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07 October 2015 - NW3370

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)When will the construction of the pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke in the North West (a) start and (b) be completed; (2) (a) what will be the length of the pipeline and (b) how many mega litres of water will be transported per day, (c) what is the cost of the pipeline and (d) how will it be funded; (3) whether the total cost of the project is already funded; if not, (a) why not and (b) how will it be funded; if so, what are the different (i) amounts and (ii) sources of funding; (4) whether she received an approval from the SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) regarding the construction of the pipeline over their property; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether there exists an alternative plan for the pipeline if Sanral does not approve the planned construction on its land; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The construction of the pipeline will commence in March 2016.

(1)(b) The construction of the pipeline will be completed end of September 2016.

(2)(a) The length will be a 72 km and 350 mm diameter pipeline

(2)(b) 6.5 mega litres per day.

(2)(c) The total cost of the pipeline is R 72 million.

(2)(d) It will be funded by my Department through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG).

(3) Yes, the total cost of the project which is R403 million is already budgeted through RBIG in MTEF period

(3)(a) Falls away.

(3)(b) Falls away.

(3)(b)(i) Falls away.

(3)(b)(ii) Falls away.

(4) Yes, the SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) granted approval for servitude.

(5) Falls away.

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07 October 2015 - NW3590

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What amount will (a) her department and/or (b) the Department of Mineral Resources contribute to the (i) construction and (ii) operational costs of the proposed acid mine water desalination plants, (c) how will her department raise the specified funds for the specified plants and (d) will there be any consequences for programmes within her department which might suffer cuts; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has any plans in place to involve the private sector in the construction and implementation of the proposed project; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what is the projected (a) commencement and (b) completion date of the construction of the specified plants?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) For the current financial year, there is no fiscal-derived funding allocated by either my Department or the Department of Mineral Resources for the construction and operation of the proposed acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination plants (long-term solution) project.

(1)(c) The Vaal River System (VRS) Reconciliation Strategy has identified AMD reclamation and beneficial use thereof as one of the key pillars for ensuring water security in the VRS. Since reclaimed AMD will augment the yield of the System and benefits all water users reliant on the VRS, it is proposed that a portion of the AMD desalination cost is recovered through the VRS Raw Water Tariff, which is levied on all water users. The balance of cost is proposed for recovery through an “environmental levy” that may be invoked in the mining sector. This dual cost-recovery mechanism ensures equity by invoking both the “user pays” and “polluter pays” principles. Any funding deficit that may result is likely to be addressed through future fiscal allocations. Having considered the foregoing funding and cost-recovery proposal, my Department was given the approval of the National Treasury to fund the AMD long-term solution project off-budget using the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP) borrowing programme (loan facility) and recover cost through the VRS Raw Water Tariff. Supplementation of the cost recovery through the proposed environmental levy is under development.

(1)(d) Irrespective of the funding model that will apply for the proposed desalination of AMD, that model will not jeopardize funding allocations to other programmes.

(2) Any potential role of the private sector in construction and/ or implementation of the proposed project will be in accordance with Government’s policy on public sector procurement for the acquisition of goods and services.

(3) It is projected that construction will commence in 2018 and would last for a minimum of 2 years. Operations are thus likely to be effective from the 2020-2021 financial year.

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07 October 2015 - NW3538

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether any parts of Botshabelo Section K and Mangaung still use the bucket system; if so, (a) how many and (b) when is her department planning to completely eradicate the use of the bucket system in the specified areas?

Reply:

(a) Botshabelo has a total of 757 Buckets of which 155 are located in Section K. Buckets are scattered throughout the settlement and mostly on informal stands. Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality has a total of 1 347 Bucket toilets to be eradicated.

(b) My Department does not fund Metropolitan Municipalities for sanitation programmes since such municipalities receive the Urban Settlement Development Grant (USDG) from the Department of Human Settlements to attend to issues related to the Built Environment which include the provision of municipal services, roads, human settlements etc.

(c) My Department will monitor the programme by the Metro to eradicate all VIP and Bucket Toilets over the next four years.

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07 October 2015 - NW3486

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2727 on 31 August 2015 regarding the building demolition cost of R6 282 853, (a) which buildings were demolished, (b) what was the reason for demolishing each of the specified buildings, (c) when was each specified building demolished and (d) what is the name of the company that demolished each of the specified buildings; (2) (a) what is meant by land matters, (b) what are the relevant details of the breakdown of the R11 815 024 that was spent on the specified land matters and (c) who were the recipients of each specified amount; (3) whether her department has taken any steps to date to dredge the Hazelmere Dam of the silt build-up in an effort to restore the storage capacity of the specified dam in anticipation of rainfall; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The following buildings were demolished:

  • Boys' hostel
  • dining hall and Dormitories
  • Green house
  • Fruit room
  • Garage and carport
  • Music room
  • Outside rooms
  • Prayer room
  • Guard house
  • Store room
  • Workshop and storerooms
  • 2x dwellings
  • Garage and rooms.

Other activities under this contract included:

  • Protection of existing graves
  • Construction of a memorial monument
  • Termination and the moving of underground services; sewer, water and electricity
  • Construction of new sewer septic tanks and laying of sewer pipe lines
  • Decommissioning and demolishing of existing sewer septic tanks and
  • Upgrading of the existing alternative access road

(1)(b) The buildings were affected by the raising of the dam wall and were within the dam boundary line.

(1)(c) The buildings were demolished during the contract period, start date 02 February to end date November 2013.

(1)(d) All buildings were demolished by NCG Oosthuizen Investment CC.

(2)(a) All issues related to acquisition of land by my Department.

(2)(b) A review of the cost revealed the changed total as shown in the Table below:

RECIPIENTS

DETAIL BREAKDOWN
EXPENDITURE ON LAND MATTERS
(excl. VAT)

   

Valuator - Turnover Trading 243

R 1 232 758

Land Surveyor - Button & O’Connor INC

R 96 802

Expropriation of properties:

 

Oakford Priory Investments (PTY)

R 10 523 000

Roman Catholic Mission

R 92 447

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

R 11 945 007

(3) My Department did not commence any dredging at Hazelmere as yet. This would be a process to be considered once a dam basin management analyses indicates this to be an economic viable operations option. Continued silt survey records indicated sections of the basin to be prone to sedimentation but this is to be mitigated by the raising of the dam wall.

My Department is in the process of developing dam basin management protocols that will guide on siltation prevention operations as well as dredging where determined as viable.

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07 October 2015 - NW3419

Profile picture: More, Ms E

More, Ms E to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether her department meets the Government’s 2% employment equity target for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Currently, my Department is not meeting the set targets of 2% for the employment of people with disabilities.

However my Department has in 2012, established an Employment Equity (EE) Forum which developed and an approved EE Plan to address issues of gender and disability.

Since the inception of the forum in 2012 there has been a slow but significant movement in the appointment of people with disabilties from 0.28% in April 2011 to 0.76% as at April 2014. Currently, the percentatge of people with disabilities as at July 2015 is 0.78%. (see below movement of appointment PWDs)

My Department plans to target vacant funded posts when advertising for people with disabilities in the future to reach the target of 2% or more, and also work closely with the Directorate Gender and Mainstreaming to address isues of gender and disabilities.

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07 October 2015 - NW3383

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether each water board in the country has an essential service agreement in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of each such agreement?

Reply:

Amatola Water

Amatola Water does not have an existing agreement of essential services as this matter is currently being discussed at the Amanzi Bargaining Council in an attempt to have a standardised approach amongst all the Water Boards.

Bloem Water

Bloem Water has an Essential Services Agreement as negotiated with labour, facilitated by the Council for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA). The agreement specifies categories of employment designated as essential services such as treatment, security, pipeline teams and artisans. The Amanzi Bargaining Council is currently attending to an Essential Services framework as a guideline for adoption by respective water boards having identified their designated job categories.

Lepelle Northern Water

Lepelle Northern Water (LNW) does not have an Essential Service Agreement. This is due to the fact that organised Labour within LNW is refusing to engage on the same in order to sign one. Organised labour’s reason for refusal is that the agreement is divisive. In case of threatened industrial action we rely on clause 1 (d) of government gazette no 18276, vol 387 dated 12 September 1997 read together with chapter iv of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 as amended.

Magalies Water

Magalies Water does not have an essential services agreement. A draft agreement is in place for all Water Boards at Amanzi Bargaining Council to be discussed at the next council meeting to be held on 17 September 2015.

Mhlathuze Water

Mhlathuze Water (MW) does not have an essential service agreement in place yet. An application was made to declare MW as essential service. After extensive investigation by the Essential Services Committee where presentations were made by MW and NEHAWU, MW was formally declared an essential service on 22 June 2015. The Essential Services Committee undertook to provide an essential service agreement to MW which is still awaited. Since Mhlathuze Water has been declared an essential service, all employees within Mhlathuze Water are deemed essential employees up until the minimum service level agreement is concluded.

Overberg Water

Overberg Water does not have an existing agreement of essential services in place. Engagements are currently planned with the Trade Unions, being the South African Municipal Workers Union and Independent Municipal and Allied Trade Union to establish an Essential Services Agreement.

Rand Water

Rand Water, by the nature of its mandate in terms of the Water Services Act, 108 of 1997, performs an essential service in supplying and distributing potable water in its area of supply. As far back as 2004, Rand Water and its Trade Unions at the time, being the South African Municipal Workers Union and the Rand Water Staff Association, established an Essential Services task team to investigate and determine which services are essential. The Rand Water Minimum Services Agreement was signed by all relevant parties on 30 September 2004. In terms of Section 70 of the Labour Relations Act, 66 of 1995 (as amended, the Rand Water Minimum Service Agreement was ratified by the Essential Services Committee of the CCMA in 12 January 2005.

In essence the agreement:

    1. Indicates that parties commit to provision of essential services of providing water during any industrial action.
    2. Defines Essential Service/s, Key Posts and Maintenance Service.
    3. Has two annexures of specified positions that are required during strike action.
    4. Directs parties to meet and consult on key posts.

However should there be, deviation or non-compliance to the agreement, Rand Water reserves its right to engage replacement staff.

Amanzi Bargaining Council, to which all water utilities belong, is in the process of developing an industry / sector wide “Minimum Services Agreement”.

Sedibeng Water

Sedibeng Water has a Minimum Service Agreement in place. The agreement provides for minimum services to be provided upon labour engaging on any strike action.

The agreement lists teams that are attached to Water Purification, Maintenance and Distribution functions of the organisation. The agreement ensures that water and sanitation services continue un-interrupted during the strike action.

Umgeni Water

Umgeni Water does not have a signed Minimum Service agreement, it still in a draft format which have been discussed with NEHAWU. We (The Department) are busy engaging NEHAWU to finalise the agreement.

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07 October 2015 - NW3376

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In terms of the latest information available to her department, (a) how many waste water treatment works are currently overflowing into nearby water bodies or areas, (b) where are they situated and (c) what is the severity of each spill; (2) what system does her department utilise in order to (a) detect and (b) rapidly respond to sewage spillage and/or overflow from waste water treatment works?

Reply:

(1) The latest information with regard to spillages that have been reported is taken from those received from April 2015 to date. The number of cases reported to my Department are 19 and the cases are captured to include all the 9 provinces. Refer to Annexure A.

(2)(a) My Department through the various provincial offices undertake planned audits for the Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTWs) against their water use license, and also attend to queries received from consumers and those reported through the media as a means to attend to spillages resulting from the WWTWs, pumpstation and manholes.

(2)(b) In areas where spillages are as a result of manholes or pumpstation and municipalities have challenges to address the spillages, the rapid response unit is despatched to the affected municipality. However, Water Service Authorities (WSAs) are able to address spillages in-house if it’s detected early. In cases of a overflow from a WWTWs, nature of overflow dictates intervention and assistance needed. As a result the nature of the overflow will determine if the matter can be addressed rapidly or if it will require the plant to be upgraded to address the overflow.

In areas where it is as a result of overloading due to capacity constraint, such plants are prioritised through various support programmes of my Department for allocation of funds (Regional Bulk Infrastructure, Municipal Infrastructure Grand and Accelerated Community infrastructure programme) to upgrade the plants or in other cases refurbishment to ensure the plant operates efficiently with functional equipments that will be able to handle loading coming into the plant. The overflow as a result of design capacity constraint may not necessarily be addressed rapidly due to the fact that the upgrades are often multi year projects which take longer to construct before the overloading is completely addressed.

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Annexure A

Region

Sector

Investigations & Inspections Reported

Investigations & Inspections Investigated or Inspected

Water User License Yes

Water User License No

Non-compliance Letters

Pre-directives

Severity of each case

Eastern Cape

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

11

11

0

11

0

7

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment hence pre-directives were issued.

Free State

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

1

2

0

0

3

0

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

Gauteng

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

2

2

0

2

0

0

Cases reported were regarded to be severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

Limpopo

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

1

1

0

1

0

0

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

Mpumalanga

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

1

2

0

1

0

1

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

North West

Government [National/Prov]

0

2

0

0

0

1

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

North West

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

2

1

0

2

0

0

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

Western Cape

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

1

2

0

2

0

0

Each cases reported were severe based on the fact that spillages reported has potential to pollute the environment

National

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

19

23

0

21

3

10

Cases reported not only for wastewater treatment works however also includes manholes that are close to streams and rivers. This has been taken with great urgency and prompted investigations that led to issuing of directives and put those affected WSAs under regulatory surveillance by the department.

07 October 2015 - NW3375

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to her media statement on 24 February 2015 on security of water supply (details furnished), (a) at what stage of development is the master plan for water resource infrastructure and (b) what is the estimated date of its completion?

Reply:

(a) The development of a Master Plan for water resource infrastructure is currently in the information gathering stage entailing aspects such as condition assessment of existing infrastructure and updating of the asset management plan.

It should be noted that the Second Edition of the National Water Resource Strategy that was published in 2013 already indicates key information on new water resource infrastructure projects that are currently under development and this shall form part of the master plan.

(b) The development of the Master Plan is estimated to be completed at the end of August 2016.

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07 October 2015 - NW3372

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department will intervene to address the malfunctioning waste water treatment works in Humansdorp in the Kouga Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department is aware of the disastrous conditions in Vergenoeg due to the spillages from the plant; if so, what plan has she put in place to address the specified matter; (3) whether the specified plant was given a Green Drop score in the last reporting cycle; if not, why not; if so, what was the score; (4) whether her department has taken any action against the specified municipality in terms of any legislation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. No, my Department has not intervened on this matter yet. The Kouga Local Municipality (LM) is the Water Services Authority, Water Services Provider and owner of infrastructure and is responsible for undertaking the necessary upgrades. The Kouga LM has secured funding through the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform to upgrade the Kwa Nomzamo Waste Water treatment Works (WWTW). My Department will therefore not intervene until the Kouga LM has shown that they are unable to perform their functions.

My Department has reacted as regulator and catchment manager as follows:

  • A non-compliance letter, dated 25 June 2015, was sent to Kouga LM addressing both the KwaNomzamo WWTW and the Koraal Pump Station. The Kouga LM responded with a reply dated 13 July 2015 (Refer to attached letter).
  • A meeting was held on 24 July 2015 between the officials from my Department and the Kouga LM technical manager to get clarity and progress on this and other matters.

 

2. Yes my Department is aware of the impact the failing WWTW is having on the environment and local communities; hence the actions taken.

The Kouga LM, in their response letter of 13 July 2015, has confirmed a partnership with the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform in 2013 to upgrade the WWTW; and on 3 June 2014 appointed a PSP to develop upgrade plans. On 4 March 2015 the Technical Report on the Refurbishment and Upgrading of the KwaNomzamo WWTW was received and is progressing to the tendering stage.

Regarding access control and fencing of the works, the Kouga Council approved a budget of R 2,0m to fence the said works. This project was approved by a full Council and a contractor has already been appointed in August 2015.

The Kouga LM is also working with local industries to ensure pre-treatment to reduce the organic and hydraulic load on the KwaNomzamo WWTW.

3. The plant assessment was done during the last green drop assessment in 2013 and the plant received a score of 57.44%. This score placed the WWTW in the category ‘50% – 80% - Fair performance, ample room for improvement’.

4. Yes, My Department has intervened from legal perspective as follows:

  • A non-compliance letter, dated 25 June 2015, was sent to Kouga LM addressing both the KwaNomzamo WWTW and the Koraal Pump Station.
  • Following their attached response dated 13 July 2015, a meeting was held on 24 July 2015 between the officials from my Department and the Kouga LM technical manager to get clarity and progress on this and other matters.

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07 October 2015 - NW3369

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) When will the new water purification plant in Bloemhof in the North West be completed and (b) what will the capacity of the plant be; (2) (a) what is the total cost of the specified plant and (b) how will it be funded; (3) whether any outstanding funding is required to complete the project; if so, (a) what amount and (b) how will it be financed; (4) who will be running the specified plant; (5) which areas will receive water from the specified plant?

Reply:

(1)(a) The new water purification plant in Bloemhof in the North West will be completed in January 2017.

(1)(b) The capacity of the plant is from 10 Mℓ/d to 25 Mℓ/d.

(2)(a) The total cost of the plant is R403 million.

(2)(b) It will be funded by my Department through Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG).

(3) No outstanding funding is required.

(3)(a) Falls away.

(3)(b) Falls away.

(4) The plant will be operated by Sedibeng Water Board on behalf of Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality.

(5) The following areas will receive water from the plant.

  • ScheizerReneke Town;
  • Ipelegeng Township;
  • Bloemhof Town; and
  • Boitumelong Township.

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29 September 2015 - NW3220

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Why is the wastewater treatment plant in Cradock which is under the control of the Chris Hani District Municipality and polluting the Great Fish River in the Eastern Capenon-functional; (2) whether her department has taken any steps to stop the pollution; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether sampling of water has been done (a) at the plant and (b) downstream from the plant to ascertain e-coli levels for each month during the period 1 July 2012 to 30 July 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the results for each month during the specified period; (4) whether there are any plans to upgrade the plant; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) what is the estimated cost; (5) what is the (a) current capacity of the plant in megalitres per day and (b) inflow currently?

Reply:

(1) The non-functionality of Cradock Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW) is attributed to the Water Service Authority functions transitioning from InxubaYeThemba Local Municipality to Chris Hani District Municipality, as it has been the case since 2014. This has been an inheritance of financial burdens which has adversely affected the whole operation and maintenance at the plant and at the sewage pump stations.Payments to maintenance service providers had been delayed as such some arms of the plant (motors, aerators, pumps, etc) that have since broken down and have not been repaired or replaced.

These are now attended to and the Cradock WWTWwill be fully repaired and will function at an optimum level in due course.

(2) My Department has taken steps to notify and request the Municipality to take corrective steps in rectifying the pollution of the Great Fish River water resource caused by the
non-functionality of Cradock WWTW and its associated sewer network infrastructure.

The following are amongst a number of steps taken by my Department:

  • Firstly, my Department issued a non-complianceletteron 2 April 2013 informing the Municipality about the poor quality effluent discharged and the incorrect disposal of the sewage sludge from the Cradock WWTWs, copy of letter attached as Annexure A.
  • Secondly, officials from my Department’s Provincial Office: Eastern Capeconducted aninvestigation on 1 August 2014 into the allegedpollution and it was revealed that pollution still persists. Therefore,myDepartment issuedanother non-compliance letter to the Municipalityon 11 August 2014 regarding pollution incidents entailing sewage spillages from manholes in Cradock, copy of letter attached as Annexure B/
  • Thirdly, myDepartment also served the Municipality with non-compliance letter on 25 September 2014 following another site inspection that was conducted on
    16 September 2014 informing the Municipality about poor quality effluent discharged by the Cradock WWTWs and requesting the Municipality to submit an action plan taken by the municipality in rectifying the situation within 14 days.
  • Thefourth interaction was a meeting that was held between Chris Hani District Municipality, Great Fish Water User Association,InxubaYeThemba Local Municipality and myDepartment at the Municipal Offices in Cradock on 10 February 2015 ,refer to attached Annexure C for minutes with actions and attendance register).

The aim was to further engage and persuade the Chris Hani DM as Water Services Authority to take action and correct the poor quality effluent being discharged by the Cradock WWTW into the Great Fish River. In this meeting the Municipality indicated the challenges (as mentioned in (1) above) promising to attend to the challenges with a detailed written response by 16 February 2015 as requested by myDepartment as was done even in previous communiqués, refer to attached Annexure D for the minutes of the .

It should be noted that there has not been any written response as yet from the Municipality after these engagements.

During the last inspection which was conducted on 12 August 2015, the presence of the Contractor on site was noted on site repairing some of the various arms of theWWTW.

(3) Table 1below is the summary of the effluent quality discharged by the (a) Cradock Wastewater Treatment Works and the (b) Great Fish River, downstream of the discharge point from the Cradock Works:

Table 1

Sampling Dates

  1. Cradock WWTW
  1. Downstream of Cradock WWTW

July 2012

0 cfu/100ml

58 cfu/100ml

August 2012

66 cfu/100ml

128 cfu/100ml

September 2012

7 500 cfu/100ml

86 cfu/100ml

October 2012

0 cfu/100ml

400 cfu/100ml

January 2013

2 cfu/100ml

7 000 cfu/100ml

March 2013

10 cfu/100ml

3 400 cfu/100ml

April 2013

0 cfu/100ml

4 400 cfu/100ml

May 2013

7 200 cfu/100ml

420 000 cfu/100ml

June 2013

520 cfu/100ml

164 cfu/100ml

May 2014

0 cfu/100ml

24 000 cfu/100ml

June 2014

0 cfu/100ml

24 000 cfu/100ml

September 2014

35 000 cfu/100ml

1 900 cfu/100ml

December 2014

37 000 cfu/100ml

40 000 cfu/100ml

February 2015

390 000 cfu/100ml

710 cfu/100ml

June 2015

4 600 000 cfu/100ml

42 000 cfu/100ml

August 2015

108 cfu/100ml

294 cfu/100ml

It should be noted my Department also done water sampling in August month for both Cradock WWTWs and the Great Fish River, downstream of the discharge point from the Cradock Works and the results are 108 cfu/100ml and 294 cfu/100ml respectively.

(4) No, the Department has not taken any plans to upgrade the WWTWs. The dysfunctional elements of the WWTWsare largely due to the lack of operation and maintenance at the WWTW and reticulation infrastructure, which if properly managed will render the works effective in its treatment of the sewage received.

The Upgrading of the WWTW would not seem to benecessary at this point unless further major developments are anticipated in the area. However, the Water Service Authority is currently attending to these repairs.

(4)(a) Falls Away.

(4)(b) Falls Away.

(5)(a) The current capacity of the plant is 8.3 mega litres per day.

(5)(b) The currently inflow is 5.6 mega litres per day average.

 

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29 September 2015 - NW3221

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether there has been an improvement of service and fewer water interruptions since the Chris Hani District Municipality became the water service provider in the municipality from 1 July 2014; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department will assist the specified municipality with ageing and inadequate infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department will assist with the non-functioning new standby generator at the main pumping station; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) will her department intervene to improve the water service in the specified municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what is the latest Blue Drop score for the purification plant in the specified municipality?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Blue Drop System does show that during the period when InxubaYethemba Local Municipality (LM) was in control, the number of samples which were taken were higher (430 per year) than when Chris Hani DM was in control (122 samples per year). The quality compliance improved though in terms of turbidity (from 47,1% to 85,1%) and ecoli(from95% to 100%) since Chris Hani DM took over. The challenge currently is on the billing system as users have not been getting their accounts on services of the InxubaYethemba LM since Chris Hani DM took over the Water Services Provider (WSP) function. The turnaround time to repair leaks is still a challenge, but there is constant intervention from the Department through the Rapid Response Unit(RRU). Unfortunately, it cannot be said that the water service has improved since the Chris Hani DM took over.
  2. There is currently no funding dedicated for the aging and inadequate infrastructure but the technical support is provided.
  3. The Chris Hani DM purchased standby generators for both main water and main sewer pump stations which are currently the subject of the dispute with the service provider. According to Chris Hani DM, the dispute is on the verge of being resolved with the service provider.
  4. Yes, there are ongoing interventions on a call down basis through the RRU and Operation and Maintenance O&M technical support.
  5. The latest Blue Drop score is 71%.

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29 September 2015 - NW3222

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department is monitoring the quality of the water in the Great Fish River; if not, why not; if so, (a) how is this being done and (b) how often; (2) whether the Great Fish River is part of the River Health Scheme; if not, why not; (3) whether her department has put any measures in place to prevent the pollution of bulk water schemes downstream of the Cradock Wastewater Treatment plant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she can provide the latest Green Drop status of the Cradock Wastewater Treatment plant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether any action was taken by the Chris Hani District Municipality in response to her department’s notice to comply within 14 days which expired on 11 February 2015; if not, what action did her department take in response to this; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes ,my Department is monitoring the quality of water in the Great Fish River.

(1)(a) Through sampling of the water quality.

(1)(b) Monitoring is conducted on a quarterly basis.

(2) Yes, it is part of River Health Programme.

(3) My Department has issued a number of regulatory actions to the polluters. Action such as Non compliance notice and Pre-Directive are issued. Whilst Chris Hani District

Municipality (CHDM) did attend to some of the issues and did provide an action plan, this plan was not detailed enough to address the non compliances.

(4) The last compliance inspection was conducted on 16 September 2014 and was not in good condition. A non-compliance letter and a pre-directive were issued. Further meetings were held to discuss the status of the system.

(5) At the July 2015 site visit it was observed that repairs were being conducted to a horizontal aerator and to one of the two circular clarifiers. Two of the vertical shaft aerators were in operation and eleven of the horizontal shaft aerators were defunct and in various states of disrepair. The two inclined screw pumps were out of order and appeared to be partly dismantled or under repair. NW3823E

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07 September 2015 - NW1532

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her replies to question 89 and question 619 on 23 March 2015 and 24 March 2015, respectively, how does she reconcile the calculated average cost of R96 491.00 for a toilet in the Eastern Cape and the cost of R9 500.00 for installing a ventilated improved toilet in the Eastern Cape; (2) (a) what is the name of the contractor who built the 57 toilets in the Eastern Cape, (b) when (i) were the toilets completed and (ii) was payment made to the contractor, (c) for the construction of how many toilets did the contract go out on tender and (d) in which municipalities were the 57 toilets built; (3)(a) what is the name of the contractor who built the 530 toilets in the Northern Cape,(b) when (i) were the toilets completed and (ii) was payment made to the contractor, (c) for the construction of how many toilets did the contract go out on tender, (d) in which municipalities were the 530 toilets built and (e) why was the calculated average cost of building a toilet R40 943.00?

Reply:

(1) With reference to question 89 of 10 March 2015 the response was adequately provided and was addressing the average cost of installing a Ventilated Improved Pit (VIP) latrine at the cost of R9 500.00 (Nine thousand five hundred) that includes the top and underground structure, health and hygiene education, project management cost and construction costs, whereas the response to question 619 of 6 March 2015 was with regard to the Bucket Eradication Programme.

(2) The name of the contractors who built the 57 toilets in Makana Local Municipality: Eastern Cape is Tyolumnqa Civils and Andile Plant Hire. Construction was completed between November 2013 and March 2014 and payment was made to the contractor. The contract went out on tender for the construction of 737 toilets.

(3) The names of the contractors who built the 363 toilets in Sol Plaatjie Municipality: Northern Cape are Reyoko Construction and Designs and LFP Trading. Construction was completed in July 2014 and payment was made to the contractor. The contract went out on tender for the construction of 954 toilets.

The Rural Household Infrastructure Grant (RHIG) provides dry, on-site sanitation at an average cost of between R9 500 (Single pit toilet) and R11 500 (Double pit toilet) however, variations may occur from province to province and may marginally increase the cost due to location of the project and the availability of materials which at times will be imported or transported from other provinces, if adequate stock is not available from local suppliers.

With regard to Water Borne Sanitation, the cost of providing a new toilet structure in urban and peri-urban areas is between R12 000 to R15 000. This does not include the water and sewer reticulation network and other direct or indirect cost associated with the project. This programme does not provide sanitation in rural areas.

Requesting the Honorable Member to clarify on the referred calculated average cost of building a toilet at the cost of R96 491.00 and R40 943.00.

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04 September 2015 - NW2791

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has effectively stopped (a) raw and untreated sewerage and (b) agricultural, mining and industrial operation contaminants from leaking into streams and rivers during the period 1 May 2009 up to 30 June 2015, and had therefore succeeded in preserving the quality of water and thereby ensuring that the water was safe for animal and human consumption and suitable for irrigating crops for local as well as export purposes; if not, what is the extent and the reasons for the Government’s failure in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of her department’s successes?

Reply:

(a) Raw and untreated sewerage is caused by many factors such as skills shortages in municipalities, aging and overloaded infrastructure and lack of maintenance. My Department is responding to this threat by implementing programmes such as Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant, Municipal Water Infrastructure Grant and Accelerated Community Infrastructure Programme. In addition, the Green and Blue Drops reports are compiled annually to provide an indication on the level of compliance of wastewater treatment works and whether conditions of authorisation are met. Furthermore, my Department provides the necessary support for the implementation of the recommendations in the reports. The discharge of raw or partially treated sewage into the water resource is treated as a pollution incident and my Department has enforcement measures that are taken in order to ensure that mitigation measures are implemented by the wastewater treatment owner to address and minimise the pollution.

(b) Yes, for the period in question, my Department had and continues to maintain stringent measures for the protection of water resources (and the general environment) from mining, agricultural and industrial impacts. In this regard, my Department has invoked principles of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998) to ensure that mines, agriculture and industries take measures to ensure unauthorised mining, agricultural and industrial-impacted discharges are terminated or treated to a suitable standard before discharging to the environment. Furthermore, my Department has implemented mega civil projects to ensure that mine water (acid mine drainage) in Gauteng is mitigated. My Department’s ongoing regulation and enforcement measures will ensure that any current and future mining, agricultural and industrial impacts on the water resources are adequately addressed.

With regard to Agriculture, my Department has during this period embarked on continuous compliance monitoring for agricultural water use activities and annual targets are set on the Annual Business Plans; furthermore my Department through water use authorisations instructs agricultural water users to exercise good farming practices such as using strip vegetation within a 50 year flood line of the river to prevent run-off with pesticides or fertilisers from polluting the resources.

My Department also instructs water users to comply with all water use license conditions, which include conditions for the prevention of contaminants from polluting streams, rivers and groundwater, as set in the respective entitlements through audits.

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04 September 2015 - NW3223

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Did National Treasury approve her department’s requested rollover of (a) R1 600 899 000 for Programme 1, 2, 4 and 5 and (b) R1 557 184 000 in respect of each economic classification from the 2014-15 to the 2015-16 financial year; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what is the implication of this decision; if so, when?

Reply:

National Treasury has not yet approved my Department’s request for rollovers of R1 600 899 000 for Programme 1, 2, 4 and 5; and R1 557 184 000 in respect of each economic classification from the 2014-15 to the 2015-16 financial year.

National Treasury will only communicate the outcome of the rollover process on or before 11 September 2015 through the approved allocation letters as per the Guidelines of 2015 Adjustment Estimates of National Expenditure.

The non-approval of the requested rollover funds will necessitate the need for my Department to reprioritise the existing allocations for 2015/16 financial year within the programmes. This will result in the rescheduling of some of the infrastructure projects earmarked for the current year.

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04 September 2015 - NW3225

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the War on Leaks programme, (a) how many of the 3 000 persons to be trained in the 2015-16 financial year have started their training and (b) when will they start working; (2) how many of the (a) 15 000 in total and (b) 3 000 to be trained in the 2015-16 financial year will be trained as (i) water agents, (ii) artisans and (iii) plumbers; (3) (a) at which institutions will the 15 000 unemployed young people receive training and (b) what type of qualification will they receive; (4) how will the training of the 15 000 persons be financed over the next three financial years; (5) whether, beside the War on Leaks programme and the appointment of Rand Water as the implementing agent, her department has any other plans or programmes to curb the high level of water losses in the country; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) A total of 800 persons have started receiving training in July 2015 and as from September a further 2200 persons will start receiving training.

(1)(b) The trained persons will start working after completion of their 36 months / 3 years training programme .Water Agents that will be trained will complete their training after ten months and could start working thereafter.

(2)(a) Below is the breakdown of the15000 to be trained in the financial year 2015-16:

15000

Trades and quantities

Plumbers

Artisans

Water agent

 

7500

5000

2500

(2)(b) Below is the breakdown of the 3000 to be trained in the financial year 2015-16:

3000 Phase 1 FY – 2015/16

Trades and quantities

Plumbers

Artisans

Water agent

 

1500

1000

500

-2-

(3)(a) The unemployed young people will be trained at various EWSETA accredited training institutions, TVETS(Technical Vocational Education and Training), municipalities and water boards in the nine provinces.

(3)(b) Artisans will be trade tested Artisans at the end of the training period, Water Agents will receive a qualification that is comprised of unit standard bearing credits to enable them to build up this basic qualification into a higher qualification. Plumbers will receive formal plumber qualifications from the respective accreditation bodies.

(4) My Department will fund this project over the 5 year project period through the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF).

(5) Yes, my Department has other plans to curb the high level of water losses in the country. There are initiatives such as the following:

  (a)The “No Drop” regulatory programme, which serves as a guideline for municipalities to develop strategies, plans to reduce water demand, water losses and non-revenue water.

  (b)  Campaigns to educate the public on the scarcity of water and also to encourage water conservation and demand management.

   (c) Training programme for councilors to institutionalise water conservation and demand management within the municipalities.

  (d) Municipal Self-Assessment System, which the municipalities use to conduct self-assessment in various areas including water conservation and demand management.

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04 September 2015 - NW1492

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Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) How many invoices from private contractors to her department currently remain unpaid for longer than 30 days and (b) in each case, what (i) are the details of the (aa) contractor and (bb) services provided and (ii) what is the (aa) date of the invoice and (bb) reason why the invoice was not paid within 30 days?

Reply:

(a) The Department currently has a total 984 invoices from private contractors that are unpaid for longer than 30 days.

(b) Refer to the attached Annexure A for a detailed list.

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04 September 2015 - NW2602

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her reply to question 1756 on 26 May 2015, has the Water Tribunal started with their work; if not, why not; if so, how many cases have been resolved; (2) how many cases are outstanding (a) that the previous tribunal did not deal with and (b) in total as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the Water Tribunal has started with their work. There are no finalized cases. However, the Water Tribunal had its first hearing on the 22 July 2015 to 24 July 2015 and the cases were not finalised and were postponed to 27 August 2015 to 28 August 2015.

(2)(a) As at August 2012 when the Water Tribunal term of office came to an end a total of 124 cases were outstanding.

(2)(b) The Department currently has a total of 313 outstanding cases.

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04 September 2015 - NW2823

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether the eThekwini Municipality took any steps to ensure that the water and sanitation infrastructure would be able to cope with increased demand before approval for (a) residential and (b) commercial developments on the KwaZulu-Natal North Coast was considered; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Requesting the Honourable Member to refer the question to the Minister of Corporative Governance and Traditional Affairs who is in a better position to respond to issues relating to the eThekwini Municipality.

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31 August 2015 - NW3088

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the most recent water quality monitoring statistics, (a) which 10 South African rivers are considered the most high risk due to levels of faecal coliform and (b) on which dates were the tests conducted on the specified rivers; (2) what is the (a) percentage risk and (b) planned remedial action for each specified river?

Reply:

  1. The Department of Water and Sanitation through the National Microbial Monitoring Programme (NMMP) provide the information needed to assess and manage the potential health risks to water uses related to faecal pollution of South African’s surface water resources. (a) The NMMP points are hotspots related and all the registered sites (217) are considered high risk and ranking them depend on a number of factors i.e. season, low and high rainfall period, year of assessment etc and (b) monitoring is an on-going process on a monthly/fortnightly basis.
  2. The potential health risk associated with the use of faecal polluted water is based on four water uses or fitness for uses; namely
  • Drinking untreated water;
  • Drinking after limited treatment (domestic treatment);
  • Irrigation of crops that can be eaten raw; and
  • Full or partial contact/recreational activities.

(2)(a) All the reports (i.e. Annual/quarterly state of water & NMMP bi-monthly) indicate that there is a high risk (100 % risk) associated with drinking untreated water directly from all NMMP hotspots sites / rivers and the risks varies (low, moderate and high) for other fitness for uses at a given period.

(2)(b) The main source of faecal pollution is discharges from poorly maintained or dysfunctional sewage treatment plants into these hotspots rivers and the Department has come up with the Green Drop System to ensure proper management of waste water treatment works or progressive improvement in their operation so as not to impact negatively on the water bodies into which they discharge (i.e. to improve the quality of the effluent). The water use upgrades licenses of other wastewater treatment plants are being assessed and there is ongoing intervention by the Department to assist the municipalities experiencing challenges. The Department is aware that there are still areas (i.e. villages & some informal settlements) experiencing challenges with regard to basic sanitation services (pit latrines/bucket system) and the possible impact and threat they can pose to water resources if not well managed. Municipalities with challenges are being assisted to get access to the Municipal Infrastructure Grant to address sanitation needs.

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31 August 2015 - NW2934

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Why is the Groblersdal Wastewater Treatment Plant in the Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality not in working order; (2) whether her department has done anything to assist the specified municipality to get the specified plant in working order; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) has any water tests been done at the specified plant’s outlet into the Olifants River since 1 January 2010; if not, why not; if so, what are the results of the specified tests; (4) has she taken any action against the specified municipality or any individual for polluting the river; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what is the specified plant’s current Green Drop status?

Reply:

 

  1. The plant is currently not in working order because the plant was affected by floods during 2014. In addition, theft and vandalism of mechanical and electrical equipment contributed to the plant not working properly.

(2) My Department has not done any intervention since the Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality proactively appointed the Lepelle Northern Water Board under a bulk contract to operate and maintain the plant. The Lepelle Northern Water is in the process of finalizing the appointment of a service provider to refurbish the Works (the process is at adjudication stage of appointment of the service provider). It is envisage that the plant will be fully restored to its normal operational status during December 2015.

(3) Yes, tests have been done at the plant's outlet. Test results are attached as Annexure A.

  1. Yes, a non-compliance notification has been issued to the municipality for not taking reasonable measures to prevent pollution from occurring. However, the municipality is in the process to refurbish mechanical and electrical components of the waste water plants. This is set to improve the quality of effluent prior to discharge.

(5) 29.76 %.

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31 August 2015 - NW3087

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) How many dams are owned by her department, (b) where is each specified dam located and (c) what is the (i) storage capacity, (ii) current level and (iii) safety-risk status of each specified dam?

Reply:

(a) There are 320 dams on the departmental register country wide.

(b) Refer to Appendix A for locations of all the dams.

(c)(i) Appendix A also gives the storage capacity of each dam, e.g. Gariep Dam approximate storage capacity is 5 342 923 000 m3 {or 5 x 106 (x 1000 m3)}. The rest of the dams can be determined in similar manner.

(c)(ii) Appendix B gives the weekly state of departmental reservoirs and the level can be read on the last column of the table, e.g. Reservoir level of Gariep on the 17 August 2015 was 69.7 % full.

(c)(iii) The National Water Act 36 of 1998 Section 117 (c) defines a dam with a safety risk as a dam which contains 50 000 m3 of water and has a wall of a vertical height of more than five meters (5 m), measured as the vertical difference between the lowest downstream ground elevation on the outside of the dam wall and the non-overspill crest or the general top level of the dam wall. Therefore according to this definition, all the departmental dams are considered dams with a safety risk.

To deal with the question of safety-risk status of each specified dam, reference is made to Section 2 (1) of Dam Safety Regulations Government Notice R 139 of 24 February 2012, (hence forth referred to as "Regulations"), which states: "Every dam with a safety risk must be classified in accordance with this regulation 2 on the basis of its size and hazard potential to determine the level of control over safety of the structure that is applicable in terms of these Regulations".

These two parameters, i.e. dam size and hazard potential are utilised as stipulated in Tables 1 and 2 of the Regulations' annexure to determine the Category classification of the dam as stipulated in Table 3 of the Regulations. It is this category classification which is used as an indicator for safety risk 'status' associated with the dam.

In the attached Appendix A Column AC gives the size classification; Column AD gives hazard rating potential classification and Column AE gives the category classification, e.g. Gariep Dam, Category classification is 3, i.e. Size classification = Large and Hazard rating classification = High.

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31 August 2015 - NW2913

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Maluleke, Ms B to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, with reference to the delegation of the former Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs by the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, in response to a letter written by a resident from Ngobi regarding a water crisis in the specified area, she undertook a follow-up intervention since her appointment; if so, what progress has been made in resolving the specified water crisis?

Reply:

The Moretele Local Municipality (LM) has implemented and completed the upgrade of the Transactie Well Field water supply augmentation project which consists of a 10 km pipeline, chlorination house, equipping 10 boreholes, 10 pump house structures and 2.5 mega litres per day (Ml/day) reservoir. The total cost of the project amounted to R11 million. This project has increased the water storage capacity in the area from 0.35 Ml to 2.85 Ml (an increase of 2.5 Ml). The system is currently operational and people are receiving water, though the water supply source is not sufficient to deal with the current demand. To augment water supply in the area of the Moretele LM is providing tankering until a lasting and sustainable solution is found.

Long Term Plan

On 16 July 2014; my Department, the Moretele LM and Magalies Water signed a tripartite agreement to conduct a study for bulk water supply in Moretele including the Moretele North Portion. The study is at an advance stage, whilst the Moretele South is under Construction in Klipdrift and the Moretele North is under detail design which incorporates the entire Ngobi Village through the supply from Klipvoor.

 

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31 August 2015 - NW2577

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What provisions are being made to assist the municipalities of (a) uMshwathi, (b) Richmond and (c) Mkhambathini with water relief to (i) residents, (ii) commercial farmers and (iii) subsistence farmers?

Reply:

The Umgungundlovu District Municipality (DM) is the Water Services Authority (WSA) responsible for water provision in the uMshwathi, Richmond and Mkhambathini Local Municipalities (LMs). The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is assisting with water relief to the Umgungundlovu DM by the provisioning of water services through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MWIG).

(a) The Umgeni Water is implementing the uMshwathi Regional Bulk pipeline which is co-funded by Umgeni Water and the DWS’s RBIG programme. The secondary bulk components of the scheme are being implemented by the Umgungundlovu DM with support from the DWS’s MWIG programme. The scheme will supply water from the Mgeni supply system to the uMshwathi LM area.

(b) The Umgeni Water has recently commissioned the Eston bulk pipeline which is supplying water from the Mgeni supply system to the Richmond area. The scheme was co-funded by the Umgeni Water and DWS through the RBIG programme.

(c) There are no projects being supported by the DWS in the Mkhambathini LM. Support for water for commercial and subsistence farmers is the responsibility of the National Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and an Inter-Ministerial Task Team has been established to address the impacts of the current drought in the Province. The Provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development has provided inputs on the drought interventions in the Province at consultation sessions that are being led by the Disaster Management Unit of the Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

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31 August 2015 - NW2601

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) When was the nine boreholes and package plant with a reservoir completed in Hoedspruit, Limpopo, and (b) what was the total cost of the project; (2) whether the plant is currently in use; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the capacity of the plant in mega litres per day?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Hoedspruit Package Plant with an elevated tank (which is used as a reservoir) and seven boreholes and not nine, as per the question raised, were constructed and commissioned on 28 May 2014 by the Mopani District Municipality to augment the supply of water from the Drankensig Water Treatment Plant owned by the National Department of Public Works. The initiative emanated from the 2011/2012 Maruleng Flood Disaster.

(1)(b) The total cost of the project was R11 972 303.00.

(2) The Package Plant is in use, however; the clear water pump has currently burnt out and the Mopani District Municipality has issued an order for repairs which will be installed by the end of August 2015.

(3) The capacity of the plant is 0.35Ml/d.

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31 August 2015 - NW2603

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Why does her department allow sand mining in the riverbed of the Karongwe River in Limpopo which forms part of a protected area under the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation; (2) whether she will take any action to stop the sand mining; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. My Department is not the responsible authority for any mining authorization. We regulate water activities in a water course. The competent authority for granting mining permits is the Department of Mineral Resources.
  2. A site investigation was conducted on 25 July 2015, by the Department’s enforcement team together with the SAPS. Upon completion of the investigation, my Department will, through its enforcement team, deal with the transgressor appropriately both administratively and criminally.

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31 August 2015 - NW2695

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) she, (b) her Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in her department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

Neither me, the Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation, nor any officials of my Department travelled to China during the 2014-2015 financial year.

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31 August 2015 - NW2727

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) amount has been spent on the project to raise the Hazelmere Dam wall to date and (b) are the relevant details of the expenditure; (2) what (a) was the annual percentage increase in sedimentation of the Hazelmere Dam over the past five years, (b) impact has this had on the storage capacity of the dam and (c) are the causes of the increased sedimentation; (3) whether any action has been taken to reduce and halt further sedimentation of the dam in future; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The total amount spent to end July 2015 is R41 713 943 (excl. VAT).

(1)(b) The relevant detail of expenditure is as follows:

DESCRIPTION

EXPENDITURE TO END JULY 2015
(excl. VAT)

   

ENVIRONMENTAL

R 399 319

LAND MATTERS

R 11 815 024

DESIGN AND SUPERVISION

R 23 216 748

CONSTRUCTION

 

- Dam

R 0

- Demolition of Buildings

R 6 282 853

TOTAL (excl. VAT)

R 41 713 943

(2)(a) The Hazelmere Dam has indicated an average of 0.72% increase in sedimentation over a 36 year period.

(2)(b) The storage capacity has been reduced from 23,94 million m3 to 17,675 million m3

(2)(c) Increased erosion in the catchment combined with increased sand-mining activities.

(3) Unlawful water uses through sand mining activities that contribute to sedimentation have been investigated on the Mdloti River upstream and downstream of the dam; and enforcement actions taken. A Catchment Management Forum also exists to deal with issues and concerns raised by water users within the catchment.

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31 August 2015 - NW2912

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Majeke, Ms CN to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she has been informed of the water crisis in Greenville Village, in Mthatha, which has been without water for more than four weeks; if so, what plans has her department put in place to resolve the specified crisis; if not, (2) whether her department intends to investigate the situation with an intention to (a) resolve the crisis and (b) ensure that water is provided?

Reply:

  1. My Department has not been informed of the water crisis in Greenville Village, in Mthatha which has allegedly been without water for more than four weeks.
  2. Upon receiving of this question, my Department’s Provincial Office: Eastern Cape investigated the matter and found out that water supply to Greenville Village was deliberately switched off by the O R Tambo District Municipality due to non-payment of water bills and there is nothing wrong with the water supply system. This area consists of government properties with some informal dwellings built around the houses. However, the OR Tambo District Municipality is carting water to the informal settlement of Kwa-Mpuku which is adjacent to the formal settlement. They have since put two Jojo tanks which are filled timeously. It will be further investigated if the houses are occupied legally which would enable Public Works to pay for the services rendered.

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31 August 2015 - NW3089

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) are the most prevalent water weeds found in the Umdloti River in KwaZulu-Natal, (b) percentage coverage do the specified water weeds have and (c) effect has the weeds had on the siltation levels of the specified river and its impoundments?

Reply:

(a) The most prevalent water weeds found in the Umdloti River are Water Lettuce and Hyacinth.

(b)  Upstream from the Hazelmere Dam the prevalence is negligible, whereas on the downstream portion the coverage of Water Lettuce is approximately 50% and that of Hyacinth is about 30%.

(c) The impact of the aquatic weed has very little to insignificant impact, especially since it is controlled.

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31 August 2015 - NW3091

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

How many bucket toilets are located in the (a) formal and (b) informal areas of each municipality in Gauteng?

Reply:

(a) There are no bucket toilets located in the formal areas of each municipality in Gauteng.

(b) There are no bucket toilets located in the informal areas of each municipality in Gauteng. Informal areas utilise chemical toilets as a form of sanitation.

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31 August 2015 - NW3118

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Atkinson, Mr P to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has any plans to provide water and sanitation to the residents of Eikenhof informal settlement in Southern Johannesburg; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The City of Johannesburg is the Water Service Authority which provides services to the Eikenhof informal settlement in the southern part of Johannesburg. The City of Johannesburg through the Joburg Water is providing the following basic water and sanitation services:

  • 6 Communal stand-pipes for water; and
  • 500 Ventilated Improved Pit-latrines (VIP’s).

The City of Johannesburg/ Joburg Water has plans in place to install 400 VIP in the current 2015/16 financial year.

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06 August 2015 - NW2370

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to Rand Water’s appointment as water service provider to the Bushbuckridge Local Municipality in the 201314 financial year, how many (a) villages had water at the time of the takeover and (b) more villages have received water since the appointment of Rand Water; (2) what is the status of phase one of the reticulation project; (3) what are the reasons for the escalation in the cost of implementation of phase one from R121 million to R278 million as per council reports; (4) what has been the progress of the reticulation project from the 2013-14 to 2014 15 financial years?

Reply:

(1)(a) According to Census 2011, 11,9% of the population in Bushbuckridge had access to piped water in their dwellings, the remaining was supplied with water at Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) standard (i.e Boreholes/communal taps) and Water Carts.

(1)(b) A total of 24 villages have received water since the appointment of Rand Water.

(2) All projects which were implemented under Phase 1 to reticulate 24 villages in Bushbuckridge were completed.

(3) Initially, the scope of the work was under estimated, upon assessment and finalization of technical designs of the projects, it was discovered that bulk of the work was not included in the initial scope of the work, therefore additional budget was required to complete the projects.

(4) The intervention was initiated in the 2013/14 financial year, 24 villages were completed in the 2014/15 financial year and a further
15 villages are currently being reticulated.

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06 August 2015 - NW1594

Profile picture: Mpontshane, Mr AM

Mpontshane, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) How many criminal dockets were opened with the SA Police Service for (i) failing to comply with water use authorizations or (ii) using water without authorization as required by the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (2) (a) how many criminal dockets were handed over to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years for offences in terms of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (3) (a) how many criminal dockets for transgressions of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, did the NPA decline to prosecute in the specified periods and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (4) how many convictions were secured in each of the specified periods for transgressions of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (5) What was the (a) highest monetary fine and (b) longest sentence of direct imprisonment obtained for convictions for offences of transgressions of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, in each specified period?

Reply:

(1)(a) My Department has opened a total of Sixty Seven (67) cases with the South African Police Service (SAPS) for contravening the National Water Act (Act no 36 of 1998) (NWA). (i), one (1) case was opened for not complying with water use authorizations and (ii) Fifty Eight (58) were cases opened for engaging in water uses without authorisation.

(1)(b) Below is the region and sector breakdown of criminal cases opened:

Criminal Cases Opened with SAPS

  1. Region
  1. Sectors
 

Mining

Agriculture

Industries

Water Services Authorities

Tourism

Total

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

Free State

-

1

-

7

-

8

Gauteng

2

6

-

-

-

8

KwaZulu-Natal

10

-

1

-

-

11

Limpopo

-

1

-

-

-

1

Mpumalanga

9

14

3

1

1

28

North West

1

2

-

1

-

4

Northern Cape

4

-

-

-

-

4

Western Cape

-

-

2

1

-

3

Total

26

24

6

10

1

67

(2) The relevant Department to answer the question is the South African Police Service (SAPS).

 

(3) The relevant Department to answer the question is the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA).

(4) The relevant Department to answer the question is the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA).

(5)(a) The highest monetary fine was One Million Rand (R1 000 000.00) in 2013/2014.

(5)(b) No imprisonment was obtained for convictions for the offences of transgressions of the NWA.

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06 August 2015 - NW1838

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether any contracts were awarded without complying with Treasury Regulation 16A8.4 in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) how many contracts were awarded, (ii) what are the details of each contract, (iii) to which project was each such contract linked and (iv) what was the value of each contract; (2) whether any officials were (a) implicated, (b) charged and/or (c) dismissed for their involvement, in each case; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department has put any measures in place to stop the contravention of the specified Treasury Regulation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes, there were contracts which were awarded without complying with Treasury Regulation 16A8.4 in 2013/2014.

(1)(b) None in 2014/2015.

(1)(b)(i) Four (4) Contracts were awarded.

(1)(b)(ii) Details of each contract awarded listed below:

Name of supplier

Description of Award

Mihle and Ayola General Trading CC

Supply of Material

TD New Look Construction

Supply of Material

Oratile Kgadi Trading CC

Supply of Material

Meondo Trading 392 CC

Repair and Services

(1)(b)(iii) These goods and services were not linked to specific projects but they were normal day to day operational activities.

(1)(b)(iv) The value of each award is indicated below on the amount column:

Name of supplier

Description of Award

Amount

Mihle and Ayola General Trading CC

Supply of Material

R18 724,50

TD New Look Construction

Supply of Material

R 8 669,00

Oratile Kgadi Trading CC

Supply of Material

R15 340,00

Meondo Trading 392 CC

Repair and Services

R 6 508,00

(2)(a) Yes, they were 3 employees who were implicated.

(2)(b) Letters were issued to the employees concerned. Employee Relations is in the process of drawing up the charges, this process will proceed in terms of the Labour Relations Act.

(2)(c) Measures have been put in place to stop the contravention of Treasury Regulations 16A8.4 where employees are disciplined for the transgression and an internal circular was circulated to all employees.

(3) Yes, measures have been put in place by means of an internal circular to all employees to stop the contravention of the specified Treasury Regulation.

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21 July 2015 - NW1204

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In which municipalities are the estimated 127 000 bucket toilets in informal settlements;

Reply:

  1. The buckets in informal settlements are located in the provinces appearing in the table below. The Department is in a process to verifying and assessing all buckets in informal settlements by province and municipality. However it should be noted that with the proliferation of informal settlements, households utilizing the bucket toilets as a form of sanitation is a moving target hence backlog is not constant.

PROVINCE

NO OF SETTLEMENTS

NO OF HOUSEHOLDS

Eastern Cape

50

23 958

Western Cape

62

59 932

Gauteng

0

0

KwaZulu-Natal

0

0

Limpopo

0

0

Northern Cape

6

5 350

North West

21

4 150

Free State

75

46 758

Mpumalanga

3

600

TOTAL

217

140 748

(2) A preliminary figure is provided in the table above.

(3) The Department anticipates, subject to additional funding being made available that a further R4,3bn over the next 4 years will be required to address informal settlements.

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21 July 2015 - NW1403

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In which municipalities are the estimated 88 127 bucket toilets in formal areas;

Reply:

(1) A study conducted in July 2012 suggested that the backlog for buckets in formal areas is estimated at 58 010; a substantial drop from the 88 127. The latter was further clarified in as far as the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro which had 19 444 buckets with an unsubstantiated claim of a further 100 buckets in the informal areas which was to be deducted from the 88 127. A second clarification came from the Free State Province in that the initial backlog was 42 815, however, after clarification reduced to 32 042 (a drop in 10 773), thus arriving at 57 910 in formal areas.

However, the Department has verified the buckets in formal areas which amount to 58 453.

(2) Refer to table below.

Province

Municipality

Project Name

Total

Eastern Cape

Makana

Grahamstown

737

Makana 2

Grahamstown

288

Sundays River Valley

Patterson

1245

Baviaans

Steyterville

14

Joe Ggabi

Steynburg

985

Chris Hani

Indwe

89

Ikhwezi

Jansenville

21

Blue Crane

Somerset east

4

Ndlambe

Nemato

2230

TOTAL

5613

Province

Municipality

Project Area

Total

Northern Cape

Dikgatlong

Proteahof

277

Koopmansfontein

37

Phokoane

Malelwane

85

Ga-Segonyana

Bathlaros

498

Emthanjeni

Britstown

424

Thembelihle

Hopetown

52

Tsantsabane

Maranteng

791

Postdene

450

KharaHais

Rosedale

2682

Pabalello

533

Louisvale

800

DekotaWeg

306

Kameelmond

122

Kalksloot

138

Renosterburg

PetrusvillePh 2

20

Phillipstown

107

Siyacuma

Breipal

282

Bongani

555

Bongani - Reservoir

49

BonganiPhomolong

31

Griekwastad

527

Campbell

596

Siyathemba

Marydale

175

Sol Plaatjie

Ritchie

1345

Freedom Park

167

Promised Land

787

Ubuntu

Victoria West

890

Nama-Khoi

Various Sites

192

Kai Garib

Various Sites

800

TOTAL

13 718

North West

City of Matlosana

Jouberton /Kanana

293

Kanana

73

LekwaTeemane

Boitumelong

230

TOTAL

596

-3-

Province

Municipality

Project Area

Total

Free State

Mohokare

Smithfield

148

Fauresmith

36

Bethulie

23

Trompsburg

149

Zastron

90

Rouxville

756

Naledi

Dewetsdorp

191

Dihlabeng LM

Rosendal

976

Mantsopa LM

Tweespruit

1266

Hobhouse

1224

Phumelela LM

Memel

568

Vrede

150

Mafube LM

Cornelia

612

Villiers

1056

Frankfort

2105

Tweeling

304

Ngwathe LM

Heilbron

1584

Vredefort

1120

Nala LM

Wesselsbron

1800

Masilonyana LM

Theunissen

1438

Hennenman

2848

Winburg

180

Matjhabeng LM

Virginia

2240

Matjhabeng LM

Odendaalsrus

264

Tokologo LM

Hertzogville

294

Setsoto LM

Marquard

1431

Ficksburg

5396

Senegal

2913

Clocolan

3379

Nketoana

PetrusSteyn

2424

Lindley

517

Arlington

210

Reitz

834

TOTAL

38526

(3)(a) All buckets in the formal areas will be eradicated by end of the financial year.

(3)(b) The programme is estimated to cost R975 339 000,00.

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21 July 2015 - NW2369

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the heavily polluted Olifants River in Mpumalanga, what impact is such pollution having on the wildlife in the Kruger National Park, particularly the aquatic animals living in and dependent on the specified river;

Reply:

  1. According to the assessment of the condition of aquatic animals, there is a negative impact especially on the fish which is used as an indicator for monitoring of river health.
  1. Yes, the Department is continuously taking action by conducting Compliance, Monitoring and Enforcement of water users upstream of the Kruger National Park.
  1. No, there is no specific or single company that can be attributed to the impact on aquatic ecosystems as they are also impacted by natural disasters such as the recent floods in the lower Olifants, which caused damage to habitats of the aquatic animals.

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21 July 2015 - NW1625

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) Which company was awarded the contract to build the Vuwani pipeline from the Levubu river in Limpopo, (b) what is the scope of the work to be completed by the company and (c) what were the time frames stipulated;

Reply:

(1)(a) PART A: WK Construction (company), PART B: Ascul Construction (company) and PART C: Murray and Dickson (company). In addition to these appointments in this project the following companies were appointed: Vuwani/Valdezia pipeline: Internal Department of Water and Sanitation Construction North, Design and construction monitoring: Bigen Africa Services (company), and Specialist Quality Control: QPI/TIS (company).

(1)(b) Refer to the table below for the scope of the work to be completed by the company:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

The supplying dam is Nandoni Dam. The Luvuvhu River Government Water Scheme will supply water for domestic use to the area between Makhado and Punda Maria in the Limpopo Province, to about 800 000 people (380 communities) with the potential of reaching 1.3 million people.

-2-

(1)(c) The original completion date for Ascul Construction was 5 July 2013, however was further extended to 30 November 2013 with anticipated completion date for Part B being 31 March 2014. The last anticipated delivery date is 31 July 2015 as proposed by the project engineer design and construction monitoring engineer: Bigen Africa Services (company). With the Defect liability expected to start from August 2015 to 31 March 2016.

During the extension of the contract the original cost of the contract was not affected, as the extension was only for the duration of the contract. The project encountered some delays due to a number of reasons, including some financial difficulties by one of the companies; as a result, some sub-contractors withdrawing from site; inclement weather resulted in flooding of trenches and pipes and long delays were experienced to clean the pipes. Rainy conditions also prevented work and humid conditions prevented repair of linings and coatings, some land owners not allowing contractors into their land, strike action by communities, availability of water for hydraulic testing, pipeline deflection defects; delays in the supply of pipes and fittings; etc.

It is confirmed that construction progress is currently standing at 95% overall completion.

(2)(a) W0497-WTE: Levuvhu Rever GWS-Construction of the 800mm diameter Vuwanisteel pipeline was advertised on 01 February 2012 and closed on 01 March 2012.

(2)(b) The contract was awarded in March 2012 and the contract was signed by the representative of the Department on 20 April 2012 and by the Contractor on the 23 April 2012.

(3)(a) Refer to the table below for the value of the contract:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

(3)(b) Refer to the table below for the amount paid to the contracting company to date:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

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(4)(a) Refer to the table below for the amount of work that has been completed on the project:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Percentage

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

99%

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

95%

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

99%

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

(4)(b) The construction progress is currently standing at 95% overall completion.

(4)(c) Contractor appointed will complete the project on 31 July 2015 with the Defect liability expected to start from August 2015 to 31 March 2016.

(5) Copies of the contracts as mentioned in (4)(a) are available for inspections.

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14 July 2015 - NW2179

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Is her department currently involved in a work exchange and/or employment agreement with the Republic of Cuba; if so, (a) what number of Cuban nationals (i) are currently employed and (ii) are due to be employed by her department, (b) what specific work roles are envisaged for the Cuban nationals, (c) what are the specific skill sets of each of the Cuban nationals (i) currently employed and (ii) due to be employed, (d) what are the details of the process followed to ensure that the same skill set was or is not available in the country and amongst South African citizens and (e) what is the total cost of the (i) employment or (ii) prospective employment of such Cuban nationals?

Reply:

Yes, my Department is currently involved in a work employment agreement, deriving from a bilateral agreement that was reached between the Cuban and the South African Government. This agreement is part of the portfolio of cooperative agreements between the two countries. The agreement was signed on 9 September 2013 and its objective is to foster a technical development on water issues between the two countries.

(a) A total of 35 Cuban Engineers are (i) currently contracted with my Department for a period of two years, with a possibility of an extension to three years. (ii) Only one agreement has been concluded

(b) The Cuban secondment programme is meant to assist the Department of Water and Sanitation in the following mutually agreed areas:

  • Hydraulic, Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering in the functional areas of the National Water Resources Infrastructure (NWRI) Operations Unit of the Department,
  • The Geohydrological and Engineering Services in rural and other disadvantaged areas where such services are inadequate in areas of Regional Functions,
  • The operations and maintenance of bulk raw water supply infrastructure,
  • The capacity building through training and support of local staff,
  • Augmenting project management capacity.

 

(c) The majority of the current employed 35 Cuban Specialists are qualified in Hydraulic Engineering, a field which is not offered in South Africa, and it emerged that this qualification is a specialty branch of Civil Engineering which focuses only on water engineering. Their field of specialization is therefore of great value to the Department in the field of Operations and maintenance. The rest of the Specialists are qualified in the fields of Mechanical, Civil, Electrical and hydro geological Engineering, and they are also adding value to the different functions within my Department.

(d) My Department proceeds to recruit local specialist to fill permanent positions as it was the case with the 13 Electrical and Mechanical engineering posts recently advertised. The Learning Academy also proceeds with the facilitation of developing local engineering skills at entry level. The table below indicates the number of posts in the Engineering field that were advertised but not filled during the 2013/2014 financial year:

 

Region/Branch

No of posts advertised per Region/ Branch

Reasons for not filling the posts

NWRI - Northern Operations

29

A very small number of applications were received per post, in some instances no applications were received per post.

The applicants did not meet the minimum criteria of the posts.

Applicants are only registered as Candidates and not Technicians or Professionals

Head-hunting for suitable candidates also did not yield any results, as individuals are requesting higher remuneration packages that cannot be offered by the Public Service.

NWRI - Southern Operations

10

 

Branch: NWRI - Head Office

18

 

Branch: Policy and Regulation

17

 

KZN Region

18

 

Free State Region

10

 

Eastern Cape Region

9

 

Gauteng Region

3

 

Limpopo Region

12

 

Mpumalanga Region

12

 

Northern Cape Region

9

 

Western Cape Region

1

 

Total

148

 

(e)(i) The total cost of contracting is an all-inclusive package of R532 278 per Cuban Specialist per annum.

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14 July 2015 - NW1878

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Since 1 January 2015, has her department installed generators at any of (a) its offices or (b) the offices of the entities reporting to her as a result of load shedding; if so, what is the total cost of the (i) installation and (ii) running of these generators?

Reply:

No generators were installed at any of my Department’s and Entities offices for load shedding purposes.

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14 July 2015 - NW2488

Profile picture: Stander, Ms T

Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is her department doing to enforce the applicable legislation relating to water pollution; (2) what are the details of each of the water pollution cases her department is involved in with regard to (a) the area, (b) a description of the situation, (c) the environmental impact and (d) the method of intervention?

Reply:

(1) My Department through the Enforcement Unit among other units ensures that all pollution cases reported are investigated and rectification measures are taken where non-compliance is detected.

In instances whereby pollution of a water resource is precisely detected to be occurring or might be occurring, my Department institutes administrative enforcement action prescript in Sections 19 and 20 of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998) (NWA) with the objective of ensuring prevention and remedying effects of pollution and control of emergency incident.

My Department may lay criminal or civil charges against responsible person for unlawfully and intentionally or negligently committing any act or omission which pollutes or likely to pollute a water resource.

My Department also actively participates in the Inter-Departmental Enforcement Task Team comprising of the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and Department of Minerals Resources (DMR) to ensure intensified collective approach against polluters.

(2) Further details cannot be furnished as it may prejudice the outcome of some administrative action and criminal prosecution taken by the Department, which is sub judice according to the National Prosecution Authority.

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14 July 2015 - NW1304

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What steps is her department taking to prevent raw sewerage flowing from Kwa-Thatha through Phaphamani into the Belmont Valley in Makana Municipality?

Reply:

Requesting that the Honorable Member to refer to the response to NA 1305.

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14 July 2015 - NW2363

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of each outstanding water use license agreement in respect of each province? (2) What is the (a) date on which the application for a water use license was made, (b) reason for delay and (c) expected date of finalisation?

Reply:

(1) The relevant details of outstanding water use licence applications (WULAs) in respect of each Province appear on Table 1 below.

Table 1: WULAs in process at the Department

Provincial Operation

Initial Assessment

Outstanding Information

Finalizing Assessment

Awaiting decision

Total

Eastern Cape

17

50

25

0

92

Free State

39

35

20

1

95

Gauteng

43

38

12

4

97

KwaZulu-Natal

6

33

10

0

49

Limpopo

52

24

125

0

201

Mpumalanga

266

30

31

1

328

Northern Cape

29

17

27

2

75

North West

123

38

40

0

201

Western Cape

121

10

57

0

188

Head Office

24

74

11

95

204

Total

720

349

358

103

1530

(2)(a) The year on which the application was made as depicted in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Year of application of water use licences in the Department

Provincial Operation

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total

Eastern Cape

0

11

8

26

30

17

92

Free State

0

16

16

22

41

0

95

Gauteng

3

12

23

15

43

1

97

KwaZulu-Natal

0

16

9

9

15

0

49

Limpopo

1

16

42

67

75

0

201

Mpumalanga

0

74

102

47

77

28

328

Northern Cape

0

2

13

23

28

9

75

North West

20

38

45

49

43

6

201

Western Cape

8

4

25

49

80

22

188

Head Office

96

67

27

13

1

0

204

Total

128

256

310

320

433

83

1530

(2)(b) Reasons for delays in water use licence applications are:

  • Outstanding information from applicants, mainly in a form of technical on site studies.
  • Complexity of applications and volumes of supporting documents.
  • Internal specialist inputs are intensive and hence the turnaround time is protracted.

(2)(c) The expected dates of completion of the water use licence application.

Table 3: Expected dates of completion of the water use licence applications per category

Category

Number of WULAs

Expected date of completion

Initial Assessment

720

30-Mar-16

Outstanding Information

349

30-Dec-15

Finalizing Assessment

358

31-Oct-15

Await decision

103

30-Sep-15

Total

1530

 

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14 July 2015 - NW2334

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the current status of the Sedibeng Regional Sewerage Scheme (SRSS); (2) (a) what factors are currently holding up the implementation of the SRSS and (b) what steps are being taken to resolve these hold-ups; (3) when is the SRSS expected to become operational and (b) what interim measures are currently in place in the Southern Gauteng region to limit the impact on development in each affected municipality; (4) who is the current implementing agent of the SRSS?

Reply:

  1. The Sedibeng Regional Sanitation Scheme (SRSS) comprises construction upgrade of the following works:
  • The Sebokeng Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW) upgrade – construction started in August 2013, Progress for these works is at 35% complete on civil works;
  • The Meyerton WWTW upgrade – construction started in March 2015 and construction work is progressing very well. Currently, progress for the civil contractor is around 8% complete; and
  • The feasibility studies for the proposed 150 mega-litres Regional WWTW has started in April 2015 and expected to be completed by November 2015. The Implementation Readiness Studies and Preliminary designs are expected to be completed by April 2016.

(2)(a) The source of delays in the implementation of the entire SRSS were as a result of the change of the Implementation Agent (IA) from the Municipalities (Emfuleni and Midvaal LMs) to Rand Water and secondly, the legal process to cede the service providers from the LMs to Rand Water. However, some of the professional service providers ceding processes experienced legal changes, this involved the Supervising Engineer for the SRSS, which ended up at High Court and subsequently resolved in an out of court settlement.

 

(2)(b) All the legal processes have been completed and work is currently being undertaken as mentioned in paragraph 1 above.

(3)(a) The implementation of the SRSS will take between 5 to 7 years to complete.

(3)(b) Additional development in both Midvaal and Sebokeng will be connected to both Meyerton WWTW and Sebokeng WWTW, which are being upgraded. Outfall sewer lines are included as part of scope to connect new developments such as Savanna City.

(4) Rand Water is appointed as the IA by the Minister of Water and Sanitation.

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14 July 2015 - NW2330

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, with reference to the Eskom Ingula Pumped Storage Scheme in the (a) Ladysmith district of KwaZulu-Natal and (b) Harrismith district of the Free State, her department has done any investigations to ascertain the impact of the specified scheme on the Wilge River and Vaal River catchment area which has been affected and/or will be affected by the resettlement of persons resident on the project sites by Eskom; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details of completed assessments and (ii) outcomes of the assessments?

Reply:

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of Eskom Ingula Pumped Storage Scheme was the responsibility of Eskom and the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) participated therein. The Department is not aware of any significant impacts on Wilge and Vaal Rivers.

The resettlement of communities was also part of the same process and thus no undue impacts are anticipated.

The Department issued Water Use Licenses for the project and will continue to monitor compliance to the license conditions.

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14 July 2015 - NW2316

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has had any engagement with the City of Tshwane regarding (a) a dam in Midas, Mabopane, Ward 22 and (b)(i) health, (ii) safety and (iii) environmental risks associated with the specified dam; (2) whether her department will conduct a health and safety assessment in respect of the specified dam; (3) whether her department intends to engage with the municipality to address the safety concerns of the local community?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation had no previous engagements with the City of Tshwane regarding health, safety or environmental risk of a dam in Midas.

(2) No complaints about the query have been received by my Department and no health and safety assessment was therefore planned.

(3) Yes, my Department has engaged with the City of Tshwane municipality regarding this issue and met incidentally with a community leader on 18 June 2015 during the site visit. According to the representative of the community, they get their services from the City of Tshwane. Madibeng Municipality will also be approached through my sector support unit to address the matter further.

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14 July 2015 - NW2303

Profile picture: James, Ms LV

James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether Coal of Africa was granted a water licence for its operations in the (a) Makhado Local Municipality and (b) Musina Local Municipality in Limpopo; if not, why not; if so, (i) on what date was it granted and (ii) what are the terms of the licence agreement?

Reply:

(a) Coal of Africa was not granted a water licence for its operations in the Makhado Local Municipality. Their water use licence (WUL) application is still being processed by the Department of Water and Sanitation.

(b)(i) Coal of Africa was granted a WUL for its operations in the Musina Local Municipality.

(b)(ii) The water use licence for Coal of Africa in respect of its operations in the Musina Local Municipality was granted on 29 March 2011. The water use licence was granted for a period of five years on the terms stipulated in WUL, which are confidential to the applicant. Coal of Africa plans to continue with the mine, consequently they have applied for another water use licence for the same area covered by the licence granted in 2011.

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14 July 2015 - NW2244

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) her department and (b) any entities reporting to her has paid out the remainder of any employee's contract before the contractually stipulated date of termination of the contract since the 2008-09 financial year up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (i) what amount has (aa) her department and (bb) entities reporting to her spent on each such payout, (ii) to whom were these payouts made and (iii) what were the reasons for the early termination of the contracts in each specified case?

Reply:

 

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation had two employees whose contracts were paid out before the contractually stipulated date of termination amounting to R2 274 513.50 for the 2008-09 financial year.

(a)(ii) Payouts were made to NJ Ngele amounting to R2 251 602.00 and OO Ayaya amounting to R22 911.59.

(a)(iii) The reasons for the early terminations were: NJ Ngele - The employer paid the employee 24 months of the employee's salary as per settlement agreement; OO Ayaya - The employer discharged the employee from the Public Service. An amount of R22 911.59 in terms of leave discounting was paid to the employee.

(b) None of the entities reporting to me has paid out remainder of any employee’s contract for the 2008-09 financial year.

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