Questions and Replies

Filter by year

24 March 2021 - NW513

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has reported as follows:

a) In the past five financial years, since 2016, a total number of 180 employees requested permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service or normal working hours, in terms of the Directive regulated by the Public Service Regulations of 2016. However, it should be noted that some of these employees applied for an approval more than once as the approval is only valid for a period of a year from the date of approval.

b) The table below provides a summary according to job title or work category for 2016/17 to 2020/21 financial years:

Item No.

Total number of applications received from officials requesting permission to perform work outside normal working hours

(ii) Total number of officials permitted to perform work outside normal working hours

 

(i) Job titles or Work Categories

Number of Approved Applications

Number of Disapproved Applications

 
1. 

Accounting Clerks

5

0

5

2. 

Administrative Clerks

57

0

57

3. 

Administration Heads (level 9)

1

0

1

4. 

Administrative Officers

11

0

11

5. 

Assistant Directors

14

0

14

6. 

Assistant Financial Operations Managers

3

0

3

7. 

Assistant Master

2

0

2

8. 

Assistant State Attorney

0

1

1

9. 

Audit Manager

1

0

1

10. 

Chief Accounting Clerk

1

0

1

11. 

Chief Administrative Clerks

4

0

4

12. 

Court Intermediaries

4

1

4

13.

Court Interpreters

6

0

6

14. 

Court Managers

7

2

7

15.

Deputy Directors

12

0

12

16.

Deputy Master

1

0

1

17.

Directors

4

0

4

18.

E-Scheduler Clerk

1

0

1

19.

Family Advocate

1

0

1

20.

Human Resource Practitioner

1

0

1

21.

Internal Auditors

3

0

3

22.

Legal Administration Officers

2

0

2

23.

Maintenance Investigators

2

0

2

24.

Maintenance Officers

2

0

2

25.

Master: Supreme Court

2

0

2

26.

Messenger

1

0

1

27.

Principal Legal Administration Officer

1

0

1

28.

Provisioning Admin Clerks

2

0

2

29.

Registrar

1

0

1

30.

Registry Clerks

2

0

2

31.

Secretaries

2

0

2

32.

Senior Secretaries

2

1

2

33.

Senior Assistant State Attorneys

2

0

2

34.

Senior Communication Officer

1

0

1

35.

Senior Court Interpreters

2

0

2

36.

Senior Human Resource Officer

1

0

1

37.

Senior Legal Admin Officer

1

0

1

38.

Senior Training Officer

1

0

1

39.

Social Workers

2

0

2

40.

State Accountants

3

0

3

41.

State Law Advisors

2

0

2

42.

Vetting Administrator

1

0

1

GRAND TOTAL

174

6

174

2. As indicated in the table above, 174 of the application requests were approved and only six (6) were disapproved.

a) The Department is guided by the Directive on other remunerative work outside the public service issued by the Department of Public Service and Administration, together with the relevant legislation that include Public Service Act and Public Service Regulations. This directive is implementing section 30 of the Public Service Act (Act No. R103 of 1994). The Department may take appropriate disciplinary action in instances where contravention of the policy is established.

b) Applications are considered and approved or disapproved by the Deputy Director-General: Corporate Services in terms of the Departmental Delegations.

c) The Labour Relations Unit in the Department has confirmed that there was no disciplinary processes taken against any employee who contravened with the Directive on performing other remunerative work outside the public service without permission in the past five (5) years. And lastly, the Directive does not require the Head of Department to report to National Treasury on misconduct in relation to performing other remunerative work outside the public service. The Department reports statistical information to the Department of Public Service and Administration and Public Service Commission, as the normal process on reporting in terms of the relevant prescripts – in this instance, disciplinary matters by Director: Employee Relations.

24 March 2021 - NW780

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will she ensure that Harding Burgh Primary School in Matatiele is provided with proper classrooms and sanitation?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

24 March 2021 - NW351

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total number of hectares of land is held in the name of traditional leaders for use by communities in Western Cape, (b) is the name of the responsible traditional leader in each of the areas and (c) government support has been provided in each area since 1 January 2014?

Reply:

a) There is no land held in the name of any traditional leader or traditional community in the Western Cape.

b)  Falls away.

c) Falls away.

24 March 2021 - NW798

Profile picture: Breedt, Ms T

Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2176 on 21 December 2020, she will (a) indicate on what date her department intends to promulgate the draft of the Animal Welfare Bill for public participation, (b) furnish Ms T Breedt with a copy of the socio-economic impact assessment that was submitted to the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and (c) further provide a list of the members of the working group responsible for drafting the specified Bill; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) The date for the gazetting of the draft Animal Welfare Bill has not been set yet. However, as responded to Honourable Winkler to the same question under parliamentary question 2995 in 2020; due to a number of technical capacity constraints, complicated by the issues related to the Covid-19 pandemic situation, the envisaged introduction of the Bill to Parliament in the 2021/2022 financial year was postponed by a year. Consultation with stakeholders on the Bill will be undertaken during the 2021/2022 financial year.

b) The Socio-Economic Impact Assessment that was submitted to the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation is hereby attached.

c) The Bill is drafted by the Animal Welfare Working Group, which consist of the following officials:

    1. Dr Mphane Molefe – DALRRD
    2. Ms Morongwa Senyatsi – DALRRD
    3. Dr Emmanuel Midzi – North West Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
    4. Dr Lea Shuda – Northern Cape Department of Agriculture and Land Reform
    5. Dr Christine Meintjes – KwaZulu Natal Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
    6. Dr Themba Malatse – Limpopo Department of Agriculture
    7. Dr Faculty Baloyi – Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
    8. Dr Lungile Jali – Eastern Cape Department of Rural Development and Agrarian Reform
    9. Dr Thelma Mokgophi – Mpumalanga Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs
    10. Dr Jurgens Barnard – Free State Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
    11. Dr Michael Swart – Western Cape Department of Agriculture.

It should be noted that the last two names on the list above have only recently joined the working group in 2020 and have not yet participated in the drafting of the Bill.

24 March 2021 - NW288

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department has developed a plan for Erf 81, a site owned by the SA National Defence Force which is situated between Bo-Kaap and Tamboerskloof in the Cape Town City Bowl; if not, why not; if so, what is the (a) master plan for the specified site, (b) timeline for development and (c) plan of her department for the (i) long-standing informal structures and occupants on the north-east side of the site, (ii) occupants of the military buildings on the south-east side of the site and (iii) unlawful occupiers?

Reply:

The Erf in question is curently the subject of discussions at the Inter Ministerial Committee on Land Redistribution and the response will be provided once the discussions are finalised.

I

23 March 2021 - NW371

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of compliance monitors who have been appointed to monitor the norms and standards of COVID-19 compliance in the facilities managed by her department?

Reply:

The department has not appointed any compliance monitors to monitor the norms and standards of COVID-19 compliance in the facilities managed by her department. Monitoring of compliance to norms and standards of COVID 19 is an added responsibility to the current existing personnel. In some cases the established structures are used to monitor compliance of norms and standards for COVID 19, for example in facilities that provide services to victims of Gender Based Violence. These facilities utilises established Task Teams across nine provinces to monitor compliance with norms and standards for COVID 19.

National Assembly Written Reply: 371 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW697

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress Grant (SRD Grant), her department took any disciplinary and/or legal steps against the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) whether any steps have been taken to recover the monies from the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any systems have been put in place to ensure that no government employee will be able to fraudulently and/or unlawfully apply for and/or receive the SRD grant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As at the 28th of February 2021, a total of 39672 government employees had applied for the Covid 19 SRD grant. No disciplinary or legal steps have been taken against these government employees because investigations have not yet been concluded. Once the investigations are concluded SASSA will recommend to the relevant Heads of Departments to institute disciplinary action and also to recover money paid over to the individuals.

SASSA has received numerous complaints from people whose ID numbers were used to apply for the Covid 19 SRD grant without their knowledge. Some government employees submitted applications in order to test the system or to assist applicants to apply as all applications were submitted electronically.

The Auditor General flagged 241 government employees who received the Covid 19 SRD grant payment for May 2020. This happened at the inception phase when SASSA did not have access to all the relevant databases. Some of the databases were not up to date, partly because of the lockdown.

2. SASSA has not yet concluded the investigation into the cases that have been flagged by the Auditor General of South Africa. Once the investigations have been concluded, the fraudulent cases will be referred to the relevant government departments and SASSA’s Debt Management unit to recover the money from implicated people.

3. SASSA has implemented a system to ensure that government employees do not receive the SRD grant. Through this system, the applications of 39,672 government employees who applied for the SRD grant were declined.

Monthly, ID numbers of approved and new applications for Covid-19 R350 SRD grant applicants are matched against various databases such as the databases of government employees, namely PERSAL and PERSOL. If the ID number of the Covid SRD grant applicant appears in the databases of government employees, the application is declined.

SASSA is still awaiting the Government Employees Pension Fund database which will strengthen the ability to verify applicants.

 

National Assembly Written Reply: 697 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW372

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of SA Social Security Agency (a) grant pay points and (b) open space pay points that are currently in operation?

Reply:

Currently, all social grant beneficiaries receive their social grants payments in their bank accounts, thus are able to transact electronically (including the withdrawal of funds) at any ATM or retail store with a point of sale device. Through the contract with the South African Post Office, additional access channels have been made available for beneficiaries who have a SASSA/SAPO card. These include post offices and mobile cash pay points.

(a) In addition to the transaction points in the National Payment System (NPS), SAPO also provides an additional 1 611 mobile pay points, and all SAPO branches in communities where the NPS access is limited.

(b) 713 of the 1 611 mobile cash pay points operate in open spaces, as indicated in the table below:

BREAKDOWN OF CASH PAY POINTS PER REGION

REGION

NUMBER OF MOBILE CASH PAY POINTS

NUMBER OF OPEN POINTS

Eastern Cape

507

 292

Free State

36

8

Gauteng

9

0

KwaZulu-Natal

334

192

Limpopo

482

203

Mpumalanga

60

14

Northern Cape

27

0

North West

143

4

Western Cape

13

0

TOTAL

1 611

 713

23 March 2021 - NW374

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the conditions and the state of the kitchen at the Palm Ridge Alcohol and Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Day Clinic in Gauteng; (2) whether the staff at the clinic have been paid their full salaries and timeously in (a) 2019 and (b) 2020; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) months in 2020 were the tranches disbursed on time?

Reply:

1. The kitchen of SANCA EG currently have no food and medication for detoxification. The staff alternate to assist with admissions on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Referrals are done to other Clinics for clients where services cannot be rendered. The Clinic do provide porridge from donations received.

2. (a) The staff a SANCA Eastern Gauteng: Palmridge Clinic were paid their salaries in full, however temporary staff employed for a certain period were paid accordingly. The permanently employed staff were paid on time. However the when Quarterly tranches were delayed and paid in June 2019 and December 2020 respectively, Staff salaries were delayed however was backdated and paid accordingly. This was verified through bank statements and quarterly expenditure reports submitted to the Department by the NPO as part of its compliance documents.

(b) (i) During 2020 financial year, all permanent staff were paid their salaries on time except for salaries of July 2020 which was paid in August 2020. Salaries for October and November 2020 were paid in December 2020 as the NPO only received their tranche on the 07th December 2020. This was verified through bank statements and quarterly expenditure reports submitted to the Department by the NPO as part of its compliance documents.

(b) (ii) The following amounts and dates indicate how funds were disbursed to SANCA EG:

Date

Amount

18 May 2020

R 1 960 388

05 August 2020

R 1 960 337

07 December 2020

R 1 960 337

Attached is the annexure indicating staff salaries and payments for 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years

National Assembly Written Reply: 374 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW304

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the monthly amount of (i) petrol and (ii) vehicle maintenance for the visits of the departmental official to Loeriesfontein, (b) is the number of times that the SA Social Security Agency official, who handles grant applications, visit Loeriesfontein in each month, (c) is the ratio for an official to grant beneficiaries for Loeriesfontein and (d) number of beneficiaries are helped on a daily basis or during each visit?

Reply:

a) The average monthly amount for petrol is

(i) R4 366.00

(ii) Maintenance is performed annually at an average cost of R7 000 if the vehicle is out of warranty.

b) The officials of Nieuwoudtville Local office visit the Loeriesfontein Service point on a weekly basis. More frequent visits are provided as informed by the number of people who need SASSA services.

c) The ratio is 1: 24 grant applications per day per single staff member

d) The average number of applications per day is between 10 and 15. This may increase to 40 on days when medical assessments are done for the disability related grants.

23 March 2021 - NW561

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the children's amendment bill relating to adoption services and in light of the fact that the Republic has had about 700 inter-country adoptions in the past five years, what mechanisms and/or measures are in place to monitor the safety of children in their adopted countries to prevent human trafficking; 2) what steps have been (a) taken against service providers who did not comply with the legal accreditation requirements in the past and/or (b) implemented to rectify the situation?

Reply:

1. The South African Central Authority have put measures in place to prevent child trafficking by entering into inter-country adoption working agreements with foreign countries. In the working agreements there are post adoption services that are expected to be rendered by the accredited foreign adoption agencies for a period of five years to the children and adoptive families.

The foreign accredited adoption agencies are expected to compile post adoption reports twice in the first year then annually which are forwarded to the SA accredited adoption agencies and the SA Central Authority. Engagements on progress are in place on the wellbeing, adjustment and functioning of children and their families.

The Central Authority and the accredited child protection organizations do visit the foreign adoption agencies, Central Authorities and adoptive families to ensure compliance to post adoption measures. During the financial year 2019/2020, some of the officials from the Central Authority and accredited CPO visited Belgium and Denmark.

(2) (a) There are no steps that were taken against any service provider as they all complied with the legal accreditation requirements, none of the service provider will be allowed to provide adoption services if they are non-compliant.

(b) No steps were taken to rectify as the applicants complied with the legal requirements.

National Assembly Written Reply: 561 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW696

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress Grant (SRD Grant), her department has been able to conclusively establish the number of government employees who have fraudulently applied for the SRD Grant; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the total number of government employees who actually received the SRD Grant and (b) is the total amount that the implicated government employees received from the SRD Grant?

Reply:

a) The total number of government employees who received the Covid-19 SRD grant payments as at February 2021 is 241.

b) The total amount paid is R 84 350.00, which was for the month of May 2020 only. Subsequent applications were declined after they were flagged as possible fraudulent applicants that were not eligible for the grant. Investigation regarding this matter is ongoing. Upon completion, SASSA will approach the relevant institution to recover the money, including requesting the institution to take appropriate disciplinary steps.

23 March 2021 - NW602

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether she has found that she has been able to strengthen relationships and support to (a) nongovernmental organisations and (b) non-profit organisations that provide vital services on behalf of the State; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development is mandated by the NPO Act 71 of 1997 to create an enabling environment that create opportunities for the NPOs to thrive.

Note that the country was ravaged by Covid -19 pandemic, the NPO sector could not spared either. During the Covid -19 Pandemic, the Department took major strides in ensuring that the sector is taken care of. The Department has been able to strengthen and provide necessary support to non-profit organisations rendering vital services to vulnerable South African citizens.

In relation to funding of non-profit organisations (NPOs), several interventions were made by the National Department including issuing a circular that was sent to all Provinces in May 2020.

The Circular outlined the measures to be taken in order to avert the delayed non-payment and to speed-up processing of claims and allocation of funds to the Non-profit organizations (NPOs) for the 2020/21 financial year. As part of our support to Provinces, Provinces were advised to use the 2020/21 Service Level Agreements (SLA) and extend them for six months to enable them to pay first trenches.

The Department encouraged provinces to consider a two-tranche payment method, with guidance sought from the National Treasury as a way to speed the transfer of funds to deserving NPOs. The proposed tranche payment significantly reduced the administrative burden associated with processing the transfer payments.

This is considered in the light that most of the NPOs funded by the Department are rendering on-going vital services and as such have a good compliance record with the Department.

Towards executing the function of administering the Non-Profit organisation Act 71 of 1997, the Department ensured that there is continued provision of registration and report submission by NPOs. Due to limitations posed by different Levels of National Lockdown in terms of gatherings and face to face interaction, the Department initiated and strengthened online platforms to ensure continued support for non-profit organisations in the country.

A social media platform was also created to provide NPO related information and to respond to immediate queries posed by organisations. The Department also supported the NPO sector through a social media platform wherein “Know Your NPO Status Campaign” was launched by the Minister in November 2020.

The Campaign was launched through a Webinar and attended by the NPO Sector. The online interaction provided an opportunity for the Minister to engage with the Sector on pertinent issues affecting NPOs including mechanisms to improve compliance with NPO’s related legislations.

In addition; the Department also ensured that prioritisation for registration and issuing of compliant letters was given to organisations that intended to provide COVID related services to communities. Prioritisation of support to such organisations ensured that communities under distress due to COVID 19 pandemic were provided with required services.

National Assembly written Reply: (Question 83 for oral reply converted to written Question 602) of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW498

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the Early Childhood Development-Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF), (a) what are the reasons that the ECD Covid-19 relief package decreased significantly from R1,3 billion announced in July 2020 to R588.8 million announced in November 2020 to R496 million announced in February 2021; (2) whether these funds were not ring-fenced for the ECD sector; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what amount of funding did each provincial social development department receive and (b) how were these amounts determined?

Reply:

(1) (a) The initial indication of R1,3 billion announced in July 2020 was subsequently revised based on the outcome of the assessment of the bid process through the National Treasury. The department received an amount of R588 728 000 from National Treasury. This included an amount of R380 million is allocated for unemployment risk support that will benefit 83 333 existing ECD related workers; R116 million allocated for the support of 25 500 compliance support officers, who are existing staff members at early childhood development programmes that will play a compliance support role within their ECD programmes; R16.5 million for registration support officers who will assist in scaling up registration and R76 million to sustain 1 809 social workers who have been appointed on contract. The R496 million is the total allocated to provide 108 833 ECD workers with income support through existing ECD services (unemployment risk support and compliance support officers).

(2) These funds were ring-fenced for the ECD sector under ECD Conditional Grant.

(3) (a) The Presidential Employment Initiative

funds are allocated as follows:

  • Eastern Cape: R60 million
  • Free State: R39 million
  • Gauteng: R78 million
  • KwaZulu-Natal: R90 million
  • Limpopo: R58 million
  • Mpumalanga: R42 million
  • Northern Cape: R42 million
  • North West: R34 million
  • Western Cape: R53 million

(b) In the absence of workforce data in the ECD sector, the department used the children’s population and the current formula for ECD conditional grant to determine allocations per province which were just the estimates.

National Assembly Written Reply: 498 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW303

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) is the total number of towns that do not have a physical SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) access point or office in the Northern Cape and (b) will she furnish Mrs G Opperman with a list of the specified towns; (2) what are the reasons that Loeriesfontein in the Hantam Local Municipality does not have a SASSA office despite many beneficiaries living there?

Reply:

1(a) currently, there are Seven (7) towns that do not have a physical SASSA access point or office in the Northern Cape.

(b) These are Okiep, Concordia, Nababeep, Carolusberg, Matjieskloof, Fonteintjie and Kleinzee

2. Loeriesfontein is a small town with a population of 2 744 people (Census 2011) and 855 social grant beneficiaries. The town is serviced by the Niewoudtville SASSA Local office staff who visit the area on a weekly basis. On average, 10 -15 people visit the SASSA office per week therefore the weekly visits by the Niewoudtville local office staff is sufficient to take care of the needs of the people of Loeriesfontein.

23 March 2021 - NW563

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to night and Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) shelters available to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and other sexuality and gender diverse (LGBTQI+) community, she will provide Ms N K Sharif with a list of (a) contact details and (b) physical addresses of night and VEP shelters which are (i) operated and (ii) funded by her department in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) which from the provided list of night and VEP shelters are for the sole use of vulnerable members of the LGBTQI+ community?

Reply:

1. Based on the list provided previously on night and Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) shelters, the Department of Social Development (DSD) in response to question (a) and (b) does not have shelters neither any plans to establish exclusive shelters to accommodate Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and other sexuality and gender diverse (LGBTQI+) victims of GBV. (i)Therefore there is no LGBTQI+ specific shelter in operation and (ii) nor any funded by the department.

The DSD subscribes to its obligation to provide psychosocial services, social protection, and respect for human dignity as well as promoting rights of all victims of GBV including LGBTQI+ community. Any shelter exclusive to accommodate LGBTQI+ community will therefore perpetuate forms of discrimination, including labelling, stigmatization and stereotyping thus exposing the said community to unnecessary victimisation. Furthermore, the DSD strives to ensure that services that are provided upholds the principle of no discrimination based on gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, culture, ethnicity and disabilities.

2. None, as all shelters on the list that was provided previously can accommodate LGBTQI+ community. The DSD recommends that the admission criteria in all shelters across the country be inclusive and not discriminate against anyone due to a person’s gender, sexual orientation, disability, race, culture, ethnicity or expression of gender identity. There are therefore no shelters that are for the sole use of the vulnerable members of the LGBTQI+ community that have been established by DSD. This approach is also based the principle of building social cohesion amongst diverse groups and minimize risk related to safety and security of an exclusive LGBTQI+ shelter in a community.

National Assembly Written Reply: 563 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW86

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the tender that has been awarded to a company in order to boost capacity to the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) National Call Centre as well as the communications Company to render support to SASSA, what is the (a) name of the company that was awarded the communications tender and (b) cost of the tender, (2) whether the communications tender was advertised; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) was due process followed in awarding the tender; (3) what is the (a) name of the company that was awarded the call centre tender and (b) cost of the tender; (4) whether the call centre tender was advertised; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) was due process followed in awarding the tender; (5) (a) what number of (i) call centre agents are manning the national SASSA call centre, (ii) employees are employed at each provincial call centre and (b) on average, how long does it take for them to answer a call?

Reply:

1. (a) The company that has been appointed to assist SASSA with the call centre is Altron TMT trading as Bytes People Solutions.

(b) The cost of the tender for a 6 month period is R29 497 500 (VAT inclusive).

2. The communications tender was not advertised but followed a closed bid process. SASSA participated in GCIS RFB 005 2017/2018 and appointed a service provider from the GCIS approved panel of agencies.

a) As indicated above, the tender did not follow an open tender process, but a request for quotations, following a closed bid process, was sent to service providers listed on the GCIS Panel of Agencies on 21 July 2020.

b) Due process was followed in awarding the tender. A request for approval to deviate from a competitive bidding process was submitted to the SASSA Bid Adjudication Committee, where support was obtained. The request was then submitted to National treasury for approval prior to the process being implemented, in accordance with recognised supply chain processes. Approval was granted. The specifications for the service required as well as the bid evaluation process followed approved processes.

3. (a) As indicated under point 1, the company appointed for the call centre is Altron TMT T/A Bytes People Solutions.

(b) The cost of the tender is R29 497 500 (VAT inclusive)

4. The call centre tender was advertised.

a) The tender was advertised on 28 August 2020.

b) Due process was followed in awarding the tender. The tender was advertised, allowing for an open and transparent process. An appointed Bid Evaluation Committee undertook the evaluation of all bids received, the results of which was presented to the Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC). On recommendation of the BAC, the appointment of the recommended company was approved by the Chief Executive Officer, and the award letter signed. The company then accepted the award.

(a) (i) The number of call centre agents in the national SASSA call centre is 30. This includes 9 back office call centre agents who are responsible for the management of all enquiries which come in through email as well as the more challenging enquiries; and 21 front office agents who are directly responsible for manning the telephone lines. This capacity is now supplemented by an additional 300 call centre agents provided by the contracted company, Altron Bytes People Solutions.

(ii) The provision of support in the respective regions is not through regional call centres, but rather help desks, which are manned by SASSA staff members. The number of staff per region is indicated below:

Eastern Cape 4

Free State 5

Gauteng 2 with 5 EPWPs

KwaZulu-Natal 6

Limpopo 4

Mpumalanga 1 with 2 part time staff

Northern Cape 3 and 1 intern

North West 5

Western Cape 3 interns

c) The international standard for responding to calls is that 80% of calls will be responded to within 20 seconds. SASSA does not achieve this standard.

Currently, once a call is accepted in the national call centre, the average time to respond is 5 minutes. However, this does not take into account the time it takes for a call to be accepted, which can be much longer than this. It is a concern that only approximately 35% of the calls made to the call centre are answered. It is this challenge that is being addressed with the contracting of the service provider, to ensure that all calls made to the 0800 60 10 11 number are responded to.

National Assembly Written Reply: 86 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW836

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of learners who are not funded by National Students Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the 2021 academic year, (b) number of students have been funded by NSFAS for the 2021 academic year, (c) is the total number of students who have enrolled in each institution of higher learning for the 2021 academic year and (d) number of students have been financially excluded for the 2021 academic year?`

Reply:

(a) All continuing NSFAS qualifying students who meet the academic and financial criteria will be funded for the 2021 academic year.

(b) Funding decisions for first-time entering students are still in the process following the announcement of the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 11 March 2021.

(c) The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021 from Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Preliminary unaudited data will only be received at the end of April 2021.

Enrolments and registrations are still underway at many universities. The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021. Preliminary unaudited 2021 enrolment data will only be received at the end of April 2022 and final audited data at the end of July 2022.

Below are the approved Ministerial enrolment planning targets for 2020 and 2021.

Institution

Projected Targets

 

2020

2021

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

35 498

37 027

University of Cape Town

28 037

28 174

Central University of Technology

18 255

19 098

Durban University of Technology

30 219

30 439

University of Fort Hare

17 310

17 673

University of Free State

40 271

40 519

University of Johannesburg

49 727

49 969

University of KwaZulu-Natal

47 726

46 829

University of Limpopo

21 995

22 561

Mangosuthu University of Technology

12 980

13 391

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

29 792

30 461

North-West University

63 065

61 054

University of Pretoria

51 978

52 134

Rhodes University

8 714

8 866

University of South Africa

376 000

376 468

University of Stellenbosch

31 690

32 380

Tshwane University of Technology

61 814

62 439

Vaal University of Technology

20 992

22 154

University of Venda

16 992

17 332

Walter Sisulu University

30 269

29 544

University of the Western Cape

24 800

25 060

University of the Witwatersrand

40 935

41 003

University of Zululand

17 920

18 636

University of Mpumalanga

4 218

5 217

Sol Plaatje University

2 512

3 278

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

6 640

6 820

Total

1 090 350

1 098 526

(d) Institutions have different financial clearance concessions in place to deal with outstanding debt before students are able to be registered and to continue with their studies. The registration at various institutions is currently underway as are consultations with students. This information can only be provided upon the conclusion of these consultations and finalisation of the registration processes at each institution.

23 March 2021 - NW672

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

Whether (a) his department makes use of private security firm

Whether (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firm

If not, what is the position in this regard

If so, in each case, what is the:

     

(i)

name of each firm

(ii)

purpose

(iii)

value

(iv)

duration of each specified contract?

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

N/A

G4s Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

To provide 24 hour guarding security services.

The costs payable increase annually as per the Sectorial Determination. Total amounts paid from date of contract to September 2021 will be as follows: R1,344 million in 2018/19, R1,451 million in 2019/20 and R1,569 million in 2020/21.

Apr 2018 – Dec 2022

N/A

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

G4S Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

Provide security services to all CSIR sites to protect people, knowledge, assets and property in cost effective and sustainable manner.

R67,2 million (excluding Value Added Tax).

Five years.

N/A

The Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

ELDNA Security Services.

Security services.

R3,134 million.

Three years.

N/A

The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) makes use of private security firms at two of its sites.

N/A

Site 1: Securi-Team.

Provide 24 hours guarding and monitoring services

R1,857 million.

Five years.

     

Site 2: Eulesaki

Provide security for the site, being a National Key Point.

R104 000 per month

Two years.

N/A

The National Research Foundation (NRF) makes use of private security firms at seven of its Business Units.

N/A

NRF Pretoria Head Office: Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise.

Security and guarding Services at the NRF Pretoria Campus.

R3,159 million.

Five years.

     

South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB) Business Unit: Hi-Tec Security.

After hours alarm monitoring of buildings.

R45 312.

Three years.

     

South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA) and South African Environment Observation Network (SAEON) Business Units: Red Alert.

Guarding Services at two separate sites.

R6,349 million.

Three years.

     

SAEON Business Unit: Palsecurity Services (Pty) Ltd and Top Security Systems (Pty) Ltd.

Alarm system monitoring.

R15 057.

Two years and six months.

       

Office security services in Kimberley.

R5 916.

One year.

     

South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) Business Unit: Virtual Security.

Protection of grounds, access control, perimeter guarding and off-site monitoring.

R820 335.

Three years.

     

South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO) Business Unit: Khulaluntu Security Hlokomela and Transport 2006

Guarding of premises.

R442 801.

One year.

N/A

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

Khensani Security Services.

24-hour security services at the HSRC Pietermaritzburg and Cape Town Offices.

R3,869 million.

Three years.

N/A

The Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) does not make use of private security firm.

ASSAf’s Office is located in Persequor Park, Pretoria. Security is provided by Eris, the property

managers.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(a)

Departm ent

(a) Whether your Department makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) Name of firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv) Duration

 

Yes

Static Protection

Services (National

Skills Fund - NSF)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R464 000.00

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

 

Yes

Ebukhosini TP Security (INDLELA)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R253 863, 72

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

(b)

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

CHIETA

No. Security is provided by the landlord.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

MICT SETA

No. Security services is

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

included in the lease agreement with the landlord.

       

CHE

Yes

Titanium Security Services

Provision of security services: Guarding and armed response, with one security personnel during the day and one at night, the service is for 24 hours and 7 days a week.

R 1 055 092.44

1 April 2019 to 31

March 2022

FOODBEV

Yes

Selkirk Security Services Ltd

Access control services, such as:

  • Preventing

unauthorized entries

to the office premises.

  • Monitoring and

recording all activity around a protected facility 24 hours a day.

R 347 912.35 (annualised value)

R 317 552.35

(to date: 28

February 2021)

1 April 2020 to 31

March 2021

SAQA

Yes

  1. Dikgaetsedi Security Services

(Pty) Ltd

  1. Letiqa Twins

Trading (Pty) Ltd

To protect SAQA’s building, movable assets, employees and clients.

The risk is linked to the insurance premium.

R 4 066 214.04

R 5 055 553.26

1 March 2018- 28 February 2021

1 March 2021 – 29 February 2024

INSETA

Yes

Gilija Tactical

To provide security services to INSETA that

R 358 800.00

01 April 2020 to

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Response

includes:

  • Guarding INSETA premises and assets.
  • Patrol services
  • Screening staff and visitors for Covid-19
  • Doing other security screening to visitors
 

31 March 2021

   

National security

To provide armed response and CCTV

services

R 367 768.91

July 2020 to June 2025

PSETA

No

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

EWSETA

Yes

Imvula Quality

Protection Services

Safeguarding Cape

House building in

Marshalltown

Johannesburg which is currently vacant

R 946 129.09

01 August 2020 to

31 August 2021

FASSET

Yes

ADT

Alarm system with response to the office building.

R 37 900.04

12 months

CATHSSETA

Yes

Jubzin Security Services

Provision of security services at its Head

Office in Killarney

(Johannesburg) and two

(2) regional offices in the Kwa-Zulu Natal and

Western Cape

R 848 240.00

8 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

provinces

   

Services

SETA

Yes

Good Work Security (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm and electrical fence at Services SETA Head Office.

R 2 916 000.00 per annum

 
   

Exodec 365 cc

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA North West (Klerksdorp) provincial office

R 342 240.00 per annum

 
   

Rise Security

Services (Pty) Ltd

Bohlale Risk

Protection

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA

Mpumalanga

(Nelspruit) provincial office

R 340 313.82 per annum

 
     

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm

R 338 934.86 per annual

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

at Services SETA free state (Bloemfontein) provincial office

   
   

Red Alert TSS (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA (Western Cape) provincial office.

R 308 221.90 per annum

 
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (Port Elizabeth) provincial office

R 291 000.00 per annum

 
   

Fuyatha General Trading

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA KZN (Durban) provincial office.

R 326 530.56 per annum

 
   

TJ Protection Services

To provide physical armed response, maintenance, and

R 288 475.00 per annum

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Northern Cape office (Kimberly) provincial Office.

   
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (East London) provincial office.

R 291 000.00 per annum

 

FP&M SETA

Yes

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7042)

  • Office Security - Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature

R 289 104.05

6 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

monitoring

 Administration

   
   

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7372)

  • Office Security Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature monitoring
  • Administration

R 278 754,05

6 months

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

(PO/2020/6950)

Arlam System and Arm

Respond Services -

Durban Office

R 13 456.56

24 Moths

   

Cortac (Pty) Ltd

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services – Head office

R 10 532.88

Month to Month

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

National Security and Fire

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services –

Cape Town office

R 11 711.88

Month to Month

SASSETA

Yes

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services

Provision of security services

R 2 319 669.27

13 August 2018 -

31 October 2020

   

Mphosha Security Services

Provision of security services including CCTV monitoring and armed response

R 5 724 590.47

28 October 2021 -

31 March 2023

AgriSETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

To render Security Services at AgriSETA premises

R 1 196 436.57

1 April 2020 –

31 March 2023

HWSETA

Yes

ADT

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 2 298.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

Adams Analytical

Detection and security

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 4 073.91

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 1 476.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 4 740.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Bloemfontein

R 2 637.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

National security

Security and monitoring -Bloemfontein

R 5 320.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring – East London

R 1 045.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Hartwig and Henderson

Security and monitoring - East London

R 3 805.00

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Kimberley

R 2 259.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

Top Security

Security and monitoring - Kimberly

R 3 428.67

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 1 546.00

01 April 2020 –

31 May 2020

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 3 059.94

01 June 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Axon Security

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 2 414.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 3 778.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

Chubb Security

Security and monitoring - Polokwane

R 2 108.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

W&RSETA

(Head

Office)

No. 24 Hour security is provided by the landlord for the Office Park.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(Eastern

Cape)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Red Alert

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 582.52 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Hartwig & Henderson Alarms (provided by the Landlord through

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 2 127.50 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Free State)

 

the lease agreement)

     
 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Imvula Security

Bloemsec

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Guarding, Monitoring and Armed Response

R 1 011.15 monthly for Guarding

R 309.01 monthly for armed response

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Nkanga Security,

Cleaning & Training

Provision of guarding services. This includes armed guarding

R 449 779.00 per annum

O1 February 2021

- 28 February

2022

(Kwa-Zulu

Natal)

(Gauteng

North – Pretoria)

(Limpopo)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 850 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Fidelity ADT

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 6 607.90 Monthly

12 Months ending 30 September 2021.

 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Ubuntu Security Services

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 526.00 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

Yes

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 340.00 Monthly

On a month-tomonth contract until moving to new premises which is planned for June 2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Western

Cape)

Yes, at the new premises.

Mastiff Security Services

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 3 140.00 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

LGSETA

Yes

  1. Broubart Alarms
  1. National Security and Fire

For alarm system

R 3 372 annually

R5 622 annually

3 years

ETDP SETA

Yes

Hlanganani Ezweni Trading and Projects, registration number: 2009/206402/2

General security services at North West

Provincial Office

R 322 179.12

1 August 2018 to

31 December

2020

   

Vuyani and Socks Security Reg no.

2006/162205/23

General security services at North West Provincial Office

R 96 000.00

1 January 2021

- 30 June 2021

   

National Security and Fire Reg no.

1950/036293/07

Armed response

security services at the

Limpopo Provincial

Office

R 11 508.96

Month to month until 30 June 2021 while the organisation is finalising process of appointing a new service provider

MQA

Yes. Our offices make use of a private security company, however the security contract is managed and paid by the

Anerley Road Body Corporate

Security company

Guarding of premises

R 540 192.00 for 2020/21. This is the

MQA portion of

1 year on an annual renewal basis

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

Body Corporate. We then pay

our portion via our monthly

management fee

name: 24/7

 

the annual expense

 

QCTO

Yes

i. Bidvest Protea

Coin ii. PABC Security

Solution

  1. For the Alarm system
  1. One (1) physical

security at the entrance of the building

  1. R 852 per month
  1. R 12 800 per month
  1. Month by month
  1. 5 years,

(linked to the contract duration of the lease)

TETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

Provision of Security to TETA Randburg offices

R 1 409 160.00

01 April 2019 –

31 March 2021

CETA

Yes

Bredasdorp Armed Response

Provision of Security

Services including

Armed response for

Bredasdorp office

R 334 926.15

23 September 2020 -

23 September

2021

   

CKN Security Services CC

Provision of Security

Services for CETA Head

Office

R 373 328.09

R 50 830.00

30 October 2020 -

28 February 2021

25 February 2020

- 15 March 2021

   

HM Security and Armed Response

Provision of Security Services including armed response for Bethal (CETA -Gert

Sibande Skills

Development Centre)

R 475 629.00

5 November 2020

- 5 December

2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

NSF

Yes

  1. Cannabe Security and Projects
  1. Static Protection

Services (Pty)

Ltd

Physical Security

R3 196 800.00

R 464 400.00

1 June 2017 - 31 May 2020

The contract was extended from

1 June 2020 to

31 December 2020 at an amount R799 200.00

01 January 2021

– 30 April 2021

BANKSETA

 

Yes

Fidelity ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm

system for East London office

R 17 604.50

 
   

4B Protection

Services (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm system for Head Office -

Vorna Velley

R 154 985.78

 

23 March 2021 - NW564

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department funds any (a) programmes and (b) non-governmental organisations that offer services to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Intersex community; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (i) services are rendered and (ii) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Department of Social Development provide funding to various programmes targeting all vulnerable group in society in terms the legislation and policy prescripts. (b) The criteria that is utilised for funding non-governmental organisations is designed to ensure that funded organisations (i) render services to the benefit of all vulnerable groups. There is no specific sets of rules that are for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Intersex community. But the emphasis is on ensuring that services rendered are equitable, accessible, and transformative and promote social cohesion in the broader community. (ii) For example in relation to LGBTQI+ Community, the DSD provide ongoing sensitization training to frontline staff both the DSD and from non-governmental organisations as part of promoting non-discriminatory practices as well as mainstreaming of service delivery to respond to the needs of all vulnerable group.

National Assembly Written Reply: 564 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW703

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether the Vangasali early childhood development campaign has been able to determine if any (a) previously registered, (b) conditionally registered and/or (c) or unregistered early childhood development centres in each province have (i) temporarily and/or (ii) permanently closed their doors since 27 March 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what monitoring mechanism does her department have in place to determine what number of registered, conditionally registered and/or unregistered early childhood development centres in each province have temporarily and/or permanently closed their doors?

Reply:

(1) The Vangasali early childhood development campaign was not intended to determine if ECD services are temporary or permanently closed. It was aimed at confirming ECD services that are (a) registered (fully or conditional) and establish a database of those that are (b) unregistered in each province.

(i) National Treasury granted the department an allocation of R496 million as an ECD Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF). The allocation seeks to minimise the loss of income, support continued operation and reduce the risk of permanent closure. This is implemented through ECD Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF) with a focus on providing additional financial support towards the ECD workforce as part of a once-off temporary intervention, through ECD programmes. The ECD-ESRF will provide 108,833 ECD related workers with income support through about 28,283 existing ECD programmes (registered and unregistered centres and programmes) that applied to this Fund.

(2) The provincial departments of social development continue to submit monthly reports indicating the number of ECD programmes that have reopened. This include registered, conditionally registered and unregistered early childhood. These reports are consolidated and presented at Heads of Social development structure constituted by EXCO and provincial Heads of Department, chaired by the accounting officer of the department.

With the implementation of the ESRF, provincial social development offices will be monitoring the ECD programmes to determine whether the paid ECD programmes have reopened 60 days after receipt of the funds.

23 March 2021 - NW702

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the Vangasali early childhood development campaign, what (a) is the current status of (i) registered, (ii) conditionally registered and (iii) unregistered early childhood development centres in each province and (b) has she found to have been the (i) successes and (ii) challenges of the Vangasali early childhood development campaign to date?

Reply:

The Vangasali campaign is progressing fairly well and is scheduled to continue until at least end of March 2022. There are three phases to Vangasali, the first was data collection which happened between June and October 2020 and resulted in a database of 52,288 ECD services which includes centre and non-centre based services.

Phase 2 focussed on orientation of provincial, district and local officials from DSD and Environmental Practitioners at local level in preparation for phase 3.

The Phase 3 will then focus on the registration massification which will commence in 2021/22 financial year.

(a)Current status on registration:

PROVINCE

(i) NUMBER OF FULLY REGISTERED

(ii)NUMBER OF CONDITIONALLY REGISTERED

(iii)NUMBER OF UNREGISTERED

SERVICES

EC

1 174

1 816

1 685

FS

310

972

1 674

GP

1 242

624

13 717

KZN

1 696

1 854

4 516

LP

478

3 021

2 695

MP

578

919

3 011

NC

95

197

660

NW

386

842

2 188

WC

850

635

4 839

TOTAL

6 423

10 880

34 985

 

(b)(i) The campaign was a success as the department was able to get the data base of the majority of ECD services that are not registered. This will assist the department in planning on assisting those services to be supported to register.

This database will be used in phase 2 of the project to drive registration massification and verify the existence of all these services.

Phase 2 began in October 2020 and builds on the great collaboration with Department of Health, Environmental Health Directorate that has been ongoing over the last four years. Phase 2 has so far resulted in the following:

  • Orientation of 474 DSD officials and 160 Environmental Health officials on the Vangasali Registration Toolkit in all 52 districts/metropolitan municipalities
  • Vangasali Social Service Professionals Manual on ECD Registration has been developed.
  • 22,000 Standardised Vangasali ECD Registration Application Packs (available in 7 official languages) were printed and will be distributed to DSD Districts by end March 2021.
  • ECD Registration Framework Rollout for ECD Service Assessment Visits has been developed
  • Online ECD Registration Management Tool has been developed.
  • Registration Jamborees have begun in 4 provinces and the remaining provinces will begin registration Jamborees this month once the ECD stimulus administration is complete. We are targeting 10,000 new ECD services to enter the registration system in the next 12 months.

Phase 3 of Vangasali is in the planning phase and involves bringing sector wide collaboration on resourcing and improving infrastructure at ECD services, drawing in the private sector, civil society and government resources into a focused effort on improving ECD services directly in line with norms and standards.

(ii) Some of the challenges that have been identified during the campaign include amongst the other:

  • Duplications
  • Missing information on the data base that makes it difficult to follow up on the service to be assisted.

The data has been cleaned to deal with the duplicates. The data is now instrumental during verification process on the ECD Stimulus Relief Package to check the applicants against the Vangasali data base.

23 March 2021 - NW765

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of (a) students are financially excluded at each university for the 2021 academic year and (b) the specified students were funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

(a) Institutions are currently finalising the 2020 academic year whilst others are busy with registrations for the 2021 academic year. At this stage, institutions are unable to provide data/information for 2021 until the above processes have been concluded.

(b) With regard to NSFAS students, the information will be available once registrations and funding decisions have been made including funding decisions appeals and the outcomes thereof.

23 March 2021 - NW635

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has provided any support to early childhood development (ECD) centres that could not generate any revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what total number of ECD centres did her department provide support to?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development has provided support to early childhood development (ECD) centres, which include ECD centres that could not generate any revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 and 2021 in the following ways to mitigate the impact of the minimum health, safety and social distancing measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 (including lockdowns) due to the national state of disaster:

  • The provincial Departments of Social Development, by direction of the Minister of Social Development continued with the payment of subsidy to 626 574 children accessing registered funded ECD programmes through equitable share and conditional grant, irrespective whether they were open or not.
  • The conditional grant for ECD’s infra-structure component (as this could not proceed under the lockdown restrictions) was repurposed to provide essential protective personal equipment (PPEs) to assist ECD centres to comply with COVID 19 health and safety requirements. A total of 13 780 ECD centres were supported.
  • The Department of Social Development also applied for the Presidential Employment Stimulus as a measure to support the ECD sector, an amount of R496 million was received from the National Treasury in this regard. The allocation seeks to minimise the loss of income, support continued operation and reduce the risk of permanent closure. This is implemented through ECD Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF) with a focus on providing additional financial support towards the ECD workforce as part of a once-off temporary intervention, through ECD programmes. The ECD-ESRF will provide 108,833 ECD related workers with income support through about 28,283 existing ECD programmes (registered and unregistered centres and programmes) that applied to this Fund. The process for the payment of those who applied and verified is currently underway.

23 March 2021 - NW376

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the total number of children who are living with disabilities in each town in (i) Hantam and (ii) Karoo-Hoogland Municipalities and (b) kind of disabilities are the children living with mostly in Calvinia?

Reply:

The Department renders, as one of the programmes, services to Parents and Children with severe and profound Intellectual disabilities accessing Day-care centres (Partial care services). We work in a co-ordinated manner with provinces in ensuring the mobilisation of Parents and identification of children with disabilities. Whilst the information provided in response to this parliamentary question was sourced from the DSD disability programme and SASSA, the DSD programme is hard at work with the identification and mobilizing parents to ensure an updated database.

The shared information is the consolidated data inputs from DSD disability programme and the SASSA Provincial office.:

a) Total number of children with disabilities:

NO

MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL OFFICE AREA

NUMBER

(i)

Hantam

Calvinia

18

   

Brandvlei

12

   

Niewoudtville and Louriesfontein

16

TOTAL

   

46

       

(ii)

Karoo Hoogland

Williston

20

   

Frazerburg and Sutherland

19

TOTAL

   

39

GRAND TOTAL

   

85

b) Types of disabilities in identified children in the Calvinia Area:

8 Physical Disabilities

2 Cerebral Palsy

2 Multiple disabilities

6 Intellectual Disability

Total: 18

                                                                                           

National Assembly Written Reply: 376 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW863

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Of the applications received for the Early Childhood Development Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF), (a) what number of applications are ECDs that are currently closed and have committed to open within 60 days, (b) where are the ECDs located and (c) how will her department assist the ECDs within the prescribed period of 60 days?

Reply:

(a) Of the applications received, thus far no ECD programme has been identified as being closed with the requirement to commit to open within 60 days. However, the national Department of Social Development together with the provincial Departments of Social Development are currently in the process of conducting document and physical verifications. Thus, only after the conclusion of this process, the department will have an indication of the number ECDs that are currently closed and have committed to open within 60 days.

(b) Thus far, no ECD programme has been identified as being closed with the requirement to commit to open within 60 days.

(c) The Provincial Departments of Social Development will continue to provide assistance upon request where needed within their mandate to ECD programmes, including those, if any, that were closed and need assistance towards their re-opening.

23 March 2021 - NW474

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether the post of Senior Manager: Human Resource Capital in the SA Social Security Agency is vacant, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for how long has the post remained vacant; (2) whether the specified post is a critical position for her department; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) are the reasons that it has not been filled?

Reply:

1.The post of Senior Manager: Human Resource Capital does not exist on the approved structure of SA Social Security Agency, however there is a vacant post of Senior Manager: Human Operations Management which has been vacant since 01 July 2019.

2. The post is critical, however due to CoE budget cut during the 2020/2021 financial year, the post could not be prioritised for filling. The post of Senior Manager: Labour Relations was prioritised due to a need to promote and ensure sound working relations, manage the collective bargaining processes and facilitate labour relations, dispute resolutions in cases of grievances and discipline. The post was filled with effect from 04 January 2021

National Assembly Written Reply: 474 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW766

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What measures will be put in place to (a) assist students who were unable to write exams due to the challenges brought by lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 with no access to (i) data, (ii) laptops and/or (iii) learning material and (b)(i) ensure that the specified students do not repeat the academic year and (ii) support the students during the continued lockdown?

Reply:

a) Universities have each put in place different measures to support students during the COVID-19 lockdown period that affected the 2020 academic year.  The information provided below is not specific to any one institution, but rather provides a system overview. Specific information would have to be obtained from individual institutions. 

According to the February COVID-19 lockdown monitoring report received by the Department, there were few students who remained disengaged from their studies. Universities adopted emergency remote multi-modal teaching and learning methodologies in line with their own resources and circumstances. In some institutions, this meant online learning and teaching support and in others the delivery of print-based teaching and learning materials. Many universities also assisted students with the acquisition of laptops and in the provision of data.  

Universities also utilised different strategies for assessments and put in place a number of different strategies to engage students. These include:

  • Designating the first two to three months of 2021 to be an adjustment period (a catch-up period) including the identification of students with one or two modules outstanding for the completion of their degrees with the focus to provide additional support to students who were left behind in 2020. 
  • Students received tuition and assistance and were also allowed the opportunity to resubmit assignments where applicable as well as sit for deferred activities or reassessments.
  • Students who had not been in regular contact with lecturers were contacted through telephone calls, emails, and SMS. 
  • Student leaders in some institutions also assisted to contact students who had been out of regular contact with universities. 
  • Students who had struggled to engage with their studies during lockdown were able to return to campus when it was possible to return. 
  • Some institutions scheduled supplementary examinations for February - March 2021. 
  • Some institutions provided additional assessment opportunities for students who could not complete their assessments. 
  • Extensions for the submission of continuous assessment tasks for students who were delayed by the late arrival of laptops.

b) During the 2020 academic year, the Department monitored teaching and learning at universities through a monitoring report, which will be redesigned for the 2021 academic year. This will allow the Department to report at a high level on some of the indicators, including access to data and devices. 

Three main types of programmes are offered at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges, i.e. NATED Report 191 Engineering Studies which are offered in Trimesters, NATED Report 191 Business and Services Studies which are offered in Semesters, and the National Certificate (Vocational) [NCV] which are offered as year programmes. In 2020, the Department took a decision to reduce the number of Trimesters offered from 3 to 2 and Semesters from 2 to 1 in order to cater for the loss of teaching and learning time during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown periods. The academic calendar for the NCV was extended.

For Report 191 programmes, those students who would not have managed to write their examinations in any of the trimesters and semester in 2020 would be accommodated in the normal academic trimesters and/or semesters in 2021. The NCV students who could not write their examinations in 2020 will have an opportunity to write their examinations during the supplementary period which runs from 08 March 2021 to 01 April 2021.

23 March 2021 - NW522

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes, there were staff members performing remunerative overtime duty during the past five financial years.

(1)(b) Information pertaining to staff members who have been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to 28 February 2021is depicted in the attached Annexure A.

(2)(a) Remunerative overtime duty is permitted when prior approval is obtained on the pro forma “Request for approval to work remunerated overtime duty”; work performed is in excess of normal working hours; in circumstances where an abnormal high workload cannot be managed by other more cost-effective arrangements; or when an employee must perform the duties over and above his/her normal duties as a result of another employee who is on prolonged sick leave or maternity leave. Members of the Senior Management Service are not entitled to compensation for overtime duty. Employees may only perform remunerative overtime duty from date of approval by the delegated authority. The monthly compensation for authorised overtime duty may not exceed 30% of the employee’s monthly basic salary.

(2)(b) The authority to approve remunerative overtime duty has been delegated to the Chief Director: Human Capital Management.

(2)(c) None.

(2)(d) Not applicable.

National Assembly Written Reply: 522 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 March 2021 - NW399

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the fact that many SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grant recipients are still experiencing numerous problems with unauthorised deductions from their grants, and in view of the fact that when the gold SASSA cards were introduced grant recipients were told that the cards are totally safe and cannot be duplicated, what (a) measures does the department intend to put in place to resolve the ongoing problem of illegal deductions from grant recipients, (b) total number of SASSA officials have been prosecuted for their involvement in fraud over the past 12 months and (c) total amount has SASSA lost due to fraud during the past 12 months?

Reply:

a) The introduction of the SASSA/SAPO card has addressed the issue of unauthorised deductions. Unauthorised stop orders or debit orders are not allowed off the SASSA/SAPO card account. The only deductions which are allowed off social grants are premiums for funeral policies, in accordance with Regulation 26A to the Social Assistance Act.

These deductions are managed by SASSA, before the social grant is paid, and are only effected with the consent of the beneficiary. The system is secure, and it is very unlikely that any unauthorised or illegal deductions are occurring; however, should this be the case, details can be forwarded to SASSA for further investigation.

In instances where social grant beneficiaries elected to receive the social grant into their personal bank accounts, they are able to authorise deductions and stop orders; and cancel these if needed, with their bank.

It is possible that abuse of deductions may occur in this commercial banking space. However, SASSA does not have any control over accounts held with commercial banks. Should a beneficiary have challenges with their bank, they can choose to have their grant paid via the SASSA/ SAPO payment system, which does not allow for deductions.

b) To date, 17 SASSA staff have been prosecuted for their involvement in fraud over the past 12 months.

c) The total amount that is attributed to fraud during the last 12 months from February 2020 to January 2021 is reported to be R17,279,523.95.

This amount mainly consists of money lost through SASSA cards that were fraudulently re-issued within the South African Post Office environment. This loss is covered SAPO which is responsible for the reimbursement of social grant beneficiaries who have been negatively affected by these fraudulent transactions.

19 March 2021 - NW700

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) was the (i) annual income of the Table Mountain National Park (TMNP) (aa) in the 2019-20 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2020 and (ii) breakdown of each sector of income from (aa) access fees at Cape Point and Boulders Beach, (bb) the Aerial Cableway company, (cc) permits and Wild Cards, (dd) picnic sites, and/or (ee) any other specified forms of income and (b) total amount of this income is reinvested into the TMNP?

Reply:

 

(i) (aa) In the 2019/20 financial year, the Table Mountain National Park generated R371657 366 in revenue.

(bb) Since the start of the 2020/21 financial year, the Table Mountain National Park

generated R23 531114 in revenue.

(ii) The detailed breakdown of each section of income is provided on the table below:

Table 1. Table Mountain National Park Revenue streams

Question

Income Description

2019-20

2020 - 21

   

Apr 2019 Mar 2020

(12 months)

Apr 2020 – Feb 2021
(11 months)

(a)(ii)(aa)

Cape Point

R216 960 043

R 7 496 115

 

Boulders

R90 502 407

R 2498 787

(a)(ii)(bb)

Table Mountain Aerial Cableway

Concession

R39 795 627

R 5 217 361

(a)(ii)(cc)

My Green - and My Activity Card

R3 374 628

R 2 643 888

(a)(ii)(dd)

Picnic Sites

R2 757 167

R 1 251 262

(a)(ii)(ee)

Tourism Income

R7 588 972

R 2 868 400

 

Other

R10 678 522

R 1 555 301

Tourism income includes Accommodation, Recreational Permits, Trail Fees, etc.

 

Other includes the other Filming, Rent Received, etc.

   

Total Revenue

R371657 366

R 23 531 114

  1. The amount re-invested in operations for the 2019/20 financial year was R99 481 040. In the 2020/21 financial year, R74498 832 has been reinvested into operations.

Table 1. Table Mountain National Park Revenue streams

Question

2019•20

Apr 2019 - Mar 2020

Income Description

2020-21

     

(a)(ii)(aa)

Cape Point

 
 

Boulders

 

(a)(ii)(bb)

Table Mountain Aerial Cableway

Concession

R39 795 627

R 5 217 361

(a)(ii)(cc)

My Green - and My Activity Card

R3 374 628

R 2 643 888

(a)(ii)(dd)

Picnic Sites

R2 757 167

R 1 251 262

(a)(ii)(ee)

Tourism Income

R7 588 972

R 2 868 400

 

Other

R10 678 522

R 1 555 301

Tourism Income includes Accommodation, Recreational Permits, Trail

Fees, etc.

 

Other includes the other Filming, Rent

Received, etc.

   

Total Revenue

R371657 366

R23 531 114

b) The amount re-invested in operations for the 2019/20 financial year was R99 481 040. In the 2020/21 financial year, R74 498 832 has been reinvested into operations.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: .18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW709

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether, with reference to the proposed new nuclear build, his department conducted any (a) feasibility studies and/or (b) business or financial case studies for new nuclear generation in the past two years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details; 2) In view of the fact that the Integrated Resource Plan 2019 (IRP 2019) makes no provision for the procurement of new nuclear generation as indicated on table 5 on page 42 of the gazetted IRP, on what basis has he committed to procure 2500MW of new nuclear generation by 2024 in his Ministerial Performance Agreement; 3) Why is he prioritising nuclear power generation ahead of other generation solutions despite ESKOM’s admission that nuclear energy is neither a least-cost, nor a short-term solution to the electricity crisis in the Republic? NW828E

Reply:

1. Whether, with reference to the proposed new nuclear build, his department conducted any (a) feasibility studies and/or

The Department has in the past, conducted at least 13 feasibility studies towards a framework for the realisation of the Nuclear New Build Programme. These include amongst others the International Atomic Energy Agency’s peer review expert mission on Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review. As result of this, a number of studies and strategies were developed to address identified issues raised for preparation toward procurement of the 9600MW nuclear programme previously. These feasibility studies provided the necessary foundation from which to prepare for the procurement of the 2500MW nuclear new build programme. Some of the relevant feasibility Studies included:

  1. Study on comparative analysis of Shale Gas to power versus Nuclear Power in SA
  2. Benchmark of Procurement Framework
  3. Cost of Nuclear Power
  4. Owner-Operator and Financing Structures
  5. Finance Options Models Solutions
  6. Economic Impact of Localisation of Nuclear New Build Programme

(b) business or financial case studies for new nuclear generation in the past two years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details;

Having those relevant studies as a basis, following the IRP2019 call for the smaller capacity of 2500MW the Department sought to update its information with the latest developments in the nuclear industry by testing the market appetite for the deployment of the Nuclear New Build Programme in South Africa. In June 2020, Department went out to test the market by issuing a non-binding Request for Information (RFI) for the 2500 MW of nuclear capacity. The process of finalising the RFI assessment is underway and this will culminate to into the implementation strategy, roadmap and procurement framework.

2. In view of the fact that the Integrated Resource Plan 2019 (IRP 2019) makes no provision for the procurement of new nuclear generation as indicated on table 5 on page 42 of the gazetted IRP, on what basis has he committed to procure 2500MW of new nuclear generation by 2024 in his Ministerial Performance Agreement;

The Department has been implementing the IRP2019 since it was promulgated in 2019 to provide sustainable energy mix to address the country energy needs with various energy technologies that are being rolled out. The IRP does not pronounce on procurement. It is a plan for electricity that is based on least cost calculations and policy adjustments. There are a number of steps in the IRP development process, one of the final steps is policy adjustment. The policy adjusted decision of an approved Integrated Resource Plan of 2019, Decision 8 states: “Commence preparations for a nuclear build programme to the extent of 2500 MW at a pace and scale that the country can afford because it is a no-regret option in the long term”. The Minister’s Section 34 Determination in terms of the Electricity Regulations Act No. 4 of 2006, as amended, is where provision for procurement of electricity generation is made. The policy Decision 8 of the IRP2019 provides the basis upon which the Minister has committed to procure 2500MW of new nuclear generation by 2024 in his Ministerial Performance Agreement;

The preparations leading to the procurement in 2024 have already started taking into account:

  1. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in the DMRE 2020-2025 Strategic Plan and the Annual Performance Plan
  2. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in Policy Position 8 of the IRP 2019
  3. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in the Performance Agreement of the Minister.
  4. That the 2500 MW Nuclear Build Programme is contained in the 2019-2024 MTSF Priorities.

The preparation for nuclear power plant is long lead-time infrastructure project and takes up to about 12 years from the planning until the commission power plant to the grid to generate electricity. These preparatory activities include but are not limited to design, siting, procurement, construction and commissioning of the nuclear power station beyond 2030. Most of the baseload coal fired power plants will be decommissioned beyond 2030 and based on the long lead times for a nuclear programme, starting the process early will yield a no regret option taking into account that nuclear is a clean baseload source of power.

3. Why is he prioritising nuclear power generation ahead of other generation solutions despite ESKOM’s admission that nuclear energy is neither a least-cost, nor a short-term solution to the electricity crisis in the Republic? NW828E

The Department has a responsibility to implement the approved IRP in totality to ensure security of energy supply for the country. It is not true that nuclear is being prioritised. Since the promulgation of the initial IRP 2010-30 and the subsequent revised IRP 2019, the only other technologies to be commissioned in line with these plans have not included nuclear. We have procured more renewable energy technologies and we continue to do so and nuclear has not been one of those. Even with the section 34 determinations following the IRP 2019, Nuclear energy is being subjected to a robust public participation process prior to NERSA’s concurrence. It is therefore not true to imply that nuclear is brought in as short-term solution despite it having policy adjusted into the IRP post the modelling process. It must be noted that the IRP does not factor in a number of issues such as hidden costs including the grid costs, balancing costs, systems costs, job creation, local industry development, geopolitics, labour movement dynamics and other related aspects. In addition, the IRP modelling process used the average capital cost of nuclear projects as US$5000/kWe whilst unlike other energy sources, nuclear projects have shown to have a wide range from as low as US$2000. After testing the market, we may arrive at a cost far lower than any other energy source possible, and this is the reason why it will be prudent to move forward with procurement of nuclear power. In addition, unlike most other energy sources which have lifetimes and loans suit limited private investor positions of short-term returns, nuclear power plants have lifetimes exceeding 60 years. Koeberg is a prime example of this and has shown to be the cheapest of all energy sources currently on the grid. Even after 20 years when a nuclear plant has been paid off (due to market limitations on loan durations), the plants will continue to generate electricity at the lowest operational cost. Each energy source must be looked at for its merits, and hence a balanced energy mix of all sources is good for South Africa.

19 March 2021 - NW751

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With regard to the Construction Health and Safety Examinations offered by the SA Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions, (a) what total number of persons are (i) waiting to write the examinations and (ii) in the process of registering for the examinations, (b) what are the reasons for the delay in the examinations, (c) what steps have been taken to address the delay, (d) how often are the examinations offered and (e) on what date will the next examination take place?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a)(i) I have been informed by the Department that the total number of the persons waiting to write the examinations is 1138.

(ii) The total number of persons in the process of registering for examinations is 2243.

(b) The examinations were delayed by the advent of the Covid-19 pandemic and the resultant lockdowns which had restrictions on gatherings.

(c) The Council adopted the principle of first in first out (FIFO) to address the backlog of those who need to sit for examinations. In addition, the Council is currently developing an online examination portal which will be operational in the new financial year.

(d) Notwithstanding the Covid-19 challenges, under normal circumstances the examinations are conducted monthly.

(e) The next examinations will be conducted from 24 March 2021.

19 March 2021 - NW689

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether (a) his department and (b) any entity reporting to him make use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

  1. Yes, as set out below:

i. Name of Firm

ii. Purpose

iii. Value in Rand of Contract

iv. Duration of contract

Dibakoane Security (Pty) Ltd

Physical Guarding Security of Block G to protect Government assets and all occupants of Block G.

Total Value

R3 467 444.05

3 years.

Procurement through a bid process

Rainprop (RF) (Pty) Ltd

Physical and monitoring security of the dtic campus and perimeter to protect the campus and all occupants of the dtic campus.

Monthly payment:

R678 839 as at Feb 2021 (a service element of monthly PPP unitary payment charge)

25 years

In terms of the Public-Private Partnership (PPP)

(b) and (per public entity responses): Yes, as set out below:

No.

Entity

(b)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)

(b)(iv)

1.

B-BBEE Commission

The B-BBEE Commission does not make use of any private security firms. It currently operates the dtic campus and the dtic is responsible for security of the campus. The B-BBEE Commission has employed only one (1) security official on its structure for the daily security requirements for its staff and offices

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

2.

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

The CIPC does make use of a private security firms

CIPC SSC Cape Town

Royal Security

Private security firms at CIPC SSC safeguarding of CIPC assets and personnel within the office and also includes access control in duties terms of the ‘Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicle Act, 1985 (Act 53 of 1985) Monday to Friday 06h00 to 18h00

R1 129 676.55

Three (3) years

     

CIPC SSC JHB

Kgaogelo Motau General Trading

Private security firms at CIPC SSC safeguarding of CIPC assets and personnel within the office and also includes access control in duties terms of the ‘Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicle Act, 1985 (Act 53 of 1985) Monday to Friday 06h00 to 18h00.

R466 800.00

One (1) year

     

CIPC SSC Pretoria

Mabuzitha Security

Private security firms at CIPC SSC safeguarding of CIPC assets and personnel within the office and also includes access control in duties terms of the ‘Control of Access to Public Premises and Vehicle Act, 1985 (Act 53 of 1985) Monday to Friday 06h00 to 18h00.

R465 651.72

One (1) year

3.

Companies Tribunal (CT)

The CT does not make use of any private security firms but shares the security officers deployed on the dtic campus, who are under contract with the dtic

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

4.

Competition Commission

The Competition Commission does make use of a private security firm

Mafoko Security Patrols

The Commission has appointed a private security firm that has been responsible for providing security services and guarding the institutions premises

R2 424 868.00

R368 098.00

April 2020 to January 2021

February 2021 to April 2021

5.

Competition Tribunal

The Competition Tribunal does make use of a private security firm

The Tribunal signs an annual memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the Competition Commission (Commission) for shared services, which includes security services. The Commission contracts directly with the security firm, Mafoko Security. The Tribunal pays 27% to the Commission in terms of the MOA for the cost of the security services

The said security firm has been appointed to safeguard Block C on the dtic campus occupied by the Tribunal and the Commission on a 24-hour, 7 days a week-basis.

R206 416.00

The Tribunal signs an annual MOA with Competition Commission

6.

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

The ECIC does make use of a private security firm

Selkirk Security Services (Pty) Ltd (Reg. No. 2014/019174/07)

Provision of physical security and guarding services

R748 788.00

Twelve (12) months (1 Nov 2020 – 31 Oct 2021

7.

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited (IDC)

The IDC does make use of a private security firm

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd with Company Registration no: 1997/013274/07

The IDC as an organisation is exposed to potential security risks, threats and vulnerabilities which necessitate the need for a security structure responsible for safeguarding of property assets (office buildings), human lives (staff, visitors and service providers), personal belongings and information.

It is for this purpose that the IDC appointed a security firm that provides 24-hour security and guarding services to the IDC, covering Head Office in Sandton and Provincial Offices.

R43 087 225.40

5 years which commenced on 01 July 2019 and will expire on 30 June 2024.

8.

International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC)

The ITAC does not make use of private firms, as there has not been any need for security firms services

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

9.

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

The NCC does not make use of any private security. The NCC is a tenant of the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) who provides security services

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

10.

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

The NCT does make use of a private security firm

Jalesca Technologies

The main purpose of this contract was concluded to ensure the provision of armed response services to the NCT

R25 700.00

The contract commenced on 1 October 2020 and will end 30 September 2022

11.

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

The NCR does make use of a private security firm

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise cc (sub-contractor is Fidelity Security)

Providing guarding and electronic security services

R4 689 713.59

Three years, contract ending on 13 February 2022

12.

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The NEF has previously procured security services for the Head Office. The NEF has resolved to insource the security personnel with effect from 01 April 2021. The NEF will therefore not be using any private security firm going forward.

Marshal Nights Security

Security Services for the National Empowerment Fund Head Office

R7 897 183.57

1 June 2017 to 31 March 2021

13.

National Gambling Board (NGB)

The NGB does make use of a private security firms

Ubomi Technologies (Pty) Ltd,

Fidelity ADT (Pty) Ltd

Security guarding service for office premises

Alarm system linked to armed response for office premises

R370 530.00

R20 311.05

12 months

36 months

14.

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

The NLC does make use of a private security firm

Titanium Security Services

Provision of physical security services Head Office

R3 562 712.00

3 years

     

Rise Security Services

Provision of physical security services Northern Cape

R792 167.00

3 years

     

KRA Security and Projects

Provision of physical security services Free State

R1 757 257.00

3 years

     

HM Security and Armed Response

Provision of physical security services Mpumalanga

R432 000.00

1 year

     

Ensemble Trading 2366

Provision of physical security services Western Cape

R 2 133 105.00

3 years

       

Provision of physical security services Eastern Cape

R2 065 045.00

3 years

     

Amazim-Zim Security Services & Private Investigations

Provision of physical security services Kwa-Zulu Natal

R301 533.00

13 months

     

Katlego Security

Provision of physical security services North West

R464 999.00

1 year

     

The Lady Boss Security Services

Provision of physical security services Limpopo

R462 000.00

1 year

15.

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

The NMISA is a tenant of the CSIR within the CSIR campus both in Cape Town and Pretoria. In terms of the lease agreement between NMISA and the CSIR, the CSIR as landlord provides security for leased buildings NMISA occupies

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

16.

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

The SABS does make use of a private security firms

Bughatti Security Services

Provision of physical security services Cape Town

R455 999.96

1 February –31 July 2020

     

Joritans Logistics

Provision of physical security services Port Elizabeth

R405 999.00

1 February –31 July 2020

     

Results Security Services

Provision of physical security services Bloemfontein

R440 000.00

1 February –31 July 2020

     

Tikedi Security Services

Provision of physical security services Cape Town

R488 266.66

1 August 2020 - February 2021

     

Fidelity Security Services

Provision of physical security services Port Elizabeth

R249 018.20

1 August 2020 - February 2021

     

Vice Grip Security Services

Provision of physical security services Bloemfontein

R389 515.14

1 August 2020 - February 2021

     

Mupo Weshu Environmental Consultant

Provision of physical security services Bloemfontein

R399 000.00

1 March 2021 – 31 August 2021

     

Venus Security International (Pty) Ltd

Provision of physical security services Port Elizabeth

R432 000.00

1 March 2021 – 31 August 2021

     

Matome and Moloto Protection Services

Provision of physical security services Cape Town

R439 530.00

1 March 2021 – 31 August 2021

17.

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

The SABS does make use of a private security firm

Bidvest Protea Coin (Pty) Ltd

The main objective is for Bidvest Coin (Pty) Ltd to protect all SABS property and staff, to provide access control for staff, tenants, visitors and contractors at the following premises:

        • Groenkloof Campus, Pretoria
        • NETFA, Olifantsfontein
        • Secunda premises
        • East London Office
        • Durban Office
        • Cape Town Office
        • New Castle premises
        • Richards Bay premises

R45 846 360.00 (including VAT) for 36 months however savings of R1 454 644.80 (including VAT) were negotiated and realised in the 2021 financial year, due to revisions in contract as a result of COVID 19

The national contract was issued for a three (3) year period and currently the contractor is month 16 of the contract

18.

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

The SANAS does make use of a private security firm

Titanium Security Services

National Security and Fire

24 Hour Security and Monitoring of Office

Alarm response and Monitoring of the Office

R923 717.71

R 28,330.08

Three (3) Years

Three (3) Years

-END-

19 March 2021 - NW724

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What criteria and process was followed to appoint a certain person (name and details furnished);whether she has found that the correct procedures were followed in order to fill the vacancy; if not, why not; if so, whether the position was advertised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) actual advertisement of the position, (b) list of names of the applicants attending the interviews and (c) minutes of when the process was completed?

Reply:

  1. An interview process was followed in accordance with the Recruitment Policy of the South African National Parks (SANParks).
  2. I have written to the SANParks Chairperson to ascertain whether the recruitment process followed was in line with the SANParks recruitment policy.
  3. a) The position was advertised nationally, with a closing date of 2 June 2015.
    b) There were five aplicants who attended interviews: Ms B. Mabandla, Ms. T. Kunene, Mr D. Erasmus, Ms. H. Sello and Mr B. Mhlongo
  4. The formal process was duly approved on 6 October 2015, with the panel indicating that the candidate (name furnished) had received the best scores during the interview process and displayed the sufficient, knowledge, experience and competency for the position

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW650

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

NATIONAL ASSEMBL1. (a). How long has the Bertram House been closed, (b) what are the reasons for the closure and (c) on what date will it reopen; 2. on what date will the marks on the Koopmans De Wet House indicating water leaks since October 2020 be attended to; 3. whether there has been proper inspection to see if there are indeed leaks; if not, why not; if so, (a) who conducted the inspection and (b) on what date? QUESTION NO. 650-2021 FOR WRITTEN REPLY INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.06- 2021: Date of publication – 05 March 2021 “Mrs V van Dyk (DA): to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture” (a). How long has the Bertram House been closed, (b) what are the reasons for the closure and (c) on what date will it reopen; on what date will the marks on the Koopmans De Wet House indicating water leaks since October 2020 be attended to; whether there has been proper inspection to see if there are indeed leaks; if not, why not; if so, (a) who conducted the inspection and (b) on what date? NW768E REPLY: (1).(a). Iziko Bertram House (IBH) has been closed since August 2015. (b). The closure was as a result of a health and safety hazard, where part of a ceiling dislodged making it unsafe for the public and staff. (c). It is scheduled to reopen Iziko Bertram House in April 2021. (2). The marks on the wall is as a result of a roof leak. In terms of the DPWI Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 5.2; repair work to roofs and waterproofing must be attended to by the DPWI. The DPWI conducted inspections and scheduled a Contractor for week of 15 March 2021 to attend to the leak. (3)(a). An inspection was conducted by Architects with heritage expertise. (b). On 7 and 21 October 2020 the Iziko Security Health and Safety Officer conducted the inspection and the Architects conducted inspections on 12 and 13 November 2020.

Reply:

(1).(a). Iziko Bertram House (IBH) has been closed since August 2015.

(b). The closure was as a result of a health and safety hazard, where part of a ceiling dislodged making it unsafe for the public and staff.

(c). It is scheduled to reopen Iziko Bertram House in April 2021.

(2). The marks on the wall is as a result of a roof leak. In terms of the DPWI Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 5.2; repair work to roofs and waterproofing must be attended to by the DPWI. The DPWI conducted inspections and scheduled a Contractor for week of 15 March 2021 to attend to the leak.

(3)(a). An inspection was conducted by Architects with heritage expertise.

(b). On 7 and 21 October 2020 the Iziko Security Health and Safety Officer conducted the inspection and the Architects conducted inspections on 12 and 13 November 2020.

19 March 2021 - NW683

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

a) I have been informed by the Department that:

The DPWI has contracted the following security service providers to safe-guard vacant properties as well as occupied office buildings:

(a)(i) Name of the contracted security service provider

(a) (ii) Purpose of the service:

Physical Security Guarding Services & access control

(a)(iii) (Value of contract

(a)(iv) Duration of contract

Sedima Security & Cleaning Services

251 AVN Building

R496 800.00

04 months

1st Respond Security

25 Soutpansberg

R492 000.00

06 months

Maahlo Protection Service

261 D F Malan Drive

R359 993.70

06 Months

Blueprint Associates

1025 Kruger Avenue

R367 999.97

06 Months

Siyaqhuba Business Trading

Centre for Advanced Training (CAT) – Lotus Gardens

R496 800.00

06 Months

Motheo Mateane Trading

Thabatshwane Golf Course Sewage

R498 900.00

06 Months

Phikama M Projects

Toitskraal Sewerage

R498 499.20

06 Months

Gesmeg Trading

31 Fiddures Bronkospruit

R355 200.00

06 Months

Simaledi Holding

600 Church

R359 973.00

06 Months

Botladaka Cleaning & Security

Salvokop Land

R496 998.00

06 Months

Securi24 Investments

Thaba Tshwane Sewerage Plant

R498 209.94

06 Months

Great Minds Network

94 Tom Jenkins Drive

R340 860.00

06 Months

Mkhontubomvu Projects Services

70 Paul Kruger Street

R378 000.00

06 Months

Mochide Trading & Projects

Vlakplaas

R495 000.00

06 Months

Heaviest Trading & Projects

127 Magarita Street

R369 000.00

06 Months

Ianjus & Trading Projects

287 Albert Street

R349 140.00

06 Months

Good Purpose Construction

205 Sterlizia Street

R356 400.00

06 Months

Heaviest Trading

SAPS Bonaccord Road

R496 000.00

06 Months

Salane Trading

Radio Uitkyk

R490 800.00

06 Months

Kingslead Security Services

38 Church Street

R352 800.00

06months

Mupowashu Environmental Consultants

No 9 Bryntirion

R353 400.00

06 Months

Wakanda Consultant

Wallmansdall Sewage Plant

R498 630.00

06 Months

Security 24 Investments

Telkom Towers A

R497 900.00

01 Month

Good work Security

237 Carina Street

R353 280.00

06 Months

Dikgabo Dikopane Trading

Union Building

R499 000.00

02 Months

NSSD Security

386 Bosman Street

R358 524.00

06 Months

Mpetha Investment

39 ARC Riet Fontein

R482 400.00

06 Months

Sakhowethu Security

159 Church Street PWH

R497 000.00

02 Months

Simaledi Holdings

326 Magalies Kruin

R350 154.72

06 Months

Selane Security

Zonderwater Waste Treatment

R494 730.00

06 Months

Kharitende Business Trading & Projects

125 Pretorius Street

R497 750.00

06 Months

Khabs Security Services

270 Delphinus

R342 000.00

06 Months

Mafelelong Security

1016 Kruger Avenue

R364 320.00

06 Months

Ebenezer Security

115 Minaar Street

R498 525.00

06 Months

Cardura Trading Enterprise

692 Bodel Street

R360 180.00

06 Months

Khakhakha Trading & projects

18 Rooth Street

R357 000.00

06 Months

Forwex Services

54 Kordaat Street, Die Wilge Pretoria

R364 999.92

06 Months

Silver Trading (PTY) LTD

213 Matroesburg Street

R364 800.00

06 Months

Xileketsi Construction & Projects

322 Rigel street Waterkloof

R358 296.66

06 Months

Ebukhosini TP Security

12 Anselia street

R351 600.00

06 Months

GJJ Construction & Projects

590 Madiba street

R495 396.00

06 Months

Mmetla Group

375 Lawley street

R359 999.76

06 Months

Touhg Security Services

05 Adina street

R346 800.00

06 Months

Umusa Security & Cleaning Services

421 Ulundi street

R348 000.00

06 Months

Emanzini Construction & projects

600 Church

R392 260.00

06 Months

Great Minds Network

94 Tom Jenkins Drive

R340 860.00

06 Months

No turning Back Security

18 Rooth Street

R357 000.00

06 Months

SNK Security

598 Bombani Street

R360 318.00

06 Months

Step Up Business Solutions

157 Stapelia Waterkloof

R355 500.00

06 Months

Senior Quality Protection & Projects

Custom house Cape Town Regional Office

R360 020. 96

2 months

Senior Quality Protection & Projects

Parliamentary Towers

R255 793. 20

3 months

Vhakula Trading & Project (Pty) Ltd

Nieuwemeester Parking

R240 070.99

3 months

BC Security Solutions

Hope Street Parking

R398 136.12

6 months

Striving Mind Trading 519cc

Fernwood Recreational Centre

R414 111. 30

6 months

Striving Mind Trading 519 cc

St. Helena Bay building

R398 773.84

6 months

Mokato Security

Pepper Bay Saldahna Building

R272 624.82

3 months

Senior Quality Protection & Projects

Oudtshoorn Workshop

R405 041.86

6 months

BC Security Solutions

21 Almain Road vacant house

R497 206.72

6 months

Mokato Security

Farm 352, Jonkershoek

R219 530.06

3 months

BC Security Solutions

Dennehof Resort vacant houses and Buildings

R399 319 .51

6 months

Maile Consulting

Kimberley Regional Office building and Workshop

R9 051 478.64

3 years

Vhakula Trading & Projects

Vacant house at 3 Hoof Street, Ritchie, Kimberley

R431 050.04

12 months

Vuyani & Monwabisi Investments

Vacant house at 12 King Street, Springbok

R452 602.53

12 months

Sputulwana Trading and Projects

Vacant house at 8 Kemp Street, Hartswater

R337 343.00

10 months

Tugela Risk Management

Vacant house at 60 Vlamboom Street, Kathu

R404 934.85

12 months

Onalenna Security

Water Treatment Plant, Louisvale; Upington

R443 981 .54

12 months

Amathuba Security and Cleaning Services

Vacant house at 31 Rossouw Street, De Aar

R374 826.12

12 months

Mzansi Protection

Alberton Police Station

 R 220,000.00

3 months

Izwelethu Protection Services

No 19 Duplessis Avenue: Kempton Park, vacant house

R 423,200.00

08 Months

D Emandleni

No 126 Boeing Road: Bedfordview, vacant house

R 423,200.00

08 Months

Prosisec Security Group

No 79 Hendrik boom & Dromedaries, vacant house

R 378,000.00

08 Months

Tshapuks Trading

No 257 Cumberland Road: Kensington, vacant house

R 420,243.26

08 Months

Ianjus Trading &Projects

No 112 Commissioner Street: Boksburg, vacant house

R 435,597.28

08 Months

Dibakoane Security Services

No 55 Jordan Street: Heidelberg, vacant house

R 485,346.64

08 Months

Vhakula Trading & Projects

No 249 Cumberland Road: Kensington, vacant house

R 339,072.16

08 Months

OKS Investment

No 05 Birch Road Petit :Benoni , vacant house

R 386,860.00

08 Months

Kabela Trading

No 21 Unie Street:Heidelberg, vacant house

R 387,615.04

08 Months

MMNT SECURITY SERVICES

No 18 Van Riebeck: Alberton, vacant house

R 396,070.70

08 Months

Svoboda Security Services

No 48 Aida Street: Cyrildine, vacant house

R 495,789.47

08 Months

Bongiza Security Services

No 38 Best Street: Sophiatown, vacant house

R 430,790.00

08 Months

Matlharani Security Trading

Maraisburg Single Quarters

R 404,800.00

08 Months

Arise and Shine

No 15 Market Street: JHBC, vacant house

R 476,323.51

08 Months

Prosisec SECURITY SERVICES

No 42 Alida Street: De Deur, vacant house

R 368,000.00

08 Months

Kukanya Security Services

No 91 Main & Steyn Street: RANDFONTEIN, vacant house

R 432,759.04

08 Months

Sbu & Sbo Security Services

No 37 Frederick Street: Observatory, vacant house

R 476,470.71

08 Months

Victra Group of Companies

No 23 Wittenberg Street: Florida, vacant house

R 411,524.83

08 Months

Bongiza Security Services

No 54 Daniel Street: Debonair Park, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

PATKEY

No 78 Dave Street: Westonaria, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

Tolo Security Services

FAMILY COURT:JHBC

R 160,000.00

2 months

PATKEY

No 3 & 5 END STREET

R 160,000.00

2 months

Mushoma Security Services

ELSBURG Police Station

R 160,000.00

2 months

Tshaphuks Security

No 223 Berrymead: Ridgeway, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

MMNT Security Services

No 46 ALIDA STREET :DE DEUR, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

Dibakoane Diomonds Trading

Cnr Juta & Rissik street :JHBC,vacant building

R 160,000.00

2 months

Jugephaphi Construction

CNR Webber & Power Street: GERMISTON, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

Lungelo Protection Services

No 08 Helio Street: Naturena, vacant house

R 160,000.00

2 months

KMT Security and Events Management

Safe-guarding and access control of 2 Polokwane Regional Office Buildings

R5 600 000.00

24 months

Livhu na Mashudu Security Services

Safe-guarding and access control of Kareebase workshop

R483 540. 00

12 months

Uncommon Favour Consulting and Trading

Safe-guarding and access control of Bloemfontein Regional Office Building

R6 498 083.52

36 months

Uncommon Favour Consulting and Trading

Safe-guarding and access control of Bloemfontein Nursery

R3 190 200. 12

36 months

VMR Trading Enterprise Pty

Safe-guarding and access control of Bloemfontein Regional workshop

R3 060 000.00

36 months

Senzwa Security Services

Safe-guarding of property at 45 Don Thompson Drive, Fortgale, Mthatha

R267 293.52

06 months

Mpompo Security

Safe-guarding and access control of Mthatha Regional Office Building

R134 100.00

03 months

Nomandla Security Services 247 cc

Safe-guarding and access control of Durban Regional Office main Building and workshop

R11 176 344.00

36 months

Landa Agricultural & Construction

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 7 Hooper lane, Yellow wood Park

R370 715 .52

12 months

Maphuphu Security

Safe-guarding of DPWI owned vacant house, Weenen House, Retief Street

R222 650.04

12 months

Maphuphu Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 25 Carlton road, Ladysmith

R309 027. 96

12 months

The Greater 77

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 33 Marshall street, Pietermaritzburg

R278 400.00

12 months

Siyanqoba Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 9 Golf street house, Ladysmith

R300 164.76

12 months

Manciza Civil Contractor

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at Melmoth

R348 462.96

12 months

Echle Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 45 Bell street, Howick

R261 692.40

12 months

Echle Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house at 238 Pine street, PMB

R276 739.68

12 months

Silver Solutions Security

Safe-guarding the cancelled SAPS tender construction site in Queenswood

R96 267.90

01 month

Silver Solutions Security

Safe-guarding of protected site (Greydel Farm Forest Area)

R1 991 747.00

04 months

Silver Solution Security

Safe-guarding and access control of PE Regional Office Satellite Office in East London

R32 089.30

01 month

Msitwa Security

Safe-guarding and access control of PE Regional Office Building and the workshop

R993 200.00

04 months

HM Security &Armed Response

Safe-guarding and access control of Nelspruit Regional Office Building

R 1 958 400.00

12 months

Xilota Projects & Security

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned sawmill in Sabie, Mpumalanga

R1 833 468.00

12 months

Prosper 74 Trading & Projects

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house in Ermelo

R450 000.00

12 months

Sky Rocket Trading PTY (LTD)

Safe-guarding of vacant DPWI owned house in Bethal

R330 000.00

12 months

Makgobistad Security

Securing Old Labour Office Accommodation in Klerksdorp

R157 300.00

Two months

Kakapi Mushi Trading

Securing Lehurutshe DHA Old Building

R153 065.00

Two months

Best Enough Security

Securing Vrybug State House

R408 000.00

6 Months

Dibereki Trading

Securing Vrybug State House

R156 000.00

Two months

Dibereki Trading

Securing Vrybug State House

R156 000.00

Two months

Briliance Security

Securing Lichtenburg State House

R432 000.00

6 Months

BLTN Group

Securing State House in Mafikeng

R159 720.00

2 Months

Legend Security

Securing State house at 29 Gordon Street, Mafikeng

R158 139.46

2 Months

Sinike Trading

Securing State House in Mafikeng

R157 904.00

2 Months

Minatlou security

Securing State House in Mogwase

R158 026.00

Two Months

Androm Security

Securing State House in Schweizereneke

R154 880.00

Two Months

Sinike security

Securing State House in Wolmaranstad

R158 000.00

Two Months

Best For All Security

Securing State House in Brits

R158 752.00

Two Months

Best Enough Security

Rendering of Security Services at PC pelser Klersdorp

R1 416 000.00

24 Months

Makgobistatd

Renedering of Security Services at Mmabatho R/O Dada Motors Building

R178 000.00

Two Months

Red Neo Security

Renedering of Security Services at Mmabatho R/O 810 Albert Luthuli, Unit 3 Building

R240 000.00

Two Months

(b) Response in respect of Entities:

Agrément South Africa

Agrément South Africa does not make use of any private security company. The entity’s security is covered as part of the lease agreement with Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). The CSIR-appointed Security Company on the Campus where the entity is accommodated, services the tenants as well.

Council for the Built Environment

The Council for the Built Environment does not have contracts with private security firms.

1. Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB)

The CIDB (b) makes use of private security firms, as follows:

 

i) Name of each firm

ii) Purpose

iii) Value

iv) Duration

1

MAHLATJI MMETJI CLEANING AND SECURITY

Physical guarding

R440 334,67

6 months

2

RESTOCOM

Physical guarding

R499 500,00

6 months

3

DONALD MOGALE HOLDINGS

Physical guarding

R510 278,36

6 months

2. Independent Development Trust (IDT)

Yes, the IDT makes use of private security firms, as follows:

 

i) Name of each firm

ii) Purpose

iii) Value

iv) Duration

1

At its National Office, the IDT makes use of the services of Madiali Security and Projects CC

Provision of security services to primarily protect office assets and employees.

R531 780.74

Thirteen (13) and half months (15 days).

2

Limpopo regional office, the IDT makes use of the services of Mokato Security

Provision of security services to primarily protect office assets and employees.

R93 481.06

Six (6) months.

19 March 2021 - NW737

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether, in light of the fact that the dumping of used tyres appears to have increased across the Republic over the past few years with a significant negative impact on the environment, particularly in parts of Durban as well as in stormwater drains in Cape Town and elsewhere, her department has undertaken any research into the correlation between the tyre levy which was instituted in 2017 and dumping of tyres that could otherwise be reused; if not, (a) why not and (b) what systems are currently in place to address the recycling of used tyres; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

 

  1. No research has been undertaken into the correlation between the Tyre levy and the dumping of tyres.
    1. There has not been evidence to suggest that an in-depth study on correlation of the tyre levy and waste tyre dumping can assist with managing waste tyre environmental pollution. However, some of the funds collected from the tyre levy by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) are made available to the Waste Management Bureau through the Department of Environment, Forestry, and Fisheries for the management of waste tyres.
    2. The Waste Management Bureau supplies waste tyres to processors to facilitate the reuse, recycling and energy recovery.

The Department has appointed the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in terms of Section 29 of the National Environment Management: Waste Act, No. 59 of 2008 to prepare an Industry Waste Management Plan (IndWMP) for tyres. The IndWMP’s intention seeks to address the current challenges that are being experienced with regard to collection, storage and processing.

One of the key objectives of the IndWMP aims to support the establishment of a viable waste tyre processing sector in South Africa which will reduce the negative environmental impacts of waste tyres. The specified actions that would be undertaken as part of the implementation of the IndWMP is to ensure that the following objectives are achieved:

      1. providing surety of supply contracts to processors to support investment in the sector;
      2. supporting investment in pollution abatement technologies and equipment through

incentives on a cost sharing basis;

      1. creating pre-processing capacity at depots;
      2. free delivery of feedstock to processors including the cement and brick-making facilities;
      3. payment of a subsidy in the form of a processing fee to all waste tyre processors, including the cement and brick-making facilities and
      4. development of markets including but not limited to:
        1. Road-building;
        2. Applications in public open spaces; and
        3. Tyre-derived fuels.

At present, the tyre levy goes into the fiscus and the Waste Management Bureau gets an allocation through the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries from National Treasury. The Waste Management Bureau uses the budget that has been allocated to collect waste tyres and promote recycling.

Storage facilities in a number of areas are full. As a temporary measure while awaiting the finalisation of the Section 29 lndWMP, the department is focusing on the following for 2021/22:

  1. To expand storage on a short-term basis through engagement with cement manufacturers, provinces and municipalities.
  1. To increase the number of processing plants that want to use waste tyres for fuel or recycling purposes.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW713

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(a) What is the size of the administration building at the isimangaliso Wetland Park, including all outbuildings, garages and/or carports, (b) what is the total budgeted cost of the building and (c) what number of staff members will be accommodated in this building on a daily basis?

Reply:

(a). ISimangaliso has been using prefabricated containers as administration offices since 2004. In 2019/20, approval to build an administration block was granted and funds were allocated. Construction started on 09 January 2020 and is anticipated to be completed in August 2021.

(b). The size of the building constitutes 840 square meters of the ground floor, 600 square meters of the second floor, 120 square meters of the archives room and 75 square meters of the ablution block. There is no parking or garages at the building and parking will be in the existing carports, outside the building.

The total budgeted cost of the building is R35 000 000.

©. The building will accommodate 46 staff members of isimangaliso Wetland Park Authority.

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW669

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

 

  1. Yes, the table below lists the security contracts by which the Department makes use private security firms:

(i) Name of Firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Contract Value

(iv) Duration Contract

SBU and SBO Protection

Services

Guarding Services to protect departmental assets

and personnel at 110 Hamilton Building Pretoria

R2 919 633.12

36 months

National Security and Fire (Port Elizabeth

Guarding Services to protect the departmental

assets and personnel at Port Alfred Office

R10, 050.00

10 months

ADT Security

Guarding Services to protect the departmental

assets and personnel at Port Elizabeth Office

R9, 132.00

36 months

(i) Name of Firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Contract Value

(iv) Duration of each Contract

Trident Security

Guarding services to protect the departmental assets and personnel at the Sea Point Aquarium

R187, 500.00

3 months

Royal Security

Guarding services to protect the departmental assets and personnel at Gariep ATDC offices

R272, 300.17

3 months

Bihlale Risk Protection

Guarding services to protect the departmental assets and personnel at Gariep ATDC offices

R435, 968.88

4 months

  1. Yes, the Entities (isimangaliso, SAWS, SANBI, SANParks) makes use of private security firms, and they are listed in the table below:

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration of Contract

ISIMANGALISO

Sizisizwe Security

To protect isimangaliso including its assets in

different parts of the Park.

R17 251488

36 months

Nkalavasi Security

To protect isimangaliso including its assets in

different parts of the Park.

R17 013 888

36 months

Let2Kuphepha

To protect isimangaliso including its assets in

different parts of the Park.

R13 809 888

36 months

SOUTH AFRICAN WEATHER SERVICES (SAWS)

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration

of Contract

Maemo Security

Services

Security services to protect SAWS’ assets

and personnel at the Eco-Glades Head Office in Eco Park, Centurion.

R2 219 634.28

31 months

 

Security services to protect SAWS’ assets

and personnel at the Irene Weather Office situated in the Agricultural Research Council (ARC) Campus.

R2315 351.91

36 months

 

Security services to protect SAWS' vacant

land at Part 264 of Garsfontein 374 JR (Waterkloof Heights); Pretoria.

R2 925 287.03

36 months

Fidelity ADT and

Technical

Video alarm monitoring system at Three

Rivers Air Quality Monitoring Station

R36 505.80

24 Months

       
 

24hrs Monitoring and Armed Response on Radar Sites at: East London, Mthatha, Durban, Ottosdal, Bethlehem and Polokwane.

R767 893.01

36 Months

Astron Alarms

24hrs Monitoring and Reaction for De Aar

weather Office

R4 560.00

12 Months

BAI Security

Services

24hrs Monitoring and Reaction for Calvinia

Weather Office

R2 052.00

12 Months

Suidekruis Security Services

24 Hour Monitoring and Reaction for George

Weather Of ce

R5 070.00

12 Months

RQ Alarms

24 Hour Monitoring and Reaction for

Springbok Weather Office

R3 900.00

12 Months

Highbury

Community Development Trust

MoU concluded 5* July 2006 with the

Highbury Community in Mthatha to provide security at Mthatha Radarsite

R159 313.30 for

2020/21 FY, with annual CPIX escalation.

5th July 2005

till either party terminates the MoU

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE (SANBI)

 

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration of Contract

G4S Secure

Solutions

Renter security services and cashier services

through alarm monitoring, access control, guarding, patrolling, armed response, cashier and customer services at Karoo Desert National Botanical Garden

R2,226,287

5 Years

Selkirk Security

Services

Security guarding, patrol duties and access

control at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden

R7,777,879

5 Years

Gobizazi Security

Security and cashier services at the

KwaZulu-Natal National Botanical Gardens

R3,379,059

5 Years

Selkirk Security

Company

Campus security, access control, customer

and cashier services, patrolling, alarm monitoring and response at the Pretoria National Botanical Garden

R12,707,681

5 Years

GnG Security

Services

 

Guarding services at the Walter Sisulu

National Botanical Garden

R12,038,026

5 Years

Mmaketse Project

Management Services

 

Guarding and cashier services at

Thohoyandou Botanical Garden

R2,902,395

5 Years

Afri-Guard

 

Security and cashier services which includes

guarding, access and exit control and cash

management for the Free State National

Botanical Garden

R2,444,279

5 Years

Metro Security

 

Security, access and armed response

services at the Harold Porter National Botanical

Garden

R2,528,772

5 Years

Phepha MV

Security Services

 

Guarding, cashier services and armed

response at Lowveld National Botanical Garden

R6,460 255

5 Years

ELDNA Security

Services

Guarding Services to protect SANBI’s

asserts, animals and personnel at SANBI’s

National Zoological Gardens, Pretoria.

13 448 572.36

36 months

Sun Rise Security

Guarding Services to protect SANBI’s

asserts, animals and personnel at SANBI’s

Mokopane Biodiversity Centre.

154 907,27

6 months

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL PARKS (SANParks)

(i)Name of Firm

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Contract Value

(iv)Duration

of Contract

Tyeks Security

Services

Guarding services to protect SANParks

assets and personnel at Addo Elephant National Park

R990, 553.37

6 months

Raite Security

Services and Consulting

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Augrabies Falls National Park

R182, 413.44

4 months

Tyeks Security

Services

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Camdeboo National Park

R4, 068, 092.00

60 months

South Cape Security

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at Garden Route Scientific Services

R28, 060.00

36 months

RRA Trading CC

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Groenkloof National Park

RS, 269, 714.20

36 months

Jen Foods

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Karoo National Parks

R470, 744.44

18 months

All Sound Security

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

Knysna Lakes

R30,728.05

36 months

Bangilizwe

Security and T. Centre

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Mountain Zebra National Parks

R336, 000.00

12 months

SmhaRSecuity

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

Tsitsikamma National Park

R33, 200.00

4 months

Bamogale

Security Solutions

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Tsitsikamma National Park

R1, 250 334.00

36 months

Shelfplett 40

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Tsitsikamma National Parks

R382, 800.00

12 months

Darling Security

Service

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at West Coast National Parks —

Langebaan Gate and R27 Gate

R461,725.00

12 months

AR 24

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

West Coast National Parks — Langebaan Offices and Mooimaa/r Facilities

R139, 566.00

36 months

Bamogale

Security Solutions

Guarding services to protect assets and

personnel at Wilderness National Parks

R3, 162, 000.00

5 years

M-Sec Security

Armed Response and CCTV cameras at

Wilderness National Parks

R52, 653.57

36 months

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW722

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1.What criteria and process was followed to appoint a certain person (name and details furnished); 2. whether she has found that the correct procedures were followed in order to fill the vacancy; if not, why not; if so, 3.whether the position was advertised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) actual advertisement of the position, (b) list of names of the applicants attending the interviews and (c) minutes of when the process was completed?

Reply:

 

  1. A recruitment and interview process was followed in accordance with the recruitment policy of the South African National Parks (SANParks).
  2. The Minister has written to the SANParks Chairperson to ascertain whether the recruitment process followed was in line with the SANParks recruitment policy.
  3. a) The position was advertised nationally, with a closing date of 18 February 2014
    b)There were four applicants who attended interviews: Mr J. De Ru, Ms S. Bokwe, Ms. M. Bokaba and Ms. V.N. Malematsa.
    c) The formal process was duly approved on 3 July 2014, with the panel indicating that the candidate (name furnished) had received the best scores during the interview process and displayed the sufficient, knowledge, experience and competency for the position

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FOSTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE:: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW726

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, as part of the mechanisms to combat corruption and state capture and thereby increasing the attractiveness of the mining industry of the Republic to investors, he intends to apply for the Republic to be an implementing country of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW847E

Reply:

No.

South Africa has not taken a decision to be part of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.

19 March 2021 - NW712

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1.What is the total number of applications in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act2 of 2000, (PAIA), that (a) her department and (b) the entities reporting to her have received since 1 January 2015; 2.what number of the PAIA applications that were received (a) have not been replied to at all,(b) were replied to, but without answering the questions and (c) were replied to comprehensively with all the information required by the PAIA?

Reply:

The total number of applications in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act 2 of 2000, (PAIA) received:

THE DEPARTMENT:

TOTAL PAIA APPLICATIONS RECEIVED

FINANCIAL YEAR

53

2015/2016

50

2016/2017

58

2017/2018

68

2018/2019

67

2019/2020

89

2020/2021

Find here: Entities

19 March 2021 - NW677

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract? NW795E

Reply:

ENTITY

(b) entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms

(i) name of each firm,

(ii) purpose

(iii) value

(iv) duration of each specified contract?

CEF (SOC) Ltd

CEF, iGas and SFF do not make use of private security firms.

PetroSA and AEMFC utilise the services of private security firms.

PetroSA: Quattro Security (Bloemfontein and Tzaneen depots); Fidelity Security Services (Parow Offices)

Excellerate Security Services at the GTL Refinery and surrounding sites in Mossel Bay

AEMFC: Protea coin t/s Bidvest Security

PetroSA is making use of private security guards armed and unarmed in its Depots (Bloemfontein and Tzaneen), GTL Refinery and its surrounding sites in Mossel Bay and Parow (Head Office).

PetroSA:

Quattro Security (Bloemfontein and Tzaneen depots) – R1,243,371,41

Fidelity Security Services (Parow Offices) – R,414,893,84

Excellerate Services (GTL Refinery and sites around Mossel Bay) – R70 000 000.00

AEMFC: R 25,847,324.00

PetroSA:

Quattro and Fidelity – 01 October 2018 – 30 September 2021

GTL Refinery and surrounding sites in Mossel Bay – 15 January 2021 – 14 January 2024 with an option to extend for one year.

AEMFC: 01 December 2020 – 30 November 2023

NECSA

The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA) does not make use of private security firms.

N/A – NECSA uses in-house security

N/A

N/A

N/A

CGS

Yes.

The Council for Geoscience has established an in-house security capacity in Head Office, Donkerhoek Core shed and Bellville regional office through mass in-housing process, whilst other regional offices are still protected through contract security

Polokwane regional office:

Field Security Services

 

Upington regional office: ADT Fidelity Security Services

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

Peter Security Services

 

Polokwane Regional Office:

24/7 Security guarding services – one grade C armed guard during the day shift and similar during the night shift.

Upington regional office: Providing armed response services only– alarm monitoring services

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

Providing armed response services only – alarm monitoring services

Polokwane Regional Office: R345, 000.00

Upington regional office:

R88,252.04

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

R19, 297.80

Polokwane Regional Office: 26 September 2020 – 26 September 2021

Upington regional office: 01 December 2020 – 30 November 2023

Pietermaritzburg regional office:

01 October 2019 to 30 September 2022

MINTEK

Mintek utilizes the services of three (3) companies for their security

  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise
  • Fidelity Security Services
  • MI 7 Security Group
  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise: General security services at Mintek Campus (24/7)
  • Fidelity Security Services:

Protection of Mintek’s Technology demonstration plant (Savmin) at Sibanye Gold Randfontein

  • MI 7 Security Group: Tactical, Surveillance and protection services for derelict/ownerless holings closure (open shaft). These open shafts are used by illegal miners and syndicates to pursue Illegal mining activities.
  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise: R375,898 p/m
  • Fidelity Security Services: R R39,930 p/m

MI 7 Security Group: R19m (total contract value. Payment based on use)

  • Services are only used on adhoc basis as and when required
  • Mfanyana Trading Enterprise: 4 year contract
  • Fidelity Security Services: month-to-month contract
  • MI 7 Security Group: 3 year contract

MHSC

The MHSC does not make use of Private Security firm

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

NERSA

Yes

Imvula Security Services (Sub-contracted by AFMS Group)

Building Security

R2,347,538

2 years

NNR

Yes

RAMS Fire, Security and Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

Building security

R5 268,218.20

01 May 2018 – 30 April 2021

NRWDI

NRWDI does not make use of private security firms.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

SDT

Yes

Rise Security Services (Pty) Ltd

For the provision of armed guarding services for its diamond premises, and to provide access control services

R38 934.36 monthly, VAT inclusive

Three (3) years (1 September 2018 to 21 August 2021)

SADPMR

Yes

Fidelity Securities

EOS Empire All System

Fidelity Securities:

Armed response and static guard services

EOS Empire All System: Maintenance of security equipment

Fidelity Securities: R1,284,126,.72

EOS Empire All System: R70 000 plus R345.00 call out, excluding travel claims

Fidelity Securities: 12 months

EOS Empire All System: 6 months

SANEDI

SANEDI does not make use of the services of a private security firm.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

19 March 2021 - NW649

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What is the total number of the Iziko Museum (a) board members who have actual knowledge and qualifications in arts and (b) buildings that have reopened after they were closed following the COVID-19 lockdown? NW767E

Reply:

a) nAdvocate Rod Solomons – Advocate focussing on constitutional; human rights; corporate governance and corporate matters. Previous Head of Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport in the Western Cape that included being in charge of museums, he was instrumental in forming various public entities in the arts & culture sector; served on the National Film & Video Foundation council.

Advocate Judith Leshabane – Advocate focussing on labour relations, human rights issues, policy, contracts and refugees. Chairperson of the National Museum in Bloemfontein Council.

Mr Dumisani Dlamini – Chartered Accountant and previous CFO of the National Arts Council and current CFO of SANPARKS and appointed to the Accounting Standards Board. Expertise in governance, turnaround strategies, risk management, financial management, asset management and tourism.

Professor Pitika Ntuli – 2 Post Graduate Degrees in Fine Arts, he is an accomplished expert in the arts and culture arena and served on various bodies and structures in this field

Mr Krishna Govender – Chartered Accountant; he was previous a CFO of Supersport, expertise in strategy, business process improvement, financial modelling and policy reviews and process-engineering.

Ms Sijabulile Makhathini – Chartered Accountant; expertise in governance, risk management, financial management.

Ms Magdalene Moonsamy – Lawyer; Deputy Chairperson of the African Peer Review Mechanism and previous Chief Operations Officer of the National Youth Development Agency.

Mr Popo Masilo – Lawyer; Chairperson of the William Humphreys Art Gallery, Kimberly.

b) 10

19 March 2021 - NW673

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

(a) Department of Home Affairs

 

(i) NAME OF SERVICE PROVIDER

(ii) PROVINCE/SITE

(iii) CONTRACT VALUE

(iv) CONTRACT PERIOD

MODISE PROTECTION SERVICES

LIMPOPO

R 51 487 678.38

36 MONTHS

MODISE PROTECTION SERVICES

HEAD OFFICE

R 11 491 104.68

29 MONTHS

MODISE PROTECTION SERVICES

MPUMALANGA (x10 OFFICES)

R 10 757 845.57

29 MONTHS

INTENSE PROTECTION & TOURISM SERVICES

KWAZULU/NATAL

R 61 587 719.24

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

NORTH WEST

R 23 957 448.54

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

GAUTENG

R 59 182 035.70

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

MPUMALANGA

R 19 318 448.54

36 MONTHS

TLHOMPHANANG BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

EASTERN CAPE

R 52 065 886.02

36 MONTHS

BAMOGALE ENTERPRISE

WESTERN CAPE

R 32 340 481.29

29 MONTHS

BAMOGALE ENTERPRISE

NORTHERN CAPE

R 13 382 827.05

36 MONTHS

MAFOKO SECURITY SERVICES

FREE STATE

R 18 851 637.24

36 MONTHS

a) The Electoral Commission

(i.)Name of firm

(ii.) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) duration

Fidelity Security Service National Office

Guarding services

R11,715,374,96

54 months

Mafoko Security service Northern Cape

Guarding services

R5 549 538,24

36 months

Huibidu Group North West

Guarding services

R4 871 417,75

36 months

Vimstire Security

Free State

Guarding services

R3 289 522,92

36 months

Khayalami Security Service

Limpopo

Guarding services

R2 326 347,90

36 months

Rise Security Services Kwazulu Natal

Guarding services

R9 055 266,08

48 months

Tykes Security Services

Gauteng

Guarding services

R2 131 100,25

36 months

Mafoko Security service Western Cape

Guarding services

R270 019.70

36 months

Shumelahaya Security Service

Mpumalanga

Guarding services

R4 475 328,77

36 months

Likunga Security Services

Eastern Cape

Guarding services

R5 039 987,52

36 months

(i.)Name of firm

(ii.) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) duration

Red Alert Security Eastern Cape

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R44 712.00

36 Months

National Security and Fire

Gauteng

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R39 856.32

36 Months

National Security and Fire

Mpumalanga

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R73 237.80

60 Months

African Urban Security

Limpopo

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R54 000.00

60 Months

National Security and Fire

National office

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R36 712.80

36 Months

Securiforce

Free State

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R48 300.00

60 Months

Defensor Security

Northern Cape

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R59 048.40

60 Months

Mzanzi Fire and Security

Kwazulu Natal

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R51 414.00

60 Months

Xpanded Security Solutions

North West

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R49 200.00

60 Months

National Security and Fire

Western Cape

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R32 400.00

36 Months

Gauteng (Local office)

Nokeng tsa Taamane

Alarm Monitoring and armed response

R27 000.00

60 Months

(b) Government Printing Works

GPW has appointed a private security service provider, for the provision of physical security guarding services, in order to complement a total of 52 internally appointed security officers.

(i) Name of the firm: Mahlatje Mmetji Cleaning and Security (Pty,) Ltd

(ii) Purpose: the company serves to protect and secure assets, people and resources both in head office and regional offices located in Gauteng, North West, Limpopo and Eastern Cape provinces.

(iii) Value: The monetary value for provisioning of security services on the current arrangement is R 353, 050.00 (VAT inclusive) for each month.

(iv) Duration: For the months of February and March 2021 (2 months, renewable), whilst the organisation plans to procure and contract security services on a 3 years basis, to assist complement the internally appointed officials. The contracted service provider would focus on the non-core areas whilst the internal officials would secure the cores areas of GPW, in order to manage security risks and breaches.

END

19 March 2021 - NW668

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

1. The Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE) has its Head Office in Silverton and shares the same premises with the Pretoria Factory. There are 13 Factories in total and all of them use private security companies to guard the premises.

No.

Factory Location

(i) Name of Security firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration

(v) Appointment date

1

BLOEMFONTEIN

G4S SECURE SOLUTION

SECURITY SERVICES

R380 611.32

12 months

01 JUNE 2020

2

DURBAN

IQ SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R391 440.00

12 months

01 MARCH 2020

3

EAST LONDON

SEKHUSELEKILE SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R496 200.00

12 months

1 AUGUST 2020

4

EPPING

CENGANI SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R449 983.20

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

5

JOHANNESBURG

BRAVE MOUNTAINS SECURITY

SECURITY SERVICES

R414 987.60

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

6

KIMBERLEY

BHUBA SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITTY SERVICES

R298 020.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

7

NDABENI

CENGANI SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R489 600.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

8

PIETERMARITZBURG

UVIKELA SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R420 141.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

9

POTCHEFSTROOM

TJ PROTECTION SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R295 200.0

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

10

PORT ELIZABETH

MKHWAZE SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R418 394.52

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

11

PRETORIA

KE NNA MALOBISE SECURITY

SECURITY SERVICES

R453 678.36

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

12

RAND

JM SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R497 352.00

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

13

SESHEGO

DINIKO MONYELA SECURITY SERVICES

SECURITY SERVICES

R473 999.76

12 months

1 JUNE 2020

TOTAL VALUE: R5 479 607.76

2. PRODUCTIVITY SA

Productivity SA does not make use of any private security firms. The entity has is rented office premises where the landlord is responsible for security obligations.

3. NEDLAC:

Name of firm

Purpose

Contract value

Duration of contract

Tiya Security Services

Security Guards - 24 Hrs

R 303 600

12 months

ADT

Alarm monitoring and armed Response

R 33 672.38

36 months

4. COMPENSATION FUND

No, Compensation Fund did not make use of any private security firms in the current financial year.

There was no need for these resources within the Fund.

5. The Unemployment Insurance Fund

Name of firm

Purpose

Contract value

Duration of contract

G4 Security

Cash delivery and collection

R154,671.97

19 June 2018 and will expire on 18 June 2021

6. CCMA

NO

REGION

NAME OF SERVICE PROVIDER

START DATE

END DATE

AWARD AMOUNT

PURPOSE OF USAGE

1

Durban

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Jun-18

31-May-21

R1 242 858.81

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

2

Richards Bay

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Dec-17

28-Feb-21

R349 149.87

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

3

Port Elizabeth.

Metro Security (Pty) Ltd

01-Nov-18

31-Mar-21

R509 359.23

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

4

Johannesburg

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Sep-18

31-Aug-21

R4 220 298.59

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

5

Ekurhuleni

Fidelity Security Services

01-Jan-19

31-May-21

R1 411 439.98

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

6

Kimberley

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Feb-19

31-Mar-21

R341 671.90

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

7

Rustenburg

TJ Protection Services

01-May-19

31-Aug-21

R317 600.00

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

8

Port Elizabeth

Imvula Quality Protection

01-Jun-19

31-Mar-21

R267 609.62

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

9

Vryburg

Papa Mike Protection Services

01-Sep-19

31-Aug-22

R461 103.91

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

10

Vaal

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

17-Apr-20

31-Mar-24

R1 187 301.19

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

11

Welkom

Khensani Security Services and Trading

01-Jun-20

31-May-21

R284 556.00

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

12

George

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

01-Jul-20

30-Jun-21

R145 395.08

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

13

Cape Town

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

01-Jul-20

30-Jun-21

R280 074.98

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

14

Polokwane

Papa Mike Protection Services

01-Dec-20

31-Oct-21

R448 822.00

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

15

Secunda

Fidelity Security Service (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

30-Nov-25

R1 475 646.68

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

16

Pietermaritzburg

Royal Security CC

01-Dec-20

31-Mar-24

R947 593.94

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

17

Port Shepstone

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

31-Oct-25

R1 463 978.09

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

18

Emalahleni

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

31-Mar-22

R880 635.96

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

19

Newcastle

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Dec-20

30-Jun-22

R250 650.18

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

20

Mbombela

Jubzin Security

01-Dec-20

30-Apr-21

R125 522.50

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

21

Tshwane

Eldna Security Services

01-Jan-21

31-Dec-23

R2 725 336.47

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

22

East London

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Feb-21

31-Jan-22

R135 710.38

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

23

Richards Bay

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

01-Mar-21

31-Mar-22

R119 451.24

To safe guard the CCMA property, personnel and its users.

19 March 2021 - NW801

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether the areas that are both supplied in bulk and billed by Eskom for energy provision are entitled to and receive a subsidy for the installation of prepaid meters as per relevant government programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW958E

Reply:

The only subsidy available from government is the electrification subsidy which is targeted at the electrification of indigent households. The subsidy covers the connection to the grid including the ready board and associated metering as per the technical designs of Eskom.

19 March 2021 - NW745

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, in light of the fact that in the 2019-20 financial year a total amount of R10,6-million meant for bus transportation was allocated to the Parliamentary Villages Management Board, and in view of the fact that Parliament operated on a hybrid system as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, any of the money was re-appropriated to cover the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) was the exact amount re-appropriated to the COVID-19 fund and (b) exactly has the re-appropriated money been used for?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. I have been informed by the Department that none of the funds appropriated to the Parliamentary Villages Management Board meant for transport for the 2019-2020 financial year were re-appropriated to cover the COVID-19 pandemic. The transport service was and is still provided to Members of Parliament as and when required and any money not used, remain in the account of the Parliamentary Villages Management Board.

a) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

19 March 2021 - NW686

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract? (NW804E)

Reply:

a) Yes my Department makes use of private security firms as outlined below:-

(i)Name

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv)Duration

Pristo Response Trading

Provision of a twenty-four hour security service at four Departmental sites.

R43 071 939.83

Three years – 29 June 2018 – 30 May 2021.

       

Cardura Security

Provision of a twenty four hour security service at Regent Place.

R4 176 000.00

Three years –

1 March 2019 – 28 February 2022.

       

(b). Yes Entities under my Department makes use of private security firms as outlined below-:

i) ENTITY

ii) NAME OF FIRM

iii) PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

iv) VALUE

v) DURATION

Iziko Museums of South Africa

Fidelity Security Services

Guarding services at the various Museums.

R113 168.54 per month

Month to month basis

 

ADT

Alarm monitoring and response services at buildings occupied by Iziko Museums.

R15 371.86 per month

Month to month basis

A tender for the services has been concluded and an agreement will be signed between the preferred service provider and Iziko Museums.

Ditsong Museums of South Africa

Senegal Security CC.

To meet all requirements of DMSA in terms of physical security access control. The purpose

of access control is to prevent the unauthorized access and egress of persons/vehicles and

the bringing in of any dangerous objects onto DMSA premises in order to safeguard the

people, the property, assets and buildings.

R 49 185 196

Thirty-Six (36) Months with effective from 1 November 2019.

Afikaanse Taalmuseum en monument

Drakenstein Security Services and CCTV Room (Pty) Ltd

Security guards for the Taalmonument and Amphitheatre for night shift

R 1 985 688

3 years

Expired on 31 December 2020

 

Baruch Security Services

Security guards for the Taalmonument and Amphitheatre for night shift

R 1 336 209

3 years

Active from 1 January 2021

Freedom Park

Elihle/Titanium Security Services

General access control and guarding services

R 12 755 026.

3 years (effective from 01 December 2019 to 30 November 2022

Kwazulu Natal Museum

Delta Force Security

To provide security at the Old St Anne’s Hospital property. The property is the site earmarked for the new KZN Museum building. Outsourced security is required while the project is at the planning and design stage. Security arrangements will change as soon as the site is handed over to a building contractor.

R9 016.00 per month.

Month to month contract.

National Museum

National security

Provision of armed response, monitoring of emergency services and annual maintenance

R 392 462.34

5 years

1 August 2019 to 31 August 2024

 

Stallion

Guarding services for the museum

R 1 765 060.16

3 years

1 February 2021 to 31 January 2024

Nelson Mandela Museum

Tyeks Security Services

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control in the museum

R 8 000 018.07

 

3 year fixed contract

uMsunduzi museum

Siyejabula Security Solution cc

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control is in place

R 1 270 980.00

3 years

 

ADT

To provide Alarm monitoring and armed response.

  R69 386.37.

24 Months

 

Sizowakha Security and Cleaning Services cc

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control is in place.

R1 113 133,41

3 years

War Museum of the Boer-Republic

Fidelity Security Services

To provide 24-hour guard on ground and guard in the museum when open

R 356 524.68

7 Months

William Humphreys Art Gallery

Gate to Door Security

To monitor the building

R 70 392.00

2 years

Luthuli Museum

Siyajabula Security Services

To provide security to the organisation

R 1,474,483.32

3 years

Robben Island Museum

G4S Security Services

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501, including Cash Collection

R10 291 783.49

2 years

 

Khuselani Security & Risk Management

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R19 673 535.09

5 years

 

Prosec security services

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R19 673 535.09

2 years 9 months

 

City security cc

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R15 022 224.00

3 years

         

South African Heritage Resources Agency

ADT

Alarm installation, monitoring and armed response to Paarl office and buildings

R 3 030.00 p/m

Month to month

 

BC security solutions

Farm patrol

R 456 000.00

24 months

 

Security SA

On-site physical security for securing of vulnerable building structures

R504 576.00

12 months

 

Qamata Trading projects

Security services at Old Resi-dency in King Williams Town

R 414 000,00

24 months

 

Suidpunt Sekuriteit

Alarm installation and moni-toring of Struisbaai units

R 321.00/Per month

Month to month

 

Bokwe’s security services

Service Provider to provide physical security services at SAHRA Head Office

R778 073,76

36 months

South African Institute

for Drug Free Sport

No private security appointed

The South African Drug Free Sport Institution has no private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

Pansalb

No private security appointed

The language Board does not use private security the Landlord provide for the service

N/A

N/A

Boxing South Africa

No private security appointed

The Boxing South Africa has no private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

AMAZWI South

Museum of Literature

Hi-Tec Security

Monitoring of intruder security system, armed response and Monitoring of fire alarms

Approximately R50 000.00 per year.

Ongoing contract

NLSA

Eldna security services

Provision of security services at Pretoria campus

R 7 583,263.30

3 years

 

Eldna security services

Provision of services at Cape Town campus

R 5, 690,038.44

3 years

South African Library for the Blind

The Library do not have private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

N/A

National Arts Council

Khokhotiva General Services (Pty) Ltd

To provide 24 Hour Protection Service at the council

R398 600,00

12 Months

National Film video and Foundation

Satenga Security Services (Pty) Ltd

The company provides security services which include monitoring access control into the premises where the NFVF rents office space.

R321 540.00

12 Months

National Heritage

The Council do not have private security at its premises the landlord provide for that service

N/A

N/A

N/A

PACOFS

Ignite security

Provision of security services. 

R4 640 400 for a period of three (3) years

3 years

South African State Theatre

Cardura Trading Enterprise

Security provision

R13,634,348.13

36 months

The Playhouse Company

Excellerate Services (Pty) Ltd

To safeguard employees, patrons, service providers, movable assets and property at The Playhouse Company buildings.

R 9 926 139 for the 3 year contract

3 years

ARTSCAPE

Afri Guard (Pty) Ltd

To provide security at the premises

R 12 186 334.08

3 years

The Market Theatre Foundation

Rise Security

To provide general security for the premises

R6 312 017.66

3 years

 

Fidelity ADT

To provide with armed response to the premises

R81 900.00

3 years