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17 November 2015 - NW3708

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any investigation has been conducted into the conduct of a certain person (name and details furnished) for (a) the unlawful appointment of a certain service provider (name furnished) which had earlier been disqualified from the bid process, (b) the incurring of fruitless and wasteful expenditure and (c) exposing the specified municipality to unnecessary litigation; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what is the current status of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

The information requested will be obtained from the appropriate authority. The information will be communicated to the Hon Member when it is available.

17 November 2015 - NW3713

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any investigation is underway into the actions, performance or administration of a certain municipal manager (name and details furnished) in the Free State; if so, (a) what is the (i) nature of the investigation and (ii) current status of the investigation and (b) when is it anticipated that the investigation will be completed; if not, (2) whether he is aware of (a) the serious allegations of corruption and maladministration that have been levelled against the specified person and (b) a Hawks investigation into the specified person; (3) (a) how long has the specified person been acting as municipal manager and (b) what is the specified person’s regular position in the municipality; (4) does the specified person have the requisite qualifications to act as a municipal manager; if so, what are the details of the qualifications; (5) whether he will instruct the political leadership of the municipality to remove the specified person from the specified position as acting municipal manager given the nature of the allegations against the specified person and return the specified person to the person’s previous position; if not, why not; if so, when? NW4395E

Reply:

The information requested will be obtained from the appropriate authority. The information will be communicated to the Hon Member when it is available.

17 November 2015 - NW3466

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What has the Kouga Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape done to assist the Oyster Bay community to (i) remove sand and (ii) stop sand dune encroachment on streets, public spaces and residential homes, (b) what definite plan does the municipality have to deal with this problem in the future and (c) what is the timeline for all specified assistance?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, requested the Kouga Local Municipality to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is available.

17 November 2015 - NW3878

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Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to his reply to question 3086 on 8 September 2015, what was the outcome of the investigation into the issues raised in the internal audit report with regard to the payment to Maximum Profit Recovery (Pty) Ltd; (2) whether the external investigator investigated the other allegations in the internal audit report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested will be obtained from the appropriate authority. The information will be communicated to the Hon Member when it is available.

17 November 2015 - NW3709

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any investigation has been conducted into the conduct of a certain person (name and details furnished) for (a) the unlawful appointment of a certain service provider (name furnished) which had earlier been disqualified from the bid process, (b) the incurring of fruitless and wasteful expenditure and (c) exposing the specified municipality to unnecessary litigation; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what is the current status of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

The information requested will be obtained from the appropriate authority. The information will be communicated to the Hon Member when it is available.

17 November 2015 - NW3738

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What was the (a) cash on hand, (b) debtors book and age analysis, (c) collection ratio and (d) monthly operating (i) income, (ii) expenditure and (iii) creditors book and age analysis in respect of each metro municipality for the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a) which capital grants were awarded to each metro in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) what amount was spent in each specified case in respect of each metro municipality; (3) were any capital grant funds utilised for operational expenditure; if so, (a) what amount, (b) have any steps been taken in this regard and (c) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (i) (ii) (iii) The tables below outlines the cash on hand , debtors age analysis, operating income, expenditure and creditors books for Metropolitan municipalities. The information sourced from the municipal 2014/15 pre-audited financial statements submitted to National Treasury and MFMA Section 71 quarterly report as at June 2015.

Here's the link for table1;2;3;4&5: http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW3738-151117.doc

(2) The table below outlines the capital grants that were awarded to each metro in the 2014-15 financial year and the amounts spent in each specified case in respect of each metro municipality. The information sourced from the National Treasury.

(3) The grants are for capital expenditure and any amounts spent on operating expenditure can only be identified through an audit. The Auditor General is currently conducting the municipal audits which will be concluded on the 30th November 2015.

Metropolitan Municipality

Urban Settlement Development Partnership Grant (USDG)

Public Transport Infrastructure Grant

Integrated National Electrification Programme (Municipal) Grant

Neighbourhood Development Partnership Grant

 

(a)Allocated in 2014/15 FY

(b)Expenditure in 2014/15 FY

(a) Allocated in 2014/15 FY

(b) Expenditure in 2014/15 FY

(a) Allocated in 2014/15 FY

(b) Expenditure in 2014/15 FY

(a) Allocated in 2014/15 FY

(b) Expenditure in 2014/15 FY

Buffalo City

R673,289,000

R 673,287,715

R -

R -

R20,587,000

R23,285,000

R5,000,000

R5,568,000

Nelson Mandela Bay

R371,602,000

R747,939,811

R167,500,000

R122,238,000

R18,000,000

R18,000,000

R9,000,000

R5,596,000

Mangaung

R654,406,000

R585,876,747

R30,000,000

R15,056,000

R30,200,000

R26,492,000

R5,000,000

R3,917,000

Ekurhuleni

R1,804,532,000

R1,498,622,869

R250,000,000

R271,932,000

R61,000,000

R60,925,000

R -

R -

City of Johannesburg

R1,695,189,000

R1,583,408,494

R553,571,000

R820,665,000

R31,000,000

R25,801,000

R48,461,000

R40,926,000

City of Tshwane

R1,469,450,000

R1,460,205,486

R867,571,000

R848,957,000

R32,000,000

R32,000,000

R75,000,000

R174,998,000

Ethekwini

R1,800,076,000

R1,800,076,000

R654,751,000

R234,698,000

R15,000,000

R42,054,000

R34,255,000

R6,833,000

City of Cape Town

R1,358,879,000

R1,481,930,471

R1,069,140,000

R 776,784,000

R5,000,000

R11,727,000

R30,784,000

R7,397,000

17 November 2015 - NW3764

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reported disclosure last year (details furnished) that out of 278 Chief Financial Officers (CFOs) in municipalities, 170 were not qualified, what is the statistics with regard to qualifications of CFOs in municipalities as at 1 September 2015?

Reply:

The response is based on the information provided by National Treasury.

As at 01 September 2015, out of 227 filled chief financial officer posts, 151 meet the requirements, in terms of the Local Government: Regulations on Minimum Competency Levels.

17 November 2015 - NW3635

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the rate in the rand levied on (a) residential property, (b) commercial property and (c) agricultural property in respect of each municipality in the Northern Cape; (2) whether the provisions of the National Treasury Instruction 07 of 2014/2015 are consistently applied in the specified municipalities with regard to the payment of the rate in the rand levied by municipalities; if not, why not, in each case; (3) whether he has found the rate in the rand levied by the Emthanjeni Local Municipality to be fair in comparison to the rates levied by surrounding municipalities; if not, what steps does he intend to take to ameliorate the conditions imposed on agricultural properties?

Reply:

The information requested will be obtained from the appropriate authority. The information will be communicated to the Hon Member when it is available.

17 November 2015 - NW3724

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether his department is aware that the upgrading of the access road into Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East, in Makana Municipality scheduled for completion in 2012 has not been completed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why was the upgrading of the specified road not completed and (b) when will the upgrading of the specified road be completed; (2) whether the Municipal Infrastructure Grant funding was used to build the specified access road; if not, (a) from what budget were the funds sourced and (b) what was the total cost of the specified project; if so, from where was this grant funding sourced; (3) has there been any attempt to complete this project since 2012; if not, why not; if so, why is the project still incomplete?

Reply:

The information requested will be obtained from the appropriate authority. The information will be communicated to the Hon Member when it is available.

04 November 2015 - NW3763

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1.Since his reply to question 1373 on 11 May 2015 (a) what total amount do national and provincial departments owe to municipalities in unpaid services such as rates and taxes and (b) what amount of the specified debts is (i) 30 days, (ii) 60 days, (iii) 90 days and (iv) 120 or more days overdue; (2) What is (a) the total interest charged and (b) he doing to ensure that the specified debts are settled?

Reply:

  1. The total owed by national and provincial departments to municipalities in unpaid services and rates amounts to R4.7 billion as at June 2015.

(b).The debtor’s age analysis is as follows

 

2. (a) The total interest charged amounts to R 291 million

(b) In ensuring that the specified debt is settled; the department participates in an inter-governmental task team that has been established to expedite the payment of debt owed by government departments to municipalities. This task team is led by the Department of Public Works.

Through the work of the task team we moved to a point where Government is improving the payment of current debt that is undisputed. The remaining challenge is older arrear debt and disputed current debt.

To accelerate payment and mitigate against disputed invoices, the Department of Public Works has employed a service provider (managed at DPW) to conduct the verification and authentication of invoices.

FOSAD has also resolved that while the debt is in disputes, departments must pay a minimum of 80% of their disputed debt whilst they are still querying it with the municipality and when verified can either be paid in full or credited to their account later on.

04 November 2015 - NW3456

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) has withdrawn any funding from the Amathole District Municipality (ADM) that had already been committed to municipal infrastructure work and in particular the Siyenza sanitation project; if not, (a) why has ADM not paid the sub-contractors employed under the Siyenza contract for work completed to date, (b) why has work been suspended on the project and (c) when can the sub-contractors expect to receive payment for work completed to date; if so, (i) on what grounds was the specified funding withdrawn, (ii) how does the ADM intend to refund the monies already expended on this project to DBSA and (iii) what contingency plans has ADM put in place to ensure the (aa) payment of its contractual obligations and (bb) completion of work by the contractors on site; (2) whether a certain company (name furnished) continues to be remunerated and/or employed in terms of this project; if so, on what grounds is the specified company selectively employed to continue operations; (3) (a) what are the reasons for the ADM’s move into the R200 million new offices, when it is unable to meet its financial obligations towards the contractors mentioned above and (b) how is this move being funded; (4) what is his position with regard to the alleged extravagance which does not directly contribute to service delivery; (5) Whether the funding should not instead be channelled into finishing the half- completed work on the sanitation project mentioned above?

Reply:

1. The DBSA has indicated that it has not withdrawn funding from Amathole District Municipality.

a)   The DBSA has indicated that it signed a loan agreement with Amathole District Municipality to advance a portion of its future MIG allocations for the accelerated sanitation programme, with the pledging period expiring on 30 June 2015. The total amount to be advanced as per the loan agreement was R631 million, with the first tranche of R286 million disbursed to the Municipality at the start of the programme (January 2015). Due to the fact that the programme was delayed, the Municipality could not draw the full amount of R631 million before the end of the pledging period. However, the loan availability is still active until 31 December 2016. This means the District Municipality may still apply to National Treasury for the extension of the pledging period. Regarding payment of subcontractors, this is a contractual matter between the Siyenza Group and the affected sub-contractors as the liability for the payment of these subcontractors rests with the Siyenza Group.

b)   The Amathole District Municipality has indicated to COGTA that it has terminated its contract with the Siyenza Group, which was carrying out the construction work. This is the reason why the work has stopped.

c) As indicated above, the payment of subcontractors is a matter between the Siyenza Group and the subcontractors concerned.

    i. As indicated above, the DBSA has indicated that it has not withdrawn funding.

    ii. As per the loan agreement between DBSA and Amathole District Municipality, the loan amounts are to be repaid to DBSA over the next two financial years (2015/16 and 2016/17), utilising a portion of MIG funding to the Municipality.

    iii. The Municipality has indicated that, should National Treasury extend the pledging period, the Municipality will, following required procurement processes, contract directly with as many of the sub-contractors as possible to complete the project.

2. As indicated above, the Municipality has indicated to COGTA that it has terminated its contract with the Siyenza group. Questions regarding the details of this termination and whether any further payments are due to the contractor should be referred to the Municipality.

3. (a) Reasons for own office accommodation

According to the Amathole District Municipality, the business case to acquire its own offices was prepared as far back as 2004. The ADM has over the years spent a substantial amount on rented office accommodation around East London from its operational budget. It was also felt that a single office structure to accommodate its head office staff was more beneficial than having departments and business units scattered around the city. It remains the aim of the ADM to own its own premises in order to house its office staff, rather than to carry on renting office space.

Reasons for relocation to Stutterheim

According to Amathole District Municipality, prior to 2011, the Buffalo City Municipality was one of the local municipalities situated within the jurisdiction of the ADM. According to the location of the ADM’s head office and seat of council in East London at the material time, were within its area of jurisdication:

However, after Buffalo City Municipality was established as a metropolitan municipality following the 2011 local government elections, it ceased to form a part of the ADM. This gave result in a situation where the ADM, which is a largely rural based municipality, having its head office outside its area of jurisdiction. Consequently it does not make economic sense for the ADM to rent property outside its boundaries.

Hence following the establishment of the BCMM, the Council of the ADM resolved that the head office and seat of the ADM must be relocated to within its own jurisdiction. Following a feasibility study, the town of Stutterheim was identified as a suitable home for the ADM.

(b) Possible Funding for office accommodation

A public private partnership process (PPP) was initiated. However, suitable private partners could not be identified to work with the ADM to develop suitable premises.

Currently, the ADM is exploring other funding models for the development of its head office in Stutterheim. Whilst it may be possible to secure funding amounting to R200 million for this purpose, for the ADM to commit itself to such a funding arrangement, would require the approval of National Treasury.

4. It would be imprudent for me to comment on a policy decision that is based on factors that are not within my knowledge. I suggest that the Honourable member should pose the question directly to the Amathole District Municipality for a direct reply.

5. The Policy considerations in this matter are peculiarly within the knowledge of the Municipal Council. I suggest that this question be directed to the Mayor of Amathole District Municipality.

We certainly agree that the maximum part of expenditure in the municipality should be spent on services for the public.

  1. BACKGROUND
    1. The DBSA signed a loan agreement with Amathole District Municipality to advance a portion of its future MIG allocations for the accelerated sanitation programme expiring in December 2015.The loan agreement was dependent on approval by National Treasury to allow Amathole District Municipality to use a portion of its future MIG to pay the DBSA for funds advanced to accelerate the sanitation programme. The loan agreement is valid till December 2016. However, National Treasury approval for the municipality to pledge its conditional grant had a validity period up to June 2015, with an additional grace period of three months thereafter. This meant that the municipality had until September 2015 to complete the programme. The total amount to be advanced as per the loan agreement was R631 million with the first tranche of R286 million disbursed to the Municipality at the start of the programme (January 2015). Due to the fact that the programme was delayed, the district could not draw the full amount of R631 million before the end of the pledging period as approved by National Treasury.
    1. However, the Municipality had submitted a further claim of R81 million to DBSA before 30 June 2015. As per the loan agreement signed between the parties, disbursements were to be made subject to the Municipality providing the Bank with confirmation of work done in the form of payment certificates. The payment certificates submitted with the claim of R81 million could not support work done and the parties acknowledged that it could have been caused by the fact that the contract with the main contractor was in the process of being cancelled. As such Amathole undertook to conduct verification using internal resources.
    1. The Municipality submitted the results of the verification in the form of happy letters signed by recipients of completed toilets to DBSA on 17 August 2015. The Bank and the Municipality assessed the happy letters as well as delivery notes of material on site and confirmed that 30,409 units had been completed and 15, 911 of uninstalled units have been delivered. There was, however, no onsite verification (verification that can confirm the existence of reported quantity, appropriate quality as well as compliance). The DBSA received a signed letter from the Municipal Manager to confirm this information. The DBSA is processing the payment of R92million based on the information provided. The rest of the balance is depended on approval of National Treasury for extension of the pledging period and extension of the loan availability by the DBSA.
  1. DISCUSSION

Amathole District Municipality is alleging that the reason the project has stopped is because National Treasury has refused to extend the pledging period beyond June 2015.

National Treasury has, however, indicated that it approved the Amathole Business case in August 2014 with a condition that the implementation of the project was going to happen over a nine (09) months period as indicated and motivated for by the Amathole District Municipality in their Business Case. This meant that implementation was to complete on 30 June 2015. Since approval was granted by National Treasury, Amathole District Municipality never approached National Treasury regarding the extension of the time on the pledge with the exception of the meeting dated the 30 July 2015 where a formal presentation was made to National Treasury by the Municipality. Further, in the business case that was approved, the Amathole District Municipality had indicated that they may require an additional three months to accommodate for unforeseeable circumstances. This meant that the implementation period could stretch until the end of September 2015. By virtue of the approval of the business case, National Treasury allowed the Amathole District Municipality the full twelve months of implementation time.

National Treasury indicated that, following the above meeting, National Treasury wrote a letter to the Municipality formally alerting the municipality to the fact that the pledge is lapsing as at the end of September 2015 and has asked for the municipality’s intention going forward. To date the National Treasury has not received any response from the municipality in this regard.  

MINISTRY

COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER 2015/3456

DATE OF PUBLICATION: XXXX 2015

Herewith a reply recommended by: Recommended by

MR NTANDAZO VIMBA DR SEAN PHILLIPSS

Executive Manager: Legal Services CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Date: DATE:

RECOMMENDED / NOT RECOMMENDED

MR V MADONSELA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

Date:

SUPPORT / NOT SUPPORTED

MR A NEL, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

Date:

APPROVED / NOT APPROVED

MR PRAVIN GORDHAN, MP

MINISTER

Date:

__________________________________________________________________________________________

R O U T E F O R M

RECEIVED AND RECORDED AT THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OFFICE ON:

DATE

NAME

SIGNATURE

1ST RETURN DATE

2ND RETURN DATE

3RD RETURN DATE

/ /2015

   

 

/ /2015

 

/ /2015

 

/ /2015

DOCUMENT CLASSIFICATION

URGENT

x

IMPORTANT

 

NORMAL

 

SUBJECT

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO 2015/3456

DRAFTER

Mr Ntandazo Vimba

PORTFOLIO

 

DIRECTORATE

Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent

REFERENCE NO

2015/3456

TEL/CELL

(012) 8485317/ 0795055368

ROUTE

SIGNATURE

DATE

DATE RETURN

MR Ntandazo Vimba

Executive Manager

Vendor Services, Legal and Contracts Management

     

Dr Sean Phillips

Chief Executive Officer

MISA

     

MR V MADONSELA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

     

MR ANDRIES NEL, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE

     

PRAVIN GORDHAN, MP

MINISTER FOR COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

     

INSTRUCTIONS / NOTES

 

THE MINISTER

REFERENCE NO: 2015/152

SUBJECT: PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO 2015/3456

Date: 16 September 2015

04 November 2015 - NW3710

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)    What amount was written off as (a) irrecoverable debt, (b) irregular expenditure, (c) fruitless and wasteful expenditure and (d) unauthorised expenditure in each metropolitan municipality in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) What amount was condoned by the council as (a) irregular expenditure, (b) fruitless and wasteful expenditure and (c) unauthorised expenditure in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year? (3) What amount of the municipal infrastructure grant went unspent in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year? NW4392E

Reply:

  1. and (2) The table below presents the amounts written off as irrecoverable debt; the amounts incurred, condoned and written off as irregular expenditure as well as fruitless and wasteful expenditure for each metropolitan municipality in the 2014/15 financial year. The information was sourced from the National Treasury.

Metropolitan Municipality

1(a) Irrecoverable Debt

Irregular Expenditure

Fruitless and Wasteful Expenditure

Unauthorised Expenditure

 

Amount

Written-off in 2014/2015

1(b) Amount Incurred in 2014/15 FY

2(a) Written-off/ Condoned

1(c) Amount Incurred in 2014/15 FY

2(b) Written-off/ Condoned

1(d) Amount Incurred in 2014/15 FY

2(c) Written-off/ Condoned

Buffalo City

R 151,514,667

R377,136, 842

R-

R479,621

R-

R245,355,953

R-

Nelson Mandela Bay

R 257,092,457

R237,405,522

R8,184,320

R1,265,661

R198,938

R32,399,251

R640,829,075

Mangaung

R 687,414,714

R8,066,258

R-

R209,103

R-

R990,840,558

R-

Ekurhuleni

R 1,391,546,895

R30,385,244

29,340,359

R31,124,642

R1,165,930

R29,570,789

R-

City of Johannesburg

R -

R-

R-

R45,000

R-

R-

R-

City of Tshwane

R -

R65,323,586

R50,611

R992,600

R329,768

R1,023,573,003

R1,193,981,952

Ethekwini

R 111,311,000.00

R129,961,000

R402,900,000

R-

R-

R-

R-

City of Cape Town

R 691,852,000.00

R-

R45,000

R-

R-

R-

R-

(3) Metropolitan municipalities do not receive Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG).

04 November 2015 - NW3711

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether his department participated in the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers Conference held in Ekurhuleni in October 2015; if so, (a) what was the nature of the participation, (b) what were the costs associated with such participation, (c) what were the specified costs intended to cover and (d) why was his department’s stand at the specified conference unmanned?

Reply:

Yes. The Department participated in the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers Conference (IMFO) held in Ekurhuleni in October 2015.

(a) The Executive Manager: Municipal Audit Outcomes and Revenue Management participated as a panel member on the Effective Governance – Audit & Risk Management Back to Basics: Ethics enhancing local government accountability discussion. The panellists made a brief presentation on the subject and fielded specific questions from the floor.

The Senior Manager Revenue Management and the Manager Municipal Audit Outcomes participated as delegates to the conference; they are the relevant personnel to attend because of the municipal financial management support nature of their work that is directly linked to the work of IMFO.

(b) Conference fees amounting to R 6906.50 per person, were paid for the two delegates. No conference fees were paid for the Executive Manager, as she was participating on IMFO’s invitation as a panellist.

(c) The conference fees amounting to R 6906.50 per person (R13 813 in total) covered the attendance of the conference for the three days. The topics of interest to the department were the following: Back to Basics Sound Governance in relation to Audit Opinions, Effective Governance, Municipal Standard Chart of Accounts, Revenue Value Chain, Ethics Enhancing Local Government Accountability, Role of Councillors in Financial Management, Oversight, Effective Performance Management Systems in the Local Government and The Implication in Implementing the central database: Local Government.

(d) To the best of our knowledge, the Departmental stand was manned throughout the conference, one staff member from the department was assigned for the exhibition. The setup of the stall commenced on the 04 October and the stall was only dismantled on the 07th October at 14:00 after the conference.

03 November 2015 - NW3557

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any internal investigation has been conducted into the municipal manager of Kareeberg Local Municipality in the Northern Cape, Mr Willem de Bruin, because of (a) his appointment without meeting the minimum requirements for the position in terms of his department and National Treasury's regulations, (b) criminal charges laid against him (CAS96/3/2015) for his misuse of the municipal commonage for personal gain and (c) his unlawful interventions in the tender processes of the municipality; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of the internal investigation?NW 4224E

Reply:

The Department has requested the MEC responsible for local government in the Northern Cape Province to investigate this matter and report back to the Minister. The Honourable Member will be furnished with a reply once the information referred herein is received

03 November 2015 - NW3413

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Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Who is paying for the consumption of 28,2% of electricity that is purchased and distributed by the City of Johannesburg and lost through illegal connections amounting to R2,5 billion in monetary value?

Reply:

The following information was provided by City Power Johannesburg:

The electricity distribution industry is characterised by distribution losses, and categorised into technical and non-technical losses.

Technical losses represent the energy lost when transmitted and distributed through overhead lines, transformers and cables to reach the customer, while non-technical losses represent losses due to theft of electricity, unbilled and incorrectly billed customers, Large Power Users illegally converted to pre-paid mode, vandalism and bypassing of meters and illegal connections.

The 28,2% losses with a monetary value of R2,5 billion refers to the 2013/14 financial year, and reflects the total distribution losses, technical and non-technical. Technical losses are calculated at 9% and non-technical losses are the difference between the total distribution and the technical losses.

For the 2014/15 financial year the total distribution losses was reduced to 18,63% with technical losses at 9% and non-technical losses at 9,63% amounting to R1,524 billion.

The City of Johannesburg annually makes budget provision for the purchase of electricity and the sale thereof and due to non-technical losses, the actual sales is less than the budget. The City of Johannesburg therefor pays for the non-technical losses.

03 November 2015 - NW3725

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether his department is aware that municipal disaster funds were utilised to repair the ring road in Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East in Makana Municipality in June and July 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details: 2. Who was the contractor appointed to repair the specified Ring Road?

Reply:

1.The municipal disaster funds were not utilised to repair the specific Ring Road at Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East in Makana Local Municipality.

This road is not specified within the approved Independent Assessment and Verified Report for the disaster declared in Makana Local Municipality in 2012. According to the report received from the Eastern Cape Provincial Disaster Management Centre, the Ring Road at Kwanomzamo, Riebeek East was not part of the assessed and verified project, as approved in the Independent Assessment and Verification report.

2. According to the report received from the Eastern Cape Provincial Disaster Management Centre, the Contractor appointed to repair the Ring Road is Izana Civils.

20 October 2015 - NW3567

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What (a) amount has the uMgungundlovu District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal divert from the conditional grant to fund the Nelson Mandela Marathon since 2013 and (b) are the reasons for the specified diversion of funds; (2) (a) what project(s) were the specified funds diverted from and (b) where were the specified project(s) located; (3) which official(s) authorised the diversion of the specified funds; (4) at which council meeting(s) were each specified diversion of funds approved; (5) were any (a) National Treasury and/or (b) Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs regulations relating to conditional grants (i) violated and/or (ii) disregarded; if so, what action will he take with respect to officials and/or councillors who approved the diversion of the specified funds?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, requested the uMgungundlovu District Municipality to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.

20 October 2015 - NW3145

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any (a) report(s) was commissioned or (b) investigation done by his department into the demarcation of the Ba Ga-Mothibi Tribal Authority in the North West since 1 January 2009; if not, what is the current status of the tribal authority; if so, (i) what were the (aa) findings and (bb) recommendations of the report(s), (ii) has the report(s) been made public and (iii) can he provide a copy of the report(s)?

Reply:

(a) No report was commissioned in this regard.

(b) On 15 April 2009, Cabinet directed the Department of Cooperative Governance to consult the Ba Ga-Mothibi and Reveilo community on their request to be incorporated into the Northern Cape Province from the North West Province. An engagement with the affected communities was held on 17 April 2009. As a result of continuous engagements with the affected communities, a Memorandum of Understanding between the two Provinces was concluded in order to ensure the continuous provision of services to the Ba Ga-Mothibi community.

(i)(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

20 October 2015 - NW3495

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) How many eviction notices have been given to residents of informal settlements in Ward 33 in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, (b) when were the specified eviction notices given, (c) when will the evictions take place and (d)(i) what alternative accommodation will be provided to the specified residents and (ii) where; (2) is there a new development planned by the specified municipality in collaboration with a certain company (name furnished) and/or any related company for the areas known as Comet and/or Angelo in the specified municipality on the land that the specified company recently acquired which was previously owned by a certain company (name furnished); if so, (a) when will the specified development take place, (b) who are the (i) directors, (ii) shareholders and (iii) related entities of the specified company, (c) what was the purchase price of the land and (d)(i) at what price was a portion of the land resold after purchase and (ii) to whom was it sold?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.

20 October 2015 - NW3692

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Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Is he aware that the Thembelihle Local Municipality in the Northern Cape is struggling to get support from the provincial Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs and that the specified department allegedly continues to withhold developmental grants of the specified municipality; if so, what is he doing to ensure that the specified municipality gets the support it needs?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, requested the Northern Cape Provincial Department to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.

20 October 2015 - NW3657

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he and/or his department has received any reports about traditional leaders who have (a) prevented (i) political parties, (ii) elected councillors and/or representatives and (iii) any person who is not from the traditional leader’s area from holding meetings in the traditional leader’s area and/or (b)(i) asked for a payment and/or (ii) required that permission be sought from the traditional leader before a meeting and/or campaign could take place in the specified area; if not, will he (i) investigate to what extent this is happening and (ii) report to Parliament; if so, (aa) how widespread is this practice, (bb) what action has he taken in this regard and (cc) will he make a statement on this matter?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) (iii) and (b)(i)(ii)

No, the Ministry has not received any reports about traditional leaders who have prevented political parties, elected councilors, representatives and any person who is not from their area from holding meetings nor those who have asked for a payment or required that permission be sought from them before a meeting and/or campaign could take place in the specified area.

The Honourable Member is requested to furnish the Department with information in this regard and the Ministry would investigate if this is indeed happening and to what extent and report to Parliament if requested to do so.

Given the afore-mentioned replies, (aa), (bb) and (cc) fall away.

20 October 2015 - NW3646

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Mr K J Mileham (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How many municipal managers are women and (b) in which municipalities are the specified municipal managers appointed?NW2491E

Reply:

The response is based on the information provided by Provincial COGTAs.

(a) A total of 29 out of 238 municipal manager posts have been filled by women, representing 12% nationally.

(b) The table below provides the names of municipalities that appointed female Municipal Managers.
 

Province

Municipality

Eastern Cape

Ntabankulu Local Municipality

 

Nyandeni Local Municipality

 

Lukhanji Local Municipality

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyane District Municipality

 

Fezile Dabi District Municipality

 

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

 

Kopanong Local Municipality

 

Lejweleputswa District Municipality

Gauteng

None

KwaZulu Natal

Umdoni Local Municipality

 

Umtshezi Local Municipality

 

Emadlangeni Local Municipality

 

Ulundi Local Municipality

 

Harry Gwala District Municipality

 

KwaSani Local Municipality

Limpopo

Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

 

Ephraim Mogale Local Municipality

 

Sekhukhune District Municipality

 

Lephalale Local Municipality

 

Greater Letaba Local Municipality

Mpumalanga

Nkangala District Municipality

Northern Cape

John Taolo District Municipality

 

Richtersveld Local Municipality

 

!Kheis Local Municipality

 

Frances Baard District Municipality

North West

Kgetleng Rivier Local Municipality

 

Moses Kotane Local Municipality

 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality

 

Tlokwe Local Municipality

Western Cape

Mossel Bay Local Municipality

 

Stellenbosch Local Municipality

   

20 October 2015 - NW3153

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with regard to his department plans to develop (a) regulations and (b) legislation for the practice of male initiation customs, his department is working on developing similar (i) regulations or (ii) legislation for virginity testing on young women, particularly young women (aa) under the age of 18 and (bb) living in rural areas?

Reply:

No, the Department has no intention to develop (a) regulations and (b) legislation for virginity testing on young women. Virginity testing is already regulated by the Children’s Act, Act No. 38 of 2005. In terms of section 12(4) of this Act, virginity testing of children under the age of 16 is prohibited. In terms of section 12(5) of the Act, virginity testing of children older than 16 may be done but only if the child has given consent to such testing and after proper counselling of the child. Section 12(6) of the Act further determines that the results of a virginity test may not be disclosed without the consent of the child. It should also be noted that section 12(7) prohibits the marking of the body of the child who has undergone virginity testing.

20 October 2015 - NW3271

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Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperate Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) What is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

CoGTA Employees

(a)

How much did the department spend on air travel for employees, between Gauteng and Cape Town to attend parliament business in the financial year 2014/2015?

How many trips?

 

R 6 229 497.00

1208

 

(b)

How much did department spend on accommodation in Cape Town for employees in 2014/2015?

 

R 1 461 954.00

 

(c)

How much did department spend on car rental in Cape Town for employees in 2014/15?

 

R 2 047 495,32

However, this is only part of the cost to departments. The time taken to travel, the cost of the individual’s expertise utilized in this process.

19 October 2015 - NW3693

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Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What steps has he taken to resolve the disputes between Northern Cape municipalities and a certain company (name and details furnished) which has recently forced through the courts, the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality to pay for services that the specified company allegedly failed to deliver in relation to the screening of the memorials and funeral of the late former President of the country, Mr Nelson R Mandela?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality:

The John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality entered into an agreement with the service provider (Buhle Buzile Investments) to screen the memorials and funeral of the late former President of the country, Mr Nelson R Mandela, in villages across the three local municipalities in the district (Joe Morolong, Ga-Segonyana and GaMagara) in December 2014. The purpose of the screening of the memorial was to ensure that deprived members of the community in these municipalities also get an opportunity to be part of the proceedings to bid farewell to the former President. The service was delivered as agreed upon.

The initial agreement that each Local Municipality within the District Municipality contributes a pro rata amount towards the cost, did not materialize due to financial constraints, resulting in payment delays. This delay caused the service provider to institute a civil claim against the municipality in the Kimberley High Court (Case No. 1589/2014) and the court ordered the District Municipality to make payment of a specified amount to the service provider. The matter has been tabled before the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Council for a resolution authorising the payment to the service provider. The Council is to consider the matter during its October 2015 sitting.

19 October 2015 - NW2793

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the Government has initiated rescue plans to revitalise any towns in the country that were experiencing a prolonged economic slump exacerbated by mining, industrial, commercial or agricultural shedding of jobs and therefore regressing to become informal settlements without economic opportunity, amenities or basic services; if not, (a) how many such towns are collapsing and (b) why is there no plan to revitalise them; if so, (i) how many such towns were identified for revitalisation and (ii) what progress has been made in that regard?

Reply:

Government has initiated a rescue plan to revitalise fifteen mining towns in five provinces that were experiencing a prolonged economic slump exacerbated by mining, industrial, commercial or agricultural shedding of jobs. Twelve of labour sending areas in two provinces have also been prioritised for the revitalisation of distressed mining communities.

 

MINING TOWNS

PROVINCE

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

Limpopo

Sekhukhune

Fetakgomo, Greater Tubatse, Elias Motsoaledi

 

Waterberg

Lephalele

Gauteng

West Rand

Westonaria, Randfontein, Mogale City, Merafong

North West

Bojanala

Rustenburg, Moses Kotane, Madibeng

 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Matlosana

Mpumalanga

Nkangala

Emalahleni, Steve Tshwete

Free State

Lejweleputswa

Matjhabeng

Twelve labour sending areas in two provinces have been prioritised for the revitalisation of distressed mining communities.

LABOUR SENDING AREAS

PROVINCE

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

Eastern Cape

OR Tambo

King Sabata Dalindyebo, Nyandeni, Nquza Hill, Mhlontlo, Port St Johns

 

Alfred Nzo

Mbizana, Ntabankulu

KwaZulu Natal

Zululand

AbaQulusi, eDumbe, Nongoma, Ulundi, uPhongolo

An integrated strategy and Back to Basics Programme was approved by the Inter-Ministerial Committees (IMC), late last year for the different work streams to address the socio economic conditions in mining towns and labour sending areas holistically. Various Programmes are in place and being implemented. The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) is coordinating the national departments, provinces and municipalities. The following departments/institutions participate in the work of the Economic Work Stream:

  • The Department of Trade and Industry – overall strategy is to promote Industrial Development through Special Economic Zones and Industrial Parks in Bojanala District Municipality (DM), Greater Tubatse and Lejweleputswa.
  • Economic Development Department through Industrial Development Corporation conducted economic assessments in 6 Districts to assist municipalities attract investment and job opportunities to their regions by creating enabling economic development in West Rand, Sekhukhune, Lejweleputswa, Bojanala, Waterberg and Nkangala.
  • South African Local Government Association (SALGA) – Small Town Regeneration – developed a comprehensive strategy to address the socio economic decline of towns. It is currently working in the following towns across the 9 provinces focusing on Mining and Industrial Towns, Tourism Towns, Transit and Commuter Towns: Lukhanji, Port St Johns, Letsemeng, Matjhabeng, Randfontein, Bela Bela, Emalahleni, Matlosana, Zululand, Umkhanyakude, Madibeng etc.
  • DCoG – Establishment of Business Development Forums to stimulate large scale employment at a local level through private sector driven catalytic business ventures Bojanala DM, Greater Tubatse DM, Matlosana LM and Waterberg DM. Furthermore, the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) in mining towns and labour sending areas has been aligned to respond to Back to Basics priorities.

Progress has been made in diversifying the economies of mining towns by conducting economic assessments to identify investment opportunities in the following Provinces:

In Limpopo, sectoral opportunities in agriculture, mining and quarrying, manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and tourism has been identified in Sekhukhune and anticipated to attract investments at De Hoop Dam tourism development, Potlake Nature Reserve, fresh produce market, Tubatse special economic zone, R55 doubling and tarring, De Hoop augmentation, mining sector support businesses, bio diesel production, vegetable processing plant, flag boshielo dam development, Mountain Resort Linked to Drakensburg Escarpment Cluster of Projects and Tsate heritage site.

Sectoral opportunities in Waterberg District Municipality were also identified in agriculture, mining and quarrying, manufacturing and tourism. The envisaged investment attraction include agricultural hubs, logistics hub, opportunities linked to mining expansion in the region, mining product beneficiation opportunities, water sorting plant ( green economy), and tourism projects linked to biosphere and nature reserves.

Gauteng sectoral opportunities in agriculture, tourism, green economy, economic infrastructure, transport and logistics were identified and hope to attract the following investments to West Rand:

  • Establishment of the Food Hubs ( Agro- processing Park)
  • Development of Logistics hub/ Park
  • Development of Township Industrial Parks/ Enterprise Hubs
  • Development of a Municipal Precinct
  • Smart city ( Broad band network)
  • The Lanseria Airport City

Free State’s sectoral opportunities were identified in agriculture, mining, tourism, automotive/transportation and energy, hope to attract the following investments in Lejeleputswa:

  • The Processing Plant (Hides processing plant & Agro-processing)
  • Redevelopment of existing Airport
  • Methane gas extraction

Sectoral opportunities in agriculture and agro processing, mining, chemicals/electronics and automotive, manufacturing and trade and tourism have been identified in the North West Province and anticipated to attract investments into Bojanala District in the following areas:

  • Catalytic Converter manufacturing plants
  • Distribution and Logistics Hub
  • International Convention Centers
  • Traditional Art Gallery and cultural information centre
  • Implementation of Heritage Park
  • Establishment of an incubator network and Development Agency
  • Rural Integrated Energy Centre
  • Lurcene Plant
  • Bio-fuel plant
  • Sisal Farming Project (Pella)
  • Further development of tourism facilities around Sun City node
  • Commercialization of small scale farming and agro-processing
  • Development of tourism facilities at Borakolalo Reserve (Klipvoordam) jointly with Madibeng
  • Upgrading of Phapatso cultural village and establishment of incubator for arts, crafts and cultural industries.
  • Pilot waste collection and recycling

Sectoral opportunities in Mpumalanga have been identified in agriculture, mining, food products, wood products, chemicals, and automotive and hope to attract the following investments into Nkangala District Municipality:

  • A catalytic convertor component manufacturing plant;
  • A truck port/ logistics hub;
  • An agro-processing bio-fuel production facility;
  • An international convention centre;
  • The Moloto corridor rail system;
  • Delmas International Cargo Airport – linked to a Free Trade/ Special Economic Zone.
  • Loskop-Zithabiseni tourism belt development;
  • Rust de Winter tourism development;
  • Kusile Power Station project.

19 October 2015 - NW3455

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether he is aware of the secondment of a certain person (name and details furnished) by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs of KwaZulu-Natal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the specified person’s permanent position within the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; (2) whether the specified person meets the minimum competency requirements for a certain position (details furnished); (3) whether the specified person is eligible to be employed in positions of fiduciary responsibility in any municipality or within the department, given the specified person’s disciplinary record at a certain entity (name furnished); if so, why; (4) whether it is the policy of his department that the appointment or secondment of certain positions (details furnished) by the provincial and local government spheres are reported to his department; if not, whether he will consider making it policy; if so, (a) which details are reported and (b) what is the timeframe of such reporting?

Reply:

The following response is based on information received from the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

1. Ms. Gabi Gumbi- Masilela was not seconded by Cogta KZN. She was appointed by Umngeni Local Municipality as an Acting Municipal Manager for an initial period of three months. Ms Gabi Gumbi-Masilela is not an employee of Cogta KZN.

2. The MEC responsible for local government in the KwaZulu-Natal Province is currently assessing whether Ms. Gabi Gumbi- Masilela meets the minimum competency requirements for the position of municipal manager.

3. The assessment in (2) above includes whether Ms Gabi Gumbi-Masilela meets the minimum academic and work related experience requirements (b) within 28 days of her appointment as Acting Municipal Manager. As far as could be ascertained, Ms Gabi Gumbi-Masilela resigned her position from the MDB.

4. Yes.

Appointment of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to municipal managers

Municipal councils are required in terms of section 54A and 56(4A)(a) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000) (“Systems Act”) to inform the MEC for local government about the appointment process and outcome of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to a municipal managers within 14 days of the date of appointment as prescribed. The Systems Act further obliges the MEC to submit the information referred to herein to the Minister within 14 days from the date of receipt of the report thereof.

Regulation 17(4) of the Regulation on Appointment and Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers (the “Regulations”) prescribes a written report regarding the appointment process and outcome which must be submitted to the MEC by the municipality. The report referred to herein must contain the following:

  1. details of the advertisement, including date of issue and the name of newspapers in which the advert was published, and proof of the advertisement or a copy thereof;
  2. a list of all applicants;
  3. a report contemplated in regulation 14(2) on the screening process and the outcome thereof;
  4. the municipal council’s resolution approving the selection panel and the shortlisted candidates;
  5. competency assessment results;
  6. the minutes of the shortlisting meeting;
  7. the minutes of interviews, including scoring;
  8. the recommendations of the selection panel submitted to the municipal council;
  9. the details of executive committee members and recommendations, if the selection panel comprised of all members of the executive committee;
  10. the recommendation of the executive committee or executive mayor to the municipal council, if any;
  11. the municipal council resolution approving the appointment of the successful candidate;
  12. the application form, curriculum vitae, proof of qualifications and other supporting documentation of the successful candidate;
  13. a written confirmation by the successful candidate that he or she does not hold political office as contemplated in section 56A of the Act, as at the date of appointment;
  14. the letter of appointment, outlining the term of contract, remuneration and conditions of employment of the senior manager; and any other information relevant to the appointment.

Secondment of municipal managers

Section 54A(6) of the Systems Act provides that municipal council may request the MEC for local government to second a suitable person, on such conditions as prescribed, to act in the advertised position until such time as a suitable candidate has been appointed. The section also permits the municipal council to request the Minister to second a suitable person, on such conditions as prescribed, until such time as a suitable candidate has been appointed if the MEC for local government has not seconded a suitable person within a period of 60 days after receipt of the request.

In terms of Regulation 20, a person seconded by the MEC or the Minister must report monthly to the MEC or the Minister on the following:

  1. steps taken to fill the vacant post to which he or she is seconded;
  2. the development and implementation of any municipal institutional recovery plan for which the seconded official is responsible;
  3. monitor and assess the adherence to policy, principles and frameworks applicable to the municipality;
  4. develop a turnaround strategy for the municipality including a strategy to promote good governance;
  5. ensure implementation of municipal council resolutions by the administration;
  6. implement a system to control and approve all expenditure;
  7. implement all governance systems and procedures; and
  8. ensure implementation of financial systems, policies and procedures.

19 October 2015 - NW3479

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)   (a) What is the total amount of outstanding debt owed to Northern Cape municipalities, (b) what amount is owed in respect of each municipality, (c) what amount of the specified amounts is owed by (i) households, (ii) businesses and (iii) government departments and (d) what amount of the outstanding debt is older than (i) 30 days, (ii) 60 days and (iii) 90 days; (2) in respect of the specified debt owed by government departments, (a) what are the reasons that government departments have not settled the specified outstanding debts and (b) what commitments have been made to the affected municipalities with regard to the specified outstanding debts; (3) (a) what total amount of the specified outstanding debt has been written off in respect of each municipality in the past five financial years and (b) what is his department doing to assist municipalities to collect the specified outstanding debts? NW4140E

Reply:

The following information is supplied by the Northern Provincial Government:

  1. (a)The total amount of outstanding debt owed to Northern Cape municipalities is R2.7 billion as at end of June 2015

(b) The table below specified the amount owed to each municipality

(c ) (i) (ii)& (iii) (d) (i) The amount of debt owed by households amounts to R1.7 billion, organs of state R426 million, commercial R373 million and other category of debt amounted to R191 million. The table below illustrates the debt in terms of consumer types and age analysis.

(2) (a) the reasons for government departments not settling outstanding debt are following:

  • Incorrect invoices sent by municipalities to departments;
  • Late issuing of invoices to departments;
  • Payments made by Departments not using a reference number so municipalities cannot identify payments made;
  • Inaccurate billings and interest charged on inaccurate accounts;
  • Claims not timeously submitted to National Department of Public Works

(b) The department in collaboration with National Task team on payment of outstanding government debt has appointed a service provider to undertake verification and auditing of outstanding debt in all municipalities for possible payments upon confirmation.

3. (a) The information has been requested from the Province; they are in the process of collecting the information from the municipalities. The information will be forwarded to the honourable member as soon as it becomes available.

(b) The department through Provincial COGHSTA and Provincial Treasury has established Provincial Debt Management Committees to mediate and assist municipalities in collecting outstanding debt. Continuous interaction with sector departments and municipalities to assess and verify correct billing for timeous payments.

19 October 2015 - NW3535

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Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Were communities in (a) Ha-Mashamba, (b) Ha-Masakona and (c) Ha-Mashau consulted regarding the process for their inclusion in the newly demarcated municipality in the Vhembe district; if not, why not; if so, (i) what concerns did each specified community raise and (ii) how were these concerns addressed, in each case?

Reply:

The Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB) is only accountable to the Department for its finances. The MDB reports on its activities to Parliament through the Portfolio Committee.

From the Departments’ point of view, this matter is now sub-judice.

 

19 October 2015 - NW3468

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Which areas did his department declare as disaster areas in terms of the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, as a result of the recent and/or current drought; (2) Did his department receive submissions for any other areas to also be declared disaster areas; if so, (a) which areas did these submissions cover and (b) what was the reason for each specified area not being declared a disaster area? NW4129E

Reply:

  1. No. In terms of the Disaster Management Act, 2002, the Minister only has the power to declare a national state of disaster. I have not declared any national state of disaster as a result of the recent or current drought.

2. (a) Kindly note that the law empowers the relevant authorities to declare events as disasters and not areas as “disaster areas”. Yes, submissions have been received from four provinces to declare drought disasters. The Premiers in all four provinces, being KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Free State and North West, have declared disasters in terms of Section 41 of the Disaster Management Act No. 57 of 2002, in the following areas.

KwaZulu-Natal Province:

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

Ugu

Umdoni, Umzumbe, Vulamehlo, and Umziwabantu

Umgungundlovu

Umshwathi, Richmond, Mpofana and Mkhambathini

uThukela

Emnambithi/Ladysmith, Indaka, Umtshezi and Imbambazane

Umzinyathi

Umvoti, Nquthu, and Msinga

Zululand

Ulundi and Nongoma

Umkhanyakude

Umhlabuyalingana, Jozini, Big Five False Bay, Hlabisa and Mtubatuba

UThungulu

Ntambanana, Umlalazi, Nkandla and Mfolozi

iLembe

Maphumulo, Ndwedwe and KwaDukuza

Harry Gwala

Greater Kokstad, Ubuhlebezwe and KwaSani

 

Limpopo Province:

NAME OF DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

AFFECTED LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES

Mopani

Maruleng, Letaba and Giyani

Waterberg

Mookgopong, Thabazimbi, Lephalale, Bela-Bela and Mogalakwena

Sekhukhune

Tubatse

Capricorn

Aganang and Blouberg

Free State Province:

NAME OF DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

AFFECTED LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES

Thabo Mofutsanyane

Mantsopa, Setsoto, Dihlabeng, Nketoana, Maluti-a-Phofung and Phumelela

Fezile Dabi

Moqhaka, Ngwathe, Metsimaholo and Mafube

Gariep

Letsemeng, Kopanong, Mohokare and Naledi

Lejelweputswa

Masilonyana, Tokologo, Tswelopele, Matjhabeng and Nala

North West Province:

NAME OF DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

AFFECTED LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES

Bojanala

Moretele, Madibeng and Moses Kotane

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Ganyesa and Bloemhof

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Ventersdorp and Tlokwe

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ramotshere Moiloa and Ratlou

(b) Disasters have not been declared in areas that have not been affected by drought as determined by the provincial assessments.   
     

The NDMC is currently busy with the classification processes in North West Province and Limpopo and still awaiting detailed drought reports from Free State Province.

KwaZulu-Natal declared a state of provincial disaster in July 2014 and is currently implementing its recovery plan with support from the Department of Water and Sanitation and National Disaster Management Centre.

 

                                            

19 October 2015 - NW3163

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Mudau, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the sphere of local government is ready to implement the Public Administration Management Act, Act 11 of 2014, with regard to the transfer and/or secondment of employees to improve service delivery?

Reply:

The Public Administration Management (PAM) Act, 2014 (Act No. 11 of 2014) (“PAM Act”) provides in section 5(1) that any employees of the transferring institution may, subject to sections 151(3), 153 and 197 (4) on the Constitution, be transferred within an institution or transferred to another institution in a manner and on such conditions as prescribed.

The PAM Act imposes an obligation on the Minister for Public Service and Administration to develop regulations providing guidelines on how to manage horizontal transfers of staff at senior management levels across all the three spheres, in consultation with the Minister responsible for local government. The Department of Public Service and Administration is currently developing minimum norms and standards, inter alia, including transfers between the three spheres of government. The regulations are not yet in place. The regulations, once finalised, will provide guidance on the implementation of the PAM Act to help improve service delivery, taking into consideration the different conditions of employment of senior managers and categories of municipalities.

This provision will enable municipalities to draw on staff with the necessary experience and competence in other spheres once the legal framework is in place.

19 October 2015 - NW3545

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Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the finding of the Auditor-General that Councillors of Nala Local Municipality in the Free State contravened section 167 of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, when they paid themselves salaries inconsistent with the regulations of the specified Act, did his department intervene in this matter in order to ensure that the specified municipality recovers the monies overpaid to the specified councillors; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister intervened in terms of section 106 of the Municipal Systems Act by requesting the MEC for local government in the Free State Provincial Government to investigate this matter.

According to the information received from Nala Local Municipality, the municipality has entered into an arrangement with affected councillors to recover the monies overpaid to them.

19 October 2015 - NW3457

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)    Whether the driver of the Buffalo City fire vehicle which was involved in a serious accident on Thursday, 27 August 2015, had a driver’s licence of any type; if not, (a) why was the driver controlling a multimillion rand vehicle which had just been returned to service, (b) who authorised that the driver utilise the vehicle and (c) what disciplinary action will follow in this regard; if so, (i) what was the code of the relevant driver’s licence, (ii) when was the licence issued and (iii) when does it expire; (2) Whether there are minimum standards in place for the control, driving and operation of specialised fire vehicles; if not, why not; if so, what are the standards?

Reply:

Below is the response provided by the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality, attached as Annexure A, as received from the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

ANNEXURE A

Number

Questions

Response

1.

Whether the driver of the Buffalo City Fire vehicle which was involved in a serious accident on Thursday, 27 August 2015, had a driver’s license of any type; if not,

The driver at the time was in possession of a Code 03 learner’s license which permits the driving of the heavy vehicle whilst accompanied by a licensed driver. The learner driver was inter alia accompanied by the Divisional Officer: Training who is in possession of a Code EC driving license

 

a) why was the driver controlling a multimillion rand vehicle which had just been returned to service, and

a) The driver was controlling the vehicle as she was on a Pump Operator/Driver course. The duration of which was 11 August 2015 to 04 September 2015

 

b) Who authorised that the driver utilise the vehicle, and

b) The Divisional Officer: Training authorised the driver to utilise the vehicle. Note – in terms of Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCMM) fleet Management Policy Fire Fighting Vehicles may only be used in the case of inspection of fire equipment or installation and training purposes

 

c) What disciplinary action will follow in this regard; if so,

c) Disciplinary action is to be decided on once a comprehensive investigation has been completed

 

(i) What was the code of the relevant driver’s license

  1. Code 3 learners license
 

(ii)When was the license issued and;

  1. Code 3 learners license issued on

11 August 2015 and

 

(iii) When does it expire

(iii) It expires on 11 February 2017

2

Whether there are minimum standards in place for the control, driving and operation of specialised fire vehicles; if not, why    not; if so, what are the standards

There are minimum standards in place, Fire fighters with a vast experience on driving heavy duty vehicles are selected to attend the Pump Operator/Driver Course. On the course people are trained on how to operate the vehicle and engage the pumps. There are tests and a practical evaluation that must be passed by each student. The competent fire fighters are issued with the relevant internal certificate. These are the only people who are authorised to drive the Aerial Appliances even during emergencies.

19 October 2015 - NW3377

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to his 2015 Budget Vote speech, what are the details of the (a) socio-economic and (b) job creation work that traditional leaders do in traditional communities, including information about each traditional community where this is taking place; (2) What are the details of the best practices of collaboration between traditional leadership and municipalities in (a) (i) Ehlanzeni District Municipality and (ii) Gert Sibande District Municipality in Mpumalanga and (b) other provinces?

Reply:

  1. (a) and (b)

Traditional Leaders are involved in various development programs as part of job creation and improving the socio-economic well-being of their communities. The following are examples:

  • Empangisweni Traditional Community: INKOSI ZONDO
  • Stock farming – in Nguni cattle. The project has resulted in the capacitation of many black farmers.
  • Soil utilization – particularly maize. This project has resulted in the employment of many locals and their capacitation.
  • Dzumeri Traditional Community: HOSI DZUMERI
  • Hosi Dzumeri awarded 50 wheelchairs to needy men, women children, not only from Dzumeri, but even other neighboring communities as well.
  • Hosi has committed himself to increasing the number to over 100.
  • Bakgatla Ba Kgafela Traditional Community: KGOSI PILANE
  • Mining – has resulted in the employment of many locals and the development of the area.
  • Mphebatho Museum – a major tourist attraction and a source of employment.
  • Clothing factory – has resulted in the employment of many locals. It supplies major clothing retailers (e.g. Truworths ) with raw material.
  • Farming – include goat farming. The aim with the project is to utilise available resources and land to make available employment opportunities to the community.
  • Hospitality industry – to advance job creation and sustainable economic development.
  • Moruleng Shopping Centre – the state of the art shopping center is a major source of employment for the community in Moruleng.
    • Road construction: The TC through its development wing constructed a road (tar road)

2. (a)(i)

Ehlanzeni District Municipality

The support provided by the District Municipality to nine (9) traditional leaders participating in Municipal Councils includes, sitting allowances and the provision of communication tools. All traditional leaders within the district are provided with financial assistance towards holding of traditional/cultural ceremonies (Immemo).The special designated seating arrangements for royalty in the council chambers and joint formal procession with the speaker into the chamber during council meetings are some of the protocol matters that are highly appreciated within the traditional institution.

Meetings that precede council meetings are held regularly between the district municipality speaker and the traditional leaders participating in municipal councils. Traditional leaders also participate in an IDP forum constituted by all mayors from local and the district municipalities in the region which focuses on development and other service delivery issues.

3. (a)(ii)

Gert Sibande District Municipality

The support provided by the District Municipality to seven (7) Traditional Leaders participating in Municipal Councils includes, sitting and cell phone allowances and other communication tools as well as office accommodation and office furniture. Traditional leaders have been enrolled on a training programme for leadership development by the district at the University of Zululand.

All traditional leaders within the district are also provided with financial assistance towards holding of traditional/cultural ceremonies (Immemo).Traditional leaders are part of the mayoral imbizo which is held annually. There is also an IDP forum constituted by traditional leaders and all mayors from local and the district municipalities in the region which focuses on development and other service delivery matters.

b) Other Provinces

In KwaZulu-Natal Province in the ILembe District and its local municipalities of Ndwedwe, Maphumulo, Mandeni and KwaDukuza, the strengthening of participation of traditional leadership in Municipal Councils proceedings is commendable. The Provincial CoGTA traditional leaders are not only attending meetings of full municipal council, but the municipalities have allocated seats for traditional leaders in Portfolio Committees of Municipal Councils. This enables traditional leaders to deliberate on policy matters.

Furthermore, the following effective partnerships with the traditional communities focusing on cooperatives, health and welfare, education, enterprise development, supply chain focusing on local procurement have been established in both Limpopo and North West within the platinum belt:

In Limpopo Province, R27 million has been invested in building a school, which is yet to be handed to the traditional community in Magadimana-Ntweng Traditional Council in Serafa Village within the Greater Tubatse Municipality. Traditional communities in Mapela, Ga-Chaba, Gamolekana, Phofola, Rooibok Sterkfontein in Mokopane are benefiting R39, 8 million agriculture projects. A market has been created for these flourishing projects. These farms supply their produce to the informal sector, local fruit and vegetable retailers and wholesalers including fresh produce markets. These projects are run by community structures supported by the traditional leaders and external capability to ensure high level of effectiveness and productivity.

Working with both Kgoshikgolo Thulare Thulare and Kgoshikgolo KK Sekhukhune and various other community leaders the ARM Broad Based Empowerment Trust built the Mampuru Thulare Primary School for R2.3 million in 2010. The school, which is currently being attended by approximately 700 pupils, has 8 classrooms and 6 ablution blocks and has been a positive catalyst for development in the area with children from the area now spared the hardship of walking long distances to school every day.

In 2014 the Trust spent a further R1.4 million on renovations and building a nutritional centre at the school. The Limpopo Rural Upliftment Trust has also been hard at work providing water to communities around the province. The Trust has spent approximately R1.2 million drilling and equipping 18 boreholes in the province. The boreholes now supply clean drinking water to these communities

In North West Province a SEDA Platinum project of glass beads jewelry has been established. The required machinery has been purchased and the cooperative members have been trained. At the moment, about R2,3 million is invested for this project. The second project is a craft hub called Tsakane Arts Cooperative. This project targets the youth and provides an opportunity for them to further explore the skills in arts and crafts and to have sustainable source of income. Almost R4.1 million has been invested in this project. Almost 7 people who were farming pigs on a casual subsistence basis have been assisted through the partnership by commercializing the farms into income generating activity at a higher scale. Almost R3.4 million has been spent to upgrade infrastructure, training for farmers on business development, product quality control, marketing and administration.

Anglo Platinum has agreed to appoint a professional videographer to capture all the projects to promote sustainable development and self-reliance in rural communities.

In the Eastern Cape Province R12 million to date has been distributed to the Eastern Cape Rural Upliftment Trust.Two new child care centers, the Kwathamsana Child Care Centre and the Zanci Child Care Centre were built in the Mqanduli area in the Eastern Cape to the value of R1.7 million. The Zanci Child Centre which was proposed by Nkosi Phatekile Holomisa benefits approximately 160 infants from the Zanci Village.

At the Ntabakandoda Secondary School, located in the Ngcamngeni Village the Trust built a soup kitchen at a cost of R200 000. The kitchen caters for 500 students and [will] cater for children from the Ntabakandoda School as well as primary school and pre-school children within the village.The Trust has spent a further R4.5 million building and renovating schools throughout the province.

Agriculture has also been a key focus for the trust in the Eastern Cape. The Manguzela Crop Production Project, in the Matatiele area, received in excess of R800 000 for farming equipment and supplies for crop production.

The Mpumalanga/ Northern Cape Rural Upliftment Trust has received approximately R7.3 million to date. In Mpumalanga, the Ipopeng Agricultural and Chicken Project received a total of R790 000 for the vegetable garden and for chicken farming. A tractor, a plough, a diesel cart, a trailer and a ploughing disc have been bought for the vegetable garden. Members of the community have been able to benefit from this project as poor families identified by the tribal council are able to receive vegetables and or chickens free of charge from the project. In addition the ARM Broad-Based Economic Empowerment Trust drilled and equipped 7 boreholes in various communities in the Ekhangala district.

The Mamathlake Vegetable Project has also been a great success having been developed in 2012 by the Trust at a cost of R780 000.The Trust’s projects in Mpumalanga also include the provision of water to the Xanthia High School in Thulamahashe, the Ngungunyane High School in Bushbuckridge, and the JP Khoza Primary School in Thulamahashe at a total cost of R198 000.

In the Northern Cape the African Rainbow Minerals (ARM) Broad Based Economic Empowerment Trust renovated and erected fencing around the Ikageng High School in John Taolo Gaetsewe and funded the purchase of 100 bicycles for learners from various schools in the area. In Kuruman a vegetable and chicken project for the Batlhaping Ba- Ga Phetlhu has been allocated R974 000.

In addition to the projects of the ARM Broad-Based Empowerment Trust R 736 million has been spent by ARM’s operations through Local Economic Development and Social Labor Plans in the preceding 5 years. The Trust continues to be committed to working with our local community leaders, government, church groups, trade unions, women and youth groups to develop sustainable projects that will improve the living conditions and standards of living of all our people.

Since inception, the ARM Broad Based Economic Empowerment Trust has distributed a total of R120 million to its beneficiaries for projects in education, health, water, enterprise development, farming, agriculture and rural development initiatives throughout South Africa.

Five provincial rural development trusts led by trustees who are key leaders in their respective communities and provinces were created for the purpose of uplifting and benefiting rural communities. The partnership between community leaders and the Trust assists in identifying the needs of the communities to ensure that projects undertaken by the provincial trusts have maximum impact in the upliftment and development of communities.

Traditional leaders, especially kingships have had partnerships with the Motsepe Foundation and the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry. The Department of Traditional affairs will be engaging the Motsepe Foundation, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry to extend and establish partnership relations as they operate within our sector. Furthermore, the DTA will also try to synchronize the work that other stakeholders are doing within the traditional communities to ensure effective and efficient service delivery and desired impact.

19 October 2015 - NW3620

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Have there been any court cases instituted against the Blue Crane Route Local Municipality since 2006; if so, (a) how many cases have been instituted, (b) how many of the specified cases were lost, (c) what has been the total cost to the municipality of all of the specified cases and (d) what was the nature of each of the cases?

Reply:

According to information submitted by the Blue Crane Route Local Municipality (BCRM), the following cases were instituted against the municipality:

  1. How many cases have been instituted
  1. How many of the specified cases were lost
  1. What has been the total cost to the municipality of all specified cases
  1. What was the nature of each of the cases

Seven cases

One case was lost and four cases were settled out of court.

Corporate Finance Solutions vs BCRM: 2010:

Legal fees: R 58 963

Municipality sued for arrear rental payments.

  1. How many cases have been instituted
  1. How many of the specified cases were lost
  1. What has been the total cost to the municipality of all specified cases
  1. What was the nature of each of the cases
   

Mr H Hendricks vs BCRM: 2012:

Legal fees: R 99 383

Settlement 1: R 67 500

Settlement 2: R 36 155

Mr Hendricks lodged a dispute for unpaid salary and performance bonus. A settlement agreement was reached and the dispute was resolved.

   

Mr A Swanepoel vs BCRM: 2013

Legal fees: Mr Swanepoel to pay all costs of the municipality.

Mr Swanepoel successfully lodged an application against the municipality for wrongful accusation of misconduct/theft. The municipality successfully appealed judgement of the lower court. The court ordered that Mr Swanepoel must pay costs of the municipality. The municipality will proceed with recovery costs against Mr Swanepoel.

  1. How many cases have been instituted
  1. How many of the specified cases were lost
  1. What has been the total cost to the municipality of all specified cases
  1. What was the nature of each of the cases
   

Mr E Rankwana vs BCRM: 2013

Legal fees: R 352 528

Settlement: R 450 000

Mr Rankwana applied for post of Municipal Manager and was not successful. He lodged an application to review and set aside appointment of Mr T Klaas as Municipal Manager. At the hearing scheduled for 18 June 2015, Mr Rankwana’s legal team proposed that the matter be resolved out of court and that each party pay its own costs. The matter was referred to the Municipal Council which unanimously resolved to settle the matter out of court.

   

Mr S Kambi vs BCRM: 2015

Legal fees: R 27 398

Mr Kambi lodged a claim to the Labour Court against the municipality in respect of payment of unpaid salary. The municipality successfully defended the matter.

  1. How many cases have been instituted
  1. How many of the specified cases were lost
  1. What has been the total cost to the municipality of all specified cases
  1. What was the nature of each of the cases
   

Mr P Dreyer vs BCRM: 2013

Legal fees: R 40 422

Settlement: R 34 544

Mr Dreyer lodged a dispute demanding payment of R 69 087.72 in respect of performance bonus for a period of two years while he acted as Manager: Community Services. The legal team of Mr Dreyer and the municipality agreed to settle out of court.

   

Ms G Sammy vs BCRM: 2014

Legal fees: R 29 490

Settlement: R 34 544

Ms Sammy lodged a dispute to the Labour Court demanding payment of R 38 428 in respect of payment of unpaid salary. According to the municipality, R 34 544 has been paid in settlement of this matter.

19 October 2015 - NW3307

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Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

 

Travel Cost

Number of trips

Accommodation Cost

(a) Minister Pravin Gordhan

R R256 971.00

44

R0.00

 

(b)

Deputy Minister Nel

R 252 538.00

35

R0.00

 

Deputy Minister Bapela

R 282 437.00

51

R0.00

19 October 2015 - NW3378

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) How many members currently serve on each traditional council and (b) how many of the specified members are women; (2) What percentage of members of each traditional council were democratically elected; (3) whether any traditional councils currently do not comply with sections 3(2)(b) and 3(2)(c)(ii) of the Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act, Act 41 of 2003; if so, (a) which traditional councils and (b) what has he done to address this?

Reply:

The replies as received from the Provinces are specified in the attached table (Annexure A).

22 September 2015 - NW3379

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How many registered farms are owned by each of the 25 municipalities in the Northern Cape and (b) what is the (i) name and (ii) size of each farm?

Reply:

This question can better be responded to by Rural Development and Land Reform as the competent authority.





END

22 September 2015 - NW3212

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the Elias Motsoaledi Municipality has contracted any person or company to provide refuse removal services in the municipality; if so, (a) what is the name of the person or company and (b) what is the (i) value and (ii) duration of the specified contract; (2) whether the specified contractor uses (a) tools, (b) vehicles and (c) fuel owned by (i) drivers and (ii) labourers employed by the specified municipality when undertaking the refuse removal services; if not, does the specified contractor only use its own equipment and staff; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the Elias Motsoaledi Municipality to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.





END

22 September 2015 - NW3211

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the requisite supply chain management processes were followed in the appointment of a certain company (name and details furnished) by the Elias Motsoaledi Municipality in Limpopo; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified company’s tax compliance status was verified with the SA Revenue Service; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) on what date was the specified company appointed by the specified municipality, (b) what amount has been paid by the municipality to the specified company since its appointment and (c) why was it deemed necessary to appoint a company to render the specified service; (4) why are the services of the specified company still needed considering that all the game on the farm have already been sold off; (5) why did the specified security company not prevent the cutting and flattening of the fence around the farm, which resulted in nearby hawkers clearing trees on the farm for firewood?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the Elias Motsoaledi Municipality to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.




END

22 September 2015 - NW2820

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether a closeout report has been submitted for the term of a certain person (name furnished) as administrator of Makana Local Municipality; if not, (a) why not and (b) when can such a report be expected; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether, if such a report has been submitted, each key objective as identified in the person’s letter of appointment was achieved; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status thereof; (3) what is the current financial status of the municipality as at the end of the administration period in terms of (a) creditors in each aging category, (b) debtors in each aging category and (c) cash-on-hand; (4) what was the financial status of the municipality at the start of the administration period in terms of (a) creditors in each aging category, (b) debtors in each aging category and (c) cash-on-hand?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the Eastern Cape Provincial Government to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.




END

22 September 2015 - NW3081

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) (a) How does (i) his department and (ii) entities reporting to him define red tape and (b) what (i) specific interventions and for (ii) systems have been implemented to (aa) identify and (bb) reduce red tape in (aaa) his department and (bbb) the entities reporting to him?

Reply:

Departments of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

a) Red Tape refers to unduly strict regulations that often make it difficult for small emerging enterprises to thrive and hinders aggressive competition with medium and macro enterprises that do business with government. It also refers to rules, regulations, and I or bureaucratic procedures and processes which are excessively complex and which impose unnecessary delay(s), inaction and I or costs which exceed their benefits, and I or is no longer effective in achieving the purpose for which they were originally created. Red tape results in undesirable economic, business and I or social impacts or outcomes as a result of negatively impacting on productivity.

(b) (i) The department has implemented key actions to facilitate a progressive improvement in the payment of suppliers, within the prescribed 30-day period, such as the centralisation of the receipt and recording of invoices as well as an integrated order and payment tracking system.

In addition to the above, the Departments are currently implementing parts of the Shared Services Model between DCOG, OTA and MISA and are working together with National Treasury's Technical Assistance Unit to enhance and refine the model. Lastly, the department is also implementing the automated submission system, which will improve efficiency in decision making processes within the departments.

South African Cities Network

1. The South African Cities Network (SACN) (ii) defines red tape as an expression used to describe rigid conformity to formal rules that may hinder or slow down the decision-making process.

(b)(i) The SACN believes in early submission of documentation that requires approval to allow enough time for the recipient to thoroughly engage with the documentation without compromising the deadlines

(ii) The Annual Performance Plan assists in forward planning and eventual execution of tasks and this is reviewed on a monthly basis to ensure we are still working within the correct timeframes.

South African Local Government Association (SALGA)

1. (ii) Red tape refers to excessive regulation or rigid conformity to formal rules that is considered redundant or bureaucratic and hinders or prevents action or decision-making.

(b)(i) Development of an automated procurement system to eliminate the lengthy manual processes to ease decision-making and action or implementation.

(c) (ii)(aa)(bb) Systems implemented to enhance efficiencies without compromising on compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Automated requests, workflows, approvals and reporting have been implemented to ensure effective service delivery.

Municipal Demarcation Board (MOB)

1. (a)(ii) Defines Red tape as the excessive regulation or rigid conformity to formal rules that is considered redundant or bureaucratic and hinders or prevents action or decision-making.

(b)(i) No specific interventions have been implemented;
(b)(ii) (aa) and (bb) Systems and processes have been implemented to enhance efficiency without compromising on compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Applicable work processes, public and stakeholder consultation forums, reporting and approval structures have been implemented to ensure effective and efficient service delivery.

The Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Rights Commission)


(1)(a)(ii)

The CRL Rights Commission defines red tape as the duplication of processes that lead to waste of resources and strict adherence to official rules and formalities.

(b )(i)(bbb)

The Commission has streamlined its internal process and developed Standard Operating Procedures with the view of improving efficiency. Furthermore, these were processed through internal governance structures of the Entity and communicated to general staff.

The CRL Rights Commission utilise the strategic plan and annual performance plan to ensure that there are no duplication in functions and that every program deliver on a unique specialisation in the mandate of the Commission. In planning ahead it helps the Commission to be able to reach its goals without having to deal with unplanned and other issues that just crop up.

22 September 2015 - NW2938

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the scope of the section 139(1)(b) intervention at Madibeng Local Municipality in the North West; (2) (a) what will be the cost of rehabilitating the water and sanitation infrastructure in the specified municipality and (b) how will this be funded; (3) whether income from water and sanitation to the specified municipality will be ring-fenced; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the North West Provincial Government to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.
 

 

END

22 September 2015 - NW3198

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the appointment of a certain person (name and details furnished), who was found guilty by a forensic audit of nepotism, intimidation of external auditors and irregular investment and procurement transactions at the Technology Innovation Agency, he will take steps to ensure the City Manager terminates the specified person’s contract; if not, why not?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We are, however, still investigating the matter and the Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as we get it.


END

22 September 2015 - NW2984

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the Cool Air Community Hall in Cool Air, Kwazulu-Natal, was owned by the former Services Board before 1994; if so, (a) when was the hall transferred to the uMshwathi Local Municipality and (b) what process was followed; (2) what arrangements have been put in place for Cool Air Secondary School to make use of the hall?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the uMshwathi Local Municipality to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.

END

22 September 2015 - NW3134

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the section 139(1)(b) intervention in Makana Local Municipality, (a) why was the contract of a certain person (name and details furnished) not renewed, (b) what are the terms of reference for the newly appointed person (name and details furnished) to that position, (c) what are the relevant details of the specified person’s remuneration package and (d) has the appointment of the specified person been approved by (i) the National Council of Provinces and (ii) him; (2) whether the specified person is currently employed by his department; if so, what are the (a) relevant details of the specified person’s employment and (b) specified person’s (i) qualifications and (ii) professional work experience?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the Eastern Cape Provincial government to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.




END

22 September 2015 - NW3186

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the basis of the cost of collection of the contract with a certain company (name furnished) and/or its subsidiaries for the installation, maintenance, management and vending related to smart electricity meters in the City of Tshwane, as (a) calculated by the metro and (b) presented to the Council by the specified company and/or its subsidiaries; (2) who calculated the cost of collection on which the actual contract is based; (3) whether the actual cost of collection matches the costs presented in the initial proposal; if not, (a) why not and (b) what is the actual cost of collection?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the City of Tshwane to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.



END

22 September 2015 - NW3187

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether a cost-benefit analysis was conducted on the installation of smart electricity meters in the City of Tshwane by a certain company (name furnished) and/or any of its subsidiaries; if not, why not; if so, did the specified analysis indicate financial threats or challenges arising from the proposal; (2) (a) what are the cost implications of the withdrawal by the municipality from the specified contract and (b) what amount (i) has been spent on this contract to date and (ii) is anticipated to be spent in terms of future costs associated with the specified contract; (3) whether (a) he, (b) his department or (c) the National Treasury issued any advice with regard to the specified contract; if so, (i) what was the nature of the advice and (ii) did the municipality followed the advice given; (4) whether he will instruct or advise the municipality and/or the municipal council to take any action against the mayor and/or the municipal manager of Tshwane to (a) recover the funds which have been spent to date and (b) initiate the necessary disciplinary action in this regard; if not, what steps will he take to minimise such expenditure in future; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. We have, however, since requested the City of Tshwane to provide this information.

The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information as soon as it is submitted to us.



END

08 September 2015 - NW3085

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether the municipal manager of Maruleng Local Municipality in Limpopo was suspended at a special council meeting held on 5 August 2015; if so, (a) on what grounds was the municipal manager suspended and (b) was the council meeting legally constituted in terms of the requisite notice of the council meeting having been provided and the agenda circulated; if not, what was the purpose of the council meeting; (2) (a) how many special council meetings have been held by the Maruleng Local Municipality since 1 January 2015 and (b) for each meeting, (i) what was the purpose of the meeting and (ii) what notice was given of the meeting; (3) was an agenda circulated for each specified meeting; if not, why not?

Reply:

The response below is based on information received from the Maruleng Local Municipality:

(1) Yes, the municipal manager of Maruleng Local Municipality in Limpopo was suspended at a special council meeting held on 5 August 2015.

(a) Misconduct
(b) Yes, the Council meeting was legally constituted.
(2) (a) Five (5) special council meetings have been held by the Maruleng Local Municipality since 1 January 2015.

(b) (i)
• 25 January 2015: The acting allowance for the Chief Traffic Officer, the acting allowance for the Director: Corporate Services, the suspension of employees and the informal settlement upgrading by Housing Development.

• 9 February 2015: Approval of adjustment budget.

• 29 May 2015: 2015/16 budget approval.

• 23 July 2015: Notice of suspension of the municipal manager.

• 5 August 2015: Suspension of the municipal manager.

(ii) Invitations were issued.

(3) Yes, the agenda for each specified meeting was circulated

08 September 2015 - NW3000

Profile picture: Matlhoko, Mr AM

Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether, with regard to the appointment of a certain company (name furnished) by the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality, the project management unit for which the specified company is hired is an internal municipality unit; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) for what project and (b) at what value was the specified company appointed?

Reply:

COGTA has engaged with the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality (NMMDM) in order to obtain answers to these questions. The municipality has responded as follows:

  1. The Project Management Unit (PMU) is an internal unit of the municipality. It has been established under the Technical Services Section within the municipality, as provided for in the PMU Guidelines developed by the Department of Cooperative Governance.

The appointment of the company was prompted by a critical shortage of technical staff in the municipality. This included a shortage of planning, engineering and project management expertise. This had resulted in the municipality failing to spend its allocated MIG and other funds for projects within specified timeframes.

Currently, the company has suspended its support to the municipality due to non-payment of outstanding invoices by the municipality.

(2)(a) The company was appointed by the municipality for a period of three years with effect from 2 September 2013, ending on 31 August 2016, to provide technical support to the PMU unit. The company was appointed to carry out the following tasks as contained in the Terms of Reference (ToR) for the appointment:

• Provision of quality technical support and advice over the Project Life Cycle, which includes inception, planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting and close-out on the infrastructure programme in the municipality

• The development of contract briefs for submission to the Professional Service Providers appointed by the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality (NMMDM).

• In respect of each project, scrutinize, approve and verify the accuracy and correctness of all practical and final completion certificates and recommend approval by the Senior Manager of the PMU

• Verification of all technical and financial aspects of the Infrastructure Programme

• Preparation of all required documentation for submission to the departments responsible for conditional grants and any other required reporting.

(2)(b)The contract amount over this period is R21,6 million from the municipality’s Equitable Share budget. Given that the NMMDM receives approximately R300 million per annum from the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), the municipality is within the 5% allowance for PMU costs in the MIG framework.