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05 April 2022 - NW205

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What number of supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him for more than (aa) 30 days, (bb) 60 days, (cc) 90 days and (dd) 120 days, (b) what is the total amount outstanding in each case and (c) by what date is it envisaged that the outstanding amounts will be settled?

Reply:

Details of the supplier invoices that are unpaid for the Department of Water and Sanitation and the Entities are indicated in Annexure A.

DWS AND ENTITIES

INVOICES PAID WITHIN 30 DAYS

MORE THAN 30 DAYS

(aa)

MORE THAN 60 DAYS

(bb)

MORE THAN 90 DAYS

(cc)

MORE THAN 120 DAYS

(dd)

TOTAL

REASONS FOR NON-PAYMENT

DWS MAIN ACCOUNT AND WATER TRADING

0

0

0

0

29

29

The bulk of the unpaid invoices relate to unfunded interventions in previous financial years of operation and maintenance.

The other invoices relate to War on Leaks projects which are still under dispute.

   

0

0

0

29

R 159 257 504

 

AMATOLA WATER

62

32

24

24

330

472

It is envisaged that the payment for the outstanding supplier invoices will be made when funds are available and in line with contractual conditions of payment.

   

R 23 776 089

R 13 390 551

R 20 230 151

R 208 490 605

R 280 953 237

 

BLOEM WATER

13

2

3

1

7

26

To be settled within 30 days

   

R 3 002 7453.68

R 59 499.71

R 80 548.71

R 203 602.45

R 3 346 394.55

 

LEPELLE NORTHERN WATER

41

7

6

13

15

82

Projects implemented on behalf of DWS amounting to R8.9m are still in dispute and will be settled upon submission of requested information. It is envisaged that most of the outstanding invoices will be settled by end of March.

   

R 18 092 000

R 13 643 000

R 21 845 000

R 348 509.00

R 402 090.00

 

MAGALIES WATER

52

0

0

0

24

76

There are 22 invoices relating to the Department of Water and Sanitation on raw water purchases, amounting to R73,6 million. There is a payment arrangement of R10 million payment every quarter.

There is one invoice of R378 652,49 relating to capital works, which has a retention period provision. The invoice will be paid once the quality of work has been verified and there are no defects. This will be an indicator for the completion of the retention period.

   

R0

R0

R0

R77 257 696,90

R103 027 850,91

 

MHLATHUZE WATER

124

8

1

1

11

145

All outstanding invoices have queries, they will be settled once all queries are addressed. It is envisaged that all outstanding invoices will be settled by end March 2022.

   

R692 406

R14 561

R102 479

R27 529 271

R33 504 326

 

RAND WATER

168

35

10

3

12

228

All outstanding invoices due to unresolved queries (Incorrect invoices not matching the services that has been rendered and/or delivered. Supplier delays sending actual Tax invoices) will only be settled once the disputes are resolved.

   

R18 846 242

R29 517 604

R4 614 058

R373 893 847

R 722 106 186

 

SEDIBENG WATER

28

88

30

23

126

295

Invoices to be cleared upon receipt of payments from customers. These invoices will be settled by end March 2022.

   

R45,826,610

R79,503,312

R16,582,170

R4,911,924,689

R5,065,396,849

 

WRC

1

0

0

0

1

2

All outstanding invoices have queries, they will be settled once all queries are addressed. It is envisaged that all outstanding invoices will be settled by end March 2022.

   

None

None

None

R135 500

R141 411

 

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05 April 2022 - NW812

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) (a) What steps will his department take to rehabilitate the Wilge River in Mpumalanga where effluent water from an un-rehabilitated coalmine destroyed the ecology over a distance of 55 km, (b) what interventions will his department put in place to prevent the ecological destruction from happening again and (c) who is held responsible for the disaster. (2) what measures will his department put in place in order to (a) monitor and (b) protect our rivers, streams and wetlands from contamination in future; (3) (a) what total number of un-rehabilitated mines pose a danger of damaging our rivers, (b) will he provide Mr L J Basson with a list of the specified un-rehabilitated mines and (c) how is his department dealing with un-rehabilitated mines that pose a danger of contaminating the water systems?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) issued a Directive instructing the responsible company to appoint a suitably qualified environmental consultant to compile a rehabilitation plan for all the areas affected by the pollution incident. The issued Directive also indicated that the rehabilitation plan ought to have clear timeframes and descriptions of how and when each remedial action will be implemented. The company subsequently submitted the draft rehabilitation plan. The Department has assessed and accepted the rehabilitation plan for implementation however, there are still further investigations that need to be conducted to ensure sustainability.

One of the important aspects that were committed in the draft rehabilitation plan is the ecological restoration of the system. This aspect will be implemented over time as containment or curbing of pollution is prioritised to prevent potential immigration. The DWS is currently monitoring implementation of compliance to the Directive to ensure all reasonable measures are taken to contain and minimise the effects of the incident.

Further, the Department together with the representative from the responsible company held a meeting wherein the following matters were confirmed:

  • The company will appoint an independent qualified environmental consultant as prescribed in the Directive to develop sustainable rehabilitation plan
  • The company will implement remedial measures to minimise and curb pollution, these measures include, amongst others, clean-up of the pollutants from the river system, the removal of fish carcass from the stream
  • The company requested approval from the DWS to release water from Bronkhorspruit and Witbank Dams to assist with the flushing of affected areas and the request was granted
  • Final Rehabilitation Plan will be submitted on or before 30 April 2022

(1)(b) The Department conducted an investigation after receiving reports of fish kill at Wilge River system. Findings of the investigation revealed that there was a pollution incident that had occurred at Kwezela Colliery on approximately 14 February 2022. The incident was caused by an old Mine shaft that collapsed which led to an overflow of polluted water from the facility into the watercourse. The Department served the facility with a Directive to immediately rectify the contravention. The Department directed the facility to, amongst others:

  • take reasonable measures to contain, minimise the effects of pollution incident,
  • undertake clean-up procedures,
  • remedy the effects of the incident.

The facility submitted an action plan, and the Department is currently monitoring implementation thereof. The DWS has recently engaged the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) to request the inclusion of criminal investigators from DFFE on the investigative team. The DFFE will therefore be supporting the other government officials, in relation to the criminal investigation, which will determine the criminal liability based on the evidence collected. A decision would then be made by the National Prosecuting Authority on whether or not to prosecute and which parties should be prosecuted.

(1)(c) Kromdraai Mine which is a section of Khwezela Colliery.

(2)(a) The DWS has a compliance monitoring programme to monitor compliance with the conditions of the water use authorisation in terms of water uses including the discharges of water into the water resources. Furthermore, the department has a regular sampling programme which serves as an early warning system to non-compliance or water quality risks.

2(b) The Department has identified and assessed catchments at high risk for acid mine drainage and is developing mitigation plans to proactively manage these aspects.

3(a) The lead authority for mining is the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE). The total number of the un-rehabilitated mines can be obtained from the DMRE.

3(b) Although my Department is not the lead authority on un-rehabilitated mines, the DWS is currently in the process of drafting mitigation strategies to address the impacts of Acid Mine Drainage and amongst other things, these include mitigation measures for un-rehabilitated mines which may pose a danger to water resources.

3(c) Until mine closure certificates are obtained, mines are monitored in accordance with their water use authorisation. The department provides comment and input in this process to DMRE. Water use authorisations also include provisions for progressive rehabilitation and mines are monitored in accordance with these provisions.

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05 April 2022 - NW695

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the new timeline for completing the Clanwilliam Dam project and (b) will the new cost be?

Reply:

a)  The raising of Clanwilliam Dam project will be completed by April 2026 as per the current approved programme.

b) The revised cost is R 3 920 000 000 as per current project cost estimate.

NW833E

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05 April 2022 - NW585

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to the project that was started in Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality in Ward 17 to eradicate tin sheltered toilets and build solid structures, which has stopped currently with some residents left with half-built toilets, (a) what are the reasons that the project was stopped and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the project will resume?

Reply:

The construction of toilet top structures in Kutlwanong, Kagisho and Phomolong within the Sol Plaatje Local Municipality was funded by the Department of Water and Sanitation and implemented by the Sol Plaatje Local municipality.

The municipality appointed Makone Consulting Engineers as the consulting engineers and Renaissance Skills Centre as the contractor for the construction of 320 toilet top structures. Construction commenced on 24 March 2021 and was anticipated to be completed by 22 November 2021. However, delays were encountered due to non-payment of labourers by the contractors which resulted in labour unrest and works stoppages.

The contractor submitted a request for extension of time, which was not approved by the Municipality. The Municipality has committed to completing the remaining works utilising internal resources. It is anticipated that the project will be completed by end June 2022.

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31 March 2022 - NW694

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) What steps does the Rand Water intend to take to resolve the electricity problems. (2) Whether the Rand Water is looking at new ways of generating electricity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Rand Water consumes an average of 682 MWh a day of electricity for abstraction, treatment and distribution of water. Due to this requirement, Eskom and municipalities are the only electricity providers with distribution licences. A substantial portion of electricity is consumed at the treatment and booster stations.

Issues of planned and unplanned power outages are covered by the Electricity Supply Agreements between electricity suppliers and Rand Water as well as NERSA regulations. Rand Water ensures enforcement of the provisions in line with the contracts. In addition, Rand Water has undertaken a comprehensive risk assessment of its power suppliers and their infrastructure and is consulting Eskom with a view to understand their upgrade plans.

Rand Water has also embarked on projects to provide emergency power generators at its pumping stations. The project to provide these emergency power generators at six of tertiary pumping stations has been completed. The emergency power provision at the larger booster pumping stations is currently underway with anticipated completion by end 2023.

(2) Rand Water is embarking on the installation of Hydropower and Solar PV at some of its sites. However, it should be noted that even though this will provide additional electric energy, it will not be sufficient to supply treatment plants and booster stations due to the size of Mega Watts (MW) that will be generated as well as the geographical locations of installation. Innovative ways of generating electricity for Rand Water are still at very early stages and the entity continues to depend on Eskom for supply.

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31 March 2022 - NW757

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What interventions has his department made to support (a) provinces and (b) municipalities, such as the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality, that are suffering from chronic water shortages?

Reply:

a)  The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has over the years developed interventions to address water shortages within the country. This intervention includes forms of grants(conditional) that are aimed at provision of sustainable water supply through the provinces.

The DWS is managing two infrastructure grant funding programs namely Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). The two grants subsidise Water Services Authorities to implement bulk projects through RBIG and reticulation projects through WSIG. The two programs fund projects that reduce water services infrastructure backlogs and enhance access by ensuring sustainability of services. The projects include-:

  • New infrastructure development
  • Upgrade of existing infrastructure
  • Refurbishment and or rehabilitation of existing infrastructure etc

b) For the 2021/22 financial year, the department is implementing 126 projects in all the 9 provinces which are funded through RBIG and 230 through WSIG to address water shortages and provide sustainable and adequate water provision in different municipalities. Part of the intervention will include the implementation of the District Development Model.

 

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31 March 2022 - NW758

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What total amount has been allocated for the 2022-23 financial year to end the water crisis at the Sekhukhune District and (b) which monitoring mechanisms have been put in place to avoid the misdirection of money by corrupt individuals?

Reply:

Sekhukhune District Municipality has been allocated a total budget of R130 million through Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) to implement 3 bulk water supply projects namely, Mooihoek, Nebo and Moutse Bulk Water Supply.

The municipality has also been allocated R 51,6 million through Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) to implement water services projects which includes groundwater development, construction of storage tanks and reticulations in various villages within the district including Maebe, Tukakgomo and GaMarishane.

Both grants are under schedule 6B and are indirect transfers and can only be paid as per the invoice of work done by the service providers and verified by the Department of Water and Sanitation, the Sekhukhune DM, and project steering committee.

The project management of the two grants is governed by the prescripts of the Division of Revenue Act and the Public Financial Management Act and Treasury Regulations to give guidelines to follow when disseminating funds to Sekhukhune District Municipality and how claims are made.

The appointment of contractors is done by Sekhukhune District Municipality, as the Implementing Agent in line with the supply chain processes. The municipality is required to establish steering committee and project management teams projects implemented for projects under implementation. This ensures effective monitoring of the project progress and payments for completed work. The invoices are verified prior to making payments to confirm that the physical work done is in line with the amount being claimed.

 

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31 March 2022 - NW868

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) him, (ii) the Deputy Ministers and (iii) officials of his department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

2019/20 financial year

 

(a) catering

(b) entertainment

(c) accommodation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

(i) Minister

2

3

1 464

(ii) Deputy Ministers

-

-

2 035

(iii) Officials

1 443

144

23 635

Total

1 445

147

27 134

2020/21 financial year

 

(a) catering

(b) entertainment

(c) accommodation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

(i) Minister

-

2

654

(ii) Deputy Ministers

-

-

345

(iii) Officials

317

22

17 175

Total

317

24

18 174

2021/22 financial year

 

(a) catering

(b) entertainment

(c) accommodation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

(i) Minister

106

3

1 897

(ii) Deputy Ministers

3

3

1 219

(iii) Officials

860

58

34 818

Total

969

64

37 934

Total amount spent

 

(a) catering

(b) entertainment

(c) accommodation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

(i) Minister

108

8

4 015

(ii) Deputy Ministers

3

3

3 599

(iii) Officials

2 620

224

75 628

Total

2 731

235

83 242

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31 March 2022 - NW809

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) In light of the Nooitgedacht Low Level Water Scheme delivering water to Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, (a) by what date will his department complete it, (b) how much water will be delivered to the specified municipality, (c) by what date will maximum delivery take place and (d) what amount will be the completion cost to his department. (2) whether his department has any plans for further phases on Nooitgedacht Low Level Water Scheme; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Nooitgedagt Coega Low Level Scheme (CLLS) project, which will deliver water to Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM) is nearing completion. The expected date of completion is end July 2022.

Upon completion of the project, an additional amount of 70MI/day will be delivered to NMBM which will take the total amount to 210 MI/day. It is anticipated that the delivery of water will commence around end of March. The total cost to completion is estimated at R 534 million.

The plant has been designed to deliver an additional 70Ml/day if required. However, the current allocation is 210Ml/day which is the maximum water that can be supplied by the plant.

The department is currently implementing the Algoa Reconciliation strategy where all possible augmentation schemes are investigated to determine which will be the next most viable scheme to augment the water supply to NMBM. The further extension of the Nooitgedagt water scheme forms part of the study. This will however mean that the allocation from the Orange Fish system will have to come out of water savings from the Agricultural Sector.

The other schemes that are being investigated is the Sea Water Reverse Osmosis, Wastewater Reclamation, Groundwater and more efforts towards Water Conservation and Demand Management. The department is of the opinion that they should concentrate on bringing the water losses down to an acceptable rate before other options are explored.

31 March 2022 - NW618

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to the financial component of the establishment of the National Water Resources Infrastructure Agency (NWRIA), how will (a) the Presidential Infrastructure Fund and (b) loans from the Development Bank of Southern Africa complement the work of the NWRIA?

Reply:

South Africa requires an ongoing and sustained multiple water resource infrastructure build programme, in addition to effectively operating and maintained existing assets. However, due to fiscal constraints, DWS cannot only rely on fiscal support to develop the required infrastructure especially for the implementation of the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan.

The National Water Resources Infrastructure Agency (NWRIA) would be better positioned than the Department of Water and Sanitation to raise funds from sources other than the fiscus and be able to seek lines of credit with international multilateral institutions. These will include commercial banks and development finance institutions such as the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA).

The NWRIA will consider a hybrid model when it comes to infrastructure funding, which will also include the Presidential Infrastructure Fund. Based on its PFMA listing and authority, credit rating and condition of assets, the NWRIA would be able to raise commercial and development finance, domestic and international markets. The DWS will continue engagements with the Infrastructure Fund with the aim of identifying projects that could be financed through the Fund.

31 March 2022 - NW620

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the reason that residents in Sekhukhune in Limpopo do not have access to clean water, in spite of living near De Hoop Dam?

Reply:

The De Hoop Dam, including the first section (40km) of the primary bulk pipeline to Steelpoort (ORWRDP Phase 2C) was completed in 2014. The construction of a secondary bulk to distribute water to the villages within the Nebo Plateau from De Hoop dam from the Malekana Water Treatment Works (WTW) commenced in January 2009.

The implementation of Nebo Scheme was planned in a phased approach and the first phase of the project was completed in December 2011. It was however, not commissioned due to delayed completion of the De Hoop Dam.

The commissioning of the completed Jane Furse pipeline from Malekana WTW to Jane Furse was also delayed due to deteriorated components of the pipeline and pump stations. The commissioning of the pipeline was halted because the contractor experienced cash flow challenges and the company was placed under business rescue.

The scheme has a capacity of 12 Ml/d and has been partially commissioned. It is operating at 4Ml/d through the Malekana WTW as construction for most of the bulk infrastructure is still in progress. The plant provides water to eight villages including Ga-Malekana, Ga-Masha, Ga-Maepa, Makakateng, Mphana, Mpelegane, Ga-Maphopha and Ga-Rantho. The Sekhukhune District Municipality (DM) is in the process to resume the commissioning process to functionalise the pipeline from Malekana to Jane Furse, which will supply water to forty-two (42) more villages.

Once the construction of the bulk water supply infrastructure pipelines is completed, the capacity of the Malekana WTW will ensure the sustainable water provision to all the villages that are meant to benefit from the scheme.

To cater for growing demand for water in the area, the Sekhukhune DM has concluded the technical report to upgrade the WTW from 12Ml/d to 24Ml/d. However, the funding remains a challenge as the Municipal Infrastructure Grant is fully committed. There is a need to reprioritise funding for the WTW upgrade as soon as possible to align with bulk distribution projects. The funding required amounts to R121 million.

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31 March 2022 - NW693

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) total amount that her department was owing the water boards at the end of January 2018, (b)(i) name of each water board owed and (ii) amount outstanding in total in respect of each specified water board and (c) on what date is it envisaged that the amounts will be paid to the respective water boards?

Reply:

Name of the Water Boards

Period

Amount outstanding in total

On what date is it envisaged that the amounts will be paid to the respective water boards

Amatola Water

2021/2022

6 914 022,59

Amount will be settled by not later than the 25 March 2022.

Bloem Water

2021/2022

1 536 436,37

Amount will be settled by not later than the 25 March 2022.

Lepelle Northern Water

2020/2021

13 290 001,62

The amount will be settled by the 31 March 2022 after budget reprioritization.

Magalies Water

 

-

No outstanding invoices

Mhlathuze Water

 

-

No outstanding invoices

Overberg Water

 

-

No outstanding invoices

Rand Water

2020/2021

132 211 798,20

Amount of R1,4 million will be processed by not later than the 25 March 2022.The balance will settle after the budget reprioritization 31 March 2022.

Sedibeng Water

 

-

No outstanding invoices

Umgeni Water

 

-

No outstanding invoices

       

Total

153 952 258,78

 
 

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14 March 2022 - NW290

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What interventions has his department taken to ensure that residents of the Sol Plaatje Local Municipality, who are subjected to drinking polluted water, are provided with clean water?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has engaged the Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality on the matter and the municipality confirmed that at times the turbidity of treated water was elevated, but that there were no failures on bacteriological contamination as all E. coli results were within requirements.

The DWS officials conducted investigations at the Riverton WTW on 04 February 2021 and the following findings were reported:

a) Aged infrastructure on both the old and new plant and poor operations and maintenance of the works.

b) The old plant was non-operational due to chemical and chlorine pumps failure

c) The new plant has 48 sand filters in total with some sand filters out of operation; those that were operational were overloaded and full of scum due to pd) or operation and maintenance

d) From the on-site physical testing, the final turbidity count was ranging from 34.4, 18.08, 9.41 to 4.79 NTU

e) The bulk water network supply lines could be corroded or full of sand; with no routine cleaning of reservoirs; and no maintenance program for existing infrastructure.

f) No full chemical and bacteriological analysis of final treated water is available on the Blue Drop Information system.

On 21 February 2022 DWS directed the municipality, in terms of 53(1) of the NWA to:

a) In terms of the Water Services Act (Regulation relating to Compulsory National Standards, No. 5) to provide water services within its area of jurisdiction, ensuring compliance with the Compulsory National Standards for the Quality of Potable Drinking Water (DWAF, 1996), SANS 241 and subsequent updated versions.

b) Ensure all water supplied to a household is tested by the water service authority/provider, with the frequency of testing depending on the size of the community in accordance with SANS 241.

c) Establish a suitable programme for sampling the quality of drinking water; specify the sampling points, frequency and which substances will be tested for in the water; compare the results with SANS 241 and if such results indicate that the water poses a health risk - inform the DWS, the Department of Health, and consumers immediately; and

d) Ensure that all consumers are educated about water quality and its importance for human health.

Furthermore, in terms of Schedule 3(1)(2) of the NWA the municipality was directed to provide an action plan within five (5) working days including short- and long-term solutions with financial and human resource implications and assigned responsibilities on how the municipality will address all the areas of non-compliance identified above. The municipality is also expected to provide monthly reports (by the first working day of following month) indicating:

  • Progress with implementation of actions,
  • Operation and maintenance of treatment water,
  • Storage and conveyance and the water quality test results to indicate ensure safe drinking water that meets the required standards

The response of the municipality with the action plan and implementation of the action plan is being monitored by the department of Water and Sanitation.

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14 March 2022 - NW297

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What steps has his department taken to resolve the water crisis that Polokwane and surrounding areas are facing because of the lack of infrastructure maintenance at the (a) Ebenezer and (b) Olifantspoort bulk water schemes?

Reply:

The Lepelle Northern Water Board (LNW) is implementing a preventive maintenance plan that is combined with condition-based, predictive, and corrective maintenance on the bulk water infrastructure as a short-term solution to address water supply challenges in Polokwane.

The Department of Water and Sanitation is implementing the Olifantspoort and Ebenezer Water Supply Schemes (O&E WSS) project to upgrade and refurbish the schemes and increase capacity to meet demand in Polokwane and surrounding areas which is projected to grow to 272,3 ML/day by 2043.

Upon completion of the project, it is envisaged that water supply will be improved as follows:

  • The capacity of the Olifantspoort scheme which is currently 60 ML/day will be increased by 40 ML/day.
  • The capacity of the Ebenezer scheme which is currently 54 ML/day and will be upgraded by 15ML/day to 69 ML/day.

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14 March 2022 - NW284

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a)(i) is the total accumulated cost of raising the Hazelmere Dam wall from 2016 to date and (ii) by what date will the specified project be completed, (b) what are the main reasons for the protracted delays in raising the dam wall and (c) is assistance being offered to the affected settlements along the uMdloti River bank?

Reply:

a)  (i) As of January 2022, the accumulated expenditure for the project was R646 111 833.

(ii) It is expected that the project will be completed in October 2022.

b) The main delays on the project were due to:

  • Unforeseen technical challenges during construction
  • Delays in the procurement of critical instrumentation
  • Longer than anticipated timeframes for the re-appointment of the contractor through the legally required National Treasury concurrence and appointment of Engineers.

However, the contractor returned to site on 14 October 2021 and construction work has commenced.

c) There are 15 households affected by the raising of the dam wall. Compensation will be provided in the form of 100m2 houses being constructed at an alternative site for each affected household. The affected households are being accommodated in the temporary housing erected on the stands allocated to affected families at Oakford. There are two families that have opted to remain on existing properties until the permanent houses have been constructed. The department is finalising the appointment of the contractor for the new houses.

 

10 March 2022 - NW74

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the bulk water supply by Magalies Water to Region 5 of the City of Tshwane, Gauteng, what is the status of the repair and/or replacement project of the 210m water supply pipeline at Wilge Dam that was washed away in December 2019, which affects water supply to the Refilwe, Cullinan, Rayton, Petra Diamond Mine and Zonderwater areas. (2) In light of the fact that the inability of Magalies Water to resolve the issue is causing water shortages for residents and reservoir levels to run low, what is the deadline for the full restoration of the bulk water supply. (3) What measures are being put in place to (a) deal with power supply issues and/or (b) erect temporary power supply solutions as Magalies Water cites Eskom power outages as the reason for regular bulk water shortages to the area?

Reply:

1.  A temporary raw water pipeline and pump station was installed by the Petra Diamond Mine in December 2019 after the flood damage of the Wilge Dam infrastructure. The temporary pumping system can supply on average, 11 Ml/d to the users. The average demand in Cullinan for the past financial two years was about 10 – 10.5 Ml/d which has been met by the Cullinan WTW. There have been interruptions to supply that are due to power outages.

(2) The Wilge Dam infrastructure, including the pumps, pipeline which was damaged by the flooding is owned and maintained by the Petra Diamond Mines. The Petra Diamond Mine is in the process of repairing the damaged infrastructure. The following progress has been made in this regard:

  • Detailed designs and Bill of Quantities for the Civils, Mechanical Electrical and Control & Instrumentation (C&I) designs have been completed
  • The Environmental Authorisation was received from Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
  • Currently awaiting approvals for Water Use License Application from the Department of Water and Sanitation DWS.
  • Tenders for appointment of Contractors have been advertised and appointment of contractors is expected to be concluded by end of April
  • Construction is expected to start in May/June 2022. The expected Project completion date is January/February 2023.

(3) Magalies Water has a contract with the City of Tshwane (CoT) for power supply. Power supply interruptions are therefore reported to the CoT for investigation and resolution, whether the interruptions are a result of challenges with their own infrastructure or Eskom related. Interventions to resolve power supply outage challenges include:

  • Engagements with the CoT to improve the unreliable electricity supply
  • Formal correspondence to CoT, requesting that Magalies Water be exempted from load shedding as this negatively impacts bulk water supply
  • The installation of standby generators was explored and found to be unaffordable
  • The raw reserved buffer dam has been cleaned and repaired and recommissioned.
  • Magalies Water is also exploring the possibility of the Petra Diamond Mine to supply the Cullinan WTW with electricity as alternative power supply.

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10 March 2022 - NW141

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

On what date (a) will construction of the water pipeline from the Xhariep Dam to the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality commence and (b) is the construction envisaged to be completed?

Reply:

a)  Construction of the water pipeline from Xhariep Dam to Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality is scheduled to start in July 2025. The next phase of the project will comprise of detailed designs, securing funding and contracting agreements.

b) It is envisaged that the project will be completed by June 2029.

10 March 2022 - NW19

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)In light of the water shortages experienced by the residents in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality area and surrounding areas, specifically in Umlazi, where residents at times go hours and even days without running water and experience periodical cut-offs, what interventions has his department made in this regard, including (a) mechanisms, (b) processes and (c) procedures that have been implemented to avoid future water cuts;

Reply:

a) The municipality rations water supply to avoid total collapse of the water supply infrastructure. The water rationing is done on a daily basis at night-time where demand for water is less allowing the infrastructure to build up storage. This is done from 20H00 to 03H00.

The Department of Water and Sanitation instructed eThekwini Metro as the WSA within its jurisdiction to undertake an investigation on the ongoing water supply interruptions within and surrounding Umlazi areas. The report indicated short, medium, and long terms solutions to mitigate the water supply challenges in the Umlazi areas.

The table below shows the short, medium, and long terms solutions that eThekwini Metro has initiated and planned to undertake to stabilize the Umlazi water system:

Item

Intervention

Description

Budget Required

Funding Source

Financial Year

1.

Short Term

Dedicated day to day operation and maintenance of Umlazi water supply system

R560 000 per month (outsourced excluding internal costs)

Internal O&M Budget

2021/2022

2.

Medium Term

Optimized maintenance of the Umlazi water supply system

R560 000 per month (outsourced excluding internal costs)

Internal O&M Budget

2021/2022

3.

Long Term

Replacement and Upgrade of the Umlazi water supply system

R2 billion (including bulk and distribution networks)

Not funded yet

N/A

Water supply into Umlazi system comes from Durban Heights Water Treatment Works (DHWTW) located in Reservoir Hills through the twin southern aqueduct lines, 1200mm steel and a 950mm diameter pipes. This aqueduct supplies Shallcross, Chatsworth, Northdene, Queensburgh, St Wendolins, Washington Heights, Welbedatch and ultimately Umlazi (including Nsimbini, Folweni and Golokodo).

The condition of the 950mm diameter pipe has deteriorated over the past four years which caused frequent major leaks that required major repairs resulting to a decision to isolate all sections of this pipe. The impact of the pipe isolation resulted in reduced system input volume to all downstream areas (Chatsworth, Shallcross, St Wendolins, Nagina, Northdene, Queensburgh, Welbedatch, Umlazi, Folweni, Nsimbini and Golokodo). This affected most the critical points (furthest and highest points), Umlazi 2 which supplies C, F, G, H, N & W Sections and ultimately Nsimbini, Folweni and Golokodo.

(a-c) The municipality, together with its water service provider (Umgeni Water) is in the process of refurbishing and upgrading bulk infrastructure which includes upgrade and replacement of bulk pipelines. The refurbishment of Reservoir 3 began in November 2019 and is scheduled to be completed by August 2022.

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11 January 2022 - NW2790

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether his department has put any interventions in place to bring sustainable solutions to municipalities which are hit by water shortages in the 2021-22 financial year; if not, what are the reasons that his department has not taken any steps to solve the water crisis; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

(a). The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has over the years developed interventions to address water shortages within the country. This intervention includes forms of grants(conditional) that are aimed at provision of sustainable water supply through the provinces.

The DWS is managing two infrastructure grant funding programs namely Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). The two grants subsidise Water Services Authorities to implement bulk projects through RBIG and reticulation projects through WSIG. The two programs fund projects that reduce water services infrastructure backlogs and enhance access by ensuring sustainability of services. The projects include-:

    • New infrastructure development
    • Upgrade of existing infrastructure
    • Refurbishment and or rehabilitation of existing infrastructure etc

(b). For the 2021/22 financial year, the department is implementing 126 projects in all the 9 provinces which are funded through RBIG and 230 through WSIG to address water shortages and provide sustainable and adequate water provision in different municipalities.

Part of the intervention will include the implementation of the District Development Model.

11 January 2022 - NW2463

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

By what date is it envisaged that the issues of (a) scarce water and (b) sewerage leaks, which have been ongoing for several years in Ward 25 informal settlements, including (i) Punters, (ii) Kennedy Road, (iii) Foreman Road and (iv) Burnwood in eThekwini, will be resolved?

Reply:

 

(a). The Ethekwini Municipality has put a plan to attend to the matter and I can confirm that there has been provision of water and sanitation services to the informal settlements in Ward 25 including the areas of Punter, Kennedy Road, Foreman Road and Burnwood. These informal settlement areas are supplied with water standpipes within 200 meters of households, and containerized ablution facilities that are fitted with water for drinking and washing, toilets and showers. This level of service is in accordance with the water and sanitation policy of the Ethekwini Metro and it is also in line with DWS standards on decent sanitation as well as clean water, while sorting an alternative place to settle the informal settlement community.

(b). The areas are provided with containerized ablution facilities which are connected to the city’s sewerage system. Sewerage leaks and overflows from this system are attended to within the operating standard of 48 hours where possible. The response

times are not always adhered to due to a backlog in the number of blockages and a fluctuating demand.

11 January 2022 - NW2366

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What steps has he and/or his department taken to resolve water provision services in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality, more specifically in (a) Esikhaleni, (b) Mandlankala, (c) KwaDlangezwa, (d) Ngwelezane Empangeni, (e) Richards Bay, (f) Macekane, (g) Mzingazi, (h) Port Dunford and (i) Madlanzini?

Reply:

The Mhlathuze Municipality has embarked on projects to address supply and demand challenges in and around the southern supply system which supplies the areas of Esikhaleni, Mandlakala, Port Dunford and Dlangezwa. The interventions are as follows:

(a). A business plan has been prepared to increase the capacity of Cubhu Water Treatment Works from 36Ml/d to 60Ml/d and construction of 1000mm diameter pipeline to Forest Reservoir.

(b).Reticulation project to Port Dunford, Ensimbini, Mcebisi, Nyembe and Ephayindini is scheduled to commence by January 2022 as soon as the construction permit is approved by department of labour.

(c). In Macekane the municipality has commenced with the construction of the reservoirs, bulk lines and reticulation to address water supply backlogs.

(d). The municipality has completed a 3Ml reservoir in Macekane and is currently busy with the 5Ml command reservoir, which is 38% towards completion.

(e). Construction of the bulk supply line from Hillview Reservoirs to Macekane and Hlaza is currently at 33% towards completion

(f). A second 25Ml reservoir is planned for the Richards Bay Supply System to supplement water supply to Mandlanzini, Mzingazi and Richards Bay areas.

For the area of Empangeni, the Mhlathuze Municipality has a contract with the Mhlathuze Water which ensures that there is a stable supply.

 

 

11 January 2022 - NW2168

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What alternative solutions will his department provide to assist the community of Sekhukhune District Municipality in Limpopo who are still without water, even after more than R4 billion was spent on the De Hoop Dam construction?

Reply:

 

The De Hoop Dam was completed in 2014 with the first section (40km) of the primary bulk pipeline to Steelpoort (ORWRDP Phase 2C). The construction of secondary bulk pipeline from Malekana Water Treatment Works (WTW) started in January 2009 in anticipation of distributing water to the villages within Nebo Plateau from the De Hoop Dam.

The implementation of Nebo scheme was structured in a phased approach. The first phase of the project was completed in December 2011 but was not commissioned due to delayed completion of remaining phases of the Olifants River Water Resource Development Project (ORWRDP).

The Jane Furse pipeline from Malekana Water Treatment Works to Jane Furse was partially commissioned and is operating at 4 Ml/d as most of the bulk infrastructure is still in progress. The scheme is currently serving eight villages, including Ga Malekana, Ga Masha, Ga-Maepa, Makakateng, Mphana, Mpelegane, Maphopha and Ga Rantho.

The Sekhukhune District Municipality (SDM) is in the process of kick starting the commissioning process of the pipeline from Malekana to Jane Furse which will supply an additional 42 villages.

The Sekhukhune DM has concluded the technical report for the upgrade of the Malekana WTW from 12Ml/d to 24Ml/d to align with bulk distribution projects. However, funding remains the challenge as the Municipal Infrastructure Grant is fully committed.

11 January 2022 - NW2863

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Which interventions and/or measures have been put in place to systematically improve the monitoring of blocked water courses on a regular basis so that the illegal construction of dams that causes major challenges to water security in the Republic is mitigated?

Reply:

 

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has both proactive and reactive measures in place to monitor compliance to water legislation and to deal with transgressions where such might have occurred. The Compliance Monitoring Programme deals with authorised water users and “blocked water courses” does not necessarily translate to unlawfulness if done within the provisions of legislation.

In terms of the different aspects of the Compliance Programme the DWS implements the following:

  • Monitors a certain number of water users, including dam owners for their compliance with legislation on an annual basis
  • Proactively promotes compliance in various platforms such as the Catchment Management Forums in order to ensure that an understanding of the requirements of water legislation is achieved to secure compliance
  • Conducts surveillance or spot check in the various catchments to detect any unlawful activities At provincial level.
  • Monitors and reports non-compliance to the relevant competent authorities on an ongoing basis through the Environmental Management Inspectorate

The Department is also actively involved in the Environmental Impact Assessment processes for new developments such as the construction of dams. Through this process the Department is able to proactively deal with developments within water courses that may impact on water security.

In terms of reactive measures; the DWS has a toll free number: 0800 200 200 and an email customercare@dws.gov.za, as channels through which complaints of suspected non-compliance to water related legislation may be lodged by members of the public or interested and affected parties. In addition, the DWS has a dedicated Enforcement Unit that deals with complaints and provides liaison with enforcement agencies.

Although there is currently is no obligation for dam owners of older dams classified as ‘dams with a safety risk’ to have outlets installed in their dams, this is a good dam engineering practice which the DWS will be promoting and enforcing on new applications for licences to construct dams. The Dam Safety Office of the department will also embark on a process to conduct an audit of in- stream dams to check whether outlet works for downstream releases and for emergency releases have been installed.

In terms of unlawfully constructed dams, the department has recently conducted an Enforcement blitz operation in the Western Cape. It is envisaged that other similar operations will be rolled out in other provinces. The department is also taking action against departmentally approved engineering professionals who have been involved in the construction of dams without following the prescripts of Chapter 4 of the National Water Act and Regulation 139 regarding the safety of dams. Offenders are referred to the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) for violation of the ECSA Code of Conduct for registered professionals.

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11 January 2022 - NW2862

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With regard to the Giyani water project which is still experiencing numerous challenges with the Vaal Gamagara Regional Water Supply Scheme and the Integrated Vaal River System, what is his department doing to address the challenges?

Reply:

 

The Department of Water and sanitation has put in place measures to ensure that challenges hindering progress for projects such as the Vaal Gamagara, the Giyani Water Supply and the Vaal River System Intervention are resolved and the services are delivered as expected by affected communities. The table below indicates the project descriptions, challenges and how these are being resolved

PROJECT / CHALLENGES

INTERVENTION/ PROGRESS

The Vaal Gamagara BWS Project:

Phase 1 entails the refurbishment and replacement of an 80-kilometre pipeline which

To address challenges regarding the Vaal Gamagara Bulk Water Supply Scheme; the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has put

in place an intervention as follows:

PROJECT / CHALLENGES

INTERVENTION/ PROGRESS

become necessary due to the pipeline having reached the end of its functional lifespan. The revised cost of Phase 1 amounts to R1.4 billion. The implementing Agent for the project, the Sedibeng Water Board is currently facing financial and liquidity crisis due to non-payment for services by the municipalities. This has also negatively impacted on the entity’s ability to continue with the implementation of the project.

  • In terms of Treasury Regulation 6.3.1 and section 5 of the Appropriation Act, an additional R294.278 million was allocated for the completion of Phase 1.
  • Phase 2: Established a Project Steering Committee (PSC) that comprises of Private Sector on large infrastructure build projects, the Northern Cape Mines Leadership Forum. The PSC has an oversight role to consider, advise, assist, and make decisions on any business relating to the VGGWSS.
  • Initiated several discussions with different bodies for a collaborative institutional arrangement for the sustainable development of the VGGWSS.

Giyani Water Services Project;

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is currently implementing the bulk water services project to address water supply challenges in 55 villages in Giyani. The project includes the construction of 8 bulk pipelines with a total length of 325km in to 55 villages. The current overall progress of the project is at48%. It is envisaged that it will be completed and commissioned by end of March 2023.

However, it should be noted that the impact of the project will be realised progressively during the implementation as the pipelines should practically be completed and delivering bulk water to the service reservoirs in the villages from October 2021.

There are currently two pipelines that are are delivering bulk water to service reservoirs in the town of Giyani and the following four villages: Thomo, Mninginisi Block 2, Mhlava and Muyexe. An estimated 11081 households are benefiting from these pipelines.

The Mopani District Municipality has a mandate to ensure availability of functional reticulation to all the villages for distribution of bulk water from the service reservoirs to the households once bulk distribution is completed.

The DWS is supporting the Municipality through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) to augment other funding that the municipality is allocated to address water services infrastructure needs, including the reticulation. For this purpose, the department has allocated R42 million for

2021/22 and a further R162 million will be allocated over the MTEF period.

Vaal River System Intervention:

Cabinet approved the Vaal River System Intervention in the Emfuleni Local Municipality through Section 63 (2) of the Water Services Act, 1997 (Act No. 108 of 1997) on the 26 May 2021. The intervention plan for the water and sanitation infrastructure in the Emfuleni LM.

The DWS appointed Rand Water in terms of Section

63 of the Water Services Act to undertake management, operations and maintenance of the water and sanitation infrastructure in order to rehabilitate Vaal river integrated system and simultaneously capacitate the municipality to manage operations.

PROJECT / CHALLENGES

INTERVENTION/ PROGRESS

 

The project is part of the immediate scope of works that will be undertaken by Rand Water. A panel of contractors for civil engineering services was appointed in June 2021. Mechanical and Electrical engineering services will be appointed early in 2022. The project includes the upgrade of Sebokeng, Rietspruit and Leeuwkuil WWTWs and completion of the Meyerton WWTW.

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11 January 2022 - NW2714

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

1. With reference to the various water cuts that took place in Johannesburg throughout 2021, what interventions has his department made in this regard, including (a) mechanisms, (b) processes and (c) procedures that have been implemented to avoid future water cuts? 2. what (a) investigations have been undertaken by his department or under the authority of his department into the issue of water cuts, (b) are the relevant details of the reports that were produced for each specified investigation, (c) are the names of the persons who undertook the investigations and (d) were the start dates and end dates of each investigation; 3. what (a) findings, outcomes and recommendations were made for each investigation, (b)mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place to ensure that the respective recommendations are planned, actioned and monitored and (c) are the timelines, time frames and deadlines for each recommendation in each investigation? NW3228E

Reply:

MINISTER OF WATER AND SANITATION

  1. Upon receipt of complaints from residents of the City of Johannesburg and media reports, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) referred water cuts complaints to the City of Johannesburg and Rand Water for corrective action. Rand Water made some changes to improve water supply into the Palmiet system from other pumping systems and we are currently monitoring the impact on their reservoirs due to the changes”
  2. Investigations were conducted by Rand Water and the and it was established that water purification plant was forced to shut down on 29 April 2021 due to fire under the ESKOM line. As a result, water levels in the Brixton, Hurst Hill and Crosby storage complex dropped to low levels, and the system took time to recover. Under normal circumstances, Rand Water supplies these reservoirs with a minimum flow of 2 500 kl/hour from their Commando Road meter, which is then supplemented from Stafford at a rate of just over 3 500 kl/hour. Johannesburg Water manages to maintain the three (3) reservoir complexes at a combined average capacity of 50%. However, since the incident of the 29 April 2021, a number of issues impacted on the flow specifically from Commando Road, as follows:
    • Stage 2 load shedding schedule implemented by ESKOM/City Power from 16 May 2021 to 18 May 2021 had adverse effect on the system, the storage was compromised, and recovery was very slow.
    • On the 18th of May 2021, Rand Water undertook a pre-isolation shutdown at Eikenhof Pumping Station to prepare for the replacement of the G34/Q2 isolation valve. During this pre-isolation shutdown, a power failure was experienced at the Vereeniging Water Treatment Plant which affected supply to the Hurst Hill system.
    • Power failure on 23 May 2021, further worsened the situation, especially for the Brixton Reservoir and Tower as both ran dry due to power failure and the inability of Johannesburg Water to pump water from Crosby Reservoir.
    • This was further negatively affected by power failures from 29 May and 30 May 2021 at the Eikenhof Rand Water pumping station.
    • Rand Water’s Eikenhof Pumping Station was shut down for two hours on 05 June 2021 to enable City Power to fix an electrical fault on the power line, a setback that negatively impacted recovery. The water supply system recovered slowly during the day due to high water demand.

The initial water outage was reported by residents of Linmeyer in 07 July 2021. The matter related to the Rand Water Palmiet Pump station failure. The failure of the pump station reduced pumping capacity to a number of reservoirs which form part of the Palmiet pumping system. One of these reservoirs was the Rand Water Meyershill Reservoir situated in South Hills Johannesburg. Johannesburg Water has a pump station which is pumping water from the Rand Water Meyershill reservoir into South Hills water tower and supplies the areas of South Hills, Risana, Linmeyer and Tulisa Park and surrounding areas with water.

Due to the Palmiet pump station failure the Meyers Hill reservoir levels dropped to a level of 6%. When the levels of the reservoir dropped below 25%, Johannesburg Water could no longer pump water into the tower without damaging the pumps thus resulting into water supply interruption.

The second water outage reported on 28 August 2021, related to the Rand Water Meyershill Reservoir being almost empty following a power failure at the Zuikerbosh purification works the previous week. This impacted the Palmiet pumping system and the majority of the reservoirs on that system were negatively affected. The system has since recovered.

3. It was established that water supply interruptions in the City of Johannesburg resulted from a power failure or load shedding. It was also established two of Rand Water purification plants namely, Zuikerbosh and Vereeniging; as well as two major pumps stations (Palmiet and Eikenhof) supplying large parts of the City had also been affected by power failure.

Following the investigations, Rand Water implemented a 54-hour shutdown to do maintenance on their raw water pipes at the Vereeniging purification works from the 15 to 17 November 2021. The line was commissioned fully on 17 November 2021, with the works back at full capacity on 18 November 2021. Once the works were in full production; Rand Water increased its pumping capacity at Eikenhof pump station on 19 November 2021.

During this period, Johannesburg Water only received 75% of water supply which resulted in some of the reservoirs running at low levels. The Brixton/Crosby reservoirs took a strain in the process, with Hurst Hill running dry. The City of Johannesburg did not provide interim measures to supply water to affected areas during the outages. However, both Crosby/Brixton and Hurst Hill reservoirs recovered, and normal supply was restored to affected areas by 19 November 2021.

21 December 2021 - NW2381

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether the Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA) and his department will furnish Mrs M R Mohlala with further details of the transactions and/or loan agreements between TCTA and the Development Bank of Southern Africa as well as agreements with the five major banks in the Republic?

Reply:

The Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA) raised R15.45 billion from six local banks, including DBSA, in May 2021, as part of its mandate to raise and manage funding for the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (“LHWP”), including the construction of Phase 2. This followed the raising of R6.5 billion in 2018 from three local banks. The loans contribute to:

  • Fulfilment of South Africa’s obligations in terms of the Treaty with Lesotho;
  • Servicing of the existing debt portfolio; and
  • New capital expenditure on LHWP-2 and liquidity management.

The LHWP augments the Vaal River System (VRS) which supplies water to 45% of South Africa’s population in Gauteng municipalities including Johannesburg, Ekurhuleni, Tshwane, Rustenberg in the North West; as well Govan Mbeki Municipality (Secunda, Evander, and Bethal) in Mpumalanga. The Vaal River System also supports 60% of the South African economy, including:

  • The bulk of Eskom’s power stations;
  • Sasol’s plants in Sasolburg and Secunda;
  • The goldfields of the North West and Free State provinces;
  • The Iron and Manganese mines in the Northern Cape; and
  • ArcelorMittal South Africa’s steel works in Vanderbijlpark and Vereeniging.

The long-term outlook for the VRS is that water requirements are outstripping the available water resources and there is a need to assure water security for the several provinces dependent on the VRS.

The transactions are an investment in an impactful project that contributes to social and economic development. Apart from the direct benefit of additional water supply for the VRS, the LHWP-2 is anticipated to contribute and maintain a total of R244.4 billion (in 2018 constant prices) GDP and Sustain 544 586 new job opportunities, of which just over 214 570 will be for unskilled workers; thereby significantly contributing to South Africa’s job creation, according to a Technical Due-diligence Report prepared by consulting company called WSP for the benefit of Development Finance Institutions lenders.

The loans are all denominated in local currency and therefore do not have foreign currency exposure and have maturities of between 5 and 20 years. They will be repaid through water tariffs charged by the Department of Water and Sanitation on the Vaal River System water users.

The TCTA's repayment obligations under the LHWP are covered by an explicit South African Government Guarantee as required by the Treaty on the Lesotho Highlands Water Project. The details of the loan agreements are provided in table 1 below.

TABLE 1: LOAN AGREEMENTS DETAILS

Lender

Loan Type

Purpose of the loan

Loan Amount

Effective Date

Final

Repayment Date

ABSA

Long-Term Loan

Refinancing of existing debt

R1,000,000,000

27 May 2021

31 March

2026

DBSA

Long-Term Loan

Capital Expenditure

R2,500,000,000

27 May 2021

30 April 2045

DBSA

Long-Term Loan

Capital Expenditure

R3,000,000,000

27 May 2021

30 April 2045

Investec

Long-Term Loan & Revolving Credit Facility

Refinancing and/or Capital Expenditure

R1,500,000,000

25 July 2018

25 July 2036

Investec

Long-Term Loan

Refinancing and/or Capital Expenditure

R1,650,000,000

27 May 2021

30 May 2036

Nedbank

Long-Term Loan

Capital Expenditure

R2,000,000,000

27 May 2021

27 May 2031

Rand Merchant Bank

Long-Term Loan

Refinancing and/or Capital Expenditure

R3,800,000,000

27 May 2021

27 May 2026

Standard Bank

Long-Term Loan &

Revolving Credit Facility

Refinancing and/or Capital Expenditure

R4,000,000,000

27 July 2018

27 July 2033

Standard Bank

Long-Term Loan

Refinancing and/or Capital Expenditure

R600,000,000

27 May 2021

30 April 2027

Standard Bank

Long-Term Loan

Refinancing and/or Capital Expenditure

R900,000,000

27 May 2021

28 April 2028

21 December 2021 - NW2382

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the (a) findings and (b) recommendations that the Ekurhuleni Water Care Company made in its report regarding the challenges associated with the Vaal River System?

Reply:

 

The findings and recommendations of the Report of the Ekurhuleni Water Care Company are indicated in the table below:

Findings

Recommendations

Non-establishment of the two key Governance Structures, the Political Steering Committee and the Project Steering Committee; resulted in delays for approval of the intervention

implementation plan

Key Governance Structures should be established to make key decisions on budgetary issues and project implementation issues.

The Project Management Office (PMO) should have been appointed shortly after appointing ERWAT as an Implementing Agent to ensure

efficient handling of the project plan and procurement of services.

The PMO should have been appointed shortly after appointing ERWAT as an Implementing Agent

There was a long lead time in Supply Chain Management processes (MFMA Compliance which affected the pace of the project.

Due to the urgent nature of the project, special procurement processes should be put in place to ensure that the needs of the project are met in a

timeous manner

There was a lack of a structured communication and engagement protocol

Councilors need to conduct regular public awareness campaigns to educate communities on the objectives of the intervention to:

  • Minimize work disturbances by the communities
  • Reduce the littering and vandalism of the sewer network by the communities.
 

Community awareness campaigns should be a constant feature/activity in projects of such a

nature to manage community expectations.

The role of the Labour Unions and communities as key stakeholders, was not acknowledged which resulted in a lack of buy-in from the Metsi- a-Lekoa personnel for the project

Labour unions should play a greater part in

projects of such a nature for the good of the project.

 

The establishment of Labour Desks at an early stage is key so that the project can be implemented with the inclusion of SMMEs and

taking into consideration job seekers in the area.

 

Buy-in from the local communities, Community

Leadership, Business Forum Leadership, MKMVA Leadership was crucial for the project.

There was scope creep between the Sedibeng Regional Sewer Scheme (SRSS) and the Vaal River System Intervention (VRSI) resulting from inadequate integration of the SRSS and VRSI Projects.

Allocation of resources and integration of projects such as the SRSS and the VRSI should be given priority even before the commencement of the

project. This will also avoid delays due to interdependencies.

 

Better planning and coordination is required for integration of SRSS into VRSI.

Finalisation of scope of works for refurbishments was delayed

The Department should prioritise finalization of scope for refurbishment when they take over

project implementation.

 

The O&M aspect of the project should be implemented first before the Capex rollout for

infrastructure refurbishment to ensure that the Implementing Agent understands the process

Findings

Recommendations

 

deficiencies and the sequence of the refurbishment process.

Human resources, equipment and fleet were found to be inadequate within Emfuleni Local Municipality and presented challenges in the operation and maintenance of the sewer

infrastructure

The project should have commenced by mobilizing resources such as staff, fleet, tools, equipment, for Metsi-a-Lekoa. Capacitatation of ELM from inception would have made skills

transfer from ERWAT an easy process.

Poor power supply to pump stations and Water Care Works (WCWs) affected water quality.

Back-up generators should be procured to ensure continuous adequate power supplies.

06 December 2021 - NW1919

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, given that the Hammanskraal community has lived in a state of indignity and health risks caused by contaminated water for over 16 years, his department made any intervention; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of such an intervention?

Reply:

Yes, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has made efforts to intervene and improve the quality of drinking water in Hammanskraal including the following:

  • Undertaking sampling of drinking water at the Temba Water Treatment Works (WTW) which confirmed that the drinking water is non-compliant with the drinking water standards, South African National Standards 214:2015
  • Conducting investigations into the situation regarding water challenges in Hammanskraal and issued Directives to the City of Tshwane to improve the quality of drinking water supplied to the community of Hammanskraal
  • Issued mutliple directives instructing City of Tshwane (CoT) to comply with the drinking water standards

It is important for the Honourable Member to note that the source of the contaminated water in Hammanskraal is the poor effluent discharged by the Rooiwal Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW) into the Apies River. The Rooiwal WWTW is overloaded, such that the effluent discharged into the Apies River is partially treated, and therefore pollutes the Apies River and the Leeukraal Dam.

The DWS also found that the CoT did not have capacity to optimally operate the Rooiwal WWTW. Subsequently, the CoT appointed East Rand Water Care Company (Erwat) to operate and upgrade the Rooiwal WWTW. Once completed, it is envisaged that the effluent discharged from the WWTW will improve. This will in turn improve the quality of water abstracted from the Temba WTW, which supplies water to Hammanskraal. The DWS will continue with compliance and enforcement processes until the CoT fully complies with effluent standards. The CoT is currently providing potable water to Hammanskraal community, using tankers.

---00O00---

 

29 November 2021 - NW2305

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What buildings does his department own in Gauteng? (2) whether his department has disposed of any of its buildings since 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, to whom were the buildings disposed?

Reply:

1.  The Water Trading Entity of the Department of Water and Sanitation owns 108 buildings in Gauteng as reflected in the table below:

Area Office

Spatial Locations

Number of buildings

1. Bronkhorstspruit Dam

Bronkhorstspruit/ Gauteng

11

2. Roodeplaat Dam on the Pienaars River

Moloto Road/ Gauteng

60

3. Vaal Dam

Springs, Krugersdorp & Germiston

37

Total

108

2. Since 1 April 2020 to date, the department did not dispose-off any buildings.

24 November 2021 - NW2057

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant facts that has been recorded by her department regarding the effects of the dry winter season on water reserves in all affected provinces?

Reply:

South Africa receives both summer and winter rainfall, with most Provinces falling within the summer rainfall area; whereas the Western Cape Province receives its rainfall mainly in winter. As a result, annual water allocation decisions for the summer rainfall areas are made in May or June when most of the summer rainfall is believed to have been harvested. On the other hand, the decision date for the winter rainfall areas is November.

The water reserves in most Provinces have been generally sufficient due to good rains received during the past summer rainfall season. The state of water storage in dams as at 30 August 2021 per Province is indicated in the table below:

Water availability and supply situation is determined by undertaking an Annual Operating Analysis (AOA) of the relevant water supply systems in the Provinces. The AOA determines the amount of water that can be supplied sustainably and equitably over the coming year considering the amount of water in storage at the decision date of the system. Water restrictions are implemented in cases of inadequate water availability.

The provinces with relatively less water availability, as indicated by low Dam levels, are located in the Eastern Cape and parts of the Western Cape Provinces. Dam levels in the Western Cape winter rainfall area are generally good and still increasing given that the Province is still in its rainfall season.

The main two water supply systems in the Eastern Cape experiencing water shortages are the Algoa and Amathole Water Supply Systems (WSS). The Algoa WSS supplies water to the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipal Metro (NMBMM), Kouga Local Municipality and the irrigation sector. On the other hand, Amathole WSS supplies the Buffalo City Local Municipality and Amatola Water Board in East London and surrounding areas; as well as the irrigation sector.

On river systems that have been found to have inadequate water availability for the season, water restrictions are proclaimed in the government gazette to curb water abstractions in order to prolong supplies, especially for essential use. The Provinces with water restrictions on a number of systems/dams are listed below as:

Eastern Cape Province

The Algoa Water Supply System, which supplies the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro area, comprises of 5 Dams and is also augmented by the Orange-Fish-Sundays transfer scheme from the Orange River System in the Free State. There are currently restrictions imposed at 80% on irrigation supply and an overall 30% on the domestic sector. Specific restrictions for the different dams are indicated in Table 2.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Churchill

35.24

23.07

19.55

50% Domestic & 80% Irrigation

Impofu

105.76

15.04

16.99

 

Kouga

125.91

4.22

5.44

70% Domestic & 80% Irrigation

Loerie

3.03

37.16

32.8

 

Groendal

11.64

26.64

21.81

80% Irrigation

Total System

281.6

11.92

12.51

30% Domestic and 80% Irrigation

Note: A supply of 58 million m³/a from the Orange-Fish-Sundays transfer scheme to the NMBMM

is not restricted

The Amathole Water Supply System, which supplies the Buffalo City area comprises of 6 Dams as detailed in table 3 below – 10% Restrictions are required on the domestic water supply and 30% on irrigation.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Rooikrantz

4.79

97.14

77.59

10% on Domestic & 30% on irrigation

Laing

18.90

99.57

100.65

 

Bridle Drift

97.92

26.59

21.15

 

Wriggleswade

91.47

19.06

14.88

 

Nahoon

19.26

42.00

28.86

 

Gubu

8.52

85.76

79.36

 

Total System

240.88

34.19

28.81

 

 

Stand-alone Dams in Eastern Cape Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 4 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Nqweba

44.7

8.0

6.7

20% domestic

Howiesonspoort and Settlers Dam

6.4

Not known - no information received from the municipality

20% domestic & 70% irrigation

Sandile

29.7

56.0

50.7

30% irrigation

Xilinxa and Gcuwa

14.2

20.4

7

20% domestic

Kliplaat

57.1

26.9

24.3

30% irrigation

Mhlanga

1.6

13.2

35.1

10% domestic

 

Western Cape Province

Stand-alone Dams in Western Cape Province that are experiencing water shortages and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 5 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage level at decision date 1 June 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Gamka

1.82

45.1

32.62

10% domestic

Oukloof

4.19

0.0

0.00

90% irrigation

Karee

0.95

14.9

21.00

50% domestic

 

Mpumalanga Province

Stand-alone Dams in Mpumalanga Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 6 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

% Storage decision date - 1 May 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Mkhombo

204.6

10

7.6

10% domestic, 40% irrigation

Rust de Winter

28.2

100

99.65

10% domestic, 40% irrigation

Ohrigstad

13.5

100

57.6

10% domestic and irrigation

Limpopo Province

Stand-alone Dams in Limpopo Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 7 below.

Table 7: Stand-alone Dams in Limpopo Province

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

% Storage decision date 1 May 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Middle Letaba

171.9

11

7.79

35% domestic, 70% irrigation

Nsami

21.9

90.5

71.46

35% domestic, 70% irrigation

---00O00--

24 November 2021 - NW2254

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is his department’s current (a) national backlog for the installation of boreholes in rural municipalities and (b) time frame for completing the (i) installation of boreholes and (ii) building of dams in this regard?

Reply:

a)  The installation of boreholes falls under the mandate of municipalities in line with Section 84(1)(d) of the Municipal Structures Act which mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water within their areas of jurisdiction.

(b) (ii) As per the Department of Water and Sanitation Annual Performance Plan and funding for the 2021/22 financial year, progress for the following construction of the following dams is as follows:

No

Project

Progress

Estimated date of completion

1

Raising of Hazelmere Dam

96% construction

August 2022

2

Raising of Clanwilliam Dam

12% construction

April 2026

3

Raising of Tzaneen Dam

10% construction

June 2023

4

Mzimvubu Water Project

20% construction (Advanced Works-Access Roads)

Completion to be confirmed on finalisation of construction drawings

5

New Nwamitwa Dam

  • Procurement completed
  • Designs completed

Completion to confirmed on sequencing of the work packages and availability of long term funding

6

Lusikisiki Regional Water Supply Scheme: Zalu Dam

  • 43% design completion with estimated
  • 100% design completion

Date of completion to be confirmed on finalisation of specialist services appointment

6

Algoa Water Supply System: Corney Dam

0% Design stage

October 2022 for completion of designs

7

Umkhomazi Water Project

Project preparation stage

2027

---00O00---

 

 

24 November 2021 - NW2157

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the status and/or condition of all the bulk water and sanitation infrastructure that his department handed over to municipalities in the Republic as at the latest date for which information is available?

Reply:

 

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is responsible for assisting the municipalities with provision of water and sanitation services to communities. In this regard, the DWS provides assistance to municipalities through conditional grants such as Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the following:

  • Building new infrastructure
  • Refurbishment and upgrade of the existing water and sanitation infrastructure.

In accordance with the implementation protocols, the DWS is responsible for implementation of the infrastructure projects and the municipalities are responsible for Operation and Maintenance of the infrastructure. Upon completion of projects, the assets are handed over to the municipalities. Municipalities are therefore obliged to ensure that the infrastructure is operational and delivers water or sanitation services as intended.

Requesting the Honourable Member to refer to the table below for details on bulk projects implemented and completed from 2012/13 financial year to date as well as the status thereof.

Status of completed projects from 2012/13 to 2021/22 financial year

Name of the project

Name of the WSA/district municipality

Status of the project

Reasons/comments on non-functional projects

EASTERN CAPE

Mount Ayliff Bulk Water Supply

Alfred Nzo DM

Functional

None

Greater Mbizana Regional Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Alfred Nzo DM

Functional

None

Mncwasa Bulk Water Supply

Amathole DM

Functional

None

Ibika Bilk Water Supply

Amathole DM

Not Functional

Water rationing due to drought around Butterworth and shortfall of funds to complete the project

Xonxa Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Chris Hani DM

Functional

The contractor is busy with snags on the pumpstation

Coffee Bay Bulk Water Supply Scheme

OR Tambo DM

Functional

None

KSDPI Bulk Sanitation

OR Tambo DM

Functional

None

Steytlerville Bulk Water Supply

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

Functional

Due to extreme drought. the plant is struggling to obtain water from the Poort where water abstraction is taking place.

Graaff Reinet Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

Functional

None

Paterson BWS Phase 1 to 5A

Sundays River Valley Local Municipality

Functional

None

MPUMALANGA

Acornhoek Bulk Water Supply

Bushbuckridge LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Functional

None

Botleng Wastewater Treatment Works

Victor Khanye LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Balfour Wastewater Treatment Works phase 2

Dipaleseng LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Amsterdam/Sheepmoor phase 1 & 2

Mkhodo LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Delmas Wastewater Treatment Works phase 1

Victor Khanye LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Lushushwane Regional Bulk Water Supply phase 1 to 4

Chief Albert Luthuli LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Hoxani Bulk Water Supply

City of Mbombela LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Not functional

Waiting for the City of Mbombela to finalise the Mechanical & Electrical components that were funded through co-funding by the Municipality

Northern Nsikazi Bulk Water Supply

     

Bushbuckridge Water Services (Cunningnore) phase 1

Bushbuckridge LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Functional

None

Empuluzi phase 3A, 4A & 8

Chief Albert Luthuli LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Refurb & Upgrade of Ermelo Water Treatment Works

Msukaligwa LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Refurbishment of Emalahleni Water Treatment Works

Emalahleni LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Balfour/Siyathemba Regional Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Dipaleseng LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Not functional

Awaiting the completion of the Upgrading of the Balfour Water Treatment Works in Fortuna (known as the Balfour/Siyathemba phase 2)

GAUTENG

Upgrade of Hannes van Niekerk WWTW

Rand West City Local Municipality (formerly Westonaria Local Municipality)

Partially Functional

Some process units of the new module are dysfunctional due to poor maintenance, theft and vandalism.

Upgrade of Rothdene Pump Station

Midvaal Local Municipality

Functional

None

Upgrade of Sebokeng Wastewater Treatment Works Module 6

Emfuleni Local Municipality

Functional

None

KWAZULU-NATAL

Jozini

uMkhanyakude DM

The scheme is functional. The plant is producing 20Ml/day. Bulk pipeline to Ngwavuma with 12 zonal areas completed. Zone 1 to zone 5 completed and operational with reticulation

The municipality is currently implementing zone 6 under MIG programme

Dukuduku Resettlement

uMkhanyakude DM

Functional with minor operational challenges in some areas.

Portion of the settlement with proper reticulation. UKDM has improved most of the unreliable areas through WSIG

Hlabisa

uMkhanyakude DM

The scheme is functional

There is currently not enough water coming from Mandlakazi scheme which is currently under construction. UKDM has improved most of the unreliable areas through WSIG

Emadlangeni

Amajuba DM

The scheme is functional

None

Greater Eston

uMgungundlovu DM

The scheme is functional

None

uMshwathi Phase 1-3

uMgungundlovu DM

The scheme is functional

None

Mhlabatshane

Ugu

The scheme is functional

None

Lower Tugela

iLembe

The scheme is functional

None

FREE STATE

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Construction of Sterkfontein WTW

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: The construction of Escol Reservoir.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Rising main to Escol Reservoir.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 2: Escol pipelines.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 2: Raw water supply system at Sterkfontein Dam.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Makwane Scheme.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Northern Bulk Storage Stage 1.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Northern Bulk Storage Stage 2.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Sealing and waterproofing of the Uniqwa Reservoirs.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Bulk interconnection pipeline: Uniqwa Reversal.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 4: QwaQwa Borehole project Stage 1: Drilling and testing of 60 operational boreholes.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply BWS, Phase 4: QwaQwa Borehole project Stage 2: The equipping of 5 priority boreholes.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Partially functional

From the five (5) priority boreholes, one (1) has been severely vandalised, and two (2) are not being operated.

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 1A: Upgrading of the Reitz WTW

Nketoana LM

Partially Functional

The some components are not working fully.

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3A: Ground Water Study in Nketoana, and Development of Boreholes in Arlington, Petrus Steyn and Lindley

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3B: Upgrading of the Lindley WTW

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3C: Upgrading and refurbishment of Lindley and Arlington Water pump Stations

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Refurbishment of Clarens Sewer Pump Station

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of La Provence Sewer pump station Rising Main

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of Bethlehem Water Treatment Works: Replacing of Asbestos Cement Pipeline from Abstraction point at Sol Plaatjies Dam to Water Treatment Works

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of Fouriesburg (Carolina) Pump Station

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of 4 sewer pump station in Bethlehem/Bohlokong

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC pipes to PVC pipes in Memel

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC pipes to PVC pipes in Warden

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of sewer rising main(asbestos) for Ezenzeleni Area and construction of new sewer station with outfall sewer

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of the WTW in Vrede & Memel Water Treatment Works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC water pipes to PVC in Vrede – Phase 1

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni 3ML reservoir and appurtenant works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni raw water pump station and pipelines

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Non-functional

The pump station was vandalized and some equipment at the pump station were stolen. Currently under Construction funded under RBIG 5B COVID19 project to render it operational.

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni Water Treatment Works and construction of the civil structure and associated works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Non-functional

The water treatment works depended on raw water pumped from the vandalized pump station within the same scheme, making it non-functional. However, currently under construction to render it operational funded under RBIG 5B. COVID19 project.

The Upgrading of the 1,5km clear water raising main line from the WTP to Marquard Reservoir

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Setsoto BWS Phase 1: Sand River Abstraction, Borehole refurbishment, Construction of the pipeline from Caledon to Meulspruit – Clocolan and Marquard

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Setsoto BWS Phase 2: Construction 630mm raw water pipeline from Meulspruit to Ficksburg Water Treatment Water

Abstraction of raw water from the Caledon Riverbed

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Ngwathe Bulk Sewer (Vredefort)

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Non-functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance.

Moqhaka Bulk Sewer

Moqhaka LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Not functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance. Currently the DWS, Provincial office and Municipality are implementing a project to refurbish the plant.

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply – Construction of concrete reservoir at Edenville

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply – Construction of pump house and equipping of boreholes in Edenville

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Partly functional

Not all boreholes are operational due to vandalism

Mafube Bulk Sewer Phase 1 of 2 - Construction of Namahadi Pump Station

Construction of Geelhout (Britz) Pump Station

Refurbishment of Seagull Street Pump Station and Associated Works

Mafube LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Moqhaka Bulk Water Supply - To construct a 9.5 km pipeline with a booster pump station

Moqhaka LM in the Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Bulk water pipeline to hospital

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of 6 Boreholes

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of Two Boreholes within 10km Radius10km Radius Phase 2A (Exploration)

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of Two Boreholes within 10km Radius – Phase 2B

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Equipping Of Boreholes and Upgrading

Of Pump Station in Excelsior

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Excelsior: Design and Construction Monitoring Water Tower, Raw Bulk Pipeline and Pumpstation- Phase 2

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Masilonyana Bulk water Supply Phase 1 of 2

Lejweleputswa DM/ Masilonyana LM

Functional

The project is functional but being a raw water pipeline, some repairs has been highly necessary to undertake through a WC/WDM project, considering water leakages in the line and mechanical / electrical issues in the high lift pump stations associated to this pipeline

Tokologo Bulk Water Supply Phase 1 of 3

Lejweleputswa DM/Tokologo LM

Functional

The project is functional, but Municipality is facing operational issues with lack of spares in the installed raw water pumps in the abstraction point.

Tswelopele Bulk water Supply Phase 1 of 2

Lejweleputswa DM/Tswelopele LM

Functional

None

Wesselsbron / Monyakeng Bulk Sewer

Lejweleputswa DM/Nala LM

Non-functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance.

Jagersfontein /Fauresmith BWS Phase 1

Xhariep DM/Kopanong LM

Functional

The project is complete and functional connected to phase 2 which is at practical completion stage

WESTERN CAPE

Worcester Bulk Water

Breede Valley

Functional

None

Grabouw Wastewater Treatment Works

Theewaterskloof

Functional

None

Paarl Bulk Sewer

Drakenstein

Functional

None

Drakenstein Wastewater Treatment Works

Drakenstein

Functional

None

Swellendam Wastewater Treatment Works

Swellendam

Functional

None

Citrusdal Wastewater Treatment Works

Cederberg

Functional

None

George Bulk Water

George

Functional

None

Stellenbosch Wastewater Treatment Works

Stellenbosch

Functional

There is a challenge on the inlet works but municipality is sorting matter.

Lamberts Bay

Cederberg

Non-functional

There is a need to complete the installation of the sea outfall. The contractor has been appointed and the anticipated completion date is end of February 2022

Tulbugh BWS

Witzenberg

Functional

There is a need to complete the construction of the dam and tributaries. The contractor has been appointed and the anticipated completion date is end of June 2024

LIMPOPO

Mogalakwena Phase 1

Waterberg

Non-functional

The challenge is with the water abstraction point that has not been developed as yet

Polokwane BWS

Capricorn

Functional

None

NORTH WEST

Koster Wastewater Treatment Works

Kgetleng river

Functional

None

Tlokwe phase 1

Tlokwe

Functional

None

Pilanesburg phase 1

Moses Kotane /Rusternburg

Functional

None

Pilanesburg phase 2

Moses Kotane /Rusternburg

Functional

None

Madibeng /Britsphase 1

Madibeng

Functional

None

Maqussi hills WWTW/BWS

Maquassi

Functional

None

Moretele south phase 1

Moretele

Functional

None

Greater Mamusa phase 1

Mamusa

Functional

None

Taung Naledi phase 1 Podumong

Dr Ruth Mompati

Functional

None

NORTHERN CAPE

Colesburg Wastewater Treatment Worksulk

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Hopetown Water Treatment Works

Thembelihle / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Niekershoop Bulk Water Supply

Siyathemba / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Kathu Wastewater Treatment Works

Gamagara / John Toalo Geatsewe

Functional

Functional, but need to be upgraded again

Colesburg Water Treatment Works

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Vanderkloof Wastewater Treatment Works

Renosterberg / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Norvalspont Bulk Water Supply

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Noupoort Bulk Water Supply

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Britstown Oxidation Ponds

Emthanjeni / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Van Wyksvlei Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Kareeberg / Pixley Ka Seme

Functional

None

Marydale Bulk Water Supply

Siyathemba / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Strydenburg Bulk Water Supply

Thembelihle / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Kalahari East Pipeline phase 1

Dawid Kruiper / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Homevale Wastewater Treatment Works

Sol Plaatje / Frances Baard

Non-Functional

The plant is currently not fully functional due to poor Operation & Maintenance, theft, and vandalism

Ricthie Bulk Water Supply

Sol Plaatje / Frances Baard

Functional

None

Loeriesfontein Bulk Water Supply

Hantam / Namakwa

Functional

None

Brandvlei Bulk Water Supply

Hantam / Namakwa

Functional

None

Williston Bulk Water Supply

Karoo Hoogland / Namakwa

Functional

None

---00O00---

24 November 2021 - NW2156

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether he has disbanded the advisory committee that was set up by the former Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the progress reports which had been compiled by the advisory committee were collected, given that these were compiled from taxpayers’ money; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The contracts of the advisory committees that were set up by the former Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation, were linked to her term of office in the Department of Water and Sanitation. Due to the fact that the tenure of the former Minister ended on 5 August 2021, the advisory committees was given 30 days’ notice from this date and terminated on 4 September 2021.

2. The Chairpersons of the respective committees were requested to prepare and submit close-out reports. The Water Services Advisory Committee has submitted its close-out report. The other Committees will table their reports when they meet with the Minister.

 

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04 November 2021 - NW2158

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that water boards such as the Amatola Water Board have in the past five years been riddled with issues of corruption and political interference surrounding the appointment of board members, what strategies of intervention have been devised to strengthen governance at water boards?

Reply:

Honorable Member, the Department of Water and Sanitation (the Department) is implementing the following interventions to strengthen governance at Water Boards:

a) The Minister had 5 Provincial engagements in the Free State, Eastern Cape, Limpopo, Gauteng and KwaZulu- Natal. These provincial engagements were attended by the DWS Provincial Office, Provincial Government, Water Boards, Water Service Authorities and broader water and sanitation Committees and Forums.

b) The engagements with Water Boards were mainly around issues of governance, financial viability and accountability and broader service delivery issues as per their mandate.

c) The Minister, during the engagement in the Eastern Cape between 31 August to 2 September 2021, interacted with Amatola Water Board. The Minister noted with concern the issues of lack of stability both in the Board and Executive Management. The situation is exacerbated by a number of allegations including allegations of political interference.

d) To stabilize Amatola Water Board the following decisions were made:

  • The Department obtained a legal opinion on the Board Appointment process of Amatola Water.
  • Probity Check was conducted on all new Board Members
  • The Minister is currently implementing the outcomes of the legal opinion and probity Check.
  • The Minister has processed a Cabinet Memorandum to appoint the permanent Chief Executive Officer of Amatola Water

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29 September 2021 - NW1369

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What total amount has been paid to AURECON for their involvement in the Lesotho Highlands Water Project?

Reply:

The total paid to AURECON SA thus far is R 236 205 932.

AURECON SA is participating in various Consulting Joint Ventures for the Lesotho Highlands Water Project as per shares and figures indicated in the schedule below.

Contract LHDA No.

Description

Contracted Party

Total Contract Amount (R)

Aurecon SA Share of Total Contract Amount (%)

3020

Design and Supervision of Major Bridges

Aurecon Consortium

123 892 049

30%

3022

Design and Supervision of Polihali Diversion Tunnels

Metsi a Senqu Khubelu Consultants (MSKC)

82 460 577

19.6%

3007

Design and Supervision of Polihali Transfer Tunnel

Metsi a Senqu Khubelu Consultants (MSKC)

914 276 029

20%

TOTAL

     

21%

09 September 2021 - NW1222

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that a number of Lesotho citizens were uprooted from their land during phase 1 of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project, what steps has she taken to ensure that (a) compensation is paid to the specified persons and (b) there will be no further disenfranchisement of the citizens of Lesotho as a result of the specified project?

Reply:

All persons affected by the project were either relocated, resettled and/or had their assets compensated in accordance with the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP) Compensation Policy as well as the Treaty between the Republic of South Africa and Lesotho. Ccompensation was paid to the affected persons by adopting the following measures:

  1. The LHWP’s legal obligations to the people and communities affected by Project works are based on: The Lesotho Constitution, the LHWP Treaty - Article 7, the LHDA Order of 1986 and the LHWP Compensation Regulations, Legal Notice No. 50 of 1990, and specifically for the implementation of Phase II, the Phase II Agreement – Article 15.
  2. The LHWP Compensation Policy covers compensation for: Loss of assets, Uprootment (including resettlement), Income Restoration, Rural Development, Natural Environment and Heritage and in addition the implementation of Public Health plans with Lesotho.

The implementation and the execution of the Compensation Policy is also regularly monitored by an Independent Panel of Experts.

Complaints relating to compensation, relocation and resettlement issues are dealt with through various Lesotho Highlands Development Agency (LHDA) field officers, the Social Development and Environment Division, and the Public Relations Office. All queries that arise are dealt with by the LHDA on a case-by-case basis and captured on a database. Complainants also have access to the Compensation Ombudsman.

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07 September 2021 - NW1650

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the full, relevant details of (a) all travel and (b) additional expenses incurred by each member of the National Rapid Response Task Team (i) between 1 March and 1 October 2020 and (ii) during the National State of Disaster period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

The following expenses were incurred by the Members of the National Rapid Response Task Team for the period 1 March 2019 and during the National State of Disaster period.

Name of official

Category

Cost

Mr Zolile Burnsncamashe

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 306 296

 

Mr Lekgotla Dichoetlise

Car hire and transfers

R 116 709

Mr Mahle Khuzani

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 283 800

 

Ms Dudu Manana

Accommodation/ Car hire

R 48 319

Mr Mzwakhe Masoue

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 468 446

Mr Maxwele Chumani

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 335 875

Mr Mogomotsi Mogodiri

Car hire/domestic accommodation

R 53 216

Dr Mandisa Mokwena

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 27 709

Ms Carla Motau

Car Hire

R 59 801

Mr Likhaya Ngqezana

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 543 363

Mr Simphiwe Ngxakeni

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and laundry

R 386 727

Ms Nolonwabo Quanta

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R355 622

Ms Debbie Raphuthi

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 112 742.00

Ms Suliwe Shilwayi

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 488 736

Mr Samuel Thembani

Car hire and domestic accommodation

R 144 422

TOTAL

R 3 732 795

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07 September 2021 - NW1649

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the full, relevant details on the (a) dates, (b) destinations and (c) costs of all flights boarded by a certain person (Mphumzi Mdekazi) (i) between 1 May 2019 and 1 October 2020 and (ii) during the National State of Disaster period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

The Department incurred the following costs in relation to Mr Mdekazi for the period 1 May 2019 and during the National State of Disaster period :

Category

Cost

Accommodation/ domestic air travel/ Car hire and transfers

R 1 763 878.00

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16 April 2019 - NW796

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the total number of mines with a water licence in each province that (a) meet the licensing requirements and (b) do not comply with the licensing requirements; (2) what (a) is the name of each mine with a water licence that does not comply with the licensing requirements, (b) is the area and province in which each mine is located, (c) are the reasons why the mines do not comply with the water licensing requirements and (d) steps does he intend to take to address the deficiencies; (3) with reference to operational mines in each province that are not in possession of water licences, what are the full relevant details of the (a) name of each mine, (b) area and province in which each mine is located, (c) reasons why the mines are operational without water licenses having been awarded to them and (d) steps he intends to take to address these deficiencies?

Reply:

(1)(a) The total number of mines with a water use licence in each province authorized to use water are 712.

(1)(b) Refer to Annexure A for the total number of mines authorized but non- compliance.

(2) Refer to Annexure A for the action taken to address the deficiencies by authorized non-compliant mines and Annexure B for the technical and administrative conditions of a licence in terms of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No 36 0f 1998) (NWA).

(3)(a) A total number of mines operating without authorisation in each province are 115.

(3)(b) The table below reflects the number and province in which each of those mines are located. Refer to Annexure C for list of mines operating without authorisation in each province.

Province

Number of mines

Steps to be taken to address

Gauteng

13

Administrative enforcement action

Limpopo

3

Administrative enforcement action

Mpumalanga

30

Administrative and criminal enforcement action

Kwa Zulu Natal

37

Administrative enforcement action

Free State

5

Administrative enforcement action

Northern Cape

25

Administrative enforcement action

Eastern Cape

1

Administrative enforcement action

North West

1

Administrative enforcement action

Total

115

(3)(c) It is not clear why transgressors resort to operation of mines without the requisite authorisation however; the Department continues to intensify activities to protect the water resource as mandated by the National Water Act, (Act No. 36 of 1998).

(3)(d) The Department investigates identified as well as reported non- compliances regularly. These non-compliances are dealt with in accordance with administrative, criminal and civil enforcement tools as prescribed by the National Water Act, (Act No. 36 of 1998).The Department also collaborates with other law enforcement agencies such as the South African Police Services and the National Prosecuting Authority in respect of non-compliance matters which require further criminal enforcement action.

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16 April 2019 - NW752

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the total number of water treatment facilities that are there in each province, (b) what number of the specified facilities are (i) functional and (ii) dysfunctional and (c) for how long have the facilities been dysfunctional?

Reply:

Requesting the Hounorable Member to note that water treatment facilities are the responsibility of the Department of Corporative Governance and Traditional Affairs and that the Department of Water and Sanitation only monitors compliance of the facilities.

Refer to the table below for the total number of water treatment facilities that were monitored by the Department in each province.

Province

Number of water treatment works per Province

(b)(i)

Number of treatment works functional

(b)(ii)

Number of treatment works dysfunctional

For how long have these been dysfunctional

Eastern Cape

224

224

0

N/A

Free State

87

83

4

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 3 years due to no raw water from the Lovedale Dam.

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 3 years due to refurbishment of raw water pump station but is now complete. The Municipality is trying to fill up the Balancing dam with raw water in order to start operating the plant.

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 6 years due to lack of raw water.

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 4 years due to lack of raw water.

Gauteng

17

17

0

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

243

196

47

Thirty nine (39) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 2 years.

Eight (8) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 4 years.

Limpopo

89

82

7

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 10 years.

Two (2) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 11 years.

Three (3) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 5 years.

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 1 year.

Mpumalanga

105

98

7

Seven (7) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 1 year.

Northern Cape

166

165

1

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 2 years.

North West

126

126

0

N/A

Western Cape

136

132

4

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 5 years.

One (1) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 2 years.

Two (2) Water Treatment Works has been dysfunctional for 1 year.

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16 April 2019 - NW722

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and/or the former minister and (ii) his deputy and/or the former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

 

a) Make of vehicle purchased for use

b) Model of vehicle purchased for use

c) Price of each vehicle purchased for use

d) (aaa) Date on which each vehicle was purchased for use in the 2016/17 FY

e) (bbb) Date on which each vehicle was purchased for use in the 2017/18 FY

Minister, Nkwinti G came with his vehicle from Rural Development

Audi

Q7

R1 039 872.66

January 2017

None

The former Minister, Mokonyane N moved with her vehicle to Environmental Affairs

Audi

Q7

R910 714.90

None

January 2018

The Deputy Minister, Tshwete P

Audi

Q7

R951 713.04

None

May 2017

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16 April 2019 - NW513

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does his department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of building rented by the Department is 33 buildings and a total number of buildings owed by the Department are 4948 refer to the table below.

Row Labels

No. of Assets

Cost

Accumulative Depreciation

Book Value

Buildings

4889

2,173,677,966.77

(1,281,645,620.50)

892,032,346.27

Buildings Auxiliary

59

19,368,099.92

(9,456,665.67)

9,911,434.25

Grand Total

4948

2,193,046,066.69

(1,291,102,286.17)

901,943,780.52

NB Auxiliary Buildings relates to Boat Houses

(a)(ii) The Minister owns, manages and controls a total of 320 state own dams (government waterworks) country wide and a total of 1175 properties refer to the table below.

Row Labels

No. of Assets

Cost

Accumulative Impairment

Book Value

Land

1174

7,791,050,104.60

(245,160,780.58)

7,545,889,324.02

Grand Total

1174

7,791,050,104.60

(245,160,780.58)

7,545,889,324.02

 

In addition the following should be noted:

In terms of Section 1(1) (x) of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act no. 36 of 1998) (NWA) the Minister owns the land on which a government waterwork is situated. The extent of the land required is determined scientifically up to the dam boundary line of each dam which includes the full supply level, the 1:100 year flood line and a buffer line. In terms of Government Immovable Asset Management ACT No 19 of 2007 (GIAMA), the disposal policies of the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) and the National Department of Public Works (NDPW) all excess land must be transferred to NDPW. The Minister only acquires the minimum land required for the government waterwork in order to manage, operate and maintain the dams. In relation to ownership, the

Minister has exclusive rights on the land within the government waterworks and the water source is regarded as national assets which must be protected in terms of the NWA.

(a)(iii) Refer to (a)(i) above.

(b)(i) The Hounorable Member is requested to note the following. The Value of each property owned by the Minister of Water and Sanitation which falls within a Government Waterwork must be determined by a Professional Registered Valuer. The Department is not in a financial position to determine the value of each property as yet and will need to seek the assistance of the Office of the Valuer-General to assist with the determination of the market related value of each property. The purpose of each property falling within a dam boundary line is to store bulk raw water. Refer to Annexure A for the value and purpose of each owed property.

(b)(ii) The Department is renting a total of 33 buildings. Refer to the table below (c) for the value and purpose of the rented properties.

(c) Refer to the table below for the rented properties:

(c)(i) for how long has each property been rented

(c)(ii) from whom is each property rented and

(c)(iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property

SPECTRUM HOUSE 1   8 years

Grey Jade Trade and Invest 85 (PTY) LTD

R 1 232 050.68

SPECTRUM HOUSE 2 5 years

Ascession Properties LTD

R 71 968.37

SIGMA HOUSE   9 years

Cape Horizon Properties (PTY) LTD

R 852 773.71

INTERPARK 5 years

Interpark

R 7 410.00

9&11 HIGH STREET  28 years

Quenprop Investment PTY LTD

R 17 345.33

9&11 HIGH STREET    28 years

Quenprop Investment PTY LTD

R 26 146.70

LIONN ROARS OFFICE PARK 9 years

Kuper Legh Property Management (PTY) LTD

R 229 751.86

SANPORT 23 years

Africorp International Properties (PTY) LTD

R 69 398.44

44 SPRIGG STREET 30 years

M.J Lombard

R 15 900.46

PARK HOMES 14 years

M. Projects CC

R 18 700.56

PRD2 19 years

Colliers RMS (PTY) LTD

R 351 581.37

2 HARGREAVES 16 years

Arrowhead Properties LTD

R 435 084.24

PROROM 26 years

Ascession Properties LTD

R 669 760.87

26 CENTRAL ROAD KIMBARLEY

8 years

Albasync (PTY) LTD

R 420 538.47

PRAETOR 11 years

Centpret Properties (PTY) LTD

R 284 095.98

SANLAM PLAZA EAST 18 years

Superbia Four (PTY) LTD

R 742 486.10

22 ROOTH STREET CANELLE BLDG

15 years

Ascession Properties LTD

R 42 690.16

TALANA 13 years

BASFOUR 3072 (PTY) LTD

R 54 240.38

SOUTHREN LIFE 19 years

Delta Property Fund (LTD)

R 674 900.55

SANLAM PLAZA 31 years

Gensec Property services Limited t/a JHB

R 313 964.06

MEGACITY WEST GALARY 4 years

Combia Falls Properties

R 712 317.29

(c)(i) for how long has each property been rented

(c)(ii) from whom is each property rented and

(c)(iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property

FACTORY 40-12 15 years

Limpopo Economic Development Agency

R 42 643.70

OLD SABC 14 years

South African Broadcasting Corporation Coc limited

R 152 479.39

LEBOWAKGOMO GOV. COMPLEX

14 years

Department of Public Works

R 7 508.55

AZMO PLACE 23 years

Delta Properties Fund LTD

R 676 362.18

LIBRARY GARDENS 18 years

Changing Tides 132 (PTY) LTD

R 82 539.52

38-42 HOOGE STREET 18 years

Omtay Property Holding Trust

R 91 835.69

SEDIBENG 37 years

Summermania Seven (PTY) LTD

R 3 735 404.30

EMANZINI 40 years

Redefine Properties

R 1 200 273.83

ZWAMADAKA 40 years

Summermania Seven (PTY) LTD

R 1 695 729.48

WATERBRON 10 years

Dreamfair Properties (PTY) LTD

R 3 444 465.10

FINPARK 17 years

Servest (Finpark)

R 110 712.91

NDINAYE 2 3 years

Supperble Four (PTY) LTD

R 751 451.30

CORPORATE 66 7 years

Faerie Glen Waterpark (PTY) LTD

R 129 650.93

NDINAYE 1 4 years

Supperble Four (PTY) LTD

R 474 345.04

CONTINENTAL 11 years

Redefine Properties

R 490 173.29

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26 March 2019 - NW751

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the current water consumption rates, his department commissioned any study to determine whether the country will have enough water to sustain the population, economic growth and development by (a) 2050, (b) 2075 and (c) 2100; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the findings of the study?

Reply:

a) The Department undertakes various planning studies over 25-year horizons, including the period to 2050 to ensure water security for the country. Such studies include (i) Water Availability Assessment Studies (WAAS), which generate base input information for planning, (ii) long term water resource reconciliation planning studies for large and small demand centres, and (iii) catchment-based studies. These planning studies culminate in strategies that address water needs for the country, which are then continuously monitored and updated every 3 to 5 years to ensure that they remain current and relevant. The outputs of the studies inform the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), the instrument by which the minister gives effect to the National Water Act, as well as the master plans that emanate from the NWRS. The studies are available on the DWS website, at http://www6.dwa.gov.za/iwrp/projects.aspx..

(b) and (c)

For the perspectives 2075 to 2100, the planning horizon is longer, and this is accompanied by a high degree of uncertainty. The studies conducted as mentioned in (a) above provide indicative directions of strategies for the country’s water security, which are continuously firmed up on a progressive basis to make them dynamic high level water resource plans that address uncertainty.

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26 March 2019 - NW818

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Since his reply to question 1791 on 14 August 2018, how many households currently use bucket toilets?

Reply:

The following beneficiary towns (see table below) from the Bucket Eradication Programme are still using bucket toilets as the construction of bulk infrastructure that will allow toilets to flush are currently in process.

 

PROVINCE

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

BUCKET ERADICATION TOWN

TOILETS NOT YET FLUSHING

Free State Province

Setsoto

Ficksburg

218

   

Senekal

2,435

   

Clocolan

3,379

 

Nketoana

Arlington

1,192

   

PetrusSteyn

960

   

Reitz

739

 

Tokologo

Dealesville

1,279

Northern Cape Province

Siyancuma

Griekwastad

387

   

Campbell

596

 

Tsantsabane

Maranteng

134

   

Postdene

149

 

Sol Plaatjie

Motswedimosa

656

   

Fraser Moleketi

97

TOTAL:

 

12 221

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26 March 2019 - NW569

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) On what date was the Rand Water project, Palmiet RW-06, started and (b) what (i) still needs to be done before the project is completed, (ii) are the reasons that the project has stalled for over a year and (iii) is the expected completion date; (2) (a) what (i) is the expenditure to date and (ii) was the original costing of the project, (b) who were the contractors and consultants on the original project, (c) who is contracted to complete the project and (d) what penalties have been requested and paid?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Rand Water project Palmiet RW-06 started in March 2014.

(1)(b)(i) The overall project is currently 90% complete. The overall scope of work for this project is the construction of a 15km pipeline and the portion now to be completed is approximately 700m which includes pipelaying together with the associated concrete chambers. Thereafter tie-ins/cross connections of the entire 15km pipeline will be constructed and this is dependent on the shutdowns.

(1)(b)(ii) The project experienced challenges which were beyond Rand Water and the service provider’s control as follows:

  • All service providers experienced unsuitable ground conditions which included excessive rock and a high water table. These conditions were not predetermined and as such had to be decided upon within the project time lines which then resulted into delays.
  • During implementation, the pipeline route had to be changed to accommodate third party requirements (i.e. restrictions related to working within the vicinity of high voltage ESKOM powerlines and late approval of Water Use Licence (WULA) by the department). This added in the delays experienced by the project.

(1)(b)(iii) The expected completion date is April 2020.

(2)(a)(i) The expenditure to date is R597 396 518.29 excluding Vat.

(2)(a)(ii) The original costing of the project was R668 556 000.00 excluding Vat.

(2)(b) The contractors and consultants on the original project where the following:

Contractors:

  • M&D Construction Group (Portion A pipe laying – 8km)
  • Lubbe Construction (Pty) Ltd (Portion B pipe laying – 7km)
  • Esor / SBM Joint Venture (Portion B pipe jacking)
  • Mapitsi Civil Works (Portion A pipe jacking).

Consultants:

  • Jeffares and Green (Pty) Ltd.

(2)(c) The service providers listed in question (2)(b) above are all contracted to complete the project. Lubbe Construction (Pty) Ltd is currently completing their scope of work on portion B where they are left with 700m of pipelaying against the scope work of 7km.

(2)(d) Penalties have been applied and are being progressively deducted for all contractor delays.

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26 March 2019 - NW494

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) qualification and (b) total number of artisans employed by each water board?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for the list of qualifications and number of artisans employed by each water board.

Entity

(a) Qualification

(b) Total number of artisan

Amatola Water

Artisan Building work

4

 

Artisan Electrical

6

 

Artisan Fitter and Turner

11

 

Artisan Instrumental

2

 

Artisan Mechanical

4

 

Artisan Millwright

1

 

Artisan Plumber

4

 

Artisan Welder

1

Bloem Water

Artisan Electrical

5

 

Artisan Mechanical

12

 

Artisan Civil

2

 

Artisan Instrumental

4

Lepelle Northern Water

Fitter, Electrician and Motor Mechanic; Maintenance Officers; Instrumentation Technicians

56

Magalies Water

N4 Electrical Engineering

14

 

N4 Electrical Engineering

 
 

N6 Electrical Engineering

 
 

National Technical Certificate 4

 
 

Grade 12

 
 

ND Electrical Engineering

 
 

N3 Electrical Engineering

 
 

N6 Electrical Engineering

 
 

N3 Mechanical Engineering

 
 

N4 Mechanical Engineering

 
 

N5 Mechanical Engineering

 
 

ND Mechanical Engineering

 
 

N3 Mechanical Engineering

 
 

N2 Mechanical Engineering

 

Mhlathuze Water

Trade Test Instrument Mechanic; National Diploma: Electrical Engineering; Trade Test Boiler Maker; Trade Test Electrician; Trade Test Fitter; Trade Test Millwright; Trade Test Plumber; Trade Test Welder

26

Overberg Water

None in terms of the qualification specified

9

Rand Water

Dry Trades Electricians

Filters and Turners

Instrument Mechanicals

Millwrights

Motor Mechanics

Telephone Electrician

Welders

163

 

Wet Trades

Painters

Plumbers

39

Sedibeng Water

N3 – N6 Certificates

43

 

National Diploma

 

Umgeni Water

Matric; N2 plus Trade Test (Electrical, Civil, Mechanic, Boilermaking, Instruments)

79

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26 March 2019 - NW189

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether any investigations have been conducted into the continuing sewerage overflow at 25 Quinine Street, Glen Marais, Kempton Park; if not, (a) what steps will be taken to resolve the matter, (b) by what date will the specified matter be resolved, (c) what is the estimated cost, (d) what number of complaints has the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Council received regarding the matter and (e) why was the matter not resolved earlier given the number of complaints; if so, will he furnish Mrs A M Dreyer with a copy of the findings of the specified investigation?

Reply:

According to information received by the department from the City of Ekurhuleni, findings of an investigation were that the sewerage overflow is as results of storm water ingress, especially when it is raining. Furthermore, building owners in the area have connected rain water gutters and are channelling storm water into sewer lines; which worsened the problem.

a) To resolve the problem at 60 Quinine Street specifically, the CoE has already installed non-return valves to prevent the backflow into the house. The plan is to install valves at all the other properties affected by overflows and back flows in the aftermath of rain.

The City of Ekurhuleni (CoE) is planning to send building inspectors who will assist in investigating illegal connections to the municipal sewer system. Furthermore, the CoE, through its Water and Sanitation Division, will facilitate the disconnection of all illegal connection pipes and also install non-return valves at critical affected areas.

For further information relating to (b), (c), (d) and (e); the Honourable Member is requested to refer the questions to the Minister of Corporative Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA) who will be in a better position to respond to specific details relating to the timelines to resolve the problem, costs and the number of complaints received by the Municipality with regard to this matter.

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26 March 2019 - NW106

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the reply to question 3753 of 12 December 2018, what number of sewerage processing plants (a) were inspected since 1 July to 30 September 2018 and (b) passed the inspection; (2) what number of sewerage processing plants (a) were inspected during (i) 1 January to 31 March 2018, (ii) 1 April to 30 June 2018 and (iii) 1 October to 31 December 2018 and (b)(i) failed and (ii) passed the inspection; (3) with reference to the letter in Annexure B, did the Siyathemba Local Municipality make written representation to his department within the 14-day period providing no compelling reasons for his department not to exercise its powers; if so, what reasons were given; (4) what number of municipalities were given non-compliance letters?

Reply:

(1)(a) The number of sewerage processing plants inspected in relation to question 3573 of 12 December 2018 is a total of forty three (43) see attached Annexure A.

(1)(b) The Inspections referred to are conducted to determine functionality and treatment efficacy of the sewerage processing plants. During the inspections the Inspector looks for any deficiencies in the process and if any are encountered the Inspector makes recommendations for implementation by the Water Services Authorities.

(2)(a)(i) A total of 114 sewerage processing plans were inspected January to March 2018 see attached Annexure A.

(2)(a)(ii) A total of 82 sewerage processing plans were inspected 1 April to June 2018 see attached Annexure A.

(2)(a)(ii) A total of 76 sewerage processing plans were inspected 1 October to 31 December 2018 see attached Annexure A.

(2)(b)(i) Please refer to response in (1)(b).

(2)(b)(ii) Please refer to response in (1)(b).

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(2)(a) Refer to Annexure A.

(2)(b)(i) Please refer to response in (1)(b).

(2)(b)(ii) Please refer to response in (1)(b).

(3) Yes, a written representation from the Siyathemba Municipality was received by the Department’s Northern Cape Regional office within the 14 days. The action plan has time frames and responsible personnel which will enable the Department to monitor progress. Requesting the Honourable Member to refer to Annexure B for details.

(4) A total of thirty two (32) municipalities were given non-compliance letters up to the third quarter of the 2018/2019 financial year and two (2) of these were issued with court interdicts, however these notices are not as a result of the above mentioned inspections. The notices were issued following complaints of pollution received by the Department’s Provincial Operations.

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25 March 2019 - NW107

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) How often must his department inspect dam infrastructure with regard to (i) dam walls and (ii) spillways and (b)(i) who conducts such inspections and (ii) under what statutory provisions is the person or entity authorised; (2) (a) on what date was the last inspection of each dam performed by his department in Gauteng and (b) what number of dams (i) passed and (ii) failed the inspection; (3) with regard to dams situated within the City of Ekurhuleni, (a) what concerns and recommendations were raised in respect of each dam, (b) on what date was the City of Ekurhuleni notified about the concerns and recommendations and (c) by what date was the City of Ekurhuleni expected to rectify all defects in the dam infrastructure, including dam walls and spillways, in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) All dams classified as dams with a safety risk by the Directorate: Dam Safety Regulation (i.e. Dam Safety Office) and are category II and III in terms of size must be subjected to a compulsory 5 yearly dam safety evaluation by an Approved Professional Person (APP).

(1)(b) The owner of a Category II or III dam must appoint an Approved Professional Person (APP) to conduct a dam safety evaluation at 5 years intervals. This regulatory provision is in terms of Section 118 and 119 of the National Water Act as well as Government Notice R 139 of 24 February 2012 (i.e. Dam Safety Regulations).

(2) Refer to Annexure A for the inspection dates, number of dams that passed or failed the inspection in Gauteng.

(3)(a) Refer to Annexure B for the APP recommendations.

(3)(b) Refer to Annexure C for the letters of acceptance or rejection sent to the City of Ekurhuleni after receipt of the Dam Safety Evaluation report from the APP.

(3)(c) Refer to Annexure C.

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25 March 2019 - NW639

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) location and (b) capacity of each privately owned dam in the country?

Reply:

Refer to Annexure A for the dams with location and capacity where the information was supplied in full.

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