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06 August 2015 - NW1594

Profile picture: Mpontshane, Mr AM

Mpontshane, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) How many criminal dockets were opened with the SA Police Service for (i) failing to comply with water use authorizations or (ii) using water without authorization as required by the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (2) (a) how many criminal dockets were handed over to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years for offences in terms of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (3) (a) how many criminal dockets for transgressions of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, did the NPA decline to prosecute in the specified periods and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (4) how many convictions were secured in each of the specified periods for transgressions of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, and (b) what is the breakdown of the figures for each (i) region and (ii) sector; (5) What was the (a) highest monetary fine and (b) longest sentence of direct imprisonment obtained for convictions for offences of transgressions of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, in each specified period?

Reply:

(1)(a) My Department has opened a total of Sixty Seven (67) cases with the South African Police Service (SAPS) for contravening the National Water Act (Act no 36 of 1998) (NWA). (i), one (1) case was opened for not complying with water use authorizations and (ii) Fifty Eight (58) were cases opened for engaging in water uses without authorisation.

(1)(b) Below is the region and sector breakdown of criminal cases opened:

Criminal Cases Opened with SAPS

  1. Region
  1. Sectors
 

Mining

Agriculture

Industries

Water Services Authorities

Tourism

Total

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

Free State

-

1

-

7

-

8

Gauteng

2

6

-

-

-

8

KwaZulu-Natal

10

-

1

-

-

11

Limpopo

-

1

-

-

-

1

Mpumalanga

9

14

3

1

1

28

North West

1

2

-

1

-

4

Northern Cape

4

-

-

-

-

4

Western Cape

-

-

2

1

-

3

Total

26

24

6

10

1

67

(2) The relevant Department to answer the question is the South African Police Service (SAPS).

 

(3) The relevant Department to answer the question is the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA).

(4) The relevant Department to answer the question is the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA).

(5)(a) The highest monetary fine was One Million Rand (R1 000 000.00) in 2013/2014.

(5)(b) No imprisonment was obtained for convictions for the offences of transgressions of the NWA.

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06 August 2015 - NW2370

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to Rand Water’s appointment as water service provider to the Bushbuckridge Local Municipality in the 201314 financial year, how many (a) villages had water at the time of the takeover and (b) more villages have received water since the appointment of Rand Water; (2) what is the status of phase one of the reticulation project; (3) what are the reasons for the escalation in the cost of implementation of phase one from R121 million to R278 million as per council reports; (4) what has been the progress of the reticulation project from the 2013-14 to 2014 15 financial years?

Reply:

(1)(a) According to Census 2011, 11,9% of the population in Bushbuckridge had access to piped water in their dwellings, the remaining was supplied with water at Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) standard (i.e Boreholes/communal taps) and Water Carts.

(1)(b) A total of 24 villages have received water since the appointment of Rand Water.

(2) All projects which were implemented under Phase 1 to reticulate 24 villages in Bushbuckridge were completed.

(3) Initially, the scope of the work was under estimated, upon assessment and finalization of technical designs of the projects, it was discovered that bulk of the work was not included in the initial scope of the work, therefore additional budget was required to complete the projects.

(4) The intervention was initiated in the 2013/14 financial year, 24 villages were completed in the 2014/15 financial year and a further
15 villages are currently being reticulated.

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21 July 2015 - NW2369

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the heavily polluted Olifants River in Mpumalanga, what impact is such pollution having on the wildlife in the Kruger National Park, particularly the aquatic animals living in and dependent on the specified river;

Reply:

  1. According to the assessment of the condition of aquatic animals, there is a negative impact especially on the fish which is used as an indicator for monitoring of river health.
  1. Yes, the Department is continuously taking action by conducting Compliance, Monitoring and Enforcement of water users upstream of the Kruger National Park.
  1. No, there is no specific or single company that can be attributed to the impact on aquatic ecosystems as they are also impacted by natural disasters such as the recent floods in the lower Olifants, which caused damage to habitats of the aquatic animals.

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21 July 2015 - NW1625

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) Which company was awarded the contract to build the Vuwani pipeline from the Levubu river in Limpopo, (b) what is the scope of the work to be completed by the company and (c) what were the time frames stipulated;

Reply:

(1)(a) PART A: WK Construction (company), PART B: Ascul Construction (company) and PART C: Murray and Dickson (company). In addition to these appointments in this project the following companies were appointed: Vuwani/Valdezia pipeline: Internal Department of Water and Sanitation Construction North, Design and construction monitoring: Bigen Africa Services (company), and Specialist Quality Control: QPI/TIS (company).

(1)(b) Refer to the table below for the scope of the work to be completed by the company:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

The supplying dam is Nandoni Dam. The Luvuvhu River Government Water Scheme will supply water for domestic use to the area between Makhado and Punda Maria in the Limpopo Province, to about 800 000 people (380 communities) with the potential of reaching 1.3 million people.

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(1)(c) The original completion date for Ascul Construction was 5 July 2013, however was further extended to 30 November 2013 with anticipated completion date for Part B being 31 March 2014. The last anticipated delivery date is 31 July 2015 as proposed by the project engineer design and construction monitoring engineer: Bigen Africa Services (company). With the Defect liability expected to start from August 2015 to 31 March 2016.

During the extension of the contract the original cost of the contract was not affected, as the extension was only for the duration of the contract. The project encountered some delays due to a number of reasons, including some financial difficulties by one of the companies; as a result, some sub-contractors withdrawing from site; inclement weather resulted in flooding of trenches and pipes and long delays were experienced to clean the pipes. Rainy conditions also prevented work and humid conditions prevented repair of linings and coatings, some land owners not allowing contractors into their land, strike action by communities, availability of water for hydraulic testing, pipeline deflection defects; delays in the supply of pipes and fittings; etc.

It is confirmed that construction progress is currently standing at 95% overall completion.

(2)(a) W0497-WTE: Levuvhu Rever GWS-Construction of the 800mm diameter Vuwanisteel pipeline was advertised on 01 February 2012 and closed on 01 March 2012.

(2)(b) The contract was awarded in March 2012 and the contract was signed by the representative of the Department on 20 April 2012 and by the Contractor on the 23 April 2012.

(3)(a) Refer to the table below for the value of the contract:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

(3)(b) Refer to the table below for the amount paid to the contracting company to date:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

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(4)(a) Refer to the table below for the amount of work that has been completed on the project:

Contract

Pipe Size

Chainages

Pipe Length

Percentage

Part A WK Construction

800mm Ø

CH 1 326 to 11 460

10 134 m

99%

Part B Ascul Construction

800mm Ø

CH 11 460 to 23 130

11 670 m

95%

Part C Murray & Dickson  

800mm Ø

CH 23 130 to 31 617

8 487 m

99%

900mm Ø

Valdezia Section

2 200 m

(4)(b) The construction progress is currently standing at 95% overall completion.

(4)(c) Contractor appointed will complete the project on 31 July 2015 with the Defect liability expected to start from August 2015 to 31 March 2016.

(5) Copies of the contracts as mentioned in (4)(a) are available for inspections.

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21 July 2015 - NW1403

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In which municipalities are the estimated 88 127 bucket toilets in formal areas;

Reply:

(1) A study conducted in July 2012 suggested that the backlog for buckets in formal areas is estimated at 58 010; a substantial drop from the 88 127. The latter was further clarified in as far as the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro which had 19 444 buckets with an unsubstantiated claim of a further 100 buckets in the informal areas which was to be deducted from the 88 127. A second clarification came from the Free State Province in that the initial backlog was 42 815, however, after clarification reduced to 32 042 (a drop in 10 773), thus arriving at 57 910 in formal areas.

However, the Department has verified the buckets in formal areas which amount to 58 453.

(2) Refer to table below.

Province

Municipality

Project Name

Total

Eastern Cape

Makana

Grahamstown

737

Makana 2

Grahamstown

288

Sundays River Valley

Patterson

1245

Baviaans

Steyterville

14

Joe Ggabi

Steynburg

985

Chris Hani

Indwe

89

Ikhwezi

Jansenville

21

Blue Crane

Somerset east

4

Ndlambe

Nemato

2230

TOTAL

5613

Province

Municipality

Project Area

Total

Northern Cape

Dikgatlong

Proteahof

277

Koopmansfontein

37

Phokoane

Malelwane

85

Ga-Segonyana

Bathlaros

498

Emthanjeni

Britstown

424

Thembelihle

Hopetown

52

Tsantsabane

Maranteng

791

Postdene

450

KharaHais

Rosedale

2682

Pabalello

533

Louisvale

800

DekotaWeg

306

Kameelmond

122

Kalksloot

138

Renosterburg

PetrusvillePh 2

20

Phillipstown

107

Siyacuma

Breipal

282

Bongani

555

Bongani - Reservoir

49

BonganiPhomolong

31

Griekwastad

527

Campbell

596

Siyathemba

Marydale

175

Sol Plaatjie

Ritchie

1345

Freedom Park

167

Promised Land

787

Ubuntu

Victoria West

890

Nama-Khoi

Various Sites

192

Kai Garib

Various Sites

800

TOTAL

13 718

North West

City of Matlosana

Jouberton /Kanana

293

Kanana

73

LekwaTeemane

Boitumelong

230

TOTAL

596

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Province

Municipality

Project Area

Total

Free State

Mohokare

Smithfield

148

Fauresmith

36

Bethulie

23

Trompsburg

149

Zastron

90

Rouxville

756

Naledi

Dewetsdorp

191

Dihlabeng LM

Rosendal

976

Mantsopa LM

Tweespruit

1266

Hobhouse

1224

Phumelela LM

Memel

568

Vrede

150

Mafube LM

Cornelia

612

Villiers

1056

Frankfort

2105

Tweeling

304

Ngwathe LM

Heilbron

1584

Vredefort

1120

Nala LM

Wesselsbron

1800

Masilonyana LM

Theunissen

1438

Hennenman

2848

Winburg

180

Matjhabeng LM

Virginia

2240

Matjhabeng LM

Odendaalsrus

264

Tokologo LM

Hertzogville

294

Setsoto LM

Marquard

1431

Ficksburg

5396

Senegal

2913

Clocolan

3379

Nketoana

PetrusSteyn

2424

Lindley

517

Arlington

210

Reitz

834

TOTAL

38526

(3)(a) All buckets in the formal areas will be eradicated by end of the financial year.

(3)(b) The programme is estimated to cost R975 339 000,00.

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21 July 2015 - NW1204

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In which municipalities are the estimated 127 000 bucket toilets in informal settlements;

Reply:

  1. The buckets in informal settlements are located in the provinces appearing in the table below. The Department is in a process to verifying and assessing all buckets in informal settlements by province and municipality. However it should be noted that with the proliferation of informal settlements, households utilizing the bucket toilets as a form of sanitation is a moving target hence backlog is not constant.

PROVINCE

NO OF SETTLEMENTS

NO OF HOUSEHOLDS

Eastern Cape

50

23 958

Western Cape

62

59 932

Gauteng

0

0

KwaZulu-Natal

0

0

Limpopo

0

0

Northern Cape

6

5 350

North West

21

4 150

Free State

75

46 758

Mpumalanga

3

600

TOTAL

217

140 748

(2) A preliminary figure is provided in the table above.

(3) The Department anticipates, subject to additional funding being made available that a further R4,3bn over the next 4 years will be required to address informal settlements.

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14 July 2015 - NW2244

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) her department and (b) any entities reporting to her has paid out the remainder of any employee's contract before the contractually stipulated date of termination of the contract since the 2008-09 financial year up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (i) what amount has (aa) her department and (bb) entities reporting to her spent on each such payout, (ii) to whom were these payouts made and (iii) what were the reasons for the early termination of the contracts in each specified case?

Reply:

 

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation had two employees whose contracts were paid out before the contractually stipulated date of termination amounting to R2 274 513.50 for the 2008-09 financial year.

(a)(ii) Payouts were made to NJ Ngele amounting to R2 251 602.00 and OO Ayaya amounting to R22 911.59.

(a)(iii) The reasons for the early terminations were: NJ Ngele - The employer paid the employee 24 months of the employee's salary as per settlement agreement; OO Ayaya - The employer discharged the employee from the Public Service. An amount of R22 911.59 in terms of leave discounting was paid to the employee.

(b) None of the entities reporting to me has paid out remainder of any employee’s contract for the 2008-09 financial year.

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14 July 2015 - NW2303

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James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether Coal of Africa was granted a water licence for its operations in the (a) Makhado Local Municipality and (b) Musina Local Municipality in Limpopo; if not, why not; if so, (i) on what date was it granted and (ii) what are the terms of the licence agreement?

Reply:

(a) Coal of Africa was not granted a water licence for its operations in the Makhado Local Municipality. Their water use licence (WUL) application is still being processed by the Department of Water and Sanitation.

(b)(i) Coal of Africa was granted a WUL for its operations in the Musina Local Municipality.

(b)(ii) The water use licence for Coal of Africa in respect of its operations in the Musina Local Municipality was granted on 29 March 2011. The water use licence was granted for a period of five years on the terms stipulated in WUL, which are confidential to the applicant. Coal of Africa plans to continue with the mine, consequently they have applied for another water use licence for the same area covered by the licence granted in 2011.

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14 July 2015 - NW2488

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Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is her department doing to enforce the applicable legislation relating to water pollution; (2) what are the details of each of the water pollution cases her department is involved in with regard to (a) the area, (b) a description of the situation, (c) the environmental impact and (d) the method of intervention?

Reply:

(1) My Department through the Enforcement Unit among other units ensures that all pollution cases reported are investigated and rectification measures are taken where non-compliance is detected.

In instances whereby pollution of a water resource is precisely detected to be occurring or might be occurring, my Department institutes administrative enforcement action prescript in Sections 19 and 20 of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998) (NWA) with the objective of ensuring prevention and remedying effects of pollution and control of emergency incident.

My Department may lay criminal or civil charges against responsible person for unlawfully and intentionally or negligently committing any act or omission which pollutes or likely to pollute a water resource.

My Department also actively participates in the Inter-Departmental Enforcement Task Team comprising of the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and Department of Minerals Resources (DMR) to ensure intensified collective approach against polluters.

(2) Further details cannot be furnished as it may prejudice the outcome of some administrative action and criminal prosecution taken by the Department, which is sub judice according to the National Prosecution Authority.

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14 July 2015 - NW1304

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What steps is her department taking to prevent raw sewerage flowing from Kwa-Thatha through Phaphamani into the Belmont Valley in Makana Municipality?

Reply:

Requesting that the Honorable Member to refer to the response to NA 1305.

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14 July 2015 - NW1426

Profile picture: Robinson, Ms D

Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Does her department have a Regulatory Burden Reduction strategy in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the strategy?

Reply:

Yes. Cabinet has recently approved the Socio Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIAS) which is effective from 1 June 2015. The SEIAS requires that government departments must, before developing any policy, regulations and legislation, ensure that they take steps to minimize the unintended consequences of such policy, regulations and legislation, including unnecessary costs of implementation and compliance. The SEIAS further requires government departments to anticipate implementation risks and develop measures to mitigate such risks.

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14 July 2015 - NW1878

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Since 1 January 2015, has her department installed generators at any of (a) its offices or (b) the offices of the entities reporting to her as a result of load shedding; if so, what is the total cost of the (i) installation and (ii) running of these generators?

Reply:

No generators were installed at any of my Department’s and Entities offices for load shedding purposes.

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14 July 2015 - NW2179

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Is her department currently involved in a work exchange and/or employment agreement with the Republic of Cuba; if so, (a) what number of Cuban nationals (i) are currently employed and (ii) are due to be employed by her department, (b) what specific work roles are envisaged for the Cuban nationals, (c) what are the specific skill sets of each of the Cuban nationals (i) currently employed and (ii) due to be employed, (d) what are the details of the process followed to ensure that the same skill set was or is not available in the country and amongst South African citizens and (e) what is the total cost of the (i) employment or (ii) prospective employment of such Cuban nationals?

Reply:

Yes, my Department is currently involved in a work employment agreement, deriving from a bilateral agreement that was reached between the Cuban and the South African Government. This agreement is part of the portfolio of cooperative agreements between the two countries. The agreement was signed on 9 September 2013 and its objective is to foster a technical development on water issues between the two countries.

(a) A total of 35 Cuban Engineers are (i) currently contracted with my Department for a period of two years, with a possibility of an extension to three years. (ii) Only one agreement has been concluded

(b) The Cuban secondment programme is meant to assist the Department of Water and Sanitation in the following mutually agreed areas:

  • Hydraulic, Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering in the functional areas of the National Water Resources Infrastructure (NWRI) Operations Unit of the Department,
  • The Geohydrological and Engineering Services in rural and other disadvantaged areas where such services are inadequate in areas of Regional Functions,
  • The operations and maintenance of bulk raw water supply infrastructure,
  • The capacity building through training and support of local staff,
  • Augmenting project management capacity.

 

(c) The majority of the current employed 35 Cuban Specialists are qualified in Hydraulic Engineering, a field which is not offered in South Africa, and it emerged that this qualification is a specialty branch of Civil Engineering which focuses only on water engineering. Their field of specialization is therefore of great value to the Department in the field of Operations and maintenance. The rest of the Specialists are qualified in the fields of Mechanical, Civil, Electrical and hydro geological Engineering, and they are also adding value to the different functions within my Department.

(d) My Department proceeds to recruit local specialist to fill permanent positions as it was the case with the 13 Electrical and Mechanical engineering posts recently advertised. The Learning Academy also proceeds with the facilitation of developing local engineering skills at entry level. The table below indicates the number of posts in the Engineering field that were advertised but not filled during the 2013/2014 financial year:

 

Region/Branch

No of posts advertised per Region/ Branch

Reasons for not filling the posts

NWRI - Northern Operations

29

A very small number of applications were received per post, in some instances no applications were received per post.

The applicants did not meet the minimum criteria of the posts.

Applicants are only registered as Candidates and not Technicians or Professionals

Head-hunting for suitable candidates also did not yield any results, as individuals are requesting higher remuneration packages that cannot be offered by the Public Service.

NWRI - Southern Operations

10

 

Branch: NWRI - Head Office

18

 

Branch: Policy and Regulation

17

 

KZN Region

18

 

Free State Region

10

 

Eastern Cape Region

9

 

Gauteng Region

3

 

Limpopo Region

12

 

Mpumalanga Region

12

 

Northern Cape Region

9

 

Western Cape Region

1

 

Total

148

 

(e)(i) The total cost of contracting is an all-inclusive package of R532 278 per Cuban Specialist per annum.

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14 July 2015 - NW2316

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has had any engagement with the City of Tshwane regarding (a) a dam in Midas, Mabopane, Ward 22 and (b)(i) health, (ii) safety and (iii) environmental risks associated with the specified dam; (2) whether her department will conduct a health and safety assessment in respect of the specified dam; (3) whether her department intends to engage with the municipality to address the safety concerns of the local community?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation had no previous engagements with the City of Tshwane regarding health, safety or environmental risk of a dam in Midas.

(2) No complaints about the query have been received by my Department and no health and safety assessment was therefore planned.

(3) Yes, my Department has engaged with the City of Tshwane municipality regarding this issue and met incidentally with a community leader on 18 June 2015 during the site visit. According to the representative of the community, they get their services from the City of Tshwane. Madibeng Municipality will also be approached through my sector support unit to address the matter further.

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14 July 2015 - NW2330

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, with reference to the Eskom Ingula Pumped Storage Scheme in the (a) Ladysmith district of KwaZulu-Natal and (b) Harrismith district of the Free State, her department has done any investigations to ascertain the impact of the specified scheme on the Wilge River and Vaal River catchment area which has been affected and/or will be affected by the resettlement of persons resident on the project sites by Eskom; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details of completed assessments and (ii) outcomes of the assessments?

Reply:

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of Eskom Ingula Pumped Storage Scheme was the responsibility of Eskom and the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) participated therein. The Department is not aware of any significant impacts on Wilge and Vaal Rivers.

The resettlement of communities was also part of the same process and thus no undue impacts are anticipated.

The Department issued Water Use Licenses for the project and will continue to monitor compliance to the license conditions.

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14 July 2015 - NW2334

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the current status of the Sedibeng Regional Sewerage Scheme (SRSS); (2) (a) what factors are currently holding up the implementation of the SRSS and (b) what steps are being taken to resolve these hold-ups; (3) when is the SRSS expected to become operational and (b) what interim measures are currently in place in the Southern Gauteng region to limit the impact on development in each affected municipality; (4) who is the current implementing agent of the SRSS?

Reply:

  1. The Sedibeng Regional Sanitation Scheme (SRSS) comprises construction upgrade of the following works:
  • The Sebokeng Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW) upgrade – construction started in August 2013, Progress for these works is at 35% complete on civil works;
  • The Meyerton WWTW upgrade – construction started in March 2015 and construction work is progressing very well. Currently, progress for the civil contractor is around 8% complete; and
  • The feasibility studies for the proposed 150 mega-litres Regional WWTW has started in April 2015 and expected to be completed by November 2015. The Implementation Readiness Studies and Preliminary designs are expected to be completed by April 2016.

(2)(a) The source of delays in the implementation of the entire SRSS were as a result of the change of the Implementation Agent (IA) from the Municipalities (Emfuleni and Midvaal LMs) to Rand Water and secondly, the legal process to cede the service providers from the LMs to Rand Water. However, some of the professional service providers ceding processes experienced legal changes, this involved the Supervising Engineer for the SRSS, which ended up at High Court and subsequently resolved in an out of court settlement.

 

(2)(b) All the legal processes have been completed and work is currently being undertaken as mentioned in paragraph 1 above.

(3)(a) The implementation of the SRSS will take between 5 to 7 years to complete.

(3)(b) Additional development in both Midvaal and Sebokeng will be connected to both Meyerton WWTW and Sebokeng WWTW, which are being upgraded. Outfall sewer lines are included as part of scope to connect new developments such as Savanna City.

(4) Rand Water is appointed as the IA by the Minister of Water and Sanitation.

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14 July 2015 - NW2363

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of each outstanding water use license agreement in respect of each province? (2) What is the (a) date on which the application for a water use license was made, (b) reason for delay and (c) expected date of finalisation?

Reply:

(1) The relevant details of outstanding water use licence applications (WULAs) in respect of each Province appear on Table 1 below.

Table 1: WULAs in process at the Department

Provincial Operation

Initial Assessment

Outstanding Information

Finalizing Assessment

Awaiting decision

Total

Eastern Cape

17

50

25

0

92

Free State

39

35

20

1

95

Gauteng

43

38

12

4

97

KwaZulu-Natal

6

33

10

0

49

Limpopo

52

24

125

0

201

Mpumalanga

266

30

31

1

328

Northern Cape

29

17

27

2

75

North West

123

38

40

0

201

Western Cape

121

10

57

0

188

Head Office

24

74

11

95

204

Total

720

349

358

103

1530

(2)(a) The year on which the application was made as depicted in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Year of application of water use licences in the Department

Provincial Operation

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total

Eastern Cape

0

11

8

26

30

17

92

Free State

0

16

16

22

41

0

95

Gauteng

3

12

23

15

43

1

97

KwaZulu-Natal

0

16

9

9

15

0

49

Limpopo

1

16

42

67

75

0

201

Mpumalanga

0

74

102

47

77

28

328

Northern Cape

0

2

13

23

28

9

75

North West

20

38

45

49

43

6

201

Western Cape

8

4

25

49

80

22

188

Head Office

96

67

27

13

1

0

204

Total

128

256

310

320

433

83

1530

(2)(b) Reasons for delays in water use licence applications are:

  • Outstanding information from applicants, mainly in a form of technical on site studies.
  • Complexity of applications and volumes of supporting documents.
  • Internal specialist inputs are intensive and hence the turnaround time is protracted.

(2)(c) The expected dates of completion of the water use licence application.

Table 3: Expected dates of completion of the water use licence applications per category

Category

Number of WULAs

Expected date of completion

Initial Assessment

720

30-Mar-16

Outstanding Information

349

30-Dec-15

Finalizing Assessment

358

31-Oct-15

Await decision

103

30-Sep-15

Total

1530

 

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14 July 2015 - NW2367

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether the cyanobacteria is present in the (a) Hartebeespoort Dam, (b) Vaal Dam, (c) Spitskop Dam, (d) Barberspan, (e) Koppies Dam and (f) Chrissiesmeer; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she can provide the results of each of the water tests done at each of the specified dams since 1 January 2011; if not, why not; if so, what are the results in each case; (3) whether she has taken any steps to resolve the problem of the presence of cyanobacteria in the specified dams; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what danger does the bacteria cyanobacteria pose to standing water bodies?

Reply:

  1. The Department does not currently monitor Barberspan or Chrissiesmeer for cyanobacteria, as they do not form part of the National Eutrophication Monitoring Programme (focused on dams). Both Barberspan and Chrissiesmeer are viewed as wetlands and will form part of the National Wetlands Monitoring Programme, which is currently being designed and will be implemented in 2016. For the other dams, the most recently available cyanobacterial counts are listed in the table below:

Dam

Cyanobacterial count (cells/ml)

(including Anabeana, Arthrospira, Cylindrospermopsis, Lyngbya, Merismopedia, Microcystis and Oscillatoria

Hartbeespoort

22 342

Vaal

33 524

Spitskop

7 851

Koppies

Not available

2. Results can be provided for all the dams since 2011 as requested, except Barberspan and Chrissiesmeer. The data information can be viewed on the Directorate’s website - https://www.dwa.gov.za/iwqs.

3. Addressing cyanobacteria in dams requires a multidisciplinary approach with its foundation in catchment management.  Nutrient loading resulting from run-off in catchment where the dam is located, is the main reason for cyanobacterial blooms.

This loading takes place as a result of, inter alia, overloaded and / or dysfunctional waste water treatment works and agricultural run-off. DWS addresses this through collaboration with and guidance to local authorities, whom is responsible for operating these waste water treatment works.  The Green Drop project is an example of this, where the efficient operation of wastewater treatment works by municipalities is audited and scored.  Based on the outcome of this evaluation, guidance is provided by the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) to municipalities to assist them with adhering to the license conditions of the waste water treatment works. 

The DWS has also recently acquired the services of Cuban engineers to assist local municipalities with the improved operation of their waste water treatment works.

The Department developed a set of guidelines for eutrophication management, including best agricultural practices which, if implemented by farmers, will reduce the nutrient loading resulting from agricultural run-off.

A specific project on the Hartbeespoort Dam to address the water quality remediation, which includes the treatment of cyanobacterial blooms, is the Metsi a Me project.  This is a multidisciplinary project which addresses the remediation of dam specific water quality.

There is currently no similar scale projects on the other dams mentioned in the question, as these dams’ issues are addressed on a catchment base.

(4)    Cyanobacteria, when present in high numbers in the water column, and under conducive environmental conditions, can release a toxin, microcystin, which could pose a health risk if untreated water is consumed by humans and animals.  In addition, when the algal blooms die off and decompose, it can result in unpleasant smells, impacting on recreational users.                                        

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14 July 2015 - NW2420

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What amount did (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in (i) Sowetan and (ii) Daily Sun in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

Requesting the Honourable Member to refer to the response in NA 1128 published on 26 March 2015.

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03 July 2015 - NW1913

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) Who are the current chief financial officers of (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her and (b) what is the qualification of each chief financial officer?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for the current Chief Financial Officers of the Department and the Entities:

Department/ Entity

Full Names

Qualifications

Department: CFO Water Trading Entity

Mr Mpho Mofokeng

B Tech: Cost & Management Accounting Degree

Department: CFO Main Account

Ms Nthabiseng Fundakubi

B Tech: Business Administration

Amatola Water

The CFO post is vacant.

N/A

Bloem Water

Mr OJ Stadler

B Comm Honours; Masters in Business Leadership (MBL)

Lepelle Northern Water

Mr JC Kilan

Honours: Accounting; Masters in Business Administration

Magalies Water

Ms A Raphela

B Comm Honours; Chartered Accountant

Mhlathuze Water

Mr B Ndaba

(b) B Comm (Accounting)

Overberg Water

Ms A Cilliers

B Compt, B Compt Honours; Chartered Accountant

Rand Water

Mrs SM Nyembe

B Comm (Accounting); B Compt Honours

Sedibeng Water

Ms MA Shasha

B Compt Honours

Umgeni Water

Mr TB Hlongwa

B Comm (Accounting); B Comm Honours (Accounting); Chartered Accountant

Inkomati-Usuthu CMA

Ms Thembelihle Mjaji

Qualified Chartered Accountant.

Honours in Bachelor of Accounting Science

Degree in Bachelor of Accounting Science

Breede Gouritz CMA

Mrs. Judith Ntombizanele Nkomombini

Bachelor of Commerce

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03 July 2015 - NW1839

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she has taken any steps to implement the recommendations of the Auditor-General with regard to preventing the procurement of goods and services with a transaction value below R500 000 without obtaining the required price and quotations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details with regard to each recommendation;

Reply:

(1) Yes, steps have been taken to implement the recommendations of the Auditor- General with regard to preventing the procurement of goods and services with a transaction value below R500 000, refer below:

  • The Accounting officer invites and accepts written price quotations for requirement up to an estimated value of R500 000.00 from as many suppliers as possible, that are registered on the list of prospective suppliers.
  • Where no suitable suppliers are available from the list of prospective suppliers, written price quotations may be obtained from other possible suppliers.
  • If it is not possible to obtain at least three (3) written price quotations, the reason should be recorded and approved by the accounting officer/ authority or his /her delegate.
  • The Supply Chain Management policy which incorporates the above and other quotation process has been approved and is currently utilized within the Water Trading Entity as a guideline for the procurement process which include other related National Treasury practices notes and related circulars issued by other authorities within the Water and Infrastructure Sector e.g. CIDB Regulations.

(2) Yes, steps have been taken to implement the recommendations of the Auditor-General with regard to preventing the procurement of goods and services with a transaction value above R500 000.00, refer below:

  • Accounting officer invite competitive bids for all procurement above R500 000.00.
  • Competitive bids are advertised in the Government Tender Bulleting and in other appropriate media should an accounting officer deem it necessary to ensure greater exposure to potential bidders. The responsibility for advertisement cost lies with the relevant accounting officer.
  • Should it be impractical to invite competitive bids for specific procurement, such as in urgent or emergency cases or in cases of a sole supplier, the accounting officer/ authority may procure the required goods and services by other means, such as price quotations or negotiations in accordance with Treasury Regulation 16A6.4. The reasons for deviating from inviting competitive bids are recorded and approved by the accounting officer or his/ her delegate.
  • The Accounting officer reports within ten (10) working days to the relevant Treasury and the Auditor-General regarding all cases where goods and services above the value of R1 Million (VAT inclusive) and providing description of the goods or services, the name/s of the suppliers/s, the amount/s involved and the reasons for deviating from the prescribed competitive bidding process.
  • Goods, works or services may not deliberately be split into parts or items of lesser value merely for the sake of procuring the goods, works or service otherwise than through the prescribed procurement process. when determining transaction values, a requirement for goods , works or services consisting of different parts or items must as far as possible be treated and dealing with as a single transaction
  • Accounting officers apply the prescripts of the preferential procurement policy Framework Act, 2000 (Act No. 5 of 2000) and its associated Regulations for all procurement equal to or above R30 000.00.00 (VAT included) less than
    that amount if and when appropriate.
  • The Supply Chain Management policy which incorporates the above and other bids processes has been approved and is currently utilized within the Water Trading Entity as a guide-line for the procurement process which include together with other related National Treasury practice notes and related circulars issued by other authorities within the Water and Infrastructure Sector e.g. CIDB Regulations.

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03 July 2015 - NW2304

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, with regard to her department’s report to the Portfolio Committee on Water and Sanitation on 3 June 2015 indicating the required investment in infrastructure over the next 10 years to be at R805 billion and available funding at only R46 billion for each year, her department has a plan in place to fund the R35 billion annual shortfall; if not, how does her department plan on managing the infrastructure; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, there is a plan to cater for the annual shortfall of R35 billion.

1.  As part of the development of the Water Sector Infrastructure Investment Framework in 2012, the Department developed a first order Water Financing Strategy published on 5 June 2012.

2.   In addition, my department has thus far successfully negotiated major increases in the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) and the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG), the establishment of a new Municipal Water Infrastructure Grant (MWIG), as well as major increases in the Water Board’s infrastructure investment budgets. This was done in collaboration with the National Treasury as well as the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, with the aim of increasing budgeting for especially municipal infrastructure operations and maintenance (O&M), addressing aged infrastructure, rehabilitation, and infrastructure replacement.

3.  Partnerships with Financial Institutions and the broader private sector are also vigorously pursued.

4.  As a result of financial constraints, there will be on-going prioritization of water supply areas to identify and sequence projects that offer the best economic and social returns and are addressing the most critical security of supply challenges.

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03 July 2015 - NW2299

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Are there any plans in place to release water from the Lesotho Highlands Water Project to assist the Free State towns of Ficksburg, Clocolan and Marquard which have been affected by drought; if not, (a) why not and (b) what other measures have been put into place to deal with the effects of water security resultant from the drought in these communities?

Reply:

Yes, a submission has been made to the Director-General on 21 May 2015 for the release of water from the Katse Dam (Lesotho Highlands Water Project).

(a) Falls away

(b) In order to ensure the sustainability of supply within the system, pumping at the Tienfontein Pump Station (Caledon River) should be maintained. This can only be achieved by releasing water from the Lesotho Highlands Water Scheme (Katse Dam) into the Caledon River. The transfer of water from Knellpoort Dam via the Novo transfer scheme to Rustfontein Dam should also be maintained. Fast-track and intensify the implementation of water conservation and water demand management measures in all affected municipalities. Urgent implementation of the gazetted water restrictions and the monitoring of possible unlawful water use along the Modder River, upstream of Maselspoort Dam.

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03 July 2015 - NW2297

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the amount of R352,4 million which was set aside to assist the nine municipalities affected by drought in KwaZulu-Natal, (a) which municipalities have received payments and (b) what amount has each municipality received to date; (2) have funding agreements been signed with all affected municipalities; if not, (a) which municipalities have outstanding agreements and (b) what action has been taken to remedy this?

Reply:

(1)(a) Refer to table below regarding the nine municipalities affected by drought in KZN:

No.

Name of Municipality

Business Plan

Funding agreement

Amount received to date

1

Umzinyathi District Municipality

Approved

Approved

R1 782 836.47

2

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

Approved

Approved

R6 321 734.42

3

Uthukela District Municipality

Received and pending approval

Received and pending approval

None

4

Ugu District Municipality

Approved

Approved

None

6

Zululand District Municipality

Approved

Approved

None

7

UguDistrict Municipality

Approved

Approved

None

8

IlembeDistrict Municipality

Approved

Approved

None

9

Harry Gwala

Approved

Approved

None

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03 July 2015 - NW2065

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the total cost of the project to raise the wall of the Clanwilliam Dam in the Western Cape; (2) which company was appointed as supervisor of the project; (3) is the company a professional service provider (PSP) for her department; if not, why was the company appointed; if so, (a) when was the company appointed as a PSP and (b) in which category; (4) what are the project value parameters for each category of PSP as stipulated by her department?

Reply:

(1) The total cost of the Olifants-Doorn River Water Resources Project (Raising of Clanwilliam Dam wall) is estimated to be R2.2 billion. This amount excludes the relocation of the N7, the relocation of the secondary road, cost for land acquisition, construction engineering supervising costs, Project Management costs, heritage expert costs, Environmental Impact Assessment Practitioner, Environmental Control Officer, Hydro-power plant over and above the civil structure, communications, and escalation (inflation).

(2) Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd was appointed for construction supervision and contract management of the project. Two more emerging companies, namely Tlou Integrated Tech cc and Batseta Engineering Services (BES Africa Engineering and Management Consulting (Pty) Ltd), from the panel were appointed for developmental and transformational purposes to work under the stewardship of Bigen Africa. This is intended to ensure that the scope is not entirely allocated to one Professional Services Provider (PSP) and that the technical expertise of a developed PSP (Bigen Africa) is used to develop emerging enterprises that are owned and managed by Historically Disadvantaged Individuals (HDIs).

(3) Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd is part of the panel of PSPs that was created by the Department, (a) in 2013 under Contract WP0485-WTE (b) in Category five (5).

(4) The guideline project value thresholds is as follows:

Category

Projects with a value between

1

R0 up to R10,0 million

2

R10.1 million up to R50 million

3

R50,1 million up to R100 million

4

R100.1 million up to R250 million

5

R250.1 million up to R500 million

6

R500.1 million - unlimited

It should be noted that the above thresholds are only a guideline. The final Category chosen is determined based on the project’s scope and is determined, amongst others, the type of project, its complexity, its timeframes, developmental and transformational outputs to be achieved and the experience of companies in each of the categories.

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03 July 2015 - NW2119

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What amount was spent by her department on environmental rehabilitation due to sewage spills in each province (a) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2015; 2) (a) what was the location, (b) cause and (c) nature of the rehabilitation for each spillage?

Reply:

  1. Table 1 below reflects the amount that was spent by the Department on environmental rehabilitation due to sewage spills in each province (a) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2015:

Table 1

(a)Province

(a)(i) 2013-14

(a)(ii) 2014-15

(b) since 1 April 2015

Eastern Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

Free State

R15 850 000 (ACIP)

R42 850 000 (ACIP)

R18 968 000 (Planned to be spent under ACIP)

 

R5 000 000 (RBIG)

R47 000 000 (RBIG)

R90 474 000 ((Planned to be spent under RBIG)

Gauteng

N/A

N/A

N/A

KwaZulu-Natal

N/A

N/A

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

N/A

N/A

Mpumalanga

R9 000 000 (ACIP)

R13, 7m (ACIP)

R47m (RBIG)

Northern Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

North West

N/A

N/A

N/A

Western Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

(2)(a) Refer to the table below for the (a) location, (b) cause and (c) nature of the rehabilitation for each spillage within the Free State and Mpumalanga provinces.

 

FREE STATE PROVINCE

2013/14 (ACIP)

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Clocolan

Non-functional sewer pump stations due to ageing infrastructure

Replaced all pumps, motors & electrical infrastructure

Setsoto LM

Ficksburg

Collapsed old sewer pipes

Unblocked sewer lines and replaced defective ones

Setsoto LM

Kroonstad

Collapsed 1,2 km old asbestos sewer line from Gelukwarts polluting the Vals river

Replaced 1,2km of sewer line.

Moqhaka LM

Wepener

Non-functional sewer pump station & waste water treatment works

Refurbished all pumps, motors & electrical infrastructure.

Naledi LM

2013/14 (RBIG)

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Vredefort

Non-functional sewer pump station & waste water treatment works

Refurbished all pumps, motors & electrical infrastructure.

Ngwathe LM

2014/15 (ACIP)

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Theunissen

Collapsed old asbestos line

Replaced a length of 500 meters

Masilonyana LM

Brandfort

Non-functional two sewer pump stations due to old infrastructure

Refurbished and upgraded the two pump stations.

Masilonyana LM

Winburg

Non-functional one sewer pump station due to old infrastructure

Refurbished and upgraded the one pump station.

Masilonyana LM

Vrede

Non-functional pumps & motors and electrical infrastructure

Replaced pumps and motors and refurbished electrical infrastructure

Phumelela LM

Waden

Non-functional pumps & motors and electrical infrastructure

Replaced pumps and motors and refurbished electrical infrastructure

Phumelela LM

Koffiefontein

Non-functional pumps & motors and electrical infrastructure

Refurbished pumps and motors and refurbished electrical infrastructure

Letsemeng LM

2014/15 (RBIG)

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Wesselsbron

Non-functional electrical and mechanical components at waste water treatment plant.

Replaced all non functional electrical & mechanical components.

Nala LM

Kroonstad

Collapsed asbestos sewer pipe line in Hill street

Collapsed Boitumelo Marabastad asbestos sewer pipeline

Non-functional sewer treatment plant

Multi-year projects. Replacing and upgrading the Hill Street sewer pipeline.

Replacing and upgrading the sewer pipeline.

Upgrading of the sewer treatment plant to meet the demands

Moqhaka LM

Vredefort

Non-functional sewer treatment plant and old sewer line

Refurbished and upgraded the waste water treatment plant and replaced the sewer line

Ngwathe LM

2015/16 (ACIP Projects under implementation)

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Koppies

Non-functional electrical and mechanical components at waste water treatment plant.

Replace all non-functional electrical & mechanical components.

Ngwathe LM

Reitz and Lindley

Non-functional of electrical and mechanical components in pump station

Refurbishment of non-functional of electrical and mechanical components

Nketoana LM

Koffiefontein

Non-functional electrical and mechanical components at waste water treatment plant.

Replace all non-functional electrical & mechanical components.

Letsemeng LM

Odendalsrus

Collapsed old sewer lines

Replacement of collapsed old sewer pipeline

Matjhabeng LM

Mamahabane

Oxidation ponds not lined and the sewerage seeps through the nearby environment.

Rehabilitation of oxidation ponds

Matjhabeng LM

Wepenar

Collapsed old asbestos sewer pipeline and non-functional of two sewer pump station.

Replace the collapsed sewer line and refurbish the two sewer pump stations.

Naledi LM

 

2015/16 (RBIG Projects under implementation)

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Kroonstad

Collapsed asbestos sewer pipe line in Hill street

 

Collapsed Boitumelo Marabastad asbestos sewer pipeline

Non-functional sewer treatment plant

Multi-year projects. Replacing and upgrading the Hill Street sewer pipeline.

Replacing and upgrading the sewer pipeline.

Upgrading of the sewer treatment plant to meet the demands

Moqhaka LM

Vredefort

Non-functional of electrical and mechanical components in pump station

Refurbishment of non-functional of electrical and mechanical components

Nketoana LM

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

2013-14

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Mhlatikop and Komatipoort

Ageing Infrastructure, operating beyond design capacities, poor operation and maintenance

Refurbishment of the WWTW and pump stations Phase 1

Nkomazi

2014-15

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Mhlatikop and Komatipoort

Ageing Infrastructure, operating beyond design capacities, poor operation and maintenance

Refurbishment of the WWTW and pump stations Phase 2

Nkomazi

Leandra

 

Refurbishment of the WWTW

Govern Mbeki

2015-16

Location (2) (a)

Cause (2) (b)

Nature of Rehabilitation (2) (c)

Municipality

Balfour

Ageing Infrastructure, operating beyond design capacities, poor operation and maintenance

Upgrade of the WWTW

Dipaleseng

Delmas

   

Victor Khanye LM

Botleng

     

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