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10 June 2016 - NW1406

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

Department of Rural Development and Land Reform

(a)(i),(ii) Yes.

(b) Not applicable.

(aa) Enterprises (small businesses and cooperatives) are supported with training and capacity building programmes for leadership, governance and business management. Agricultural enterprises and non agricultural enterprises are supported in terms of business plans developed. Support is provided for various activities business planning, feasibility studies, agro-processing, production, market access, arts and crafts, textile industry support, brick making and other financial and non financial assistance.

(bb) R390 million has been budgeted.

(cc) It is envisaged that 2540 jobs will be created.

Ingonyama Trust Board

(b)(i) No.

(b)(ii) Yes

(aa) To provide support to beneficiary communities to improve food security by crop production – under the Rural Development programme of the Trust.

(bb) R 9m for 2016/2017.

(cc) Community members are utilised on an adhoc basis for the construction of certain infrastructure and operations of the projects.

10 June 2016 - NW1480

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)How many doctors who have been approved by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) (a) are currently registered in each province, (b) have not yet renewed their contracts with SASSA and (c) still have to sign contracts with SASSA; (2) (a) how many disability grant applicants are waiting the processing of their medical certificates by SASSA-approved doctors in each province and (b) what percentage of the total number of applicants for the specified grant do the figures represent in each case?

Reply:

1. As of 23 May 2016 SASSA had a total of 339 contracted active medical assessors on its database nationally.

(a) The provincial spread of SASSA contracted assessors (doctors) is as below:

Province

Contracted Doctors

Eastern Cape

13

Free State

31

Gauteng

71

KwaZulu-Natal

75

Limpopo

39

Mpumalanga

31

Northern Cape

48

North West

27

Western Cape

4

TOTAL

339

 

(b) 8 doctors have not renewed their contracts.

(c) 14 doctors still have to sign their contracts

2. (a)

Province

Awaiting Assessment

Eastern Cape

0

Free State

3 800

Gauteng

3661

KwaZulu-Natal

7587

Limpopo

2322

Mpumalanga

1755

Northern Cape

150

North West

893

Western Cape

6797

TOTAL

26 965

In the Eastern Cape and the Western Cape it should be noted that assessments are largely conducted by the Department of Health doctors and SASSA merely contracts doctors where the Department of Health does not have the capacity to support social assistance disability assessments.

(b) SASSA assessed a total of 660 773 clients for social assistance disability during the 2015/ 2016 financial year, subsequent to them being booked for such assessments with a SASSA contracted medical assessor. The number of total

booked clients currently at SASSA nationally is 26 965 and the number reduces on

daily basis as SASSA conducts assessments continuously. None of the clients will be

booked more than 30 days from the booking date with about 95% to be assessed

within 2 weeks.

10 June 2016 - NW1558

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a)(i),(ii),(b)(i)(ii) Please refer to the table below.

No

(i) Department

(ii) Entities

   

Commission

Ingonyama Trust Board

(a) Spent 2015/2016

R22 253 497.98

19 808 488.45

382 921.00

(b) Budgeted 2016/2017

R17m

4 649 000.00

361 874.00

10 June 2016 - NW1136

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether any information is available regarding the total number of persons who are addicted to drugs; if not, when does she intend to carry out a comprehensive census in order to establish the number of addicts; if so, (a) how many persons are addicted and (b) in which provinces are they located?

Reply:

No. There is no comprehensive date available but currently the Department relies on the information from South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drugs (SACENDU). According to data collected from treatment centers on people admitted to treatment services by SACENDU between January 2015 and June 2015, the following were finding:

NUMBER OF PEOPLE ADMITTED FOR TREATMENT SERVICES DURING JANUARY-JUNE 2015

  1. Number of persons admitted for treatment services
  1. Province

3524

Western Cape

4285

Gauteng

226

Limpopo

850

Mpumalanga

1122

KZN

74

Northern Cape

126

North West

366

Free State

363

Eastern Cape

Plans are underway in the current financial year to develop a system to collect data on the number of people accessing anti-substance abuse services during 2016/2017 financial year. The Department will further conduct research on the nature, extent and impact of substance abuse amongst communities in South Africa during 2016/2017 financial year.

10 June 2016 - NW1188

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How many consumer units received (i) water, (ii) electricity, (iii) sanitation and (iv) solid waste management services in each metropolitan municipality since 1 July 2015 and (b) how many of the specified units received the specified services for free in each specified metropolitan municipality?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance, as part of the 828 approach, monthly requests municipalities to report on the number of households receiving (i) water, (ii) electricity, (iii) sanitation and (iv) solid waste management services, new connection made and the number of households receiving free basic water and free basic electricity. The numbers in the table below are the average number of households that monthly received the service for the period July 2015 to March 2016:
 

Metro

How many households received electricity?

How many households were connected for the first time to the electricity system?

How many households received sanitation?

How many households received water?

How many households were connected for the first time to the water system?

How many households received Free Basic Water

How many households received Free Basic Electricity?

How many households have access to refuse removal?

Buffalo City

125787

95

219797

221169

23

52909

78032

161431

City of Cape Town

567481

362

897965

897965

545

897965

369060

706205

City of Johannesburg

493939

145

266246

414231

103

27445

22580

1001550

City of Tshwane

411773

359

618739

775660

1220

314500

213000

823388

Ekurhuleni

390969

1142

902332

908293

88

460204

208835

695987

Ethekwini

689270

895

699258

818201

227

613674

124883

945910

Mangaung

187328

33

115179

172500

21

23367

29744

206650

Nelson Mandela Bay

273311

122

295177

325302

127

76396

64555

317760

09 June 2016 - NW1479

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any commission investigated the legitimacy of the Sukazi chieftaincy in Mpumalanga; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of the investigation; (2) Whether a report has been generated in this regard; if not, why not; if so, has the specified report been presented to the affected parties?

Reply:

  1. The Honourable Member is requested to note that the Provincial Committee on Disputes and Claims of Traditional Leadership in Mpumalanga did conduct an investigation with respect to the claim for traditional leadership that was lodged by Mr. ME Sukazi and others. The investigation was closed following the findings by the Committee.
  2. Yes, a report was generated but was not presented to the affected parties as they did not dispute the findings of the Committee. However, a letter dated 18 February 2015 from the Office of the Premier in Mpumalanga was forwarded to Mr. ME Sukazi and others informing them of the outcome of the investigation.

09 June 2016 - NW1419

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a)What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on contracting consultants in the (aa) 2014-15 and (bb) 2015-16 financial years, (b) what are the names of the consultants and (c) for which projects was each of the specified consultants contracted?

Reply:

(a) Refer to the table below for the amount spent on contracting consultants:

Name

(a)(i)(aa) 2014-15 financial year

(a)(i)(bb) 2015-16 financial year

My Department

R1, 109, 274, 032.30

R 560, 240, 080.17

Amatola Water

R 97 865 416.98

R 54 179 428.00

Bloem Water

R 39 000 000

R 26 000 000

Lepelle Northern Water

R4,900,000

R341,232,467

Magalies Water

R135 172 912.51

R 98 112 787.65

Mhlathuze Water

R2 031 137.77

R1 266 768.93

Overberg Water

R1,543,573

R1,505,433

Rand Water

R 613,275.51

R13,824,923.64

Sedibeng Water

R26 349 620,52

R56 461 967,20

Umgeni Water

R290 000 284.50

R,148 804 583.89

WRC

R 1 210 679.46

R 1 762 296.69

TCTA

R 227 667 114,28

R 216 631 089,72

Inkomati CMA

R5 995 644

R7 504 431

Breede-Gouritz CMA

R3, 063, 385.10

R5, 641, 394.18

(b) and (c) Refer to Annexure A for the names of the consultants and the consultants contracted for each project from my Department and Annexure B for the names of the consultants contracted for each project from each entity reporting to me.

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09 June 2016 - NW1595

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether any South African companies were considered to develop desalination plants along all coastal communities to boost water supply before a partnership was struck around 11 May 2016 with the Islamic Republic of Iran to develop the specified plants; if not, why not; if so, (2) why did she choose to partner with the Islamic Republic of Iran when many local jobs could have been created if a South African company was to develop the specified plants; (3) whether any studies were conducted by her department before the specified partnership was struck with Iran; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) what were the outcomes of such studies and (c) who was consulted in this regard?

Reply:

(1) No specific South African or Iranian companies were approached or selected for partnership on desalination. My Department has been working with various active actors nationally and internationally to examine the viability of desalination as an option in South Africa. Refer to Annexure A for the signed agreement.

(2) My Department’s International Engagement with Iran is based on the Bi-National Relations led by the Department of International Relations and Cooperation on issues of national interest for the benefit of the water sector.

(3) Yes, my Department has, through the Water Research Commission (WRC) conducted various studies over time to establish facts on the viability and benefits of desalination in the coastal areas of our country. The relevant details are contained in the study reports or outcomes backed by years of research by the WRC. Different actors and organisations and countries working on desalination were consulted by WRC both locally and internationally. Refer to Annexure B.

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09 June 2016 - NW593

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4092 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

There are various municipal officials and councillors who undertook international trips in the 2014/15 financial year and since 01 July 2015 in each metropolitan municipality. The following responses are from 6 metros who responded. The Department will forward input from the 2 outstanding metros once the information is made available.

The purpose of each trip, officials who undertook each trip, and the total cost of each trip including flights and accommodation in each metropolitan municipality is outlined in the attached Annexure below:

09 June 2016 - NW1196

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether any (a) blankets and/or (b) other specified items were dispensed by the SA Social Security Agency on the day of the local government election manifesto launch of a certain political party (name furnished), held in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape on the weekend of 15 and 16 April 2016; if so, (i) why and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(a) (b) No.

09 June 2016 - NW1482

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

QUESTION 1:(a) On which dates were fire hydrants for each fire station precinct in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality last inspected and(b) what are the further relevant details in this regard? (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The hydrants are inspected daily.
(b) According to the City of Ekurhuleni, maintenance of fire hydrants within its area of jurisdiction is a Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) issue and there is a comprehensive programme being implemented throughout the year. In terms of this comprehensive program, a target of 50 000 hydrants must be inspected annually, and this was exceeded as depicted in the table below.

(c) The City indicated that they have appointed a Professional Service Provider (PSP) who is responsible for the maintenance and servicing of fire hydrants. The PSP has 220 fieldworkers who are responsible for the maintenance and servicing of fire hydrants within the City. The business process that the City has adopted requires a fieldworker to locate (some hydrants are underground and some above ground) the hydrant, mark with paint, service or maintain, and geo- code the location of the hydrant on a Global Positioning System (GPS). This approach requires at least five visits to each hydrant. In view of this, the City has outlined that it is difficult and cumbersome for them to indicate the date of the last visit to each hydrant as a single visit is not enough to locate, mark with paint, maintain or service and geo-code the hydrant. According to the City, work areas are divided in line with the operational fire districts, which cover more than one fire station precinct. The following numbers of hydrants have been located, marked with paint, serviced/ maintained, tested and geo-coded per Service Delivery Area:
 

Service Delivery Areas

Name of the Fire Districts

Number of Hydrants Serviced

Financial year (FY) Period

Service Delivery Area 1

• Alberton /Thokoza
• Palm Ridge
• Sonkesizwe

12 473

2013/2014

   

12 620

2014/2015

   

11 332

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 2

• Wadeville/Katlehong
• Vosloorus

11 781

2013/2014

   

2 305

2014/2015

   

15 250

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 3

• Boksburg Central
• Germiston Central

8 912

2013/2014

   

5 036

2014/2015

   

10 556

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 4

• Edenvale
• Primrose
• Bedford view

10 320

2013/2014

   

5 777

2014/2015

   

16 009

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 5

• Kempton park
• Tembisa
• Commercial
• Olifantsfontein

6 544

2013/2014

   

18 921

2014/2015

   

14 104

201512016

Service Delivery Area 6

• Leon Ferreira
• Farrarmere
• Rynfield

8 735

2013/2014

   

6 897

2014/2015

   

20 262

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 7

• Brakpan
• Benoni
• Central Tsakane

8 292

2013/2014

   

7 058

2014/2015

   

16 516

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 8

• Springs
• Daveyton
• Etwatwa

9 213

2013/2014

   

1 442

2014/2015

   

16 097

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 9

• Nigel
• Duduza
• Selection Park

8 946

2013/2014

   

10 000

2014/2015

   

16 097

2015/2016

09 June 2016 - NW1021

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Why a luxury Mercedes Benz vehicle (details furnished) registered in her Ministry’s name at the Youngsfield Army Base is used daily to transport a certain person (details furnished) to the University of Cape Town campus and back; (2) whether she can confirm that the specified army officer (details furnished) who has the use of the vehicle also resides at the specified address in Cape Town; if not, (a) is it just the specified Major’s daughter who occupies the property and (b) what are the further relevant details; if so, (i) how long has the specified army officer been resident at the specified address and (ii) who else lives with the specified army officer at the specified address; (3) whether there are any policies in place that allow children of officers to be transported to universities in luxury vehicles registered in her Ministry’s name at the expense of her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, from which budget(s) are personal trips like these funded; (4) are such personal trips ever (a) declared to the SA Revenue Services and (b) reported to the human resources department of her department?

Reply:

1.And (2) The Youngsfield Army Base was making use of any type of vehicle to assist the daughter of C SANDF when necessary, and did not specifically allocate a Mercedes Benz for this purpose. This only happened previously when the daughter was unable to get alternative transport. The daughter is now using her own vehicle as this was a temporary arrangement.

  (a) The specified army officer driving such luxury vehicle does not occupy any property at the army base.

3. The transportation was not on daily basis and no budget was allocated.

4. Not applicable

09 June 2016 - NW1586

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What amount is owed to (i) the Magalies and (ii) Lepelle Northern water boards by each local municipality in Limpopo, (b) what amount is owed in each specified case, (c) for how many days have the debts been outstanding, (d) why has it taken so long to settle the debts, (e) when will the debts be paid in full and (f) what arrangements, if any, have been made to settle the outstanding debt?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for amount owed to Magalies Water Board:

(a)(i)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Thabazimbi Local Municipality

R28 912237

More than 3 years

The municipality is experiencing cash flow challenges.

Unknown at this stage as the municipality is under administration.

The municipality has made a commitment to make a payment of R1 million per month until National Treasury has approved the finance recovery plan.

Modimolle Local Municipality

R2 390962

0

The account is on current

31 May 2016

N/A

BelaBela Municipality

R1 620436

0

The account is on current

31 May 2016

N/A

Refer to the table below for amount owed to Lepelle Northern Water Board:

(a)(ii)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Ba-Phalaborwa Municipality

R69,6m

120 days+

Availability of funds

By 2019

The settlement agreement is in place and adhered to by the Water Services Authority (WSA)

Capricorn District Municipality (CDM Urban)

R3m

Current

N/A

N/A

 

Greater Letaba Municipality

R1m

Current

N/A

N/A

 

Greater Tzaneen Municipality

R0.78m

Current

N/A

N/A

 

GSDM (Fetakgomo Local Municipality)

R6,4m

120 days+

Availability of funds

 

Negotiations with the WSA are taking place

GSDM (Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality)

R16,1m

120 days+

Availability of funds

 

Negotiations with the WSA are taking place

Marble Hall Municipality

R1,m

120 days+

Availability of funds

 

Negotiations with the WSA are taking place

Mogalakwena Local Municipality

R5,6m

Current

N/A

N/A

 

Mopani District Municipality

R249,6m

120 days+

Availability of funds

By 2019

The settlement agreement is in place and adhered to by the WSA

Polokwane Municipality

R13,4m

Current

N/A

N/A

N/A

Lepelle Nkumpi Municipality (CDM Rural)

R2M

Current

N/A

N/A

 

Greater Tubatse Local Municipality

R20,7m

120 days+

Availability of funds

 

Negotiations with the WSA are taking place

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09 June 2016 - NW1578

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What are the updated costs of the damage caused to property at each affected university as a result of student protests since his reply to question 833 on 12 April 2016; (2) will the affected universities be paying for the costs of the damages; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, where will the funding be sourced from; (3) will his department be contributing to the payment for the costs of damages incurred due to student protests; if not, why not; if so, what amount will his department be contributing in each case; (4) whether any of the affected universities have lodged insurance claims for the damages caused by the specified student protests; if not, why not; if so, (a) which universities lodged insurance claims and (b) what is the value of the insurance claims (i) lodged, (ii) paid out, (iii) repudiated by insurers and (iv) that remain outstanding?

Reply:

(1) With reference to my reply to Question 833 on 12 April 2016, the estimated costs of damage to properties have increased by R151.532 million, totalling R459.835 million since October 2015.

University

Damages up to February 2016

Damages from March to May 2016

Total Damages

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

689 850

0

689 850

University of Cape Town

3 200 000

0

3 200 000

Central University of Technology

0

0

0

Durban University of Technology

0

0

0

University of Fort Hare

8 000 000

0

8 000 000

University of the Free State

2 800 000

2 432 300

5 232 300

University of Johannesburg

345 000

100 000 000

100 345 000

University of Kwazulu-Natal

82 000 000

0

82 000 000

University of Limpopo

1 786 295

2 306 837

4 093 132

Mangosuthu University of Technology

0

0

0

University of Mpumalanga

0

0

0

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

0

0

0

North-West University

151 000 000

0

151 000 000

University of Pretoria

0

30 000

30 000

Rhodes University

250 000

0

250 000

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

0

0

0

Sol Plaatje University

0

0

0

University of South Africa

0

395 154

395 154

Stellenbosch University

352 000

1 069 000

1 421 000

Tshwane University of Technology

5 073 748

34 801 896

39 875 644

Vaal University of Technology

0

7 000 000

7 000 000

University of Venda

0

0

0

Walter Sisulu

351 287

0

351 287

University of the Western Cape

46 544 446

0

46 544 446

University of the Witwatersrand University

1 410 223

3 497 082

4 907 305

University of Zululand

4 500 000

0

4 500 000

Total

308 302 849

151 532 269

459 835 118

2. The Department is in the process of investigating which universities will be lodging insurance claims to cover some of the damage costs.

3. The Department has contributed an amount of R40.496 million towards damages at five historically disadvantaged universities, i.e. Universities of Fort Hare (R8 million), Zululand (R4.5 million), Western Cape (R25.858 million), Walter Sisulu (R351 287) and Limpopo (R1.786 million).

4. Four Universities, i.e. University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of Limpopo, Tshwane University of Technology and the University of the Western Cape, have thus far lodged claims with insurers estimated at R106.917 million. Insurers have to date paid out R28.227 million.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1578 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 June 2016 - NW1274

Profile picture: Jooste, Ms K

Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the full details of the procedure that needs to be followed by grant recipients when they note (a) unlawful, (b) fraudulent and/or (c) immoral debit deductions made from their SA Social Security Agency accounts; (2) what steps is her department taking to communicate the specified procedure to all current grant recipients?

Reply:

1. Any beneficiary noticing any (a) unlawful; (b) fraudulent and/or (c) immoral activity on his/her social grant must immediately report this to the nearest SASSA office. At the SASSA office, the beneficiary will be requested to complete an affidavit confirming that he/she did not purchase any advanced airtime, pre-paid electricity or take out a loan. This affidavit can be commissioned by the SASSA official attending to him/her. The SASSA official will then log the dispute and submit the affidavit to Cash Paymaster Services, to facilitate the refund of the money deducted and to blacklist that social grant account for any future purchases. In terms of the approved Dispute Resolution Mechanism, all cases must be dealt with within a time frame of 10 working days.

Alternatively, any beneficiary can call the SASSA toll free number 0800 60 10 11 and register a dispute. Again, that beneficiary will be requested to submit an affidavit confirming the dispute and that he/she did indeed not purchase any financial services or commodities. On receipt of the affidavit, SASSA will submit the dispute to Cash Paymaster Services, which has 10 working days in which to resolve the dispute.

2. SASSA has conducted a training programme for identified SASA staff within all provinces as well as those manning the call centre at Head Office, to ensure that they are aware of the procedures to be followed. The approved Dispute Resolution Mechanism has been made available to all staff as well as Cash Paymaster Services. In addition, SASSA is continuing with its communication programme through both print and electronic media (radio and television) to try to ensure that all beneficiaries are aware of the processes to follow, should they become aware of any untoward activity on their social grant.

SASSA is also appealing to community leaders and NGO’s to assist in directing any social grant beneficiary who may have experienced challenges with his/her social grant payment to the nearest SASSA office.

Notwithstanding these measures which have been put in place, notice should be taken of the amendments to the Regulations to the Social Assistance Act, Act 13 of 2004 which were published on 6 May 2016. These amendments make it clear that no deductions or EFT debit transactions, apart from these authorized in terms of the Regulation 26A for funeral policies which comply with the regulations, may be effected off the SASSA card account. This is effective immediately and should halt the type of challenges beneficiaries have been experiencing. Should any beneficiary with to have access to the stop order or debit order facility, that beneficiary will be required to open a commercial bank account, and request SASSA to transfer the social grant from the SASSA card account to the commercial bank account. This will be done at no cost to the beneficiary, who is then free to manage his/her bank account as he/she sees fit.

08 June 2016 - NW1545

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) R10,633,337.38;

(ii) The table below reflects the details in this regard

ENTITY

EXPENDITURE

Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC)

R1,189,948.39

South African Medical Research Council (MRC)

R448,741.39

National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS)

R1,929,655.89

Council for Medical Schemes (CMS)

R1,146,219.06

(b) (i) R14,924,000.00

(ii) The table below reflects the details in this regard.

 

ENTITY

EXPENDITURE

Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC)

R2,300,000.00

South African Medical Research Council (MRC)

R437,470.00

National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS)

R2,500,000.00

Council for Medical Schemes (CMS)

R320,000

END.

08 June 2016 - NW932

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Has he ever (a) met with any (i) member, (ii) employee and/or (iii) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting with the specified persons (i) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (ii) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bb)(aaa) when and (bbb) where did each such meeting take place and (cc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

I have not attended any meeting with the Gupta family or anyone else at their Saxonworld Estate. I have encountered one or more members of his family at public events on a few occasions, eg a cricket match. I have met one of the Gupta brothers at Mahlamba Ndlovu around 2009/10 during which a brief discussion on small business finance took place.

08 June 2016 - NW1243

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the SA Women's Auxiliary Services Memorial Hospital in Jansenville in the Eastern Cape qualifies to have a full-time medical doctor on its staff; if not, (a) why not, (b) what level of medical expertise can the hospital employ and (c) where should the community that is served by the specified hospital access a doctor; (2) what are the terms of the contract offered to the medical doctor who is currently employed at the specified hospital; (3) whether the specified doctor has been given notice of termination of his employment; if so, why?

Reply:

1. SA Women's Auxiliary Services Memorial Hospital in Janesville in the Eastern Cape does qualify to have a full time medical doctor on its staff.

   (a) Not applicable;

   (b) The hospital qualifies for a medical officer with an MBCHB Degree and experience as a generalist.

   (c) The community that is served by the specified hospital should access a doctor at the hospital.

2. The hospital has a full- time doctor who is not on contract.

3. The doctor has not been given any notice of termination of employment.

END.

08 June 2016 - NW907

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work

Reply:

(1) & (2) No

08 June 2016 - NW661

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the (a) director-general and/or (b) any officials from his department attended meetings of the study groups of a certain political party (name furnished) in Parliament in the (i) 2014-15 and (ii) 2015-16 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aa) what was the purpose of the meeting, (bb) what is the (aaa) name and (bbb) designation of each official who attended, (cc) on what date did the meetings take place and (dd) which study group was attended by the specified officials; (2) whether there are any statutory grounds on which (a) the director-general and/or (b) any officials from his department are allowed to attend meetings of study groups of a certain political party in Parliament; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on which provisions contained in the (i) Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, (ii) the Public Service Act, Act 103 of 1994 as amended, (iii) Public Service Regulations and/or (iv) Code of Conduct for Public Servants do the specified persons rely to attend the specified meetings?

Reply:

1. (a) No. And no to all subsequent sections to the question.

(b) Yes. The DDG: Tax Policy and Financial Regulations was requested by the Minister to brief the study group on certain items that were before the parliamentary committees.

    (i) Yes

    (ii) Yes

    (aa) To discuss legislation before the parliamentary committees

     (bb) (aaa) LC August and T Plaatjie

            (bbb) Ministerial Parliamentary Liaison Officers

     (cc) Upon request, usually during Parliamentary sessions.

     (dd) Finance and Appropriation study groups

2. The Code of Conduct for Public Service (Chapter 2 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001, as amended) stipulates:

(a)        An employee may not does not abuse her or his position in the public service to promote or prejudice the interest of any political party or interest group (regulation C.2.7)

(b)        An employee must refrain from party political activities in the workplace (regulation C.3.7).

However, officials of a department may and should communicate with, and consult, relevant role players on policy and legislative proposals. Relevant role players include the study group of any political party for a Parliamentary committee. Furthermore, if a Minister is invited to a study group meeting in their capacity as the Minister, i.e. as a member of the executive, they may nominate an official to represent or attend on their behalf.

On the direction of the Minister, officials have also met Members of Parliament of various political parties to provide clarity on Legislative and policy matters.

08 June 2016 - NW1393

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Health

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) The National Department of Health does not have structured development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives, however, as part of our Supply Chain Management approach the procurement of goods and services is executed in line with the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act No 05 of 2000 and its associated Preferential Procurement Regulations of 2011, with the purpose of enhancing the participation of Historically Disadvantaged Individuals (HDIs) and the small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in the public sector procurement system. The basis of the current position within the department is informed by the legislative environment of public sector procurement which currently does not allow for “set asides” procurement approach.

(aa) This is not applicable to the department since no structured development programmes for (i) small businesses; and (ii) co-operatives exist within the department.

(bb) Whilst the department does not have an approved policy of dedicated spend on (i) small businesses; and (ii) co-operatives, the department budget for the procurement of goods and services for 2016-17 is R 1 453 613 000.00 of which 30% will be utilized for SMMEs' and Co-operatives where applicable.

(cc) This is not applicable to the department since no structured development programmes for (i) small businesses; and (ii) co-operatives exist within the department.

(b) None of the entities reporting to the Minister of Health are running development programs for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives as this does not fall within the legal mandate as outlined in the entities enabling legislation.

END.

08 June 2016 - NW1452

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the Public Investment Corporation holds any financial interest in certain companies (name furnished) in the form of (a) equity, (b) debt or (c) any other form; if not, why not; if so, what (i) was the initial value of the financial interest, (ii) was the date of the transaction, (iii) is the current value of the financial interest, (iv) is the percentage of ownership that the financial interest represents, (v) is the agreement governing the specified transactions and (vi) are the details of the agreement governing the specified transactions?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Public Investment Corporation (PIC).

The PIC does not hold any financial interest in certain companies (name furnished).

08 June 2016 - NW1341

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she is aware of the dispute between a certain company (name furnished) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what steps is she taking to investigate (a) the causes of the dispute and (b) the allegations of corruption at sefa which has impaired the company’s ability to fulfil its obligations to clients?

Reply:

Question 1:

Whether she is aware of the dispute between Razoscan (Pty) Ltd and sefa as outlined in a letter to the Minister dated 14 March 2014 from the owner of Razoscan, Ms Mendiswa Mzamane. 

Reply: sefa is not aware of the letter or its contents by the said Ms. Mzamane to Honourable Minister Zulu. However, sefa would like to highlight the dispute with Ms Mendiswa Mzamane as follows:

Purpose of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd Transaction

The transaction was to export 15 (fifteen) containers of fruit (oranges known as Valencia) to one of the largest importers of fruit in Dubai, viz Floral Fruit LLC. Purchase orders were placed with Razoscan (Pty) Ltd in US Dollars for the fruit.

Stakeholders and Background

Razoscan (Pty) Ltd approached sefa for funding in February 2015 for loan facility of R3 200 000.00 (inclusive of Initiation fee & VAT) in order export of fruit (referred to as the “exporter”).

Floral Fruit LLC: large retail entity in Dubai (referred to as “the Importer”); who imports fresh fruit from most parts of the world. Clinched a deal with Razoscan (Pty) Ltd last year (2015) for Razoscan (Pty) Ltd to supply fresh fruit.

Cosmo Fruit (Pty) Ltd: a key player in the fruit industry in the Western Cape. An importer and exporter of fresh who was approached by Razoscan (Pty) Ltd to source fresh fruit from farmers in the Western Cape.

FNB: the commercial bank appointed by Razoscan (Pty) Ltd to overlook the flow of funds and proceeds resulting from the export of fruit.

N.B: Agreements are in place for the following: importer and exporter; exporter and fruit supplier; sefa/FNB and Razoscan (Pty) Ltd.

Background

After battling for over 5 (five) months to get all the required information to put together the deal, sefa’s Investment Officer presented the deal to sefa’s credit committee in June 2015. The deal was declined after sefa had followed its normal systems and procedures in the assessment of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd’s application for funding based on the following reasons:

Poor profitability

Ms Mendiswa Mzamane, the owner of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd, showing inability to carry out the transaction and lack of adequate expertise and industry knowledge; and poor backup and no financial strength to carry out the transaction for a start-up business in the highly competitive sector.

Ms Mendiswa Mzamane, the owner of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd, appealed the “decline decision” and presented her model where she indicated how she will mitigate the risk. She was afforded two meetings where she presented her model. One meeting was held at sefa’s Centurion Head Office (attended by key sefa internal stakeholders). The other meeting was held at IDC offices where she also presented her risk mitigating factors. Key sefa stakeholders attended the meeting. FNB, who are her bankers and key players in the transaction, attended all meetings represented by Mr Richard Harvey.

Razoscan (Pty) Ltd’s application was finally approved by sefa in July 2015. By then the following key areas formed part of the deal:

  • Suppliers: the new supplier of the fresh fruit was Cosmo Fruit (Pty) Ltd – owned by Ioannis Ntinos. Ms Mendiswa Mzamane, the owner of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd had already changed suppliers three times. sefa had to conduct due diligence on all of the suppliers;
  • FNB as the commercial bank of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd had to oversee the export transaction. A Collection Agreement was signed between sefa, Razoscan (Pty) Ltd and FNB, in order to regulate the flow of the transaction and to agree on the parties respective roles and responsibilities; and
  • Fruit: at approval there was only one type of fruit to be exported namely, Valencia (oranges). The agreement with Floral Fruit was to export 15 containers but only 1 was shipped.

Approval of the Deal (see below – Approval and Disbursement of Funds)

Loan Structure

Loan Structure

Total Rand value

R2 868 000.00 (excluding fees)

 

Term

60 days

 

Grace Period

n/a

 

Grace Type

n/a

 

Interest rate

Prime 9.25 + 5.75% = 15%

 

Initiation Fee

5% of Loan (incl. VAT) = R163 476.00

Description of Business

Fresh fruit exporter to Dubai (UAE)

Approved and Disbursed Funds

Cost of 15 Fruit Containers (inclusive of cost freight/inspection/insurance, etc) R2 868000.00

sefa initiation fee @ 5% (inclusive of VAT) R 163476.00

Total Loan Value R3 031476.00

Disbursement Status

Instruction to make Disbursement of the amount of R2 868 000.00 was given by sefa at the instance of Ms Mendiswa Mzamane, the owner of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd to FNB in October 2015 to release the payment to Cosmo Fruit who would then take the funds and secure fruit from the farmers. Cosmo Fruit was thus paid an amount of R2 868 000.00 to secure the entire fruit of 15 (fifteen) containers.

Update on Export of one container and the awaited proceeds:

Only one container was shipped by Cosmo Fruit (who also assisted with the freight and loading).

The importer’s bank has not honoured the payment for the one container due to error from FNB with regard - to the payment instructions. FNB send payment instructions that did not match those agreed upon and as a result of this error the importer’s bank will not pay.

 

Ms Mendiswa Mzamane, the owner of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd, has since instructed her bank FNB to amend the instructions.

It was later discovered that Cosmo Fruit (Ioannis) has shipped the wrong fruit i.e. class 2 instead of class 1;

Ms Mendiswa Mzamane, the owner of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd, alleges that Razoscan (Pty) Ltd has a dispute with Cosmo Fruit (Pty) Ltd which is owned by Ioannis Ntinos.

Question 2:

If not, why not.

Reply: sefa and Razoscan (Pty) Ltd have entered into a legally binding loan facility agreement or an amount of R3 031 476.00 on 17 September 2015 and the whole loan facility has been to date fully disbursed in terms of the provisions of the loan facility agreement.

Question 3:

(3) If so, what steps is the Minister taking to investigate (a) the causes of the dispute and

Reply:

 (a) sefa is not aware of the specific dispute referred to in the letter dated 14 March 2014; and

(b) Razoscan (Pty) Ltd is currently in breach of the provisions of the loan facility agreement and sefa is proceeding with legal action against Razoscan (Pty) Ltd as well as against Ms. Mzamane, as the surety for the obligations of Razoscan (Pty) Ltd, arising from the loan facility agreement. Currently the legal process is underway. In conclusion, sefa’s rights shall at all material times remain reserved to protect its interest.

Question 4:

If so, what steps is the Minister taking to investigate (b) Ms Mzamane’s allegations of corruption at sefa which she claims has impaired her company’s ability to fulfil its obligations to clients?

Reply:

  • sefa is not aware of the nature of the corruption claims alleged and/or made by

Ms. Mzamane in the letter dated 14 March 2014;

    • sefa is not aware of any corruption relating to Razoscan (Pty) Ltd application for funding

and the transaction; and

  • sefa therefore has no basis to institute any investigation into the matter.

08 June 2016 - NW992

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether any person in the National Treasury requested changes to the Standing Committee on Finance’s programme for (a) Tuesday, 15 March 2016 and/or (b) Wednesday, 16 March 2016; if not, why not; if so, (i) what is the name of the person and (ii) why were the changes requested; (2) whether the person who requested the changes to the programme was authorised to do so; if not, why not; if so, what is the name of the person who authorised the request; (3) whether the request for changes to the programme was submitted to the specified committee in writing; if not, why not; if so, when?

Reply:

(1)(2)(3) The National Treasury is invited by the relevant parliamentary committee Chairperson according to their programme and only the parliamentary committee is able to decide on its programme and any possible changes. The Chairpersons and / or Committee Secretaries do consult with the relevant ministries and departments on the availability of the Minister, Deputy Minister and also the representational departmental officials before finalizing an invitation. Therefore, I suggest that this request should be directed to the identified Committee Chairperson for comment.

08 June 2016 - NW1224

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

What are the latest statistics on abortion in each province?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard:

PROVINCE

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

12,911

Free State

5,846

Gauteng

15,511

KwaZulu Natal

12,233

Limpopo

9,600

Mpumalanga

1,797

North West

6,744

Northern Cape

1,402

Western Cape

19,254

END.

08 June 2016 - NW1181

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What is the target number of community health workers that are needed in each district in each province to ensure that all Ward-Based Primary Health Care Outreach teams are fully operational and (b) how many Community Health Workers are currently employed in each district in each province; (2) whether there is a shortfall between the target number and the total number of the currently employed community health workers; if so, (a) what is (i) his department and (ii) each provincial department of health doing to ensure that the target is reached and (b) when will the target be reached in each district in each province?

Reply:

(1) (a) The estimated numbers of Community Health Workers (CHWs) needed to serve 30 million poor people based on Upper Bound Poverty Line of Statistics South Africa, the number of CHWs currently deployed in all provinces and districts, the shortfall and surplus of CHWs are shown in the table below. The profiles of 52 health districts are presented.

Name of Province

No of CHW needed

No of CHW deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Eastern Cape Province

4,494

4,506

 

12

Free State Province

1,933

1,068

865

 

Gauteng Province

4,985

6,012

 

1,027

KwaZulu-Natal Province

6,475

4,410

2,065

 

Limpopo Province

3,911

2,244

1,667

 

Mpumalanga Province

2,536

890

1,646

 

North West Province

2,185

2,496

 

311

Northern Cape Province

664

828

 

164

Western Cape Province

2,563

2,180

383

 

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

7,705

1,442

Total of all provinces

29,747

24,634

5,112

 

EASTERN CAPE

       

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

A Nzo DM

578

456

122

 

Amathole DM

677

876

 

199

Buffalo City MM

433

150

283

 

C Hani DM

589

936

 

347

Joe Gqabi DM

260

270

 

10

Nelson Mandela Bay MM

652

450

202

 

O Tambo DM

1,031

1170

 

139

Sarah Baartman DM

275

198

77

 

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

684

696

Eastern Cape Province

4,494

4,506

 

12

FREE STATE 

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Fezile Dabi DM

333

300

33

 

Lejweleputswa DM

442

138

304

 

Mangaung MM

459

144

315

 

T Mofutsanyane DM

592

408

184

 

Xhariep DM

108

78

30

 

Free State Province

1,933

1,068

865

 

GAUTENG

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

City of Johannesburg MM

1,737

1,698

39

 

City of Tshwane MM

1,067

1,749

 

682

Ekurhuleni MM

1,365

1,123

242

 

Sedibeng DM

468

847

 

379

West Rand DM

347

595

 

248

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

281

1,308

Gauteng Province

4,985

6,012

 

1028

KWA ZULU-NATAL

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Amajuba DM

337

198

139

 

eThekwini MM

1,772

474

1,298

 

Harry Gwala DM

343

342

1

 

iLembe DM

416

312

104

 

Ugu DM

501

378

123

 

uMgungundlovu DM

594

486

108

 

Umkhanyakude DM

478

438

40

 

Umzinyathi DM

369

420

 

51

Uthukela DM

485

402

83

 

Uthungulu DM

600

426

174

 

Zululand DM

582

534

48

 

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

2,118

51

KwaZulu-Natal Province

6,475

4,410

2,065

 

LIMPOPO

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Capricorn DM

872

235

637

 

Mopani DM

831

935

 

104

Sekhukhune DM

831

66

765

 

Vhembe DM

977

956

21

 

Waterberg DM

399

52

347

 

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

1,771

104

Limpopo Province

3,911

2,244

1,667

 

MPUMALANGA

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Ehlanzeni DM

1,160

309

851

 

G Sibande DM

626

360

266

 

Nkangala DM

750

221

529

 

Mpumalanga Province

2,535

890

1,646

 

NORTH WEST

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Bojanala Platinum DM

834

798

36

 

Dr K Kaunda DM

410

534

 

124

Ngaka Modiri Molema DM

591

786

 

195

Ruth Segomotsi Mompati DM

349

378

 

29

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

36

347

North West Province

2,185

2,496

 

311

NORTHERN CAPE

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

Frances Baard DM

212

222

 

10

J T Gaetsewe DM

153

240

 

87

Namakwa DM

60

108

 

48

Pixley ka Seme DM

116

246

 

130

ZF Mgcawu DM

123

12

111

 

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

111

275

Northern Cape Province

664

828

 

164

WESTERN CAPE

District/Province

No of CHWs needed

No of CHWs Deployed

Shortfall

Surplus

City of Cape Town MM

1,622

1,100

522

 

Cape Winelands DM

381

180

201

 

Overberg DM

142

180

 

38

Eden DM

257

285

 

28

Central Karoo DM

80

105

 

25

West Coast DM

81

330

 

249

Shortfall/Surplus Total

   

723

340

Western Cape Province

2,563

2,180

383

 

(b) No province nor districts is currently employing Community Health Workers.

(2) (a) (i) and (ii) No province nor district is currently employing Community Health Workers. CHWs are deployed in the district through engagement with NGOs. In addition, the National Health Council is leading the process of developing an investment case so as to determine equity in resource allocation for each province in order to determine a model for formal engagement of Community Health Workers in public sector.

(b) The target will be reached when formal mechanisms of employment have been agreed on and implemented.

END.

08 June 2016 - NW1267

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

How many mental health care patients were attended to at (a) primary, (b) secondary and (c) tertiary levels of care in each province in (i)(aa) 2014 and (bb) 2015 and (ii) since 1 January 2016?

Reply:

Data for mental health care patients attended to is collected in the District Health Information System in terms of ambulatory attendees and hospital admissions - rather than primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Tables 1, 2 and 3 reflect ambulatory attendees and hospital admissions. The available data for 2016 is only up to February 2016. Data for the later months is still being collated.

(a), (b) and (c) (i) (aa)

Table 1.

Province

Attendees at ambulatory (Non inpatient) services for mental health conditions in 2014

Total number of clients admitted for mental health conditions in 2014

Eastern Cape

398950

7244

Free State

113827

2608

Gauteng

422765

4812

KwaZulu-Natal

583737

8445

Limpopo

276026

7097

Mpumalanga

3175

3286

North West

135942

3418

Northern Cape

64423

991

Western Cape

206161

13697

(a), (b) and (c) (i) (bb)

Table 2

Province

Attendees at ambulatory (Non inpatient) services for mental health conditions in 2015.

Total number of clients admitted for mental health conditions in 2015

Eastern Cape

306699

8112

Free State

49021

2199

Gauteng

254593

7314

KwaZulu-Natal

569331

9301

Limpopo

243015

7383

Mpumalanga

2142

2723

North West

81115

3360

Northern Cape

51175

1397

Western Cape

213772

16696

(a), (b) and (c) (ii)

Table 3

Province

Attendees at ambulatory (Non inpatient) services for mental health conditions in 2016 (January and February only)

Total number of clients admitted for mental health conditions in 2016 (January and February only)

Eastern Cape

42076

1579

Free State

3679

301

Gauteng

16506

1393

KwaZulu-Natal

92292

1599

Limpopo

36663

1113

Mpumalanga

306

490

North West

9211

495

Northern Cape

7439

222

Western Cape

32824

3188

END.

08 June 2016 - NW823

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)(a) What (i) was the cost of staging the SA Business Incubation Conference which took place in Midrand from 10 to 11 March 2016 and (ii) proportion of the specified cost did (aa) her department and/or (bb) each agency reporting to her cover and (b) what amount were the conference organisers paid to organise the specified conference; (2) whether any sponsorships were raised for the specified conference; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of the sponsors and (b) what amount did each specified sponsor pay in sponsorship for the specified conference? NW942E

Reply:

Cost of South African Business Incubation Conference

  1. (a) and (i) The total costs for staging the SA Business Incubation Conference was R 4 383 375 (ii) (aa) The department did not cover any costs for the conference (bb) seda contributed a total amount of R 3 479 379 to the conference ,the other agency sefa, reporting to the department did not cover any costs for the conference. (b) The conference organisers were paid R 259 850 to organise the said conference;

     2. Yes, sponsorship was raised, (a) the names of the sponsors are listed in the table below; (b) the amount paid by each sponsor is specified in the table below;

Sponsor Name

Contribution

Vodacom

R 400 000

Exhibition stands sold

R 482 000

New Generation Mindset

R 22 000

Total

R 904 000

08 June 2016 - NW1513

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) No.

(2) No.

08 June 2016 - NW1340

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(a) Who are the registered owners of each Township Industrial Park under the control of the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), (b) what steps are being taken to transfer title and ownership of the specified parks to the tenants currently occupying them and (c) when does she expect that such transfers to (i) sefa and (ii) thereafter to the tenants

Reply:

(a) The properties identified to be transferred to the tenants are located in Gauteng Province. sefa’s Board of Directors has approved a resolution to transfer the ownership of the properties to qualifying tenants. The preferred tenant representative organization, Gauteng Province Industrial Parks Association (GAPIPA) and OWIPA (Orlando West Industrial Property Association) and sefa are currently in discussion to formulate and agree on the process to be followed in transferring the ownership of the properties to the existing tenants.

The Township Industrial Parks are:

Industrial Park

Registered Owner

1.

Orlando West Industrial Park

sefa

2.

Atteridgeville Industrial Park 1

Tshwane Metro

3.

Atteridgeville Industrial Park 2

Tshwane Metro

4.

Sebokeng Industrial Park 1

Business Partners Ltd.

5

Sebokeng Industrial Park 2

Business Partners Ltd.

6.

Vuka Tsoga Industrial Park

sefa

7.

Mamelodi Industrial Park 1

Tshwane Metro

8.

Mamelodi Industrial Park 2

Tshwane Metro

(b) The transferring attorneys, Kokinis Inc. are currently in the process of transferring these properties to Khula Business Premises Ltd. (100% subsidiary of sefa), where these properties will be housed.

(c) This process is anticipated to be completed by September / October this year. Once this is done, sefa will commence with negotiations for the sale of properties to the tenants. The process of transfer of ownership to the tenants is being negotiated with GAPIPA and their respective affiliates currently.

It is important to note that these properties were not designed and developed with the intention to sell to individual tenants at the time. The cost of subdivision may end up being substantial. It is for this reason that sefa is engaging with tenants representative bodies and together try and ascertain the most suitable way to transfer the properties and also ensuring that all the tenants hold equity (ownership) equivalent to the square metres and portion(s) they are occupying / renting. The recipients (tenants) of the properties will be notified of the obligations, both financially and legally, of owning a fixed commercial property.

08 June 2016 - NW1487

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What are the detailed reasons for the suspension of a certain official of the SA Airways (name and details furnished) and (b) on what statutory grounds was the specified person suspended in May 2016?

Reply:

I have been informed by South African Airways (SAA) that:

The employee was put on a precautionary suspension, based on serious allegations of misconduct levelled against her, which remain a subject of a current pending internal investigation. Full reasons for the suspension of the employee are clearly set out in the correspondence exchanged between SAA and the employee’s duly appointed legal representatives. There is no specific statute or legislative framework that regulates the suspension and/or provides grounds for the suspension of this employee. The requirements for a valid precautionary suspension are fully enunciated in common law and, such requirements had been fully complied with and met by SAA in dealing with this particular matter. The employee has a contractual employment relationship with SAA and is subject to the Disciplinary Code like all other employees. Most importantly, the Labour Relations Act, Act No. 66 of 1995 (LRA) governs and regulates the employment relationship between the employee and SAA, and thus, should the employee be aggrieved by the decision to place her on precautionary suspension, pending an internal investigation, she is at liberty to invoke the relevant provisions of the LRA for an appropriate relief. This remains an operational matter.

08 June 2016 - NW1481

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether a certain person (name furnished) (a) was and/or (b) still is on the SA Airways no-fly list; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The following information was provided by South African Airways (SAA).

The certain person (name furnished) (a) was not and (b) is not currently on any SAA no-fly list.

07 June 2016 - NW1381

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether any plans have been put in place to formally house the residents of the Kya Sands informal settlement in Johannesburg in Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of such plans, (b) how many beneficiaries have been identified and (c) by when will such plans be put in place?

Reply:

(a) Yes, plans have been put in place to formally house the residents of the Kya Sands Informal Settlement. Due to the dense nature of the informal settlement, there is not enough land surrounding the area to formalise the project in situ. As a result, it was proposed that the project be developed in conjunction with the Lion Park Project further north, near the Lanseria Airport. The concept envisaged was that the Nietgedacht Property on which the Lion Park Project would be located would be formalized first due to the fact that the density is lower and it is envisaged that some of the residents of Kya Sands will then be relocated to the Lion Park Project. The remaining Kya Sands informal settlements residents would be formalized in situ. It should be noted that because of the high housing demand, both projects would be developed as high density housing and as such incremental formalization is not possible.

(b) A total of 13 000 beneficiaries have been identified and the scope of the project was increased to include all the informal settlements on Malibongwe Drive, between Kya Sands and Lanseria. 8 000 beneficiaries will be accommodated at the Lion Park development and 5 000 beneficiaries will be accommodated at the Kya Sands site. Beneficiaries from Lanseria/Freeway, Lanseria/Lion Park, Lanseria/Selina Park, Sands/iNanda Holding 57, Houtkoppen, Plot 5 Riverbed and Malatje informal settlements will be accommodated at the two developments.

(c) The planning process is currently underway and indications are that the development will commence during 2019/2020 financial year.

07 June 2016 - NW1273

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Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department commissioned any studies into the (a) social and (b) financial impact of the universalisation of the (i) older persons and (ii) child support grants; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) which institution(s) conducted the specified studies, (bb) when were such studies completed and (cc) is the research findings publicly available; (2) what are the key factors contributing to the development of a policy on the universalisation of the (a) older persons and (b) child support grants respectively?

Reply:

a) (i) Yes, the universalization proposals are rooted in the Taylor Committee recommendations of 2002. The Department of Social Development has also conducted studies on the social and financial impact of the universalisation of both the older Persons Grant (OPG) as well as the Child Support Grant (CSG) entitled “An exploration of the causes of poverty in old age in South Africa” and “The Feasibility study on the universal provision of the Child Support Grant (CSG) in South Africa”

(b) The Discussion Paper with policy options was developed. The Paper also highlights financial implications for each option.

(aa) The OPG study was conducted in-house by the Department, whilst the CSG study was conducted by the Economic Policy Research Institute (EPRI) for the Department.

(bb) The CSG study was concluded in 2011 and the OPG study in 2014.

(cc) The OPG research report is available for various stakeholders. The CSG research report however is currently not available for public reading as the Department is currently working on another study related to the CSG Universalisation.

2. (a) (b) Essentially, the key factors contributing to the development of a policy on the universalisation stems from the need to ensure that all excluded eligible poor people are captured and receive social grants through an easier administration process that results from Universalisation. The CSG and OPG are poverty alleviation measures targeting the largest number of poor beneficiaries in comparison to all other grants, these grants have enabled the country to achieve progress in addressing the needs of children and older persons in the household with no or low income.

However, the promise of basic care for the poorest older persons and children still faces challenges; many are excluded due to various reasons including not having the correct documentation. While the Department has taken many steps to improve coverage to reach these poor beneficiaries in the past five years, evidence suggests that under-coverage will be effectively reduced by eliminating the means test and enabling all children and older persons to access the grants with minimum of bureaucratic requirements. Furthermore, universal provisions will enable many poor children that are excluded from the programme to realise the important developmental impacts that the CSG currently delivers to millions of others. The Department believes that universal provisions of these grants will build national solidarity and reflect a common understanding that South Africans are committed to providing income support to older persons and provide children with the opportunity to develop their full capabilities.

07 June 2016 - NW1272

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Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What factors were taken into consideration when the 1 April 2016 increase in social grant pay-outs by her department were calculated; (2) whether she has found that the specified increase of social grant pay-outs will allow the grant recipients to meet their minimum nutritional requirements based on food price inflations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Social grant increases are determined in consultation with the National Treasury and the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA). The amount of money available for the individual grant increases is subject to government’s expenditure ceiling and is guided by the appropriation made for grants by Parliament. For this financial year a budget increase of 8.2% was allocated for grant increases. This increase needs to provide for both demographic and economic factors. All these factors have a considerable influence in determining annual grant increases. However, these increases are constrained by the available budget.

2. All grants, with the exception of the Child Support Grant (CSG) are above the country’s basic food poverty line as determined by Statistics, South Africa. They are also above the highest Upper Bound Poverty line (of R753 per month in 2014). Hence these beneficiaries should have enough to buy adequate food as well as additional non-food items.

07 June 2016 - NW1467

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With reference to his reply to question 1161 on 9 May 2016, how many learners were registered as at 6 March 2016 to rewrite their National Senior Certificate examinations in October and November 2016 at each of the 31 sites where the National Youth Development Agency is offering the specified learners the opportunity to rewrite the specified exams?

Reply:

The closing date for learner registration was on 30 March 2016, all learners completed and signed the DOBE Examination Registration Form. The forms have been submitted to the relevant Department of Basic Education examinations offices based in provinces. The Department is working on ensuring that all learners are captured. It will issue the Preliminary Schedules in August/September 2016 to confirm that all learners are registered and their subjects are captured correctly.

07 June 2016 - NW640

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What amount has her department budgeted for food parcels for 2016, (b) how many of the food parcel projects are planned for the period 1 May 2016 to 31 August 2016 and (c) what steps has her department taken to dispel the notion that her department allegedly disburses food parcels as a mechanism to buy votes during election periods?

Reply:

(a) An amount of R500 000 000 has been made available for the social relief of distress programme for the 2016/17 financial year. Social relief of distress is a comprehensive programme which aims to meet the immediate material needs of citizens who experience a crisis. Food parcels are only one component of this programme. Social relief of distress may be provided in the form of food parcels, food vouchers, school uniforms, humanitarian support in times of disasters and/or cash, under certain circumstances.

(b) The social relief of distress programme is a needs driven programme, in that citizens who find themselves in such dire circumstances that they are unable to meet their or their family’s basic needs may apply for this assistance at SASSA offices and service points. In addition, where SASSA becomes aware of a disaster which has affected community members. The current drought is one such example of a natural disaster which may prompt the provision of social relief of distress.

It is therefore difficult to know in advance how many people will apply for this form of support. In terms of the Annual Performance Plan, SASSA has targeted to provide social relief of distress to 400 000 people. Of these, 160 000 are targeted for assistance in the first 2 quarters of the new financial year. However, it should be noted that these are projected numbers – the actual numbers will only be known when people come forward in response to a crisis situation. The numbers may be affected by natural disasters, which cannot be predicted, or economic circumstances in the country.

(c) Any social relief of distress is provided to South African citizens, permanent residents and refugees, who meet the criteria as set in the Social Assistance Act, Act 13 of 2004 and its Regulations. This means that every person who receives social relief of distress has gone through a screening and application process. These applications are available for audit.

The criteria which applicants must meet before they are considered for social relief of distress are that, in addition to the citizenship criteria, the applicant must have insufficient funds, and: meet one or more of the following-

Is awaiting payment of an approved grant;

The breadwinner has been assessed as being disabled for a period of less than 6 months;

The breadwinner of that household has died and application is made within 12 months of the death;

The breadwinner of that household has been admitted to a private or public institution for at least one month;

Where the refusal may cause undue hardship; or

The household has been affected by a disaster.

Social relief of distress is an on-going legislated programme which is budgeted for and implemented every year.

 

07 June 2016 - NW1384

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Arts and Culture’s Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE) programme provides opportunities for small business and co-operatives in all creative industries sectors. The MGE strategy was initiated in 2011 to create cross-sectoral strategic investment mechanisms to overcome significant challenges with regard to job creation, market and audience development, skills development and research identified through sector research processes and also consultation processes with creative industry practitioners, businesses and organisations. The core of the programme comprises 10 work streams as follows:

MGE Objectives

Work streams

Audience development

  • Cultural Events
  • Touring Venture
  • Public Art
  • Artists in Schools

Building Demand

  • Art Bank
  • Mzansi Golden Market
  • Cultural Observatory
  • Cultural Precincts

Human Capital Development

  • National Academy for the Creative Industries of South Africa (NACISA)

Under the auspices of this programme, and the National Academy for the Creative Industries South Africa (NACISA) workstream, the Department of Arts and Culture’s 6 performing arts entities run incubator programmes for arts entrepreneurs. The details per institution are outlined in the table below.

DAC Business Development Programmes

 

Question 1aa

1bb

1cc

MGE Workstream

Description

Budget 2016/17

(in ZAR)

Jobs Created

Cultural Events

The programme supports festivals, exhibitions, productions and other cultural events across the country through national and regional flagships programmes and open calls. Enterprises supported include companies, co-operatives, non-profit organisations and individuals.

162,032,000

Across all workstreams it is anticipated that 15,000 work opportunities will be created

Touring Ventures

The programme supports participation by South African artists in local and international platforms including festivals, Cultural Seasons, biennales, conferences through identified programmes and open calls. Enterprises supported include companies, co-operatives, non-profit organisations and individuals.

28,500,000

 

Public Art

The programme supports public art programmes and infrastructure across the country through flagships programmes and open calls. Enterprises supported include companies, co-operatives, non-profit organisations and individuals.

8,000,000

 

Artists in Schools

Individual artists are provided with opportunities to join teachers in the classroom to enhance the teaching and learning experience through the formal curriculum of learners in identified primary and high schools in all nine provinces.

12,000,000

 

Art Bank

The Art Bank in 2016/17 will begin commissioning and purchasing contemporary visual art works from artists and galleries across the country for exhibition and rental by government agencies and private sector stakeholders.

6,000,000

 

Mzansi Golden Market

(Sourcing Enterprise)

The MGM portal will be fully launched in 2016/17, providing all arts enterprises with opportunities to profile their organisation and work on an online portal.

1,000,000

 

Cultural Observatory

The Cultural Observatory will conduct research and impact studies across the creative industries that will inform policy and programming, and also provide the sector with insights into business and other opportunities in the sector.

16,000,000

 

Cultural Precincts

Support will be provided to the development infrastructure in cultural precincts as designated spaces for the production and consumption of the arts.

12,500,000

 

National Academy for the Creative Industries of South Africa (NACISA)

Artists and enterprises will be provided with training opportunities through identified programmes including the incubator programmes offered by the performing arts institutions as outlined in the table below.

31,569,400

 

A portion of these funds will directly benefit small business and co-operatives in the sector as these organisations are eligible for financial support in terms of the funding criteria of the DAC for the MGE programme.

Public Entity Business Development Programmes

  1. Performing arts institutions

As outlined in the Estimates of National Expenditure, through their core programming, the 6 DAC performing arts entities will

Programme

Target Number

Budget

(in ZAR)

Annual productions

205

124,031,000

Annual festivals

14

 

Skills and training development programmes

50

23,300,000

(A portion of this will be spent on skills development & training)

A portion of these funds will directly benefit small business and co-operatives in the sector.

The incubator programmes, delivered in partnership with the DAC are as follows:

ENTITY

PROGRAMME

DESCRIPTION

BUDGET 2016/17

OUTPUT PER CYCLE

Market Theatre

Community Theatre Practitioners Incubator Programme

The proposed Community Theatre Practitioners Incubator Programme will concentrate on improving the skills of community based writers, directors and actors and empower them with the necessary skills to enable them to create and produce works of high standard and of local content.

The Incubator Programme will train the next generation of the community arts leaders, arts entrepreneurs and administrators and expose them to the creative and practical sides of the industry and what is required to produce a professional theatre piece.

The Incubator Programme will provide the group leaders (usually the writers and directors) with specialised training and resources to acquire additional and enhanced skills that will enable them to improve the quality of their work and their leadership which will ultimately be of benefit to the group and the new plays they are creating.

1,600,000

10 Writers

10 Directors

+/- 80 Community Arts Practitioners Incubated

10 Plays of local content

 

DAC Incubator Photography Programme

The Market Photo Incubator intends developing an on the job based photography programme as a platform from which photographers at a relatively progressed level might enhance and refine their practice, while learning additional skills through the guidance of established practitioners, curators and administrators.

Aimed at emerging photographers, the Programme is envisaged as a transfer of skills, experience, knowledge and professional practice that might shift talented photographers into a more advanced stage.

The incubation Programme further offers an administrative directed opportunity in photography, affording the incubates skills and credentials that facilitates independent thought, ensuring high levels of competence, commitment and reliability.

1,600,000

10 Photographers Incubated.

10 annual fully developed projects that will take the form of an exhibitions and publications.

Projects engaging with the public and communities through photography.

Publications, as reflection of overall activities.

Windybrow Theatre

Emerging Theatre Practitioners Incubator Programme

Windybrow Theatre’s Emerging Theatre Practitioners Incubator Programme will engage with emerging and/or mid-level theatre practitioners – directors, designers, stage managers and actors - and offer them areas of opportunity to work one-on-one with a professional mentor over a 4 month period towards the staging of a fully developed script of their choice. This incubation process will result in the creation and staging of 5 new works of local content annually.

1,600,000

4 fully fledged theatre productions of local content per year.

4 professionally trained directors per year with the creative and business skills to develop sustainable careers in the theatre industry and contribute to production of exciting new South African work on the country’s stages.

12 fully trained designers in set, costume and lighting design per year.

4 fully trained production managers per year

4 fully trained stage managers per year.

24 fully trained actors per year (+/-6 actors per production)

The Playhouse Company

Playhouse Dance Residency Incubator Programme

The Residency Incubator programme aims to develop 8 dancers annually and these dancers will create 4 new locally inspired pieces for 4 seasons, tapping into a wide range of dance repertoire which consists of a schools programme, New Stages, South African Women’s Arts Festival and the Festive Season programme. With assistance from The Playhouse Company, the Dance Residency also receives mentorship from established arts administrators.

1,600,000

x4 seasons

x4 Productions of Local Content

x8 Dancers Incubated

 

Playhouse Actors' Studio

A core company of twelve actors is engaged as part of The Playhouse drama residency/ incubation programme. This fully-fledged annual programme provides incubation and advancement in the industry for suitably talented actors. Established performing arts professionals would contribute to the work of the residency by teaching masterclasses.

The actors will also feature in existing seasons at the Playhouse i.e New Stages, the South African Women's Arts Festival, Children's Theatre, Schools seasons as well as in the Playhouse Community Arts Mentorship Programme etc.

1,600,000

x12 Actors incubated

x4 New local Productions

Participation in 4 platforms

ArtsCape

Creative Capacities Incubator

Creative Capacities Incubator (CCI) is aimed at 15 arts organisations across performing arts disciplines towards a well-rounded programme that supports the establishment of healthy arts business practice that is sustainable, efficient and professionalised.

The potential for the existing organisations in the landscape to contribute significantly to the turning around of the status quo which is dominated by eternal volunteerism at the expense of the constitutional right of every citizen of South Africa to participate in the economy, as set out in the NDP and other such efforts by our government as aspirations towards social cohesion was identified to be and still continues to be underutilised and unexplored.

Parallel to that is the existence of such models that are somewhat successful but are driven by the privileged, accessing government funding and donor funding; etc. on behalf of the marginalised and keeping them at the level of dependent beneficiary eternally.

The project seeks to challenge this by means of capacitating to disrupt the norm significantly.

1,600,000

x80 Individuals capacitated

Min 30 content created which is either written and or performed.

x15 fully incubated Arts Marketers per cycle

x15 fully incubated technical and lighting technicians

State Theatre

Indie Spotlight Incubator Programme

Independent theatre practitioners in and around the province would be offered a venue where they could stage their productions at no cost. The State Theatre will provide available resources like décor, costume, human resource and technical skills, mentorship, and marketing – with the caveat that the productions be competent enough to be able to draw and sustain a respectable audience.

The independent producers would then go into a deal with the State Theatre, where box office returns would be split 80 or 70 % to the independent producers and 20 or 30% to the State Theatre. Such a box office split would serve as a driver for the independent producers to try and achieve a full audience capacity for their productions as this would satisfy their profit principle, and this in turn would serve to benefit the State Theatre with attracting new audiences and increasing its declining audiences.

1,600,000

x20 New production per cycle

x20 Groups with +/- 4 individuals per group incubated.

Skills transfer from State Theatre technical skills to incubates.

2 Weeks Season per organisation.

Possible recording and editing of a DVD of the production.

 

The Precinct Programme

The Precinct Incubator Programmes aims to establish talented Artists and bands within the local community. The programme will screen bands through a panel of judges and the winning band will be incubated for 3 month and with the output being a completed album.

Through the 3 months recording period, the band or artist will be mentored by industry professionals that will be strategically selected based on the genre of music that the winning band produces.

1,600,000

x4 Completed market ready Albums.

x4 New demos for artist that place in 2nd place.

+/- 10 individuals incubated and capacitated.

Opportunity created for artist to perform at State Theatre Jazz and African Nights.

PACOFS

Operation Vulindlela Incubator Programme

Over the next year, the aim is to successfully provide Resources and Practical experience to 6 local theatre productions, 12 Music Groups or individuals and employ approx. 12 facilitators to host the Workshops and Masterclasses.

The programme will provide on-hand incubation to artists that make it through the selection process in developing their projects or creating new content and PACOFS will provide tools of production and platform to showcase their content.

The incubator project will present 6 Exit productions for 12 music groups at the end of each cycle as part of the First Stages Festival. Incubates will also be afforded opportunities to participate in various other projects within the province as part of our Current Artistic Development program.

1,600,000

x6 Local Theatre Production.

Incubate 12 music groups or individual productions

Participation in various festivals organised by PACOFS

 

Total Incubators for 2015/16 FY

Total Individuals Incubated or Capacitated in 2015/16 FY

 

6 Incubators to be launched by July 2015

406

 

Total Incubators for 2016/17 FY

Total Estimate of Individuals Incubated or Capacitated in 2016/17 FY

 

6 Incubators functional in 2016/17

406

 
  1. Development Agencies

As outlined in the Estimates of National Expenditure, through their core programming, the Development Agencies will support:

Entity

Programme

Target Number

Budget

(in ZAR)

National Film & Video Foundation (NFVF)

Local content scripts developed annually

66

53,495,000

 

Local content films developed annually

38

 
 

Bursaries provided for film & video studies annually

63

 
 

Film festivals supported annually

16

 

National Arts Council

Individual artists supported annually

212

26,725,000

 

Arts programmes developed & successfully implemented annually

8

 
 

Flagship creative arts projects financially supported annually

3

 
 

Arts organisations receiving 3 year funding on an annual basis

91

 

A portion of these funds will directly benefit small business and co-operatives in the sector as these organisations are eligible for financial support in terms of the funding criteria of the NFVF and NAC.

07 June 2016 - NW1526

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Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1)&(2) No.

07 June 2016 - NW1019

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and TraditionalAffairs

1. In each case where a municipality has been threatened with having the supply of electricity cut off by Eskom, was a payment agreement entered into with Eskom in order to avert such a cut-off; if not, (a) why not and (b) what steps is his department taking to resolve the situation in each case; if so, in each case, when was each such an agreement reached and signed, (2) is the payment schedule (a) affordable and (b) reducing the specified municipalities' debt owed to Eskom; (3) has the specified municipalities complied with the terms of their respective agreements; if not, why not; (4) what is the current status of the inter-ministerial negotiations to resolve the impasse between municipalities and Eskom regarding (a) the billing period and (b) the interest charged by Eskom?.

Reply:

1 (a) (b). Yes, a process of entering into payment agreements between each of the affected municipalities is in its final stages. The Department of Co-operative Governance ((DCoG) in collaboration with Department of Public Enterprise (OPE), SALGA, Provincial COGTA's and Treasury conducted work sessions with the affected municipalities and Eskom. A detailed affordability analysis was conducted for each municipality taking into account its unique circumstances, the root causes for non-payment as well as other municipal commitments. This work resulted in new payment arrangements being drafted for Eskom's consideration. On approval by Eskom, these agreements will be formalised with municipalities by means of council resolutions. Eskom aims to have all the agreements in place with municipalities by end of May 2016.

2. (a). Yes, since the draft payment agreements were based on the affordability analysis; they will be affordable to municipalities.

(b) The debt will be reduced because one of the conditions of the agreements is that municipalities pay their current debt over and above the agreement amount to service outstanding debt. .

3. Eskom is still engaging and finalising discussions with the municipalities on agreed payment terms and to date there is no municipality that has finalised and signed the payment agreement with Eskom. Compliance will only be monitored once agreements are reached between Eskom and the municipalities.

4. During the inter-ministerial negotiations; Eskom made a commitment to consider waving the interest for municipalities who adhere to their payment terms and to consider reviewing the payment period. However; the response received from Eskom in that regard is as follows:
"Considering the Eskom financial situation and in line with the PFMA and MFMA requirements as well as the Supply Agreements held with our customers, Eskom has decided to continue to apply the 15 days payment period as well as charging Prime plus 5% on overdue amounts."

07 June 2016 - NW1603

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to her reply to question 415 on 8 March 2016, (a) what is the current status of appointing the new Chief Executive Officer of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa and (b) by what date will this process be completed?

Reply:

The process to appoint the GCEO of PRASA has progressed well and is at an advantage stage

07 June 2016 - NW1532

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1703E

Reply:

  1. Department was not approached by any political for funding;
  2. Falls away

07 June 2016 - NW1521

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i)(ii)(iii) No.

(b) No.

(2) (a) (i)(ii)(iii) No.

(b) No.

07 June 2016 - NW982

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What research has the National Development Agency conduct as part of its mandates in the (i) 2012-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and (v) 2015-16 financial years and (b) how has the specified research contributed to the improvement of the development sector in South Africa?

Reply:

(a) Research conducted:

(i) 2011/12

There were no research studies conducted during the year

(ii) 2012-13

  1. Civil Society Organization’s participation in Food security Activities in South Africa (March 2013)
  2. Civil Society Organization’s participation in Income generating Activities in South Africa (March 2013)
  3. Challenges faced by Early Childhood Development Sector in the Country (April 2012)
  4. A situational Analysis of Civil Society Organizations in the Western Cape (June 2012)

(iii) 2013-14

  1. Funding Constraints and Challenges faced by Civil Society Organizations in South Africa (June 2013)
  1. Framework for the Development of an annual state of development report (January 2014)
  1. Civil Society Organization’s participation in the MDG processes in South Africa (January 2014)
  2. State of poverty and its manifestation in the nine provinces of South Africa (March 2014)

(iv) 2014-15

  1. Community development foundation framework &capacity Development framework (March 2015)
  2. Enhancing active citizenry engagement in South Africa (March 2015)

(v) 2015-16

  1. Enhancing civil society participation in the South African Development Agenda : The role of CSOs (December 2015)
  2. South African government funding to non-profit organisations: what is the investment value? (February 2016)

(b) Research contribution

The research studies conducted by the NDA has contributed in new knowledge on how to improve programmes aimed at supporting the civil society sector, government planning and implementation of programmes for the civil society and making information available to the broader public through publications of the research in the NDA website. Some of the research has been used to inform debates and discussions with relevant organs of state for purposes of informing policy and programme planning. In addition, research reports are printed in hard copies and made available for the public in the NDA Provincial offices and NDA Advisory Centres. In addition, all NDA research reports are presented to a range of stakeholders, including civil society, government, private and international donors.

07 June 2016 - NW1130

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How many metropolitan police departments are there in South Africa, (b) what are their names and (c) how much funding was allocated to each of these metropolitan police departments (i) in the (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13 (cc) 2013-14 (dd) 2014-15 and (ee) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

Attached please find here: Reply
 

07 June 2016 - NW978

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) How many (i) non-governmental organisations and (ii) community-based organisations has the National Development Agency funded since its inception and (b) in each case, (i) how many of the specified organisations are (aa) still operational and (bb) not operational, (ii) why are the specified organisations no longer operational and (iii) what has happened to the services that they were providing?

Reply:

(a) The NDA has funded 2612 Community Based Organisations and Non-governmental organizations since inception. However, in the last five years, a total of 485 NGOs/CBOs were funded for which have hereunder provided the responses. The status of all organisations since inception cannot be confirmed as The NDA Grant making process works with funded projects for a period of 12 to 18 months. During this period our relationship with an organization is regulated by a Funding Agreement between the NDA and the CBO/NGO. At the end of the funding period, the NDA would develop an exit/sustainability plan for the organization and then the formal relations between the NDA and the organization ceases.

(b) (i) Of the 485 organisations funded in the last five years, 452 are still operating and providing services to communities. A total of 33 NGOs/CBOs are no longer operational. (ii) The reasons for their lack of operation include lack of funding since the completion of NDA funding and governance challenges, including conflict within the organisations. (iii) The activities that they were involved in have been transferred to other organisations within the area. To mitigate the challenges faced by organisations the NDA in partnership with the Department of Social Development has implemented a capacity building programme since 2013 which has trained 4244 NGOs/CBOs in all provinces, including organisations that may not have been directly funded by the NDA. The capacity building will result in sustainability for the organizations and their service delivery capacity.

07 June 2016 - NW1553

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(a) What amount did (i) the Office of The Presidency and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) the Office of The Presidency and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year? [

Reply:

The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) spent R1 598 million from a budget of R3 670 million. Statistics South Africa spent 6. 870 million from a budget of 5. 281 million.

07 June 2016 - NW1035

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) (a) How many (i) permanent and (ii) temporary employees are currently employed by the Tshwane Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) and (b) at what (i) salary band and (ii) skill level;(2) what is the detailed breakdown of the TMPD's expenditure for (a) the remuneration of councillors, (b) debt impairments, (c) contracted services and (d) depreciation and asset impairment (i) in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2015 to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

Attached please find here: Reply
 

07 June 2016 - NW969

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the Kabuso Investigative Report into the Makana Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape, (a) what action has he taken against those implicated in the report, (b) what plans does he have, if any, to recover any financial losses incurred by the guilty parties and (c) when will he table the Kabuso report, released in February 2010, in Parliament?

Reply:

The response below was provided by municipality:

(a) Following the recommendations of the Kabuso forensic report, the employment contracts of the Municipal Manager and Strategic Manager in the Office of the Mayor were terminated. Further, a committee was established consisting of councillors to address issues implicating councillors and an action plan was also submitted to Council in order to address issues implicating officials. This process is being coordinated by the Administrator.

(b) The municipality's legal representatives are engaging with those implicated with a view to recover the financial losses incurred by the municipality.

(c) I was not aware that the Kabuso report is supposed to be tabled in Parliament. The Administrator is dealing with this matter and would adhere to such a request.

07 June 2016 - NW1548

Profile picture: James, Ms LV

James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The national department of Human Settlement spent R 2,941,920.20 for advertising in the 2015-16 financial year.

Entities spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year

(a)(ii) 1. The EAAB spent R1, 172,583.00.

2. The HDA spent R1, 200, 209.39.

3. The NURCHA spent R178, 478.07.

4. The SHRA spent R189, 017.65.

5. The NHBRC spent R7,700,000.00.

6. The NHFC spent R433 975.00.

7. The RHLF spent R197, 280.29.

8. The CSOS spent R225, 000.00.

(b) (i) The department has budgeted for R1, 5 million in the 2016-17 financial year.

(b)(ii) Entities

1. The EAAB budgeted for R135,367.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

2. The HDA budgeted for R1, 311, 886.60 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

3. The NURCHA budgeted for R 400 000.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

4. The SHRA budgeted for R1, 6 000.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

5. The NHBRC budgeted for R30, 000, 000.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

6. The NHFC budgeted for R500 00.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

7. The RHLF budgeted for R210 000.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

8. The CSOS budgeted for R0.00 for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.