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09 October 2023 - NW2892

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the (a) addresses and contact details of each SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) (i) district and (ii) local office in the Eastern Cape and (b) names and contact details of each SASSA district director in the Eastern Cape;(2)(a) what is the total number of (i) staff employed and (ii) vacancies at each district and local office and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled; (3)what is the total number of the SASSA recipients of each grant in each district and local municipality; (4) what (a) methods are utilised by grant recipients to withdraw their grant payments in each district and (b) total number of recipients withdraw their funds via each specified method in each district and local municipality?

Reply:

1. (a) i and ii and (b) See Annexure 1

2. (a) i and ii and (b) See Annexure 2 (limited by the POPI Act we have as such provided office contact details of the various positions in the different offices)

3. (a) i and ii See Annexure 3

(b) There is progress currently in filling of vacancies across all regions in adherence with HR processes. Positions are advertised and filled as determined by the Critical Post Committee (CPC) within the limited available budget.

4. (a) and (b) refer to the table below:

EC Region payment trends

   

 

202309

 

Methods of payment

Sum of Number Of Beneficiaries

Sum Amount

ABSA BANK

86,153

R153,674,039.00

ACCESS BANK (SOUTH AFRICA

3,461

R7,262,323.00

AFRICAN BANK

13,285

R23,285,919.00

BIDVEST BANK

5,897

R9,656,835.00

CAPITEC BANK

373,155

R561,245,938.00

DISCOVERY BANK

22

R38,179.00

FINBOND MUTUAL

5,646

R11,303,171.00

FINBOND NET1

208

R360,921.00

FIRSTRAND BANK

141,267

R261,672,748.00

GRINDROD BANK

186,623

R303,855,833.00

INVESTEC BANK LTD

4

R7,980.00

ITHALA

57

R113,380.00

NEDBANK LIMITED

94,238

R165,479,761.00

POSTBANK

730,238

R1,088,461,320.00

IGPS

726,294

R1,081,926,187.00

MZANSI

3,944

R6,535,133.00

STANDARD SA

90,869

R164,139,097.00

TYMEBANK

8,751

R12,429,224.00

Grand Total

1,739,874

R2,762,986,668.00

09 October 2023 - NW2821

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the relevant details of her department’s plans to ensure the improvement and/or demolition of the plain pit and bucket latrines identified by programmes such as (a) the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative, (b) the Sanitation Appropriate For Education initiative and (c) any other sanitation programmes?

Reply:

What are the relevant details of her department’s plans to ensure the improvement and/or demolition of the plain pit and bucket latrines identified by programmes such as (a) the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative, (b) the Sanitation Appropriate For Education initiative and (c) any other sanitation programmes?

What are the relevant details of her department’s plans to ensure the improvement and/or demolition of the plain pit and bucket latrines identified by programmes such as

(a) The Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative,

  1. In 2011, the Department of Basic Education launched the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI-2011).  This programme focused on the following:
    • Providing appropriate building for schools made entirely of inappropriate materials.
    • Providing appropriate water supply to schools with no water.
    • Providing appropriate sanitation at schools with no toilets.
    • Providing appropriate electricity supply to schools with no electricity supply.
  2. In 2011, there were initially 510 schools on the ASIDI programme made entirely of inappropriate materials. This number decreased to 332.
    1. Of the 332 schools made entirely of inappropriate materials, 330 have been replaced.
    2. The remaining 2 replacement schools are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.
  3. In 2011, there were initially 1 117 schools on the ASIDI programme with no water supply. This number increased to 1 306.
    1. Of the 1 306 water supply projects, 1 292 have been completed.
    2. The remaining 14 water supply projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.
  4. In 2011, there were initially 701 schools on the ASIDI programme with no toilets. This number increased to 1 087.
    1. All of the 1087 sanitation projects have been replaced.
  5. In 2011, there were initially 902 schools on the ASIDI programme with no electricity. This number decreased to 373.
    1. All of the 373 electricity supply projects have been completed.

(b) The Sanitation Appropriate For Education initiative

  1. In 2018, the Department of Basic Education launched the Sanitation Appropriate For Education (SAFE-2018) initiative.  This programme focused on providing appropriate sanitation at schools dependent on basic pit toilets.
  2. There were initially 3 898 schools on the SAFE programme. This number reduced to 3 382, as some of the schools were either provided with approrpiate sanitation facilities, or the schools were due for rationalisation as they were found not to be viable.
  3. Of the 3 382 sanitation projects, 2 911 have been completed through SAFE.
  4. The remaining 471 sanitation projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.

(c) any other sanitation programmes?

Through Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) Provincial Education Departments have ongoing programmes on Provision / Replacement of Sanitation.

09 October 2023 - NW2582

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Bilankulu, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Social Development

What measures and mechanisms are in place to curb the practice of parents who do not use child support grants for the children’s needs which contributes to the proliferation of child stunting?

Reply:

The Child Support Grant was introduced specifically to ensure the best interest of the child at all times and to address child poverty, including malnutrition and stunting. The person who receives the CSG must be the primary caregiver of the child.

We encourage members of the public to report cases of the abuse of the CSG SASSA and social workers who will investigate and based on the findings, the grant may then be transferred to a new primary caregiver.

The Department has developed draft policies on integration of children’s grants with other services and maternal support. The two draft policies emphasise the need of building linkages between children’s grants and other developmental services for children amongst others education, health and early childhood development. We are currently preparing to initiate Cabinet approval processes for the policy, which will be followed by amendment of relevant legislation to enable the Department to share data with the Department of Health and Basic Education, amongst others. In this manner, the Department will be empowered to monitor and track health indicators including the prevention of stunting.

09 October 2023 - NW2797

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Dyantyi, Mr QR to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation: [487]

(a) What are the details of the plans that have been put in place to strengthen and/or improve the overall work of her Office and (b) how does she intend to repurpose and realign her Office to focus more on planning for development?

Reply:

  1.  REPLY(a)

  2. The overall work of the office is strengthened by putting the National Development Plan (NDP) at the centre of the work and programmes being implemented. The National Planning Commission (NPC) is critical in this process through the periodic reviews of different sectors and production of diagnostic reports identifying challenges and opportunities in order to register progress.
  3. Furthermore, the Minister has signed a Performance Agreement with the President outlining the priority areas which she will be reporting to the President on. This serves as a strategic guideline in the work of the Ministry.
  4. The work of the Ministry is strengthened by the coordination between the Office of the Minister, the Deputy Minister, the department through the Office of the Director-General, the NPC through the Office of the Secretary of the NPC. This ensures that all the components under the leadership of the Minister are in sync and complement each other in the execution of the mandate of the Minister and the Department at large. Regular meetings are held to monitor work such as strategic stakeholder engagements and other priority areas.
  5. The Minister has appointed a competent team of core support staff, in line with the Ministerial handbook, to support her in the execution of her duties. In this regard the Minister has appointed two Special Advisors in line with the Section 12 of the Public Service Act:-

a) to advise the executive authority on the exercise or performance of the executive authority's powers and duties;

b) to advise the executive authority on the development of policy that will promote the relevant department's objectives; and

c) to perform such other tasks as may be appropriate in respect of the exercise or performance of the executive authority's powers and duties.

 

 

REPLY (b)

  1. planning for development means we must pursue or implement an integrated, multi-sectoral process through which governmental institutions streamline social, economic and spatial growth and development.
  2. The NDP defines the desired development outcomes to be achieved by 2030 and it also provides a strategic framework within which more detailed planning and budgeting takes place.
  3. The Minister is advocating active citizenry for the private sector and civil society to play an active role in to promote and accelerate the implementation of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the African Union Agenda 2063, and the NDP.
  4. The framework to repurpose the department is being developed. Among others it will seek to initiate coordination of development agencies within a “hub” for coherence and clear articulation of the role and contribution of different sectors and stakeholders in achieving the outcomes envisaged in the NDP.
  5. The Integrated Planning Framework Bill is being finalised and will be presented to Cabinet. The Bill when finalised and passed into legislation is intended to help government focus more on planning for development:
  6. We are also conducting benchmarking with our counterparts on the continent and elsewhere in order to share experiences and ideas on how to optimise the department for development planning.

 

 

THANK YOU

 

09 October 2023 - NW2539

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether she intends to implement socio-economic projects in Mitchells Plain and the 50 villages mobilised by the Parliamentary Constituency Office to benefit from the job-creation initiatives of her department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she implemented any socio-economic projects for job-creation initiatives in the Women’s Month of August, to empower women and take them out of poverty; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As the Honourable Member is aware, the Department has facilitated a number of meetings between the identified communities, including Mitchells Plain and potential funders such as the World Food Programme and the Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TİKA), with the view to support socio-economic projects targeting women, youth and persons with disabilities.

These projects identified for potential funding by development agencies that we work closely with include the peanut butter manufacturing cooperative in KwaZulu-Natal and the group of women interested in textile at Mitchells Plain. The partner organisations have taken keen interest in these projects as they have a huge potential to create sustainable job opportunities and to economically empower both women and youth.

2. Yes, during the Women’s Month I partnered with the National House of Traditional and Kho-San Leaders (NHTKL) focusing on youth and women empowerment programmes at Magadimana Ntweng Traditional Authority in Limpopo Province. We are looking at implementing a number of youth and women empowerment projects in the area.

09 October 2023 - NW2798

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Phiri, Ms CM to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Considering her role and/or mandate as Chairperson of the National Planning Commission, what has she found to have been the impact of the Commission towards the implementation of the National Development Plan?

Reply:

The current National Planning Commission (NPC) of which I am chair is the third Commission. As members know the first Commission drafted the NDP. The second commission started the process of institutionalising planning in government and undertook research into long-term trends, analysing implementation of short- to medium-term plans and recommended improvements to Government to inform policy and planning. This included a review of the NDP.

The current NPC’s mandate is, inter alia, to:

  • Mobilise society to promote the acceleration in implementing the National Development Plan towards 2030, recognising the changes that have ensued since its initial adoption.
  • Assist in forging a conversation among key stakeholders, leading to effective and impactful interventions on several key issues facing the country.
  • Undertake research and build a body of evidence on critical matters for the long-term planning and development of South Africa. Strengthen the use of evidence and the quality of empirical data, generated from impact assessments for national planning.

In the short time that I have been the Minister responsible for the Department of Planning, Monitoring, and Evaluation and Chair of NPC, I have had the opportunity to engage with the NPC, who displayed a passionate loyalty to seeing South Africa and all its people succeed.

They have done this by identifying objectives that will make a difference not only in terms of long-term planning by ensuring the implementation of the National Development Plan, but that can be implemented in the short-term. The work being undertaken relate to areas that cover social protection, which covers education, health, and social assistance, among others, growing the economy in an equitable and inclusive manner, and addressing governance broadly through developing state capacity.

In this regard, and through establishing partnerships, the NPC has welcomed the adoption of the National Framework Towards the Professionalisation of the Public Sector by Cabinet in October 2022; provided practical advice that has since been adopted by government with respect to alleviating the energy crisis; and has played an active role in guiding the implementation of the District Development Model.

The NPC will soon launch its Ten-Year Review of the NDP. This review interrogates the factors that affected the implementation of the NDP since its adoption, including consideration of domestic and international crises such as the Covid-19 pandemic, the civil unrest in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal in July 2021, and the Ukraine-Russia war. In particular, the review assesses the progress made with the key NDP targets of eliminating poverty and reducing inequality and unemployment. The analysis evaluates the extent to which planning has been institutionalised and the reform of the country’s planning system across all spheres of government following the adoption of the NDP.

Given the body of work I can only conclude by indicating that the Commission is having a positive impact in ensuring the implementation of the NDP

THANK YOU

 

09 October 2023 - NW2651

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the temporary disability grant backlog in the Western Cape and the fact that there are only 11 assessment doctors in the province, what (a) measures has her department taken to address the shortage of assessment doctors and (b) total number of assessment doctors have been successfully recruited to date?

Reply:

a) It is important to put the backlog into context. The current medical assessment backlog in the Western Cape comprises of persons who wish to apply for a disability-related grant for the first time, applications that have been previously rejected and or persons who were granted temporary Disability Grant (TDG).

To address the shortage of assessment doctors, SASSA WC has since inception, entered into Service Level Agreements (SLA’s) with all districts of the Provincial Department of Health for the provision of medical assessment services. The implementation of the SLA Provincial is hampered by the shortage of doctors and other health practitioners who can perform proper medical assessments.

b) In July this year, SASSA embarked on a procurement process for Independent Health Practitioners. An advert for a three (3) year tender was issued with a closing date of 14th July 2023. SASSA WC is in the process of issuing award letters to fourteen (14) successful bidders. The appointed doctors will be provided with schedules to speed up medical assessments, with specific focus on areas where the need for medical assessments remain high.

09 October 2023 - NW2796

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Pillay, Mr KB to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What (a) measures are being undertaken to assess the impact of the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework and (b) progress can be highlighted as it is the last financial year of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework?

Reply:

(a) What measures are being undertaken to assess the impact of the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework

Various interventions to assess the impact of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF)

  1. Annual Performance Plans (APPs) analysis to ensure that they are aligned with the MTSF
  2. Biannual reports that are submitted to the clusters and Cabinet with clear recommendations
  3. Recommendations are considered in the Budget Prioritisation Framework
  4. Frontline monitoring undertaken to validate implementation
  5. Secondary data from Stats South Africa (Stats SA) and Government Communications and Information System (GCIS) and other state and non-state actors considered especially in relation to the views of South Africans
  6. The National Planning Commission (NPC) also engages with the stakeholders.
  7. There is a need to improve on this depending on the availability of resources.

(b) What progress can be highlighted as it is the last financial year of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework.

  1. Management of Covid-19 including relief measures for vulnerable groups including business
  2. Cabinet decisions on the professionalization of the public service and implementation ongoing
  3. Stable performance management system of HODs/DGs even though it needs continuous evaluation and improvement.
  4. Establishment of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council and ongoing efforts to implement the recommendations of the Zondo Commission and the SIU.
  5. Ministers performance agreements signed and assessments ongoing
  6. Ongoing interventions to improve the performance of the electricity and logistics sectors led by the President and involving the private sector
  7. Infrastructure South Africa (ISA) established and has commenced functioning to support municipalities to improve planning and implementation. Amongst others this focuses on rural roads and bridges.
  8. Successful hosting of the 2023 BRICS Summit
  9. Implementation of SA Connect to connect government buildings and communities ongoing. This follows the successful licensing of the radio frequency spectrum in 2022.
  10. Presidential Employment Stimulus, since its launch in 2020, the Presidential Employment Stimulus initiative has achieved 86.7% of its target, with a total of 1.085 million opportunities created.
  11. SMME support, as at 31 March 2023, a total of 809 products produced and services rendered by SMMEs and Co-operatives have been linked to domestic private sector markets. Furthermore, the Small Enterprise Manufacturing Support Programme, which aims to build the industrial base for both the domestic and external markets, has disbursed R548 million to 74 SMMEs.

A total of 136 184 competitive small businesses and Co-operatives were supported through the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA) using their non-financial and financial instruments, exceeding the MTSF target to support 100 000 competitive small businesses and Co-operatives by 2024.

12. Black Industrialists support programme

13. Land given to entrepreneurs [ 700 000 hectors]

14. Natural Spatial Development Framework finalized. DPME and others aligning the NSDF with the District Development Model [DDM]

15. NHI Bill approved by the Portfolio Committee on Health. Second reading of the Bill in the National Assembly (NA) occurred in June 2023 and the Bill was approved by the NA.

16. Education -NSFAS has grown (numbers)

-Support for TVET and community colleges

-General access has grown

17. GBVF remains a priority of this government

18. Resources allocated to improve the performance of the South African Police Services [SAPS]

However, through our monitoring and evaluation we have identified some limitations on the capacity of the state to deliver services and achieve developmental outcomes. These include:

a) State of Local government i.e. 163 municipalities distressed and 66 municipalities dysfunctional

b) Challenges related to the intersphere coordination (Report to the Presidential Coordination committee which includes Cabinet, Premiers and the Executive Mayors of the Metros and SALGA

 

THANK YOU

09 October 2023 - NW2784

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Whether, with reference to the identification of a number of challenges related to the payment of social grants and other forms of social assistance by the Government, her Office has put measures in place to monitor and/or ensure that the relevant government departments (a) address the issues it had identified relating to security issues around the SA Social Security Agency cards and Post Office accounts and (b) find alternative mechanisms for making safe payments; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) Whether her office has addressed the issues it had identified relating to security issues around the SA Social Security Agency cards and Post Office accounts?

Yes, the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation conducted an extensive frontline monitoring at the paypoints and produced a report that has been shared with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies.

DPME made extensive recommendations to improve the payment mechanism. Engagements on this report is ongoing and will be considered in the review of the MTSF in preparations for the 7th administration. In the meantime, DPME continues to monitor the immediate interventions being introduced by the Department of Social Development and Department of Communications and Digital through their entities, SASSA and the Postbank.

B. Whether her office has found alternative mechanisms for making safe payments; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Yes, this is ongoing as the recommendations of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation are being discussed internally within government.

 

THANK YOU

09 October 2023 - NW3010

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What total amount did the Industrial Development Corporation invest in each specified copper smelting company through debt and equity in the past three financial years; (2) whether his department has provided any tax or other incentives to copper smelters in the past three financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total amount and (b) to who in each specified financial year? NW4075E

Reply:

The Industrial Development Corporation has not invested in copper smelting activities in the past three financials years being, FY2022/23, FY2021/22 and FY2020/21.

The Department does not have a dedicated funding facility for smelters in its budget, approved by Parliament, and no disbursements were made in the financial years concerned to copper smelters.

Tax incentives are announced by the Minister of Finance.

-END-

09 October 2023 - NW2717

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Alexander, Ms W to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to sign a proclamation that extends the scope of the investigation of the Special Investigating Unit into alleged corruption in the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) to include investigation of procurement by the NLC; if not, why not; if so; on what date does he intend to sign a proclamation in this regard?

Reply:

I am advised that allegations relating to procurement irregularities and maladministration at the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) are currently undergoing the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) internal assessment processes.

Once the internal assessment processes are complete, the SIU will decide whether to submit a motivation to amend the scope of the proclamation.

09 October 2023 - NW2547

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) are the details of the resources her department has allocated to implement Pillar 4: Response, Care, Support and Healing of the National Plan of Action Against Gender-based Violence since 2021 and (b) has she found to date has been achieved through the implementation of Pillar 4 in the fight against gender-based violence?

Reply:

a) The National and Provincial Departments allocate funds to NGOs that render prevention and support services to survivors of violence and crime, including gender-based violence as guided by Pillar 4 of the National Strategic Plan on GBVF. These are inclusive of those rendering immediate response services, shelter ss well as psycho-social support services.

In addition, the department has formed strategic partnerships with a number of funders such as the Global Fund, NEDLAC, Solidarity Fund, European Union, SANAC and the HWSETA. These partners availed resources for the recruitment, training and appointment of the different cadres such as volunteers, social workers and coordinators to provide and increase provision of psycho-social support services across the country. Refer to the table below for the budget allocation for implementation of Pillar 4: Response, Care, Support and Healing:

ITEMS

AMOUNT APPROX.

Criminal and Asset Recovery Account (CARA)

R 100 MIL

Global Fund/NACOSA

R 19.6 Mil

VEP Good and Services

R 16 Mil

GBVF Ambassadors HWSETA

R 4,3 Mil

Transfer Payments to National NGOs

R 4.2 Mil

Overall

R 144,1 Mil

b) There are many successes, including:

  • Intersectoral Shelter Policy and Policy on Provision of Psycho-Social Support Services). Both policies are meant to standardise and strengthening services offered to victims of Gender Based Violence and Femicide. All nine provinces were reached through capacity building on both policies targeting different stakeholders including those from the JCPS Cluster.
  • In partnership with the HWSETA, DSD secured a budget of 4.3 mil for the appointment and capacity building of GBVF ambassadors deployed in the thirty (30) National GBVF hotspots found in six (6) provinces which are (Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape, Western Cape, Free State, and North West)
  • Ensured increased capacity in response, care, support and healing services through the facilitation of the establishment of shelters for abused women as part of response and prevention interventions that address socio-economic needs of women within shelters in the Free State (QwaQwa, Sasolburg and Koffiefontein).
  • A partnership has been established between the Department of Social Development (DSD) and the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to identify public facilities that are re-purposed for use as shelters for GBV survivors. To date, a total of 95 public facilities have been earmarked for this purpose.
  • Provided funding to 332 NGOs rendering psychosocial support services through transfer payments and CARA funding.
  • Successfully appointed permanently over 200 Social Workers across all nine provinces to deal specifically with GBV cases. Through the Global Fund, the Department was able to deploy on contract 65 Social Workers dealing with GBV cases in the 30 National GBVF hotspots. The Department has also capacitated frontline workers including those from the NGOs in all nine provinces on GBV-related matters.

06 October 2023 - NW3131

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Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Finance

In light of the latest account provided by the Special Investigating Unit on the malfeasance by the National Treasury in the implementation of the infamous Integrated Financial Management System project, what consequence management steps will he take against officials responsible for the litany of missteps which resulted in hundreds of millions of Rands in irregular and fruitless expenditure?

Reply:

The National Treasury noted the presentation made by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) to the Standing Committee on Public Accountants on Wednesday, 13 September 2023. The National Treasury will comprehensively respond to the matters raised in the referrals by the SIU to the National Treasury, after receipt of the SIU’s final report, including its entire set of supporting documents and annexures. The National Treasury will also fully co-operate with all law enforcement agencies.

06 October 2023 - NW2766

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he will disclose the beneficial owner registries and audited financial statements of mining companies and their subsidiaries publicly; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3161E

Reply:

I published Regulations in May 2023 under the Companies Act, as amended in 2022, to prescribe how companies will submit information to disclose; or make known companies shareholders; or those who hold beneficial interest in securities in companies.

Companies will be required to file the register of the disclosure of beneficial interest in their companies with the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) when submitting their annual returns. The companies required to disclose the beneficial ownership information include mining companies or their subsidiaries. The information as currently provided for in the legislation and regulations, is for law enforcement agencies.

The new Companies Amendment Bill, 2023 addresses the matter of broader disclosure of information on shareholding. I believe it is in the public interest that beneficial ownership should be available more widely. The Bill is currently before Parliament and I await its consideration by Parliament

-END-

06 October 2023 - NW3075

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What (a) number of megawatts are being transmitted to the Republic from the Cahora Bassa power transmission system, (b) are the details of the extent of financing undertaken by the Republic to build and maintain the specified system since it was put back into operation in 1997 and (c) are the long-term plans for the system in terms of (i) life-span of the existing infrastructure, (ii) expansion of the system and (iii) on-going usage?

Reply:

(a)Eskom is contracted for 1 150 MW until 31 March 2030.

(b)The extent of infrastructure investment/financing undertaken by Eskom to build/sustain Apollo high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) is provided in Table 1 below for a period of 13 years. Ten of the listed projects have been completed (over R241 million), and eight of the projects are in the execution phase (over R951 million), with the remainder in the development phase (R321 million). The infrastructure includes HVDC key components such as transmission lines, converter transformers, and shunt capacitors, which amounts to a total of R1.5 billion. Obtaining information prior to the year 2010 will require more time, as this information has been archived.

Table 1: Details of infrastructure investment (from 2010)

PROJECT NAME

PLANT TYPE

INITIATIVE PHASE

TOTAL (rand)

Apollo Shunt Capacitor Bank Refurbishment

CAP BANKS

COMPLETED

18 693 718

Apollo CS Breaker 11 kV Replacement

BREAKERS

EXECUTION

31 116 104

Apollo CS Pietersburg Security Fence and Road

SECURITY

COMPLETED

12 342 665

Apollo Bridge 5 Converter Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

11 554 690

Apollo Upgrade DC Harmonic Filters

CAP BANKS

EXECUTION

11 800 000

Apollo CS Line Voltage Divider Replacement

LINE DIVIDERS

EXECUTION

62 143 000

Apollo CS Problematic Bypass Breakers

BREAKERS

EXECUTION

219 225 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 1: Tower 322

TOWER

COMPLETED

4 266 123

Apollo Songo PLC refurbishment

PLC

EXECUTION

14 200 000

Apollo Storage Plinths DC Side

NON-PLANT

CONCEPT

11 600 000

Apollo CS: HVDC Refurbishment Phase 2: Bridge 4 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

EXECUTION

296 156 754

Apollo CS: HVDC Refurbishment Phase 2: Bridge 2 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

EXECUTION

296 156 754

Apollo – Cahora Bassa No. 1 and 2 Quad Spacers

LINES

CONCEPT

130 000 000

Apollo CS: Deluge System Water Storage Tank

NON-PLANT

CONCEPT

17 769 000

Apollo – Cahora Bassa Lines Bird Guards

BIRD GUARDS

CONCEPT

5 400 000

NSP1 Security Build 2 – Apollo (NKP) ERA

SECURITY

EXECUTION

20 450 000

Apollo CS: Replacement of Pole 1 533 kV Reactor

REACTORS

CONCEPT

155 500 000

Apollo HVDC Lines Reinsulation Project

REINSULATION

COMPLETED

44 602 502

Apollo CS: CCTV Installations

SECURITY

COMPLETED

3 834 421

Replacement Bushings for Converter Transformers – Apollo CS

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

17 193 111

Apollo CS Install Spare Transformer in Bridge 6

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

10 000 000

Apollo CS Install Spare Transformer in Bridge 8

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

10 000 000

Apollo 2 x Converter Transformers + Reactor (Capital Spares)

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

109 145 411

   

TOTAL

1 513 149 254

The maintenance costs component, provided in Table 2 below, for a period of 14 financial years, amounted to over R165 million, which included the following:

  • Servitudes maintenance
  • Maintenance by Rotek Industries
  • Materials
  • Equipment spares
  • Production plant services
  • Facility services

The maintenance costs information can only be provided from the 2009/10 financial year, as Eskom changed to the current SAP system at that point. Obtaining information prior to that period will require more time, as this information has been archived.

Table 2: Maintenance (from the 2009/10 to the 2022/23 financial years)

(C) Are there long-term plans for the system in terms of (i) life-span of the existing infrastructure, (ii) expansion of the system and (iii) on-going usage?

(i) Details of the long-term plans for Apollo HVDC in terms of the lifespan of the existing infrastructure (refurbishment plan) are provided in Table 3 below.

Table 3: Long-term refurbishment plan

PROJECT NAME

PLANT TYPE

INITIATIVE PHASE

TOTAL (rand)

Apollo Install New Earth Electrodes

ELECTRODE

PRE-CONCEPT

14 000 000

Apollo CS: Permanent Bipole Bypass

ISOLATORS

PRE-CONCEPT

69 010 000

Apollo CS: Replace Bridge 1, 3, and 7 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

PRE-CONCEPT

888 470 262

Apollo CS Repeater Station Pietersburg Battery System

BATTERY

PRE-CONCEPT

15 000 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 1 Refurbishment

LINES

PRE-CONCEPT

230 000 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 2 Refurbishment

LINES

PRE-CONCEPT

230 000 000

Apollo CS Problematic Equipment Phase 2

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

105 600 000

Apollo CS Problematic Equipment Phase 3

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

124 200 000

Apollo SS Auxiliary Transformer Bund Walls

NON-PLANT

PRE-CONCEPT

10 300 000

Apollo CS: HVDC System Ref. Upgrade Phase 3

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

1 700 562 263

   

TOTAL

3 387 142 525

(ii) Currently, there is no long-term plan for expansion for the Apollo Converter Station.

(iii) Hidroeléctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB) has indicated that it would like to start engagements in terms of the contractual extension beyond 2030. Eskom will be open to such engagements, as HCB power forms part of the baseload power supply mix.

06 October 2023 - NW2907

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Mbatha, Ms SGN to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) are the relevant details of the process to empower communities in the forestry industry to ensure the prevention of deforestation and (b) is the state of pilot projects in this regard?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3086

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

By what date will the ordinance be effectively repealed as there are discrepancies between national and provincial legislation and the hunting and other ordinances in several provinces are outdates and no long in line with national legislation and with scientific evident in terms of biodiversity loss?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW2919

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

What consultation process does the National Treasury undertake before finalising the cost-containment measures to assist national departments, public entities and provinces to close a fiscal gap?

Reply:

Various high-level forums of government have been briefed about the fiscal challenges in the current fiscal year and the need for urgent and difficult measures to be taken to forestall their damaging impact during the course of the financial year. This includes briefings and discussions at Cabinet, the Minister’s Committee on the Budget, the Budget Council, the Forum of South African Directors-General (FOSAD), and the Technical Committee for Finance, which is a committee of Provincial Treasuries. In addition, the National Treasury has publicly highlighted the difficult financial constraints facing government and its implications during a meeting of NEDLAC as well as in the 2024 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budgeting guidelines, which are published on the website of the National Treasury.

In all of these engagements, the National Treasury emphasized that measures will be required to achieve savings, improve efficiency and contain costs.

06 October 2023 - NW3085

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

How did SANParks take into account the conclusions of the 2020 Elephants Alive Recommendations Concerning the Proposed Elephant Offtakes of the Associate Private Nature Reserves (APNR) in supporting and/or commenting on the proposed APNR Elephant Offtake of 55 elephants, as Elephants Alive recommended that only 35 elephants be hunted (details furnished)?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW2924

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What is the current status of the implementation of the Just Transition to a Decarbonised Economy for South Africa?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3084

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) How prevalent is snaring (a) in and (b) on the borders of the Kruger National Park; (2) whether snaring is concentrated in any particular areas; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there are any discernible snaring trends; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether snaring is increasing or decreasing overall and/or in any particular areas; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are relevant details; (5) what total number of snares were detected and/or removed in the Kruger National Park in the (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022 calendar years?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3125

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Mhlongo, Ms N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What (a) measures have been put in place to ensure that residents who were affected by the Jagersfontein Dam disaster in Free State have been compensated, (b) steps have been taken against the mine to ensure that they are held accountable for the disaster and (c) is the current progress on rebuilding the community?

Reply:

The Department does not have the authority to regulate the processing of residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam. This is as a result of the De Beers court judgment over Jagersfontein mine residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007). The judgement held that historical mine residue deposits (those created before the coming into operation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) on the 01st of May 2004) are not minerals as contemplated in the MPRDA and such they are not regulated under provisions of the MPRDA. The processing of historical mine residue deposits does not constitute mining and the area where they are situated is not classified as a mine. This was again confirmed by the court judgment in the case of Ekapa Minerals (Pty) Ltd & Others vs Lucky Seekoei & Others (2057/2016) [2017] ZANCHC 5 (13 January 2017).

However, The Department engaged the Minerals Council South Africa to provide assistance to the affected community even though the facility is legally not a mining operation. About R2.75 million was spent by the Minerals Council on the following emergency relief through three Public Benefit Organisations, namely Gift of the Givers, Soul Provider and the Red Cross:

  • Distributing 15,000 food parcels, each providing an average of 25 meals totalling 375,000 meals at a cost of R1,250,000. An estimated 4,500 people received nutritious meals for four months. The percentage of black South Africans benefiting from the programme is 100%.
  • Providing running water from water boreholes at two schools for learners and the surrounding community at a cost of R1 million.
  • Distributing mattresses, blankets, clothing, underwear, sanitary packs, water and cooking utensils at a cost of R500,000.

Following a series of meetings by the Minerals Council with the Kopanong Local Municipality and the Free State Government, 6 projects were initially earmarked. Further assessments identified 3 of the 6 projects being potentially sustainable and within the objectives and mandate of the Fund:

  1. Working towards a sustainable water solution for the Jagersfontein community. The assistance does not include services that are the responsibility of local, provincial and national government.
  2. Aiding local schools and learning centres to enhance learning and education in the community. The assistance does not include services that are the responsibility of local, provincial and national government.
  3. Establish an internet and Wi-Fi service for the community at the Jagersfontein library.

06 October 2023 - NW3109

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to the reported R500 million in revenue that her department will generate through the sales of various properties across the globe, (a) what total amount will be lost through commissions and taxes related to the sales and (b) how does her department plan to spend the remaining money from the sales?

Reply:

(a) The process for the disposal of some of the identified superfluous properties is currently at the approval stage, whilst others are at an advertisement stage. The total amount for commissions and taxes will only be determined at conveyancing stage and when sales have been successfully concluded by estate agents.

(b) Subject to approvals by National Treasury, the generated revenue will be used by the Department to fund new acquisitions/constructions and major refurbishments, using the National Treasury Self-Financing Mechanism

06 October 2023 - NW3100

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2675 on 1 September 2023 by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and the 2020-21 report of the Auditor-General which stipulates that 84% of municipalities in the Republic failed to pay their creditors within the mandated 30-day period, (a) the National Treasury has conducted a detailed quantitative and qualitative assessment of the resultant socio-economic ramifications, specifically the adverse impact on job losses and business viability for small companies, sole proprietors and cooperatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (i) assessment and (ii) strategic measures under consideration to rectify the systemic issue?

Reply:

Payments not made within 30 days are in breach of the Municipal Finance Management Act and the oversight over compliance to laws and regulations is that of the Municipal Council. Therefore, the questions should be directed to the respective municipalities as these relate to contractual obligations entered between municipalities and their respective service providers.

The National Treasury has not conducted research or an assessment on the adverse impact of late payments. The Department of Small Business Development has a mandate to promote and develop Small, Micro and Medium Enterprises (SMMEs). It is therefore suggested that the Honourable Member directs this enquiry to them.

06 October 2023 - NW3128

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With regard to the dried-up slurry that is dumped and heaped close to the residential areas around the power plants in Lephalale, which must be causing health hazards for the communities during windy seasons, what steps has her department, in collaboration with Eskom, taken to manage the spread of deadly fine particles that get swept into the surrounding communities?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3035

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will provide Mrs. C Phillips with the records of the written notice and consultation as envisaged by section 26(3) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002, for the beneficiation of chrome currently undertaken by a certain company (name furnished) on Portion 71 of the Farm Groenkloof, in the Bojanala District, North West; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1, The entity referred to has no mining authorisations issued by this Department, furthermore the Department has no records pertaining their application to beneficiate minerals. However, section 26 of the Act was meant to promote beneficiation of mineral in the Republic. Section 26(3) requires any person who intends to beneficiate any mineral outside the Republic to do so with written notice and in consultation with the Minister. The constraints on electricity generation have limited the ability to facilitate local beneficiation.

06 October 2023 - NW2923

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What total number of (a) cheetahs and (b) cubs born later, which were exported to the Republic of India as part of a Memorandum of Understanding, have died as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3139

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) What (a)(i) total number of and (ii) which fishing rights were allocated to (aa) individuals and (bb) companies and/or any other entity in each province and (b) total number of licences were denied in each province; (2) whether it is a requirement for applicants to indicate their racial profile; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what total number of licences were allocated to (a) each race in (b) each province; (3) whether any communities and/or individuals are excluded from applying and/or being awarded fishing rights, permits and/or licences; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what grounds?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3141

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) amount of (i) abalone, (ii) crayfish and (iii) fish are estimated to be poached from the seas of the (aa) Western Cape, (bb) Eastern Cape and (cc) Northern Cape annually, (b) amount of each of the poached species have been confiscated fresh, dried, and in live condition in each of the past five years, (c) happens to the confiscate species and (d) other illegal items were confiscate in the above-mentioned instances from the poachers?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3047

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With reference to the entrance gate at the Three Rondavels of the Panorama route in Mpumalanga, (a) what are the reasons that bank card machines are not operational at the gate, (b) by what date will the bank card machines be fixed, (c) how is the cash received being monitored and controlled and (d) what measures, processes, procedures and mechanisms are in place to ensure that there is not theft of the cash received?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW2817

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) Whether he has found that the practice of seawalls is extremely harmful to the diamond diving industry and the littoral environment when hundreds of tons of residue stockpile are being dumped into the ocean every hour, destroying habitat, sterilising large areas of valuable diamond diving resource, turning the water column into a black slurry and driving the final nail into the coffin of the diamond diving industry; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps have been taken by his department to address the environmental crisis; (2) whether it is his position that seawall material is defined as residue stockpile and is therefore the responsibility of the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment to monitor, as provided for in the National Environmental Management Act, Act 107 of 1998, instead of his department that has no authority over the specified matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3232E

Reply:

(1) Response: Seawalls are generally created using sea – sand excavated directly from the sea mining block to allow the enclosed area to be pumped out and drained. The pumping creates a semi-dry working environment so that work can be carried out safely and efficiently. In most cases, particularly in the case of diamond mining, seawalls are created as temporal structures, they collapse as mining activities proceed from one block to the next. In cases where the mining block is set to have a longer lifespan, the sea – sand (i.e., seawall) is reinforced with rocks often collected on the coast and tailings material. There would be minimal impact on the sea and surrounding environment as there is no harmful or hazardous material introduced to create the seawalls. Naturally, when the seawalls collapse, they create high turbidity in the immediate area that often creates murky water, but given the strength of ocean currents, the sediment is swiftly dispersed. In cases where the mining block is situated in heavy mineral sands, the tailings may appear reddish-brown in colour due to the presence of the zircon element and this is often mistaken as a black slurry.

2. Response: According to the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (Act 28 of 2002) as amended, the residue stockpile “means any debris, discard, tailings, slimes, screening, slurry, waste rock, foundry sand, beneficiation plant waste, ash or any other product derived from or incidental to a mining operation and which is stockpiled, stored or accumulated for potential re-use, or which is disposed of, by the holder of a mining right…”. Seawalls do not fall into this definition as the material used will not be reused or disposed of. However, the environmental impacts arising out of any mining/prospecting activities subject of a mining right or any right/permit issued in terms of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002, falls within the competent jurisdiction of the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy.

06 October 2023 - NW2915

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What measures are in place to protect the coast and fishing grounds of the Republic against foreign fishing vessels?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3120

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What are the reasons that the Acting Chief Financial Officer of SA Tourism is also acting as the Chief Executive Officer and (b) which processes were followed in the appointment?

Reply:

(a) What are the reasons that the Acting Chief Financial Officer of SA Tourism is also acting as the Chief Executive Officer?

I have been informed by South African Tourism (SAT) that an investigation into the attendance of SAT officials at the Soccer World Cup was initiated by the previous board of SA Tourism.

After consideration of the final report, the current board resolved that conclusion of this matter required the then-acting CEO to revert to her role as COO while a fair, independent, and transparent process is conducted.

Since the recruitment process for the Chief Executive Officer is still in progress, the board considered options available for a new acting CEO from within the current executive management. In light of the reduced capacity at the exco level, the board resolved to appoint the CFO as the acting CEO for the short term and to put in place mitigations to manage any associated risks.

(b) Which processes were followed in the appointment?

At various meetings, the board deliberated on the available options. Having resolved to appoint the CFO as ACEO, the board approached the Minister for concurrence on its decision in line with the Tourism Act, 2014. With the Minister’s concurrence received on 6 September 2023, the CFO was appointed as acting CEO with compensating controls including exco participation in decision making, as well as reporting to Board on decisions taken. It must be noted that, in the letter of concurrence, the Minister strongly advised the Board to speedily appoint a new CFO.

06 October 2023 - NW2914

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What assistance is being offered by her department to black-owned small-scale mussel farmers on the West Coast of the Western Cape, who experienced serious setbacks during COVID-19, to ensure their ventures become viable and successful

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3076

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What number of megawatts (MWs) (a) has Mozambique undertaken to provide to the Republic in terms of the contractual relationship with Mozambique and (b) is the Republic currently using; (2) whether the Republic uses all the allocated MWs; if not, what are the reasons for the underutilisation of electricity in the midst of the loadshedding crisis; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the terms of the agreement in respect of (a) the period, (b) the pricing matrix and (c) other material elements of the agreement?

Reply:

(1)(a)Mozambique is currently developing a number of power plant projects and is engaging with South Africa at present. At this point, there are no firm commitments. The projects would need to be incorporated into the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP).

(1)(b) Yes, Eskom is currently using the power from Hidroeléctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB), as well as purchasing power from the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) competitive markets, which, at times, includes power from Mozambique. Eskom has aspirations to buy power from cross-border countries. Depending on the pricing and technical feasibility, Eskom will procure power from Mozambique in terms of a fair, transparent, and equitable process.

(2) Eskom utilises the allocated megawatts (MWs) most of the time. On odd occasions, Eskom is unable to access the power when there are limiting factors, including infrastructure faults.

(3) (a) 31 March 2030.

(b) The price is based on avoiding the cost of building a baseload station.

(c) 1 150 MW capacity.

06 October 2023 - NW3127

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Noting the positive reports regarding bringing units back from planned maintenance like Unit 4 in Kusile Power Station, the expected new capacity soontobe unleashed by Unit 5 and the successes of fuel gas desulphurisation plant for clean emissions, what is the point of pursuing the various bid windows for the unreliable renewable generators?

Reply:

The supply of South Africa’s energy demand is broadly determined by the energy mix as set out in The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) 2019. Based on the 2019 IRP, Coal constitutes 43% of installed capacity followed by Wind (22.53) Solar PV (10.5) CSP (0,76) Nuclear (2,36) and Gas and Diesel (8.1) Hydro (5.84).

Whilst the IRP is currently being reviewed, Coal, Nuclear and Gas is expected to continue to be significant contributors to SA’s base load demand in the foreseeable future, with investments in cleaner technologies to mitigate negative environmental impacts, coupled with and battery storage to neutralise and solar/wind hybrid solutions to stabilise the intermittency challenges of renewables.

 

06 October 2023 - NW3126

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What amount of sulphur has been extracted through the fuel gas desulphurisation unit in Kusile Power Station; (2) whether the sulphur has been sold to other industries like agriculture, pharmaceuticals and rubber industries; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the consequences of storing such a corrosive chemical; if so, what amount in revenue has Eskom derived from the sales?

Reply:

1. Eskom removes sulphur dioxide (SO2), which is a by-product of fossil fuel combustion, from the flue gases. This SO2 is removed by means of a wet flue gas desulphurisation system. The flue gas flows through a spray of calcium carbonate (limestone) slurry and forms an end product of calcium sulphate (gypsum).

2. (2)(a) Therefore, no sulphur in its pure, corrosive form is extracted from the absorber, and no sulphur is being sold. The gypsum is currently disposed of on site in a designated area on the power station premises as per licence. The future plan is to sell the gypsum as it can be used in the industry.

(2)(b) No corrosive chemical is being stored and no revenue is being generated at this stage from gypsum.

 

06 October 2023 - NW2921

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she is actively exploring additional funding mechanisms for the implementation of the Just Transition to a Decarbonised Economy for South Africa to supplement the initial $8.5 billion commitment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3121

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the details of the (a) total number of vacant positions at the SA Tourism, (b) level of each vacant position and (c) time frames that have been put in place to the fill the vacancies?

Reply:

I have been informed by South African Tourism that the details of the total number of vacancies, level of each position and timeframes to fill the vacancies, are contained in the table, below.

(a) Total number of vacant positions at the SA Tourism

(b) Level of each vacant position

(c) Time frames that have been put in place to the fill the vacancies

5

Executive

6 months

2

Senior Management

Work-in-progress

20

Management

Work-in-progress

6

Officer/administration

Work-in-progress

SAT will prioritise appointments for consideration by the Minister, following due process.

 

06 October 2023 - NW3136

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether his department has plans in place for the wide establishment of small-scale miners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the DMRE has established a Small-Scale mining component with officials at nine regional offices whose functions is to handle enquiries, guide and advice and assist with the application process. Furthermore, a policy was gazetted in 2022 to develop the mechanisms to formalise artisanal and small-scale mining operations and bring them within the mainstream economy.

04 October 2023 - NW2956

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the gold cards of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) which are due to expire on 31 December 2023, what (a) total number of beneficiaries have (i) renewed and (ii) not yet renewed their SASSA cards and (b) measures have been put in place to ensure that all cards are renewed before the expiry date?

Reply:

a) The Postbank currently provides banking accounts and cards to approximately 5.3 million SASSA beneficiaries. All the cards that are affected by the December deadline will be replaced as part of the Card Replacement Project Plan. The number of beneficiaries fluctuates on a daily basis as many beneficiaries have opted to migrate to other banks.

i) and (ii) Postbank has not provided details at the time of responding to this question.

b) Postbank has a phased-in Card Replacement Project Plan as follows:

  • Phase 1: will focuses on SASSA regions with the largest number of beneficiaries (KZN, Gauteng, Eastern Cape, Limpopo and Mpumalanga), which account for 76% of the SASSA customer base.
  • Phase 2: will focus on SASSA regions with the least number of beneficiaries (Western Cape, North West, Free State and Northern Cape), which account for 24% of the SASSA customer base
  • As a contingency measure, Postbank is engaging with VISA and the South African Reserve Bank to extend the validity of cards as a contingency in the event cards cannot be distributed to all customers within the said deadline.

04 October 2023 - NW3033

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) gold card which has been extended and is expected to expire in December 2023, (a) what total number of cards are expected to expire in December 2023 in each (i) province and (ii) grant category, (b) on what date will SASSA and/or the SA Postbank commence with the renewal process of the cards, (c) on what date will SASSA communicate with beneficiaries on the status of the card renewal process, (d) what is the name of the service provider which has been awarded the contract for the design and roll-out of the new cards and (e) what is the total cost of the design and roll-out of the new cards?

Reply:

a) There are approximately 5.3 million cards due for replacement by 31 December 2023.

(i) The regional breakdown is as per table below:

PROVINCE

Beneficiary Volume

 
     

KWAZULU NATAL

1 120 702

 

GAUTENG

975 063

 

EASTERN CAPE

745 994

 

LIMPOPO

717 656

 

MPUMALANGA

490 188

 

WESTERN CAPE

484 131

 

NORTH WEST

331 618

 

FREE STATE

323 604

 

NORTHERN CAPE

110 542

 

GRAND TOTAL

5 299 499

 

(ii) The table below illustrates the grant type affected by the December deadline:

PROVINCE

Care Dependency Grant (CDG)

Child Support Grant (CSG)

Foster Child Grant

Combination of

CDG & FCG

Disability Grant

Old Age Grant

War Veteran Grant

Grand Total

KWAZULU NATAL

11 634

712 022

8 945

204

72 710

265 839

1

1 071 355

GAUTENG

9 331

648 802

10 966

210

41 916

315 252

2

1 026 479

EASTERN CAPE

7 677

488 694

16 082

378

58 151

226 837

 

797 819

LIMPOPO

5 339

427 652

10 068

143

34 113

222 683

 

699 998

MPUMALANGA

5 057

338 979

6 671

125

34 974

138 790

 

524 596

WESTERN CAPE

5 682

311 996

5 695

187

36 214

148 245

2

508 021

NORTH WEST

2 482

189 266

4 662

89

17 181

101 027

1

314 708

FREE STATE

3 463

211 542

5 522

160

26 261

94 629

 

341 577

NORTHERN CAPE

1 311

65 481

1 610

80

9 794

30 022

1

108 299

Grand Total

51 976

3 394 434

70 221

1 576

331 314

1 543 324

7

5 392 852

b) Work is currently underway to meet the December deadline and Postbank will make necessary information available to the public.

c) Refer to (b) above.

d) I cannot pre-empt the outcome of a procurement process of the Postbank. This is an administrative process that does not involve the Executive Athority.

e) Refer to (d) above.

04 October 2023 - NW2981

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What tourism projects, undertaken by the Development Bank of Southern Africa, were initiated in the (i) past three financial years and (ii) current year to date, (b) on what date was each project initiated, (c) which of the specified projects were completed, (d) what was the set deadline for each project to be completed, (e) what are the actual completion dates for each completed project, (f) what are the reasons that each project was not completed by the set deadline, (g) what budget was allocated for each completed project and (h) what amount was spent in each completed project?

Reply:

The DBSA has seventy tourism-related projects, of which twenty-two have been completed, and forty-eight are in various stages of execution.

The detailed project list, which includes details (question (a)-(h)) is listed below.

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date ( e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

1

NW

Compliance Certificates

NW Lehurutshe Bird and Trophy Hunting owned by the Bakgatla ba Lencoe Trust

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-03-22

2024-03-22

Not Applicable

R28,209,243.11

R1,176,025.47

2

KZN

Compliance Certificates

KZN Isibhubhu Project

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-09-16

2023-11-15

Slow performance of the contractor at commencement due to cash constraints and material sourcing challenges. The DBSA loan facility to the contractor has assisted in procurement of material and the performance of the contractor has improved as they are recovering to complete on time. Suspension of works due to the yearly traditional reed dance for a week was the latest stoppage. Delay also caused by client request for change in design for the maidens change rooms.

R35,470,271.15

R13,489,181.26

3

KZN

Compliance Certificates

KZN Muzi Pan Project

2020-12-07

Concurrence

Procurement - Concurrence Requested

2024-06-13

2024-06-13

Not Applicable

R21,899,635.05

R578,852.36

4

MP

Community Tourism Projects

Numbi Gate - Nkambeni Safari Lodge

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-03-26

2024-03-26

Delays in commencement of the project due to community social issues and currently a land claim.

R24,563,693.62

R2,659,306.92

5

MP

Community Tourism Projects

Numbi Gate - Mdlhuli Safari Lodge

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-03-26

2024-03-26

Delays in commencement of the works due to the delays in appointment of the CLO and labour

R33,554,531.24

R3,455,932.19

6

LP

Community Tourism Projects

Nandoni Dam

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-05-16

2024-05-16

Not Applicable

R38,982,441.65

R1,738,488.51

7

LP

Community Tourism Projects

Tshathogwe Game Farm

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-09-09

2023-11-14

Poor performance of the Contractor. Penalties to be charged in accordance with contract.

R26,741,416.87

R9,476,563.90

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

8

LP

Community Tourism Projects

Mtititi Game Farm

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-06-10

2023-12-31

Poor performance of the Contractor. Penalties to be charged in accordance with contract.

R27,898,562.18

R14,455,737.46

2023-12-31

LP

Community Tourism Projects

Mapate Recreational Social Tourism Facility

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-06-16

2023-12-31

Suspension of works due to fatality on site, Poor performance by contractor at commencement of the constructions works.

R27,450,164.53

R9,245,260.80

2023-12-31

KZN

Local Community Museums

Product Enhancement at Anton Lembede Museum eThekwini Municipality (KZN)

2021-02-08

Construction

Construction

2024-03-02

2024-03-02

Not Applicable

R23,611,547.91

R979,096.02

11

NC

Local Community Museums

Product Enhancement at McGregor Museum (NC) WP1

2021-02-08

Evaluation

Procurement - Evaluation

2024-06-16

2024-06-16

Not Applicable

R240,750.00

 

12

NC

Local Community Museums

Product Enhancement at McGregor Museum (NC) WP2

2021-02-08

Evaluation

Procurement - Evaluation

2024-04-15

2024-04-15

Not Applicable

   

13

KZN

Local Community Museums

Product Enhancement at AmaHlubi Cultural Heritage (KZN)

2021-02-08

Concept NDT

Planning and Design

2024-03-11

2024-03-11

Not Applicable

R8,228,848.39

R979,069.02

14

NW

Local Community Museums

Product Enhancement at Sol Plaatjie Museum (NW)

2021-02-08

Construction

Construction

2024-02-01

2024-02-01

Delay in commencement of works due to an impasse on works to be implemented (new and maintenance work). Meeting between NDT, DBSA and Mahikeng Municipality to be held on 20.09.2023 to find way forward on scope.

R8,228,848.31

R832,007.41

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4), Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date ( e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

15

NW

Local Community Museums

Product Enhancement at Lehurutshe Liberation Heritage Museum

2021-02-08

Concept NDT

Planning and Design

2024-02-27

2024-02-27

Not Applicable

R15,384,460.00

R832,007.41

16

NC

lndi-Atlantic Route (Coastal and Marine Tourism initiatives)

Tourism development at Orange River Mouth (NC) as part of the Indi-Atlantic Route

2021-02-08

Design Development

Planning and Design

N/A

N/A

Project works to be completed till Design Stage. Further stages will await NDT instruction to Proceed.

R76,121,200.33

R949,421.57

17

EC

lndi-Atlantic Route

Tourism Development at Hole in the Wall (EC) as part of the Indi-Atlantic Route

2021-02-08

Design Development

Planning and Design

N/A

N/A

Project works to be completed till Design Stage. Further stages will await NDT instruction to Proceed.

R56,103,208.95

R1,760,791.87

18

KZN

lndi-Atlantic Route

Tourism development at Harold Johnson Nature Reserve as part of the Indi-Atlantic Route

2021-02-08

Design Development

Planning and Design

N/A

N/A

Project works to be completed till Design Stage. Further stages will await NDT instruction to Proceed.

R48,708,342.83

R1,443,770.69

19

GP

Maintenance & Beautification

Suikerbosrand Nature Reserve, Gauteng

2020-12-07

Evaluation

Procurement - Evaluation

2024-03-20

2024-03-20

Not Applicable

R8,733,665.78

R257,326.41

20

KZN

Maintenance & Beautification

J L Dube Precinct, KZN

2020-12-07

Design Development

Planning and Design

2023-11-27

2023-11-27

Not Applicable

R4,277,257.82

R37,527.79

21

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Gariep Dam Resort, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-09-14

2023-12-31

The contractor is behind schedule. Penalties to be charged in accordance with contract.

R4,999,748.71

R2,182,007.88

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

22

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Maria Moroka Resort in Thaba Nchu, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-09-15

2023-12-31

The contractor is behind schedule. Penalties to be charged in accordance with contract.

R4,999,748.71

R894,648.15

23

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Phillip Saunders Resort in Bloemfontein, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-08-15

2023-12-31

Additional scope of work requested by the end user Client and extension of time under review to determine the completion date.

R4,999,748.71

R2,637,239.48

24

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Sterkfontein Dam Nature Reserve, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-08-14

2023-12-31

The contractor is behind schedule. Penalty to be charged in accordance with contract.

R4,999,748.71

R2,967,908.65

25

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Manyeleti Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R2,922,378.71

26

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Andover Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R3,476,227.74

27

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Songimvelo Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R3,801,835.77

28

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

SS Skosana Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R3,089,137.42

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status (c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

22

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Maria Moroka Resort in Thaba Nchu, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-09-15

2023-12-31

The contractor is behind schedule. Penalties to be charged in accordance with contract.

R4,999,748.71

R894,648.15

23

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Phillip Saunders Resort in Bloemfontein, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-08-15

2023-12-31

Additional scope of work requested by the end user Client and extension of time under review to determine the completion date.

R4,999,748.71

R2,637,239.48

24

FS

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Sterkfontein Dam Nature Reserve, Free State

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-08-14

2023-12-31

The contractor is behind schedule. Penalty to be charged in accordance with contract.

R4,999,748.71

R2,967,908.65

25

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Manyeleti Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R2,922,378.71

26

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Andover Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R3,476,227.74

27

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Songimvelo Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R3,801,835.77

28

MP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

SS Skosana Nature Reserve, Mpumalanga

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

2023-06-08

Not Applicable

R3,736,433.94

R3,089,137.42

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date ( e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

29

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Thomas Baines Nature Reserve, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-08-08

2023-09-14

Certain areas on site were put on hold due to environmental concerns which did not form part of the scope. Practical completion has been achieved.

R4,285,162.35

R3,415,779.54

30

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Hluleka Nature Reserve, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Concept To be Approved

Planning and Design

2023-12-27

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

R4,185,939.39

R83,973.60

31

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Double Mouth Nature Reserve, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-06

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,528,146.03

R2,859,541.75

32

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Oviston Nature Reserve, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-25

2023-09-01

Project was affected by the hunting season as the contractor had limited access to site, hence the delay in completion against the baseline PC date. The project has achieved practical completion.

R3,504,584.39

R2,622,218.39

33

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Baviaanskloof Nature Reserve, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-07-25

2023-10-31

Change in the design of the kitchen building and location allocated by the end user.

R3,528,146.03

R2,182,741.34

34

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Cwebe and Dwesa, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-12-01

2023-12-01

Delays in granting contractor access to all facilities on site due to a movie recording or filming.

R4,263,982.64

R888,768.16

35

EC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Mpofu and Fordyce Nature Reserve, Eastern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-12-02

2023-12-02

Delay on works as some facilities had to be put on hold to accommodate the hunting season which generates revenue for the reserve.

R4,263,982.64

R1,502,586.19

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date ( e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

36

NC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Doornkloof Nature Reserve, Northern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-11-23

2023-11-23

Not Applicable

R5,254,310.06

R1,235,877.71

37

NC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Rolfontein Nature Reserve, Northern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-11-23

2023-11-23

Not Applicable

R5,254,310.06

R1,686,739.19

38

NC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Goegap and Witsand Nature Reserve, Northern Cape

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-11-23

2023-11-23

Not Applicable

R5,254,310.06

R3,410,098.70

39

LP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Makapans Valley WHS, Limpopo

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,145,623.58

R2,997,834.07

40

LP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Nwanedi Nature Reserve, Limpopo

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,145,623.58

R2,558,202.70

41

LP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Blouberg Nature Reserve, Limpopo

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,145,623.58

R2,465,052.22

42

LP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Musina Nature Reserve, Limpopo

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,145,623.58

R2,777,971.87

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

43

LP

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Modjadji Nature Reserve, Limpopo

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-16

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,145,623.58

R2,430,597.23

44

WC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Kogelberg Nature Reserve, Western Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-06-14

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,634,316.46

R3,003,843.38

45

WC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Goukamma Nature Reserve, Western Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-06-14

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,634,316.46

R2,527,332.95

46

WC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Lookout Hill Khayelitsha, Western Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-06-14

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,634,316.46

R3,277,649.65

47

WC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

De Hoop Nature Reserve, Western Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-06-14

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,634,316.46

R2,026,649.36

48

WC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Wolwekloof Nature Reserve, Western Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-06-14

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,634,316.46

R3,072,463.11

49

WC

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Cederberg Wilderness Area, Western Cape

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-06-14

N/A

Not Applicable

R3,634,316.46

R1,946,132.58

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

50

NW

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Mafikeng Hotel School

2022-04-04

Concept NDT

Planning and Design

2024-09-12

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

   

51

NW

Maintenance & Beautification of Provincial State-Owned Attractions.

Pilanesberg Nature Reserve, North West

2022-04-04

PSP Appointment

Pre-Initiation

2024-06-11

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

   

52

NC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

NC Platfontein Lodge

2020-12-07

Concept

Planning and Design

2023-12-27

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

R36,944,350.33

R464,114.63

53

NW

Further detailed planning & construction

NW Lotlamoreng Dam

2020-12-07

Tender / Retender

Procurement - Contractor

2024-02-11

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

R21,680,806.49

R392,300.67

54

NW

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

NW Manyane Lodge

2020-12-07

Evaluation

Procurement - Evaluation

2023-11-02

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

R25,788,890.01

R392,300.67

55

LP

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

LP Matsila Lodge

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-12-14

2023-12-14

Contractor is running behind schedule due to cashflow constraints on purchasing the high value items. DBSA has approved a loan facility and is assisting the contractor with purchasing of the material.

R43,036,821.09

R9,940,053.98

56

LP

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

LP Phiphidi Waterfall

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-03-16

2024-03-16

Not Applicable

R24,984,745.91

R1,258,843.25

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

57

LP

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

LP Oaks

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-02-07

2024-02-07

Not Applicable

R30,540,765.25

R6,582,104.00

58

LP

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

LP Ngove

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-05-19

2024-05-19

Not Applicable

R35,488,790.91

R1,951,886.39

59

LP

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

LP Tisane

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-12-24

2023-12-24

The Contractor had cashflow constraints that affected purchasing of material. The DBSA has approved a loan facility and the material has already been provided to the contractor.

R32,500,362.51

R10,759,639.31

60

LP

Further detailed planning & construction

LP Vhatsonga

2020-12-07

Evaluation

Procurement - Evaluation

2024-04-11

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

R34,509,658.61

R1,164,067.68

61

FS

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

FS QwaQwa Guesthouse

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-09-18

2023-10-30

The design of the sewer had to be changed by engineers.

R24,619,623.73

R20,195,710.68

62

FS

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

FS Infrastructure through Monontsha

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-09-18

N/A

Not Applicable

R7,852,914.40

R5,605,553.72

63

FS

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

FS Vredefort Dome

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-10-17

2024/25FY

Contract Terminated due to poor performance of the contractor

R28,163,338.17

R7,165,192.19

No

Province

Work Package

Project Name (a)

Date IPW signed off by NDT to DBSA (b)

Status ( c)

Current Status (Planning & Design stage 1-3, Procurement (stage 4),Construction Stage 5, Close Out (stage 6-7)

Baseline Targeted Practical Completion & Occupation Date (d)

Actual & revised Practical Completion & Occupation date (e)

Comments on Delays & targets not being met (pls be precise to the point) (f)

Total Budget (PSP, Construction, DBSA Fees) (g)

Actual Total Expenditure as at End August 2023 (h)

64

NC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

NC Kamiesberg Tourism Development

2020-12-07

Design Development

Planning and Design

2024-04-15

2024/25FY

Not Applicable

R19,816,186.00

R1,016,253.44

65

EC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

EC Maluti Hiking and Horse Trail

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-07

N/A

Not Applicable

R21,953,838.99

R21,099,619.33

66

EC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

EC Mthonsi Lodge

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2023-11-14

2023-11-30

Delay due to inclement weather. EOT approved

R7,563,919.96

R20,649,930.73

67

EC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

EC Qatywa Eco Tourism Development

2020-12-07

Construction

Construction

2024-01-16

2024-03-12

Delay due to inclement weather. EOT approved

R39,654,075.62

R18,654,465.84

68

EC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

EC Chalets at Nyandeni Great Place

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-08-15

N/A

Penalties charged to contractor for late completion

R22,996,656.27

R20,600,239.42

69

EC

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

EC Western Thembuland

2020-12-07

Practical Completion

Practical Completion Achieved

2023-07-07

N/A

Not Applicable

R28,333,432.75

R26,545,363.06

70

LP

Construction Planning, Procurement & Implementation

Royal Khalanga Lodge

2021-09-13

Construction

Construction

2024-03-25

2024-03-25

Not Applicable

R17,772,742.44

R2,409,864.34

04 October 2023 - NW2978

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Social Development

What measures has her department put in place to work together with the Department of Basic Education and other role players to place safety ambassadors at schools to identify learners from dysfunctional backgrounds and refer them to a system in which social workers and psychologists work together to create a better and healthier society?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education leads the implementation of Integrated School Health Programme (ISHP) working in collaboration with other relevant government departments, including DSD. This is an integrated programme with a number of interventions aimed at prevention and early intervention services for vulnerable children.

RISIHA, a community-based prevention programme works closely with local schools and assist in early identification of children in need of care and support services and complements other government interventions such as Safety Ambassadors at schools.

04 October 2023 - NW3129

Profile picture: Mafanya, Mr WTI

Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Finance

Noting that in its ruling the Constitutional Court stated that section 2 of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, Act 5 of 2000, (PPPFA) allows organs of state to formulate their own regulations and further clarified that the power of the Minister to make regulations does not override section 2, what are the reasons that he has not liberated the stateowned companies to make their own regulations instead of forcing them to comply with the PPPFA regulations of 2022?

Reply:

Section 5 of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (Act No. 5 of 2000 – “the Act”) states that the Minister may make regulations regarding any matter that may be necessary or expedient to prescribe in order to achieve the objects of this Act. The judgement of the Constitutional court was that the impugned regulations 3,4 and 9 of the 2017 Regulations amounted to determining preferential procurement policy which was the responsibility of the organ of state in terms of Section 2(1) of the Act. The Minister made the Preferential Procurement Regulations 2022 in line with the Constitutional Court judgement to prescribe what is necessary or expedient in order to achieve the objects of the Act.

It is important to note that the Constitutional Court did not rule that State-Owned Companies can make their own regulations as that would be going against what the Act provides, but it did rule that each organ of state is empowered to determine its own preferential procurement policy (in terms of section 2(1) of the Act) and that these policies must still comply with the Act, which includes the 2022 Regulations.

04 October 2023 - NW3116

Profile picture: Marais, Ms P

Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) time frames have been put in place to clear the delays experienced regarding the SA Social Security Agency grant payouts and (b) assistance has been provided to beneficiaries to compensate for the delays?

Reply:

a) The matter is currently receiving attention from myself and the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies to ensure there is no recurrence. To date, all failed transactions have been corrected.

b) The matter related to compensation, if any, will be discussed as part of the Service Level Agreement between SASSA and Postbank. I therefore, do not want to pre-empt the outcome of this process at this stage.

 

04 October 2023 - NW3032

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) payment glitch which affected SASSA beneficiaries over the period 5 to 8 September 2023, what (a) total number of beneficiaries were adversely affected in each (i) province and (ii) grant category, (b) were the root causes of the payment glitch, (c) was the cause of the payment glitch, (d) are the relevant details of any fraudulent activity that was detected during the specified period, (e) are the consequences of the SA Postbank being in breach of their service-level agreement given its inability to reliably pay grants and (f) progress has been made, together with financial institutions, in processing the payment of grants to beneficiaries through their bank accounts which have proven to be far more reliable rather than the SASSA gold card; (2) whether her department intends to work with retail stores to develop a training programme for retail staff to equip them to assist SASSA beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether SASSA have access to a bulk SMS system in order to communicate with the beneficiaries when payment glitches arise; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.(a) The system glitch, which resulted in payment delays affected approximately six hundred thousand (3%) of social grants beneficiaries who access their monies through the Postbank.

(i) The system glitch affected Postbank clients randomly across all the provinces. At the time of responding to this question, Postbank was conducting a proper analysis of province-specific data.

(ii) The system glitch occurred predominantly on the first day of September payment cycle, which is the pay day for the payment of Old Age Grant.

(b) and (c) The glitch within the Postbank banking system was caused by the concentrated load capacity challenge resulting in intermittent timeouts, further complicated by a failure in the auto reversal process.

(d) Postbank reported there were various attempts to defraud the system. At the time of responding to this question, we did not receive any detailed information on this matter.

(e)Matters related to penalties, if any, are covered in the Service Level Agreement between SASSA and Postbank and will be discussed at the appropriate time.

(f) As I have mentioned on many occasions, SASSA clients have the right to choose any bank into which their money will be paid, including Postbank. All clients’ requests to change bank account details are initiated by the client and processed as quickly as possible. SASSA has put in place additional resources to accommodate the increased demand for alternative banks.

(2) neither SASSA nor the Department has any direct dealings with retailers. Retailers are places where clients purchase goods and/ or exchange funds. SASSA continues to conduct beneficiary education that they do not have to withdraw their money as they can use their cards to transact like any other ordinary bank card.

(3) Yes, SASSA uses this platform to communicate directly with beneficiaries on matters related to the administration of grants. However, with regard to the system glitch SASSA could not use this platform as it does not have access to beneficiary bank accounts.

04 October 2023 - NW3108

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises (1) What are the cost implications for the Government regarding the new State Asset Management Company as proposed in the National State Enterprises Bill that was recently opened for public comment, considering that some stateowned companies (SOCs) would allegedly be included, with others shut down

(1) What are the cost implications for the Government regarding the new State Asset Management Company as proposed in the National State Enterprises Bill that was recently opened for public comment, considering that some state owned companies (SOCs) would allegedly be included, with others shut down. (2) Whether any costing was done regarding (a) setting up the new company and (b) winding down the SOCs that are not included; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the detailed costs in each case?

Reply:

1. The financial obligation with respect to the development of the National State Enterprises Bill is borne by the Department of Public Enterprises. For 2023/24, budget has been allocated and ring-fenced for the necessary external project support and expertise under the Departmental funds for the processing of the Bill. Working capital of the Holding Company will need to be secured, and consultation with the National Treasury is on-going in this regard.

2. (a) Preliminary costing of the HoldCo has been done on the basis that it shall become self-sustainable in the short term. The Holding Company will derive dividends from its subsidiary companies and it is envisaged that this income stream will be sufficient to cover its operational costs.

(b) The closure, merger or restructuring (some which is already happening, e.g. in Small Business Portfolio) will be considered by government on the basis of recommendations of the PSEC.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

04 October 2023 - NW2976

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What has been the latest development in progress towards providing Palestinians visa-free entry into the Republic?

Reply:

The visa waiver for Palestinian ordinary passport holders was implemented on 15 September 2023. Negotiations with Palestinian counterparts on the Agreement to waive visa requirements for Diplomatic passport holders only, are at an advanced stage.

END

04 October 2023 - NW2937

Profile picture: Alexander, Ms W

Alexander, Ms W to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, in light of financial losses incurred by municipalities as a result of lower electricity sales due to the rolling blackouts, the National Treasury has taken any steps to assist struggling municipalities to adapt and recalibrate their budgets; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (Act No 56 of 2003) and through various sections of the Act, provide guidelines to municipalities on how to treat impending revenue shortfalls. In addition, the National Treasury also provides regular Budget Circulars to guide municipalities to prepare annual budgets and address situations like loadshedding.

Section 70 of the MFMA, subsection 1. “the accounting officer of a municipality must report in writing to the municipal council – (a) any impending (i) shortfalls in budgeted revenue, and (ii) overspending of the municipality’s budget, and (b) any steps taken to prevent or rectify such shortfalls or overspending.

Section 28 of the same Act provides guidance on Municipal Adjustments Budgets – (1)(a) that “a municipality may revise an approved budget through an Adjustments Budget and (2)(a) must adjust the revenue and expenditure estimates downwards if there is a material under collection of revenue during the current year.

Given the fiscal constrained environment within which the National Fiscus operates, the National Treasury was not in a position during the preparation of the 2022 MTEF, to make any additional funding available to municipalities for this purpose. As a result, they were advised to reprioritize their tabled 2023 MTREF Budgets to absorb the cost associated with loadshedding within baselines.