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05 December 2016 - NW2499

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Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Tradtional Affairs

Whether his department paid for his legal fees to interdict the release of the State of Capture report by the former Public Protector, Ms Thuli Madonsela; if so, how does this fall within his department’s mandate?

Reply:

Yes, the allegations were levelled against the Ministers’ appointment and not in his private capacity. 

 

05 December 2016 - NW2601

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any payments have been made to any former councillor in terms of the once-off gratuity that was promised to former councillors before the 2016 local government elections; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the specified gratuities be paid to the former councillors; if so, (i) what is the total amount that was paid out in gratuities to the former councillors, (ii) how many of the former councillors still need to receive their gratuities and (iii) what is the total amount of gratuities that are still outstanding?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance was advised that payments of the once-off gratuity to eligible non-returning councillors after the 3 August 2016 local government elections could only be made after the Independent Commission for the Remuneration (“the Commission”) of Public Office Bearers published their recommendations in this regard.

On Friday, 11 November 2016:

  • The Commission published their recommendations in this regard in Government Gazette No. 40422; and
  • The Local Government MinMEC resolved that the Minister finalise the payment model for the once-off gratuity after having considered the recommendations of the Commission and the resolutions taken at the MinMEC meeting that was held on 2 September 2016.

The payment model was finalised on Tuesday, 16 November 2016.

Yes, payments of the once-off gratuity has commenced.

(i) In the process of payment, the Department is busy with the necessary preparations, calculations and verification of the payments to eligible non-returning councillors.

   An amount of R309 million was appropriated for this purpose. The total amount that will be paid out will be determined after the payment have been finalised.

(ii) As at 28 November 2016, more than 4000 former councillors, still need to receive their gratuities.

(iii) The total amount of gratuities for the more than 4000 former councillors are still outstanding. This amount is still to be determined based on the payment model (including the formula) that was approved on the 16 November 2016.

05 December 2016 - NW2569

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the total number of persons in his department who are employed in senior management with a special salary level and (b) what (i) amount has each person been paid since their appointment, (ii) is the basis for each specified salary level and (iii) are the further relevant details of each appointment?

Reply:

(a) One

(b) (i) The amount paid to the employee as at appointment in 2011 was R 1 025 133, which increases incrementally on an annual basis due to general salary adjustment.

(ii) The Department was not able to secure the services of an expert Executive Manager: Finance who met the gender representivity requirements. The appointee has skills that are highly in demand in the public and private sector and it was to the benefit of the Department to secure her services due to a buy offer.

(iii) Although the post was advertised on salary level 14, the successful candidate’s remuneration package was at a higher level and she was therefore appointed on a personal notch.

28 November 2016 - NW2526

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether any (a) criminal, (b) civil and/or (c) disciplinary charges have been laid against any person and/or organisation involved in the Siyenza Group toilets tender scandal project in the Amathole District Municipality in the Eastern Cape; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what is the (i) nature of the charges laid and (ii) current status of each specified case; ( 2 ) Whether any amounts have been recovered from (a) the specified company and/or (b) any of the specified persons and/or organisations involved in the specified tender scandal project; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what amount (i) has been recovered and (ii) remains outstanding in each case; (3) What is the current status of the rectification programme undertaken by (a) the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent and/or (b) any of the specified agent’s implementing agents on the tender scandal project

Reply:

The response below was provided by the municipality:

(1) (a),(b) & (c) No criminal, civil or disciplinary charges have been laid against any person and/or organisation involved in the Siyenza Group toilets tender project in the Amathole District Municipality. The investigations by the Public Protector and the National Treasury are currently underway. The outcome of the investigations will determine if there are grounds for such actions.

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(2) No amounts have been recovered from the specified company and/or any of the specified persons and/or organisations involved in the Siyenza Group toilets tender project. The outcome of the investigations will determine if there are grounds for such actions.

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(3) (a) & (b) There is no rectification programme currently being undertaken by Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA). However, MISA in partnership with the Department of Water and Sanitation will be supporting the implementation of the programme by Amatola Water Board. The Amatola Water Board has been appointed by the Department of Water and Sanitation as an implementing agent for the completion of the project. Further, the Amatola Water Board has developed and costed the implementation plan for the completion of the project. The proposed commencement date of the project is January 2017.

28 November 2016 - NW2553

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What (a) was the total budget allocated by his department to disaster management (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016 and (b) amounts were (i) requested by each province in each of the specified financial years and (ii) paid out in each case; (2) whether any outstanding funds must still be paid out to the provinces; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount of outstanding funds must still be paid to the provinces and (b)(i) since what date has each of the specified payments been outstanding and (ii) what is the reason in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) The total budget as per the Grant Allocation was as follows

FINANCIAL YEARS

MUNICIPAL GRANT

PROVINCIAL GRANT

MUNICIPAL DISASTER RECOVERY GRANT

2013/14

R346 500 000

R188 000 000

R11 300 000

2014/15

R363 600 000

R197 000 000

R8 600 000

2015/16

R374 000 000

R204 000 000

R124 000 000

(ii) Yes, no amounts were directly made available by the department since April 2016

(b) (i) Amount requested by each province in the specified financial years and (ii) paid outs.

Note: The amount stated in these tables reflects funding transferred from the Disaster Grants to affected sectors and municipalities. The post disaster recovery funds for sectors are facilitated by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, directly transferred from National Treasury within the Contingency Reserve to relevant sectors.

PROVINCE

Type of disaster

2013/14

   

Requested

Paid out

Easter Cape

Floods

R1 348 397 495

R111 350 000

Free State

 

0

0

Gauteng

 

0

0

KwaZulu-Natal

Floods

R309 265 636

R34 162 030

Limpopo

Floods

R737 035 841

R87 925 200

Mpumalanga

 

0

0

Northern Cape

Drought

R360 000 000

R50 000 000

North West

Drought

R3 000 804 000

R43 630 000

Western Cape

Floods

R266 589 672

R55 617 000

PROVINCE

Type of disaster

2014/15

   

Requested

Paid out

Eastern Cape

Floods

R579 180 687

R 8 610 800

Free State

Fires

R50 000 000

R15 791 000

Gauteng

Floods

R701 200 770

R14 878 446

KwaZulu-Natal

Drought, Floods and Fires

R181 563 069

R89 083 000

Limpopo

Floods

R213 450 000

R14 884 000

Mpumalanga

Floods

R535 600 000

R97 170 000

Northern Cape

 

0

0

North West

Earth Quake

R163 500 131

R148 508 00

Western Cape

Floods

R1 074 746 408

R82 796 000

NB: It is important to note that national and provincial sector departments, including municipalities agreed to reprioritise internal funding that is anticipated and estimated savings within their equitable shares and conditional grants to address the drought situation to ensure non-duplication of financial resources. The Disaster Grants were to be utilised once provinces have fully spent the reprioritised funding. Again, the funding allocated for floods are the funds that were allocated in 2014/15, within the Medium Term Expenditure Framework to repair the damages as a result of the 2013 floods disasters.

PROVINCE

 

2015/16

   

Requested

Paid out

Easter Cape

Drought

R385 732 991

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

Free State

Drought

R102 442 000

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

Gauteng

Floods for 2013

R35 588 184

R 35 588 184

KwaZulu-Natal

Floods for 2013/14

R87 096 000

 

Drought

R487 884 098

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

Limpopo

Floods for 2013/14

R20 836 000

 

Drought

R51 000 000

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

Mpumalanga

Floods for 2013/14

R30 000 000

 

Drought

R162 500 000

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

Northern Cape

Drought

R163 281 173 (per month)

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

North West

Drought

R3 461 545 284

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

Western Cape

Floods 2013/14

R86 919 000

 

Drought

R105 000 000

No disaster grants paid out until April 2016, only reprioritised funding as indicated above.

2. No outstanding amounts are to be paid out to the provinces.

28 November 2016 - NW2552

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)To what position has Ms Ashley Rutherford been appointed in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality? (2) whether the position was advertised before the appointment of the specified person; if not, why not; if so, (a) on which dates and (b) in which media were advertisements placed? (3) (a) what qualifications (i) were required for the specified position and (ii) does the person possess, (b) how many other applicants applied for the position and (c) what is the total annual remuneration package for the position?

Reply:

The following response is based on the information received from Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

1. Ms Ashley Rutherford was nominated as a councillor from July 2014 up until 31 May 2015 to fill a vacancy following the resignation of a councillor.

2. Not applicable, councillors are nominated from the applicable party list to be elected in the vacancy.

3. Not applicable, councillors are nominated from the applicable party list to be elected in the vacancy.

14 November 2016 - NW2346

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

When will the application for the recognition of the Amathombeni chieftaincy in the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality in Mpumalanga be finalised?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is requested to note that the information that is being requested is not readily available within the Department because the matter is a provincial competence. However, the information has been requested from the Mpumalanga Provincial government.

14 November 2016 - NW2289

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any (a) internal and/or (b) external forensic reports pertaining to (i) his department and/or (ii) each entity reporting to him were completed from January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what is the (aa) name, (bb), subject matter and (cc) date of conclusion of each of the specified forensic report?

Reply:

The department has commissioned seven (7) cases of financial and forensic investigations since 1 April 2012. The nature and details of the cases are as follows: -

Case Number

Name

Subject Matter

Date of Conclusion

1

NDMC Report

Irregularities in the information technology infrastructure at the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC)

20/09/2013

2

Suka Report

Various allegations, complaints and/or queries relating to the implementation of the Community Work Programme (CWP)

27/09/2013

3

SANACO Report

Investigation into allegations of mismanagement of funds of the Department of Cooperative Governance by the South African National Cooperative Limited (SANACO)

In Progress

4

Payroll Fraud

Allegations of fraud and corruption by an official at the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA)

May 2016

5

CWP Forensic Audit

Possible financial irregularities relating to the implementation of the Community Work Programme (CWP)

In Progress

6

Allegations of financial misconduct

Subsistence and travel irregularities

August 2015

7

Allegations of financial irregularities by a service provider

Various allegations of improper procurement of the travel management solution and abuse of travel benefits

September 2016

The cases listed above, have been referred to the Internal Audit Unit for further investigation and consequence management. Once the investigation is finalised, the details thereof will be communicated accordingly.

14 November 2016 - NW2234

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the Special Investigating Unit’s (SIU) investigation into municipalities in Limpopo, specifically the (a) Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality and (b) Sekhukhune District Municipality have commenced yet; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, (i) what is the current status of the investigation and (ii) on what date is it anticipated that the investigation will be completed?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the SIU:

Yes, the SIU investigations within the two municipalities have commenced. The SIU has been mandated to investigate allegations, as contemplated in Section 2(2) of the SIU Act, in respect of the affairs of (a) the Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality and (b) the Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality as authorized by Proclamation R59 of 2016 published in Government Gazette No. 40348 dated 14 October 2016.

(i) The SIU commenced with the investigation within the two municipalities on 14 October 2016 and the investigation is in its initial stages; namely, project planning and set up. The initial stages are anticipated to be completed by 14 December 2016.

(ii) The SIU will only be in a position to advise of the anticipated end date of the investigations once they have gathered all the necessary documentation and the project planning stage completed.

14 November 2016 - NW2350

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What are the names of each implementing agent of each community work programme being run by each relevant municipality, (b) on what date was each of the specified implementing agents appointed, (c) what amount (i) has been paid to each of the implementing agents to date and (ii) will be paid to each of the implementing agents for the remainder of the duration of each agreement, (d) what are the key deliverables specified in each of the specified agreements, (e) how many job opportunities (i) did each of the implementing agents create to date and (ii) is each of the implementing agents expected to create for the remainder of the duration of each agreement and (f) on what dates will each of the agreements expire?

Reply:

9A0 The following are the names of the Implementing Agents running the programme in the municipalities: (1) Border Rural Committee (2) Dhladhla Foundation (3) Insika Foundation (4)LIMA Rural Development (5) Seboka Training and Support (6) Seriti Institute (7) Siyakholwa Development (8) Thabiso/3L Development, and (9) Thembalethu Development

Kindly refer to the response to question “e” wherein it is specified as to which Implementing Agent is facilitating the implementation of the programme in each municipality.

​(b) All current Implementing Agents were appointed with effect from 01 April 2014.

(c) The amount that (i) has been paid to each of the Implementing Agent to date and (ii) will be paid to each of the Implementing Agent for the remainder of the duration of each agreement are tabled below.

Implementing Agents are paid per order or contract for each province, therefore it is important that we reflect the amounts paid against each order (in a specified province) as at 30 September 2016.

PROVINCE

ORDER NUMBER

IMPLEMENTING AGENT

PAID

TO BE PAID

EASTERN CAPE

AG350815

BORDER RURAL COMMITTEE

R 16,836,7065

R 6,303,961.35

 

 

BORDER RURAL COMMITTEE Total

R 16,836,7065

R 6,303,961.35

EASTERN CAPE

AG350823

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 31,219,895.33

R 8,717,112.65

FREE STATE

AG350825

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 14,316,004.63

R 5,571,810.22

GAUTENG

AG350820

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 16,543,503.66

R 4,876,495.28

KWAZULU NATAL

AG350819

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 18,524,356.45

R 6,488,991.18

LIMPOPO

AG350811

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 25,006,566.66

R 7,579,313.70

MPUMALANGA

AG350822

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 17,022,519.88

R 5,808,942.98

NORTH WEST

AG350824

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 19,708,628.85

R 6,569,217.33

NORTHERN CAPE

AG350826

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 7,563,482.22

R 2,856,865.95

WESTERN CAPE

AG350821

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

R 27,297,767.68

R 6,765,920.86

 

 

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION Total

R 177,202,725.35

R 55,234,670.15

GAUTENG

AG350806

INSIKA FOUNDATION

R 10,150,940.44

R 3,194,491.48

KWAZULU NATAL

AG350805

INSIKA FOUNDATION

R 20,262,4648

R 8,004,541.29

 

 

INSIKA FOUNDATION Total

R 30,413,404.52

R 11,199,032.77

FREE STATE

AG350814

LIMA RURAL DEVELOPMENT

R 13,139,786.91

R 3,612,423.12

 

 

LIMA RURAL DEVELOPMENT Total

R 13,139,786.91

R 3,612,423.12

FREE STATE

AG350801

SEBOKA TRAINING & SUPPORT

R 10,788,957.51

R 6,760,953.81

MPUMALANGA

AG350803

SEBOKA TRAINING & SUPPORT

R 11,641,758.20

R 4,169,341.92

 

 

SEBOKA TRAINING & SUPPORT Total

R 22,430,715.71

R 10,930,295.73

FREE STATE

AG350807

SERITI INSTITUTE

R 12,631,144.31

R 6,124,120.11

GAUTENG

AG350818

SERITI INSTITUTE

R 8,812,110.29

R 5,062,889.71

KWAZULU NATAL

AG350804

SERITI INSTITUTE

R 17,628,805.28

R 8,227,248.36

LIMPOPO

AG350808

SERITI INSTITUTE

R 20,166,774.54

R 8,576,313.69

MPUMALANGA

AG350809

SERITI INSTITUTE

R 16,087,148.96

R 7,144,282.59

NORTH WEST

AG350810

SERITI INSTITUTE

R 17,020,774.93

R 10,753,744.30

 

 

SERITI INSTITUTE Total

R 92,346,758.31

R 45,888,598.76

EASTERN CAPE

AG350802

SIYAKHOLWA DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

R 13,870,347.89

R 4,749,210.21

 

 

SIYAKHOLWA DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Total

R 13,870,347.89

R 4,749,210.21

NORTHERN CAPE

AG350816

THABISO NGO /3L DEVELOPMENT

R 10,502,917.11

R 3,707,290.89

 

 

THABISO NGO /3L DEVELOPMENT

R 10,502,917.11

R 3,707,290.89

EASTERN CAPE

AG350812

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT

R 20,597,918.99

R 8,007,995.71

GAUTENG

AG350813

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT

R 8,232,740.65

R 3,261,654.73

NORTHERN CAPE

AG350817

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT

R 10,133,948.16

R 3,972,336.74

 

 

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT Total

R 38,964,607.80

R 15,241,987.18

 

 

Grand Total

R 415,707,969.64

R 156,867,470.18

(d) The following are the key deliverables as per the Service Level Agreement entered into between the individual Implementing Agent and the DCoG.

TASKS

TIMELINE

a) Implement the Community Work Programme at approved sites in accordance with the Norms and Standards, and SOPs of the programme

Throughout the contract period

b) Sustain and/or expand participation levels at existing sites in order to achieve the total work-day targets and participation rates.

Throughout the contract period to 31 March 2017

c) Establish/re-establish/strengthen CWP Local Reference Committees at all sites in accordance with the procedures for the establishment and Terms of Reference for these committees involving the provinces, municipalities and all stakeholders in the process

Throughout the contract period to 31 March 17

d) Support and ensure functionality of Local Reference Committees

Throughout the contract period

e) Interface with beneficiary communities, relevant municipalities and provincial departments responsible for Local Government

Throughout the contract period

f) Provide necessary technical support to the site to ensure standardized systems for registers, baseline forms, asset registers, task management and work organization management

Throughout the contract period

g) Ensure that all participants complete the baseline registration form and that daily registers are updated

From inception of the contract, on registration of new participants.

h) Provide a financial and narrative report on CWP site implementation progress to DCoG within 10 days of the end of every month. Such reporting shall be in accordance with the prescribed reporting framework; and should include a monthly schedule of work days, beneficiary data and all information required to comply with EPWP’s web based Management Information System

10th of every month

i) Provide the information required by the EPWP’s web-based Management Information System, including work days, training days, and beneficiary data such as age, sex and disability status input such data into the prescribed format and include with the report to DCoG

10th of every month

j) Provide cumulative quarterly narrative, financial and output reports including lessons learnt

Quarterly

K) Provide cumulative annual narrative , financial and output including lessons learnt

Annually

l) Develop annual Site Business Plans in collaboration with or following consultation with Local Reference Committees, communities, municipalities and provincial departments responsible for Local Government. This would include general Site Business Plans, Procurement Plans and Training plans. These are to be updated regularly and aligned to municipal Integrated Development Plans (IDPs).

Initially within 45 days of new contracts and thereafter by 31 March of every year for the following year. All plans are to be updated monthly

m) Maintain adequate Site Records for all CWP Sites, and ensure that these records are available for inspection by the DCoG, the provincial departments responsible for Local Government (this includes original receipts at IA HQ and certified copies of invoices at site level)

Throughout the contract period

n) Ensure compliance with the Ministerial Determination on conditions of Work in the Expanded Public Works Programme, as well as other statutory requirements, such as UIF and COIDwhere applicable

Throughout the contract period

o) Keep an inventory of all stock, equipment, tools and assets per site and ensure that inventory is available for inspection by DCoG, the provincial departments responsible for Local Government, other DCoG appointees or the office of the Auditor-General.

Inventory of all stock and assets updated on a monthly basis.

p) Ensure, through the Local Reference Committees, that Useful Work is undertaken and benefits the community

 

q) Conduct entry and exit interviews, while keeping updated records of why participants leave and what they engage in thereafter

 

(e) The number of job opportunities that (i) each of the Implementing Agent did create to date and (ii) is expected to create for the remainder of the duration of each agreement are tabled below per province.

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

There are four Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Chris Hani Emalahleni

Border Rural Committee

-

473

635

1,108

500

Engcobo

Border Rural Committee

1,074

1,161

1,122

3,357

1000

Great Kei

Border Rural Committee

329

563

607

1,499

500

Inkwanca

Border Rural Committee

1,056

1,167

1,142

3,365

1000

Intsika Yethu

Border Rural Committee

1,151

1,067

1,073

3,291

1000

Inxuba Yethemba

Border Rural Committee

-

490

526

1,016

500

Lukhanji

Border Rural Committee

1,108

1,139

1,090

3,337

1000

Sakhisizwe

Border Rural Committee

1,053

1,212

1,107

3,372

1000

Tsolwana

Border Rural Committee

1,055

1,100

1,013

3,168

1000

9

BRC Total

6,826

8,372

8,315

23,513

7500

Elundini

Dhladhla Foundation

1,156

1,108

1,087

3,351

1000

Gariep

Dhladhla Foundation

1,292

1,038

998

3,328

1000

Kouga

Dhladhla Foundation

-

96

353

449

500

Maletswayi

Dhladhla Foundation

-

142

486

628

500

Mbashe

Dhladhla Foundation

1,240

1,153

1,028

3,421

1000

Mnquma

Dhladhla Foundation

1,219

1,168

1,139

3,526

1000

Ndlambe

Dhladhla Foundation

449

430

463

1,342

500

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

Dhladhla Foundation

1,242

1,514

1,973

4,729

2500

Nkonkobe

Dhladhla Foundation

1,214

1,140

1,117

3,471

1000

Nxuba

Dhladhla Foundation

1,151

1,156

1,076

3,383

1000

Nyandeni

Dhladhla Foundation

1,103

1,222

1,172

3,497

1000

Peddie

Dhladhla Foundation

1,161

1,139

1,053

3,353

1000

Perfeville

Dhladhla Foundation

1,741

1,967

1,990

5,698

2000

Port St Johns

Dhladhla Foundation

1,204

1,214

1,119

3,537

1000

Senqu

Dhladhla Foundation

2,273

2,222

2,145

6,640

2000

15

Dhladhla Foundation Total

16,445

16,709

17,199

50,353

17000

Amahlathi

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

1,836

1,905

1,784

5,525

1600

Baviaans

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

-

-

430

430

500

Blue Crane Route

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

308

515

533

1,356

500

Camdeboo

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

1,195

1,007

1,165

3,367

1000

Ikwezi

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

981

929

903

2,813

1000

Koukamma

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

-

-

450

450

750

Makana

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

1,281

1,198

1,275

3,754

1000

Sunday Rivers

Siyakholwa Development Foundation

-

369

666

1,035

500

8

Siyakholwa Total

5,601

5,923

7,206

18,730

6850

Ksd: Mthatha

Thembalethu Development

1,634

1,858

1,705

5,197

1500

Lukhanyo / Mhlontlo

Thembalethu Development

1,717

1,942

1,837

5,496

1500

Matatiele

Thembalethu Development

2,100

2,329

2,122

6,551

2000

Mthamvuna

Thembalethu Development

1,787

1,608

1,511

4,906

1500

Mzimvubu

Thembalethu Development

2,145

2,292

2,181

6,618

2000

Nquza Hill

Thembalethu Development

1,626

1,917

1,846

5,389

1500

Ntabankulu

Thembalethu Development

1,073

1,136

1,046

3,255

1000

7

Thembalethu Development Total

12,082

13,082

12,248

37,412

11000

FREE STATE PROVINCE

There are four Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Mafube

Dhladhla Foundation

-

370

495

865

500

Mangaung

Dhladhla Foundation

1,857

2,029

1,895

5,781

2500

Metsimaholo

Dhladhla Foundation

1,000

1,060

969

3,029

1000

Moqhaka

Dhladhla Foundation

1,024

940

807

2,771

1000

Ngwathe

Dhladhla Foundation

2,089

1,948

1,999

6,036

2000

5

Dhladhla Foundation Total

5,970

6,347

6,165

18,482

7000

Dihlabeng

Lima Rural Development

-

350

473

823

500

Harrismith/ Maluti-a-Phofung

Lima Rural Development

2,832

2,963

2,703

8,498

2500

Nketoana

Lima Rural Development

-

333

442

775

500

Phumelela

Lima Rural Development

1,123

1,164

1,109

3,396

1000

Setsoto

Lima Rural Development

1,193

1,185

1,057

3,435

1000

5

Lima Rural Development Total

5,148

5,995

5,784

16,927

5500

Kopanong

Seboka Training & Support

 

 

 

 

500

Letsemeng

Seboka Training & Support

1,185

1,281

1,133

3,599

1000

Mantsopa

Seboka Training & Support

100

947

1,029

2,076

1000

Mohokare

Seboka Training & Support

1,306

1,211

1,035

3,552

1000

Wepener/Dewetsdorp

Seboka Training & Support

1,805

1,797

1,735

5,337

1600

5

Seboka Training & Support Total

4,396

5,236

4,932

14,564

5100

Masilonyana

Seriti Institute

-

239

321

560

500

Nala

Seriti Institute

995

995

951

2,941

1000

Tokologo

Seriti Institute

856

861

770

2,487

1000

Tswelopele

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

500

Welkom

Seriti Institute

3,343

3,283

3,067

9,693

3000

5

Seriti Institute Total

5,194

5,378

5,109

15,681

6000

GAUTENG PROVINCE

There are four Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

CoJ Region G

Dhladhla Foundation

1,160

1,282

1,115

3,557

1000

Munsieville

Dhladhla Foundation

2,798

2,934

2,926

8,658

2500

Randfontein

Dhladhla Foundation

2,304

2,411

2,273

6,988

2000

Westonaria

Dhladhla Foundation

2,683

2,627

2,324

7,634

2000

4

Dhladhla Foundation Total

8,945

9,254

8,638

26,837

7500

City of JHB Region E

Insika Foundation

1,363

1,230

1,109

3,702

1000

Merafong

Insika Foundation

2,513

2,358

2,170

7,041

2000

2

Insika Foundation Total

3,876

3,588

3,279

10,743

3000

City of JHB Region A

Seriti Institute

1,609

1,237

1,056

3,902

1000

City of JHB Region C

Seriti Institute

1,155

1,066

1,006

3,227

1000

EKURHULENI

Seriti Institute

-

-

1,019

1,019

1000

Tshwane Metro

Seriti Institute

1,743

1,670

1,663

5,076

2000

4

Seriti Institute Total

4,507

3,973

4,744

13,224

5000

CoJ REGION F

Thembalethu Development

1,192

1,391

1,056

3,639

1000

eMfuleni

Thembalethu Development

879

1,108

948

2,935

1000

Lesedi

Thembalethu Development

1,098

1,201

1,202

3,501

1000

Midvaal

Thembalethu Development

797

1,031

1,027

2,855

1000

4

Thembalethu Development Total

3,966

4,731

4,233

12,930

4000

KWAZULU NATAL PROVINCE

There are three Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Ezingoleni

Dhladhla Foundation

1,052

1,211

1,147

3,410

1000

Greater Kokstad

Dhladhla Foundation

-

389

492

881

500

Hibiscus Coast

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

Ingwe

Dhladhla Foundation

1,143

1,183

1,120

3,446

1000

Kwa Sani

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

100

Msunduzi

Dhladhla Foundation

1,088

1,080

980

3,148

1000

Okhahlamba

Dhladhla Foundation

1,109

1,139

1,102

3,350

1000

Richmond

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

Ubuhlebezwe

Dhladhla Foundation

1,043

1,046

1,067

3,156

1000

Umdoni

Dhladhla Foundation

-

326

548

874

500

Umuziwabantu

Dhladhla Foundation

1,116

1,209

1,116

3,441

1000

Umzimkhulu

Dhladhla Foundation

1,149

1,144

1,098

3,391

1000

Umzumbe

Dhladhla Foundation

1,591

1,617

1,581

4,789

1500

Vulamehlo

Dhladhla Foundation

1,095

1,158

1,085

3,338

1000

14

Dhladhla Foundation Total

10,386

11,502

11,336

33,224

11500

City of Umhlathuze

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

Dannhauser

Insika Foundation

955

1,046

1,021

3,022

1000

eDumbe

Insika Foundation

1,134

1,079

1,101

3,314

1000

eShowe

Insika Foundation

1,184

1,160

1,060

3,404

1000

Ethekwini

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

1000

Impendle

Insika Foundation

1,089

1,130

1,053

3,272

1000

Indaka

Insika Foundation

1,214

1,155

1,116

3,485

1000

Kwadukuza

Insika Foundation

-

284

549

833

500

Ladysmith/Emnambithi

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

Mandeni

Insika Foundation

442

551

493

1,486

1000

Maphumulo

Insika Foundation

1,014

1,053

1,080

3,147

1000

Mfolozi

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

Mkhambathini

Insika Foundation

1,072

1,100

1,074

3,246

1000

Mthonjaneni

Insika Foundation

404

638

570

1,612

500

Ndwedwe

Insika Foundation

1,207

1,115

1,060

3,382

1000

Newcastle

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

Nkandla

Insika Foundation

1,094

1,219

1,126

3,439

1100

Nongoma

Insika Foundation

1,130

1,070

1,116

3,316

1000

Ntambanana

Insika Foundation

1,115

1,132

1,084

3,331

1000

Ulundi

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

uMshwathi

Insika Foundation

 

 

 

 

450

uPhongolo

Insika Foundation

934

1,011

1,065

3,010

1000

22

Insika Foundation Total

13,988

14,743

14,568

43,299

17850

Abaqulusi

Seriti Institute

1,068

1,064

1,031

3,163

1000

Big Five False Bay

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

225

eMadlangeni

Seriti Institute

1,344

1,255

1,151

3,750

1000

Endumeni

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

450

Hlabisa

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

225

Imbabazane

Seriti Institute

-

-

233

233

500

Jozini

Seriti Institute

1,101

1,100

1,065

3,266

1000

Mpofana

Seriti Institute

-

-

323

323

500

Msinga

Seriti Institute

1,594

1,621

1,561

4,776

1500

Mtshezi

Seriti Institute

1,140

1,107

1,027

3,274

1000

Mtubatuba

Seriti Institute

1,201

1,164

1,110

3,475

1000

Nquthu

Seriti Institute

1,242

1,112

1,068

3,422

1000

Umhlabuyalingana

Seriti Institute

1,598

1,716

1,732

5,046

1600

uMngeni

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

450

Umvoti

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

500

15

Seriti Institute Total

10,288

10,139

10,301

30,728

11950

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

There are two Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Ba-Phalaborwa

Dhladhla Foundation

1,108

1,072

1,106

3,286

1000

Bela Bela

Dhladhla Foundation

1,010

1,155

1,171

3,336

1000

Greater Giyani

Dhladhla Foundation

1,955

1,720

1,681

5,356

1700

Greater Letaba

Dhladhla Foundation

442

1,077

1,071

2,590

1100

Greater Tzaneen

Dhladhla Foundation

1,893

2,239

2,237

6,369

2100

Lephalale

Dhladhla Foundation

-

-

308

308

500

Makhado

Dhladhla Foundation

1,153

1,117

1,269

3,539

1200

Maruleng

Dhladhla Foundation

1,109

1,106

1,056

3,271

1100

Modimolle

Dhladhla Foundation

-

355

559

914

500

Mogalakwena

Dhladhla Foundation

1,096

1,398

1,308

3,802

1300

Mokgoophong

Dhladhla Foundation

-

389

525

914

500

Musina

Dhladhla Foundation

399

1,083

1,270

2,752

1000

Mutale

Dhladhla Foundation

1,181

1,104

1,147

3,432

1100

Thabazimbi

Dhladhla Foundation

-

155

245

400

500

Thulamela

Dhladhla Foundation

1,349

1,221

1,139

3,709

1000

15

Dhladhla Foundation Total

12,695

15,191

16,092

43,978

15600

Aganang

Seriti Institute

1,135

1,105

1,014

3,254

1000

Blouberg

Seriti Institute

1,226

1,100

1,192

3,518

1000

Elias Motsoaled

Seriti Institute

357

619

1,138

2,114

1100

Ephraim Mogale

Seriti Institute

1,147

1,165

1,127

3,439

1000

Fetakgomo

Seriti Institute

1,142

1,095

1,036

3,273

1200

Greater Tubatse

Seriti Institute

1,878

1,712

1,564

5,154

1500

Lepelle Nkumpi

Seriti Institute

1,204

1,101

1,126

3,431

1150

Makhuduthamaga

Seriti Institute

1,057

1,159

1,319

3,535

1200

Molemole

Seriti Institute

893

1,032

1,191

3,116

1000

Polokwane

Seriti Institute

354

623

1,068

2,045

1500

10

Seriti Institute Total

10,393

10,711

11,775

32,879

11650

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

There are three Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Albert Luthuli - Nhlazatshe

Dhladhla Foundation

1,096

1,184

1,132

3,412

1000

Albert Luthuli - Tjakastad

Dhladhla Foundation

1,637

1,743

1,673

5,053

1800

Dipaleseng

Dhladhla Foundation

224

1,133

1,119

2,476

1000

Govan Mbeki

Dhladhla Foundation

1,257

1,228

1,207

3,692

1000

Lekwa

Dhladhla Foundation

314

1,188

1,125

2,627

1000

Mkhondo

Dhladhla Foundation

1,642

1,774

1,733

5,149

1500

Msukaligwa

Dhladhla Foundation

1,152

1,210

1,210

3,572

1000

Pixley Ka Seme

Dhladhla Foundation

1,107

1,190

1,097

3,394

1000

Victor Khanye

Dhladhla Foundation

217

1,030

1,131

2,378

1000

9

Dhladhla Foundation Total

8,646

11,680

11,427

31,753

10300

Dr JS Moroka

Seboka Training & Support

1,293

1,198

1,097

3,588

1400

Emalahleni

Seboka Training & Support

1,189

1,338

1,133

3,660

1000

Steve Tshwete

Seboka Training & Support

1,284

1,254

1,047

3,585

1000

Thembisile Hani

Seboka Training & Support

1,051

1,229

1,226

3,506

1200

4

Seboka Training & Support Total

4,817

5,019

4,503

14,339

4600

Bushbuckridge

Seriti Institute

2,674

2,858

2,696

8,228

2900

eMakhazeni

Seriti Institute

275

540

712

1,527

1000

Mbombela

Seriti Institute

1,368

1,826

1,642

4,836

1500

Nkomazi

Seriti Institute

1,541

1,683

1,578

4,802

1900

Thabachweu

Seriti Institute

1,246

1,218

1,031

3,495

1100

Umjindi

Seriti Institute

269

729

959

1,957

1000

6

Seriti Institute Total

7,373

8,854

8,618

24,845

9400

NORTHERN CAPE

There are three Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Emthanjeni

Dhladhla Foundation

-

1,069

1,155

2,224

1000

Kareeberg

Dhladhla Foundation

1,302

784

981

3,067

1000

Karoo Hoogland

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Renosterberg

Dhladhla Foundation

966

1,060

1,100

3,126

1000

Thembelihle

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Ubuntu

Dhladhla Foundation

1,486

1,122

1,072

3,680

1000

Umsobomvu

Dhladhla Foundation

-

231

444

675

500

7

Dhladhla Foundation Total

3,754

4,266

4,752

12,772

5500

Dikgatlong

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

1,366

1,189

1,108

3,663

1000

Ga-segonyana

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

 

 

 

 

500

Hantaam

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

 

 

 

 

500

Joe Morolong

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

1,574

1,721

1,687

4,982

1500

Khara Hais

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

 

 

 

 

500

Kheis

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

 

 

 

 

500

Magareng

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

1,471

1,246

1,035

3,752

1000

Nama Khoi

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

 

 

 

 

500

Phokwane

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

-

818

949

1,767

1000

Sol Plaatje

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

14

1,225

966

2,205

1000

Tsantsabane

Thabiso NGO /3L Development

 

 

 

 

500

11

Thabiso NGO /3L Development Total

4,425

6,199

5,745

16,369

8500

Gamagara

Thembalethu Development

659

723

979

2,361

1000

Kammiesberg

Thembalethu Development

 

 

 

 

500

Kgatelopele

Thembalethu Development

1,129

1,323

1,191

3,643

1000

Khaima

Thembalethu Development

1,252

1,199

1,299

3,750

1000

Mier

Thembalethu Development

240

302

271

813

500

Richtersveld

Thembalethu Development

1,002

905

787

2,694

1000

Riemvasmaak /Ka! Gariep

Thembalethu Development

1,254

1,360

1,315

3,929

1000

Siyancuma

Thembalethu Development

-

319

329

648

500

Siyathemba

Thembalethu Development

 

 

 

 

500

9

Thembalethu Development Total

5,536

6,131

6,171

17,838

7000

NORTH WEST PROVINCE

There are two Implementing Agents facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provided to date

Target for 2016/17

Ditsobotla

Dhladhla Foundation

-

808

997

1,805

1000

GREATER TAUNG

Dhladhla Foundation

1,647

1,730

1,596

4,973

2000

Kagisano Molopo

Dhladhla Foundation

1,035

1,179

1,051

3,265

1000

Lekwa-Teemane

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Mafikeng

Dhladhla Foundation

1,688

1,686

1,555

4,929

1500

Mamusa

Dhladhla Foundation

502

1,095

1,217

2,814

1000

Naledi FS

Dhladhla Foundation

1,098

961

1,216

3,275

1000

Ramotshere Moiloa

Dhladhla Foundation

1,099

1,018

1,087

3,204

1000

Ratlou

Dhladhla Foundation

1,008

1,175

1,009

3,192

1000

Tswaing

Dhladhla Foundation

1,220

1,151

1,158

3,529

1000

10

Dhladhla Foundation Total

9,297

10,803

10,886

30,986

11000

Kgetlengrivier

Seriti Institute

598

658

1,163

2,419

1000

Madibeng

Seriti Institute

1,196

1,244

1,316

3,756

1000

Maquassi Hills

Seriti Institute

1,161

1,322

1,278

3,761

1000

Matlosana

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

500

Moretele

Seriti Institute

1,294

1,234

1,248

3,776

1000

Moses Kotane

Seriti Institute

1,112

1,267

1,113

3,492

1100

Rustenberg

Seriti Institute

2,579

2,592

2,289

7,460

2000

Tlokwe

Seriti Institute

 

 

 

 

500

Ventersdorp

Seriti Institute

1,309

1,285

1,139

3,733

1000

9

Seriti Institute Total

9,249

9,602

9,546

28,397

9100

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

There are one Implementing Agent facilitating the implementation of the programme, the table below provides the detailed breakdown of the work opportunities provided per site (Municipality) over a period of three years.

Municipality/Site Name

Implementing Agent

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Total provide to date

Target for 2016/17

Beaufort West

Dhladhla Foundation

668

1,105

1,238

3,011

1000

Bitou

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Breede Valley

Dhladhla Foundation

1,145

1,244

1,150

3,539

1000

Cape Agulhas

Dhladhla Foundation

-

18

214

232

500

Cape Town

Dhladhla Foundation

1,232

1,131

1,100

3,463

1100

Cederberg

Dhladhla Foundation

535

606

547

1,688

700

Drakenstein

Dhladhla Foundation

564

449

538

1,551

500

George

Dhladhla Foundation

-

-

228

228

500

Hessequa

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Kannaland

Dhladhla Foundation

690

726

889

2,305

1000

Khayelitsha

Dhladhla Foundation

978

1,159

961

3,098

1000

Knysna

Dhladhla Foundation

-

-

465

465

500

Laingsburg

Dhladhla Foundation

304

236

249

789

500

Langeberg

Dhladhla Foundation

261

252

327

840

500

Mosselbay

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Nyanga/Guguletu

Dhladhla Foundation

870

1,060

1,042

2,972

1000

Oudtshoorn

Dhladhla Foundation

540

682

816

2,038

700

Overstrand

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Prince Albert

Dhladhla Foundation

440

386

399

1,225

500

Saldanha

Dhladhla Foundation

208

390

531

1,129

500

Stellenbosch

Dhladhla Foundation

 

 

 

 

500

Swellendam

Dhladhla Foundation

350

380

301

1,031

500

Theewaterskloof

Dhladhla Foundation

1,067

1,298

1,031

3,396

1000

Witzenberg

Dhladhla Foundation

533

510

614

1,657

500

24

Dhladhla Foundation Total

10,385

11,632

12,640

34,657

16000

(f) The contracts will be expiring on 31 March 2017.

14 November 2016 - NW2232

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) of the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality is implicated in any criminal proceedings; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the municipality:

The municipality is not aware of any criminal proceedings in which the incumbent concerned is implicated.

14 November 2016 - NW2233

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether ward committees are dissolved by his department or the local municipal council on a local government election day; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) Whether all ward committees were dissolved in all municipalities on 3 August 2016; if not, in each case, (a) why not and (b) what are the names of the municipalities where ward committees were not dissolved, (3) Whether any costs were incurred for any ward committees that were not dissolved on 3 August 2016 after the local government elections; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW2563E

Reply:

1)  Ward committees are dissolved by local municipal councils in line with the Local Government Municipal Regulations for the Term of Office of Ward Committee Members (2009). The Regulations seek to regulate the implementation of section 75 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, no.117 of 1998, which provides for the alignment of the term of office of ward committees to that of municipal council (5 years).

(2)(a)In line with section 75 of the Municipal Structures Act all ward committees across provinces and municipalities were dissolved and ceased to exist from 3 August 2016 with the exception of two local municipalities in the province of Kwazulu Natal.

Ward Committees in the two municipalities were allowed to serve beyond the approved term of office to ensure and allow for smooth transition and provide hand over reports to new councils and were only dissolved at the end of September 2016.

The following are the municipalities where ward committee served beyond the approved term of office:

  1. Ingwe Local Municipality, and
  2. Emadlangeni Local Municipality

(3) The following table reflects details of costs incurred per municipality:

Municipality

Number of wards

Cost incurred

Ingwe

11

90 000

Emadlangeni

04

58400

 

14 November 2016 - NW2365

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How many boreholes did each municipality (i) drill, (ii) repair and/or (iii) upgrade since 1 October 2015, (b) what is the exact GPS location of each of the specified boreholes, (c) what were the costs of (i) drilling per meter and/or (ii) refurbishment in each case and (d) was water found at each of the boreholes?

Reply:

The information requested by the Hon Member is not readily available within the department. However, the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA), is busy collating the information and will submit as soon as it’s complete.

31 October 2016 - NW2151

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any tenders have been awarded by the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality for fleet maintenance since 1 July 2016; if so, (a) when was each such tender awarded, (b) what were the (i) names and (ii) amounts tendered by each successful bidder, (c) what criteria were used to award the specified tenders, (d) how many bidders were considered for each of the specified tenders and (e) on what basis was each successful bidder awarded the specified tenders?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the municipality:

Question

Responses

 

Whether any tenders have been awarded by the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality for fleet maintenance since 1 July 2016;

No tender for fleet maintenance has been awarded by the municipality since 01 July 2016.

(a) when was each tender awarded

Not applicable

(b) what were the (i) names and (ii) amounts tendered by each successful bidder

Not applicable

(c) what criteria were used to award the specified tenders,

Not applicable

(d) how many bidders were considered for each of the specified tenders

Not applicable

(e) On what basis was each successful bidder awarded the specified tenders?

Not applicable

06 October 2016 - NW2015

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Atkinson, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What formal qualifications does each of his department’s (a)(i) Chief Financial Officers and/or (ii) acting Chief Financial Officers and (b)(i) Directors-General and/or (ii) acting Directors-General possess?

Reply:

Department of Cooperative Governance

(a)(i) National Diploma: Government Finance

National Diploma: Cost and Management Accounting

B Tech: Business Administration

M Tech: Business Administration

(b)(i) Post currently vacant, with acting appointment

(b)(ii) Bachelor of Arts in Education

Honours Bachelor of Arts

Master of Public Administration

Department of Traditional Affairs

(a)(i) National Diploma: Commercial Practice

(b)(i) Bachelor of Arts

BA Honours in English

Master of Arts in English

D LITT in English

23 September 2016 - NW1739

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Has there been any investigation into (a) Sam Shabalala Manager at the Emfuleni Local Municipality and (b) the financial affairs of the specified municipality; if so, what is the (i) nature and (ii) current status of each investigation conducted; (2) whether any disciplinary or criminal charges have been preferred against any individuals as a result of the investigation?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the province:

1. (a) There has been no investigation instituted against the former Municipal Manager of Emfuleni Local Municipality, Mr Sam Shabalala. Mr Shabalala voluntarily resigned from the municipality.

   (b) No investigation has been conducted with regard to the financial affairs of the Emfuleni Local Municipality.

2. There has been no disciplinary or criminal charges laid against any individual in relation to the investigation.

23 September 2016 - NW1741

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he will table legislation to move the Matatiele Local Municipality from the Eastern Cape back to KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

No.

Section 103 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (“the Constitution”), read with Schedule 1A, provides for the boundaries of the Provinces.

The movement of the Matatiele Local Municipality from the Eastern Cape Province to the KwaZulu-Natal Province, or the movement of any municipality from one province to another, therefore requires an amendment to the Constitution.

As the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services is the custodian of the Constitution, it is that Minister who will table legislation in this regard, should such a decision be taken to move the Matatiele Local Municipality to the KwaZulu-Natal Province.

12 September 2016 - NW1681

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether his department recognises the Ndebele amaNzunza as a (a) tribe and/or (b) nation; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) Whether his department recognises that there is a difference between the Ndebele Manala and amaNzunza cultural groups; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Why is the Ndebele amaNzunza not recognised as a kingdom by the Government?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the government recognised the Ndebele amaNzunza as a kingship community (traditional community) and not a nation. The Department acknowledge the people of South Africa as a Nation composed of different communities including amaNzunza. AmaNzunza have their recognised senior traditional leaders who are under their king. AmaNzunza as a community separate from any other community were in existence for over five hundred years and have been recognised as such.
  2. Yes, the government does recognise that there are differences between amaNzunza and amaNala. The two are not cultural groups but communities, any cultural groups from each will depict the community thus there will be a difference. The Honourable Member is requested to note that each community has its own king and follows their own customs and customary laws and their traditions differ like initiation schools differ in terms of regiments naming and the number of regiments, lobola cattle etc.
  3. The Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act, 2003 (Act No. 41 of 2003) does not make provisions for the recognition of kingdoms in the Republic of South Africa. The Act makes provision for the recognition of kingships and kings of which amaNzunza have been recognised as such.

12 September 2016 - NW1679

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any sanctions will be imposed against a Councillor MO Sikosana from the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality in Mpumalanga after an audit finding revealed that the specified person had an interest in one of the specified municipality’s suppliers Balondiwe Construction Projects; if not, (a) why not and (b) what is the current status of any disciplinary processes against the specified person; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information is sourced by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the Mpumalanga Province.

1. No sanction will be imposed on Councillor MO Sikosana.

   (a) The reason is that the Councillor MO Sikosana had declared the interest in writing to the Municipal Manager as required by the Code of Conduct being an active member of the company.

   (b) None.

 

12 September 2016 - NW1738

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) Has he convened and/or attended any Minister and Members of Executive Council meetings since taking office; if not, why not; if so, what was the (i) date and (ii) venue of each meeting?

Reply:

Yes, the Minister has convened and presided over the following meetings of the Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Minister and Members of Executive Council (MINMEC). The meetings were held as follows:

(i) Dates

(ii) Venues

19 February 2016

Offices of the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, 87 Hamilton Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, Boardroom S-37

01 April 2016

Offices of the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, 87 Hamilton Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, Boardroom S-37

13 May 2016

Offices of the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, 87 Hamilton Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, Boardroom S-37

02 September 2016

Offices of the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, 87 Hamilton Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, Boardroom S-37

12 September 2016 - NW1680

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality in Mpumalanga is supplying water to the Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality in Limpopo; if so, how many litres of water does Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality supply to Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality; (2) whether the Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality pays for any water it receives from the Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, how much did the Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality pay to the Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality for water received (a) in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14, (iii) 2014-15 and (iv) 2015-16 municipal financial years and (b) since 1 July 2016 to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality was contacted to provide a response to the question.

The response from Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality to the above-mentioned questions is as follows:

  1. No, water in Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality is supplied by the Sekhukhune District Municipality.
  2. No, please refer to the above.

30 August 2016 - NW576

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2483 on 28 July 2015; he has received the outstanding information from the provinces; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

REFERENCE

Mr K J Mileham (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(1) In each (a) metropolitan, (b) local and (c) district municipality, what is the total amount currently owed for rates and service charges by municipal councillors and/or traditional leaders serving on municipal councils which is over 90 days;

(2) in respect of each case, (a) who is the councillor or traditional leader involved, (b) what is the amount owed and (c) has a repayment agreement been reached with the councillor and/or traditional leader; if so, when will the amount be repaid in full;

(3) whether any action has been taken against such councillors and/or traditional leaders in terms of section 13 and 14 of the Code of Conduct for Municipal Councillors; if not, why not; if so, (a) who is the councillor and/or traditional leader involved and (b) what action has been taken;

(4) whether his department will take any action against the (a) municipality, (b) speaker of the municipal council and (c) municipal council in cases where no action has been taken in this regard? NW2852E

RESPONSE

(1), (2) and (3):

On receipt of the question from the Honourable Member, the Department of Cooperative Governance (“the Department”) requested all provincial departments responsible for Local Government to obtain the required information from the municipalities within their area of jurisdiction, and to submit same to the Department.

The total amount currently owed from (a) metropolitan, (b) local and (c) district municipality municipalities for rates and service charges by municipal councillors and/or traditional leaders serving on municipal councils which is over 90 days is R 10 255 152, 78.

In respect of questions 1, 2 and 3, the responses attached as an Annexure were received from provinces and municipalities, respectively.

The report shows that some councilors and traditional leaders have entered into payment agreements with their respective municipalities including radical actions such as accounts being handed over for collection or disconnection of services. However, we have also noted that no actions have been taken against some of the defaulting councilors and traditional leaders.

In summary the following status prevails:

PROVINCE

NO. OF MUNICIPALITIES

NO. OF MUNICIPALITIES SUBMITTED

NO. OF MUNICIPALITIES

OUTSTANDING

NO. OF CLLRS. AND OR AND/OR TRADITIONAL LEADERS OWING

KWAZULU-NATAL

61

26

35

28

EASTERN CAPE

45

23

22

35

WESTERN CAPE

30

29

1

32

NORTHERN CAPE

32

13

19

53

NORTH WEST

23

15

8

90

FREE STATE

24

10

14

78

MPUMALANGA

21

18

3

31

GAUTENG

12

12

0

35

LIMPOPO

30

15

15

28

TOTALS

278

161

117

410

The breakdown in terms of debts owed by Councillors and Traditional Leaders, per province, is as follows:

PROVINCE

DEBT OWED FOR RATES AND SERVICE CHARGES BY MUNICIPAL COUNCILLORS AND/OR TRADITIONAL LEADERS

KWAZULU-NATAL

R 199 621, 13

EASTERN CAPE

R 54 551, 13

WESTERN CAPE

R 130 346, 80

NORTHERN CAPE

R 595 552, 00

NORTH WEST

R 7 391 942, 72

FREE STATE

R 673 812, 79

MPUMALANGA

R 913 587, 08

GAUTENG

R 168 358, 87

LIMPOPO

R 127 379, 76

TOTALS

R 10 255 152, 78

4(a), (b) and (c):

It must be noted that in terms of Item 12A of the Code of Conduct for Councillors (“the Code”), a councillor may not be in arrears to the municipality for rates and service charges for a period longer than 3 months.

Item 14 Of the Code provides for breaches of the Code, and requires that a municipal council investigate and make a finding on any alleged breach of the Code, or appoint a special committee to do this.

If the council or a special committee finds that a councillor has breached a provision of the Code, the council may -

    (a) issue a formal warning to the councillor;

    (b) reprimand the councillor;

   (c) request the MEC for local government in the province to suspend the councillor for a period;

   (d) fine the councillor; and

   (e) request the MEC to remove the councillor from office.

If the council does not investigate a breach of the Code, the MEC for local government may appoint a person or a committee to investigate any alleged breach of a provision of this Code and to make a recommendation as to the appropriate sanction mentioned above.

Item 15 of the Code provides for the application of the Code, in the same way they apply to councillors, to traditional leaders who participates or has participated in the proceedings of a municipal council in terms of section 81 of the Municipal Structures Act.

However, If a municipal council or a special committee in terms of item 14 (1) finds that a traditional leader has breached a provision of the Code, the council may issue a formal warning to the traditional leader; or request the MEC for local government in the province to suspend or cancel the traditional leader's right to participate in the proceedings of the council.

Additionally, the MEC for local government may appoint a person or a committee to investigate any alleged breach of a provision of this Code and to make a recommendation on whether the right of the traditional leader to participate in the proceedings of the municipal council should be suspended or cancelled.

If the MEC is of the opinion that the traditional leader has breached a provision of this Code, and that such breach warrants a suspension or cancellation of the traditional leader's right to participate in the council's proceedings, the MEC may suspend that right for a period and on conditions determined by the MEC; or cancel that right.

The above provisions in the Code clearly place the responsibility on municipal councils, in consultation with the MEC for local government in the province, to take action against councillors and/or traditional leaders who are in default for paying for rates and service charges.

On 27 July 2016, the Department issued Circular 29 of 2016 to all Heads of Department of Local Government, and to all Municipal Managers. Item 3.2 (ii) of the Circular recommended to municipal managers to fulfil their responsibilities in terms of section 32 of Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003 ("MFMA") to ensure that those councillors who owe the municipality money to make arrangements to recover those monies owed by non-returning councillors, if possible and by agreement, from the last salary amounts payable to such councillors.

16 August 2016 - NW569

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) For each of the metropolitan municipalities, (a) how many officials are currently on suspension and (b) for each suspended official, (i) what is the position of the specified official, (ii) what is the reason for the suspension, (iii) for how long has each specified official been suspended and (iv) what has been their total remuneration during the period of suspension; (2) Whether any severance packages were paid to any municipal officials; if so, for each specified official, (a) who was the official, (b) why was the severance package paid, (c) for how long was the specified official employed by each of the specified municipalities and (d) what was the total amount of the severance package? NW4964E

Reply:

Attached reply for Metroplitan find here: Reply

11 July 2016 - NW550

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 3110 on 8 September 2015, the information requested from the provinces has been received by his department; if not, why not; if so, by when will the information be communicated? “3110:Whether all municipal managers implemented section 81 of the National Credit Act, Act 34 of 2005, regarding loan deductions from salaries of municipal employees; if not, which municipalities did not comply?”

Reply:

1. In terms of section 81 of the National Credit Act, 2005 (Act 34 of 2005) when applying for a credit agreement, and while that application is being considered by the credit provider, the prospective consumer must fully and truthfully answer any requests for information made by the credit provider as part of the assessment required by this section.

A credit provider must not enter into credit agreement without first taking reasonable steps to assess:

  (a) the proposed consumer’s –

      (i) general understanding and appreciation of the risks and costs of the proposed credit, and of the rights and obligations of a consumer under a credit agreement;

      (ii) debt re-payment history as a consumer under credit agreements;

       (iii) existing financial means, prospects and obligations; and

 (b) whether there is reasonable basis to conclude that any commercial purpose may prove to be successful, if the consumer has such a purpose for applying for that credit agreement.

Based on the above information, credit agreement can be entered between the consumer and credit provider and therefore municipal managers do not have a role to play on the loan agreement entered into by municipal officials.

11 July 2016 - NW597

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How many petitions (a) in total and (b) for each city council in each petition committee of all the local authorities in Gauteng have been (i) presented and (ii) resolved since the start of the present municipal term in 2011?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Provincial Department:

Gauteng province is comprised of 12 municipalities which include: 3 Metropolitan, 2 District and 7 Local.

Total number of petitions received and resolved for each city council in each petition committee of the 3 Metropolitan and 7 local authorities since the start of the present term of councils in 2011 is illustrated in the table below:

Name of Municipality

Number of petitions received

Number of petitions resolved

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

1364

344

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

557

553

City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

963

862

Enfuleni Local Municipality

331

96

Lesedi Local Municipality

7

6

Merafong Local Municipality

17

14

Midvaal Local Municipality

135

131

Mogale City Local Municipality

143

140

Randfontein Local Municipality

76

69

Westonaria Local Municipality

17

16

TOTAL

3610

2231

 

11 July 2016 - NW1254

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 3198 on 22 September 2015, has he received the requested information yet; if not, why not; if so, by when will the specified information be communicated? “3198: Whether, with reference to the appointment of Mr Simphiwe Duma who was found guilty by a forensic audit of nepotism, intimidation of external auditors and irregular investment and procurement transactions at the Technology Innovation Agency, he will take steps to ensure the City Manager terminates the specified person’s contract; if not, why not?”

Reply:

According to the information received from the Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality, the municipal council did not approve the appointment of Mr Simphiwe Duma. Therefore, there are no steps to be taken by the Minister.

08 July 2016 - NW793

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(1) (a) Which Tshwane Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) stations currently serve Wards (i) 9 (ii) 12 (iii) 19 (iv) 20 (v) 21 (vi) 22 in the City of Tshwane and (b) how many (i) officers and (ii) operational vehicles are at each of the specified stations; (2) Whether there are any plans to establish a TMPD station to serve the community of Winderveldt in the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The TMPD has one (1) Regional Office in Region 1. Region 1 is divided into two (2) sub-regions namely Region 1 Sector 1 and Region 1 Sector 2. The abovementioned wards are serviced by Region 1 Sector 1.

(b) Region 1 Sector 1 (the wards as depicted above) is serviced by:

(i) 123 Metro Police Officers

(ii} 16 Metro Police Vehicles

• 6 Operational

• 10 Non-operational (in for service/repairs)

(2) Currently Region 1 consists of one (1) TMPD regiona l office (station). Region 1 Sector 1 is situated in Unit U, Mabopane. This station services Mabopane, Winterveld and parts of Soshanguve.

Region 1 Sector 1 was fully established during the 2012/13 financial year. The community of Mabopane was also consulted before the establishment of the said Metro Police Regional Office. Currently, no official plans exist for future expansion of Metro Police Offices within the Region 1 Sector 1. However, the Department has plans for the establishment of a fully-fledged Metro Police Regional Office within Region 1 Sector 2 (Garankuwa, Pretoria North, Akasia and Rosslyn areas} .

08 July 2016 - NW1590

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Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) (a) What is the budgeted total cost of the complete construction of the Nelson Mandela Capture Site Exhibition Centre in Howick in the uMngeni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, (b) what are the total costs incurred to date and (c) how will the costs required to complete the specified project be funded; (2) what is the total square meterage of buildings at the specified project?

Reply:

The information below has been supplied by uMngeni Local Municipality:

(1) (a) R 54 281 400.00
(b) R 45,350,886.20 (inclusive of VAT).
(c) Funding is being sourced from all sectors including private sector through the Corporate Social Investment. LOTIO is also being mobilised to assist. So far, nothing has been forthcoming so we need to intensify and be more aggressive in marketing the facility

(2) The total square meterage of the buildings is 1601 square metres (m2

06 July 2016 - NW1387

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why • not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG)- and Department of Traditional Affairs (OTA

The Department of Co-operative Governance and Department of Traditional Affairs do not have any developmental budgeted programmes on small businesses and co-operatives. However, DCoG and National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL) do work together with the Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries in areas of interest within the municipal space.

DCoG approach towards the development of co-operatives focuses on capacitating municipalities, facilitating and coordinating support by national sector departments. Through a partnership with the German Co-operative Raiffeisen Confederation (DGRV), DCoG provides municipalities with training skills for implementing co-operative programmes. LED officials from 188 municipalities were trained on Cooperatives Establishment and Management, between 2012/2013 to 2015/2016 financial years. The training covered KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Eastern Cape, Northern Cape, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, and North West Provinces.

DCoG and NHTL do not have the number of jobs created through these development programmes. The database on the number of jobs created is administered the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries and the Department of Trade and Industry.

(b) Associated Institutions of CoGTA: South African Local Government Association (SALGA), South African Cities Netwrok (SACN), Municipal Demarcation Board (MOB), Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL) Rights Commission and National House of Traditional Leaders.

The associated institutions of CoGTA namely SALGA, SACN, MOB and CRL are not running formal developmental programmes for small businesses and cooperatives for the 2016/17 becuase it falls outside their mandate. However, NHTL strategic objective is the development and promotion of socio-economic development programmes for traditional communities. Therefore. members of the House must participate in programs relating to the improvement of food security and revival of cooperatives in rural communities. Thus, in promoting those socio-economic programmes, traditional leaders have been allocating land for development projects, small scale farming in order to assist SMMEs and Cooperatives. for example, the NHTL has played a very instrumental role in engaging the Bakwena Ba Mogopa Traditional Council to allocate land to the community and cooperatives for agricultural projects and also ensuring that the local mines assists the agricultural cooperatives with seedlings and gardening equipment.

05 July 2016 - NW1338

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What (a) was the reason for the swopping of the Municipal Managers of the (i) Govan Mbeki and (ii) Msukaligwa Local Municipalities in Mpumalanga in March 2016 and (b) process was followed to effect the swop at each specified municipality; (2) was the specified swop (a) tabled in the council of each specified municipalities and (b) approved by each council; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what are the (i) dates and (ii) further relevant details; (3) on what statutory ground(s) was the swop done?

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore submit to the Honourable Member as soon as the information becomes available.

05 July 2016 - NW1277

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What steps has been taken by the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape in resolving the recent water crisis; (2) why did the specified municipality fail to (a) adequately communicate the extent of the water problem to residents, businesses and civic organisations and (b) call for them to use water sparingly; (3) why did the specified municipality fail to (a) take steps to inform the ward councillors of the extent of the water crisis and (b) keep the specified councillors up to date with progress made in restoring the water supply?

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore submit to the Honourable Member as soon as the information becomes available.

05 July 2016 - NW1276

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to the recent water crisis in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape, any scheduled, planned and/or required maintenance on (a) the Umzonyana water treatment plant, (b) the specified plant’s intake pipes and (c) source reservoirs was carried out in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14, (iii) 2014-15 and (iv) 2015-16 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case in each specified financial year; (2) whether the specified municipality has considered replacing the unreliable siphon system currently in place at the specified plant with a gravity feed system; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the proposals; (3) whether any progress has been made with the implementation of the specified proposals; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified progress made to date; (4) whether any reservoirs were allowed to run dry before anyone realised that there was a problem at the specified plant; if so, (a) why and (b) how did this occur?

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore submit to the Honourable Member as soon as the information becomes available.

05 July 2016 - NW1590

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) (a) What is the budgeted total cost of the complete construction of the Nelson Mandela Capture Site Exhibition Centre in Howick in the uMngeni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, (b) what are the total costs incurred to date and (c) how will the costs required to complete the specified project be funded; (2) what is the total square meterage of buildings at the specified project?NW1760E

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the uMngeni Local Municipality to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore submit to the Honourable Member as soon as the information becomes available.

05 July 2016 - NW1438

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Social Development to question 61 on 13 March 2015 (a) when will the SA Social Security Agency Office in Tembisa in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality be upgraded and (b) what are the envisaged costs of the upgrading?

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore submit to the Honourable Member as soon as the information becomes available.

04 July 2016 - NW577

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1. What was the gross annual salary of (a) the municipal manager, (b) the chief financial officer and (c) each of the other managers (i) directly reporting to the municipal managers and/or (ii) appointed directly by Council of each (i) metropolitan, (ii) local and (iii) district municipality in the 2014-2015 financial year? 2. in each case, (a) what was the performance bonus paid to each of the specified officials in the specified financial year and (b) what other perks and/or benefits accrue to them? NW883E

Reply:

Information from Eastern Cape and Mpumalanga is outstanding and provinces were requested to submit the information. The information will be made available to the Honourable Member once available.

According to information received from the Provincial departments responsible for local government the following municipalities paid, the annual gross salaries, performances bonuses and perks and/or benefits to senior staff members during the year 2014/15 financial year .

Find here: Metropolitan Municipalities

30 June 2016 - NW580

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 440 on 17 March 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

Yes, the Department received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities. These are reflected below.

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO 2015/ 440

Hon BH Bhanga (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

  1. For each metropolitan municipality, ( a ) what are the details of each forensic investigation that has been commissioned since 1 June 2011 and ( b ) what were the reasons for the commissioning of each investigation;
  2. Whether he can indicate if each forensic investigation is ( a ) complete or (b ) still ongoing;
  3. ( a ) has the report of each completed investigation been made public; if not, ( a ) why not and ( b ) when will the specified reports be made public; if so, ( i ) when was each report released and ( ii ) was each report tabled in Parliament;
  4. for each incomplete investigation, when will it be completed;
  5. What action has been undertaken by the Government in terms of the recommendations made in each forensic report?

It is important to highlight that most of the forensic reports were commissioned by metropolitan municipalities as a way of intensifying the fight against corruption and related offences in local government. The information below was received from the eight (8) metropolitan municipalities:

(1) The table below illustrates the response as per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Response to 1 (a)

Response to 1 (b)

Buffalo City

Two (2) forensic investigations have been commissioned since 1 June 2011.

The investigations were prompted by allegations of tender irregularities regarding the awarding of two tenders.

City of Johannesburg

A total of 127 forensic investigations have been commissioned since 1 June 2011.

The investigations were initiated as a result of allegations of fraud, corruption, theft and other irregularities reported through the fraud hotline wherein members of the public and staff members are encouraged to report.

City of Tshwane

A total of 1056 forensic cases were registered between 2011 and 2015 financial years.

The City of Tshwane receives various verbal and/or written allegations of crimes/offences from a number of sources. The reporting tools include KPMG hotline, anonymous informants, management requests, provincial anti-corruption hotline, Office of the Public Protector, and the Presidential hotline.

Ekurhuleni

A total of 215 forensic investigations have been commissioned by the Municipality.

Forensic cases are investigated following allegations of possible fraud and corruption received through the municipality’s fraud hotline, the provincial and national hotlines, and allegations raised by management and the public.

eThekwini

1 (one) forensic investigation has been commissioned. The MEC for CoGTA KZN commissioned an investigation into allegations of maladministration, fraud and corruption alleged to have occurred at the municipality.

The MEC for CoGTA in KZN had reason to believe that maladministration, fraud and corruption had occurred at eThekwini Metro, which lead to the investigation being commissioned.

Nelson Mandela Bay

A total of 96 alleged fraud and corruption cases were received by the municipality, since 1 June 2011. The cases varied in complexity and magnitude.

The allegations reported related to fraud and corruption (which by nature could be criminal) and alleged mismanagement of public funds.

(2) The table below illustrates the response as per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Response to (a)

Response to (b)

Buffalo City

Council took a resolution in 2014 to rescind its original resolution to investigate the two contracts due to procedural defects in the taking of the decision. This affected the validity of the investigation by the service provider as well as its findings.

Council has authorised MPAC to conduct an investigation regarding the irregular expenditure for the procurement of services arising from the defects in the original resolution(s). The investigation by Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) on irregular expenditure is ongoing.

City of Johannesburg

A total of 127 forensic investigations were closed.

28 are still ongoing.

City of Tshwane

A total of 636 forensic cases were finalised.

420 are still in progress.

Ekurhuleni

A total of 215 forensic investigations were conducted.

Some of the investigations for 2014/15 are still on-going.

eThekwini

One forensic investigation was conducted and completed.

N/A

Nelson Mandela Bay

A total of 57 of the reported forensic cases had been investigated and completed, i.e. 20 reports were issued and 37 cases closed.

39 Outstanding.

(3) The table below illustrates the response as per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Response 3 ( a ) ( b ) ( i ) ( ii )

Buffalo City

The investigations by MPAC were not completed as no report was tabled in Council, since Council took a decision to rescind its original resolution to investigate the aforesaid contracts due to procedural defects in the taking of the decision. As a result, the report was not tabled in Council and not made public.

City of Johannesburg

The outcomes of the investigations are communicated to senior management (including the City Manager) who will then implement appropriate actions. In addition, the outcomes of the investigations are also communicated to the Group Audit Committee, MPAC and the Auditor -General. The reports were not tabled in Parliament.

City of Tshwane

Reports are tabled at various Council structures.

Ekurhuleni

The investigation reports are released to all relevant parties following the finalisation of the investigations. This finalisation process is then followed by the process of implementing recommendations. Reports are also tabled before the Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC), where necessary. The reports were not tabled in Parliament.

eThekwini

The forensic report was tabled in council and was made public in March 2014. The reports were not tabled Parliament.

Nelson Mandela Bay

Forensic reports are submitted by the NMBM’s Internal Audit Unit to the Accounting Officer and Legal Services. Reports are then tabled at various Council Structures i.e. Audit Committee meetings, Municipal Public Accounts Committee meetings and thereafter the resolutions of MPAC are tabled at Council meetings. The reports were not tabled in Parliament.

(4) & (5) The table below illustrates the response as per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Response to (4)

Response to (5)

Buffalo City

For the reasons that Council rescinded its original resolution in 2014 to investigate the aforesaid contracts due to procedural defects, the investigation was therefore discontinued.

On this matter no action was taken arising from the investigation as Council rescinded its original decision.

City of Johannesburg

The completion time for investigations is difficult to predict due to the nature of each case under investigation. However, efforts are put in place to ensure timely completion.

The recommendations emanating from forensic reports are implemented through disciplinary processes, civil recovery, and criminal actions.

City of Tshwane

Same as above.

The recommendations emanating from forensic reports are implemented through disciplinary processes, civil recovery, and criminal actions. Disciplinary cases were finalised on 17 cases.

Ekurhuleni

Same as above.

The recommended actions have been taken by management and this includes improving the control environment as well as corrective measures instituted against the implicated officials.

eThekwini

Not applicable. The investigation at eThekwini Metro has been completed.

The recommendations emanating from the forensic report have been partially implemented. Further, some of the allegations are still being investigated by law enforcement agencies.

Nelson Mandela Bay

The completion time for investigations is difficult to predict due to the nature of each case under investigation. However, efforts are put in place to ensure timely completion. The NMBM has requested the Provincial Treasury to assist the NMBM with forensic matters in order to complete investigations.

Forensic reports are tabled at various Council Structures i.e. Audit Committee meetings, MPAC meetings, and thereafter the resolutions of MPAC are tabled at Council meetings. Action by the NMBM is implemented in accordance with these resolutions.

The City of Cape Town and Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality indicated that they are not in a position to accede to my request to release details regarding forensic investigations. The City of Cape Town indicated that releasing information relating to forensic investigations would compromise future investigations, and the implementation of recommendations contained in such reports.

30 June 2016 - NW587

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4256 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information, if not, why not, if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

With reference to the question of 21 December 2015 a request was made to all Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information as per the question. Most Metropolitan Municipalities responded to the request and those outstanding committed to provide the information when it is available.

The original question 4256 was and the following Metropolitan Municipalities replied:

Whether each metropolitan municipality has taken any steps to enable citizens to become physically fit by (a) providing outdoor gym equipment, (b) initiating fitness programmes and/or (c) any other initiatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

The information was provided by the respective Metropolitan Municipality:

NAME OF METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

(a)

(b)

(c)

Buffalo City

n/a

n/a

n/a

Nelson Mandela Bay

In the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality we have installed Outdoor Equipment on the Beachfront as part of the Beach Development Upgrade by the Mandela Development Agency. The city is benefitting from the project by Sport and Recreation South Africa to deliver Outdoor Gym Equipment in certain municipalities. Outdoor Gym Equipment has been delivered in Motherwell and 2 more will be constructed in Zwide and Kwanobuhle in 2016. A MoU has been signed with the Minister of Sport’s Office for the delivery of the outdoor gyms.

The Sport and Recreation Directorate in partnership with a sport NGO, United Through Sport, has arranged the following programmes to promote active and healthy lifestyles:

  • Community Walks in Colchester, Helenvale, New Brighton, Walmer and Mqolomba Park in Kwanobuhle;
  • School holiday programmes with young people took place during the July school break at the following venues: Lilian Ngoyi Sport Centre, George Botha Sport Centre, Rosedale and Motherwell.

Activities on stage included:

  • Skipping challenge for participants aged 40+
  • Hoola-Hoop challenge for participants aged 40+
  • Soccer Ball tapping challenge for participants aged 10-
  • Soccer Ball heading challenge for participants aged 10-
  • Push-ups ladies challenge
  • Spot prizes for youngest and oldest participants

The Sport and Recreation Directorate has entered into a 3 year partnership agreement with EP Athletics to deliver a number of road races as part of the Nelson Mandela Legacy Project. The races are as follow:

  • 27/30 km Human Rights Run in commemoration of the Uitenhage Langa Massacre;
  • Freedom Run 10/5 km in Motherwell;
  • DIVA Run 10 km race for women only, in celebration of Women’s Month;
  • Gelvandale Run 15 km;
  • SA Half Marathon (2016/17) July month in celebration of Mandela Month – this event is sanctioned by Athletics South Africa and has been given Championship Status;
  • The Directorate has approved a budget of R1,380 000 for the implementation of this project.

The Sport and Recreation Directorate has entered into a 3 year Partnership with Iconage Holdings/Move-it, moving matters to implement its Get Ahead Sports Programme / GASP in 5 Primary Schools in Gelvandale / Helenvale. The programme is promoting Physical Education and Sport Development in three sporting codes, e.g. Football, Cricket and Tennis. The budget approved for this project is R400 000. The programme does not only focus on developing skills in these sport disciplines, but on life skills and improving their cognitive development.

City of Tshwane

Yes, The City of Tshwane has taken steps to enable the citizens to become physically fit by providing outdoor gym equipment in 4 of its 7 Regions. These gyms are installed through the City’s 2-Parks-Per-Ward Programme. The outdoor gyms have also been possible through the City’s partnership with the National Department of Sports, enabling 2 outdoor gyms in the City’s Regions to be installed, with one of the outdoor gyms being officially introduced by the Minister. Plans are afoot to install another outdoor gym in Region 7 (Ekangala), which should be completed late in the calendar year or early next year.

Yes, The City of Tshwane hosts events in partnership with the National and Provincial Departments of Sports to galvanize the public to keep fit and lead a healthy life style.

In the current financial year, the program is being rolled out across all the City’s Regions with events being hosted quarterly. Going forward, the City hopes to host such events more frequently in all the parks and/or open spaces easily accessible to the public.   

City of Joburg

The City of Johannesburg has been providing outdoor gym equipment since 2011/12 financial year.

The City has initiated 20 more fitness programmes since 2011/12 financial year.

The installation of green gyms is aligned to yearly capex allocation and is budget for. The City strikes a balance between greening, pathways, gym equipment etc. when designing a park with the allocated budget yearly.

Ekurhuleni

The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has allocated an amount of R8 million for the installation of outdoor gym equipment to 60 public parks and open spaces in the current financial year (2015/16). This also includes gym equipment for disabled persons to selected parks.

The installation of the gym equipment will commence after the December recess (starting 15 January 2016) and will be completed by end of April 2016.

We also have an Aerobics programme running in 8 facilities throughout the metro, every Saturday morning. To date we have had 132 sessions were on average we have 100 participants per session.

Mangaung

The Municipality has established a Regional Park in Thaba Nchu which includes outdoor gym equipment.

Furthermore, a Memorandum of Understanding has been concluded between the Municipality and SARSA – Sports and Recreation South Africa in terms of which the National Department will provide outdoor gym equipment to a park in Botshabelo. This agreement will unfold and be implemented early in 2016.

All the Parks that the Municipality develops are multi facility parks which includes infrastructure such as netball courts, basketball courts, chess playing facilities, morabaraba facilities, skate board facilities, tennis courts and/or 5-a-side soccer fields.

The Municipality is also in the process of appointing a service provider to supply and install outdoor gym equipment to the Municipality for a period of 3 years. Prominent parks and facilities within the Municipality will then be provided with this equipment which will ultimately contribute to a more healthy community.

City of Cape Town

     

eThekweni

The Parks Department has undertaken and started to roll out Outdoor Gyms in many of the 103 wards throughout the City.

The Department sees fitness and wellness as an important component of all citizens’ wellbeing R1.199 million

The department has undertaken to erect 1 outdoor gym in each ward.R1.287 million

The City is planning to rollout 10 new sites per year.

30 June 2016 - NW591

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4259 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities, if not, why not, if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

With reference to the question of 21 December 2015 a request was made to all Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information as per the question. Most Metropolitan Municipalities responded to the request and those outstanding committed to provide the information when it is available.

The original question 4259 was and the following Metropolitan Municipalities replied:

(1) What amount of capital budget of each metropolitan municipality was spent on refurbishing infrastructure in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years;

(2) (a) what are the details of each project and (b) how much was spent on each project;

(3) whether any capital funds were used to pay salaries; if so, (a) why and (b) how much?

The information was provided by the respective Metropolitan Municipality:

NAME OF METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

(1)

(2)

(3)

 

(a)

2013-14

(b)

2014-15

(a)

(what are the details of each project)

(b)

(how much was spent on each project)

(a)

(any capital funds used to pay salaries, why)

(b)

(any capital funds used to pay salaries, how much)

Buffalo City

R13.3m

R36.7m

Refurbishing water infrastructure: the budget was spent on pipe replacement and water meter replacement programmes

R13.3m and R36.7m respectively

No capital funds were used to pay salaries

Nelson Mandela Bay

           

City of Tshwane

R24m

R18m

Schedule attached

Schedule attached

No capital funds were used to pay salaries

City of Joburg

R99 770m

R166 400m

Schedule attached

Schedule attached

No capital funds were used to pay salaries

Ekurhuleni

R963 719 157

R899 975 194

Schedule attached

Schedule attached

Yes, to reimburse employees cost of project managers directly involved in the capital projects as per GRAP standard

In 2013/14 financial year, a total amount of R33,403,241.00 was paid out for salaries of project managers; and

In 2014/15 financial year, a total amount of R69, 186,120.00 was paid out for salaries of project managers.

Mangaung

R257 348 123

R353 300 397

Schedule attached

Schedule attached

No capital funds were used to pay salaries

City of Cape Town

R229 949 091

R208 541 123

Schedule attached

Schedule attached

No capital funds were used to pay salaries

eThekweni

R1.199m

R1.287m

Schedule attached

Schedule attached

No capital funds were used to pay salaries

ANNEXURE A

CITY OF TSHWANE

  1. In the City of Tshwane the following amounts were allocated:
    1. In 2013/14 financial year, the total amount of R24 Million was allocated for refurbishment; and
    2. In 2014/16financial year, the total amount of R18 Million was allocated for refurbishment
  1. (a) what are the details of each project and (b) how much was spent on each project;

FINANCIAL YEAR

   

2013/14.

132 KV network infrastructure for the primary substation.

R15 million.

 

Rooiwal power station.

R9 million.

2014/15.

132 KV network infrastructure for the primary substation.

R10 million.

 

Rooiwal power station.

R8 million.

  1. All capital funds were never used for salaries.
    1. Not applicable.
    2. Not applicable.

CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

1. In the City of Tshwane the following amounts were allocated:

          (a) In 2013-14 financial year, the total amounted of R99 770 million was allocated.

          (b) In 2014-15 financial year, the total amount of R166 400 million was allocated.

2.Please refer attached Annexure A, for the list of projects.

3. All capital funds were never used for salaries.

     (a) Not applicable.

     (b) Not applicable.

EKURHULENI METRO MUNICIPALITY

1. In Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality the following amounts were allocated:

   (a) In 2013-14 financial year, the total amounted of R963, 719,157.00 was allocated.

    (b) In 2014-15 financial year, the total amount of R899, 975,194.00 was allocated.

2. Please refer attached Annexure B, for the list of projects.

3. Yes, capital funds were used to pay salaries.

     (a) To reimburse employees cost of project managers directly involved in the capital projects as per GRAP standard.

      (b) In 2013/14 financial year, a total amount of R33,403,241.00 was paid out for salaries of project managers; and

In 2014/14 financial year, a total amount of R69, 186,120.00 was paid out for salaries of project managers.

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1. a. R 257 348 123.30

   b. R 353 300 397.35

2. a. 2013/14

Projects

Amount

REPLACEMENT OF OBSOLETE AND ILLEGAL SIGN

1 048 695.00

RESEALING OF STREETS

62 262 452.02

RESEALING OF STREETS

6 188 589.89

 

68 451 041.91

 

 

REFURBISHMENT OF SEWER SYSTEMS

11 811 479.10

REFURBISHMENT OF SEWER SYSTEM

13 035 016.49

 

24 846 495.59

 

 

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

31 995 893.97

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

20 642 497.61

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: R

7 697 928.72

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: T

5 000 000.00

REPLACE PUMPS MASELSPOORT

26 644 402.88

REPLACE WATER METERS AND FIRE HYDRANTS

28 520 434.98

REPLACE WATER METERS AND FIRE HYDRANTS

18 704 897.64

 

139 206 055.80

 

 

COMPUTER REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT

1 791 728.10

REPLACEMENT LAPTOPS FOR TECNICIANS (12)

104 481.00

REPLACEMENT OF 240 MM XLPE BETWEEN SUB A

13 183 628.49

REPLACEMENT OF 2 & 4 WAY FIBREGLASS BOX

197 293.20

REPLACEMENT OF BRITTLE OVERHEAD CONNECTI

349 490.40

REPLACEMENT OF LOW VOLTAGE DECREPIT 2 4

1 149 234.40

REPLACEMENT OF DECREPIT HAMILTON SUBSTAT

1 444 567.80

REPLACEMENT OF 11KV SWITCHGEARS FOR MAGI

1 303 171.26

NETWORK REFURBISHMENT

5 059 245.35

UPGRADE AND REFURBISHMENT OF CENTLEC COM

261 690.00

 

24 844 530.00

 

 

 

257 348 123.30

b. 2014/15

Projects

Amount

RESEALING OF STREETS

9 644 600.99

RESEALING OF STREETS

56 705 381.94

RESEALING OF STREETS

315 228.00

RESEALING OF STREETS

157 445.00

REPLACEMENT OF OBSOLETE AND ILLEGAL SIGN

4 799 899.44

REPLACEMENT OF OBSOLETE AND ILLEGAL SIGN

56 305.00

 

71 678 860.37

 

 

REFURBISHMENT OF OLD TOILETS

2 675 439.00

REFURBISHMENT OF SEWER SYSTEMS

28 771 174.45

REFURBISHMENT OF BLOEMSPRUIT WWTW

19 253 625.53

REFURBISHMENT OF SEWER SYSTEMS

8 618 373.09

REFURBISHMENT OF BLOEMSPRUIT WWTW

18 023 394.03

REFURBISHMENT OF BLOEMSPRUIT WWTW

-

REFURBISHMENT OF SEWER SYSTEM

25 761 468.53

REFURBISHMENT OF SEWER SYSTEMS

397 465.70

 

103 500 940.33

 

 

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

-

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

49 887 101.69

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

1 367 285.00

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS RE

3 782 296.88

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS AU

19 781 572.21

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

14 963 976.94

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS TE

4 678 798.55

REPLACEMENT/REFURBISHMENT OF VALVES IN B

3 295 819.10

REPLACEMENT/REFURBISHMENT OF WATERMAINS

23 528 182.73

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

12 973 895.00

REFURBISHMENT OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: R

2 302 071.00

REPLACEMENT OF WATER PIPES NOORDHOEK

3 999 999.88

 

140 560 998.98

 

 

TRANSFORMER REPLACEMENT

3 408 929.33

REPLACEMENT OF DECREPIT 11KV CABLE

1 045 476.29

REPLACEMENT OF 240 MM XLPE BETWEEN SUB A

5 845 657.41

REPLACEMENT OF 2 & 4 WAY FIBREGLASS BOX

273 499.88

REPLACEMENT OF BRITTLE OVERHEAD CONNECTI

738 133.88

REPLACEMENT OF LOW VOLTAGE DECREPIT 248

396 829.65

REPLACEMENT OF OIL PLANT

902 734.00

REPLACEMENT OF DECREPIT HAMILTON SUBSTAT

902 866.38

REPLACEMENT OF 110V BATTERIES FOR EAST Y

435 745.00

REPLACEMENT OF 11KV SWITCHGEARS FOR MAGI

575 275.88

REPLACEMENT OF 32V BATTERIES

365 360.46

NETWORK REFURBISHMENT

21 262 346.46

UPGRADE AND REFURBISHMENT OF CENTLEC COM

1 406 743.05

 

37 559 597.67

 

 

 

353 300 397.35

3. No Capital Funds were used to pay salaries.

20 June 2016 - NW1255

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 3567 on 20 October 2015, has he received the requested information yet; if not, why not; if so, by when will the specified information be communicated?

Reply:

The following information was provided by uMgungundlovu District Municipality:

1.An amount of R6 million was diverted in 2013 and R4 million was diverted in 2015. There are two reasons for the diversion. (1) The Municipality could not implement the project as a result of the delay in the approval of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) (2) The Municipality entered into a strategic partnership with Umgeni Water in terms of which R84 million was secured for the same project. Furthermore, the Municipality has set aside an additional R4 million for the same project for the additional reticulation pipeline.

2. It is the Mkhambathini Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) in Camperdown. This project is championed by Umgeni Water from their approved CAPEX.

3. The Municipal Manager, in partnership with KZN Cogta Officials, informed by the virement procedures as espoused in the Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2013.

4. At the Executive Committee meeting held on 08 September 2015.

5. It must be mentioned that the grant funding in question is part of the Corridor Development Fund for Local Economic Development projects and not part of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant. The Mandela Marathon is designed to promote local economic development goals and thus in line with the strategic objectives of the Corridor Development Fund. As such, no regulations relating to conditional grants were violated nor disregarded in this instance.                  

10 June 2016 - NW1188

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How many consumer units received (i) water, (ii) electricity, (iii) sanitation and (iv) solid waste management services in each metropolitan municipality since 1 July 2015 and (b) how many of the specified units received the specified services for free in each specified metropolitan municipality?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance, as part of the 828 approach, monthly requests municipalities to report on the number of households receiving (i) water, (ii) electricity, (iii) sanitation and (iv) solid waste management services, new connection made and the number of households receiving free basic water and free basic electricity. The numbers in the table below are the average number of households that monthly received the service for the period July 2015 to March 2016:
 

Metro

How many households received electricity?

How many households were connected for the first time to the electricity system?

How many households received sanitation?

How many households received water?

How many households were connected for the first time to the water system?

How many households received Free Basic Water

How many households received Free Basic Electricity?

How many households have access to refuse removal?

Buffalo City

125787

95

219797

221169

23

52909

78032

161431

City of Cape Town

567481

362

897965

897965

545

897965

369060

706205

City of Johannesburg

493939

145

266246

414231

103

27445

22580

1001550

City of Tshwane

411773

359

618739

775660

1220

314500

213000

823388

Ekurhuleni

390969

1142

902332

908293

88

460204

208835

695987

Ethekwini

689270

895

699258

818201

227

613674

124883

945910

Mangaung

187328

33

115179

172500

21

23367

29744

206650

Nelson Mandela Bay

273311

122

295177

325302

127

76396

64555

317760

09 June 2016 - NW1482

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

QUESTION 1:(a) On which dates were fire hydrants for each fire station precinct in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality last inspected and(b) what are the further relevant details in this regard? (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The hydrants are inspected daily.
(b) According to the City of Ekurhuleni, maintenance of fire hydrants within its area of jurisdiction is a Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) issue and there is a comprehensive programme being implemented throughout the year. In terms of this comprehensive program, a target of 50 000 hydrants must be inspected annually, and this was exceeded as depicted in the table below.

(c) The City indicated that they have appointed a Professional Service Provider (PSP) who is responsible for the maintenance and servicing of fire hydrants. The PSP has 220 fieldworkers who are responsible for the maintenance and servicing of fire hydrants within the City. The business process that the City has adopted requires a fieldworker to locate (some hydrants are underground and some above ground) the hydrant, mark with paint, service or maintain, and geo- code the location of the hydrant on a Global Positioning System (GPS). This approach requires at least five visits to each hydrant. In view of this, the City has outlined that it is difficult and cumbersome for them to indicate the date of the last visit to each hydrant as a single visit is not enough to locate, mark with paint, maintain or service and geo-code the hydrant. According to the City, work areas are divided in line with the operational fire districts, which cover more than one fire station precinct. The following numbers of hydrants have been located, marked with paint, serviced/ maintained, tested and geo-coded per Service Delivery Area:
 

Service Delivery Areas

Name of the Fire Districts

Number of Hydrants Serviced

Financial year (FY) Period

Service Delivery Area 1

• Alberton /Thokoza
• Palm Ridge
• Sonkesizwe

12 473

2013/2014

   

12 620

2014/2015

   

11 332

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 2

• Wadeville/Katlehong
• Vosloorus

11 781

2013/2014

   

2 305

2014/2015

   

15 250

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 3

• Boksburg Central
• Germiston Central

8 912

2013/2014

   

5 036

2014/2015

   

10 556

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 4

• Edenvale
• Primrose
• Bedford view

10 320

2013/2014

   

5 777

2014/2015

   

16 009

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 5

• Kempton park
• Tembisa
• Commercial
• Olifantsfontein

6 544

2013/2014

   

18 921

2014/2015

   

14 104

201512016

Service Delivery Area 6

• Leon Ferreira
• Farrarmere
• Rynfield

8 735

2013/2014

   

6 897

2014/2015

   

20 262

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 7

• Brakpan
• Benoni
• Central Tsakane

8 292

2013/2014

   

7 058

2014/2015

   

16 516

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 8

• Springs
• Daveyton
• Etwatwa

9 213

2013/2014

   

1 442

2014/2015

   

16 097

2015/2016

Service Delivery Area 9

• Nigel
• Duduza
• Selection Park

8 946

2013/2014

   

10 000

2014/2015

   

16 097

2015/2016

09 June 2016 - NW1479

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any commission investigated the legitimacy of the Sukazi chieftaincy in Mpumalanga; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of the investigation; (2) Whether a report has been generated in this regard; if not, why not; if so, has the specified report been presented to the affected parties?

Reply:

  1. The Honourable Member is requested to note that the Provincial Committee on Disputes and Claims of Traditional Leadership in Mpumalanga did conduct an investigation with respect to the claim for traditional leadership that was lodged by Mr. ME Sukazi and others. The investigation was closed following the findings by the Committee.
  2. Yes, a report was generated but was not presented to the affected parties as they did not dispute the findings of the Committee. However, a letter dated 18 February 2015 from the Office of the Premier in Mpumalanga was forwarded to Mr. ME Sukazi and others informing them of the outcome of the investigation.

09 June 2016 - NW593

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4092 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

There are various municipal officials and councillors who undertook international trips in the 2014/15 financial year and since 01 July 2015 in each metropolitan municipality. The following responses are from 6 metros who responded. The Department will forward input from the 2 outstanding metros once the information is made available.

The purpose of each trip, officials who undertook each trip, and the total cost of each trip including flights and accommodation in each metropolitan municipality is outlined in the attached Annexure below:

07 June 2016 - NW1131

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How many officers are currently employed by each of the metropolitan police department?

Reply:

(1) The following response is based on the information provided by eThekwini, Cape Town Metropolitan municipalities and Gauteng Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs. Mangaung and Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan municipalities indicated that they do not have a Metropolitan Police departments. Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality has Security and Traffic Services which has about 600 employees. Buffalo City did not meet the deadline for submission of responses. However, the municipality has been requested to respond accordingly. The information will be delivered to the honourable member as soon as it is received.

(2) The number of officers are currently employed by each of the metropolitan police departments are provided below:

Metropolitan Municipality

Number of officers are currently employed each of the metropolitan police department

eThekwini

1866 officers

Cape Town

557 officers

Ekurhuleni

1375 officers

Johannesburg

3017 officers

Tshwane

3815 officers

Mangaung

No applicable

Nelson Mandela Bay

No applicable

by

07 June 2016 - NW1130

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How many metropolitan police departments are there in South Africa, (b) what are their names and (c) how much funding was allocated to each of these metropolitan police departments (i) in the (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13 (cc) 2013-14 (dd) 2014-15 and (ee) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

Attached please find here: Reply
 

07 June 2016 - NW705

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)How much did it cost to fund each district municipality to fulfil its mandates in the (a)(i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14 and (iv) 2014-15 municipal financial years and (b) since 1 July 2015; (2) whether, with reference to the budget speech delivered by the Minister of Finance, Mr Pravin Gordhan, on 24 February 2016, measures will be implemented to curb expenditure by each district municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any studies have been conducted to determine the viability of maintaining each district municipality whose entire income comes from the national fiscus; if not, why not; if so, what were the outcomes

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

07 June 2016 - NW298

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a municipal public accounts committee; if not, why not; if so, (a) is the committee chaired by a member of the opposition, (b) what is the name of the chairperson, (c) are meetings of the committee open to the public and (d) how are the specified meetings advertised?

Reply:

The responses below were received from the metropolitan municipalities:

All the Metropolitan Municipalities stated that they have a Municipal Public Accounts Committees.

The table below illustrates the responses to question (a), (b), (c) and (d) as per municipality.

Attached please find here: Table

 

07 June 2016 - NW1252

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2735 on 25 August 2015, he has received the requested information yet; if not, why not; if so, by when will this information be communicated?

Reply:

The response below is based on information received from the Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality (as approved by Minister P Gordhan on 3rd Sep 2015)

 (a) The municipality allocated a total amount of R156 million for Zone Plans, i.e. block sum allocations to each ward, in the 2014-15 budget.

(b) (i) The funds allocated to each ward are utilized for the implementation of small projects that are identified by Councilors in consultation with ward residents. (ii) Wards benefiting have been reduced to 78 wards that have less developed municipal infrastructure and the budget allocation for each ward varies depending on the project identified. The 25 wards that were excluded are highly developed and have all the necessary municipal services.

(c) The quested information still needs to be discussed first at Council level as it relates to the 2014/15 financial year’s budget, which ended on 31 July 2015.

07 June 2016 - NW969

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the Kabuso Investigative Report into the Makana Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape, (a) what action has he taken against those implicated in the report, (b) what plans does he have, if any, to recover any financial losses incurred by the guilty parties and (c) when will he table the Kabuso report, released in February 2010, in Parliament?

Reply:

The response below was provided by municipality:

(a) Following the recommendations of the Kabuso forensic report, the employment contracts of the Municipal Manager and Strategic Manager in the Office of the Mayor were terminated. Further, a committee was established consisting of councillors to address issues implicating councillors and an action plan was also submitted to Council in order to address issues implicating officials. This process is being coordinated by the Administrator.

(b) The municipality's legal representatives are engaging with those implicated with a view to recover the financial losses incurred by the municipality.

(c) I was not aware that the Kabuso report is supposed to be tabled in Parliament. The Administrator is dealing with this matter and would adhere to such a request.

07 June 2016 - NW1253

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2984 on 22 September 2015, he has received the requested information yet; if not, why not; if so, by when will this information be communicated?

Reply:

The information was provided by uMshwathi Local Municipality and approved by Minister P Gordhan):

  (1) Yes, it was owned by the former Development Services Board (DSB) in 1994 – 1995.

    (a) It was transferred to Air Health Committee, then the Health Committee became Cool Air TLC in 1996 – 2000. In December 2000, the Cool Air TLC was amalgamated into uMshwathi Municipality.

   (b) There were four areas that were controlled by Development Services Board-Dalton, Cool Air, Wartburg and New Hanover, that were converted into Health Committees and the assets from DSB were handed over to these Health Committees.

  (2) The arrangements for Cool Air Secondary School is for them to book the hall in advance at no cost to the school.