753,818.40

796

45

1,439,018,753.73

2016/2017

1,986,919,423.53

881

65

1,715,839,804.12

2017/2018

1,694,480,063.76

891

48

1,511,549,760.23

Active suppliers

500

SA Express procures

various goods and

servicesfrom different

suppliers

 

ESKOM:

(1)(b)

Annexure 2A provides details including rank of Eskom suppliers in the past five financial years

(2)(a)

SAP standard reporting provides contract information at line item level including the description of the specific line item.  The detail contract scope of work for the material or service procured needs to be extracted individually for each contract.  We currently have more than 29 300 contracts and therefore consolidation of this information will take 6 months to conclude.   Further we request clarity on whether details of each of the 29 300 contract is indeed required.

 

(2)(b)

Annexure 2A provides actual amounts paid to each supplier in the past five years, excluding VAT.  The figures with negative values indicate returns by the suppliers for various reasons, e.g. reversals; credit note; insurance claims, etc.

 

(3)(a)

Over the past five year, and average of 2299 black owned suppliers per year were paid by Eskom, totalling to R 169.6 billion actual spend.

 

(3)(b)

See (2)(a) above

 

(3)(c)

Annexure 2B provides the actual amount paid to each black-owned supplier in the past five years, excluding VAT.  The figures with negative values indicate returns by the suppliers for various reasons, e.g. reversals; credit note; insurance claims, etc.

07 May 2018 - NW1294

Profile picture: Mente, Ms NV

Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of contracts of the Health Professions Council of South Africa have been awarded to a certain company (name furnished) since 1 January 2010, (b) on what date was each contract awarded, (c) what was the total monetary value of each contract and (d) who signed off on the contract?

Reply:

According to the Health Professions Council,

(a) A total of 10 Contracts were awarded to Kaebetswe Business Enterprise;

(b) Please refer to the table below for dates of contracts

(c) Please refer to the table below for the monetary value of each Contract

(d) The work was commissioned through sourcing of quotations not contracts. The requisitions were made by the then Manager: Facilities Management, Ms Olivia Fisher and was approved by the then Senior Manager Finance, Mr Tshepo Tefo.

Transaction Date

Invoice Number

Payment Number

Voucher Number

Transaction Amount

14-Feb-12

177

8806

32672

R3 857,76

24-Feb-12

178

8898

32731

R1 956,24

01-Oct-12

270

12464

42044

R28 464,66

05-Oct-12

278

12523

42062

R13 450,86

   

12563

16160

R13 450,86

26-Oct-12

280

13088

43374

R1 539,00

05-Nov-12

284

13084

43206

R14 852,38

06-Nov-12

285

13088

43375

R1 584,60

12-Dec-12

480

14402

48831

R1 539,00

27-Mar-13

482

15266

51362

R35 002,56

25-Nov-13

106

20515

65558

R52 177,80

TOTAL

R167 875,72

END.

07 May 2018 - NW563

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the (i) name, (ii) location and (iii) patient capacity of each (aa) clinic, (bb) hospital and (cc) other public health facility that does not have medical waste removal and (b) what is the reason for this in each case?

Reply:

(a) There is no public health facility that does not have medical waste removal. All public healthcare facilities in the Nine Provinces have appointed healthcare risk waste management contractors.

(b) Not applicable.

END.

07 May 2018 - NW1298

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What were the recommendations of the 2015 Report of the Ministerial Task Team to Investigate Allegations of Administrative Irregularities, Mismanagement and Poor Governance at the Health Professions Council of South Africa, (b) what number of the specified recommendations (i) have been carried out, (ii) have not been carried out and (iii) are in the process of being carried out and (c) why were no steps taken with regard to the recommendations which were not carried out?

Reply:

(a) The recommendations were as follows:

(1) To institute disciplinary and incapacity proceedings against the Registrar/CEO, COO and General Manager of Legal Services;

(2) To appoint an interim executive management team;

(3) That the incoming and future Councils of the HPCSA should undergo a structured induction process to ensure an understanding and appreciation by all its members of their legal and governance obligations;

(4) To address the recommendations of the KPMG Forensic Report of November 2011; and

(5) To institute a full organisational review and a proposal for a new governance and administrative structures for the future.

(b) (i) 4 out of 5 have been carried out and finalised, namely –

To institute disciplinary and incapacity proceedings against the Registrar/CEO, COO and General Manager of Legal Services –

Amicable settlement agreements were reached with the previous Registrar/CEO and COO. The settlement was done according to the legal advice the Council obtained.

To appoint an interim executive management team

Council had resolved that should the need arise to fill a vacuum within the Executive Management team, Council would attend to the appointments in line with the Act and the prescribed policies of Council.

All critical vacant senior management positions were filled with a diverse team that was able to ensure that the HPCSA upholds its mandate of protecting the public and guiding the professions.

That the incoming and future Councils of the HPCSA should undergo a structured induction process to ensure an understanding and appreciation by all its members of their legal and governance obligations;

The Council noted the recommendations and the inductions did occur and training was provided. Training of the Council and its structure are ongoing as detailed in the Council’s Annual Performance Plans.

See Council’s mid terms performance report attached under Annexure G1. As well as Councils Annual Performance Plan for 18/19 under Annexure G2.

To address the recommendations of the KPMG Forensic Report of November 2011

The Council reviewed the KPMG reports and its recommendations and resolved as follows –

1. Recommendation One: Waymark Contract

Extract from KPMG Report –

“Although the Waymark contract provides for the rectification of errors by Waymark at their own cost, provided that the HPCSA informs Waymark of such faulty execution to the remedied, this course of action was not taken by the HPCSA.

We strongly recommend that the HPCSA obtain an independent legal opinion with regards to possible recourse in respect of the Waymark contract to remedy the ERS implementation issues.”.

Action by the previous Council

(i) The matter was referred to legal counsel (i.e. Bowman Gilfillan) in 2012/2013.

(ii) Further to the opinion, Bowman Gilfillan advised that it would be necessary to interview Adv B Mkhize, the former Registrar/CEO. Unfortunately the previous Council went out of office before doing so because Adv Mkhize is no longer an employee of the Council.

Action by current Council

Council RESOLVED that the matter be closed due to effluxion of time and prescription having set in.

2. Recommendation Two: Delegation of Authority

Extract from KPMG Report –

“Although the Delegation of Authority provides for various levels of authority for Senior Managers, the COO and the CEO, it places no limit on the amounts that EXCO could approve. Good governance suggests that the mandate, responsibilities and levels of authority of the EXCO be well-defined.

We recommend that the HPCSA review and revise its Delegation of Authority to provide more specific levels of authority to EXCO and indicate instances that may require referral to Council for consideration and approval.”.

Action by previous Council

(i) The recommendation was noted and Management and the Human Resources and Remuneration Committee of Council in 2013 commenced with the revision of the Delegation of Authority (DOA) document, which was last reviewed in 2009;

(ii) The DOA served at the Council workshop in March 2015 and again in June 2015. Council resolved that the DOA be revised to incorporate all of the Council’s inputs and same will be tabled to the newly appointed Human Resources and Remuneration Committee of Council for final review prior to submission to Council for approval;

(iii) The Finance and Investment Committee of Council also ensured that the newly approved Supply Chain Management policy clearly defines the limit delegation of Council and Management

Action by current Council

Council noted the work undertaken by the previous Council and the resolved that the Delegations of Authority document would be considered and approved by the relevant Council structures;

The Delegations of Authority was approved by Council at its 3rd Ordinary Meeting held in September 2016 and is being implemented across all structures of Council.

3. Recommendation Three: Possible Disciplinary Action

Extract from KPMG Report –

“The appointment of at least two consulting firms, namely BPLC and Kakanyo, were not done in accordance with the HPCSA’s procurement policies and procedures. Furthermore, certain expenses paid to service providers could potentially have been avoided, had the Registrar acted in the best interest of the HPCSA by demanding that Waymark rectify the implementation problems at their own cost. In addition, a number of payments to Kakanyo were approved without the proposals having been appropriately approved in terms of the HPCSA’s procurement policies and procedures.

We recommend that the HPCSA considers whether there are sufficient grounds to institute disciplinary action against the following officials for non-compliance with the HPCSA’s procurement policies and procedures and possible failure to act in the best interest of the HPCSA:

Ms O’Reilly;

Adv Boikanyo; and

Mr Mphahlele.

More in-depth investigations may be required into the matters referred to above in order to prepare specific reports and supporting evidence that could be used during a disciplinary hearing, if necessary.”.

Action by previous Council: MMC O’ Reilly

(i) The matter was considered by Council in December 2011 and Council resolved to institute disciplinary action against Ms O’Reilly. The matter was further handled through the office of the President and Legal Counsel: Mponyana Ledwaba Inc.

(ii) The matter was closed.

Action by previous Council: Adv Boikanyo & Mr S Mphahlele

(i) The matter was considered by Council in December 2011 and no action was taken.

(ii) The Matter was reconsidered by Council and in February 2013, the Registrar/ CEO, Dr Mjamba-Matshoba, addressed correspondence to Adv Boikanyo and Mr Mphahlele requesting them to provide explanations for the alleged non-compliance.

(iii) Both parties provided a response to the Registrar/CEO and the matter was closed in line with the Disciplinary Code of Council.

Action by Current Council

In reference to Adv T Boikanyo and Mr S Mphahlele, Council resolved that the matter be closed as the explanations provided by the employees were considered and accepted therefore re-opening the matter would be tantamount to double jeopardy and contrary to law.

4. Recommendation Four: Compliance with the HPCSA’s policies and procedures

Extract from KPMG Report –

“We recommend that the HPCSA communicates its policies and procedures to its staff on a regular basis, through, for example, annual declarations in which the staff acknowledge that they are familiar with the contents of such policies and procedures. This will ensure compliance therewith to avoid the recurrence of, inter alia, the following:

  • That a contract, used by another government department, was used as the basis for concluding a contract with a service provider; and
  • That the contract was signed without it having been reviewed by the HPCSA’s Legal Department.”.

Action by previous Council

(i) The recommendation was noted and Management in 2012 introduced a process for contract review and developed a contract document control sheet which details the relevant line managers that needs to sign off and approve the contract prior to final sign off.

(ii) The contracts are then housed with the Senior Manager Legal Services and the Office of the Registrar.

Action by current Council

Council noted the mechanisms implemented by Council and resolved that it be monitored accordingly.

(b) (ii) None

(iii) Recommendation number 5. Full organizational review and submit proposals to the Minister for the reform of the administrative and governance structures of the health professions”

In executing the MTT recommendation No. 5, Council embarked on a Turnaround Strategy, to enhance our effectiveness and efficiencies through streamlined services.

Thus, for the past 12 months, Council has been moving towards building a new organisation that will be reputable for its innovation, professionalism and excellence in service delivery.

The Turnaround Strategy has focussed on five key workstreams that are critical to achieving the above-mentioned objective, namely: Vision & Design (Operating Model design), Business Process Re-engineering, Structure & People (Organisational Design), IT and Governance.

Benefits from the Turnaround Strategy are already being realised by HPCSA and their customers through the reduction of turnaround times in the Registration Department and the elimination of backlog practitioner registration applications. Implementation of additional Quick-Wins are underway. A Complaints Handling Unit within Ethics & Professional Conduct is being piloted with the objective of reducing the turnaround time and accuracy of the initial perusal of complaints received by the HPCSA. A complaints backlog reduction plan is also being developed for immediate implementation. Analysis on HPCSA’s governance structure is still underway.

Council at its 9th Ordinary meeting in March 2018, tasked Fever Tree Consulting and Secretariat to embark on a consultative process with all the relevant structures of Council and submit a comprehensive report in the subsequent meetings of Council inclusive of the following:

    1. Revised Terms of Reference for all Committees of Council including the proposed Inter-Board Committee of Council
    2. Terms of Reference for the Proposed Committees of the Professional Boards including the Joint Standing Committee/s of Professional Boards
    3. New Delegations of Authority
    4. A clear framework on the functioning of Council, Professional Boards and Secretariat in view of the Proposed Committees of Council & Professional Boards, the New Functional/Organizational Design and the New Delegations of Powers/Duties.
    5. The rationale behind the proposed new committee structures of Council and Professional Boards

Other Issues in MTT Report: Council further resolved that all the Professional Board incidents that form part of the report was reviewed and addressed as a matter of urgency. This was done in consultation with the relevant constituencies (e.g. Professional Boards and its committees).

(c) Not Applicable

END.

07 May 2018 - NW482

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What quantity of coal has Eskom stockpiled on average at each of its coal-fired power stations and (b) has the coal been paid for?

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been forward to Eskom and the Ministry of Public Enterprises awaits their urgent response. Further information will be conveyed to Parliament as soon as the response is received.

07 May 2018 - NW1291

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of persons who are on the waiting list for surgery in each hospital in the Western Cape, (b) what are the reasons that each person requires surgery, (c) what is the name of each hospital they are going to have the surgery at, (d) on what date was each individual added to the waiting list and (e) by what date is each individual expected to have the surgery in each specified hospital in the Western Cape?

Reply:

(a)-(e) Honourable Member the National Department of Health does not collate this level of detailed patient level data pertaining to waiting list for surgery. Each surgical ward in a hospital has this data which is never static or stable at any one time, but is used for clinical management of patients.

There is no standardised way which the National Department can use to compile such data at national level.

This is because the criterion used to place anybody on a waiting list is too complex and very fluid to be able to compile sensible data.

Criteria for waiting lists depend on a multiplicity of complex factors like clinical evaluation, availability of beds, prioritization of some patients over others depending on their clinical conditions. Patients conditions may change within a matter of hours and this may render the list irrelevant.

Hence the list is better kept ward per ward with all these changes that may happen day per day or even hour per hour.

This problem is faced by many health authorities internationally.

END.

07 May 2018 - NW1109

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Works

What (a) number of consulting firms or companies are currently contracted by (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him and (b)(i) is the name of each consultant, (ii) are the relevant details of the service provided in each case and (iii) is the (aa) start date, (bb) time period, (cc) monetary value in Rands of each contract and (dd) name and position of each individual who signed off on each contract?

Reply:

For the National Department of Public Works:

(a) (i), (ii), (iii), (aa), (bb), (cc) and (cc) refer to Annexures A1 and A2

For the Entities reporting to the Minister of Public Works:

(b) (i), (ii), (iii), (aa), (bb), (cc) and (dd) on behalf of the Entities reporting to the Department of Public Works, see attached responses as follows:

Annexure B 1: Agrément South Africa (ASA);

Annexure B 2: Council of the Built Environment (CBE);

Annexure B 3: Construction Industry Development Board and

Annexure B 4: Independent Development Trust

07 May 2018 - NW329

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What amount did (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her spend on the promotion or celebration of the Year of O R Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017?

Reply:

Responses are based on information received from DPE Corporate Management, Eskom, SAX, Transnet, respectively.

DPE:

(a)

There was no spending by the department on promotion or celebration of the year of OR Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017.

ESKOM:

(b)

There was no spending by Eskom on promotion or celebration of the year of OR Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017.

SAX:

There was no spending by South African Express on promotion or celebration of the year of OR Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017.

TRANSNET:

There was no spending by Transnet on promotion or celebration of the year of OR Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017.

Alexkor, Denel, Safcol responses not received.

07 May 2018 - NW624

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Health

1. What is the (a) total number of posts of each specified profession (details furnished) that are (i) filled and (ii) vacant in the Frances Baard District Municipality in Northern Cape and (b)(i) (aa) name and (bb) location of each institution and (ii)(aa) duration of each vacancy and (bb) date by which each vacancy is envisaged to be filled?

Reply:

Count of Prov/Dept

Frances Baard District Municipality 

 

DENTIST

DENTIST Total

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER Total

MEDICAL OFFICER

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

MEDICAL SPECIALIST

MEDICAL SPECIALIST Total

NURSE

NURSE Total

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST Total

PHARMACIST

PHARMACIST Total

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

PHYSIOTHERAPIST Total

PSYCHOLOGIST

PSYCHOLOGIST Total

Grand Total

Row Labels

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

   

FRANCES BAARD

11

11

7

7

33

33

2

2

248

248

11

11

17

17

11

11

4

4

344

CLINIC

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

111

111

1

1

 

 

2

2

 

 

116

BEACONSFIELD CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

1

1

 

 

1

1

 

 

8

BETTY GAETSEWE CLINIC

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

CITY CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

10

DE BEERSHOOGTE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

DR TORRES CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

FLORIANVILLE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

FRANCES BAARD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

GANSPAN CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

GREENPOINT CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

HARTSWATER CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

IKHUTSENG CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

JAN KEMPDORP CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

LONGLANDS CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

MADOYLE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

MAPULE MATSEPANE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

MASAKHANE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

MATALENG CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

MOTHIBI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

PHOLONG CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

PHUTHANANG CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

PLATFONTEIN CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

RITCHIE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

WARRENVALE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

WINDSORTON CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

4

4

 

 

6

6

 

 

47

47

2

2

9

9

 

 

2

2

70

GALESHEWE CHC

3

3

 

 

5

5

 

 

31

31

2

2

9

9

 

 

2

2

52

PAMPIERSTAD CHC

1

1

 

 

1

1

 

 

16

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

DIRECTORATE

 

 

1

1

 

 

1

1

6

6

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

9

FRANCES BAARD

 

 

1

1

 

 

1

1

6

6

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

9

DISTRICT HOSPITAL

4

4

3

3

23

23

1

1

81

81

7

7

8

8

8

8

1

1

136

BARKLY WEST HOSPITAL

4

4

 

 

8

8

1

1

30

30

3

3

3

3

6

6

1

1

56

HARTSWATER HOSPITAL

 

 

1

1

6

6

 

 

27

27

2

2

3

3

2

2

 

 

41

JAN KEMPDORP HOSPITAL

 

 

2

2

3

3

 

 

12

12

1

1

2

2

 

 

 

 

20

WARRENTON HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

12

12

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

DIVISION

 

 

1

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

FRANCES BAARD

 

 

1

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

JAN KEMPDORP MOBILE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

SUB DIVISION

1

1

2

2

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

7

FRANCES BAARD

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

FRANCES BAARD

1

1

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

4

Grand Total

11

11

7

7

33

33

2

2

248

248

11

11

17

17

11

11

4

4

344

07 May 2018 - NW1292

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to the recommendation of the 2015 Report of the Ministerial Task Team to Investigate Allegations of Administrative Irregularities, Mismanagement and Poor Governance at the Health Professions Council of South Africa(HPCSA), a certain person (name furnished) was subjected to disciplinary and incapacity proceedings by the HPCSA; if not, (a) why not and (b) has he found it to be in the interest of the HPCSA for the specified person to remain part of the organisation, in particular as part of its senior management and acting as the registrar; if so, what was the outcome of the disciplinary and incapacity proceedings against the person?

Reply:

In terms of the General Manager Legal Services, Adv P Khumalo: The Council, in considering the MTT Report and following due process, acted as follows –

(a) In the matter related to disciplinary/ incapacity action as a result of the complaints in the MTT Report, it was evident that most of the complaints dealt with in the MTT Report relates to matters that had transpired prior to his appointment to the HPCSA, therefore Adv P Khumalo was exonerated. The decision was communicated to the incumbent and formal correspondence had been drafted to officially close the matter.

(b) On the question of whether it is in the interest of the HPCSA for Phelelani Khumalo to remain part of the organisation, in particular as part of its senior management, Council exonerated Adv FP Khumalo on the basis that the issues listed in the MTT report occurred prior to his joining HPCSA. This question therefore becomes irrelevant.

END.

07 May 2018 - NW1064

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What are the anticipated costs of providing for the country’s landward defence capabilities for the 2018-19 financial year and (b) what amount has actually been provided?

Reply:

a) 2018-19 Financial year: R36,256,875,856.00.

b) Amount provided: R13,929,201,744.00.

07 May 2018 - NW558

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the (i) name, (ii) location and (iii) patient capacity of each hospital that does not offer transplant services and (b) what is the reason for this in each case?

Reply:

.(a)-(b) In terms of Government Gazette No R 185 issued in 2012 and the national norms and standards only central hospitals provide transplant services.

There are ten (10) Central Hospitals in South Africa:

  1. Groote Schuur in Cape Town (Western Cape)
  2. Tygerberg in Stellenbosch (Western Cape)
  3. Nelson Mandela Central Hospital in Mthatha (Eastern Cape)
  4. King Edward VIII Hospital in Durban (KwaZulu Natal)
  5. iNkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital in Durban (KwaZulu Natal)
  6. Universitas Hospital in Bloemfontein (Free State)
  7. Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto (Gauteng)
  8. Charlotte Maxeke Hospital in Parktown (Gauteng)
  9. Steve Biko Hospital in Tshwane (Gauteng)
  10. George Mukhari Hospital in Ga-Rankuwa (Gauteng)

END.

07 May 2018 - NW1300

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Health

On what basis does the Health Professions Council of South Africa recruit senior managers for a proposed new structure?

Reply:

The Council’s new Organisational Structure was finalised as part of Phase One of the Turn Around Strategy. The implementation of the entire organisational structure including Top 20 Senior Management forms part of Phase Two which is scheduled to take 12 months and the process commenced in January 2018.

The Senior Management Positions have been assigned exclusively to the Human Resources and Remuneration Committee (REMCO) of Council in consultation with the independent consultants (i.e. Fevertree Consulting).

The principles of recruitment are still being finalised by REMCO and will be submitted to the Executive Committee of Council in May 2018 for onward submission to Council at its next meeting scheduled for 28 June 2018.

It is important to note that in order to ensure fairness and transparency the current Management Structure of Council is not involved in the top 20 recruitment process.

Once Council has approved the placement principles, Parliament will be advised accordingly.

END.

07 May 2018 - NW609

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Health

1. What is the (a) total number of posts of each specified profession (details furnished) that are (i) filled and (ii) vacant in the iLembe District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal and (b)(i) (aa) name and (bb) location of each institution and (ii)(aa) duration of each vacancy and (bb) date by which each vacancy is envisaged to be filled?

Reply:

Count of Prov/Dept

iLembe District Municipality 

 

DENTIST

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

MEDICAL OFFICER

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

MEDICAL SPECIALIST

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

NURSE

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

PHARMACIST

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

PSYCHOLOGIST

MEDICAL OFFICER Total

Grand Total

Row Labels

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

   

Filled

 

Filled

 

Filled

   

ILEMBE DISTRICT

12

12

3

3

175

175

19

19

1232

1232

8

43

43

18

18

1

1

1511

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

3

3

2

2

7

7

 

 

122

122

 

6

6

2

2

 

 

142

NDWEDWE CHC

2

2

1

1

3

3

 

 

51

51

 

2

2

1

1

 

 

60

SUNDUMBILI CHC

1

1

1

1

4

4

 

 

71

71

 

4

4

1

1

 

 

82

COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTRE

3

3

 

 

14

14

 

 

37

37

6

13

13

5

5

 

 

78

MONTOBELLO HOSPITAL

1

1

 

 

1

1

 

 

10

10

1

3

3

1

1

 

 

17

NDWEDWE CHC

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

 

 

6

STANGER HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

11

11

1

3

3

1

1

 

 

17

SUNDUMBILI CHC

1

1

 

 

5

5

 

 

2

2

1

3

3

1

1

 

 

13

UMPHUMULO HOSPITAL

1

1

 

 

4

4

 

 

13

13

1

1

1

1

1

 

 

21

UNTUNJAMBILI HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

 

 

 

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

4

DISTRICT HOSPITAL SMALL B

3

3

1

1

34

34

 

 

278

278

 

6

6

3

3

 

 

325

MONTEBELLO HOSPITAL

1

1

1

1

13

13

 

 

79

79

 

2

2

1

1

 

 

97

UMPHUMULO DISTRICT HOSPITAL

1

1

 

 

11

11

 

 

116

116

 

3

3

1

1

 

 

132

UNTUNJAMBILI HOSPITAL

1

1

 

 

10

10

 

 

83

83

 

1

1

1

1

 

 

96

DISTRICT OFFICE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

ILEMBE DISTRICT OFFICE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

GATEWAY CLINICS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

MONTEBELLO HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

UNTUNJAMBILIHOSPITAL GATEWAY CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

UMPHUMULO DISTRICT HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

INTERN TRAINING

 

 

 

 

31

31

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

39

STANGER HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

31

31

 

 

 

 

 

5

5

 

 

 

 

36

SUNDUMBILI CHC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

 

 

 

2

UMPHUMULO HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

1

MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

MONTEBELLO MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

NDWEDWE CHC: MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

STANGER MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

SUNDUMBILI CHC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

UMPUMULO 1 MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

UNTUNJAMBILI MOBILE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

OQAQENI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CLINIC A (8HOURS 5DAYS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

84

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

84

AMANDLALATHI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

DARNALL CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

DUKUZA CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

HLOMENDLINI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

ISITHUNDO CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

KEARSNEY PHC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

MAPHUMULO CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

MAQUMBI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

MOLOKOHLO CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

MPUMELELO CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

OHWEBEDE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

THAFAMASI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CLINIC B (12HOURS 7DAYS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

134

134

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

134

BALLITO CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

CHIBINI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

DOKODWENI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

ESIDUMBINI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

GLENHILLS CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

KWANYUSWA CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

MACAMBINI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

MANDENI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

MBHEKAPHANSI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

MPISE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

MTHANDENI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

NANDI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

NDULINDE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

OTIMATI CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

WOSIYANA CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CLINIC C (24HOURS 7DAYS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

108

108

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

109

GROUTVILLE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

ISITHEBE CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

KWADUKUZA CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

38

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

39

SHAKASKRAAL CLINIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

REGIONAL HOSPITAL

3

3

 

 

89

89

19

19

404

404

2

9

9

8

8

1

1

535

STANGER HOSPITAL

3

3

 

 

87

87

17

17

404

404

2

9

9

8

8

1

1

531

STANGER HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

2

2

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Grand Total

12

12

3

3

175

175

19

19

1232

1232

8

43

43

18

18

1

1

1511