Questions and Replies

Filter by year

12 April 2016 - NW591

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4259 on 21 December 2015; his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW393

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any municipality has (a) transferred any funds to any political party or (b) budgeted for funding of any political party in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and/or (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, in each municipality where this occurred, (aa) in terms of what legislation were these transfers or budgets made, (bb) which political parties received funding, and (cc) how much was budgeted or transferred in each case?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

12 April 2016 - NW779

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any funding was made available in each metropolitan municipality as sponsorship for (a) sports and/or (b) cultural events in the (i) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since 1 July 2015; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (a) which metropolitan municipality, (b) for what purpose and (c) what was the amount involved; (2) whether the return on investment was measured in each specified case; if not, why not; if so, what was the return on investment in each specified case; (3) whether any (a) councillor and/or (b) municipal official and/or (c) any family member of any (i) councillor and/or (ii) municipal official benefitted in any way from the specified sponsorships; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) what action has been taken in this regard, if any, and (bb) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

12 April 2016 - NW579

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What were the legal costs incurred by each (a) local, (b) district and (c) metropolitan municipality in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

12 April 2016 - NW593

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4092 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information from Metropolitan Municipalities is yet to be received and the efforts are being made to follow up on them. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

11 April 2016 - NW440

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

QUESTION 1: How many (a) fire and rescue stations are there in each metropolitan municipality and (b) (i) personnel and (ii) working vehicles are at each specified station? QUESTION 2: How many (a) fire and rescue training academies or facilities are situated in each specified municipality and (b) persons were trained by each institution in the last reporting cycle? QUESTION 3: Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the target and (b) percentage of call outs were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Reply:

In order to respond comprehensively to all questions, the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) has formally requested the Heads of Provincial Departments to submit this information on or before Monday, 7 March 2016. The NDMC has received data from all provinces and consolidated the information that is covered in the response attached as Annexure A. With regard to question 3, it is important to note that most municipalities in the country utilise the South African National Standard (SANS): Community Protection against fire, 10090: 2003 as a benchmark for delivering fire services and responding to fires. This standard has been utilised by the metros in responding to question 3. The SANS: Community Protection against fire, 10090: 2003 standard is attached as Annexure B.

QUESTION 1: How many (a) fire and rescue stations are there in each metropolitan municipality and (b) (i) personnel and (ii) working vehicles are at each specified station?

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF TSHWANE

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Central

39

5

Erasmuskloof

20

6

Phillip Nel Park

22

2

Innesdale

18

9

Wonderboom

26

5

Silverton

27

6

Hazelwood

7

1

Rosslyn

40

4

Jabulani

20

2

Atteridgeville

23

2

Centurion

32

5

Temba

29

3

Garankuwa

27

3

Mabopane

27

2

Rayton

16

2

Bronkhorstspruit

30

3

Ekangala

16

2

Hatfield

19

2

Heuweloord

17

1

Mamelodi

6

1

Total:

461

66

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of All fire services operational vehicles

Ambulances

District 1

Midrand

38

3

2

Ivory Park

55

3

10

Lonehill

36

4

2

Diepsloot

45

3

5

District 2

     

Sandton

33

5

7

Alexandra

49

2

3

Modderfontein

32

5

3

Northview

33

5

2

District 3

Central

38

4

4

Fairview

41

3

3

Berea

43

2

3

Brixton

38

3

2

Malvern

36

1

3

District 4

Turffontein

44

2

5

Kibler Park

33

6

5

Eldorado Park

45

1

6

Lawley

41

2

7

Orange Farm

54

2

9

District 5

Jabulani

65

4

14

Diepkloof

43

3

5

Dobsonville

48

1

6

Hodgoson Street

48

1

3

Rietfontein

39

1

3

District 6

     

Randburg

36

2

4

Huntershill

39

4

5

Florida

36

4

3

Roosevelt Park

37

2

2

Rosebank

29

1

3

Total:

1154

79

129

Nb: The City of Johannesburg indicated that they are in the process of building additional two fire stations i.e. Cosmo City and Protea. Personnel in this City work in both fire services and Ambulance.

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF EKURHULENI

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Alberton

27

11

Thokoza

29

5

Palm Ridge

32

4

Zonkesizwe

36

3

Wadeville

28

8

Vosloorus

32

3

Katlehong

32

4

Germiston Central

29

4

Boksburg Central

25

5

Edenvale

28

6

Primrose

36

6

Bedfordview

20

2

Tembisa

40

4

Olifantsfontein

40

4

Commercia

40

3

Kempton park

40

13

Leon Ferreira

36

10

Farrarmere

28

3

Rynfield

32

4

Daveyton

29

3

Total

639

105

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF MANGAUNG

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Central

59

12

Ehrlich

21

5

La Kamanda Thapedi

Non-operational due to staff shortages

Sellosesha

33

5

Botshabelo

20

3

Bayswater

Non-operational due to staff shortages. Two rescue boats has been placed at this station.

Total:

133

25

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF CAPE TOWN

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Northern District

Goodwood

37

5

Epping

42

3

Brooklyn

19

1

Milnerton

43

4

Melkbos

23

1

Atlantis

37

4

Bellville

32

3

Durbanville

18

1

Kraaifontein

24

1

Brackenfell

24

1

Western District

   

Roeland Street

60

4

Sea Point

18

1

Salt River

17

1

Ottery

33

3

Wynberg

18

1

Constantia

18

1

Hout Bay

34

1

Lakeside

37

3

Fish Hoek

23

2

Simonstown

17

1

Eastern District

   

Belhar

31

3

Mfuleni

24

1

Kuilsriver

23

2

Strand

45

3

Somerset

18

1

Macassar

19

1

Mitchells Plain

33

3

Gugulethu

27

1

Lansdowne

24

1

Khayelitsha

25

1

Total

843

59

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF ETHEKWINI

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

The City has 563 firefighters and this is not divided per station

Central

88

9

Umlazi

24

2

Ntuzuma

20

1

Chatsworth

20

1

Mobeni

16

1

Virginia Airport

-

2

Amanzimtoti

43

6

Prospection

20

1

Pinetown South

20

1

Durban North

20

2

Cato Ridge

28

3

Pinetown

44

6

Westville

16

1

Umhlanga

51

6

Tongaat

20

2

Hammersdale

16

4

Folweni

12

2

Gillits

16

3

Congella

16

1

Queensburgh

20

1

Phoenix

24

1

Jacobs

32

2

Total

566

58

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: NELSON MANDELA

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

South End Fire Station

32

10

Sidwell Fire Station

23

3

Miramar Fire Station

24

3

Govan Mbeki Fire Station

24

2

Motherwell Fire Station

30

3

KwaZakhele Fire Station

23

3

Greenbushes Fire Station

28

2

Uitenhage Fire Station

22

9

KwaNobuhle Fire Station

21

3

Total

227

38

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: BUFFALO CITY

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Central Fire Station

29

11

Alpha

20

1

Charlie

16

2

Bravo

20

1

Delta

20

2

Echo

19

2

Foxtrot

8

1

Total

132

20

QUESTION 2: How many (a) fire and rescue training academies or facilities are situated in each specified municipality and (b) persons were trained by each institution in the last reporting cycle?

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF TSHWANE

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Erasmuskloof Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

45

Southern African Emergency Services Institute (SAESI)

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

45

 
 

Firefighter I

45

 
 

Firefighter II

45

 
 

Total

180

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Rietfontein Fire and Rescue Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

25

SAESI & Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority [LGSETA].

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

13

 
 

Firefighter I

19

 
 

Firefighter II

13

 
 

Pump Operator

18

 
 

Aerial device operator

9

 
 

Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

105

 
 

High Angle I

151

 
 

High Angle II

38

 
 

Confined Space Rescue

25

 
 

Trench Rescue

29

 
 

Structural Collapse

26

 
 

Industrial and Agricultural Rescue

26

 
 

Motor Vehicle Rescue

15

 
 

Instructor

23

 

Total

 

535

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF EKURHULENI

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Ekurhuleni Emergency Services Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

39

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

90

 
 

Firefighter I

34

 
 

Firefighter II

76

 
 

Pump Operator

74

 
 

Aerial device operator

54

 
 

Fire & Life Safety Educator II

6

 
 

Fire Service Instructor

25

 

Total

 

398

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF MANGAUNG

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Mangaung Training College

Hazardous Materials Awareness

33

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

21

 
 

Firefighter I

33

 
 

Firefighter II

21

 
 

Learnership: Fire & Rescue Operations

6

LGSETA

Total

 

114

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF CAPE TOWN

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

City of Cape Town Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

20

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

14

 
 

Firefighter I

37

 
 

Firefighter II

23

 
 

Fire & Life Safety Educator I

31

LGSETA

 

Rope Rescue (High Angle I)

18

 
 

Front End Loader Course

25

Transport Education Training Authority (TETA)

 

Truck Dozer Operator

25

TETA

 

Respiratory protection

59

LGSETA

 

Wildland Fire Fighting

24

 
 

4X4 Driver Operator

20

 

Total

 

296

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF ETHEKWINI

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Illovo Fire and Rescue Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

7

SAESI & LGSETA

LGSETA

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

3

 
 

Firefighter I

3

 
 

Firefighter II

3

 
 

Pump Operator

28

 
 

Rope Rescue (High Angle I)

52

 
 

Aerial appliance operator

8

 
 

Breathing apparatus

3

 
 

Advanced Breathing apparatus

16

 
 

Advanced Fire Investigation

18

 
 

Swift Water Rescue

6

 

Total

 

147

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: NELSON MANDELA

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Nelson Mandela Bay Fire and Emergency Services Regional Training Centre

Hazardous Materials Awareness

20

SAESI & LGSETA

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

10

 
 

Firefighter I

20

 
 

Firefighter II

0

 
 

Fire Services Instructor

10

 
 

Fire Services Officer I

10

 

Total

 

70

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: BUFFALO CITY

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Buffalo City Fire and Rescue Training Centre

Hazardous Materials Awareness

20

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

16

 
 

Firefighter I

22

 
 

Pump Operator

27

 

Total

 

85

 

QUESTION 3: Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the target and (b) percentage of call outs were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF TSHWANE

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

A baseline of 80% of attendance time to all reported structural fire incidents according to Category A to D Fire Risk Areas

(Category E fire risks are dealt with in the predominant Risk Category)

In meeting the 80% baseline

  1. Cat A = 86%
  1. Cat B = 81%
  1. Cat C = 58%
  1. Cat D = 79%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

To respond to fire incidents within 12 min

73%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF EKURHULENI

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

The target is to reach 75% compliance with the prescribed attendance times for Fire Risks Categories as per SANS 10090.

82%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF MANGAUNG

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

7.5 out of 10 calls (75%) to be responded to in accordance with SANS 10090

915 out of 1080 (84% or 8.4 out of 10) emergency calls responded to in accordance SANS 10090

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF CAPE TOWN

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

80% of all emergencies to be reached from time of call to first arriving vehicle within 14 minutes.

81%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF ETHEKWINI

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

Linked to SANS 10090 in terms of the applicable category

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: NELSON MANDELA

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP)

SDBIP target is 15 minutes

100%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: BUFFALO CITY

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

75% linked to SANS 10090 in terms of the applicable category

49%

11 April 2016 - NW590

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4251 on 21 December 2015, he has received the outstanding information from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality:

  1. (a) and (b) The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has indicated that it approached Rand Water regarding the installation of the telemetry system at all of its reservoirs. At present, the final draft of the service level agreement between the Municipality and Rand Water for the installation of the telemetry system at all of the Municipality’s reservoirs is with Rand Water for formalisation.
  2. (a) According to the Municipality, an amount of R8 million is available in the current financial year to commence with the work. The design of the system is complete. The data loggers are expected to take six months to install the system at all of the Municipality’s reservoirs. Further phases in the next financial year would include the completion of the integration of the Municipality and Rand Water control rooms as well as the installation of the telemetry to control the reservoir valves. (b) The Municipality has indicated that the first phase will take six months to complete.

11 April 2016 - NW315

Profile picture: Topham , Mr B

Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

For each metropolitan municipality, how many commercial, industrial and residential building plan submissions were made in the: (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (b) How many building plan submissions were approved by each specified municipality in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (c) What is the response time to acknowledge receipt of building plans; (d) How long does it take to finalise building plan submissions?

Reply:

1. The following table represents commercial, industrial and residential building plan submissions per Metro in the 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years

Building Plans:2013-14

Metro

Commercial

Industrial

Residential

Total

City of Tshwane

94

97

12 323

12 514

Ekurhuleni

50

190

5062

5302

City of Johannesburg

104

72

11977

12153

City of Cape Town

330

7904

8234

Nelson Mandela Bay

95

86

7734

7915

Buffalo City

83

96

2461

2640

Mangaung

45

17

2283

2345

eThekwini Municipality

927

408

9618

10953

Building Plans:2014-15

Metro

Commercial

Industrial

Residential

Total

City of Tshwane

128

87

12 883

13 098

Ekurhuleni

33

241

5382

5656

City of Johannesburg

41

79

12963

13083

City of Cape Town

353

8985

9342

Nelson Mandela Bay

87

94

9530

9711

Buffalo City

84

86

2370

2540

Mangaung

35

24

2069

2108

eThekwini Municipality

1363

601

12740

14704

2. The following table represents building plans that were approved by each municipality in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years

Municipality

YEAR

 

2013-14

2014-15

City of Tshwane

10 654

9 554

Ekurhuleni

4550

5272

City of Johannesburg

11247

11934

City of Cape Town

8407

9859

Nelson Mandela Bay

2475

3724

Buffalo City

2314

2207

Mangaung

3083

2173

eThekwini Municipality

5748

6044

3. The table below represents the time indicated by each metro on the response time to acknowledge receipt of building plans

Municipality

Response time to acknowledge receipt of Building Plans

City of Tshwane

Application is acknowledged as soon as it is received and the necessary fees are paid.

Ekurhuleni

Upon submission and payment of necessary fees.

City of Johannesburg

Upon receipt and payment of necessary fees.

City of Cape Town

Application is acknowledged as soon as it is received and necessary fees are paid.

Nelson Mandela Bay

Upon submission the application is issued with an invoice. 

Buffalo City

1 week

Mangaung

Immediately after submission and payment of the requisite building plan fees.

eThekwini Municipality

Immediately on submission and payment of the prescribed tariff where applicable.

4. The information below represents response time each municipality takes to finalise building plan submissions.

Municipality

Time taken to finalise Building Plan Submissions

City of Tshwane

Building Plans 500m² and less: 30 days

Building Plans 501m² and more: 60 days

Ekurhuleni

 

City of Johannesburg

As per the legislated time period, namely

30 days for building plans smaller that 500m² and 60 days for plans larger than 500m².

City of Cape Town

Building Plans 500m² and less: 30 days

Building Plans 501m² and more: 60 days

Nelson Mandela Bay

Eight (8) days from date of submission if application has all necessary supporting documents

Buffalo City

22 days

Mangaung

The general norm is as per the legislated time period, namely

30 days for building plans smaller that 500m² and 60 days for

plans larger than 500m².   In most cases Mangaung

Metropolitan Municipality complies.

eThekwini Municipality

In terms of timeframes expressed as a percentage the performance has been 98.1% (2013/14) and 99.9% (2014/15).

11 April 2016 - NW299

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the meetings of each metropolitan municipality’s bid adjudication committee are open to the public; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was this implemented and (b) where are the specified meetings advertised; (2) Whether bid boxes are opened in view of the public; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The processes relating to the supply chain management policies of municipalities including metropolitan municipalities is regulated by chapter 11 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003. Section 111 this Act requires each municipality to have and implement a supply chain management policy which is in line with a framework that is prescribed in section 112 of the same Act. This section provides the minimum requirements to be covered by the supply chain management policy. Of relevance to this parliamentary question is section 112(h) which prescribed that the policy must provide for procedures and mechanisms for: “(i) Opening, registering and recording of bids in the presence of interested persons” and (ii) “The evaluation of bids to ensure best value for money”

There is no requirement for the evaluation and adjudication of bids in public in the Act nor in any other municipal relevant legal prescript.

(i) There is no legal prescript that requires the meetings of a municipality’s bid adjudication committee to be open to the public. Only two metropolitan municipalities; Ekurhuleni and City of Cape Town have adopted this practice as an additional measure to emphasise transparency in procurement.

The following table outlines is the approach elected by each of the eight metropolitan municipalities in this regard; this is according to the information provided by the municipalities:

Metropolitan municipality

Are the bid adjudication committee meetings open to the public?

When was this practice implemented?

Where are the meetings advertised?

City of Johannesburg Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Tshwane Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Ekurhuleni Metro

Yes

1 December 2015

Local media and municipal notice boards.

City of Cape Town Metro

Yes

1 June 2006

Local media and municipal notice boards.

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Buffalo City Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Ethekwini Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Mangaung Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

(ii) The public opening of municipal bids is a legal requirement as prescribed in section 112(h) (i) of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003. This section prescribes that the supply chain management policy must provide for procedures and mechanisms for: “(i) Opening, registering and recording of bids in the presence of interested persons”.

In this regard; all metropolitan supply chain management policies require the public opening of bids and they have all confirmed that the bid boxes are indeed opened in view of the public.

11 April 2016 - NW583

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4187 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the remaining four metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information from the remaining four Metropolitan Municipalities is yet to be received and the efforts are being made to follow up on them. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

11 April 2016 - NW586

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4236 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The following response is based on information received from legal services at Tlokwe Local Municipality:

(a)(i)

Total amount spent on legal fees for

2013-14 financial year

(b)

Breakdown of the specified amounts (2013-14 financial year)

(a)(ii)

Total amount spent on legal fees for

2014-15 financial year

(b)

Breakdown of the specified amounts (2014-15 financial year)

 

Month

Amount

 

Month

Amount

R 8 890 840.36

July

R 402 187.14

R 4 237 194.63

July

R 476 318.83

 

August

R 591 972.78

 

August

R 178 640.36

 

September

R 637 242.16

 

September

R 775 808.30

 

October

R 874 365.14

 

October

R 296 796.00

 

November

R 390 942.12

 

November

R 143 550.39

 

December

R 1555 722.59

 

December

R 258 000.00

 

January

R 140 226.23

 

January

R 731 770.23

 

February

R 559 686.80

 

February

R 371 386.63

 

March

R 956 695.62

 

March

R 381 521.70

 

April

R 656 578.95

 

April

R 23 689.34

 

May

R 1 157 336.92

 

May

R 525 803.29

 

June

R 967 883.91

 

June

R 100 909.56

11 April 2016 - NW301

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a disaster risk management centre; if so, (a) how many staff members work for each specified centre and (b) what (i) is the budget for the 2015-16 financial year and (ii) are the critical disaster risk management issues for each municipality?

Reply:

Metropolitan Municipality

Centre Established (Yes/No)

  1. Number of staff working for each Specified Centre

(b)(i) Budget for 2015/16 financial year

(b)(ii) the critical disaster risk management issues for each municipality

City of Cape Town

Yes

83

R 119.18 mil

(Capital Budget: R 8,183 mil

Operational Budget: R111 mil)

  • Fires and floods

City of Tshwane

Yes

26

R 22.566 Mil

  • Shortage of staff and resources

City of Ekurhuleni

Yes

11

R 18. 935 mil

(Capital Budget: R 14.176 mil

Operational Budget: R 4.759 mil)

  • Staff of shortage in relation to the municipal population of ± 3.2 million which the municipality is trying to resolve with 11 more positions created and advertised.
  • Lack of funding model for disaster management which still awaits the approval of the council.
  • Mainstreaming of the function in all the sector departments of the municipality as required by law.

City of Johannesburg

Yes

30

R 1 350 000

(Incident Management Fund R 1 000 000.00

Capacity Building – R100 000.00

Printing & Stationery (Public awareness campaigns) – R200 000.00

Stores & Material –

R50 000.00)

  • Establishment of an integrated Disaster Management Centre
  • Increase of Human Capital
  • Funding for the City’s Disaster Risk Reduction Projects
  • Ward based capacity building programmes
  • Enhancement of Early Warning Systems

Ethekwini Municipality

Yes

7

R 116 000 000

(Capital Budget: R 21 mil

Operational Budget: R 95 mil

  • Constrain is that there is a huge staff shortage

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

Yes

22

(5 x Operational staff;

17 x Control Centre Operators)

R 16 477 194

  • High vacancy rate on critical posts relating to operational staff
  • Insufficient budget allocation (especially for immediate emergency incident relief)

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

Yes

1 x Manager

1 x Admin

4 x Operational

1 x Intern

1 x Vacant funded post

41 Vacant unfunded posts

R 2 782 063

  • Buffalo City lacks the capacity in terms of finances, staff, vehicles, equipment and accommodation required for a Metropolitan Municipal Disaster Management Centre.
  • Lack of participation of Sector Departments in Disaster Management Structures
  • Very large informal sector (multiple risks)

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

Yes

29

R 20 654 900

  • Budgetary constraints
  • Staffing
  • Incorporation of the DM plan in the IDP and development projects.

11 April 2016 - NW305

Profile picture: Ross, Mr DC

Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality offers any support to neighbourhood watch initiatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? (2) whether there were any disruptions of service or late removal of waste as a result of a failure by any municipality since 1 January 2015; if so, (a) what were the causes and (b) how has this been addressed?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

The BCMM does not offer any support to neighbourhood watch initiatives other than the BCMM Law Enforcement Services and Traffic Services.

CITY OF TSHWANE

The functions of the Tshwane Metro Police include Crime Prevention, By-Laws and Road Policing. The Crime Prevention and Social Crime Prevention Units do assist neighbourhood watches as and when needed. Tshwane is divided into Regions and Regional Policing offices attend meetings at South African Police Stations whereby the community is assisted through the Community Police Forum Meetings.

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

Not applicable

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (NMBMM)

Metro Police not yet established. The SAPS currently provides support to neighbourhood watch initiatives.

 

11 April 2016 - NW196

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a programme to provide basic services to backyard dwellers; if not, why not; if so, what (a) electricity, (b) water and (c) sanitation services were provided in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlement (DHS) has developed a draft National Backyard Rental Housing Assistance Policy. The draft policy is based on the findings of extensive research, as well as case studies, commissioned by the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) on Backyarders and Backyard Dwellings. This research project was followed by an extensive national consultation process to engage all the municipalities and provincial governments on the matter.

The draft policy proposals specifically make provision for grant funding to municipalities to improve the quality of life of the tenants occupying backyard rental dwellings. Importantly, the proposals also deal with the necessity of infrastructure upgrading required to accommodate the additional load on current services, and the provision of basic municipal services for backyard residents.

It is recommended that the Honourable member direct his question to the DHS, which will provide detailed information and a comprehensive answer to the question whether each metropolitan municipality has a programme to provide basic services to backyard dwellers.

11 April 2016 - NW296

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How often do metropolitan municipalities review their by-laws holistically; and (b) On what date was the last review done in each metropolitan municipality?

Reply:

The response in the attached schedule is based on information provided by the eight (8) metropolitan municipalities.

Metropolitan Municipality

a) How often do metropolitan municipalities review their by-laws holistically

b) On what date was the last review done in each metropolitan municipality

1. City of Cape Town

Council reviews its by-laws during the five (5) years term of office in local government.

The last review was on 29 June 2015.

2. City of Johannesburg

On an annual basis.

The last reviewed was in 2015.

3. Ekurhuleni

On an annual basis.

The last reviewed was in 2015.

4. eThekwini

Currently in the process of rationalising all by-laws, a process which the municipality started a few years ago.

Still in the review process.

5. Mangaung

On an annual basis.

The last reviewed in May 2015

6. City of Tshwane

By-laws are reviewed on an on-going process.

The last review was in September 2013. Some by-laws are still in the review process.

7. Buffalo City

The review process is ongoing. Some by-laws some in the process of commented on.

The last review was in 11 August 2014.

8. Nelson Mandela Bay

Periodic review are undertaken.

The last review was in January 2016

11 April 2016 - NW306

Profile picture: Ross, Mr DC

Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) How often does each metropolitan municipality collect household waste and (b) is it collected on a fixed schedule; if not, why not; (2) whether there were any disruptions of service or late removal of waste as a result of a failure by any municipality since 1 January 2015; if so, (a) what were the causes and (b) how has this been addressed?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. (a) Once a week

           (b) Yes

      2. None

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. (a) Once a week

          (b) Yes

   2. Yes, there were disruptions of services in BCMM Solid Waste Department

      (a) Disruptions were caused by frequent breakdowns of Refuse Compactor Trucks and labour unrests;

     (b) The Department of Solid Waste usually addresses the labour issues that arise with the assistance of Corporate Services.

CITY OF TSHWANE

  1. (a) Once a week

          (b) Yes

2. The collection trucks were mostly on schedule but there may have been 1 or 2 days where some areas experienced delays.

    (a) The delays would typically be due to a break-down of a vehicle or a workers strike.

     (b) The collection continues into the following day or days so that there are no backlogs when the following week starts.

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. (a) Once a week

        (b) Yes

2. Yes, there were disruptions and late removal of waste since 1 January 2015.

     (a) There is often a shortage of vehicles due to vehicles breaking down.

     (b) The municipality utilises a pool of SMMEs who have been appointed to render emergency door to door waste collection as and when necessary.

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. The NMBM is collecting refuse from 99.98% of households within the urban edge, excluding informal areas on privately owned erven not earmarked for Human Settlements development. Almost one third of the households waste is collected bi-weekly and the remaining two-thirds are collected weekly. The NMBM is in the process of converting all bi-weekly refuse collection to a weekly service by June 2016.

2.   Yes, there were instances of late removal of waste since 1 January 2015.

     (a) The capacity to render efficient Waste Collection Services is often hampered by breakdowns in refuse trucks due to ageing fleet and turnaround time on repairs and maintenance. This leads to refuse being collected later than usual, in certain communities. Nonetheless, the refuse is collected on the same day of refuse collection schedule even if it is late during the day.

     (b) The NMBM has embarked on a process of recapitalisation of old fleet. New refuse trucks have been purchased and other trucks are scheduled to be purchased in the next financial year. In the meantime, the NMBM is hiring externally through the existing Municipal contract in order to supplement its service delivery demands.

 

11 April 2016 - NW584

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4258 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:


Find here: Reply

11 April 2016 - NW581

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4183 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the specified municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information from the remaining five Metropolitan Municipalities is yet to be received and the efforts are being made to follow up on them. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

11 April 2016 - NW575

Profile picture: Topham , Mr B

Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4103 on 8 December 2015, the information has been received from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

According to the information provided by Tlokwe City Local Municipality:

1. Amounts of Capital budget spent on refurbishment of infrastructure:

(a) 2013/2014 – R27 722 428.12

(b) 2014/2015 R63 549 878.94

2. Details of the refurbishment projects as well as the amount spent on each project are as per the table hereafter.

Tlokwe City Local Municipality Capital budget spent on refurbishment of infrastructure

2013 - 2014

PROJECT

BUDGET

SPENT

 

 

     

 

WATER

     

 

 

Refurbish sand filters at the water treatment works

1,000,000.00

231,192.00

Multi year project

 

Refurbished mechanical equipment at the Water Treatment Works

500,000.00

482,475.92

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

 

1,500,000.00

713,667.92

 

SANITATION

     

 

 

Refurbished mechanical equipment at the Sewer Treatment Works

1,000,000.00

836,512.94

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

Upgrade the Chris Hani Pump Station

5,000,000.00

119,118.60

 

 

1260 m main outfall sewer to be upgraded - Ikageng Proper

6,996,396.00

7,722,848.76

Multi year project

 

 

12,996,396.00

8,678,480.30

 

ELECTRICITY

     

 

 

Upgrade protection and switchgear in 5 main substations

7,872,000.00

7,070,734.50

 

 

Upgrade Electrical Network in Bailliepark

3,000,000.00

1,739,820.48

Multi year project

 

 

10,872,000.00

8,810,554.98

 

 

     

 

ROADS

     

 

 

1 000m² roads to be resealed in the Tlokwe Municipality jurisdiction

14,130,578.00

9,519,724.92

Multi year project

 

 

14,130,578.00

9,519,724.92

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

GRAND TOTAL

39,498,974.00

27,722,428.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 - 2015

PROJECT

BUDGET

SPENT

 

 

     

 

WATER

     

 

 

Refurbish sand filters at the water treatment works

2,768,808.00

3,088,291.10

Multi year project

 

Purchase and refurbish pumps, gearboxes and motors at the treatment plants

1,005,355.00

220,966.70

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

2.2km of 450 rising main to be upgraded from WTW to Ventersdorp Road Reservoir.

5,000,000.00

4,020,628.16

Multi year project

 

Replacement of 90kw motors for pumps

160,964.58

160,964.58

 

 

Replacement of 55kw motors for pumps

111,094.14

111,094.14

 

 

To re-sleeve Water pumping line of 450mm steel with 170m underneath the runway at airport and 950m in Ikageng Road

4,895,687.00

5,581,084.27

 

 

Replacement of water & sewer lines in the following streets: Otto, Cronje , Mael, Mooivalleipark,Water Sisulu, MC Roode & James Morake Ave

5,331,660.00

3,807,836.50

Multi year project

 

To reline water pipes to the Promosa Reservoir

2,963,737.00

3,189,379.14

 

 

Replacement of motors and pumps at the Vyfhoek Res Pump station

831,858.00

831,858.00

 

 

To replace telemetry system at all water reservoirs

1,800,000.00

1,800,000.00

 

 

 

24,869,163.72

22,812,102.59

 

 

     

 

SANITATION

     

 

 

Purchase and refurbish pumps, gearboxes and motors at the treatment plants

1,005,355.00

220,966.70

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

Replacement of water & sewer lines in the following streets: Otto, Cronje , Mael, Mooivalleipark,Water Sisulu, MC Roode & James Morake Ave

5,331,660.00

3,807,836.50

Multi year project

 

 

6,337,015.00

4,028,803.20

 

 

     

 

ELECTRICITY

     

 

 

Upgrade 66KV protection and 11Kv switch gear in main substations

28,848,084.00

19,386,695.18

Multi year project

 

Upgrade the electricity network in the Bult area

2,000,000.00

1,999,791.14

 

 

Upgrading and maintain SCADA system in electrical substation

5,000,000.00

4,438,293.65

 

 

 

35,848,084.00

25,824,779.97

 

 

     

 

ROADS

     

 

 

1500m² roads resealed

15,000,000.00

9,697,463.11

Multi year project

 

Widen Chief Luthili Drive between Govan Mbeki and Walter Sisulu Avenue

4,020,000.00

1,186,730.07

Multi year project

 

 

19,020,000.00

10,884,193.18

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

GRANT TOTAL

86,074,262.72

63,549,878.94

 

3. No part of this amount was used to pay salaries to municipal employees.

11 April 2016 - NW303

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Does each metropolitan municipality have a service level agreement with the relevant provincial department of health for the provision of clinic services; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many (i) clinics, (ii) health centres, (iii) satellite clinics, (iv) mobile clinics and (v) male health clinics are run by each metropolitan municipality, (b) what services do they offer, (c) how many new clinics have been built since 1 June 2011 and (d) what is each metropolitan municipality’s budget for health infrastructure upgrades in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (BCMM)

The BCMM does not provide Primary Health Care Services, hence there is no service level agreement with the relevant provincial department of health. This function was provincialized and devolved to the Eastern Cape Province, Department of Health.

CITY OF TSHWANE (CoT)

1. A Service Level Agreement between the Gauteng Department of Health and the CoT for the provision of Primary Health Care is available and signed.

     (a) The City is rendering Primary Health Care services in 26 fixed facilities; Operating hours are from 07:30 – 16:00, Monday to Friday; 2 mobile units and 1 satellite clinic; Extended service hours are rendered on Saturdays from 08:00 to 13:00 in a selected 13 facilities to accommodate those clients that could not manage to visit the clinic during week days.

     (b) Full comprehensive PHC package is rendered in 26 facilities.

     (c) 9 Clinics were built and upgraded, namely: Lotus, Danville, Doornpoort, Gazankulu, Pretorius Park, Stanza Bopape, Olievenhoutbosch, Zithobeni and Soshanguve JJ.

     (d) The CoT allocated R43 million towards the construction and upgrade of three clinics, namely: Soshunguwe, Gazankulu and Zithobeni during the 2015-16 financial year. The projects are all in the final phase of construction and upgrading.

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

a) The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality manages ninety one (91) Primary Health Care Services as at February 2016 as indicated in the table below.

All Community Health Centres and Medical Male Circumcision Sites are managed by the Gauteng Department of Health.

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES BOTH PROVINCIAL AND EKURHULENI EXCLUDING MALE MEDICAL CIRCUMCISION SITES

FACILITY TYPE

EMM

GDoH

GRAND TOTAL

Community Day Centre

 

2

2

Community Health Centre (24-Hours)

 

7

7

Clinic

78

3

81

Satellite Clinic

1

 

1

Mobile Clinic

12

2

14

Grand Total

91

14

105

b) The Primary Health Care Facilities managed by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality render health services relevant for the type of facility as defined in the Primary Health Care Core Package of Services, namely:

Clinics: Render the basic range of Primary Health Care Services as follows:

  • Child Health Services:
  • Expanded Programme on Immunization;
  • Vitamin A supplementation;
  • Protein Energy Malnutrition Programme;
  • Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses; and
  • Growth monitoring and developmental screening.
  • Women and Maternal Health Services:
  • Reproductive Health including Family Planning;
  • Cervical cancer screening;
  • Antenatal Care Services;
  • Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV;
  • Postnatal Care Services; and
  • Counselling and referral for Termination of Pregnancy.
  • Men’s’ Reproductive Health:
  • Prostate cancer screening (Selected facilities).
  • HIV, AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections and Tuberculosis Programme:
  • Health and HIV Counselling and Testing;
  • Elimination of Mother-to-Child-Transmission of HIV;
  • Antiretroviral Therapy;
  • Post Exposure Prophylaxis;
  • Comprehensive Care, Management and Treatment of HIV Positive clients and treatment of opportunistic infections;
  • Management of Sexually Transmitted infections; and
  • Tuberculosis Control Programme.
  • Acute and Chronic Diseases Management:
  • Acute Curative Care;
  • Management of Chronic Diseases.
  • Specialised Services:
  • Primary Mental Health Services; and
  • Secondary Level Mental Health Services (Selected facilities);
  • Health Information, Education and Communication
  • Multi-sectoral HIV/AIDS Programme:
  • Door-to-Door Ward-based HIV/AIDS Education and awareness programme;
  • Stakeholder engagements including traditional health practitioners and vulnerable and marginalized groups;
  • Health awareness and screening programme; and
  • AIDS Council.

c) Twenty-one (21) new clinics, as listed in the table below, were built and they are all operational. In the current financial year (2015-16), six (6) clinics are under construction.

NEW PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES 2011 TO DECEMBER 2015

Number

Facility Name

Year opened

Ward

Address

1

Katlehong North Clinic

2011

52

2098 Khotso street Katlehong

2

Phutanang Clinic

2011

84

7522 Kgaga street  Tsakane

3

Reedville Clinic

2011

74

Stands 604 + 605 Ottawa Street, Reedville

4

Slovo Park Clinic

2011

75

Erf 1932,1933 + 1954 Durban Drive, Slovo Park

5

Tsakane Ext 10 Clinic

2011

86

Stand 45522 & 45523, Simelane Street, Tsakane

6

Wannenburg Clinic

2011

21

C/o Pretoria and Mimosa Road, Primrose

7

Ethafeni Clinic

2012

14

43 Bennin Steet, Ethafeni Section, Ethafeni Park

8

Itireleng Clinic

2012

13

2959 Posmor & Inauguration Road, Phomolong Section, Chloorkop Ext 52, Tembisa

9

Tsakane Clinic (Ward 83)

2012

83

33334 Fingo Street, Tsakane

10

Vosloorus Poly Clinic

2012

47

New: Vosloorus ERF30, EXT1, Vosloorus

11

Alrapark Ext 3 Clinic 

2014

88

Cnr Sasstri and Molopo street Ext 3 Alra Park

12

Joy Clinic

2014

67

Erf 1343 Etwatwa West

13

Ramaphosa Clinic

2014

42

Ingwamza Street, Reiger Park Ext 5

14

Springs Clinic

2014

75

Middle Six and Plantation Road, Springs

15

Tamaho Clinic

2014

51

Erf 2141 Nhlapo Section, Cnr. Sokele and Matsose Street, Katlehong

16

White City Clinic

2014

79

Thema Road, Kwa -Thema, Springs

17

Daveyton East Clinic

2015

68

Stand No 869, Chris Hani, Ext 9 Daveyton East

18

Motsamai Clinic

2015

50

260 Motsamai Section Katlehong

19

Palmridge Clinic

2015

58

RE 41 Palmridge Road, Palmridge Community Centre, Palmridge

20

Tswelopele Clinic

2015

44

22 Lusika Street, Eastfield, Vosloorus

21

Villa Lisa Clinic

2015

43

22 Camel Street, Villa Liza

 

TOTAL

 

 

21

d) The budget for health infrastructure upgrades for 2015/16 is R96 727 171(ninety-six million, seven hundred and twenty-seven thousand, and one-hundred and seventy-one rand).

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

There is no Service Level Agreement between the Municipal Health Services of the Mangaung Metro and the Provincial Department of Health.

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (NMBM)

Since July 2012 the NMBM is no longer providing Primary Health Care Services following the provincialisation of these services. There is no Service Level Agreement in place since the above-mentioned date. The only clinic service rendered by the NMBM is for Occupational Health Services for Municipal employees.

11 April 2016 - NW573

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4088 on 8 December 2015, the information has been received from the metropolitan municipalities; if so, when will the specified information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The information below was sourced from the Metros. The information from the other metros is still outstanding:

Name of the Municipality

Operational Budget

Capital Budget

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality

R433,89 million

R210,65 million

Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

R190,1 million

R252,5 million

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

R1,9 billion

R940,5 million

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

R100 000

R139, 87 million

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

Informal settlements are a part of a bigger programme, namely formalisation which includes;

  • Informal settlements;
  • Infrastructure services (Roads, Bulk and Electrification)

The total Budget for this category which is funded through the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) is R678 000 000.00 (six hundred and seventy eight million for the 2015/16 financial year. Although this is categorised as Capital expenditure, professional fees and related kind of expenses are drawn from this grant (subject to the USDG conditions) as the total cost is capitalised.

11 April 2016 - NW585

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4185 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information, if not, why not, if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

With reference to the question of 21 December 2015 a request was made to all Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information as per the question. Most Metropolitan Municipalities responded to the request and those outstanding committed to provide the information when it is available.

The original question 4185 was and the following Metropolitan Municipalities replied:

Whether any of the metropolitan municipalities measure the average time it takes to fix (a) potholes, (b) street lights and (c) traffic lights; if not, why not; if so, (i) which metros, (ii) what is the average time in each case, (iii) how is this measured and (iv) what is the specified municipality doing to improve performance in this area?

The information was provided by the respective Metropolitan Municipalties:

NAME OF METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

(a)

(potholes)

(b)

(street lights)

(c)

(traffic lights)

Buffalo City

The BCMM attend to pothole fixing within seven 97) working days after receipt of report subject to availability of material, resources and weather permitting.

Response to street light repairs is informed by the assessment of the actual problem. Sometimes normal street light failure takes one (1) or two (2) days to repair whilst rea fault takes seven (7) days to repair

All traffic signal faults are attended to immediately upon receipt (depending on staff being available and weather permitting). The roadway is cleared of debris and installation made electrically safe. Where possible the damage or fault is isolated and the signals can operate while the full repair is being completed. Normal Traffic light faults within two days of being reported (In most instances signals are repaired within one day). The response times above are under normal failure conditions and not vandalism, theft or illegal connections. An SMS service is used to improve repair times

 

A job card is opened when the complaint is received and closed after repairs are completed. Records of work done are kept to inform plans to cascade them to lower levels. The Ward based volunteers are used in line with EPWP principles on remuneration and use of private contractors to supplement the internal capacity as and when need arises.

   

Nelson Mandela Bay

ii.

  • Time taken to repair a single pothole bigger than 1m² on a major road is 55 minutes per m²;
  • Time taken to repair a single pothole smaller than 1m² on a major road is 35 minutes per m²;
  • Time taken to repair a single pothole on a minor road is 35 minutes per pothole;
  • Time taken to repair a road following an open trench service crossing is 35-55 minutes per m² - depending on material in trench;
  • Time taken to repair walkways (concrete) is 105 minutes per m²;
  • Time taken to repair walkways (asphalt) is 35 minutes per m².
   
   
   

City of Tshwane

ii. The target time is 48 hours

ii. The target time is 48 hours

ii. The target time is 48 hours

 

iii. The road maintenance tasks are measured through IMIS: TASKER system;

The response time is measured in terms of time taken from the time identified or reported;

 

iv. Standby teams have been established to deal with after-hours reported complaints;

City of Joburg

    1. The CoJ does measure the average time it takes to fix potholes.
    1. The average response time for fixing a pothole is (6.21 days).
    1. The CoJ does measure the response time it takes to fix streetlights.
    1. The average time is a day after the defected streetlight has been identified or reported.

i. The CoJ does measure the response time it takes to fix streetlights.

ii. The average turnaround time to repair traffic lights is 9 days.

 

iii. The response time for potholes is measured through the Hansen, the Johannesburg Road Agency (JRA) performance management system;

The streets get inspected during the day and night to identify those that that are not working, which is then followed with repairs are done to defective lights;

The clock starts from recording of the event in the system up until physical repair is performed.

 

iv. The JRA focuses on a Road Resurfacing programme that will minimise the number of potholes and increase the value of our roads. In addition, the JRA has set quarterly targets which are aimed at reducing the number of potholes and Agency responds to the calls logged by the customers and attempt to resolve the calls within the 3 days turnaround time;

Various resources have been allocated to repair vandalized streetlights in the main arterial routes, secondary routes and in the low-cost cost areas;

The CoJ field crews are working daily on the maintenance of traffic lights.

Ekurhuleni

(ii) The average time it takes to respond differs as follows:

  • Repair a single pothole – in major road – 24 hours.
  • Repair a single pothole – in minor road – 5 working days.
  • Repair a road following an open trench service crossing – 5 working days.
  • Repair/replace a kerb inlet – 20 working days.
  • Repair walkways – 10 working days.

(ii) The average time it takes to fix non-functioning street lights is 3 days.

  • Non-functional street lights are logged into the Customer Relations Management (CRM) System. The logged complaints are attended to and as-and-when completed, they are closed on the CRM System with actual date.

(ii) The repair of any traffic light fault in a major road (subject to electrical supply available) is 4 hours;

  • The repair of any traffic light fault in a minor road (subject to electrical supply available) – 24 hours
 

iii. EMM uses Engineering Management Information System (EMIS);

Non-functional street lights are logged into the Customer Relations Management (CRM) System. The logged complaints are attended to and as-and-when completed, they are closed on the CRM System with actual date; The Metro measures the response by using Engineering Management Information System (EMIS);

 

iv. The Roads and Stormwater Department within the EMM has put up measures in place for the following: road rehabilitation, pothole signage and road marking and bitumen tar products to supplement and assist Department Depot;

EMM has increased capacity through the appointment of as-and-when required capacity to assist the Metro in reducing the average response time to keep the Metro lit;

The Roads and Stormwater Department has put measures in place for the following: road rehabilitation, pothole signage and road marking and bitumen tar products to supplement and assist Department Depot.

Mangaung

ii. The targeted turn-around time for fixing portholes is 5 days;

ii. there is not specific turn-around time to fix streetlights

ii. the targeted time to fix traffic lights is 4 hours

 

iii. It is measured by the electronic Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System used by the Municipal Call Centre. The measurement is taken from the time the customer reports a complaint to the Call Centre when the complaint is logged into the CRM System and allocated a reference number until such time that the relevant service delivery unit closes the complaint with the Call Centre on the electronic CRM System.

At this stage we are busy rolling out the CRM System to the relevant service delivery units which in effect mean that all the service delivery units are in the process of implementing the system.

 

iv. Additional vehicles and SUV’s have been ordered to assist the Traffic Signs Division. Contractors were appointed for some areas and their performance can be measured with the implementation of SMART streetlight systems, performance and repairs can be measured.

City of Cape Town

Potholes are made safe within 24 hours after report received from the Roads Department. Final repair depends on the class of road and this can take between 1 and 5 days subject to departmental priority schedule.

The average time to fix single streetlights is 14 days but normally done within 48 hours.

The average time to fix traffic lights is 6 to 12 hours.

 

Potholes are measured by analysing customer complaints and fault reporting systems. The fixing of streetlights are measured in days and by the amount of streetlights out and the fixing of traffic lights are measured by the fault reporting system.

 

Ongoing training and internal performance reviews are implemented. Maintenance is becoming pro-active and the department performs block replacement of luminaires to mitigate luminaire end-of-life failures.

eThekweni

ii. 14 days

ii. the average time to fix a simple lamp outage is 2 days and when cables are stolen the average time is 5 days

 
 

(iii)Work requests are received from the public via the City’s customer call centre, via work orders from service providers and from scheduled inspections. The process is measured from request to closure.

 

(iv) The system is monitored by management with a view to improve performance.

11 April 2016 - NW780

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What process is to be followed by (a) provinces and (b) municipalities affected by the latest round of amalgamations in terms of the revised municipal demarcations, with specific reference to (i) budgets, (ii) organograms, (iii) systems and processes and (iv) assets and equipment?

Reply:

a) The process to be followed by provinces is as outlined in Section 12 of the Municipal Structures Act, which requires the MEC for local government in a province to establish a municipality in each municipal area which the Municipal Demarcation Board demarcates, and which establishment takes effect at the commencement of the first election of the council of that municipality.

Section 14(5) of the Municipal Structures further provides that the MEC, by notice in the Provincial Gazette, may make provision for transitional measures to facilitate the disestablishment of an existing municipality and the establishment of a new municipality.

The different transition matters are discussed and processed through various transitional structures at the provincial and municipal spheres, as well as reported at the Municipal Demarcation Transition Committee which is convened by the Department of Cooperative Governance.

b) The Section 14(5) Notices also provide for the establishment of Municipal Political Change Management Committees and Municipal Technical Change Management Committees.

The Municipal Political Change Management Committees are constituted by the mayors, speakers, members of the executive or mayoral committees and traditional leaders from the affected local and district municipalities.

The Municipal Technical Change Management Committees are constituted by the municipal managers and heads of department from the affected local and district municipalities, as well as representatives from organised labour and the South African Local Government Association.

The Section 14(5) Notices deal with matters relating to budgets, organograms, systems and processes, assets and equipment, integrated development planning, communications and other institutional systems and processes.

11 April 2016 - NW304

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether each metropolitan municipality has a metropolitan police department; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was it established, (b) how many persons (i) in total and (ii) per category are currently part of the specified municipality’s police force and (c) how many operational (i) cars, (ii) motorbikes, (iii) bicycles and (iv) other vehicles are currently used by the metro police force in each case; (2) whether each metropolitan police department have specialised units tasked with dealing with drugs, gangs and any other safety needs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether each metropolitan municipality measures the average response times of the metro police to accidents and complaints; if not, why not; if so, (a) how is this measured and (b) what is the current average response time in each case?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (BCMM)

1. The BCMM does not have a Metropolitan Police Department. BCMM is in the process of establishing a Metropolitan Police Department with its implementation date being scheduled for 2016/17.

2. Not applicable

3. Not applicable

CITY OF TSHWANE (CoT)

  1. (a) The Tshwane Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) was established on 04 April 2002. It functions independently from the South African Police, funded by and accountable to the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality, as per the South African Police Service Act, 1995 and 1998, as amended (Act No. 68 of 1995 and Act No. 83 of 1998). The Act prescribes the functions of a Municipal Police Service per Section 64E, as follows:

    Traffic policing, subject to any legislation relating to road traffic (Road Policing);

    The policing of municipal by-laws and regulations which are the responsibility of the municipality in question;

    The prevention of crime.

(b)  The TMPD Staff Establishment is listed within the table below:

Designation

                                   ESTABLISHMENT

 
     
 

Approved Posts as per structure

 

Posts filled as per Migration and Placement process

Vacancies

Current warm bodies

Proposed vacancies to be filled in 2015/16

Male

Female

Operational

Admin

Occupational   level

 
           

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

       

Admin Officer

289

167

122

143

0

22

1

0

6

65

8

2

39

0

143

5

 

Cashier

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

 

Chief of Police

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

 

Chief Security Evaluator

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

 

Chief Security Officer (GR A): Internal Security

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

 

Commander

36

21

15

21

0

8

1

0

9

2

0

0

1

21

0

2

 

Constable / Sergeant

2601

1533

1068

1531

0

824

48

5

108

518

10

0

18

1531

0

5

 

Constable Gr III

 

 

 

1875

 

1032

24

0

3

812

4

0

0

1875

 

5

 

Deputy Chief of Police

5

2

3

2

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

2

 

Deputy Director

15

10

5

10

0

5

1

0

0

0

1

0

3

1

9

2

 

Director

13

11

2

11

0

7

1

0

2

0

0

0

1

4

7

2

 

Driver

8

2

6

2

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

5

 

Driver Messenger

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

 

Examiner

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

4

 

Executive Commitments Tracking Specialist

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

 

Executive Secretary

2

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

2

4

 

Executive Support Specialist

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

 

Functional Head

41

19

22

19

0

4

1

0

6

5

1

0

2

2

17

3

 

Functional Head/ Snr Superintendent

8

2

6

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

3

 

General Worker

22

14

8

14

0

10

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

14

6

 

Human Resource Officer

2

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

4

 

Inspector

350

230

120

230

70

97

5

1

65

57

1

0

4

230

0

4

 

Law Enforcement officer

80

73

7

73

0

42

3

0

0

28

0

0

0

73

0

5

 

Liaison Officer

7

1

6

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

4

 

License Officer

0

0

0

9

0

3

0

0

0

4

0

0

2

0

9

5

 

Librarian

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

 

Management / Strategic Support Officer

3

2

1

2

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

3

 

Messenger

2

2

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

6

 

Operator Radio Control

40

18

22

18

0

3

0

0

2

12

0

0

1

18

0

5

 

Personal Assistant

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

3

 

Regional Director

7

5

2

5

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

5

0

2

 

Secretary

20

3

17

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

3

4

 

Security Evaluator

8

2

6

2

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

5

 

Security Officer (GR C)

120

1

119

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

5

 

Snr Admin Officer

56

34

22

33

0

5

0

0

3

12

2

0

11

0

33

4

 

Snr Secretary

5

4

1

4

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

1

0

4

4

 

Snr Security Evaluator

4

3

1

3

0

0

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

3

0

4

 

Snr Security Officer (GR B)

18

4

14

4

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

4

0

5

 

Snr Superintendent

88

55

33

55

0

25

1

0

15

9

0

0

5

55

0

3

 

Strategic Support Specialist

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

4

 

Superintendent

146

87

59

87

0

34

2

0

14

32

0

0

4

87

0

3

 

Supervisor (Worker)

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

 

Support Service Officer

22

5

17

5

0

2

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

5

4

 

System Officer

8

5

3

5

0

0

1

0

3

1

0

0

0

0

5

4

 

Technical Officer

2

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

5

 

Waiter

3

3

0

3

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

3

6

 

Warden

52

27

25

27

0

22

1

0

4

0

0

0

0

27

0

5

 

Total

4095

2354

1741

4212

75

2165

91

6

245

1575

27

2

100

3941

271

   
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4212

   
     

Sergeant

866

 

429

17

4

83

317

3

0

13

       
     

Constable

665

 

395

31

1

25

201

7

0

5

       
     

 

1531

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

(c)         The Tshwane Metro Police Fleet vehicles are listed within the table below:

Type

Total

BUS

11

CAR

187

KOMBI

72

LDV

192

MOTORBIKE

142

TRACTOR

1

TRAILER

47

TRUCK

25

TOTAL

677

2. The Tshwane Metro Police’s Special Project Team assists with drug enforcement, as per the initiative implemented by the Chief of Police since January 2015. The unit consists of seven (7) members and one Supervisor who has sixteen (16) years’ experience relevant to the enforcement of illegal substance abuse. Tshwane does not have a problem of gangs as such, but the department however works closely with the SAPS to deal with crime prevention in general.

3. (a) The current TMPD system (manually) assists with monitoring calls and call time intervals. The TMPD Nodal Point (331) dispatches complaints to the regions, after which the regions contact members via cell phones or radio to attend to complaints.

    (b) Status quo on dispatch is 00:01:39 (1 Minute and 39 seconds from receipt of a call until dispatched to operational members).

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality does not have a Metro Police Department.

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (NMBM)

NMBM is currently busy with the planning and physical establishment process of a Metro Police Department.

 

11 April 2016 - NW720

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he has gone to (a) Ga-Rankuwa or (b) any other area where violent protests were taking place at present, in the period since his appointment to his new post, to (i) bring fed-up protesters and slack local government authorities together around a table to address long simmering community grievances quickly, effectively and efficiently and (ii) protect the image of South Africa in the face of a regular showing on TV screens around the world that South Africa was a violent and dangerous country with ordinary people being at odds with local government and angry at national government for not being responsive and caring; if not, why not; if so, what has he achieved through his direct involvement in resolving the long-simmering dispute at GaRankuwa or anywhere else where protests have recently been flaring up because of unresolved grievances?

Reply:

(a) No, the Minister has not visited Ga-Rankuwa.
(b) The Minister visited the Tlokwe Local Municipality, since his appointment.
(i)
The Minister has taken steps to address community grievances. These include:

• Ensuring that the department continues to implement the Back-to-Basics (B2B) programme that addresses challenges in the local government sphere

• Directing the department's provincial 828 coordinators to focus on areas where violent protests are taking place, to address community grievances;

(ii) The City of Tshwane is involved in addressing concerns raised by the residents of GaRankuwa.
The Back to Basics provincial teams have identified municipalities where violent protests are taking place and are working at resolving the challenges in these municipalities.
The teams report back to the Minister regularly.

11 April 2016 - NW592

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether, with reference to his department's reply to question 4097 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the Tlokwe Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Tlokwe Local Municipality:

Below is the response regarding the amounts spent by Tlokwe Local Municipality on print media, radio, television, online and outdoors during the 2014/15 financial year and since July 2015:

Amount spent and purpose on advertising by Tlokwe Local Municipality for 2014/15

(a) Print Media

(i) Local Community Newspapers

MEDIA

PURPOSE

COST

Mooivaal Media

The purpose of the advertisements was to inform the communities about public meetings relating to progress on

11 959

lzindwe Marketing

 

82 100

lzindwe Marketing

service delivery and unexpected interruptions to services

29 000

Total

123 059


Please find here: (ii) National Magazines

11 April 2016 - NW740

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he and senior members of his department travelled to Isithebe in KwaZulu-Natal at an early stage to defuse the crisis which flared up there and which led over several days to (a) the burning and looting of many factories, (b) billions of rand of loss in production, (c) millions of rand of loss to workers who had no work to go to and (d) further loss of investor confidence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what did he and his senior officials do to calm the situation and address the deep-seated grievances of the surrounding communities regarding service delivery failures and alleged nepotism; (2) whether his department has a policy to act proactively and decisively in respect of crisis situations at local government level before the protests get out of hand and the protesters resort to arson, vandalism and obstruction of traffic; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) outcomes thereof? NW858E

Reply:

(1) In line with a cooperative governance approach, indeed the concerns in Isithebe area were attended to at an early stage through the intervention of provincial government leadership and by engaging with business, communities and other stakeholders in order to find solutions to the challenges. It was through these engagements it was established that interventions to the challenges needed a multi-sectoral approach. To this end, it was agreed that interventions should focus, amongst other, on the need to expedite service delivery. Mass prayers and community dialogue were facilitated to emphasize the need for constructive engagement, peaceful protests, respect for rights and properties of others as well as education on rights to recourse as well as poverty alleviation programmes.

To date, Lower Tugela Bulk Water Supply for the area was launched on 22 March 2016 as one of the service delivery responses which also present the people of Isithebe with jobs as well as skills development opportunities. A prayer meeting for peace and stability in Isithebe was held 31 March 2016. Other activities are planned to take place in the area.

(2) In 2014, government adopted the Local Government Back to Basics Strategy as a response to challenging situations at local government level. Recognising the need for inter-sphere collaboration, the strategy is implemented and monitored collaboratively, with the Department of Cooperative Governance taking the lead in the coordination of the following five pillars of the strategy:

(i) put people and their concerns first and ensure constant contact with communities through effective public participation platforms;

(ii) create conditions for decent living by consistently delivering municipal services of the right quality and standard;

(iii) demonstration of good governance and administration;

(iv) ensuring sound financial management and accounting; and

(v) building and maintaining sound institutional and administrative capabilities, administered and managed by dedicated and skilled personnel at all levels.

Since the strategy was implemented, the department’s monitoring of municipalities has shown signs of municipal performance improvement in the KZN Province. The Department also established Back to Basic teams clustered in Provinces to provide oversight and rapid response.

08 April 2016 - NW567

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4096 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the Tlokwe Local Municipality, if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

According to information received from Tlokwe City Local Municipality, as at Dec 2015.

(1) (a) Two (2) officials are currently on suspension.

(b) (i) (aa) Position of suspended official

(bb) Reason for suspension

(ii) Period of suspension

(iii) Total remuneration during period of suspension

Senior Librarian

Harassment and intimidation of subordinates, failure to report theft by a subordinate and gross misconduct (abuse of power).

One (1) month

(27 October 2015)

R 49 762.30

Senior Admin Officer

Disruption of normal operations of the employer, displaying rude and aggressive behaviour to fellow employees, wilful absence from performing tasks and responsibilities allocated to him.

One (1) month

(2 October 2015)

R 39 172.29

(2) No severance packages were paid to any municipal official.

08 April 2016 - NW571

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4094 on 8 December 2015, the requested information has been received from the metropolitan municipalities; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

a) The department is only responsible for managing the local government equitable share which provides for the subsidization of the provision of basic services to poor households. In the Local Government Equitable Share formula a monthly household income equal to two old age pensioners’ grant of R2 300 per month is used to define the formula’s affordability threshold. It should be noted that the threshold is not an official poverty line or a required level to be used by municipalities in their own indigent policies. However, should municipalities choose to provide fewer households with free basic services than they are funded for through the local government equitable share, their budget documentation should clearly indicate why they have made this choice and how they have consulted with their community during the budget process.

b) With regard to the Local Government Equitable Share (LGES) formula, the basic services component of the formula provides for the subsidisation of the provision of basic services to poor households. The subsidy includes funding for the provision of free basic water (6 kiloliters per household per month), energy (50 kilowatt-hours per household per month) and sanitation and refuse (based on the service levels as defined national policy). The basic services component provides a subsidy of R313.76 per month in 2015/16 for the cost of providing basic services to each of these households. The monthly amount provided to each service is provided in the Explanatory Memorandum to the 2015 Division of Revenue Bill.

c) According to the STATSSA Non-Financial Census released in August 2015, the total nationwide number of indigent households registered with municipalities is 3 482 260. The table below captures registered indigent households per metro:

Table 1: Total Number of Indigent Households Registered in each Metropolitan Municipality

Province

Metropolitan Municipality

Indigent Households

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

288, 209

 

Tshwane

96, 883

 

Ekurhuleni

36,526

Free State

Mangaung

20, 105

KwaZulu Natal

Ethekwini

589, 605

Eastern Cape

Buffalo City

61, 960

 

Nelson Mandela Bay

85,022

Western Cape

City of Cape Town

288, 724

Total

 

1,467,034

d) The basic services component of the local government equitable share is worth
R33.3 billion in 2015/16 financial year and accounts for 74.9 per cent of the total value of the local government equitable share.

e)

      1. The eligibility for indigent subsidy is determined via application. All households who qualify in terms of the criteria set by the municipality visit municipal offices and/ or other registration points established by the municipality to complete and lodge applications for subsidy consideration.
      2. The eligibility for indigent subsidy is not determined automatically via Property valuation. Instead, it is determined via application process as in (i) above. Property valuation is just but one of the many targeting methods that municipalities can use to target indigent households as spelt out in the national indigent Policy framework and the implementation guidelines.

08 April 2016 - NW491

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the construction of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s Bus Rapid Transit system currently operating from Kempton Park to Tembisa in Gauteng, (a) what are the reasons that there are no bus stop near the Kempton Park West suburb and (b) why have the residents of Kempton Park West not been consulted in this regard?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the department. We will however engage the affected provincial department responsible, to solicit the relevant information from the municipality. The Honourable Member will be kept updated on the process.

07 April 2016 - NW176

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the (a) accounting officers and/ or (b) any of the oversight officers, such as local government committees, the executive mayors and municipal councils, have any responsibilities to ensure that the directors at any local government operate within their designated (i) operating and (ii) capital budgets; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 2) Whether any incidences of unauthorized, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure were reported in any local government in the Northern Cape in the last municipal financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why are incidences of irregular , fruitless and wasteful expenditure at local Government level, reported in the Auditor General’s opinion on the relevant authority’s annual financial statements, only addressed at this stage of the financial reporting process, and not during the financial year as soon as it is picked up and (b) why are incidences of these types of expenditure not recouped from the responsible directors and / or political office-bearers in line with section 32 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003?

Reply:

  1. Yes, (a) accounting officers and oversight committees have responsibilities to ensure that the directors at any local government operate within their designated (i) operating and (ii) capital budgets in line with Chapter 8 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, 56 of 2003. Further, section 79 of the Local Government Structures Act gives municipal councils the power to establish one or more committees necessary for the effective and efficient performance of any of its functions or the exercise of its powers.

After the municipal council approves the budget, the Budget and Treasury Office (BTO) ensures that each director within the municipality manages their own budget. On a weekly basis cash flow plans as well as expenditure plans are distributed amongst directors to avoid over expenditure on budget votes. Councillors also play an oversight role due to the fact that expenditure reports are tabled to the council on a quarterly basis.

2. Three (3) municipalities reported in line with Section 32 of Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, expenditures to MEC: Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs in Northern Cape in the last financial year. The municipalities which reported are Tsantsabane Local Municipality, Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality and ZF Mgcawu District Municipality.

 (a) Municipalities do not report regularly to the Province on unauthorised, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure. Such expenditure is reported to council and the necessary steps are taken to recover the losses. The actual amount of unauthorised, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure can only be determined at the end of the municipal financial year. Municipalities also reports to the National Treasury on a monthly basis in line with Section 71 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003.

 (b) Municipal Councils have the responsibility to recover monies from the responsible directors and political office bearers. In addition, where political leaders and senior officials are found to have ignored their mandates or disregard legislation, the Code of Conduct for Political Leaders and the procedures provided for in the Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No 32 of 2000), as amended are invoked, respectively. Members of the Executive Council (MECs) have been sensitized on the matter and were urged to take the necessary steps to apply the said provisions, as and when required.

07 April 2016 - NW312

Profile picture: Stander, Ms T

Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether each metropolitan municipality has a Mayoral Discretionary/Benevolent Fund; if so, (a) what is the value of each specified fund and (b) does council have a policy related to this fund ; (2) Does the Mayor of each specified municipality report monthly to the council on expenditure of the specified fund; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant financial details of each specified fund ; (3) Whether he will provide a list of the projects and/or initiatives that benefited from each specified fund in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

Please find here: Reply

07 April 2016 - NW302

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality offers rate rebates to (a) the elderly, (b) disabled persons, (c) low income property owners and (d) other persons and/or organisations; if not, why not; if so, what is the (i) criteria and (ii) rebate in each specified case?

Reply:

Yes, the response with respect to each metropolitan municipality is as reflected in the tables below.

Given that the granting of rate rebates is one of the three instruments municipalities utilise in granting relief to property owners, for completeness we have included information pertaining to the granting of reductions on the market values of properties and exemptions where applicable. This is because municipalities use any combination of these three relief measures (according to their individual preference). Thus, by merely looking at only one of these three relief measures in isolation of the other two, one cannot get a full picture as to how each metropolitan municipality approaches the issue of granting relief to property owners.

The information below is sourced from municipal rates policies and other relevant municipal budget related documents which contain detailed information (such indigent policies and resolutions levying rates), and therefore this response does not provide all detailed information (e.g. with respect to criteria) as reflected in those documents because to do so would amount to duplicating information in those municipal documents which are ordinarily published in municipal websites for any interested person to obtain detailed information without the risk of these being summarised by someone else (as is the case now by the Department) in a manner which can fail to do justice to those detailed public documents.

Buffalo City

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Be the owner of a property categorized as residential
    • Occupy the property as his/her primary residence
    • Must apply for the rebate
    • Must be in receipt of gross monthly income (excluding medical contributions) not exceeding R10,500.00 from all sources including income of spouse
    • Must be at least 60 years of age on 1 July of the financial year concerned, and If the applicant turns 60 in that financial year the rebate will be granted on a pro rata basis from the date on which the applicant turns 60

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate : Income R0 - R3000
    • 85% rebate : Income R3001 – R4500
    • 70% rebate : Income R4501 – R6000
    • 55% rebate : Income R6001 – R7500
    • 40% rebate : Income R7501 – R9000
    • 25% rebate : Income R9000 – R10500

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

    • The first 4 bullets in (a) above applies
    • Disabled persons must be in receipt of a disability grant and submit proof e.g. letter from SASSA

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Same as in (a) above.

(c) Low income property owners:

(i) Criteria

    • The owner may not own any property in addition to the property in respect of which indigent support is provided
    • Property of indigent household may be inspected annually to determine validity of application or indigency
    • The property must be categorized as residential

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • 100% rebate if the value of the property does not exceed R120, 000.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Newly developed commercial/industrial properties

(i) Criteria

    • The property must be categorized as commercial/industrial in the valuation roll
    • The property must be developed
    • The value of the development must be R50,000,000.00 or above (this requirement does not apply to East London Industrial Development zone property owners).

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate is phased out over a period of 5 years
  • Year 1 – 50%
  • Year 2 – 40%
  • Year 3 – 30%
  • Year 4 – 20%
  • Year 5 – 10%, thereafter, full rates will be payable

2. Differential rebate

(i) Criteria

    • Areas where some or all of the services are not offered by the municipality

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Water – 22.50% rebate
    • Electricity – 15.00% rebate
    • Sewerage – 15.00% rebate
    • Refuse – 7.50% rebate
    • Constructed roads – 15.00% rebate

3. Public Benefit Organisations (PBOs)

(i) Criteria

  • Various properties owned by PBOs, for example, used exclusively as a home catering for persons with disabilities, a hospital, clinic, metal institution, frail care centre, orphanage, old age homes or any other benevolent institutions, provided that any profits from the use of such properties are used entirely for the benefit of the institution.

(ii) Relief in each case

  • May qualify for 100% rebate on application.

Exemptions

The following properties are exempted from rating:

  • Municipal owned properties non-rateable
  • Religious or places of places of public worship and special property (e.g. museums, libraries)
  • Rural communal land

Ekurhuleni

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached the age of 60 years or more
    • Own property concerned which must be
      • residential
      • farm property used for residential purposes
      • smallholdings used for residential purposes
    • total monthly income from all sources including income of spouse of owner must not exceed an amount determined by the Council from time to time (see table below for amounts)
    • Once-off application for the duration of valuation roll
    • Not be in receipt of indigent assessment rate rebate
    • Must reside permanently on the concerned property
    • Property must consist of one dwelling only and no part thereof is sub-let

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Additional reduction of R150,000 of the market value of property
    • Additional rebate based on household income:

Average monthly earnings in respect of preceding 12 months

Rebate in percentage on assessment rates

R0.00 – R2,700.00 (2 x state pensions)

100%

R2,700.01 – R5,250.00

85%

R5,250.01 – R6,840.00

70%

R6,840.01 – R8,470.00

55%

R8,470.01 – R12,750.00

40%

 

(b) People with disability:

1. Disability grantees and/or medically boarded persons

(i) Criteria

    • Same as (a) above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Additional reduction of R150,000 of the market value of property
    • Additional rebate based on household income:

Average monthly earnings in respect of preceding 12 months

Rebate in percentage on assessment rates

R0.00 – R2,700.00 (2 x state pensions)

100%

R2,700.01 – R5,250.00

85%

R5,250.01 – R6,840.00

70%

R6,840.01 – R8,470.00

55%

R8,470.01 – R12,750.00

40%

(c) Low income property owners

Refer to reductions and exemptions below.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Natural disasters

(i) Criteria

    • Property damaged by a natural disaster as defined in terms of the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002
    • Apply to the Council

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Council may fully or partially suspend the levying or rates

2. Sporting bodies

(i) Criteria

    • Apply to be granted a rebate
    • For purposes of amateur sport and any social activities which are connected to sport
    • Subject to existing agreements between club and Council

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 90% rebate

3. Public and private schools, universities and colleges

(i) Criteria

    • Public schools which are state funded
    • Private schools not funded in terms of South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996 and are registered as independent schools
    • Universities
    • Technical and other colleges

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate on private (independent) primary and secondary schools is in accordance with percentage after net profit:

Net profit after tax

Rebate

0.00% – 10.00%

100%

10.01% – 20.00%

90%

20.01% – 30.00%

80%

30.01% – 40.00%

70%

    • 20% rebate on private (independent) universities and colleges, registered as educational institutions not subsidized by state
    • 100% rebate on crèches registered as educational institutions

4. Vacant unimproved land

(i) Criteria

    • Dwelling units being constructed which will be used for residential purposes
    • Rebate granted for a maximum period of eighteen months from the date the approved building plan is supplied
    • Occupation certificate be supplied at the end of the eighteen months period
    • Failure to supply the occupational certificate will result in reversal of rebate already granted

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 75% rebate

Reductions

(a) The elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The first R150, 000 of the market value of property is deducted.

Exemptions

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Indigent households

(i) Criteria

    • Own residential property
    • Apply to access the relief provided the combined household income of all occupants/ residents and/or dependents residing on the property and are over the age of 18 years, is less than two (2) state monthly pension grants.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted if property does not exceed maximum value of R150 000.

2. Child headed households

(i) Criteria

    • Headed by child and registered in terms of Council’s approved indigent policy
    • Apply to access the relief provided the combined household income of all occupants/ residents and/or dependents residing on the property and are over the age of 18 years, is less than two (2) state monthly pension grants.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted if property does not exceed maximum value of R150 000.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations

 

1. Public benefit organisation / non-governmental organization and cultural organisations

(i) Criteria

    • May be exempted from paying rates if fall within:
      • welfare and humanitarian institutions
      • animal welfare
      • cultural
    • Once-off application for the duration of valuation roll

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted

eThekwini

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached age of 60 years or more during financial year
    • Own residential property concerned or property owned solely by either spouse
    • The property being a primary residential
    • Value of property must not exceed R3 million
    • Apply for renewal of rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A rebate not exceeding R3, 623 or such lesser amount

(b) People with disability:

1. Disability grantees or medically boarded persons

(i) Criteria

    • Owner physically or mentally disabled
    • Own residential property concerned or property owned solely by either spouse
    • Reside in the property concerned
    • Annually apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A rebate not exceeding R3, 623 or such lesser amount

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Child headed households

(i) Criteria

    • Property headed by a minor (person under age of 21)
    • Property owned by terminally ill parent or a child or deceased estate of the parent
    • Value of property must not exceed a value determined by Council at its annual budget
    • Minors must reside permanently on the property
    • Apply for renewal of rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A rebate not exceeding R3, 623 or such lesser amount

(d) other persons and/or organisations:

1. Life rights schemes and retirement villages/complexes

(i) Criteria

    • The scheme must be registered in terms of Housing Development Scheme for Retired Persons Act, 65 of 1988
    • The Scheme must be registered with and regulated by the South African Association of Homes for the Aged (SAHA)
    • Title deeds of the property must be appropriately endorsed
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 25% rebate

2. Commercial accommodation

(i) Criteria

    • Owner of property must permanently reside on the property
    • Bed and breakfast, guesthouses, and back-packers lodges must have a valid registration certificate issued by the Municipality
    • Apply for a rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 50% rebate for bed and breakfast
    • 25% rebate for guesthouses
    • Rebate not exceeding 50% for backpacker lodges, holiday accommodation and student accommodation with up to 40 beds available
    • Rebate not exceeding 25% for backpacker lodges, holiday accommodation and student accommodation with up to 80 beds available
    • 25% rebate for property let-out for purposes of holiday accommodation for reward
    • 25% rebate for property let-out for purposes of student accommodation (learners of higher education and above)

3. Schools not for gain

(i) Criteria

    • The schools not for gain on the business and commercial category
    • Use of land or buildings, or any part thereof shall not be for the private pecuniary benefit of any individual whether as a shareholder in a company or otherwise
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 50% rebate

4. Natural and other disasters

(i) Criteria

    • Property damaged by a natural disaster as defined in terms of the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002
    • Property damaged by causes other than that defined by the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002 and such damage renders the property uninhabitable
    • Damage to property caused by arson is excluded
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 75% temporary rebate for a period of six months or a portion thereof
    • Thereafter, a further 75% temporary rebate for a period not exceeding six months

5. Economic development

(i) Criteria

    • Developments as indicated in the Incentive Policy of Council
    • Rebates shall be for defined period
    • Developer shall be under contractual obligation to complete property within a defined period
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Green field development and brown field development receive rebates:

Value of development R (Millions)

Rebate on rates payable in percentage

0 – 50

15%

51 – 150

25%

151 – 300

50%

301 and above

65%

Reductions

(a) the elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The first R120, 000 of the market value for property exceeding R185, 000

(d) other persons and/or organisations

1. Vacant land

(i) Criteria

    • Land outside the urban development phasing line which is vacant

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Reduction of R30, 000

Exemptions

(d) other persons and/or organisations

1. Residential property with a value of up to R185,000 is exempted.

2. Public benefit organisations

(i) Criteria

    • May be exempted from paying rates if fall within:
      • welfare and humanitarian institutions
      • health care institutions
      • animal welfare
      • Schools and organisations for the mentally and physically challenged
      • cemeteries
      • heritage sites
    • Use of land or buildings, or any part thereof shall not be for the private pecuniary benefit of any individual whether as a shareholder in a company or otherwise
    • Apply for exemption

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted

3. sporting bodies

(i) Criteria

    • Apply for exemption, and aapplicants must produce a tax exemption certificate issued by the South African Revenue Services (SARS) as contemplated in Part 1 of the Ninth Schedule of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (Act 58 of 1962).

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rated on value of building area only
    • The building area shall exclude change rooms and store rooms necessary for the sport.

City of Cape Town

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Occupy the property as his/her primary residence
    • Must be at least 60 years of age
    • Must apply
    • Must be in receipt of gross monthly household income not exceeding R12,000.00
    • The applicant and/or spouse and/or life partner should not be the owner of more than one property nationally

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate : Income R0 – R3500
    • 95% rebate : Income R3501 – R5000
    • 90% rebate : Income R5001 – R6000
    • 80% rebate : Income R6001 – R7000
    • 70% rebate : Income R7001 – R8000
    • 60% rebate : Income R8001 – R8500
    • 50% rebate : Income R8501 – R9000
    • 40% rebate : Income R9001 – R9500
    • 30% rebate : Income R9501 – R10000
    • 20% rebate : Income R10001 – R11000
    • 10% rebate : Income R11001 - R12000

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

Same as (a) above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

Same as (a) above.

(c) Low income property owners:

(i) Criteria

Same as (a) above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • May qualify for 100% rebate.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Agricultural properties

(i) Criteria

    • Bona fide farming properties
    • Contribute to the local economy
    • Assists in meeting the service delivery and development obligations of the city
    • Contribution to the social and economic welfare of farm workers
    • Must apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 80% rebate on the rate levied on residential properties

2. Nature reserves, special nature reserves and national parks

(i) Criteria

  • May apply for the rebate
    • Private property contracted into the Table Mountain National Park in terms of the Protected Areas Act
    • Private property exhibiting sensitive ecological areas/features, identified by the City’s Environmental Management Resources Department
    • Owners of properties with formal in perpetuity conservation agreements of over 10 hectares

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May be granted a 100% rebate

3. Religious organisations

(i) Criteria

  • Property used primarily as an office of a religious organization
  • Property used as parking facilities, halls used for religious purposes
  • Accommodation for missionaries, camping sites not operated for gain and cemeteries for that religious community

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May be granted a 100% rebate

4. Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs)/ Public Benefit Organisations (PBOs)

(i) Criteria

  • Must have a constitution which does not preclude any resident of the City from being a member
  • Must be open to the general public
  • May apply for the rebate
  • Be registered as NPOs under the Non-Profit Organisations Act or be PBO that qualify for tax exemption as contemplated by Part 1 of section 30 of the Ninth Schedule of the Income Tax Act
  • Must be organisations with limited resources
  • Health and welfare institutions
  • Educational institutions
  • National/Provincial/ Local Heritage Site /Historical Monuments
  • Charitable institutions
  • Cemeteries and crematoria
  • Cultural institutions
  • Museums, libraries, art galleries and botanical gardens
  • War veterans organisations
  • Youth development organisations
  • Animal protection
  • Sporting bodies
  • Homeless people shelters
  • Early childhood development

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May be granted a 100% rebate

Reductions

  1. Criteria
  • Residential properties
  1. Relief in each specified case
  • Maximum reduction of up to R200,000.00 granted to every individually-valued residential property

Exemptions

  1. Criteria
  • Any private road or any other property where the market value of the property is equal to or less than R50,000.00

City of Johannesburg

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached age of 60 years
    • Own and occupy property concerned
    • Value of property may not exceed R2, 000, 000
    • Apply to Council for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate if pensioner receives National Social Security Grant
    • 100% rebate if pensioner is age 70 years and above irrespective of income
    • 100% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income below or equal to R7, 850
    • 50% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income above R7, 850 but less than or equal to R13, 458

(b) People with disability:

1. Emanating from injury

(i) Criteria

    • Must have been injured on duty serving:
      • South African National Defence Force
      • South African Policy Service
      • Emergency Services
      • Johannesburg Metropolitan Police
    • Own and occupy property concerned
    • Value of property may not exceed R2, 000, 000
    • Apply to Council for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate if pensioner receives National Social Security Grant
    • 100% rebate if pensioner is age 70 years and above irrespective of income
    • 100% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income below or equal to R7, 850 provided pensioner is at least 60 years of age
    • 50% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income above R7, 850 but less than or equal to R13, 458 provided pensioner is at least 60 years of age

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Extended social package

(i) Criteria

    • Apply to municipality every six months
    • Own and occupy property concerned
    • Property value not exceeding R450, 000

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 70% rebate of current monthly rates when Johannesburg Poverty Index is greater than zero but not exceeding 34 points
    • 100% rebate of current monthly rates when Johannesburg Poverty Index is greater than 35 points

2. State’s Social Security Grant

(i) Criteria

    • Own and occupy residential property concerned
    • Owner is dependent on a State’s Social Security Grant in terms of Social Assistance Act, 59 of 1992
    • State’s Social Security Grant is their sole source of income

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

3. Child headed households

(i) Criteria

    • Property occupied by a household headed by a minor
    • Value of property may not exceed R2, 000, 000
    • Property owned by terminally ill parent or a child or deceased estate of the parent
    • Terminally ill parent or their child must apply annually for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 100% of the current monthly rates

(d) other persons and/or organisations:

1. Heritage properties

(i) Criteria

    • Declared heritage site in terms of section 27 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 25 of 1999
    • Designated as protected areas in terms of section 28 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 25 of 1999
    • Designated as heritage area in terms of section 31 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 25 of 1999
    • Apply to Council for approval of rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 20% of the current monthly rates

2. Residential sectional title

(i) Criteria

    • High density residential development including sectional title units

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 5% rebate of the currently monthly rates

3. Protection of animals

(i) Criteria

    • Property registered in the name of any institution or organization which has as its exclusive objective the protection of animals
    • Apply to Council for approval of rebate/exemption

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 100% of the current monthly rates

4. Disaster areas

(i) Criteria

    • Property situated within an area affected by a disaster within the meaning of the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002
    • Apply to Council for approval of rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 100% of the current monthly rates

5. Vacant land

(i) Criteria

    • Land outside the urban development boundary which is vacant
    • Rebate only available if property could not be developed due to unavailability of bulk infrastructure and/or bulk services
    • Apply to Council for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 50% of the current monthly rates

6. Housing development schemes for retired persons

(i) Criteria

    • Properties owned by juristic persons that fall under the Housing Development Schemes for Retired Persons Act, 65 of 1988 as amended
    • Owner of property shall pass on the benefits of the rates rebate to the registered holder/s of the right to occupation in the Scheme

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 50% of the current monthly rates

7. Registered social landlords

(i) Criteria

    • Properties owned by individuals or entities designated as Registered Social Landlords under the Registered landlord Policy of the City

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 40% rebate on the current monthly rates where property is zoned for commercial use and is rated accordingly

8. New building incentive

(i) Criteria

    • New building development that would take place within the identified Corridors of Freedom in line with the Growth and Development Strategy 2040
    • Development must be in line with the development requirements set out by the City
    • Proposed developments must follow all planning by-laws

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Property owner will pay a quarter of the rate as per the category of land for a period not exceeding two years during the construction
    • Property owner will pay half the rates on the first year of operation as per the category of land

9. Private sports club

(i) Criteria

    • Owned by private sports club
    • Used primarily for sporting purposes

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 40% rebate

10. Provision and/or promotion of youth development

(i) Criteria

    • Property registered in the name of any institution or organization which has as its exclusive objective the provision and/or promotion of youth development

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

Reductions

(a) The elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property
    • Properties used for multiple purposes, provided one or more components of the property are used for residential purpose

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The first R200, 000 of the market value of the property.

Mangaung

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • The property must be registered in the name of the applicant
    • Must be at least 60 years of age
    • Must occupy the relevant property
    • In a case of a semi-detached house, of which a section is rented out, only rates paid for that section occupied by the owner is subject to rebates
    • If the owner due to medical reasons had to take early retirement the age requirement of 60 years will not apply
    • The property owner must apply

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The rebate on the first R250,000.00 of the rateable value for residential properties of qualifying senior citizens will only be applicable on properties with a value that does not exceed R2 ,000,000.00

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

    • Same as (a) above.
    • Must be in receipt of a disability pension from the Department of Welfare and Population Development

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The rebate on the first R250,000.00 of the rateable value for residential properties of qualifying disabled persons will only be applicable on properties with a value that does not exceed R2 ,000,000.00

(c) Low income property owners:

(i) Criteria

    • Occupy the property as his/her primary residence and must be registered as indigents in terms of the adopted indigent policy of the municipality
    • The rebate will automatically apply and no further application is thus required

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • May qualify for 100% rebate

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Child headed families

(i) Criteria

    • The head of the child headed family must occupy the property as his/her normal residence
    • Must not be older than 18 years of age
    • Must still be a scholar or jobless
    • Must be in receipt of a total monthly income from all sources not exceeding an amount to be determined by the municipality
    • Must apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May qualify for 100% rebate

Reductions

  1. Disaster related matters
  1. Criteria
  • Partial or total destruction of a property
  • Disasters as defined in the Disaster Management Act
  • Owner must apply
  1. Relief
  • Maximum reduction of 80%
  1. Residential properties
  1. Criteria
  • No requirement for lodging an application.
  1. Relief in each specified case
  • In addition to the mandated first R15,000.00 of the market value of residential properties, and additional R55,000.00 reduction is applicable to all residential properties

Exemptions

  1. Public Benefit organisations (PBOs)
  1. Criteria
    • Property owned by public benefit organisations and used for any specified public benefit activity listed in item 1(welfare and humanitarian), item 2 (health care) and item 4 (education and development) of part 1 of the Ninth Schedule to the Income Tax Act
    • Must apply
    • PBO must attach a SARS tax exemption certificate issued by the South African Revenue Services
  1. Relief
  • May be exempted

Nelson Mandela Bay

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Be a natural person
    • Be the owner of the property
    • Occupy the property as his/her normal residence
    • Must be at least 60 years of age on 1 July of the financial year concerned, or if the owner turns 60 during the year the rebate will be granted on a pro rata basis from the date on which the applicant turned 60
    • Submit pension statements
    • Not be a receipt of an indigent subsidy
    • Ensure that his/her accounts are not in arrears before applying for a rebate
    • Be in receipt of a total gross annual income not exceeding R118,700

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate is based on the total annual household income
    • 85% rebate : Income between two state pensions and R54,000
    • 70% rebate : Income between R54,001 and R66,900
    • 55% rebate : Income between R66,901 and R79,800
    • 40% rebate : Income between R79,801 and R92,800
    • 25% rebate : Income between R92,801 and R105,700
    • 10% rebate : income between R105,701 and R118,700

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

    • Same as (a) above.
    • Must be in receipt of a disability grant/pension and submit proof and nature of disability, and submit SASSA statements with the application.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Same as (a) above.

(c) Low income property owners

(i) Criteria

    • The household income of applicants, from all sources, shall not exceed the equivalent of two State welfare pensions
    • The applicant must be an account holder and must reside on the property in respect of which assistance is sought and must apply in person.
    • The applicant must not own more than one fixed property within the metro

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • A full credit for property rates.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Sporting bodies (Professional)

(i) Criteria

    • Property must be owned/leased for sporting purposes
    • May be for gain and not-for -gain
    • Profits earned must be invested in the betterment of the organization and not be for private gain
    • Must apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May qualify for 40% rebate

2. Social Housing

(i) Criteria

  • Property registered in the name of an institution accredited in terms of the Social Housing Act 16 of 2008 which provides or intends to provide rental of cooperative housing options for households with a gross monthly household income less than the maximum housing subsidy
  • Accounts of the applicant must be up to date or arrangements must be made to pay outstanding balances before any rebate will be granted

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May qualify to be rated at the same rate as public benefit organisations in terms of the Rate Ratios Regulations Between Residential and Non-Residential Properties.

Reductions

None, and for properties affected by disasters, such properties are re-valued to get the revised their market values for rating purposes.

Exemptions

  1. Sporting bodies (Amateur)
  1. Criteria
    • Property must be owned/leased for sporting purposes
    • May be for gain and not-for -gain
    • Profits earned must be invested in the betterment of the organization and not be for private gain
    • Must apply for the rebate
  1. Relief in each specified case
  • May be exempted
  1. PBOs and Not For Gain institutions or organisations
  1. Criteria
    • Must apply for the exemption
    • Properties used exclusively as hospitals, clinics, mental hospitals, orphanages, retirement villages, old age homes or any other benevolent institutions
    • Properties belonging to not-for-gain institutions (organisations) that perform charitable work
    • Land used exclusively for cemeteries and crematoriums
    • Properties owned by a declared institution in terms of the Cultural Institutions Act
    • Museums, libraries, art galleries and botanical gardens registered in the name of private persons and open to the public
    • Properties registered in the name of a trust/trusts and/or organisations as defined in the Social Aid Act
    • Properties owned/used by youth organisations for the promotion and development of the youth
    • Properties owned, or used by institutions or organisations the exclusive aim of which is to protect birds, reptiles, fish and animals not-for-gain
    • Properties registered in the name of and used primarily as a place of public worship by a religious community
  1. Relief
  • May be exempted

Tshwane

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached age of 60 years or more during financial year
    • Own residential property concerned
    • Property concerned must be occupied only by the pensioner and his/her spouse, if any, and by dependents without income

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A further maximum/total rebate of 50% (on the remaining property rates, after the applicable residential rebates have been granted) if total gross income of the pensioner and/or spouse does not exceed an amount equal to twice the annual state pension (2 x R1,410 or 2 x R1,430 if older than 75) for a financial year
    • A further maximum/total rebate of 40% (on the remaining property rates, after the applicable residential rebates have been granted) if joint income of the pensioner and/or spouse does not exceed R130, 000 for a financial year

(b) People with disability:

1. Physically or mentally disabled

(i) Criteria

    • Owner physically or mentally disabled
    • Own residential property concerned
    • Property concerned must be occupied only by the pensioner and his/her spouse, if any, and by dependents without income

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A further maximum/total rebate of 50% subject to total gross annual social pension for a financial year, which amount may be reviewed during the City’s annual budget process
    • A further maximum/total rebate of 40% if joint income of the pensioner and/or spouse exceeds an amount equal to twice the annual state pension (2 x R1,410 or 2 x R1,430 if older than 75) for a financial year, but does not to exceed R130, 000 for a financial year

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Indigent households

(i) Criteria

  • Gross monthly income of all members of the household does not exceed the joint amount of two state old age pensions excluding child support grant and foster care grant
    • Applicant as well as any other member of the household does not own other fixed property than one in which they reside

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

2. Owner temporarily without income: indigent criteria may be applied in terms of Indigent Policy of City of Tshwane

(i) Criteria

    • Same as indigent households above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Grants-in-aid

(i) Criteria

    • Registered in the name of an institution or organization in terms of Non-profit Organizations Act, 71 of 1997
    • Hospitals, clinics and institutions for mentally ill person which are not operated with intention to make profit
    • Cemeteries and crematoriums which are registered in the name of private persons and which are used exclusively for burials and cremations
    • Museum, art galleries, libraries and botanical gardens which are registered in the name of private persons and which are open to public, whether admission is charged or not
    • Rateable property registered in the name of a trustee or any organization which is being maintained for the welfare of war veterans as defined in section 1 of the Social Aid Act (House of Assembly), 37 of 1989
    • Sports grounds used for the purpose of amateur sport and any social activities which are connected with the sport
    • Rateable property registered in the name of the Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Sea Scouts, Voortrekkers or any organization which is in the opinion of the municipality similar or, any rateable property let by a municipality to any such organization
    • Rateable property registered in the name of a declared institution as defined in section 1 of the Cultural Institutions Act, 29 of 1969, or the cultural Institutions Act (House of Assembly), 66 of 1989
    • Apply to Chief Financial Officer

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

2. Owners of land alienated by the municipality after January 2015

(i) Criteria

    • Owners of land alienated by the municipality

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebates in terms of the Development Investment Incentive Policy of the City

3. Owners of catalytic investment properties

(i) Criteria

    • Owners of catalytic investment properies

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebates in terms of the Development Investment Incentive Policy of the City

4. Independent school

(i) Criteria

    • Application does not meet the criteria for Public Benefit Organisation property as defined
    • Apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 20% rebate

Reductions

(a) the elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • First part of value of property up to R75, 000 of the market value

Exemptions

(d) Other persons and/or organisations

1. Public Service infrastructure

2. Places of public worship

3. Protected areas

4. State trust land

Cooporate Gov Ministry letter.jpg

07 April 2016 - NW286

Profile picture: Matlhoko, Mr AM

Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What is he doing about the struggling Vhembe District Municipality which appointed a Municipal Manager who was dismissed from the previous employment for gross incompetence and (b) what is his department doing to assist the municipality's deteriorating situation?

Reply:

(a) Vhembe District Municipality has been identified as one of the municipalities that is supported in terms of Back to Basics programme. Support that is currently provided by the department includes filling of vacant senior management positions, namely: (1) Municipal Manager; (2) Director: Community Services; and (3) Director: Technical services.

(b) According to the information received from the Limpopo Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs, the Vhembe District municipal council resolved that the employment of the municipal manager should not continue as she refused to sign an employment contract. The Council indicated that the terms of the employment contract which the municipal manager refused to agree with are reasonable and in the best interest of the municipality. The department is in the process of seconding an acting municipal manager as requested by the municipal council.
 

07 April 2016 - NW292

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether councillors of each metropolitan municipality are required to declare their financial interests; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether the financial interests of councillors are made available to the public; if not, why not; if so, where are these details made available?Reply:Thus far, responses have been received from three Metropolitan Municipalities, namely; Buffalo City, Nelson Mandela Bay and City of Cape Town. We are still awaiting responses from the other 5 Metropolitan Municipalities.The responses below are from the 3 Metropolitan Municipalities mentioned above:( 1 ) The three Metropolitan Municipalities stated that all Councillors of their municipalities are required to declare their financial interest.

Reply:

Thus far, responses have been received from three Metropolitan Municipalities, namely; Buffalo City, Nelson Mandela Bay and City of Cape Town. We are still awaiting responses from the other 5 Metropolitan Municipalities.

The responses below are from the 3 Metropolitan Municipalities mentioned above:

( 1 ) The three Metropolitan Municipalities stated that all Councillors of their municipalities are required to declare their financial interest.

( 2 ) The three Metropolitan Municipalities stated that the financial interest of the Councillors are made available to the public.

The table below illustrates the response per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Method of publication of Financial interest of the

Councillors

Buffalo City

The Annual Report of the municipality

City of Cape Town

The website of the municipality.

Nelson Mandela Bay

The Declaration of Interest form consists of two categories, of which only category B is made available for public scrutiny, in line with Council resolution. The financial

interest of the Councillors' are published in Council agendas, public libraries throughout the Metropolitan area and hard copies are made available at Council meetings.

City of Johannesburg

Awaiting response from the municipality.

City of Tshwane

Same as above.

Ekurhuleni

Same as above.

eThekwini

Same as above

Mangaung

Same as above

07 April 2016 - NW271

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the sum total accrued in respect of arrears service fees that are owing by (a) individuals, (b) businesses and (c) state institutions to municipalities across the country for (i) electricity and (ii) any other services as at the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

According to the report compiled by the National Treasury in terms of section 71 of the MFMA, as at September 2015, the categories of debtors set out below have arrears on electricity and other services including sewerage, refuse removal and water. The debtor amounts reflected below are exclusive of interest.

  1. (a) Individuals

Service

Arrears on service fees excluding interest (R ‘000)

  1. Electricity

R3,772,823 billion

  1. Any other services (excluding property rates)

R20,110,377 billion

(1) (b) Businesses

Service

Arrears on service fees excluding interest (R ‘000)

  1. Electricity

R5,102,455 billion

  1. Any other services (excluding property rates)

R2,983,647 billion

(1) (c) Sate Institutions

Service

Arrears service fees excluding interest (R ‘000)

  1. Electricity

602,587 million

  1. Any other services (excluding property rates)

989,179 million

2. My department, in consultation with other stakeholders, has taken various initiatives to curtail the non-payment of municipal arrear debt. These initiatives include auditing and verification of the outstanding government debt, the verification entails confirming whether invoices that are contested by government departments are correct. The team is also ensuring that municipalities have enforceable credit control policies and by-laws.

I will consider whether or not to make a statement in due course.

07 April 2016 - NW145

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any municipalities have been furnished with notifications by (a) Eskom and/or (b) any water board to notify them that the supply of electricity or water as the case may could be cut off due to non-payment; if so, (i) which municipalities are affected, (ii) what amount is owed to the relevant utilities by each specified municipality as at 31 December 2015 and (iii) what detailed steps are being taken to avert the crisis? (2) whether he will consider provincial and/or national intervention in the defaulting municipalities in terms of section 139(5) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, for a failure to meet their financial obligations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Eskom has issued nine public notifications of partial disconnection of electricity supply by 31 December 2015. (b) There are no municipalities that have received notices from the Waterboards due to non-payment.

(ii)The following municipalities are affected have been issued with disconnection notices by Eskom. The detailed breakdown of debt owed by each is illustrated in the table below:

PROVINCE

MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL DEBT OWED R’000 (Million)

Eastern Cape

Gariep

R56.8

 

Maletswai

R59.2

 

Nxuba

R43

 

Ikwezi

R13.9

Northern Cape

Kha-ima

R5.7

 

Dikgatlong

R23.1

 

Ubuntu

R16.8

 

Thembelihle

R22.7

 

Magareng

R17.5

(iii) Aligned to the approach taken by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, (COGTA) Public Enterprises (DPE) and SALGA, Eskom in conjunction with the national task team is visiting affected municipalities, as well as those that were disconnected in December 2015 and January 2016. The objective is to assess the challenges faced by the municipalities and provide Eskom with the opportunity to enter into sustainable payment arrangements.

(2) I have not yet considered an intervention in the defaulting municipalities, in terms of section 139(5) of the Constitution, the power to intervene in municipalities rests with the relevant provincial executives. It is only when a provincial executive cannot or does not adequately exercise the powers or perform the functions referred to in subsection (5) that the national executive is permitted to intervene in a municipality.

15 March 2016 - NW185

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(1) Whether Mpumalanga's traditional leaders recently received new vehicles from the provincial government; if so, (a) what was the total cost of the new vehicles, (b) how many vehicles were bought and (c) with regard to each vehicle, (i) what is the (aa) make, (bb) model and (cc) cost and (ii) who was the recipient of the vehicle; (2) (a) what was the (i) age, (ii) make and (iii) model of each vehicle that was replaced by the new fleet and (b) what was done with all the vehicles that were replaced; (3) whether the specified traditional leaders also received any cattle; if so, (a) what are the details of the animals awarded to each traditional leader, (b) what was the total cost and (c) why were the traditional leaders awarded these animals?

Reply:


Please find here: Reply

15 March 2016 - NW1

Profile picture: Mulder, Dr PW

Mulder, Dr PW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) What are the (a) annual salaries and (b) other financial benefits that (i) King Buyelekhaya Dalindyebo and (ii) the abaThembu royal family receive from the State; (2) whether any of the financial contributions that the State pays the specified king should be suspended because of the sentence and incarceration that he is currently serving; if not, why not; if so, (a) which contributions have been suspended and (b) from which date the contributions have been suspended; (3) whether the State is paying or will pay any financial remuneration and contributions to the abaThembu king; if not, why not; if so, (a) what (i) amount or (ii) respective amounts have been or will be paid to him, (b) on what date the funds were or will be paid to the acting king and (c) in terms of which legislation the payments were or will be made to the acting king? NW1E

Reply:

(1) The salaries, allowances and benefits of all Public Office Bearers, thus including Kings, are determined by the President based on recommendations made by the Independent Commission on the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers. This Commission also makes recommendations in respect of resources which are necessary to enable a Public Office Bearer to perform his or her functions effectively. Further to this determination, the Department has developed minimum norms and standards for the provision of resources to recognised traditional leaders which have been endorsed at MINMEC on 26 September 2013. Thus, King Buyelekhaya Dalindyebo annual remuneration is R 1 137 922 as per the determination.

(2) Yes, the remuneration, allowances, benefits and tools of trade have been suspended. The King's car that was allocated by the State was withdrawn soon after the Kings incarceration on 30 December 2015. As for the remuneration of the King, the Province has reported that his salary would be suspended with effect from March 2016. It should be noted that there are no provisions in legislation governing Public Office Bearers to stop the payment of his salary. However, the Minister intervened as follows:

• Sent the DG to engage the Provincial Accounting Officer to use the provisions of Section 38 of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), Act 1 of 1999.

• To explain the national process to unite the different factions of the royal family delaying the implementation of section 10 of the Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act, Act 41 of 2003.

• Furthermore, the Minister wrote to the MEC advising him to stop the salary in accordance with section 38 of the PFMA, Act 1 of 1999.

(3) No, the King is in prison and can no longer perform his duties-continuing to pay him will constitute irregular, wasteful and fruitless expenditure and the Eastern Cape Accounting Officer is expected to prevent it.(b) The issue of the acting King has not been finalised. The Royal family is still consulting on this matter. As soon as an acting King has been nominated, the Royal family is expected to make a submission to the Premier in accordance with section 14 of the Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act, Act 41 2003.

15 March 2016 - NW329

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) How many times did the National Disaster Management Advisory Forum meet since 1 January 2009;

Reply:


The National Disaster Management Advisory Forum meets on a quarterly basis every year.
The National Disaster Management Advisory Forum has met 27 times since 2009 as follows:

Year

National Disaster Management Advisory Forum Meeting Dates

Number of Meetings

2009

12 February 2009

3

 

13 August 2009

 
 

12 November 2009

 

2010

11 February 2010

4

 

13 May 2010

 
 

12 August 2010

 
 

11 November 2010

 

2011

10 March 2011

4

 

2 June 2011

 
 

8 September 2011

 
 

10 November

 


Attached please find here: Reply

15 March 2016 - NW77

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019; if not, why not; if so, (a) which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement, (b) how many performance assessments has he undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed, (c) what progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF, (d) what are the key obstacles to implementation and (e) what is the plan to address such obstacles?

Reply:

1. Whether he has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019; if not, why not; if so,

The Performance Management Framework for Ministers is the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) for 2014-2019, which is the first 5-year implementation plan of the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030. The performance targets and indicators are derived from the 14 Outcomes which government seeks to achieve.

These Outcomes and targets constitute government’s Programme of Action (POA), against which performance is tracked and reported at least on a quarterly basis. POA reports are publicly available on the government’s website.

(a) Which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement?

Key targets for the MTSF include:

  • Increase in the percentage of households with access to a functional water service from 85% in 2013 to 90% by 2019.
  • Increase in the percentage of households with access to a functional sanitation service from 84% in 2013 to 90% by 2019, including elimination of bucket sanitation in the formal areas.
  • 1.4 million Additional households to be connected to the grid between 2014 and 2019, and 105 000 additional non-grid connections.
  • An increase in the level of public trust and confidence in local government from 51% in 2012 to 65% in 2019, as measured by the IPSOS survey.
  • An improvement in overall municipal audit outcomes, with at least 75% of municipalities receiving unqualified audits by 2019.
  • Income support to the unemployed through expansion of the Community Work Programme to reach 1 million participants in 2019.

(b) How many performance assessments has he undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed?

Cabinet closely monitors the implementation of the NDP 2030/MTSF 2014-2019 through POA reports. These reports are tabled before an Implementation Forum of a Cluster of Ministers collectively responsible for MTSF Outcomes and then submitted to Cabinet, where progress is noted, bottlenecks to implementation are discussed and recommendations to address bottlenecks are considered and approved.

(c) What progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF?

This response is based on information received from Department of Water and Sanitation, Energy, Environmental Affairs, Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and National Treasury and Government Communication and Information Systems (GCIS). Progress provided hereunder on basic services is as at April 2015. The impact of the key indicators and targets is measured annually by sector departments. As a result, the latest measurement as at end of March 2016 on the key indicators and targets will be provided to the honourable member as soon as it has been finalised by respective Outcome 9 delivery partners.

Indicator

Baseline

Target

Progress

Progress rating

Number or percentage of hhs with access to a functional service at acceptable levels as per norms and standards

Water: 85% operational service

65% reliable service as benchmarked by Census 2011 (this equates to 85% operational service)

90% by 2019

Access to Water Infrastructure increased from 96.2% in April 2015 to 96.5% in December 2015, which constitutes an estimated 85 000 households that have been served with water supply infrastructure during the first 3 quarters of 2015/16 financial year.

66% households have access to reliable services, i.e. access to water services without frequent and lengthy interruptions in supply.

 
 

Sanitation: 84%

New baseline proposed by Sanitation of 74%

90% by 2019

Sanitation delivery through the Rural Household Infrastructure Grant and Municipal Infrastructure Grant was 133 508 households served cumulatively since April 2015. This translates to a 0, 7% annual increase.

 
 

HHs using bucket sanitation 88127 in formal areas

 

88127 buckets eradicated in formal areas by 2015.

32 500 buckets eradicated in formal settlements by March 2016

As at June 2015, bucket sanitation has been removed in 24 559 households over the past year against the initial target of 88 000.

The Department has planned to replace 32 500 buckets by the end March 2016

 

Indicator

Baseline

Target

Progress

Progress rating

 

Electricity: 12,8 million hhs connected to grid

1.4 million additional HHs connected by 2019

Access to electricity (grid) increased from 88.13% in April 2014 to 88.23% in April 2015. This percentage increase constitutes 233 455 households connected to grid from.

 
 

Refuse: 72%

80% by 2019

According to the General Household Survey results, access to refuse removal increased from 74.5% in July 2013 to 74.6% in July 2014.

The percentage increase constitute 162 046 households with access to waste collection services. The GHS is conducted annually and the results are release in July every year. The latest report will be released in July 2016.

 

Public trust and confidence in local government

51% (Ipsos 2012)

65% by 2019

Decreased from 55% in November 2014 to 49% in November 2016. This is according to a survey conducted by Ipsos.

 

Number of municipalities that improve their audit outcomes

20% adverse and disclaimers

25% qualified audits

50% unqualified audits (2014)

Number of municipalities with disclaimers and adverse opinions

Maximum of 25% municipalities with Qualified audits

At least 75% of municipalities with unqualified audit opinions by 2019

The audit outcomes for the MFMA 2013/14 Financial Year are as follows:

17% of municipalities and entities had disclaimers and adverse, which is a reduction of 6% from 23%.

22% of municipalities and entities had qualified opinions

58% municipalities and entities had unqualified opinions. As at 17% of municipalities and entities had disclaimers and adverse opinion

The 2014/15 preliminary audit results for 2014/15 were released by the Auditor-General in December 2015. The final consolidated report will be released in June 2016. The improvement in audit outcomes can only be measured after the release of the consolidated AG report.

 

Number of participants reached

172 000 (actual participation rate end March 2014)

1 million participants by 2019

The total CWP participation rate as at end of December 2015 was 214 013 cumulatively

 

 

(d) What are the key obstacles to implementation?

  • The provision of reliable services remains a challenge across all services due to backlogs in infrastructure refurbishment and neglect of operation and maintenance and asset management. There are no proper investments for infrastructure maintenance, which results in service interruptions.
  • The challenge of connecting households in rural areas, to bulk electricity infrastructure remains an issue. Most of these connections are concentrated in remote areas far from the grid, which necessitates installation of additional bulk infrastructure to connect these households. Installation of new bulk infrastructure necessitates environmental impact assessments, acquiring servitudes and project design functions, which have long lead times, to complete leading to delays in reticulation.

(e) What is the plan to address such obstacles?

  • Improving service delivery performance requires a programme management approach to proactively address the planning, coordination and institutional constraints experienced in the 27 priority districts. In this regard, a Service Delivery Business Strategy (Attached) was developed and approved by Cabinet on 02 June 2015 which entailed the establishment of a Programme Management Office (PMO) which is currently being coordinated by MISA and comprises key sector departments (DWS, DoT, DEA, DOE, NT, DCoG, & DPME).
  • To date, the PMO has completed the diagnostic assessments at the Amathole District to determine and confirm the status quo of the backlogs on access to reliable services. Umzinyathi, Sekhukhune and Bojanala Districts municipalities are currently being assessed.

 

  • The Department of Energy has recognized the need to enhance performance through project management of the electrification programme, to establish stakeholder forums aimed at managing expectations and to ensure alignment with planned electrification targets. Separate funding from Integrated National Electrification Programme (INEP) will be allocated to address bulk infrastructure requirements for targeted electricity connections specifically in deep rural areas.

 

15 March 2016 - NW309

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality, (a) operates an independent fraud line and (b) is connected to the National Anti-Corruption Hotline; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The responses below were received from the metropolitan municipalities:

( a ) 6 out of the 8 metropolitan municipalities operates independent fraud / corruption hotlines. The table below illustrates the response per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Details regarding fraud / corruption hotline

Buffalo City

The municipality operates an independent fraud hotline.

City of Cape Town

The municipality operates an independent fraud hotline.

City of Johannesburg

The municipality operates an independent fraud hotline.

City of Tshwane

The municipality operates an independent fraud hotline.

Ekurhuleni

The municipality operates an independent fraud hotline.

eThekwini

The municipality operates an independent anti-corruption hotline.

Mangaung

The municipality does not operate an independent fraud hotline.

Nelson Mandela Bay

The municipality is finalising the Service Level Agreement (SLA) with the service provider with regard to the fraud hotline. As soon as the SLA agreed and signed by relevant parties, the hotline will be operational.

( b ) All the 6 independent fraud hotlines are not connected to the National Anti-Corruption Hotline (NACH). There is no requirement for the independent fraud / corruption hotlines to be connected to the NACH.

15 March 2016 - NW17

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What action will he take to ensure that a mayor is elected at the uMzinyathi District Municipality following the resignation of the former mayor in September 2015, as numerous municipal council meetings since then have failed to elect a Mayor, partly due to the absence of the Speaker?NW17E

Reply:

Section 41 of the Municipal Structures Act, 1998 (Act No. 117 of 1998) ("the Structures Act') provides that if the speaker of a municipal council is absent or not available to perform the functions of speaker, the municipal council must elect another councillor to act as speaker. If the position of mayor is vacant, the deputy mayor exercises the powers and performs the duties of the mayor. If the mayor is absent or not available and the municipality does not have deputy mayor or the deputy mayor is absent or not available, a councillor elected by the members of the executive committee acts as mayor, if the mayor has not designated a member or if the designated member is absent or not available. Section 48(2) of the Structures Act provides that the election of a mayor or deputy mayor takes place when it is necessary to fill a vacancy.

Therefore, the necessity to fill the vacant position of mayor is the prerogative of council, unless there is evidence to prove that the municipality does not fulfil the statutory obligations binding on it

15 March 2016 - NW289

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(1) Whether each metropolitan municipality has an informal trading policy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether each specified metropolitan municipality licenses informal traders operating in public spaces; if so; (a) how many licensed informal traders are in each such municipality, (b) does each specified metropolitan municipality receive licence fees from informal traders and (c) what is the cost of obtaining an informal trading licence; (3) Whether each specified metropolitan municipality provides any services to informal traders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) The following Cities have approved informal trading policies: Cape Town; EThekwini; Johannesburg; Ekurhuleni and Tshwane. Nelson Mandela Metro has a final draft policy for informal trading which is currently under review. Buffalo City and Mangaung do not have informal trading policies but have By-laws on Street Trading.

(2) Yes, all Metropolitan Municipalities licenses informal traders operating in public spaces. The details are as follows:

Metropolitan Municipality

Number of licenses

Whether Municipality receives license fees

Cost of informal trading license

Cape Town

3701

Yes

R70 up to R465

EThekwini

10 000

Yes

R40.00 up to R1200.00

Johannesburg

9740

Yes

R80 - R 500

Ekurhuleni

3,000

No

No fee charged

Tshwane

1 500

Yes

R138,40

Nelson Mandela Bay

72

Yes

R90,00

Buffalo City

179

Yes

R513.00

Mangaung

178

Yes

R30.00


(3) Yes, all Metropolitan Municipalities provide services to informal traders as follows:
 

Metropolitan Municipality

Services provided

Cape Town

Hard surfacing of trading bays; provision of roof structures; Kiosks; training and development opportunities; access to markets through events; Area cleansing; Environmental Health and developing trading plans; education; training and trading permits.

EThekwini

Water; ablution facilities; storage facilities; trading shelters, 24 hour security and capacity building I training programmes.

Johannesburg

Maintenance and cleaning of the markets and streets, training and By-law education, workshops on business management and By-law enforcement to illegal traders who violate informal trading By-laws.

Ekurhuleni

Space and facilities including traders' market stalls and operational support such as compliance procedures and training.

Tshwane

Training and mentorship; personal and life-skills; business growth and success factors and appropriate business development support including training; and instruments to facilitate co-operatives' bulk buying.

Nelson Mandela Bay

Litter bins; refuse removal bags; storage facilities; ablutions; electricity and water/sinks.

Buffalo City

Umbrellas & training opportunities.

Mangaung

Training and skills development programmes focusing on Customer Care; Financial skills; Environmental Health - Food Preparation, Fire Dept. - Training to Informal Traders, Waste management and Street Traders By-law








 

15 March 2016 - NW238

Profile picture: Matlhoko, Mr AM

Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether he and/or his department has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

Below is the response regarding the advertising space bought by the Department of Cooperative Governance in the New Age during the financial years 2012-13; 2013-14 and 2014 -2015

(a) 2012 - 2013 Financial year:

The Department of Cooperative Governance participated in one business briefing organised by The New Age Media in December 2012 which provided an opportunity to the Minister to engage with stakeholders and the public on local government matters and traditional affairs, through a live TV broadcast on SABC. The cost for this initiative amounted to R 486 255 - 60.

(b) 2013 - 2014 Financial year:

The Department did not buy any advertising space in the New Age during the 2013-2014 financial year.

(c) 2014 - 2015 Financial year:

The Department did not buy any advertising space in the New Age during the 2014-2015 financial year.

15 March 2016 - NW294

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether each metropolitan municipality has a programme to assist unemployed matriculants or young people to gain employment; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) what is the budget of the programme for the 2015-16 financial year and (c) how many young people have been assisted by each specified municipality since 1 January 2015?

Reply:


Yes, all Metropolitan Municipalities have programmes to assist unemployed matriculants or young people to gain employment. The details are as follows:

Attached please find here: All Metropolitan Municipalities

15 March 2016 - NW310

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1. With reference to his reply to question 960 on 10 April 2015, which municipalities conducted customer satisfaction surveys in the (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-2014 financial years; 2. Whether he can provide the comprehensive database of all municipalities who have undertaken customer satisfaction surveys; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Below is a list of municipalities that have conducted Customer Satisfaction Surveys in the (a) 2012-2013 and (b) 2013-2014 financial years.

(a) Municipalities that have conducted Customer Satisfaction Surveys in 2012-2013 financial year are as follows:
i. City of Cape Town Metro
ii. Nelson Mandela Metro
iii. City of T shwane Metro
iv. EThekwini Metro
v. Maluti a Phofung local municipality in Free State
vi. Ekurhuleni Metro
vii. Baviaans Local Municipality in Eastern Cape
vii i. Swartland Local Municipality in Western Cape

(b) Municipalities that have conducted Customer Satisfaction Surveys in 201 3-2014 financial year are as follows:

i. Mangaung Metro
ii. Joburg Metro
iii. City of Tshwane Metro
iv. EThekwini Metro

2. Attached at (Tag A) is a database of municipalities that have conducted Customer Satisfaction Surveys in the (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2013-2014 financial years.

Notably, some of the local and district municipalities did not conduct the customer satisfaction survey in the period indicated based on capacity constraints in terms of personnel and budget. Most local and district municipalities rely on the surveys conducted by the Metros and provincial departments in their respective provinces

Attached please find here: Status of Citizens Satisfaction Surveys Conducted Currently

15 March 2016 - NW6

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

What measures does he intend to put in place to curb ( a ) noncompliance with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, ( b ) wasteful expenditure, ( c ) irregular expenditure, fraud and ( d ) corruption (details furnished) in the local government sector?

Reply:

(a) The Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) is./ legislation that falls within the mandate of the National Treasury. It is applicable to national and provincial spheres of government; therefore, the Act does not apply to local government. The applicable legislation is the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) which has similar provisions on wasteful and irregular expenditure as in in the PFMA. Furthermore, it must be noted that the implementation of the MFMA also falls within the mandate of the National Treasury.

(b), (c) and (d)

A number of interventions are being put in place to address challenges pertaining to wasteful expenditure, irregular expenditure, fraud and corruption. Currently, we have the following measures in place:

• The Department is finalising the review of the 2006 Local Government Anti-Corruption Strategy.

• Draft Local Government Integrity Management Framework which sets out the responsibility of municipalities when implementing Local Government Anti-Corruption Strategy.

• We have a draft Implementation plan which provides for practical actions that will be undertaken to implement the strategy.

The additional measures that we have put in place are the following :

• The Department requested Provinces and municipalities to submit copies of forensic reports commissioned between April 2009 and October 2014.

• Of the 115 copies of forensic reports received , 106 have been assessed.

• We are collaborating with law enforcement agencies like the Special Investigating Unit (SIU), Asset Forfeiture Unit (AFU), Hawks, and the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to accelerate investigations and prosecution.

• Most of the forensic reports commissioned by Provinces and municipalities made recommendations that certain remedial or other corrective measures should be taken

15 March 2016 - NW19

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether his Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant? NW19E

Reply:

The following response is based on information on the current (2015/16) financial year's organisational structure:

There are no frozen posts on the organisational structure.

 

15 March 2016 - NW392

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether Municipal Assessment Tool reports were generated in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; if not, why not; if so, (i) when were the specified reports completed, (ii) why have the specified reports not been tabled to the relevant portfolio committees, and (iii) why has his department not posted the specified reports on the website of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation? NW404E

Reply:

The Municipal Assessment Tool falls within the mandate of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) and, in collaboration with various stakeholders, developed and manage this tool. It is thus recommended that the Honourable member direct his question to the DPME to provide detailed information and a comprehensive answer to the question.