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16 October 2017 - NW2347

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether (a) he and/or (b) any official in his department has at any time since 13 December 2015 requested, instructed and/or required a certain company (name furnished) to prepare any plans, documents, reports and/or strategies for his department; if so, in each case, (i) what supply chain processes were followed, (ii) what amounts were paid to the specified company, (iii) on whose instruction was the request made and (iv) what was the nature of the plans, documents, reports and/or strategies; (2) Whether any of the specified plans, documents, reports and/or strategies have subsequently been implemented; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?NW2592E

Reply:

  1. (a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)

The Department issued an open tender and/or requested quotations in terms of the Government Procurement processes and delegated authority for the appointment of the following companies to prepare plans, documents, reports and strategies since December 2015.

No

FQ / Tender Number

Description

Awarded Company

Amount Awarded

1.

CoGTA (T) 03/2015

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER TO DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT WEB BASED ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE TOOLSET FOR THE DEPARTMNET OF COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS.

KPMG

R 6 719 912.00

No

FQ / Tender Number

Description

Awarded Company

Amount Awarded

2.

CoGTA (T) 01/2016

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER FOR THE REVIEW AND ENHANCEMENT OF A SIMPLIFIED REVENUE PLAN MODEL FOR CUSTOMISATION AND IMPLEMENTATION IN SELECTED MUNICIPALITIES.

UBUNTU BUSINESS ADVISORY AND CONSULTING (PTY) LTD, NKONKE TRADING 1004 CC, BIGEN AFRICA SERVICES (PTY) LTD, DATA WORLD (PTY) LTD, DUCHARME CONSULTING – COASTAL (PTY) LTD, KAGISO TRUST CONSULTANCY PTY LTD, BONAKUDE CONSULTING (PTY) LTD

Rate per Hour

Project Manager –

R 1600.00

Team Leader –

R 1 200.00

Project Manager –

R 1000.00

3.

CoGTA (T) 02/2016

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED PROPERTY AND CONSUMER DATABASE TO BE USED BY MUNICIPALITIES IN CREDIT CONTROL, DEBT COLLECTION AND INDIGENT MANAGEMENT.

GISCOE PTY LTD

R 8 899 880.00

4.

CoGTA (T) 03/2016

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER TO DEVELOP PROTOTYPE (MINIMUM STAFFING REQUIREMENTS) STAFF ESTABLISHMENTS ACCORDING TO DIFFERENT FUNCTIONS AND POWERS OF DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF MUNICIPALITIES

DELOITTE CONSULTING (PTY) LTD

R 9 525 319.20

5.

CoGTA (T) 04/2016

THE APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER TO STRENGTHEN THE

INTERNAL CONTROLS ENVIRONMENT BASED ON A BUSINESS

PROCESS MAPPING AND RE-ENGINEERING EXCERCISE WHERE

NECESSARY FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE OVER A PERIOD OF 24 MONTHS

SIZWENSALUBAGOBODO

R 2 844 072.00

6.

CoGTA (T) 13/2016

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER TO DEVELOP AND ROLL OUT TRAINING PROGRAMME ON THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ANTI-CORRUPTION STRATEGY AND THE MUNICIPAL INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK.

THE ETHICS INSTITUTE NPC

R 1 235 720.10

7.

FQ 09/2016

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER FOR THE DESIGN, LAYOUT AND PRINTING OF COGTA ANNUAL REPORT 2015/16 FINANCIAL YEAR

OUTPUT COMMUNICATIONS

R 300 518.82

8.

FQ 119/2016

APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER FOR THE DESIGN, LAYOUT, EDITING AND PRINTING OF COGTA ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN 2017/18 FINANCIAL YEAR

BLACK MOON

R 126 843.53

2. These plans, documents, reports and /or strategies have been implemented by the Department in line with the terms and conditions as well as timeframes for each contract.

16 October 2017 - NW2418

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the reply to question 1171 on 28 June 2017, when last was the Eastleigh solute channel in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng, which was damaged by flooding on 9 November 2016, maintained and (b) what amount was paid towards the maintenance?

Reply:

The Eastleigh solute channel infrastructure referred to belongs to the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and therefore the question was referred to the municipality through the Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs. A response received from the municipality is as follows: the routine maintenance on the channel and other similar infrastructure was conducted prior to the floods of 9 November 2016; however, a specific date is not available. (b) The actual amount utilised solely for the maintenance of the Eastleigh channel has not been indicated. The municipality indicated that an amount of R3.4 million was utilised for the maintenance of the Eastleigh channel and other similar infrastructure in the Edenvale area.

 

16 October 2017 - NW2217

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the reply to question 1172 on 28 June 2017, has his department applied for disaster funding in order to repair the Eastleigh solute channel damaged by flooding on 9 November 2016 in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the total amount that has been applied for, (b) on what date was the application submitted and (c) what is the outcome of the application?

Reply:

(a) No, the department has not applied for disaster funding to repair the Eastleigh solute channel since no funding request was submitted by the Gauteng Province on behalf of the affected municipality.

(b) and (c) Not applicable

16 October 2017 - NW2419

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 1170 on 28 June 2017, (a) by what date will his department repair the Eastleigh solute channel in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng, which was damaged by flooding on 9 November 2016, (b) what is the estimated cost of the repair and (c) by what date is the repair work expected to be completed?

Reply:

(a) Section 56 (2) (b) of the Disaster Management Act (Act 57 of 2002) places the onus for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of infrastructure on the organ of state responsible for maintaining such infrastructure. The Eastleigh solute channel belongs to Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and therefore the responsibility for the repairs lies with the municipality. The Department of Cooperative Governance referred the matter to the municipality through the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance Province and a response is as follows:

The actual date for the repair of the channel is not available. The municipality indicates that specialist consultants were appointed to undertake investigations on the stability of the structures, the actual repair work that require to be undertaken and the designs for remedial measures including the costing for the repair work. It is indicated that the appointed specialist consultants were issued with instructions to proceed with work on 04 July 2017 and completed the assigned work on 31 August 2017.

(b) According to the municipality, the estimated cost received from the consultants after investigations and preliminary designs for the repair works amounts to R111.5 million.

(c) According to the municipality, the date for the completion of the repair work is not available since the repair work has not started as the municipality is currently studying the report and recommendations from specialist consultants.

11 August 2017 - NW1395

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 487 on 8 May 2017, the information requested has been received; if not, by what date is it expected; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

We have since requested this information from the Premier’s office and are making continuous follow-ups. The information will be submitted to the Hon Member as soon as it becomes available.

11 August 2017 - NW1650

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the total number of (a) informal settlements that the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has and (b) houses in each of the specified informal settlements that received (i) electricity connections, (ii) sewerage systems, excluding chemical toilets, and (iii) piped water connections in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

We have since requested this information from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and are making continuous follow-ups. The information will be submitted to the Hon Member as soon as it becomes available.

31 July 2017 - NW1652

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)     (a) What is the total amount that has been spent on Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) system to date and (b) what was the initial budget; (2) (a) on what date was the specified BRT system supposed to have been fully operational, (b) by what date will the specified BRT system be fully operational and (c) how much additional money is needed in order for the BRT system to become fully operational; (3) what are the reasons for the delay in making the specified BRT system operational?

Reply:

This question should be redirected to the Ministry of Transport, as the competent authority.

21 July 2017 - NW1588

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his trip to Dubai in December 2015 , which was allegedly sponsored and booked by a certain family (name and details furnished), (a) who (i) specifically paid for and (ii) organised the specified trip, (b) what was the purpose of the trip and (c) what is his relationship with the specified family?

Reply:

This matter is sub judice.

Cooporate Gov Ministry letter.jpg

21 July 2017 - NW1884

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Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)

Neither the Department nor the entities reporting to the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 01 January 2012 to 31 December 2016.

21 July 2017 - NW1448

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Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Who is building the generator for the Windsor pump station in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, (b) what is the cost of building the generator, (c) when will the generator be delivered and (d) when will it be installed?

Reply:

According to the information received from Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality:

(a). At the moment, there is no one building a generator for the Windsor pump station, however, a feasibility study for extension of the pump station has been completed, installation of one pump and a generator.

(b). Total cost is estimated at R 4, 500, 000

(c). April 2018/2019 metro financial year due to budget allocation, should savings be available in 2017/ 2018 financial year then the project will be brought forward.

(d). End of April 2019

20 July 2017 - NW1482

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) Bell Pottinger (Company Name) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc)(dd)(ee)(ff)

The Department and its Entities did not procure any services from and/or made any payments to Bell Pottinger or any other public relations firms, as the services were not required by the Department.

20 July 2017 - NW1298

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the proposed housing development on portion 296 of the Zuurfontein farm 33 I. R. situated within the boundary of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, where the previous owner transferred the said portion of land to the Gauteng Provincial Government for the building of a school, on what statutory grounds is the specified municipality building houses on the said property?; and (2) On what date was the property transferred from the Gauteng Provincial Government to the specified municipality?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

1. The Human Settlements Department has identified a need for a mixed development which includes residential and educational facilities (School). The Department is still negotiating with Provincial Government for the land and currently the Human Settlements Department are at a phase where proposals are only being done and circulated for comments. Once positive comments are received from the Provincial Government and Authorities to use the land, the town planning process will be finalised.

2. The ownership still vests with the Provincial Government.

20 July 2017 - NW2015

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the fact that (a) a certain councillor, Bhelekazi Mabandla, for Ward 27 in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality, has only attended one council meeting since the 2016 Local Government Election, (b) the Buffalo City Council resolved on 28 February 2017 to refer the matter to the MEC for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the Eastern Cape, following a decision that the specified councillor had breached the Code of Conduct for Municipal Councillors, and (c) media reports indicate that the councillor had resigned in August 2016, why has a vacancy not been declared in the specified ward; (2) Did the municipality inform the Independent Electoral Commission of the situation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; and (3) Whether the councillor received any remuneration after 28 February 2017; if so, (a) what is the total amount that was paid to the councillor since 1 March 2017 to date, and (b) on what statutory and/or contractual grounds were the specified payments made?

Reply:

The response below is based on an input provided by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the Eastern Cape Province.

1. Councillor Bhelekazi Mabandla last attended council business on 31 August 2016 and on 27 September 2016 she submitted notice of her resignation.

In a letter dated 6 March 2017, from the Speaker of the Municipality to the MEC for local government in the Province, the MEC is informed of the council resolution of 28 February 2017 to remove Councillor Mabandla from municipal council.

On 12 April 2017, the MEC for local government in the province requested Councillor Mabandla for her views on this matter. On 2 May 2017 the councillor, through her attorneys, confirmed that she had resigned from the council on 27 September 2016.

2. No.

On 19 June 2017 the MEC for local government in the province requested the Municipality to declare a vacancy within 14 days of receipt of his letter and to call for by-elections after consulting the Electoral Commission.

3. No remuneration was paid to the councillor after 28 February 2017.

 

20 July 2017 - NW1536

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the (a) Bela-Bela Local Municipality, (b) Lephalale Local Municipality, (c) Thabazimbi Local Municipality, (d) Modimolle Local Municipality and (e) Mookgophong Local Municipality in Limpopo sold any (i) buildings or (ii) vacant land in each of the past five financial years to date; if so, what (aa) are the relevant details in each case, (bb) was the market value on each date of sale and (cc) procedures were followed to sell the properties in each case; (2) Whether any of the specified municipalities have property to rent and/or for sale in the market currently; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the municipalities in question:

(1) (a) No. Bela Bela local municipality has not sold any building or vacant land in the past five financial years.

(b) No. Lephalale local municipality did not sell (i) any building or (ii) vacant land in the past five years

(c) Yes. Thabazimbi local municipality sold a vacant stand to a church. Appropriate procedures were followed.

(d) LIM 368 (Modimolle/Mookgophong local municipalities) has not sold any building or vacant land in the past five financial years.

 

(2) (a) Yes. Bela Bela local municipality has properties to rent (refer to Annexure A).

(b) No. Lephalale local municipality does not have any property to rent or sell.

(c) No. Thabazimbi local municipality does not have any property to rent or sell.

(d) No. LIM 368 (Modimolle/Mookgophong local municipalities) does not have any property to rent or sell.

Annexure “A”

PROPERTY NAME

LESSEE

SIZE

 

Portion 1 Nylstroom Town and Townlands

MTN

 

Camp E4

Sethako Agriculture Projects

1 ha

Camp System

B2 - B4

C1 – C5

K

Modimolle Cooperative Limited

225ha

252ha        783ha

306ha

Erf P6532

Kopanong Creche

1 825m²

Erf V84

Mabaleng Creche

 

Erf P6853

Lerato Day Care Centre

 

Erf P7308

Agape Edu Care

 

Erf P5021

ABC Creche

 

Erf P4440

Thusanang Creche

 

Erf P3965

Bophelong Creche

 

A portion of land bordered by Jeppe Street to the north

Nylstene

1 939

Nelson Mandela Drive to the east, the railway line to the south and the ESCOM power line to the west

 

 

A portion of the Farm Nylstroom Town and Townlands 419KR

Alma Endurance Club

8.5809ha

Remaining extent of the farm Nylstroom Town and Townlands

Ant Business Ventures

4248.0746

Camp System B

W L Botes

225ha

Camp 2

M L Malan

40ha

Camp J

C C Laurens

257ha

Camp A

D Beukes

350ha

A portion of Camp System E

Bokamoso Development Project

1ha

Erf P503

Victim Support Centre

 

Erf 3 Sediba Street

Phagameng HIV/AIDS

 

A portion of Erf 2

Modimolle Job Creation

 

Room 12:  Beehive Centre

Childline Limpopo

 

Camp E4

A Re Hudisaneng Agricultural Primary Cooperative Ltd

2.5ha

A portion of land adjacent to the hostel and sport grounds

Ayitzvumbeni Project

1ha

Office 2 of Erf P503

Modimolle Entrepreneurs

 

Office 1 of Erf P503

People opposing women and child abuse

 

Office 3 of Erf P503

Phagameng Youth and Environmental Club

 

CAMP SYSTEMS (GRAZING)

NAME

SIZE

OWNER

LESSEE

Camp System J

257ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

C C Laurens

Camp 1

12 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

D M Mokhutswane

Camp 2

40 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

M L Makau

Camp 4

31 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

J Pretorius

Camp D5

39 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

J Pretorius

Camp B2-B4

225 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

Modimolle Cooperatives

Camp C1 – C5

252 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

 

Camp K

306 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

 

Camp 3

24 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

PJJ van der Schyff

Camp B

225 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

W L Botes

Camp C1, C2, C3, C4, C5

252 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

G C Moll

Camp A

350 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

Daleen  Beukes

Camp 5

1 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

L S Lekala

Camp E4

2 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

M D Josias

Camp 1 & B1

300 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

R Honeycomb

20 July 2017 - NW1715

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i)(ii)(iii)(aa)(aaa)(bbb)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)

The Department of Cooperative Governance has not awarded any contracts or agreement to a government employee in the 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years. Only one official Ms K Mosimege, a Deputy Director from Information and Database Management Uni, declared and obtained approval to work as an Online and Face-to-Face Tutor at the University of South Africa to the total amount of approximately R5000.00 per month, in 2014/15, 2015/16, and 2016/17 financial years.

(b) (i)(ii)(iii)(aa)(aaa)(bbb)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)None of the staff members from his Entities were awarded contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the 2014/15, 2015/16, and 2016/17 financial years.

20 July 2017 - NW1300

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the proposed housing development on portion 296 of the Zuurfontein farm 33 I.R. situated within the boundary of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, (a) which company (ies) was/were appointed to conduct the (i) environmental impact and (ii) traffic impact studies, (b) on what date was each company appointed, (c) who took the decision to appoint each company and (d) what amount was paid to each company for each report? (2) Whether he will furnish Mr M Waters with copies of each of the specified reports; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(1)

(a) (i) Shuma company

(ii) Shuma company

(b) On 25 January 2017.

(c) The Municipality appointed the company.

(d) Shuma was paid as follows:

  • Basic Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is R 84 214.08.
  • Traffic Impact Assessment (TIA) is R129 519.03.

2. Yes, report will be furnished to the Honourable Member in due course.

20 July 2017 - NW1535

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the (a) Bela-Bela Local Municipality, (b) Lephalale Local Municipality, (c) Thabazimbi Local Municipality, (d) Modimolle Local Municipality and (e) Mookgophong Local Municipality in Limpopo rent any properties from (i) private persons and/or companies and/or (ii) former and/or current political office bearers; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the market values and further relevant details in each case; (2) whether any of the specified municipalities lease any properties to (a) private persons and/or companies and/or (b) former and/or current political office bearers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full details in each case?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the municipalities in question:

1.(a) Bela-Bela local municipality is not renting any property from any private person or company or current or former political office bearers.

(b) Lephalale local municipality does not rent any property from any private person or company or current or former political office bearers.

(c) Thabazimbi local municipality is currently renting offices from private companies. One political office bearer is the estate agent of those companies and he is getting commission directly from those companies.

(d) LIM 368 (Modimolle/Mookgophong local municipalities) is not renting any property from any private person or company or current or former political office bearers.

(2) (a) Bela-Bela local municipality does lease property to private persons, municipal staff and companies. (b) It does not lease any property to current or former political office bearers.

(b) Lephalale local municipality is currently leasing offices in the Thusong Centres they have built, one company is occupying offices in Mokuruanyane Thusong Centre. (b) It does not lease any property to current or former political office bearers.

(a) and (b) No. Thabazimbi local municipality is not leasing any of its properties.

(a) and (b) LIM 368 (Modimolle/Mookgophong local municipalities) is leasing its properties as follows:

PROPERTY NAME

LESSEE

SIZE

 

Portion 1 Nylstroom Town and Townlands

MTN

 

Camp E4

Sethako Agriculture Projects

1 ha

Camp System

B2 - B4

C1 – C5

K

Modimolle Cooperative Limited

225ha

252ha        783ha

306ha

Erf P6532

Kopanong Creche

1 825m²

Erf V84

Mabaleng Creche

 

Erf P6853

Lerato Day Care Centre

 

Erf P7308

Agape Edu Care

 

Erf P5021

ABC Creche

 

Erf P4440

Thusanang Creche

 

Erf P3965

Bophelong Creche

 

A portion of land bordered by Jeppe Street to the north

Nylstene

1 939

Nelson Mandela Drive to the east, the railway line to the south and the ESCOM power line to the west

 

 

A portion of the Farm Nylstroom Town and Townlands 419KR

Alma Endurance Club

8.5809ha

Remaining extent of the farm Nylstroom Town and Townlands

Ant Business Ventures

4248.0746

Camp System B

W L Botes

225ha

Camp 2

M L Malan

40ha

Camp J

C C Laurens

257ha

Camp A

D Beukes

350ha

A portion of Camp System E

Bokamoso Development Project

1ha

Erf P503

Victim Support Centre

 

Erf 3 Sediba Street

Phagameng HIV/AIDS

 

A portion of Erf 2

Modimolle Job Creation

 

Room 12:  Beehive Centre

Childline Limpopo

 

Camp E4

A Re Hudisaneng Agricultural Primary Cooperative Ltd

2.5ha

A portion of land adjacent to the hostel and sport grounds

Ayitzvumbeni Project

1ha

Office 2 of Erf P503

Modimolle Entrepreneurs

 

Office 1 of Erf P503

People opposing women and child abuse

 

Office 3 of Erf P503

Phagameng Youth and Environmental Club

 

CAMP SYSTEMS (GRAZING)

NAME

SIZE

OWNER

LESSEE

Camp System J

257ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

C C Laurens

Camp 1

12 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

D M Mokhutswane

Camp 2

40 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

M L Makau

Camp 4

31 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

J Pretorius

Camp D5

39 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

J Pretorius

Camp B2-B4

225 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

Modimolle Cooperatives

Camp C1 – C5

252 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

 

Camp K

306 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

 

Camp 3

24 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

PJJ van der Schyff

Camp B

225 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

W L Botes

Camp C1, C2, C3, C4, C5

252 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

G C Moll

Camp A

350 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

Daleen  Beukes

Camp 5

1 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

L S Lekala

Camp E4

2 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

M D Josias

Camp 1 & B1

300 ha

Modimolle Local Municipality

R Honeycomb

20 July 2017 - NW1299

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the proposed housing development on portion 296 of the Zuurfontein farm 33 I.R. situated within the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s boundary: (a) What was the reason that the specified Municipality only gave residents 13 days to lay objections instead of the standard 28 days’ notice (details furnished), (b) Why is the deadline for the submission of objections given on the specified notice incorrectly announced as Wednesday, 6 May 2017, when the date does not exist? (c) What is the actual closing date for the submission of objections? and (d) Why is the portion of land in the notice incorrectly stipulated as portion 153 and not portion 296?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(a) The site notices indicate 30 days, the opportunity to participate in the EIA was announced in April 2017 in the following ways:

  • Newspaper advertisement placed in the Kempton Express on Thursday, 13 April 2017 inviting Interested and affected parties to register with, and submit their comments to the service provider (refer to the attached proof of newspaper advert).
  • Site notices informing the surrounding communities and immediately adjacent landowners of the proposed development. The service provider placed site notices within the boundaries of the study area on 19 April 2017. Refer to the attached site notices.

(b) This is an error, as the latest date was supposed to be the 10 May 2017. This will be corrected and communicated in the public meetings.

(c) The Draft Basic Assessment Report (DBAR) would be made available for public review as stipulated in the EIA Regulations 2014 and the report will be out for public review and comment for a 30-day commenting period. The commenting period is envisaged to commence on Monday, 23 May 2017 to Friday, 23 June 2017 (end of business day). Registered interested and affected parties would be sent written notification on the availability of the DBAR through faxes, emails depending on the mode of correspondence they wished to be notified.

(d) This is an error and it will be corrected on the Draft Basic Assessment Report and further adverts.

20 July 2017 - NW1408

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether any provincial Member of the Executive Council responsible for local government consulted with him regarding an adjustment of the powers and functions of (a) local or (b) district municipality since his appointment in December 2015; if so, (i) on what date did the consultations take place and (ii) which municipalities are affected; (2) Whether capacity assessments were conducted on the affected municipalities as required by section 85(2)(b) of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, Act 117 of 1998, as amended; if not, why not; if so, what were the recommendations of each capacity assessment?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (i) (ii)

The Minister of CoGTA is not aware of any adjustments undertaken by MECs in their provinces, in respect to the powers and functions of municipalities, since his appointment in December 2015.

In terms of Section 85 of the Local Government: Municipal structures Act No 117 of 1998, the MEC for local government in a province may, subject to the other provisions, adjust the division of functions and powers between a district and a local municipality as set out in section 84 (1) or (2), by allocating, within a prescribed policy framework, any of those functions or powers vested in the local municipality, to the district municipality; or in the district municipality (excluding a function or power referred to in section 84 (1) (a), (b), (c), (d), (i), (o) or (p), to the local municipality.

Here, it must be noted that the MEC has no legal obligation to consult the Minister on the adjustment of powers and functions of a municipality his/her province. Section 85 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act No 117 of 1998, empowers the MEC of Local Government to adjust functions and powers of municipalities without any legal requirements for the MEC to consult the Minister.

(2) In terms of Section 85 (5) of the Municipal Structures Act, in the event that the MEC disagrees with the MDB on the capacity of the municipality to receive the function, and refuses to adjust the division, contrary to the assessment of the MDB, the MEC must then furnish reasons to the relevant municipalities and the Minister, before finalising a proposed adjustment.

Therefore, the Minister will only be aware of the MDB assessment that is informing an adjustment, if there is a disagreement between the MEC and MDB on the matter.

20 July 2017 - NW1261

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the (a) Ellis Park, (b) Royal Bafokeng, (c) Nelson Mandela Bay and (d) FNB stadiums, (i) (aa) how many and (bb) what events were held in each of the specified stadiums in each of the past three financial years, (ii) what were the total operational costs in each case, (iii) what was the total revenue generated in each case, (iv) what amount was spent on maintenance in each case and (v) what is the current operational status of each stadium?

Reply:

(a) ELLIS PARK STADIUM

Emirates Airline Park, previously known as Ellis Park Stadium is managed by Ellis Park Stadium (Pty) Ltd.

(i) The total number of events held at Emirates Airline Park in the past three financial years were as follows.

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Number of events

170

145

111

(ii) The following events were held at Emirates Airline Park in the past three financial years:

Event

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Soccer

1

0

0

Music concerts

4

1

0

Political

3

2

3

Religious

38

19

12

Rugby

22

19

17

Campaigns/Conference

36

30

16

Functions

19

20

13

Film shoots

8

8

8

Athletics & recreation

7

1

1

Karate

2

2

2

Netball

0

0

3

Training courses

30

42

36

Basketball NBA

0

1

0

(iii) The total operational cost per financial year was as follows:

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total cost

R 47 351 212

R 52 213 358

R 30 515 640

(iv) The total revenue generated was as follows:

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total revenue

R 53 266 418

R 58 165 202

R 38 338 870

(v) The total cost for maintenance was as follows:

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Maintenance cost

R 4 672 380

R 3 970 533

R 5 785 617

(vi) The Stadium is still operational under the management of Ellis Park Stadium (Pty) Ltd on a 99 year lease from the City of Johannesburg.

(b) ROYAL BAFOKENG STADIUM

The Royal Bafokeng Stadium is owned and managed by the Royal Bafokeng Administration.

(c) NELSON MANDELA BAY STADIUM

The information was provided by the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality.

(i) Number of events held in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

BOWL

NON BOWL

BOWL

NON BOWL

BOWL

NON BOWL

18

125

31

119

29

65

(ii) Total operational costs in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16

 

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

R98,941,086 excl. VAT

R106,095,846 excl. VAT

R149,742,834 excl. VAT

(iii) Revenue in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

R46,901,674 excl. VAT

R42,111,565 excl. VAT

R50,931,696 excl. VAT

(iv) Maintenance costs in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

R7,002,047 excl. VAT

R7,790,066 excl. VAT

R11,156,683 excl. VAT

(v) The current status is that the Mandela Bay Development Agency as an entity and agent of the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality took over the management and operations of the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium effective 1 January 2017 in line with a resolution from the NMBM Council. The majority of the staff employed by Access Facilities (the previous stadium operator) were employed by the MBDA on fixed-term contracts and a new Stadium Manager was appointed in May 2017.

To date a total of 31 bowl and 77 non- bowl events have taken place.

The Southern Kings Super Rugby franchise is based at the Stadium as is Chippa United who play in the PLS soccer league.(c

(d) FNB STADIUM

(i) (aa) The total number of events held at FNB Stadium in the past three financial years are as follows.

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Number of events

32

34

33

(bb) The following events were held at FNB Stadium in the past three financial years:

Event

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Soccer

24

17

24

Music

4

4

3

Political

1

0

0

Religious

0

2

4

Walk

2

1

2

Campaigns/Conference

1

9

0

Wedding

0

1

0

(ii) The total operational cost per financial year was as follows:

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total cost

R157 752 356

R132 777 584

R110 164 005

(iii) (The total revenue generated was as follows:

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total revenue

R169 613 767

R122 318 701

R137 610 267

(iv) The total cost for maintenance was as follows:

Financial year

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Maintenance cost

R3 640 732

R3 654 122

R5 160 638

(v) The FNB Stadium is still operational under the management of Stadium Management South Africa, National Stadium South African and the City of Johannesburg.

20 July 2017 - NW1260

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the (a) Loftus Versveld, (b) Free State, (c) Peter Mokaba and (d) Moses Mabhida stadiums, (i) (aa) how many and (bb) what events were held in each of the specified stadiums in each of the past three financial years, (ii) what were the total operational costs in each case, (iii) what was the total revenue generated in each case, (iv) what amount was spent on maintenance in each case and (v) what is the current operational status of each stadium?

Reply:

(a) LOFTUS VERSVELD STADIUM

The Loftus Versveld Stadium is privately owned and managed by the Blue Bulls Rugby Union.

(b) FREE STATE STADIUM

(i) (aa) and (bb) Number of events held in 2014, 2015, 2016

2014

2015

2016

EVENT

NUMBER

EVENT

NUMBER

EVENT

NUMBER

PSL Soccer Matches

9

PSL Soccer Matches

12

PSL Soccer Matches

1

CHAN Soccer Tournament

1

Rugby Matches

13

Rugby Matches

21

Rugby Matches

8

Macufe Cup

1

Other

2

Macufe Cup

1

Other

5

   

Other

1

       

Events Total

20

Events Total

31

Events Total

24

(ii) Average Operational costs of Stadium per match 

2014

R174 959.97

2015

R188 956.76

2016

R204 073.30

(iii) REVENUE GENARATION

As per the agreement with Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality no fees have been charged for rental of soccer or government events. This means that only operational costs has been paid and we have no record of income generated or the hosting of events. 

Looking at the situation as explained above an event does not make any money and merely costs money.

(iv) MAINTENANCE COSTS

The yearly maintenance budget for the Stadium is currently R6 million. Currently the Free State Rugby Union is responsible for the maintenance, insurance and upkeep of the Stadium.

(v) OPERATIONAL STATUS OF THE STADIUM

The stadium is used for various events, but since the maintenance and insurance of the stadium is taken care by the Free State Rugby Union, the stadium is mainly used for rugby matches as indicated by the number of rugby games played from 2014-12016.

(c) PETER MOKABA STADIUM

The information was provided by the City of Polokwane.

(i) Number of events held in 2015, 2016, 2017

2015

2016

2017

BOWL

NON BOWL

BOWL

NON BOWL

BOWL

NON BOWL

23 PSL matches

129 Events hosted

20 PSL matches

88 Events hosted

25 PSL matches

144 Events hosted

3 CUP matches

 

7 CUP matches

 

5 CUP matches

 

1 National Team Match

 

2 political rallies

 

2 National Team matches

 

1 Super Rugby Warm Up Match

 

1 Super Rugby Warm Up Match

     

2 political events

 

1 Comrades Qualifier Marathon

     

1 Gospel concert

         

Total 31 major events

 

Total 31 major events

 

Total 32 major events

 

(ii) Total operational costs in 2015, 2016, 2017

2015

2016

2017

OPERATIONS

OPERATIONS

OPERATIONS

Standby operations: R352 500.00

Team appearance fees (x2 teams): R8mil

TOTAL : R8,35mil

Standby operations: R388 500.00

Team appearance fees (x1 team): R4,5mil

TOTAL : R8,88mil

Standby operations: 415 000.00

Team appearance fees (x2 teams):R8mil

TOTAL : R8,41 mil

(iii) Revenue in 2015, 2016, 2017

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R 5 170 616.20

R6 506 604.82

R5 434 088.35

(iv) Maintenance costs in 2015, 2016, 2017

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R10 821 453.58

R14 976 803.00

R11 605 709.96

(v) The stadium is still well maintained using internal staff who are experienced in management and operations of the stadium, making it possible to host a variety of events, large and small. It continues to operate with limited resources but since 2010 has attracted a significant number of major events and activities, has been an anchor to some PSL clubs, Kaizer Chiefs, Supersport United, Free State Stars as well as permanent home ground for Polokwane City, Baroka FC and Black Leopards. The municipality is finalizing a model of commercialization that would assist the stadium to enhance revenue and move towards self-sustainability.

(d) MOSES MABHIDA STADIUM

Information provided by Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality

(i) (aa) and (bb) Number of events held in 2015, 2016, 2017

2015

2016

2017

BOWL

NONBOWL

BOWL

NONBOWL

BOWL

NONBOWL

24

351

20

316

20

262

PSL football matches, cup finals, international football matches, concerts, political events, church services.

Meetings, conferences, cocktail parties, dinners, fashion shows, music festivals, cycle races, triathlons, walks/ runs, TV shows, corporate family days, teambuilding etc.

PSL football matches, cup finals, international football matches, concerts, political events, church services.

Meetings, conferences, cocktail parties, dinners, fashion shows, music festivals, cycle races, triathlons, walks/ runs, TV shows, corporate family days, teambuilding etc.

PSL football matches, cup finals, international football matches, concerts, political events, church services.

Meetings, conferences, cocktail parties, dinners, fashion shows, music festivals, cycle races, triathlons, walks/ runs, TV shows, corporate family days, teambuilding etc.

(ii) Total operational costs in 2015, 2016, 2017

2014/2015

2015/2016

2016/2017

R92 198 807

R95 460 957

R52 817 974 (to May 17)

(iii) Revenue in 2015, 2016, 2017

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R70 797 989

R76 366 895

R103 639 346 (to May 17)

(iv) Maintenance costs in 2015, 2016, 2017

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R3 785 165

R 5 927 168

R4 081 279 (to May 17)

(v) Over time Moses Mabhida Stadium has built up an excellent reputation with a range of promoters and event organisers who love working with the stadium and city team. The city of Durban, KZN provincial government (along with KZN Tourism and Durban Tourism) and the stadium have secured a vibrant mix of major events over time eg Top Gear Festival, SA v India cricket match, PSL football fixtures, AFCON, international football fixtures eg Manchester United, Manchester City, Liverpool Legends, SA A v French Barbarians rugby match and a variety of concerts and music festivals for the stadium and People’s Park.

Other events hosted by this multi-purpose stadium include International U19 football tournament, Amashova and Tour Durban cycle races, triathlon, marathons, Jump City, Nitro Circus Live, Red Bull Unlocked skateboarding, craft beer festival, Shisanyama festival, Fact Durban Rocks, East Coats Radio Durban Day and Big Walk, I Heart Market, political rallies, church concerts and services, memorial services. Many of these events are hosted at the stadium on an annual basis some for more than 5 years now.

Usage is from three main sources as this stadium which is different in that it has a retail area and tourist attractions plus an adjacent park with kid’s playground and café which operate 7 days a week. This creates revenue streams as follows:
1. Bowl events in the stadium

2. Non-bowl events in other stadium venues and People’s Park

3. Retail tenant rental income and attractions income (SkyCar, Stadium Tours, Adventure Walk).

The stadium has a permanent staff compliment of 141 people in the following departments: Finance, Procurement, HR, Operations (Maintenance, Assets, Landscaping, Safety and Security) and Commercial (Retail, Marketing, Event Services). On event days we draft in temporary staff for cleaning, security and hospitality and create almost 10 000 job opportunities per annum.

04 July 2017 - NW1795

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Which entities reporting to him (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) With reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

SOUTH AFRICAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SALGA)

1. (a) The South African Local Government Association (SALGA) has a board in place.

(b) Not applicable

(i) (aa) 1 December 2016

(bb) 30 November 2021

(ii) (aa) 31 members

(bb) 13 female members

2. (a)(b) Not applicable

SOUTH AFRICAN CITIES NETWORK (SACN)

1. (a) The South African Cities Network does have a board in place

 (i) (aa) each board member was appointed at varying times.

Appointment dates

May 2012

August 2004

July 2013

October 2007

April 2011

April 2011

April 2011

December 2011

May 2016

June 2016

May 2012

March 2016

March 2014

January 2012

(bb) the term of all board members will lapse in August 2017 and

(ii) (aa) 14 board members and

(bb) 2 female members.

2. (a)(b)Not applicable

MUNICIPAL DEMARCATION BOARD (MDB)

1.(a) The Municipal Demarcation Board has a board in place

(b) Not applicable

2.(aa) All board members were appointed on 20 February 2014;

(bb) The term of the current board will lapse on 19 February 2019;

  1. (aa) 9 board members;

(bb) 5 female members.

(2) (a)(b)Not applicable.

COMMISSION FOR THE PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF THE RIGHTS OF CULTURAL, RELIGIOUS AND LINGUISTIC COMMUNITIES (CRL COMMISSION)

1. (a) The CRL Commission has a board in place

(b) Not applicable

(i) (aa) All commissioners were appointed from March 2014

(bb) The term of the commission will lapse in March 2019

(ii) (aa) 12 commissioners

(bb) 6 female commissioners

2. (a)(b) Not applicable

04 July 2017 - NW1537

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the foreman, superintendent, direct manager, director and/or municipal manager reported the incident that led to the death of a certain person (name and details furnished) while in the employ of the Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality in Limpopo in accordance with the reporting line to the Department of Labour; if not, in each case, (a) why not, (b) will action be taken against any official for failing to report the death and (c) will the fatality be investigated; if so, what are the full relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Municipal Manager of the Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality (LM):

On 16 November 2016 an incident occurred whereby an official of the Greater Tzaneen LM was electrocuted and died whilst on duty. Three team members of the deceased witnessed the accident and immediately notified the office. An official of the OHS Office was the first to respond to the scene and followed due procedure to secure the scene of the accident. All relevant stakeholders were called on the scene, namely, Paramedics, the Police and Pathology.

    (a) Not applicable.

    (b) The case was reported to the Department of Labour by the first official to respond to the incident scene (Event No. 980065).

    (c) The fatality was investigated internally and an incident investigation meeting was further held with the Director: Electrical Engineering Services, the Superintendent and the three officials who witnessed the incident.

A preliminary investigation meeting was held with an Inspector from the Department of Labour. The Municipality is currently waiting for the Department of Labour to conduct further investigations. Incident investigation is ongoing until the Department of Labour brings the matter to finality.

04 July 2017 - NW1750

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Does (a) he, (b) his Deputy Ministers or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to him make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The details are as per table below.

Designation

(a) Minister DES van Rooyen

(b1) Deputy Minister Obed Bapela

(b2) Deputy Minister

Andries Nel

(c1) Chairperson of National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL)

(c2)

Deputy Chairperson of NHTL

(i) Himself

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

(ii) Immediate family member

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

(iii) Any of their staff members

No

No

No

No

No

(aa) Reasons

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

24/7 Security services at official residence owned by DPW.

24/7 Security services at official residence owned by DPW

(bb) From which department‘s budget?

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Department of Cooperative Governance.

Services are part of DCoG’s Head Office guarding services contract.

Department of Cooperative Governance. Services are part of DCoG’s Head Office guarding services contract.

(cc) Relevant details

None

None

None

24/7 Security services provided at house number 11 Anselia Street Waterkloof

occupied by Chairperson of NHTL Kgosi PP Maubane and family

24/7 Security services provided at house number 12 Anselia Street Waterkloof occupied by Deputy Chairperson of NHTL Inkosi SE Mahlangu and family.

27 June 2017 - NW1253

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Mulder, Dr PW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) Whether municipalities and Eskom are obliged to apply for licences to supply electricity to South Africa and (b) whether they are regulated by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa in terms of section 36 of the Electricity Regulation Act, Act 4 of 2006; (2) whether municipal authorities, in their task of supplying electricity, are subject to the standard NRS 057:2009, read together with South African National Standard requirements SANS 474:2009; (3) whether electricity suppliers such as a municipal authority and Eskom may make use of unlicensed, uncalibrated and untested electric meters and secondary equipment which cannot guarantee an accurate account, particularly against the background of the Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, and relevant electricity legislation and regulations? NW1394E

Reply:

1 (a) & (b). Yes, Section 4 of the Electricity Regulation Act, 2006 (Act No. 4 of 2006) provides for the National Electricity Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) to issue licences for generation, transmission or distribution facility and the import or export of electricity to be involved in the trading. Rules as determined by the Regulator specify that anyone owning and operating an electricity distribution facility requires a license from the Regulator.

2 Yes, NERSA as the statutory body that oversees the electricity market, has issued a distribution metering code and a transmission code [grid code] which contains the regulations that require compliance with NRS 057. NERSA has declared compliance with NRS 057/SANS 474 to be a licence condition for all licensees and is therefore a mandatory requirement for the municipalities.

3 No, all electricity suppliers such as municipalities and Eskom must make use of certified equipment which is compliant with the relevant standards used in the metering installation and supply. NRS 057 and SANS 474 set compulsory certification for meters and all the municipalitieis should adhere to such. In terms of calibration standards, new or replacerment components of meters shall be individually calibrated by an accredited calibration laboratory before the installation. Each model of meter shall also be tested to prove that it complies with the relevant standard and accuracy class.

26 June 2017 - NW1262

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to (a) Green Point and (b) Mbombela stadiums, (i) (aa) how many and (bb) what events were held in each of the specified stadiums in each of the past three financial years, (ii) what were the total operational costs in each case, (iii) what was the total revenue generated in each case, (iv) what amount was spent on maintenance in each case and (v) what is the current operational status of each stadium?

Reply:

a) GREEN POINT STADIUM

The information was provided by the Provincial Department of Local Government in the Western Cape.

(i) (aa) Number of events held over the past three financial years:

 

July 2013 – June 2014

July 2014 – June 2015

July 2015 – June 2016

TOTAL

104

118

117

(bb) What events were held over the past three financial years:

 

July 2013 – June 2014

July 2014 – June 2015

July 2015 – June 2016

Concerts

3

7

2

Film Shoots

42

30

39

Sporting Events

27

34

34

Religious Events

0

2

3

Corporate Events

32

45

39

TOTAL

104

118

117

(ii) Total operational costs in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16. This expenditure is recovered from the event organisers.

 

 

2013 – 2014

Total R

2014 – 2015

Total R

2015 – 2016

Total R

Concerts

3

R1,867,060

7

R3512,211

2

R1,047,834

Film Shoots

42

R271,171

30

R489,115

39

R203,480

Sporting Events

27

R120,775

34

R2,698,085

34

R6,346,455

Religious Events

0

0

2

R688,580

3

R1,298,492

Corporate Events

32

R516,802

45

R1,065,230

39

R779,960

TOTAL

104

R2,775,808

118

R8,453,221

117

R9,676,221

(ii) Revenue in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16

 

2013 – 2014

Total R

2014 – 2015

Total R

2015 – 2016

Total R

Concerts

3

R3,578,252

7

R5,421,051

2

R123,022

Film Shoots

42

R1,229,604

30

R1,433,825

39

R789,539

Sporting Events

27

R2,295,849

34

R5,510,302

34

R9,798,168

Religious Events

0

0

2

R1,022,785

3

R2,132,795

Corporate Events

32

R1,375,792

45

R2,459,238

39

R1,103,524

TOTAL

104

R8,479,497

118

R15,847,200

117

R13,947,048

(iv) Maintenance costs in 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16

The information requested is not recorded per event.

(v) The Stadium is fully operational and the intention is to establish a Municipal Entity which will become operational on 1 February 2018.

(b) MBOMBELA STADIUM

The City of Mbombela Local Municipality was contacted to provide a response to the above with particular reference to the Mbombela Stadium.

The response from the Municipality to the above-mentioned questions regarding the Mbombela Stadium is as follows:

(i) Number of events held

March 2014 – Feb 2015

Inside Bowl – Sport Events

  • 21 Football
  • 13 Rugby

Non- sport events

  • 196 Events (Ranging from small meetings with no income or costs to large events attended by 55 000 persons)

March 2015-Feb 2016

Inside Bowl- Sport Events

  • 19 Football
  • 8 Rugby

Non- sport events (Small meetings, conference etc)

  • 232 Events (Ranging from small meetings with no income or costs to large events attended by 55 000 persons)

March 2016-Feb 2017

Inside Bowl – Sport Events:

  • 10 Football Matches
  • 11 Rugby Matches

Non- sport events (Small meetings, conference etc)

  • 223 Events ((Ranging from small meetings with no income or costs to large events attended by 55 000 persons)

(ii) Total operational costs

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R13,219,496.81

R9,232,754.21

R6,189,906.69

(iii) Revenue

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R14,194,076.22

R10,268,543.99

R 9,188,502.25

(iv) Maintenance costs

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R15,278,337.57

R13,481,344.75

R9,899,012.22

(v) The facility is being managed by a private operator in close cooperation with the City of Mbombela. The operator is responsible for the daily management of the facility and receives a monthly management fee from the municipality. The City is kept informed of the activities at the Stadium. Events are hosted on a self- sustaining basis. Small non- profitable events are being cross subsidised by the income from large profitable events. The facility is being managed with a strong focus on community accessibility and not only on a commercial basis. Much less activities would be hosted if profit was the only consideration. In addition to commercial activities the facility is being used on a daily basis by the local marathon, cycling, junior wrestling, local football clubs etc.

It is ideal to have football and rugby anchor tenants at the stadium as a platform to sell hospitality suites, advertising, naming rights etc.

The Steval Pumas, being a Rugby Team participating in the Premier Division of the Currie Cup Competition is based at the Stadium. The team plays all its Currie Cup home matches at the stadium. Four International Rugby matches have been hosted at the stadium since 2010 and the stadium has been included in the 2023 Rugby World Cup Bid Document that will be submitted to the IRB on 1 June 2017.

The previous football anchor tenant at the stadium namely Mpumalanga Black Aces FC was sold and the club has been relocated to Cape Town and is playing under a new name, Cape Town City FC. SuperSport United FC has entered into a three-year agreement with the City of Mbombela and Mbombela Stadium to play their top home matches as well as cup games at the Mbombela Stadium.

Annual provision is made on the municipality`s budget for the maintenance of the facility.

23 June 2017 - NW1013

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What percentage of roads in the road network in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Council jurisdiction have been classified as (i) very poor, (ii) poor and (iii) any other classification, (b) how many kilometres does this translate into in each case and (c) on what date was the assessment conducted; (2) (a) What is the (i) Rand value and (ii) distance in kilometre in respect of the backlog or resurfacing and rehabilitation of roads and (b) what amount in the current budget has been allocated in this regard?

Reply:

The information was provided by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance Traditional Affairs.

1.

(a) (i) Very poor – 0%

(ii) Poor – 2%

(iii) Fair – 12%

Good – 40%

Very good – 46%

(b) (i) Very poor – 0

(ii) Poor – 164 km

(iii) Fair – 984 km

Good – 3200 km

Very good – 3852 km

(c) The assessment was conducted in 2012.

(2)

(a) (i) The rand value is R11.25 billion.

(ii) The distance in kilometres in respect of the backlog or resurfacing and rehabilitation of roads is 2 500km.

(b) A total amount of R325 million has been allocated in the current budget.

23 June 2017 - NW1562

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 995 on 22 May 2017, does he support the creation of Special Rating Areas within municipalities to achieve specific service delivery goals in geographically defined communities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister cannot express an opinion on the exercise of an authority that has been directly given by Parliament to municipalities and communities nor can he seek to influence the municipalities and communities not to exercise their prerogative. Municipalities and interested communities have the prerogative to establish SRAs provided they do so in accordance with the provisions of section 22 of the Municipal Property Rates Act. To that end, the Department can provide advisory support to municipalities where required on the interpretation of the provisions as well as with respect to any implementation challenges associated with those provisions that municipalities may require guidance with.

Cooporate Gov Ministry letter.jpg

05 June 2017 - NW87

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) What is the current amount owed to Eskom by each municipality which is considered to have defaulted on its payment agreement to the electricity supplier; (2) in each case, has (a) his department or (b) any provincial department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs taken any action in terms of section 139(5) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to implement a financial recovery plan; if not, why not; if so, what was the outcome of this recovery plan; (3) what has he found to have been the reason why each specified municipality is not successful in addressing the Eskom debt?

Reply:

(1) Listed below are municipalities with payment arrangements, however these municipalities have defaulted at some point. These key defaulting municipalities’ combined contribution to overdue municipal debt is 87%.

Table 1: Municipalities with valid payment arrangements, as at 31 January 2017

See the link: http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW87Table-170605.pdf

(2)(a) Section 139(5) states that if a municipality, in financial crisis, breaches its obligation to provide basic services or admits that it is unable to meet its financial commitments, the relevant provincial executive authority must impose a financial recovery plan. The Minister can only intervene in terms of Section 139(7) if the provincial executive authority cannot adequately exercise its power to perform the functions referred to in sub-sections 4 or 5. The national executive authority must then intervene.

National and provincial government is obligated, in terms of Section 154 of the Constitution, to support and strengthen the capacity of municipalities in managing their own affairs and exercising their own power to carry out functions. In holding municipalities accountable, CoGTA as part of the Inter-Ministerial Task Team on Eskom debt, has been in discussion with Premiers, MECs and Mayors. The Department has had engagements with various stakeholders to resolve the issue of Eskom debt. The following agreements were reached:

  • Eskom proposed to reduce the current interest rate charged to municipalities that are in arrears from 5% to prime plus 2,5%.
  • Eskom will review charging interest after 15 days as opposed to 30 days, in terms of the PFMA.
  • Eskom has agreed to allocate the payments by municipalities first toward the principal debt before the interest.
  • The majority of municipalities have been assisted to enter into payment agreements. In August 2016, only 24 municipalities had agreements in place. However, as at January 2017, it has increased to 54.
  • The Inter-Ministerial Task Team is in the process of resolving the legislative matters on electricity reticulation between Eskom and municipalities.

(3) Based on Eskom’s interaction with municipalities and the Inter-Ministerial Task team (DPE/CoGTA/NT) during 2016, the following common challenges were identified as contributing to the municipalities not honouring their financial obligations with Eskom:

i) Financial

  • Cross-subsidisation of electricity revenue for other municipal services.
  • Electricity tariff setting is not cost-reflective.
  • Some municipalities are grant-dependent.
  • Notified Maximum Demand (NMD) penalties and interest on arrears makes it difficult to decrease the principal debt.

ii) Technical

  • Eskom charges a high penalty when municipalities exceed the NMD.
  • Theft and losses of electricity equates to as much as 50% of purchases in some municipalities.
  • A maintenance backlog in infrastructure results in high technical losses.

iii) Legislative Framework

  • Municipalities are unable to effect credit control measures in Eskom-supplied areas of electricity supply.

05 June 2017 - NW1214

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him has (i) procured any services from and/or (ii) made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) were the total costs, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of the costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of the payments in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc)(dd)(ee)(ff)

The Department and the Entities reporting to the Minister did not procure any services from and/or made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation.

22 May 2017 - NW601

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Since his reply to question 2365 on November 2016, how many boreholes has (i) his department and (ii) each municipality (aa) drilled and/or installed, (bb) refurbished and/or (cc) equipped (b) What were the costs, (c) From which departmental (sub) programme was the expenditure funded, (d) To which companies were contracts related to the specific borehole activities awarded and (e) What is the location of the specified boreholes?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

did not undertake directly.

(aa) any drilling and/ or installation of boreholes

(bb) any refurbishment of boreholes

(cc) any equipping of boreholes.

(ii) According to the information received from the municipalities,

(aa) drilled and/ or installed 33 boreholes

(bb) refurbished 3 boreholes

(cc) equipped no borehole.

Only Mpumalanga and Northern Cape reported information on boreholes completed as indicated in the table below. All other provinces had not completed any work on boreholes since November 2016.

Province

Municipality

a. How many boreholes

   

ii (aa). Drilled

ii (bb). Refurbished

ii (cc). equipped

Mpumalanga

Govan Mbeki LM

24

0

0

 

Lekwa LM

6

0

0

Northern Cape

Ga-Segonyana

3

2

0

 

Gamagara

0

1

0

TOTAL

 

33

3

0

Reference: A detailed list is attached in Annexure A.

(b): (aa) drilling and/ or installation of 33 borehole amounts R 6593 564.21

(bb) refurbishment of 3 boreholes amounts R 299 850.00

(cc) as there was no equipping of boreholes, no cost incurred.

Reference: A detailed list is attached in Annexure A.

(c): Expenditure were funded from MIG of the Department of Cooperative Governance and MWIG of the Department of Water and Sanitation

The details of funding are as given hereunder

(aa) drilling and/ or installation costs of total R 6 593 564.21, MIG provided total R 6 057 499,21 (Mpumalanga got R 6 057 499.21 and Northern Cape got R 264 390.00). MWIG provided the rest R 536 065.00 which went to Northern Cape alone.

(bb) refurbishment costs of total R 299 850.00 was provided by MWIG and Northern Cape got all of it.

(cc) No cost was incurred.

Reference: A detailed list is attached in Annexure A.

(d): The companies to which the contracts were awarded to were:

  1. M/s Sandmix Construction and Development and M/s Asdu Trading got the contracts for Mpumalanga municipalities and
  2. M/s Kimopax/ Gobora Drilling AB Pumps Contractors gt the contrats of Northern Cape municipalities

Reference: A detailed list is attached in Annexure A.

(e): The boreholes location details are given in Annexure A.

22 May 2017 - NW626

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Which (a) national departments and (b) entities of national government departments owe money to (i) Bela-Bela Local Municipality, (ii) Lephalale Local Municipality, (iii) Lim368: Modimolle & Mookgophong Local Municipality and (iv) Thabazimbi Local Municipality, (b) what are the outstanding amounts to each of these local municipalities (c) since when are these amounts owed (d) what are the reasons that these departments and entities are not paying their accounts and (e) when will all the outstanding amounts be paid to each of these municipalities?

Reply:

The following information was received from the Provincial Department of Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements, and Traditional Affairs (CoGHSTA) in Limpopo.

a) and b)

(i) Bela-Bela Local Municipality is owed by the following departments:

Departments

Amount

Payment received in March 2017

National Public Works

R202,130.42

R0.00

Provincial Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

0.00

R0.00

Agriculture

R14,206.00

R0.00

Education

R1,463,428.37

R500 000.00

Rural Development and Land Reform

R0.00

R0.00

TOTAL:

R1 679 764.79

R500 000.00

c) The above amounts are owed since 2011.

d) The reason for non-payment is that there are government properties that are built on communal land and some properties are not registered.

e) In the last Debt Verification session held with Bela-Bela Local Municipality, the Departments owing indicated that they will pay some of the outstanding debt by 31 March 2017. Only the Department of Education honoured the commitment to pay and an amount of R500 000.00 was paid by 31 March 2017.

The National Department of Co-operative Governance (DCoG) was able to collect information from the following local municipalities:

  • Lephalale Local Municipality
  • Lim 368 (i.e. former Modimolle and Mookgophong Local Municipalities)
  • Thabazimbi Local Municipality

a) and b)

(ii) Lephalale Local Municipality is owed the amounts reflected on the link below by the following departments:

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW626Table-170522.pdf

c) The above amounts have been owed for more than 150 days.

d) The municipality has not provided the reasons for non-payment.

e) Information regarding when the amounts will be paid has not been submitted.

a) and b)

(iii) Lim 368 (i.e. Modimolle and Mookgophong LMs) is owed by the following departments (see link below):

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW626Department-170522.pdf

c) The above amounts have been owed for more than a year (1yr).

d) The municipality has not provided any reasons for non-payment.

e) Information regarding when the amounts will be paid has not been submitted.

a) and b)

(iv) Thabazimbi LM is owed by the following departments:see link below

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW626ThabazimbiLM-170522.pdf

c) Some of the amounts have been outstanding since March 2008.

d) The municipality has not provided the reasons for non-payment.

e) Information regarding when the amounts will be paid has not been submitted.

22 May 2017 - NW995

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What number of municipalities have implemented Special Rating Areas (SRAs) as contemplated in section 22 of the Local Government: Municipal Property Rates Act, Act 6 of 2004, as amended; (2) has the SRA achieved the objectives for which it was established in each case; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether SRAs is an effective method of enhancing localised service delivery, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?NW1123E

Reply:

1. As at 15 December 2016, information at our disposal indicates that 7 municipalities have established 49 Special Rating Areas (SRAs) between them in terms of section 22 of the Local Government: Municipal Property Rates Act, Act 6 of 2004 (“the Act”). The 7 municipalities are Breede Valley, City of Cape Town, eThekwini, KwaDukuza, Mossel Bay, Stellenbosch, and Nelson Mandela Metro.

2. Taking into account that the establishment of SRAs is a voluntary arrangement, we are not in a position to provide an independent authoritative view because we have not undertaken an assessment of whether the 49 SRAs that have been established by the 7 municipalities have achieved the objectives for which they were voluntarily established for.

Section 22(2) of the Act requires a municipality to consult and obtain the consent of the majority of the members of the local community in the proposed special rating area who will be liable for paying the additional rate”. Accordingly, it is reasonable to conclude that if the majority of the affected members of the community are of the view that the SRA is not achieving its objectives, they can call for its dissolution. In this regard, the policies of all 7 municipalities provide for the municipality to dissolve the SRA upon written application by the majority of the owners of rateable properties within the SRA.

The establishment of SRAs is normally initiated by property owners (and not by municipalities) who make proposals to municipalities and these are established for a fixed period, which is ordinarily not more than five years, but their geographic boundaries and life spans can be amended by the municipality after consultations with the affected property owners if the majority are in favour of such amendment.

3. Following from (2) above, we are not in a position to answer this question at this point in time.

 

 

Cooporate Gov Ministry letter.jpg

08 May 2017 - NW883

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the Klynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeler (KPMG) forensic report commissioned within the Bela-Bela Local Municipality and finalised in May 2016, (a) when will the report be tabled before the Council Bela-Bela Local Municipality and (b) what amount did it cost to compile the forensic report; (2) were any of the report’s recommendations implemented; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) do any of the report’s recommendations include the institution of criminal charges; if so, against whom; (4) what are the reasons for ignoring the Promotion of Access to Information Act application to receive the forensic report; (5) will any action be taken against officials who have not performed according to their job descriptions; if not, why not; if so, what action?

Reply:

The following response was provided by the municipality:

1. (a) The KPMG forensic report was tabled before Municipal Council on the 15th of September 2016.

   (b) The cost of the compilation of the forensic report is R959 593.55.

(2) All of the report’s recommendations were implemented. Further, legal opinion was obtained regarding the matter and its subsequent recommendations were also implemented by putting in place all the applicable corrective measures as espoused in the reports. The Municipal Public Accounts Committee subsequently prepared a report as duly mandated by Municipal Council and submitted the report for Council’s consideration on 27 January 2017.

(3) There is a recommendation with regard to the institution of criminal charges against one of the Joint Venture Company whose termination was also a subject of investigation. However, the matter is still being dealt with by the courts and thus sub duce.

(4) According to the municipality, there has never been an instance where Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA) application pertaining to the KPMG was ignored. The municipality has consistently provided the same response to everyone requesting the report that until such time that all Municipal Council processes are duly concluded, the report remains the confidential report of Council.

(5) The forensic investigation did not find any official(s) that had not performed their responsibilities as espoused in their respective job descriptions.

08 May 2017 - NW487

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What were the total costs for the (a) KwaZulu-Natal State of the Province Address held on 28 February 2017 and (b) King’s Address held on 1 March 2017 in terms of (i) food and beverages, (ii) transport, (iii) venue hire, including tents, air-conditioning and seating, (iv) décor, (v) audio visual hire, (vi) security and (vii) accommodation?

Reply:

The information requested by the Hon Member is not readily available within the Department, however, we have requested the office of the Premier in KwaZulu-Natal to assist and will submit to you as soon as it becomes available.

08 May 2017 - NW884

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the outcome of the 2014 disciplinary case against a certain official (name and details furnished) for tender fraud committed in 2012, (a) what are the details of the charges, (b) what is the total amount the specified person has to pay back and (c) what amount has the person paid to date; (2) Was a criminal case opened with the SA Police Service against the specified person; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what is the specified person’s current position and (b) does the person still participate in tender procedures?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the municipality:

1. (a) The details of the charges are as follows:

Charge 1 - Misconduct by providing the Mayor and Council with false statement or evidence.

Charge 2 - Misconduct with regard to the sourcing of quotations for the purchase of transformer. The official intentionally and /or deliberately concealed the quotation of one of the service provider which was R600 000.00 less than the appointed service provider; thereby causing the municipality to suffer financial loss in the amount of R600 000.00.

Charge 3 - Failure to verify SARS status before submitting the invoice to the Municipal Manager and CFO.

Charge 4 - Contravention of section 195 of the Constitution.

Charge 5 - Gross negligent for his recommendation of Makgoleng Trading Enterprise

(b) The total amount to be paid back is R392 107.00.

(c) The amount which has been paid to date is R136 163.36.

(2) No criminal case was opened. The Department is still awaiting for the municipality to provide the reason(s) why a criminal case was not opened with the SA Police Service.

(3) (a) The official’s employment contract expired on the 30 March 2017.

     (b) No

08 May 2017 - NW873

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With regard to the decision of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Council to move residents from the Angelo informal settlement to Farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein, (a) what type of structures are to be built on the specified property, (b) what is the total number of structures that will be built, (c) for how long are the residents expected to live on the specified property and (d) will the property be fenced off in order to protect the residents from the (i) railway line, (ii) mineshaft and (iii) sinkhole; (2) How does the municipality intend to provide (a) sanitation and water, (b) refuse removal and (c) electricity services at the specified property?

Reply:

1. According to the information received from the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements, the following responses were provided that :

(a) The type of structures to be built are temporary structures, L-shaped IBR sheeting structure with insulation inside and 100mm slab for floor.

(b) A total number of 565 structures will be built.

(c) The residents will be there for a period of 2-3 years if there are no delays on the Comet Village Housing Project. This is where permanent housing will be allocated for the residents. (d) Yes, the property will be fenced off to protect the residents from the (i) railway line, (ii) mineshaft and (iii) sinkhole.

2. Interim services will be provided in line with council service standards for the informal settlements in that:

(a) Water standpipes and chemical toilets will be provided;

(b) Refuse removal will be done once a week; and

(c) Electricity services will be provided, subject to budget availability.

08 May 2017 - NW736

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the attached letter from the Acting Director-General of his department to the Municipal Manager of Bela-Bela Local Municipality, his department has received the KPMG report on 10 November 2016; if not, (a) why and (b) what action has his department taken to receive the report?

Reply:

In October 2016, the Department received correspondence from the Honourable Kevin Mileham, MP. The correspondence was with regard to a forensic report commissioned within the Bela Bela municipality by KPMG. The Honourable Member was requesting a copy of the forensic report for purposes of review and distribution to the Bela Bela Councillors.

According to the Honourable Member, the forensic report was finalised in May 2016. The report is alleged to be available at the Internal Audit department for Councillors to view although they are not allowed to take copies.

Following the request from Parliament, on 04 November 2016, the Department prepared a correspondence requesting the municipality to submit a copy of such a report with a view to assess the report and advise accordingly. The correspondence to the municipality was approved from the Acting Director-General’s office.

On 11 November 2016, the Department received a correspondence from the municipality as a response. The municipality indicated that Council processes are still underway to ensure that the recommendations emanating from the forensic report are implemented. In this regard, they requested to be granted space and time to finalise internal processes before releasing a copy of the report.

 

During its special meeting on the 15th September 2016, the Municipal Council, resolved, amongst others that:

  • the report on investigation into various allegations of irregularities in the municipality be noted;
  • legal advice sought with regard to the processing of the recommendations of the report to ensure that Council is insulated from any potential litigation;
  • all the recommendations of the report which may necessarily not need legal opinion be implemented and subsequently referred to MPAC for processing and reporting to Council;
  • the outcomes of the legal opinion on the recommendations of the forensic report be referred to MPAC for further processing and reporting to Council;
  • the Manager for Planning and Economic Development, as the designated Acting Municipal Manager during the forensic investigation period, be authorised to handle all the processes of the report until its conclusion in accordance with Council’s Oversight and Governance Structures as outlined above.

 

08 May 2017 - NW871

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the Council of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality conducted any (a) environmental impact assessment studies and/or (b) geographical studies prior to its decision to move residents from the Angelo informal settlement to Farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) on which dates were the specified studies concluded and (ii) what were the outcomes in each case; (2) on what date(s) did the council become aware of (a) an open mineshaft and (b) the beginning of a sinkhole on the specified property; (3) why did the council not (a) stop the construction of foundations and (b) conduct the necessary studies when it became aware of the mineshaft and sinkhole; (4) whether the council will reassure the residents that neither the (a) mineshaft nor (b) sinkhole pose no threat to them?

Reply:

It is important to indicate that the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs referred the questions to the Human Settlements, as the sector is responsible for the matters indicated in the questions. The Provincial Department of Human Settlements through the National Department of Human Settlements provided the information in response to the questions.

(1) According to the report received from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlement, it is indicated that, the studies were undertaken to determine the suitability of the land for human habitation. The studies conducted are the following: (a) Environmental Impact Assessment, (b) Geotechnical Studies and Township Establishment application to determine the suitability of the land for human habitation in farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein.

(i) The specified studies were concluded on the following dates: Geotechnical studies were concluded and a final report compiled in August 2012, the Environmental Impact Assessment was concluded in May 2016, the assessment has not been approved and the Township Establishment Application was concluded in October 2014, the application has not been approved.

(ii) The outcomes of the studies were as follows:

Geotechnical Studies - the land was categorised into three portions for analysis of its development prospects. Zone A-has a mining depth less than 30m, this is excluded from the developable area. Zone B characterised by shallow undermining where the depth rise is more than 30m, the land is developable with restrictions. Zone C has no undermining at all.

Township Establishment application – the application took the development constraints into cognisance, the Town Planning Layout of the site provides for the following land uses: 12.7h of land constitutes 57.71% of the site to be used for residential development and 9.3h of land that constitutes 42.29% used for Public Open Spaces.

The Environmental Impact Assessment - the land is characterised as largely degraded and thus no objection was noted for housing development purposes.

(2) The department became aware of the (a) open mineshaft during 2012 (b) the date regarding the beginning of a sinkhole on the specified property was not provided by Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements.

(3) The construction (a) was not stopped because it was done in a developable area; (b) the land surveyor demarcated the developable and the undevelopable area. The area where the slabs are laid is the part that is developable according to the township layout plan and the geotechnical studies conducted.

(4) The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements indicated that the Council will:

(a) implement safety measures before relocating the community; and

(b) the area that is prone to sinkholes will be fenced off, and other sinkholes in the area will be filled prior to the relocation of the community..

 

08 May 2017 - NW513

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the (a) total annual remuneration package of a certain official (name furnished) of the Emalahleni Local Municipality in Mpumalanga and (b) annual travel allowance for the specified person?

Reply:

According to the information received from Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(a) The annual total remuneration package payable to the municipal manager of Emalahleni Local Municipality, Mr. T van Vuuren, is R1 242 967.

(b) The annual travel allowance paid to Mr. van Vuuren is R757 260

08 May 2017 - NW874

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the decision of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Council to move residents from the Angelo informal settlement to Farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein, the municipality has addressed the issue of illegal miners on the specified property; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) action has the specified municipality taken to ensure that the lives of the residents are not put in danger?

Reply:

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements indicated that;

(a) Illegal miners were not identified, however if and when identified, the Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department and the South African Police Service will be engaged (b). The department has not provided information on the action taken to ensure that the lives of the residents are not put in danger.

 

 

08 May 2017 - NW446

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether his department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(d)(ii)

The Department did not procure any services from and/or made any payments to

Mr Mzwanele Manyi, the Progressive Professionals Forum, the Decolonisation Fund or the Black Business Council. The Department procures goods and services from different service providers on rotational basis as per the SCM prescripts and these services were never utilised by the Department.

08 May 2017 - NW535

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) (a) What is the total amount that has been spent by the (i) City of eThekwini and (ii) KwaZulu-Natal provincial government on bidding and preparations for the 2022 Commonwealth Games and (b) what is the detailed breakdown of the expenditure in each case; (2) what consequences will the proposed withdrawal of financial support by the (a) Minister of Sport and Recreation, (b) City of eThekwini and (c) KwaZulu-Natal provincial government have in terms of (i) financial costs, (ii) loss of tourism revenue, (iii) loss of work opportunities and (iv) potential wasteful expenditure?

Reply:

The Hon Member is advised to redirect this question to the National Treasury, as the competent authority.

08 May 2017 - NW392

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any investigations have been launched into the alleged financial mismanagement by the (a) Sekhukhune District Municipality and (b) Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality in Limpopo; if not, when will investigations be launched; if so, (i) what are the details of the terms of reference for each investigation and (ii) by what date is a report expected in each case?

Reply:

The response below were provided by the two municipalities:

Yes, investigations have been launched with regard to the financial mismanagement by the (a) Sekhukhune District Municipality and (b) Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality in Limpopo. The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) has been mandated to investigate the allegations, as contemplated in Section 2(2) of the SIU Act, in respect of the affairs of (a) the Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality and (b) the Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality as authorized by Proclamation R59 of 2016 published in Government Gazette No. 40348 dated 14 October 2016.

(i) The terms of reference are published in Government Gazette No. 40348 dated 14 October 2016 (Annexure A).

(ii) The Department is still engaging with the SIU regarding the anticipated finalisation date of the investigation.

08 May 2017 - NW872

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any public participation processes took place with the (a) residents of the Angelo informal settlement in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and (b) residents of surrounding communities before a decision was taken to move the Angelo residents to Farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein; if not, why not in each case; if so, (i) what was the nature of each public participation process, (ii) on what date did each take place and (iii) how many residents participated in each process?

Reply:

1. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality through Gauteng Department of Human Settlements indicates that (a) public participation processes were not undertaken with the residents of the Angelo informal settlement in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and (b) public participation processes were not undertaken with the residents of surrounding communities before a decision was taken to move the Angelo residents to Farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein. According to Gauteng Department of Human Settlements, the reasons for public participation not to be conducted with the residents of Angelo informal settlement is that, the meeting scheduled for 04 February 2017 for public participation processes with the residents did not materialize due to unrests in the area and the Councilor requested for the meeting to be postponed.

08 May 2017 - NW160

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services to question 2714 on 16 January 2017, has the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department (EMPD) closed the illegal shebeen located at 102 Handel Street, Kempton Park West, Kempton Park; if not, (a) what action was taken in this regard, (b) by when will the EMPD enforce the court order and (c) why has the EMPD not enforced the court order; if so, (i) on what date and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Based on the response provided by the provincial Gauteng Cogta, Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) opted to provide a similar response to the one that was initially forwarded to the province. As a result, Gauteng Cogta requested national DCoG to use the initial response forwarded by Ekurhuleni. Below is an outline of the initial reply from Ekurhuleni metro:

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality does not enforce court orders. It is the responsibility of sheriffs of the court to enforce and implement court orders. Ekurhuleni also stated that in regard to court orders relating to evictions on illegally occupied land and contravention of by-laws, for instance, sheriffs of the court are agents responsible for enforcement of these court orders.

Moreover, according to Ekurhuleni, the liquor licenses are issued by Gauteng Provincial Liquor Board, which assumes responsibility over the existence or not of a shebeen or liquor outlet. In other words, Ekurhuleni does not have authority nor form part of processes undertaken by the Liquor Board to oversee existing shebeens and other liquor outlets. Therefore, Ekurhuleni maintains that it is not its responsibility to close down illegal shebeens in keeping with court orders.

08 May 2017 - NW875

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether his department intends to investigate the price of R12,1 million that the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality paid for purchasing Farm 87 Portion 230 Driefontein from Living Africa Development (Pty) Ltd, which paid a mere R112 074 for the specified land; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements responded that the department does not intend to investigate the price of R12,1 million that the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality paid for purchasing Farm 87 Portion of 230 Driefontein from Living Africa Development (Pty) Ltd. The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements indicated that, all acquisitions were done from the basis of a market valuation based on the value of the property as per legal requirements, which are done by a registered valuer to determine the value at the time of the transaction.

According to the department, Living Africa made Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality an offer for the land on 21 October 2015. They offered the land to Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality for R16,5 million and at the time, the land was valued at R28 million as per Living Africa valuation. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality further conducted its own valuation which determined the value at R22 million and the municipality started its negotiations at a value of R7,7 million which were not acceptable to the owner. The Property Acquisition Task Team led the negotiations that closed the deal with both parties accepting a sale price of R12,1 million subject to Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Council approval. According to Gauteng Department of Human Settlements, this transaction is therefore deemed to be above board and was done with Councils best interest at heart.

 

 

 

 

02 May 2017 - NW771

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the current overall municipal debt of each municipality in the country?

Reply:

The overall municipal debt, as at 31 January 2017, is as follows.

 

Name of Municipality

Current

Overdue

Total

 

EASTERN CAPE

R 430 667 207

R 371 388 892

R 802 056 099

1

ALFRED NZO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-R 11 912

R 77 535

R 65 623

2

AMAHLATHI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 020 013

R 0

R 2 020 013

3

AMATHOLE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 314 812

R 1 938 976

R 2 253 788

4

BAVIAANS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 36 974

R 0

R 36 974

5

BLUE CRANE ROUTE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 960 749

R 0

R 5 960 749

6

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN

R 111 486 560

R 0

R 111 486 560

7

CACADU MUNICIPALITY

R 12 880

R 0

R 12 880

8

CALA TOWN COUNCIL

R 0

R 9

R 9

9

CHRIS HANI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 108 426

R 79 959

R 188 385

10

DR BEYERS NAUDÉ LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 155 493

R 21 626 373

R 28 781 865

11

ELUNDINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 53

R 0

R 53

12

EMALAHLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 6 176

R 6 176

13

ENGCOBO MUNICIPALITY

R 215 315

R 0

R 215 315

14

ENOCH MGIJIMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 63 047

R 0

-R 63 047

15

GREAT KEI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 690 293

R 130 607

R 820 900

16

INTSIKA YETHU MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 196 047

R 0

R 196 047

17

INXUBA YETHEMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 548 125

R 38 849 753

R 44 397 878

18

JOE GQABI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-R 2

R 0

-R 2

19

KING SABATA DALINDYEBO MUNICIPALITY

R 19 863 393

R 62 535 733

R 82 399 126

20

KOUGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 17 209 944

R 0

R 17 209 944

21

KOU-KAMMA MUNICIPALITY

R 401 207

R 1 537 527

R 1 938 734

22

LUKHANJI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 19 433

R 19 433

23

MAKANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 216 855

R 46 860 682

R 54 077 537

24

MATATIELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 099 456

R 271 137

R 3 370 593

25

MBASHE MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 0

R 0

R 0

26

MBIZANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 84 720

R 0

R 84 720

27

MHLONTLO MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 0

R 0

R 0

28

MNQUMA MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 0

R 0

R 0

29

NDLAMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 299 301

R 0

R 4 299 301

30

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN

R 229 482 560

R 385

R 229 482 945

31

NGQUSHWA MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 200 100

R 0

R 200 100

32

NTHABANKULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 21 676

R 29 622

R 51 299

33

NYANDENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 4 527

R 4 151

R 8 678

34

O R TAMBO MUNICIPALITY

-R 32 822

R 45 121

R 12 299

35

PORT ST JOHNS MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 0

R 0

R 0

36

QAUKENI MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 0

R 0

R 0

37

QUMBU MUNICIPALITY (MHLONTLO)

R 0

R 0

R 0

38

RAYMOND MHLABA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 937 794

R 70 380 549

R 76 318 343

39

SAKHISIZWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 127 867

R 39 095

R 166 962

40

SENQU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 2

R 8 815

R 8 813

41

SUNDAYS RIVER VALLEY MUNICIPALITY

R 1 341 772

R 0

R 1 341 772

42

TSOLWANA MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

43

UKHAHLAMBA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-R 7

R 0

-R 7

44

UMZIMVUBU MUNICIPALITY

R 3 542

R 79 829

R 83 371

45

WALTER SISULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 743 561

R 126 867 425

R 134 610 986

46

XHOKONXA WEIR (O.R TAMBO DISTR ICT MUNICIPALITY)

-R 9 015

R 0

-R 9 015

 

FREE STATE

R 319 549 397

R 4 339 870 442

R 4 659 419 839

47

BRANDFORT MUNISIPALITEIT

R 20 520

R 4 393

R 24 914

48

CENTLEC MUNICIPALITY

R 1 603 885

R 0

R 1 603 885

49

DIHLABENG MUNICIPALITY

R 11 892 987

R 122 046 046

R 133 939 032

50

HARRISMITH MUNISIPALITEIT

-R 1 732

R 0

-R 1 732

51

KOPANONG MUNICIPALITY

R 3 515 246

R 728 750

R 4 243 995

52

LETSEMENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 169 098

R 304 311

R 473 409

53

MAFUBE MUNICIPALITY

R 6 175 306

R 56 505 801

R 62 681 108

54

MALUTI A PHOFUNG MUNICIPALITY

R 53 193 650

R 1 678 505 109

R 1 731 698 760

55

MANGAUNG MUNICIPALITY

R 112 391 255

R 80 347

R 112 471 602

56

MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 121 217

R 93 874 389

R 97 995 605

57

MASILONYANA MUNICIPALITY

R 2 922 409

R 33 823 510

R 36 745 919

58

MATJHABENG MUNICIPALITY

R 47 209 112

R 1 206 373 462

R 1 253 582 574

59

METSIMAHOLO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (including Deneysville)

R 15 340 373

R 1 142 693

R 16 483 066

60

MOHOKARE MUNICIPALITY

R 11 383

R 0

R 11 383

61

MOQHAKA MUNICIPALITY (including Steynsrus)

R 19 092 367

R 124 657 289

R 143 749 656

62

NALA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 535 804

R 161 435 136

R 168 970 940

63

NALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 43 394

R 657 186

R 613 792

64

NGWATHE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 21 323 553

R 644 036 624

R 665 360 177

65

NKETOANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 486 982

R 117 194 971

R 122 681 954

66

PHUMELELA MUNICIPALITY

R 2 283 258

R 63 839 355

R 66 122 614

67

SETSOTO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 640 268

R 4 124 735

R 4 765 003

68

SMITHFIELD MUNISIPALITEIT

R 0

R 0

R 0

69

TOKOLOGO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 201 103

R 25 714 014

R 27 915 118

70

TSWELOPELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 464 746

R 4 822 319

R 7 287 065

         
 

GAUTENG

R 2 137 493 037

R 511 355 496

R 2 648 848 533

71

CITY OF TSHWANE METROPOLITAN

R 572 018 050

R 39 104

R 572 057 154

72

CITY POWER JOHANNESBURG

R 607 949 213

R 2 629 472

R 610 578 685

73

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN COUNCIL

R 706 757 916

R 80

R 706 757 996

74

EMFULENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 111 479 492

R 112 993 570

R 224 473 062

75

GREATER JHB. TRANS. METROPOLITAN

R 0

R 0

R 0

76

JOHANNESBURG WATER

R 4 964 062

R 0

R 4 964 062

77

KUNGWINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 558 803

R 31

R 558 834

78

LESEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 15 240 263

R 19 156 736

R 34 396 999

79

MERAFONG CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 16 491 239

R 99 138 730

R 115 629 968

80

MIDRAND TOWN COUNCIL(LORD KHANYILE )

R 19 097

R 0

R 19 097

81

MIDVAAL LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 16 137 215

R 0

R 16 137 215

82

MOGALE CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 49 907 300

R 127 731 490

R 177 638 790

83

NOKENG TSA TAEMANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 261 376

R 205 805

R 1 467 181

84

RANDFONTEIN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 29 020 498

R 149 126 454

R 178 146 952

85

SEDIBENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (MPHATLATSANE THEATRE)

R 10 613

R 0

R 10 613

86

WESTONARIA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 677 901

R 334 023

R 6 011 924

 

KWAZULU NATAL

R 1 088 182 004

R 76 239 611

R 1 164 421 615

87

ABAQULUSI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 11 789 463

R 0

R 11 789 463

88

AMAJUBA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 151 206

R 143 413

R 294 619

89

DANNHAUSER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

90

DR NKOSAZANA DLAMINI ZUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 130 133

R 0

R 130 133

91

EDUMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 790 810

R 2 657 804

R 5 448 614

92

EMADLANGENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (incl Utrecht)

R 0

R 0

R 0

93

EMNAMBITHI/LADYSMITH MUNICIPALITY

R 15 480 303

R 18 066

R 15 498 369

94

ENDUMENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 6 118 608

R 0

R 6 118 608

95

ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN

R 681 001 972

R 281 331

R 681 283 303

96

EZINGOLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 27 658

R 0

R 27 658

97

GREATER KOKSTAD LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 1 633

R 0

-R 1 632

98

HARRY GWALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY (including Sisonke)

-R 1 509 507

R 58 207

-R 1 451 301

99

HIBISCUS COAST MUNICIPALITY

R 7 998 312

R 0

R 7 998 312

100

HLABISA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 29 416

R 53 880

R 83 295

101

ILEMBE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 229 830

R 0

R 229 830

102

IMBABAZANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 25

R 1 728

R 1 753

103

IMPENDLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

104

INDAKA MUNICIPALITY

R 227 488

R 693 600

R 921 088

105

INGWE MUNICIPALITY

R 133 801

R 13 646

R 147 447

106

INKOSI LANGALIBALELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 69 485

R 0

R 69 485

107

JOZINI MUNICIPALITY

R 75 934

R 23 024

R 98 958

108

KWA SANI MUNICIPALITY

R 20 417

R 0

R 20 417

109

KWADUKUZA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 47 334 135

R 0

R 47 334 135

110

MANDENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 817 219

R 817 219

111

MAPHUMULO MUNICIPALITY

R 60 042

R 57 739

R 117 782

112

MKHAMBATHINI MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

113

MPOFANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 28 302 858

R 3 415 843

R 31 718 701

114

MSINGA MUNICIPALITY

R 4 690

R 18 212

R 22 902

115

MSUNDUZI, MUNICIPALITY

R 113 654 122

R 671 547

R 114 325 668

116

MTHONJANENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

117

MTUBATUBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 11 077

R 0

R 11 077

118

NDWEDWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 60 442

R 0

R 60 442

119

NEWCASTLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 41 108 187

R 73 240

R 41 181 427

120

NKANDLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 112 027

R 0

R 1 112 027

121

NONGOMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

122

NQUTHU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

123

NTAMBANANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 37 737

R 2 374

R 40 110

124

OKHAHLAMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 17 644

R 0

R 17 644

125

RICHMOND TOWN BOARD

R 0

R 0

R 0

126

THE BIG 5 FALSE BAY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 18 364

R 18 789

R 37 152

127

UBUHLEBEZWE MUNICIPALITY

R 14 831

R 0

R 14 831

128

UGU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 126 127

R 20 807

R 146 934

129

ULUNDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 782 060

R 62 913 521

R 68 695 581

130

UMDONI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 10 478

R 0

-R 10 478

131

UMFOLOZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (including Mbonambi)

R 0

R 20 780

R 20 780

132

UMGUNGUNDLOVU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 5 794

R 22 058

R 27 852

133

UMHLABUYALINGANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

134

UMHLATHUZE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 100 514 211

R 317 485

R 100 831 696

135

UMKHANYAKUDE DISTRICT MUNIC

R 1 092 591

R 11 609

R 1 104 201

136

UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 668 467

R 0

R 3 668 467

137

UMNGENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

138

UMSHWATHI MUNICIPALITY

R 92 579

R 0

R 92 579

139

UMTSHEZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 12 975 267

R 79

R 12 975 346

140

UMUZIWABANTU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

141

UMVOTI MUNICIPALITY

R 3 403 663

R 0

R 3 403 663

142

UMZIMKULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 1 592

R 1 592

143

UMZINYATHI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 689 198

R 1

R 689 199

144

UMZUMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 173 902

R 0

R 173 902

145

UPHONGOLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 190

R 0

-R 190

146

UTHUKELA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 2 359 858

R 77 113

R 2 436 971

147

UTHUNGULU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 111 048

R 0

R 111 048

148

VULAMEHLO MUNICIPALITY

R 652

R 29 142

R 29 794

149

ZULULAND DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 697 376

R 3 805 763

R 4 503 139

 

LIMPOPO

R 139 775 547

R 488 707 883

R 628 483 430

150

AGANANG MUNICIPALITY

-R 89 363

R 0

-R 89 363

151

BA-PHALABORWA MUNICIPALITY

R 201 761

R 5 479 597

R 5 681 358

152

BELA-BELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 194

R 547 963

R 555 157

153

BLOUBERG MUNICIPALITY

R 2 289 577

R 0

R 2 289 577

154

CAPRICORN DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-R 712 005

R 77 968

-R 634 037

155

ELIAS MOTSOALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 514 299

R 0

R 5 514 299

156

EPHRAIM MOGALE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 622 735

R 0

R 2 622 735

157

FETAKGOMO,MUNICIPALITY

R 207 484

R 14 019

R 221 504

158

GREATER GIYANI, MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 739 091

R 0

R 739 091

159

GREATER LETABA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 082 187

R 0

R 1 082 187

160

GREATER TUBATSE MUNICIPALITY

R 14 108

R 0

R 14 108

161

GREATER TZANEEN MUNICIPALITY

R 23 920 478

R 3 388

R 23 923 867

162

LEPELLE NKUMPI MUNICIPALITY

R 5 501

R 0

R 5 501

163

LEPHALALE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 10 150 997

R 0

R 10 150 997

164

MAKHADO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 17 036 087

R 0

R 17 036 087

165

MAKHUDUTHAMAGA,MUNICIPALITY

R 16 925

R 0

R 16 925

166

MARULENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 19 818

R 0

R 19 818

167

MODIMOLLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 9 159 252

R 78 899 132

R 88 058 385

168

MOGALAKWENA MUNICIPALITY

R 20 522

R 0

R 20 522

169

MOLEMOLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 1 752

R 1 752

170

MOOKGOPHONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 710 201

R 91 434 936

R 96 145 136

171

MUSINA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 321 848

R 116 222 108

R 117 543 956

172

MUTALE MUNICIPALITY

R 52 335

R 178 556

R 230 892

173

POLOKWANE MUNICIPALITY

R 50 166 213

R 30 254

R 50 196 467

174

SEKHUKHUNE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 1 388 716

R 0

R 1 388 716

175

THABAZIMBI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 570 210

R 195 818 209

R 203 388 418

176

THULAMELA MUNICIPALITY

R 244 327

R 0

R 244 327

177

VHEMBE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 2 115 048

R 0

R 2 115 048

 

MPUMALANGA

R 270 424 003

R 2 251 461 991

R 2 521 885 995

178

ALBERT LUTHULI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 889 475

R 19 209 558

R 23 099 033

179

BUSHBUCKRIDGE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 666 967

R 1 715 855

R 3 382 822

180

DIPALESENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 218 608

R 12 468 889

R 16 687 498

181

DR J S MOROKA MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

182

EMAKHAZENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 987 872

R 38 241 350

R 42 229 222

183

EMALAHLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 69 287 973

R 937 910 681

R 1 007 198 654

184

GOVAN MBEKI MUNICIPALITY

R 39 867 473

R 352 173 797

R 392 041 271

185

LEKWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 56 529

R 277 421 021

R 277 364 492

186

MBOMBELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 53 124 382

R 30 822 100

R 83 946 482

187

MKHONDO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 8 601 619

R 44 000 000

R 52 601 619

188

MSUKALIGWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 14 829 829

R 139 460 616

R 154 290 444

189

NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 12 086

R 24 484

R 36 570

190

NKOMAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 10 012 146

R 5 868 216

R 15 880 362

191

PIXLEY KA SEME LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 478 082

R 0

R 3 478 082

192

STEVE TSHWETE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 30 537 762

R 0

R 30 537 762

193

THABA CHWEU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 11 817 199

R 364 846 202

R 376 663 401

194

THEMBISILE HANI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 394 614

R 0

R 394 614

195

UMJINDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 6 947 741

R 13 654 792

R 20 602 532

196

VICTOR KHANYE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (including Delmas)

R 7 806 705

R 13 644 430

R 21 451 135

 

NORTH WEST

R 266 149 058

R 852 774 654

R 1 118 923 712

197

BOPHIRIMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY FBE

R 0

R 0

R 0

198

CITY OF MATLOSANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 43 654 851

R 137 268 033

R 180 922 884

199

DITSOBOTLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (including Lichtenburg)

R 777 750

R 196 669 743

R 197 447 492

200

GREATER TAUNG MUNICIPALITY

R 768 979

R 0

R 768 979

201

KAGISANO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 16 480

R 0

R 16 480

202

KGETLENGRIVIER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 978 230

R 50 784 331

R 53 762 561

203

LEKWA - TEEMANE

R 6 577 963

R 43 408 806

R 49 986 768

204

MADIBENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 879 819

R 18 481 086

R 19 360 905

205

MAFIKENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 1 294 648

R 2 290 462

R 995 813

206

MAMUSA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 961 252

R 52 650 051

R 55 611 303

207

MAQUASSI HILLS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 928 940

R 3 230 359

R 7 159 299

208

MORETELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 592 597

R 0

R 592 597

209

MOSES KOTANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 152 544

R 18 908

R 171 453

210

NALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 9 557 009

R 217 041 441

R 226 598 451

211

NGAKA, MODIRI MOLEMA DISTRICT MUNIC

R 19 024

R 556 645

R 575 669

212

RAMOTSHERE MOILOA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY (including Zeerust Waterworks)

R 4 004 955

R 21 682 561

R 25 687 516

213

RATLOU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 64 916

R 168 488

R 233 404

214

RUSTENBURG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 154 574 064

R 190 339

R 154 764 403

215

TLOKWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 29 971 376

R 0

R 29 971 376

216

TSWAING LOCAL MUNICIPALTY

R 2 839 627

R 69 148 279

R 71 987 906

217

VENTERSDORP LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 123 330

R 39 185 122

R 42 308 452

         

 

NORTHERN CAPE

R 113 521 741

R 600 620 284

R 714 142 025

218

CARNARVON MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

219

DIKGATLONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 2 894 660

R 43 873 154

R 46 767 814

220

EMTHANJENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 516 328

R 12 502 182

R 17 018 510

221

FRASERBURG MUNICIPALITY

R 326 125

R 0

R 326 125

222

GAMAGARA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 8 243 296

R 26 597 555

R 34 840 851

223

GA-SEGONYANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 6 366 353

R 21 401 214

R 27 767 567

224

HANTAM LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 549 022

R 0

R 1 549 022

225

HARTSWATER MUNICIPALITY

R 2 882 493

R 14 647 921

R 17 530 413

226

JOE MOROLONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 168 281

R 0

R 168 281

227

KAI !GARIB LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 6 708 242

R 92 210 020

R 98 918 262

228

KAMIESBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 791 435

R 5 980 026

R 6 771 462

229

KAREEBERG MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

230

KAROO HOOGLAND MUNICIPALITY (including Williston)

R 393 736

R 0

R 393 736

231

KGATELOPELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 423 748

R 9 424 679

R 10 848 427

232

KHAI-MA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 780 023

R 6 463 800

R 7 243 823

233

KHARA HAIS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 16 070 008

R 150

R 16 070 157

234

KHEIS MUNICIPALITY

R 100 954

R 0

R 100 954

235

MAGARENG MUNICIPALITY

R 1 845 476

R 26 673 860

R 28 519 336

236

MIER MUNICPALITY

R 33 456

R 0

R 33 456

237

NAMA KHOI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 383 744

R 75 215 982

R 80 599 726

238

PHOKWANE MUNICIPALITY

R 2 359 503

R 5 360 770

R 7 720 274

239

RENOSTERBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-R 1 923

R 41 207 623

R 41 205 700

240

RICHTERSVELD LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 189 314

R 0

R 1 189 314

241

SIYANCUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 913 335

R 72 294 065

R 76 207 399

242

SIYATHEMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 743 065

R 16 958 881

R 18 701 947

243

SOL PLAATJE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 35 056 683

R 0

R 35 056 683

244

THEMBELIHLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 679 409

R 39 746 499

R 41 425 908

245

TSANTSABANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 336 624

R 58 886 223

R 62 222 847

246

UBUNTU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 848 030

R 31 175 681

R 33 023 711

247

UMSOBOMVU MUNICIPALITY

R 1 920 323

R 0

R 1 920 323

248

VOSBURG MUNISIPALITEIT

R 0

R 0

R 0

 

WESTERN CAPE

R 932 188 111

R 34 427 908

R 966 616 018

249

BEAUFORT WEST MUNIC

R 4 106 933

R 26 414

R 4 133 347

250

BERGRIVIER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 5 744 869

R 0

R 5 744 869

251

FBITOU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 7 916 536

R 27 153

R 7 943 689

252

BREEDE VALLEY MUNICIPALITY

R 22 024 801

R 0

R 22 024 801

253

CAPE AGULHAS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 39 902

R 0

R 39 902

254

CEDERBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 703 172

R 1 144 365

R 5 847 537

255

CITY OF CAPE TOWN METROPOLITAN

R 618 775 644

R 299 661

R 619 075 305

256

DE RUST MUNICIPALITY

R 0

R 0

R 0

257

DRAKENSTEIN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 53 856 762

R 0

R 53 856 762

258

EDEN DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

R 61 119

R 0

R 61 120

259

GEORGE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 32 312 271

R 0

R 32 312 271

260

HESSEQUA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 1 683 437

R 0

R 1 683 437

261

KANNALAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 67 011

R 11 232 467

R 11 299 478

262

KNYSNA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 12 854 929

R 0

R 12 854 929

263

LAINGSBURG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 14 937

R 0

R 14 937

264

LANGEBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 27 733 287

R 0

R 27 733 287

265

MATZIKAMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 6 456 048

R 0

R 6 456 048

266

MOSSEL BAY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 22 651 188

R 0

R 22 651 188

267

MURRAYSBURG MUNICIPLITY

R 274

R 379 800

R 380 074

268

OUDTSHOORN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 11 295 727

R 21 268 548

R 32 564 275

269

OVERSTRAND LOCAL MUNCIPALITY

R 18 586 878

R 0

R 18 586 878

270

PRINS ALBERT LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 555 782

R 0

R 555 782

271

SALDANHABAAI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 17 470 258

R 0

R 17 470 258

272

STELLENBOSCH MUNICIPALITY

R 26 467 480

R 49 172

R 26 516 652

273

SWARTLAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 13 759 917

R 0

R 13 759 917

274

SWELLENDAM LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 3 592 536

R 0

R 3 592 536

275

THEEWATERSKLOOF LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 4 302 823

R 0

R 4 302 823

276

WESKUS DISTRIK MUNISIPALITEIT

R 19 466

R 0

R 19 466

277

WITZENBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

R 15 134 123

R 328

R 15 134 451

 

TOTAL

R 5 697 950 106

R 9 526 847 160

R 15 224 797 266

02 May 2017 - NW90

Profile picture: James, Ms LV

James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the proposed ward-based War Rooms, which the MEC for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the Eastern Cape has instructed that they must establish in every ward of every municipality, have any basis in legislation; if so, what are the relevant details: (2) is the function of such War Rooms a duplication of the existing ward committee structures; if not, what is their purpose; if so, why are they being established; (3) has the establishment of such War Rooms had a financial implication for the municipalities in terms of (a) support, (b) administration and (c) resources; if not, how are the municipalities expected to operate without resources; if so, (i) on what basis is this unfunded mandate issued and (ii) where are municipalities expected to obtain such resources from?

Reply:

Service Delivery War Room is a province-wide, integrated, comprehensive and sustainable service delivery model that seeks to radically restructure the interface between government and the people to better respond to the needs of the people. The collaborative War Room Machinery aims to improve government’s service delivery capacity and build an activist public service that is responsive to the needs of the people.

1. The establishment of ward-based War Rooms is intended to give effect to Chapter 3, section 41(1)(c) and (h) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa,1996, that provides for the principles of co-operative government and Inter-governmental relations in the three spheres of government.

The War Rooms’ model is also meant to give effect to section 16 and 17, Chapter 4 of the Municipal Systems Act Chapter 4 of the Municipal Systems Act that all for municipalities to have a mechanism for public participation, War Rooms become that mechanism for involving the public in planning, implementation and monitoring of service delivery as the public gets to participate trough their structures in War Rooms.

2. War Rooms are not a duplication of ward committees. War Room serves as an inclusive support structure that is aimed at promoting public participation in the affairs of the municipal council in a ward in a structured and coordinated manner.

3. The War Room is premised on the utilization of existing municipal resources. War Rooms are conducted in community halls or public institutions. Development Workers do not receive additional remuneration.

(a) in terms of support, Cogta and the Office of the Premier utilize their resources to support municipalities to conduct workshops and training;

(b) on administration, Community Development Workers provide administrative support and their remuneration is provided for by Cogta; and

(c) there are no additional resources that are expected from municipalities in operating the War Rooms.

  (i) War Rooms are regarded as Integrated Services Delivery Models meant to bring together fragmented service delivery to communities and are therefore not viewed as unfunded mandate; and

  (ii) Municipalities are using the existing resources and are supported by Cogta and the Office of the Premier.

 

 

24 April 2017 - NW338

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Why is Emfuleni Local Municipality paying members of Bursary and Investment committees R2 000 per meeting for traveling allowance while members of the ward committee are paid R300, even though they all come from Emfuleni?

Reply:

According to the Emfuleni Local Municipality, the amounts in question pertain to a sitting allowance and not a travel allowance. The difference in the sitting allowance of R2000 for the Mayoral Investment Council and Bursary Committee and that of the stipend of ward committee member of R300 is based on the following:

  • The two committees play different roles and functions. The Investment and Bursary committee, consists of members from business, industry, education, and academia amongst others.
  • The stipend for ward committee members is determined using the National Framework: Criteria for Determining out of Pocket Expenses for Ward Committee Members, issued by the Department for all municipalities in 2009.