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30 October 2015 - NW3525

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Will her department increase the budget of the Central Drug Authority (CDA) for the 2016-17 financial year in order to enable the CDA to (a) adequately assess the impact of the National Drug Master Plan and (b) collect the necessary baseline data against which it will measure the impact of its interventions; (2) since her reply to question 79 on 18 March 2015, how many (a) Provincial Drug Forums (PDFs) and (b) Municipal Action Committees (MACs) are currently (i) in place and (ii) operational in each province; (3) does her department have the capacity to monitor all the PDFs and MACs; if not, why not; if so, what does her department plan to do in order to capacitate itself in this regard?

Reply:

(1) (a) Yes. The budget of the Central Drug Authority (CDA) for the 2016-2017 financial year by 6.2% according to Medium Term Expenditure Framework. The current budget is R6.1 million which covers both personnel and goods and services.

(b) Yes. The budget will to some extent enable the Department to collect baseline data against which we will measure the impact and efficacy of current interventions, at least in one province.

(2) To ensure a seamless and coordinated approach to the implementation of the National Drug Master Plan, the Department has commenced with the process to conduct an audit of all structures. I will furnish the Honourable Member with a comprehensive reply upon completion of this process.

(3) Yes. Measures currently underway include the upgrading of the Directorate to a Chief Directorate to ensure proper coordination and support to the CDA.

 

30 October 2015 - NW3726

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has his department implemented a special dispensation for minors from the Kingdom of Lesotho whereby they do not need to produce an unabridged birth certificate on entrance to the Republic of South Africa as long as they have a letter from a learning institution stating that they are in possession of the original unabridged birth certificate; if so, (a) on what date did the specified dispensation come into effect, (b) which (i) piece of legislation and/or (ii) regulation empowers his department to institute the specified dispensation, (c) on (i) what date and (ii) under what Government Gazette notice was the specified dispensation published and (d) what is his department’s definition of learning institution?

Reply:

No, therefore (a-c) falls away.

(d) The Immigration Regulations, 2014 defines a "learning institution" as-

(a) an institution of higher education established in terms of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No. 101 of 1997); or

(b) a college established in terms of the Further Education and Training Colleges Act, 2006 (Act No. 16 of 2006), but does not include-

(i) a school offering further education and training programmes under the South African Schools Act, 1996 (Act No. 84 of 1996); or

(ii) a college under the authority of a government department other than the Department of Higher Education and Training; or

(c) a school contemplated in section 1 of the South African Schools Act, 1996 (Act No. 84 of 1996);

30 October 2015 - NW3700

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With regard to (a) the diplomatic immunities and privileges awarded to delegates attending the African Union (AU) summit in Johannesburg in June 2015 as gazetted on 5 June 2015 (details furnished) and (b) the reply of President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, to oral question 14 in the National Assembly on 6 August 2015, that her department had gazetted the specific areas that would be the AU area, what was or were the exact geographical area or areas declared to be the AU area under the specified Gazette notice?

Reply:

  1. None

UNQUOTE

30 October 2015 - NW3543

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

With regard to the announcement by his department that the 24 Aquaculture projects under the Operation Phakisa have to be implemented by 2019, (a) how many of these projects will be implemented in 2015 and (b) what are the relevant details of the specified projects?

Reply:

a) The 24 catalyst projects are the original projects identified during the Operation Phakisa Aquaculture LAB phase held in Durban during July and August 2014. Twenty of these projects have started their implementation.

b) An overview of the 24 Operation Phakisa Catalyst Projects are provided in the table below.

Initiative

Name

Species

Location

Province

Expansion or new

1a

Expansion-Venteresdorp- Catfish

Catfish

Ventersdorp

North West

new

1b

Dooringbaai Abalone Farm

Abalone

Dooringbaai

Western cape

expansion

1c

Paternoster Oyster Hatchery

Oysters

Paternoster

Western cape

new

1d

Hamburg Oyster Farm

Oysters

Hamburg

Eastern Cape

expansion

1e

Oceanwise

Dusky kob

East London

Eastern Cape

expansion

1f

HIK Abalone Buffeljags Expansion

Abalone

Hermanus/Bredarsdorp

Western cape

expansion

1g

Abagold

Abalone

Hermanus

Western cape

expansion

1h

Jacobsbaai Sea Products

Abalone

Jacobsbaai

Western cape

expansion

1i

Amatikulu ornamental Farm

Various oramental species

Amatikulu

kwaZulu Natal

new

1j

Amatikulu kob farm

Dusky kob

Amatikulu

kwaZulu Natal

new

1k

Hamburg Kob Farm

Dusky kob

Hamburg

Eastern Cape

expansion

1L

Saldanha Bay Molapong Trout and Salmon

Trout and Salmon

Saldanha Bay

Western cape

new

1n

Catfish cluster/ADZ Ventersdorp

Catfish

Ventersdorp

North West

new

1o

Blue Oceans Mussels (Growout)

Mussels

Saldanha Bay

Western cape

expansion

1p

Southern Atlantic Mussels

Mussels

Saldanha Bay

Western cape

new

1q

Algoa Bay Sea Cage Farming - Yellowtail

Yellowtail

Algoa Bay

Eastern Cape

new

1r

Richards Bay Kob Cage culture

Dusky Kob

Richards Bay

kwaZulu Natal

new

1s

Hondeklip Baai Abalone

Abalone

Hondeklip Baai

Northern Cape

expansion

1t

Diamond Coast Abalone Ranching

Abalone

Hondeklip Baai

Northern Cape

new

1u

Saldanha Bay Oysters

Oysters

Saldanha Bay

Western cape

expansion

1v

Wild Coast Abalone

Abalone

Haga Haga

Eastern Cape

expansion

1vb

Wild Coast Abalone Ranching

Abalone

Port Elizabeth/Cape Recife

Eastern Cape

new

1w

Roman Bay Abalone Farm

Abalone

Gansbaai

Western cape

expansion

1x

Marine Growers Abalone Farm

Abalone

Gansbaai

Western cape

expansion

29 October 2015 - NW2935

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) is the current capacity of the Groblersdal Water Purification Plant in the Sekhukhune District Municipality and (b) will be the plant’s capacity after the completion of the construction, measured in mega litres per day; (2) (a) what (i) will be the final cost and (ii) is the current status of the project and (b) when will the specified project be completed; (3) (a) who was appointed to undertake the construction, (b) what is the tender (i) amount and (ii) contract number and (c) who is the implementing agent; (4) whether the appointed contractor is still on site; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether the additional extraction of water will have any effect on farmer quotas downstream?

Reply:

(1)(a) The current capacity of the Groblersdal Water Purification Plant is 22 mega litres per day (Ml /day).

(1)(b) The new capacity will be 40Ml/day.

(2)(a)(i) Total estimated completion cost will be R 38,866,533.67.

(2)(a)(ii) Current status of the project is 90% complete.

(2)(b) Estimate completion date for the Groblersdal Water Purification Plant is 26 May 2016.

(3)(a) Paparich Property Development was appointed on the project.

(3)(b)(i) The tender amount was R 32,366,533.67.

(3)(b)(ii) The Contract number is SK/8/3/1-05/2011/12.

(3)(c) The Implementing Agent is the Sekhukhune District Municipality.

(4) The contractor (Paparich Property Development) is no longer on site. The contractor’s contract was terminated by the Sekhukhune District Municipality due to poor performance on site. My Department’s Construction West Unit has taken over the project and it is anticipated to be completed by 26 May 2016.

(5) The additional extraction of water from the Olifants River will have no negative effect on the farmers with a registered allocation downstream.

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29 October 2015 - NW3706

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What (a) is the current status of the parole application for a certain person (Mr Nicholas Pike) and (b) are the reasons for the delay in processing the specified application; (2) when are the specified delays expected to be resolved ?

Reply:

(1)(a) The offender was sentenced on 6 December 2006 to four (4) years imprisonment in terms of section 276(1)(i) of the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977 for driving a motor vehicle without the owner’s permission and theft. He was placed on Correctional Supervision on the 17 August 2007. The offender absconded from the system of community corrections. He committed crimes during this period and was sentenced on the 19th April 2008 to 15 years imprisonment for fraud and forgery and again on 20th April 2010 was sentenced to five (05) years imprisonment for fraud and forgery and the court ordered that the sentence to run concurrently with the 15 years imprisonment. He was considered by the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board (CSPB) for possible placement on parole on the 16th October 2014 and was given a further profile for the 18th February 2015.

(b) During consideration by the CSPB it was discovered that the offender did not complete his Correctional Supervision period and Community Corrections Office of Kgoši Mampuru II Management Area was approached for clarity on the number of outstanding days to be served for parole violation. Clarification was received from the Community Corrections offices that the offender still has to serve an additional 1193 days of his previous sentence. The effective sentence is currently 15 years plus 1193 days imprisonment.

(2) On 20 October 2015 the Community Corrections Office at Kgoši Mampuru II Management Area visited the CSPB at Leeuwkop Management Area, explained to the offender the period to be served for his absconding. Subsequently, he appeared before the CSPB on the 20th October 2015 and it was decided that he will be reconsidered on the 21st July 2016.

29 October 2015 - NW37720

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What progress has been made in moving the corporate services component of the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) into the Department of Justice and (b) what functions of corporate services are still left with the NPA?

Reply:

a) I wish to inform the Honourable Member that the Senior Management of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development [DoJ&CD] and the National Prosecuting Authority [NPA] are continuing to engage with a view to ensuring alignment and continued cooperation within the corporate support services environment. This will ensure that a single set of policies and systems are in place by the end of the current financial year, which would be applicable to both the DoJ&CD and the NPA.

The 2014/2015 Annual Report of the DoJ&CD submitted to Parliament was a consolidated document, which also included NPA information and henceforth the planning and reporting processes will also be integrated.

I as the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services, the Director-General [DG] and the National Director of Public Prosecutions [NDPP] have agreed that the NDPP will shortly submit a proposal to the Minister for discussion, such proposal addressing a possible way forward with regards to administrative support services which will remain in the NPA in order for the NDPP to fulfill the administrative legislation requirements, including reporting. This proposal will then also address issues of structure within the NPA and post provisioning associated with such structure of support.

b) Currently the NPA still performs the corporate support services as previously, until the matters in the response to [a] above, have been finalized.

29 October 2015 - NW3705

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) Whether there was an outbreak of Leptospirosis at the Pollsmoor remand detention facility; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What actions have been taken to (a) quarantine inmates, (b) fumigate their personal effects, (c) deal with the rat infestation and (d) transfer inmates to other facilities; (3) What long term steps are being taken to improve sanitation, hygiene and overcrowding problems at the specified facility as recently highlighted by the report by the former judge of the SA Constitutional Court, Justice Cameron?

Reply:

  1. Yes, there was an outbreak of Leptospirosis at the Pollsmoor Remand Detention facility.

The details are as follows:

  • Two cases of Leptospirosis have been identified in August 2015.
  • One Leptospirosis case identified in September 2015.
 

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Patient Initials

Patient BC

Patient AM

Patient DV

Age

52

49

44

Race

Coloured

African

Coloured

Gender

Male

Male

Male

Unit

Section A (Cell 591)

Section A (Cell 545)

Section E 2

Date of onset of illness

25.07.2015

Returned to Clinic: 01.08.2015

04.08.2015

Returned to Clinic: 11.08.2015

31.08.2015

Returned

04.09.2015

Referred to Victoria Hospital

01.08.2015

11.08.2015

04.09.2015

Treatment Outcome date

Demised : 02.08.2015 at Victoria hospital

Discharged from Victoria hospital on the 20th August 2015

Discharged from Victoria hospital on the 17.09.2015

N.B. Confirmation of Leptospirosis Diagnosis by the Communicable Disease Control: Department of Health Western Cape was received by DCS on the 20th August 2015 for the first two cases identified at Victoria Hospital. Third case confirmation was received on the 07th September 2015.

2. Actions that had been taken to :

(a) Quarantine inmates,

  • Inmates were not quarantined; however those with moderate to severe signs were transferred immediately to Victoria Hospital as recommended by the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD).
  • All inmates who presented with nonspecific signs and symptoms were tested and treated empirically for Leptospirosis.

(b) Fumigate their personal effects,

  • Fumigation intervals of the cells have been increased.
  • Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment (PPE) was purchased and distributed for use in all areas that can expose one to risk of infection (e.g. waste handlers, cleaners).
  • All Remand Detainees were issued with the prescribed uniform.
  • Frequent washing and disinfecting of personal clothing was encouraged.

(c) deal with the rat infestation :

Pest Control service providers have been contracted for rodents and other pests control measures.

  • Advanced mechanical rodent traps were placed at access points to eradicate the rodents.
  • Gas fumigation of the tunnel will be implemented as per evacuation plan.
  • The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) was contacted to remove feral rats.
  • Waste Management has been intensified and waste collection has been reviewed from twice a week to daily. Waste storage procedures have been implemented.
  • Environmental hygiene was intensified through identification of additional cleaning teams, increasing the frequency of cleaning programs to twice daily and the entire facility scrub down was conducted as per facility evacuation plan.
  • Weekly inspection is being done by the City of Cape Town Environmental Health Practitioners and DCS officials.

(d) Transfer inmates to other facilities

  • In-service training was provided to clinical staff with regard to clinical presentation, diagnosis and prevention of Leptospirosis by 4th September 2015.
  • Inmates were screened as per NICD guidelines before they were evacuated to other Correctional Centers.
  • Evacuation plan was developed and inmates were transferred to other facilities in the Western Cape as per plan. The evacuation and transfer plan was implemented per schedule to mitigate risk factors.
  • All Provincial Stakeholders were informed about the evacuation plan.

3.Long term steps being taken to improve sanitation, hygiene and overcrowding problems at the specified facility as recently highlighted in the report by the former judge of the SA Constitutional Court, Justice Cameron.

Sanitation and hygiene:

  • Medication available and issued as prescribed.
  • Meals are provided three times per day as per meal plan.
  • Mattresses and blankets are issued on admission for sleeping purposes to all offenders.
  • Cleaning material availability monitored and cleaning procedures intensified.
  • Overcrowding:Comprehensive HIV and AIDS as well as Tuberculosis programmes and services are implemented with the support of external partners. Condoms are distributed however there is malicious misuse of condoms (trafficking of contraband).

The Department of Correctional Services implements a multi-pronged strategy to manage overcrowding .The strategy consists of the following dimensions:

  • Managing levels of remand detainees (RD’s) through IJS Case Management Task Team & Inter-Sectoral Committee on Child Justice;
  • Managing levels of sentenced inmates through improving effective & appropriate use of conversion of sentence to community correctional supervision, release on parole, & transfers between correctional centres to attempt to establish some degree of evenness of overcrowding;
  • Ensuring progress with DCS capital works programme to upgrade correctional facilities & to build new correctional centres that are both cost effective & rehabilitation oriented;
  • Encouraging debate in South Africa about reason for incarceration as a sentence & encouraging an approach to appropriate sentencing that is focused on facilitating rehabilitation;
  • Enhancing community correctional supervision so that it can be better utilized as an appropriate sentence for less serious crimes;
  • Improving correction & development programmes within DCS to ensure enhanced facilitation of rehabilitation that targets offending behaviour;
  • Encouraging improvement of first & second levels of correction in family & social institutions & social & economic sector government departments respectively to decrease rate of entry into criminal justice system; and
  • Encouraging community involvement in social reintegration of offenders back into their community in order to assist in reducing levels of repeat offending
    .

28 October 2015 - NW3593

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How many (a) basic ambulance assistants, (b) ambulance emergency assistants, (c) operational emergency orderlies, (d) paramedics, (e) emergency care technicians and (f) emergency care practitioners are employed in the public sector in each province; (2) whether there are staffing targets for each of the specified categories in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the staffing targets in each case?

Reply:

(a) to (f) The table below indicates the provincial operational human resources, per category. Operational Emergency Care Orderlies are not employed by the Department.

PROVINCES

BAA

AEA

PARAMEDICS

ECT

ECP

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

1890

493

25

15

2

2425

Free State

1372

181

15

41

1

1610

Gauteng

976

115

35

103

0

1229

Kwa Zulu Natal

1254

715

72

15

8

2064

Limpopo

1184

627

21

11

1

1844

Mpumalanga

580

174

3

0

0

757

North West

377

175

2

122

3

679

Northern Cape

556

197

4

11

0

768

Western Cape

674

620

131

38

6

1469

Total

8863

3297

308

356

21

12845

Abbreviations:

BAA - Basic Ambulance Assistants

AEA - Ambulance Emergency Assistants

ECT - Emergency Care Technicians

ECP - Emergency Care Practitioner

(2) The current staffing target is derived from a figure of 1 ambulance per 10 000 population, and 10 personnel to man a single vehicle on a 24 hour basis. A study has been proposed to scientifically determine the norm for ambulances to population as well as the staffing norms which will be guided by the Human Resource for Health Strategy 2030.

END.

28 October 2015 - NW3752

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the (a) prescribed and (b) targeted period by which a service provider’s course and/or programme should receive accreditation through the (i) Council on Higher Education’s (CHE) and (ii) SA Qualifications Authority’s (SAQA) respective systems; 2) how many service providers’ applications for course and/or programme accreditation are awaiting results in (i) the CHE offices and (ii) the SAQA offices; 3) are any of the specified applications overdue in respect of the (a) prescribed and/or (b) targeted date for accreditation; if so, why in respect of each specified case; 4) with reference to each specified service provider whose application for course and/or programme accreditation is still awaiting result (a) what is the name of the service provider, (b) what is the original date of the submission of the application and (c) what is the reason for the delay in the resolution of applications in the (i) CHE offices and (ii) SAQA offices?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Council on Higher Education (CHE) has provided information that there is no prescribed period by which a service provider’s course and/or programme should receive accreditation as this is not possible, given the nature of the accreditation processes and the variety of applications received. Accreditation is a peer driven qualitative evaluation process.

(b) (i) CHE’s target period for the application for accreditation of new programmes is six months. Factors affecting the achievement of this target are the following:

  • Deferrals, i.e. sent back to the institution for omitted or additional information. This could happen multiple times until all the necessary information has been received and the application is sent to a peer evaluator.
  • A site visit is undertaken to verify that the programme will meet the Higher Education Qualifications Committee’s (HEQC’s) criteria for programme accreditation. The site visit report and paper-based evaluation report need to be integrated before the application is tabled.
  • A large number of applications are received and they cannot all be tabled on the agenda of the Accreditation Committee (AC) that has the capacity to consider approximately 140 applications of various kinds (accreditation of new programmes, reaccreditation of existing programmes, deferrals, representations, relocation of sites and approval of new sites) in a two-day meeting. This year, one–two day meetings were extended to three days and an additional unscheduled meeting will take place at the end of October to deal with the large number of applications. This expansion in the number of applications submitted is due to new nursing and education programmes submitted to meet the changed professional bodies’ and Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework (HEQSF) regulations. In addition, many institutions are submitting replacement programmes for those that cannot be aligned to the HEQSF.

(ii) In terms of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Act, section 13(1)(h)(i) and (ii), the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) is responsible for the development, registration and publication of qualifications and part qualifications; and to register a qualification or part qualification recommended by a Quality Council (QC) if it meets the relevant criteria. SAQA does not accredit education and training providers or service providers that offer learning programmes. Accreditation is the responsibility of the CHE, which conducts the accreditation and then submits the documents to SAQA for a qualification or part qualification to be registered on the NQF. The service provider will be recorded as the accredited provider on the NQF. The prescribed and targeted period by which SAQA will register qualifications or part qualifications on the NQF is four months from the time of receipt from the CHE.

2. (i) There were approximately 120 applications submitted at the CHE for accreditation of new programmes between January and August 2015 that are still at various stages of processing and peer evaluation. At the next HEQC meeting scheduled to take place at the end of November 2015, 72 applications for accreditation of programmes will receive an outcome and 15 programmes are still in process or have already been through an application process, but may have been referred back for further amendments. These applications will be on the agenda of the Accreditation Committee meeting in January 2016.

(ii) There is no backlog at SAQA regarding qualification registrations.

3. (a) and (b) In terms of the targeted date for accreditation and overdue applications, 84 private institutions submitted applications for accreditation in 2014. Of these, 14 programmes from 9 institutions are still in process as either deferrals or a representation (an opportunity for an institution to provide information in response to the reasons for non-accreditation of a programme submission) after receiving a non-accreditation.

4. (a), (b) and (c) (i) Programmes submitted in 2015: 1 January–30 April 2015: programmes from the following institutions as per the table below, are still in process. Each of these applications went through more than one process and was returned to the institution either for more information (a deferral) requested by the Accreditation Committee or have had a non-accreditation outcome; in this instance they have sent in a representation that again had to go through the evaluation process. These applications will be on the agenda of the Accreditation Committee meeting scheduled for January 2016

.

Name of Institution

2015 submission dates

 

12 Jan

19 Jan

10 Feb

12 Feb

23 Mar

24 Mar

26 Mar

31 Mar

1 Apr

9 Apr

13 Apr

22 Apr

24 Apr

Grand Total

African Academy

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Akademia

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Caerus Nursing School

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Chatsmed Candlelight Nursing School

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Darul Uloom Zakariyya

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Equine-Librium College

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Foundation for Professional Development

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Oakfields College

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

Prestige Academy (Pty) Ltd

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

S Buys Academy

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

SAISI (South African Institution of Sensory Integration)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

Thembelani Institute of Nursing Education and Training

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Tshwane University of Technology

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

2

Grand Total

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

15

(c)(ii) SAQA has no current delay regarding processing qualifications and part qualifications received from the CHE for registration.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3752 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

28 October 2015 - NW3643

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has any plans in place to replace the two teachers who were suspended in February 2015 for allegedly sexually assaulting students in Phusela High School in Tzaneen; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister has no jurisdiction to replace the two teachers who were suspended in February 2015 for allegedly sexually assaulting students in Phusela High School in Tzaneen.

Subject to the provisions of Section 6 of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, the appointment of any person, or the promotion or transfer of any educator in the service of a provincial Department of Education shall be made by the Head of Department. It is therefore, the responsibility of the Head of the Limpopo Education Department to deal with the matter.

28 October 2015 - NW3714

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether there is a shortage of the chicken pox vaccine in the country; if so, (a) for how long has there been a shortage, (b) what (i) are the reasons for the shortage and (ii) is his department doing to mitigate the situation and (c) when will the vaccine be available again; if not, (2) is he aware that parents who take their children to public health facilities are told that there is a shortage of the vaccine?

Reply:

  1. The Chicken Pox vaccine is not part of the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) schedule in South Africa and is therefore not provided for in the public sector. The vaccine is provided for by the private sector where the shortage has been recognised.
  2. Since it is not part of the schedule of vaccines provided for in the public sector, there is no need for any form of action from the Department.

END.

28 October 2015 - NW3224

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her media release on 14 August 2015, what are the names of the 250 water supply systems that need intervention due to non-submission of data and low performance of the operational compliance with the SA National Standard 241; (2) whether, besides communicating with water service institutions, her department has taken any further action to address this; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The names of the 250 water supply systems are attached as Annexure A.

(2) Besides communicating with the water services institutions, non-compliance letters have been issued for some municipalities and site inspections conducted. Others have been assisted with development of action plans to address the identified short comings and task teams have also been established in other Provinces.

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28 October 2015 - NW3754

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether the Government intends to implement any plan through local government to allow owners of businesses and residential properties to get certification for being carbon neutral and therefore to enjoy a 10% rebate on their rates in order that such a dispensation will help to improve air quality, reduce pollution, create sizeable job opportunities and help mitigate climate change; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Environmental Affairs is responsible for facilitation and co-ordination within environmental projects/interventions implemented by the municipalities and does not take the lead in as far as the implementation of local government incentive programmes for residents is concerned.

Notwithstanding this role, it is noted that the above is an innovative proposal that will be considered in consultation with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

---ooOoo---

28 October 2015 - NW3368

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

How does her department intend to recover the billions of rand lost by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) as a result of the alleged fraud and mismanagement attributed to the Group Chief Executive Officer, Mr Lucky Montana, (b) and what measures will her department put in place to ensure that PRASA is able to successfully fulfill its mandate to provide the public with safe affordable and reliable rail services? NW 4027E

Reply:

The Minister of Transport and the Board have commissioned forensic investigations on several aspects that include maladministration and improper conduct by the former Group CEO, any employee of the Agency and any Board Member. Once these investigations on all aspects are finalized, the Minister will peruse the report and its recommendations and decide on the way forward for implementation of the outcome of the reports. Currently the group CEO is challenging the outcome of the Public Protector’s report by making some submissions, once the Public Protector has considered the submissions, a final report of the Public Protector will be issued and the Minister of Transport will be in the position to decide on the way forward, including reporting to the President

The Minister of transport have already advised the Board of PRASA to ensure that all employees are sent to various training which will enhance their capacity of comprehending amongst others the PFMA and its regulations and all other statutes that may be relevant for the performance of their dities.

The Minister will first peruse the recommendations of the forensic investigations, the final Public Protector’s report. Once all the parties has submitted their motivations and a final outcome of the investigations have taken into account all the affected parties statements the Minister will decide on the action to take. Currently it is premature to decide or announce what steps will be taken before the forensic investigation and the Public Protector’s investigations are finalized and perused. The Minister however guarantee to the members that steps will be taken against any person who may be fingered by the investigation reports.

28 October 2015 - NW3090

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)On what date was the most recent biomonitoring report compiled for (a) Kaap River, (b) Ngodwana River, (c) Nels River, (d) Sabie River, (e) Olifants River, (f) Limpopo River, (g) Vaal River, (h) Orange River and (i) Buffels River; (2) What was the water quality of each specified river as reflected in the report; (3) On what date was the sample for each specified river taken; (4) What was the geographical location where each of the samples were taken?

Reply:

Refer to the table below for responses.

NAME OF THE RIVER

(1) RECENT BIOMONITORING

(2) WATER QUALITY

(3) SAMPLE DATE

(4) GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

Kaap River

done in 2013.

moderately impacted

The sample in Kaap River was taken on March/April 2012 (wet season) and August /September 2012 (dry season).

The geographical location of each samples were taken at the following sites; Holversum, Suid Kaap, Decedale; Noord Kaap, Oratava, Figtree, Lancaster and Louwscreek

Ngodwana River

done in 2013.

moderately impacted

March/April 2012 (wet season)and August /September 2012 (dry season).

Ngodwana dam

Nels River

    1. done in 2013
    1. moderately impacted

March/April 2012 (wet season) and August /September 2012 (dry season

Rhenoesterhoek and spitzkopje.

NAME OF THE RIVER

(1) RECENT BIOMONITORING

(2) WATER QUALITY

(3) SAMPLE DATE

(4) GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

Sabie River,

done in 2014.

largely good with a few sites showing fair quality particularly at the headwaters which were impacted by trout fishing and forestry.

Sabie River samples were last taken in February 2013 (Wet season) and September 2013 (Dry season).

Sabie headwaters, Long Tom, above Horseshoe Falls, Sabie Hoek, Above York Saw Mill, Below Horseshoe Falls, Sabie Sewage Farm, Above Rietfontein Mine, Rietfontein Mine, DR de Wet Sabie, Frankfort Bridge, Lunsklip, Brandwag, and Aand-de-Vliet.

Olifants River,

Done in 2015

fair state

February 2015 (Wet season) and August/ September

Klein Olifants, Kranspoortspruit, Selons, Steelpoort River, Watervals, Sterkspruit, Spekboom and Blyde.

Limpopo River

Monitoring of the Limpopo River started in 2010, in 2012 and 2013 and as it is toxic it may destroy some of aquatic life including invertebrates which indicate toxic substances in the water.

Only chemical programme is carried out with nutrients trend not posing threat. Most of the aquatic weeds are washed down the system from upstream

The sampling dates are as follows: 12-15 July 2010, 19-25 September 2011, 25June-01 July 2012, 11-14December 2013, 30- 31July2014, 02-04 2015

Kruger National Park after Limpopo River & Luvuvhu confluence. Kruger National Park bridge on Luvuvhu River., Kruger National Park on Limpopo River, Beitbridge, Limpopo River before the weir, Downstream of Beitbridge sewage works(Zim) Limpopo River, Grobler bridge weir Limpopo River, Lephalale River on R572 Road Bridge, Mokolo River on Bridge in R572 Road, Mogalakwena River bridge on R572, Matlabas River( Bridge to Thabazimbi), Crocodile River(Bridge to Rustenburg)

Vaal River

Biomonitoring of the Upper Vaal WMA was last done on the 26th – 28stMay 2015 for Quarter 2.

Water Quality analyses were not done for the two specified WMAs because (a) No accredited laboratory services contracted and (b) No site equipment available for on-site monitoring.

No Water Quality samples taken. Macro-invertebrate sampling was done on-site for the Upper Orange WMA (26 – 28 May 2015)

260768573” 270678081”; S26.87437 E28.116292; 26088336” 270356332”;

S26.73864 E27.592506 (for other tributary rivers,

NAME OF THE RIVER

(1) RECENT BIOMONITORING

(2) WATER QUALITY

(3) SAMPLE DATE

(4) GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

Orange River

Biomonitoring of the Upper Orange WMA was last done on the 9th – 11th June 2015 for Quarter 1 and the next biomonitoring of the Upper Orange WMA will be on the 14th – 18th of September 2015

Water Quality analyses were not done for the two specified WMAs because (a) No accredited laboratory services contracted and (b) No site equipment available for on-site monitoring.

11 of June 2015

290573464” 24007414344”; S270531084” E80475889”

Buffels River

The Buffels River is a non-perennial river and mostly dry throughout the year. It however flows during winter seasons only after heavy rainfall. There is therefore no active monitoring programme being implemented for this river.

N/A

N/A

N/A

---00O00---

28 October 2015 - NW3760

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether she approached the United Nations with a view to soliciting its support for South Africa and other African countries that are losing rhinos, elephants and other wildlife through systematic and wide-scale poaching in order for this matter to be dealt with at both national and international level, leading to a treaty coming into force so that South Africa and other African countries can continue to derive economic benefits through ecotourism and community based enterprises linked to the efficient management of wildlife and ecosystems; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. Existing multilateral agreements are being used to address poaching and illegal trade in wildlife, as well as ensuring that economic benefits can be derived from the efficient management of wildlife and ecosystems.

The Convention on Biological Diversity is a United Nations convention that has, as objectives, the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components; and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources. Furthermore, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) provides for sustainable utilisation, and is aimed at ensuring that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. South Africa is a Party to these conventions, and through collaboration with other Parties, issues of concern, including poaching, is being addressed, while sustainable utilisation is promoted.

--ooOoo--

28 October 2015 - NW3683

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Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

Has there been a moratorium placed on health posts; if so, (a) when was this moratorium put into place in the Eastern Cape Department of Health, (b) how many posts have been affected by this moratorium in respect of each staffing category and (c) when is it envisaged that this moratorium will be lifted?

Reply:

(a) No, there is no moratorium on health posts. The moratorium is on administration posts from 06 June 2015. The posts that are however exempted from this moratorium are on the appointments made against all the conditional grants.

(b) All vacant and funded non-clinical posts are affected by the moratorium. In cases, where these non-clinical posts are critical (e.g hospital managers/ CEO's), special motivation is made to the Head of Department for approval.

(c) The moratorium is reviewed by the Head of Department on quarterly basis, and will be uplifted when the Head of Department is satisfied that the financial position has stabilized and the potential over expenditure is averted.

END.

28 October 2015 - NW3517

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Since her reply to question 1972 on 9 July 2015, has her department gathered any statistics with regard to female learners that are allegedly absent from school for up to 55 days in respect of each year due to lack of (a) sanitary towels and (b) proper sanitation facilities in schools, including bathrooms sanitary bins; if not, when will her department conduct an audit in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What measures is her department willing to put in place immediately in affected schools to ensure that (a) sanitary bins and (b) other resources are available at such schools to keep female learners in school?

Reply:

(1) Since her reply to question 1972 on 9 July 2015, has her department gathered any statistics with regard to female learners that are allegedly absent from school for up to 55 days in respect of each year due to lack of (a) sanitary towels

RESPONSE

1(a) The Department does not have information indicating that female learners do not attend school as a result of poor and/or no ablution facilities. The Third Youth Risk Behaviour Survey, 2011 interviewed Grade 8-11 learners on, amongst others how easy or difficult it was for them to access sanitary towels when they needed them. Nationally, the majority of the female learners reported that it was easy to access sanitary towels when they needed them, with no significant variation by grade. Details are provided in the table below:

Grade

Number of respondents

% of high school learners who have access to sanitary towels (pads) when they need them

Grade 8

1 387

70.1%

Grade 9

1 427

75.1%

Grade 10

1 498

73.5%

Grade 11

1 344

73.1%

There is very limited research in this area. A significant research study in this regard was conducted in Nepal. These could also not provide substantial evidence in this regard. The Nepal research was undertaken in a two-pronged approach (control group and focus group) with the other group provided with sanitary ware. After some time, both groups were interviewed to assess improvement in attendance of learners who were provided with sanitary ware. The findings indicated that learners who were provided with sanitary ware reported no improvement in school attendance, despite the access to sanitary ware. This suggests that menstruation (lack of and unaffordability of sanitary ware) has no impact on school attendance.

 

Furthermore, the Department, through the analysis of 2014 General Household Survey (GHS) data from Statistics South Africa has found that there is no difference between boys and girls absenteeism rate at school (Table 1). On the reasons for being absent at school, the data did not include lack sanitary wares as a reason for absenteeism amongst female learners. But almost 15 per cent of female learners indicated that they were absent from school due to illness or injury compared to 11 per cent of male learners. The detailed reasons for learner absenteeism are provided in the table below disaggregated by gender (Table 2);

Table 1: Percentage of learners by number of days absent

No. of days

2014

 

Male

Female

1 day

2.8

2.6

2 days

1.3

1.2

3 days

0.6

0.5

4 days

0.3

0.3

5 days

1.6

1.5

Not Absent

93.4

94.0

Total

100.0

100.0

Source: General Household Survey, 2014, DBE own calculations

Table 2: Reasons given for learners who were absent for 5 days

Main reasons for being absent at school

2014

 

Male

Female

Illness/injury

11.0

14.5

Did not want to go to school

8.7

8.5

Need to take care of someone else at home

0.0

0.0

Employed/working outside home

0.0

0.0

Doing household chores

0.0

0.0

The weather was bad

4.0

6.5

No money for transport

3.4

0.6

Lack of transport/problems with transport

0.0

1.5

Writing exams

73.0

68.4

Does not feel safe at school

0.0

0.0

Total

100.0

100.0

Source: General Household Survey, 2014, DBE own calculations

1(b) Proper sanitation facilities in schools, including bathrooms sanitary bins; if not, when will her department conduct an audit in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details;

Response:

1(b) The Department does not have information indicating that female learners do not attend school as a result of poor and/or no ablution facilities. Instead of carrying out a survey whose outcomes would assess the impact of the absence of these facilities on absenteeism, the Department rather conducted condition assessments on the schools to asses those that do not have sanitation facilities and has put in place plans to provide these facilities as part of the ASIDI Programme and where these are available but insufficient or require upgrading, the Provincial Departments of Education have provided for those under the Education Infrastructure Grant and their Equitable Share.

2. What measures is her department willing to put in place immediately in affected schools to ensure that (a) sanitary bins and (b) other resources are available at such schools to keep female learners in school?

Response:

2(a) Schools are encouraged to ensure that sanitary towels bins and / or burners are made available in all female toilets and districts/circuits and health units in provinces are responsible for monitoring that.

2(b) As mandated by the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure (Gazette 37081 of 2013) the Provincial Education Departments have submitted implementation plans to provide adequate infrastructure, this includes the provision of basic services (sanitation, water and electricity) and other educational spaces, part of the purpose of providing sanitation facilities at schools is to create a conducive learning and teaching environment that would reduce learner absenteeism at schools. In cases where these facilities do not exist at all, they are provided for under the ASIDI Programme.

27 October 2015 - NW3704

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) are the reasons for the delay in the submission of periodic reports as required by the United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (UNCAT) and (b) corrective measures have been taken to avoid future delays in submitting reports as required by UNCAT?

Reply:

a) Government is dealing with a delay in submitting country reports due to a huge backlog of outstanding reports, lack of capacity and coordination mechanism over the years.

b) As a response, Government in early 2012 committed itself to make a positive turn- around in this regard. An Inter-departmental Committee on Treaty Obligations (IDC) has been established to work, amongst others, on the backlog of country reports. The IDC reports to the Directors- General of the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS), International Cooperation, Trade and Security (ICTS) and Social Protection Community and Human Development (SPCHD) Clusters. The Ministers of Justice and Correctional Services, International Relations and Co-operation and Minister in the Presidency responsible for Performance, Monitoring and Evaluation have oversight on compliance with treaty obligations. Officials are undergoing training on report writing; and a Government Manual on Treaty Obligations has been prepared by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, which co-chairs the IDC with the Department of International Relations and Co-operation. The report under the Convention Against Torture, although there was a delay, has been submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC). This report is being summarized currently as requested by the HRC.

27 October 2015 - NW3490

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)How many persons who are sentenced to life imprisonment and who qualify for consideration for parole are still incarcerated; (2) whether any case of the specified persons has not yet been considered by the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS); if so, (a) why have the specified cases not been considered and (b) how many such persons are affected; (3) whether the NCCS has put in place measures to deal with any backlogs that exist; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As at 10 September 2015 there was a total of two thousand two hundred and fifty eight (2258) persons who are sentenced to life imprisonment and who qualify for consideration for parole.

2. Yes, at the outset it is important that the Honourable member takes note that members of the National Council for Correctional Services are professionals appointed by the Minister in terms of Section 83 of the Correctional Services Act, 1998 (Act 111 of 1998). They are not in full time employment of Correctional Services.

As a result of the backlog created by the Van Wyk Judgment (case nr: 40915/10 in the North Gauteng High Court Pretoria) the newly appointed NCCS meets on a regular basis; meetings have been scheduled on a two weekly basis.

The consideration of offenders for parole is not a matter that can be dealt with lightly. Considerable time and effort is put into the deliberation of individual cases before a recommendation is made to the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services. Approximately thirty (30) cases are considered during a one day meeting and fifty (50) during a two day meeting. As at 10 September 2015 a total of three hundred and eighty eight (388) of the specified persons has not yet been considered by the National Council for Correctional Services.

3. Yes; Regular meetings are scheduled in an attempt to deal with the backlog.

27 October 2015 - NW3706

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What (a) is the current status of the parole application for a certain person (Mr Nicholas Pike) and (b) are the reasons for the delay in processing the specified application; (2) when are the specified delays expected to be resolved ?

Reply:

(1)(a) The offender was sentenced on 6 December 2006 to four (4) years imprisonment in terms of section 276(1)(i) of the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977 for driving a motor vehicle without the owner’s permission and theft. He was placed on Correctional Supervision on the 17 August 2007. The offender absconded from the system of community corrections. He committed crimes during this period and was sentenced on the 19th April 2008 to 15 years imprisonment for fraud and forgery and again on 20th April 2010 was sentenced to five (05) years imprisonment for fraud and forgery and the court ordered that the sentence to run concurrently with the 15 years imprisonment. He was considered by the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board (CSPB) for possible placement on parole on the 16th October 2014 and was given a further profile for the 18th February 2015.

(b) During consideration by the CSPB it was discovered that the offender did not complete his Correctional Supervision period and Community Corrections Office of Kgoši Mampuru II Management Area was approached for clarity on the number of outstanding days to be served for parole violation. Clarification was received from the Community Corrections offices that the offender still has to serve an additional 1193 days of his previous sentence. The effective sentence is currently 15 years plus 1193 days imprisonment.

(2) On 20 October 2015 the Community Corrections Office at Kgoši Mampuru II Management Area visited the CSPB at Leeuwkop Management Area, explained to the offender the period to be served for his absconding. Subsequently, he appeared before the CSPB on the 20th October 2015 and it was decided that he will be reconsidered on the 21st July 2016.

27 October 2015 - NW3705

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) Whether there was an outbreak of Leptospirosis at the Pollsmoor remand detention facility; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What actions have been taken to (a) quarantine inmates, (b) fumigate their personal effects, (c) deal with the rat infestation and (d) transfer inmates to other facilities; (3) What long term steps are being taken to improve sanitation, hygiene and overcrowding problems at the specified facility as recently highlighted by the report by the former judge of the SA Constitutional Court, Justice Cameron?

Reply:

  1. Yes, there was an outbreak of Leptospirosis at the Pollsmoor Remand Detention facility.

The details are as follows:

  • Two cases of Leptospirosis have been identified in August 2015.
  • One Leptospirosis case identified in September 2015.
 

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Patient Initials

Patient BC

Patient AM

Patient DV

Age

52

49

44

Race

Coloured

African

Coloured

Gender

Male

Male

Male

Unit

Section A (Cell 591)

Section A (Cell 545)

Section E 2

Date of onset of illness

25.07.2015

Returned to Clinic: 01.08.2015

04.08.2015

Returned to Clinic: 11.08.2015

31.08.2015

Returned

04.09.2015

Referred to Victoria Hospital

01.08.2015

11.08.2015

04.09.2015

Treatment Outcome date

Demised : 02.08.2015 at Victoria hospital

Discharged from Victoria hospital on the 20th August 2015

Discharged from Victoria hospital on the 17.09.2015

N.B. Confirmation of Leptospirosis Diagnosis by the Communicable Disease Control: Department of Health Western Cape was received by DCS on the 20th August 2015 for the first two cases identified at Victoria Hospital. Third case confirmation was received on the 07th September 2015.

PARLIAMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

2. Actions that had been taken to :

(a) Quarantine inmates,

  • Inmates were not quarantined; however those with moderate to severe signs were transferred immediately to Victoria Hospital as recommended by the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD).
  • All inmates who presented with nonspecific signs and symptoms were tested and treated empirically for Leptospirosis.

(b) Fumigate their personal effects,

  • Fumigation intervals of the cells have been increased.
  • Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment (PPE) was purchased and distributed for use in all areas that can expose one to risk of infection (e.g. waste handlers, cleaners).
  • All Remand Detainees were issued with the prescribed uniform.
  • Frequent washing and disinfecting of personal clothing was encouraged.

(c) deal with the rat infestation :

Pest Control service providers have been contracted for rodents and other pests control measures.

  • Advanced mechanical rodent traps were placed at access points to eradicate the rodents.
  • Gas fumigation of the tunnel will be implemented as per evacuation plan.
  • The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) was contacted to remove feral rats.
  • Waste Management has been intensified and waste collection has been reviewed from twice a week to daily. Waste storage procedures have been implemented.

PARLIAMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

  • Environmental hygiene was intensified through identification of additional cleaning teams, increasing the frequency of cleaning programs to twice daily and the entire facility scrub down was conducted as per facility evacuation plan.
  • Weekly inspection is being done by the City of Cape Town Environmental Health Practitioners and DCS officials.

(d) Transfer inmates to other facilities

  • In-service training was provided to clinical staff with regard to clinical presentation, diagnosis and prevention of Leptospirosis by 4th September 2015.
  • Inmates were screened as per NICD guidelines before they were evacuated to other Correctional Centers.
  • Evacuation plan was developed and inmates were transferred to other facilities in the Western Cape as per plan. The evacuation and transfer plan was implemented per schedule to mitigate risk factors.
  • All Provincial Stakeholders were informed about the evacuation plan.

3. Long term steps being taken to improve sanitation, hygiene and overcrowding problems at the specified facility as recently highlighted in the report by the former judge of the SA Constitutional Court, Justice Cameron.

Sanitation and hygiene:

  • Medication available and issued as prescribed.
  • Meals are provided three times per day as per meal plan.
  • Mattresses and blankets are issued on admission for sleeping purposes to all offenders.
  • Cleaning material availability monitored and cleaning procedures intensified.

PARLIAMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

  • Comprehensive HIV and AIDS as well as Tuberculosis programmes and services are implemented with the support of external partners. Condoms are distributed however there is malicious misuse of condoms (trafficking of contraband).

Overcrowding:

The Department of Correctional Services implements a multi-pronged strategy to manage overcrowding .The strategy consists of the following dimensions:

  • Managing levels of remand detainees (RD’s) through IJS Case Management Task Team & Inter-Sectoral Committee on Child Justice;
  • Managing levels of sentenced inmates through improving effective & appropriate use of conversion of sentence to community correctional supervision, release on parole, & transfers between correctional centres to attempt to establish some degree of evenness of overcrowding;
  • Ensuring progress with DCS capital works programme to upgrade correctional facilities & to build new correctional centres that are both cost effective & rehabilitation oriented;
  • Encouraging debate in South Africa about reason for incarceration as a sentence & encouraging an approach to appropriate sentencing that is focused on facilitating rehabilitation;
  • Enhancing community correctional supervision so that it can be better utilized as an appropriate sentence for less serious crimes;
  • Improving correction & development programmes within DCS to ensure enhanced facilitation of rehabilitation that targets offending behaviour;

PARLIAMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

  • Encouraging improvement of first & second levels of correction in family & social institutions & social & economic sector government departments respectively to decrease rate of entry into criminal justice system; and
  • Encouraging community involvement in social reintegration of offenders back into their community in order to assist in reducing levels of repeat offending.

27 October 2015 - NW3758

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has evaluated the number of requests from citizens and organizations to the Public Protector to investigate complaints of the abuse of authority from 1 September 2010 to 31 August 2015, in order to (a) pick out the common threads and deal with it systemically through legislative reform, (b) draw the attention of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, and the national executive to deal with such abuse of power, (c) work with the Minister of Police to ensure that hotspots of corruption in the Government are regularly and systematically investigated and transgressors prosecuted to maintain the confidence of citizens in the Government, (d) work with the Minister of Finance and the Auditor-General to ensure that better systems are put in place to prevent the serial and large-scale abuse of state funds and resources by rogue elements in the Government and (e) determine how best to provide the Public Protector’s Office with adequate resources in order to meet the avalanche of requests for the specified office to investigate; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a), (b), (c) and (d):

As the Honourable member is aware, in terms of section 181(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, all organs of state, through legislative and others measures, must assist and protect all the institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Public Protector, to ensure the independence, impartiality, dignity and effectiveness of these institutions.

It is, therefore, the responsibility of all organs of state, including the President, the national executive and Government, as referred to by the Honourable member, to evaluate the number of requests from citizens and organisations to the Public Protector to investigate the complaints of the abuse of authority from 1 September 2010 to 31 August 2015, in order to act upon it as indicated in paragraphs (a) to (d) of the Honourable member’s question.

In view of the above, I would kindly advise the Honourable member to scrutinize the relevant findings in all the Public Protector’s reports during the period in question and if necessary address his questions to the organs of state concerned.

 

As far as could be ascertained from the reports of the Public Protector during the period in question, there were no requests from citizens and organisations to the Public Protector to investigate complaints of the abuse of authority against the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development and it was therefore not necessary for the Department to act upon it as indicated in paragraphs (a) to (d) of the Honourable member’s question.

(e) Government has been supportive of the Public Protector’s requests for increasing its investigative capacity as is evident by the significant increase in its budget allocation throughout the previous Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) periods. The Honourable member may also be aware that Parliament approved the revised organizational structure of the Public Protector comprising of 420 posts in the 2012/2013 financial year. At the time, the Public Protector was advised by my colleague the Minister of Finance to develop a multi-year implementation plan to ensure that critical posts are prioritized and filled within the medium term expenditure framework allocations. During his 2015 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement on 21 October 2015, the Minister of Finance also indicated that the Public Protector will receive an additional allocation to address capacity challenges.

It should also be noted that within the current economic climate it is expected of all institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Public Protector, to work together to determine how to deal with matters in a more economic, cost effective and efficient manner and to ensure that there is no duplication as it relates to their mandates.

The Honourable member may further be aware, that the National Assembly is still seized with the report of the Ad hoc Committee on the Review of Chapter 9 and associated Institutions often referred to as the Kader Asmal report. This report contains a number of recommendations that may have far-reaching implications for the institutions supporting constitutional democracy, including the Public Protector. The Speaker of the National Assembly recently convened a workshop of relevant stakeholders in order to exchange views and to finalize the National Assembly’s position in order to help Parliament to adopt the report.

With all the above in mind and given our limited resources, it is my view that the Public Protector should be able to execute its mandate and deliver on its core business responsibilities within the budget allocation and assistance that was provided for by Government.

 

26 October 2015 - NW3697

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) How many road users have bought e-tags for the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) e-tolling system in Gauteng in each month since 03 December 2013; (2) How many of the e-tags that have been bought since 03 December 2013 are (a) still active accounts and (b) no longer being used; (3) How many road users have been using the GFIP freeways where the e-tolling system has been installed in each month since 03 December 2013; (4) What is the monthly amount that has been levied by the e-tolling system since December 2014?

Reply:

  1. The number of road users who bought e-tags for the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) e-tolling system in Gauteng in each month since 03 December 2013 are as follows:

Date period

Tag assigned to account

20131203

265 514

201401

168 175

201402

114 062

201403

89 689

201404

71 590

201405

63 963

201406

67 275

201407

52 854

201408

41 796

201409

35 696

201410

32 398

201411

26 329

201412

19 426

201501

25 628

201502

23 285

201503

22 673

201504

19 892

201505

23 810

201506

30 626

201507

37 852

201508

31 738

201509

32 190

Total

1 296 461

  1. All e-tags bought since 03 December 2013 are (a) active as and when the road network is used.
  2. See (a) above.

(3)  How many road users have been using the GFIP freeways where the e-tolling system has been installed in each month since 03 December 2013;

Unique VLN's  (Unique vehicle plate numbers)

Class

Overall

Dec-13

2,410,896

Jan-14

2,364,201

Feb-14

2,262,121

Mar-14

2,356,039

Apr-14

2,389,110

May-14

2,389,987

Jun-14

2,373,444

Jul-14

2,423,919

Aug-14

2,442,606

Sep-14

2,437,115

Oct-14

2,521,269

Nov-14

2,539,513

Dec-14

2,654,032

Jan-15

2,544,343

Feb-15

2,483,322

Mar-15

2,599,570

Apr-15

2,593,900

May-15

2,571,134

Jun-15

2,521,515

Jul-15

2,607,359

Aug-15

2,614,246

Sep-15

2,585,302

(4) The monthly amount that has been levied by the e-tolling system since December 2014?

Please see the graph below

        

Please note that the cash flow projections for August and September 2015 took into account the 60% discount offering for historic debt that will now become available to the public from 2 November 2015.

26 October 2015 - NW3408

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How many bodies were received at State mortuaries in each province (a) in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014 and (b) since 1 January 2015; (2) how many of these bodies in each specified year in each specified province were deaths as a result of (a) gunshot wounds, (b) stabbings, (c) motor vehicle accidents, (d) drownings, (e) fires, (f) pedestrian deaths, (g) motor cycle accidents and (h) cyclist deaths; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) and (2) Please refer to Tables 1 to 9 below:

TABLE 1: EASTERN CAPE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

7812

9713

10747

9131

8763

6430

Gunshot wounds

515

515

586

937

641

509

Stabbings

2225

1018

2219

2169

2194

1598

Motor vehicle accidents

1467

1489

1449

1429

1337

1165

Drowning

319

486

340

368

306

208

Fires

377

372

303

273

263

188

Pedestrian deaths

371

365

280

229

252

218

Motorcycle accidents

4

8

7

1

3

2

Cyclist deaths

1

3

4

2

2

1

TABLE 2: FREE STATE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

4020

3799

4000

3086

3472

1853

Gunshot wounds

194

180

213

135

246

128

Stabbings

544

528

494

392

476

229

Motor vehicle accidents

1202

1056

1163

857

906

571

Drowning

151

137

137

90

154

64

Fires

148

139

151

164

169

92

Pedestrian deaths

218

186

218

188

207

108

Motorcycle accidents

21

23

22

27

32

10

Cyclist deaths

Included in motorcycle accidents

Included in motorcycle accidents

Included in motorcycle accidents

Included in motorcycle accidents

Included in motorcycle accidents

Included in motorcycle accidents

TABLE 3: GAUTENG

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

14761

14019

13602

14586

14866

6601

Gunshot wounds

Data not available

Data not available

1413

1552

1608

175

Stabbings

Data not available

Data not available

1097

1164

1257

115

Motor vehicle accidents

Data not available

Data not available

1881

1927

1707

206

Drowning

Data not available

Data not available

270

268

210

15

Fires

Data not available

Data not available

665

710

715

349

Pedestrian deaths

Data not available

Data not available

1212

1276

1193

541

Motorcycle accidents

Data not available

Data not available

148

177

188

20

Cyclist deaths

Data not available

Data not available

Included in the motor vehicle accidents

Included in the motor vehicle accidents

Included in the motor vehicle accidents

Included in the motor vehicle accidents

TABLE 4: KWA-ZULU NATAL

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

13330

12551

12643

12824

12718

6935

Gunshot wounds

Data not available

1450

1425

1418

1538

641

Stabbings

Data not available

1516

1560

1510

1534

615

Motor vehicle accidents

Data not available

3209

2997

2998

2908

1291

Drowning

Data not available

1703

(Asphyxial – drowning, hanging, etc)

1842

(Asphyxial – drowning, hanging, etc)

1730

(Asphyxial – drowning, hanging, etc)

1660

(Asphyxial – drowning, hanging, etc)

592

(Asphyxial – drowning, hanging, etc)

Fires

Data not available

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Pedestrian deaths

Data not available

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Motorcycle accidents

Data not available

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Cyclist deaths

Data not available

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

TABLE 5: LIMPOPO

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

2401

2376

2277

2224

2321

3167

Gunshot wounds

221

201

194

186

217

175

Stabbings

238

230

283

267

304

209

Motor vehicle accidents

1660

1641

1509

1443

1465

1204

Drowning

151

168

143

181

177

81

Fires

131

136

148

147

158

101

Pedestrian deaths

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Motorcycle accidents

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Cyclist deaths

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

TABLE 6: MPUMALANGA

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

3855

3802

4271

4635

4561

3014

Gunshot wounds

221

245

355

470

448

138

Stabbings

279

258

258

288

333

222

Motor vehicle accidents

1090

1058

1224

1360

1095

493

Drowning

137

114

118

165

158

59

Fires

96

129

161

191

153

81

Pedestrian deaths

434

481

439

394

402

288

Motorcycle accidents

4

3

20

20

9

6

Cyclist deaths

3

2

3

7

2

5

TABLE 7: NORTHERN CAPE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

1626

1634

1713

1707

1803

705

Gunshot wounds

360

32

30

35

29

6

Stabbings

Included in gunshot wounds above

264

261

294

308

90

Motor vehicle accidents

390

318

304

254

356

114

Drowning

243

84

107

117

102

15

Fires

Included in above

85

79

71

79

30

Pedestrian deaths

Included in motor vehicle accidents

90

103

123

132

43

Motorcycle accidents

Included in motor vehicle accidents

3

2

3

4

2

Cyclist deaths

Included in motor vehicle accidents

9

20

7

5

4

TABLE 8: NORTH WEST

 

(1)(i) 2010

(1)(ii) 2011

(1)(iii) 2012

(1)(iv) 2013

(1)(v) 2014

(1)(b) 2015

Total bodies received in:

3627

3539

3316

3695

3560

2678

Gunshot wounds

157

183

235

222

188

198

Stabbings

392

504

401

364

409

279

Motor vehicle accidents

914

936

883

813

856

755

Drowning

96

115

96

83

132

49

Fires

202

183

134

177

137

130

Pedestrian deaths

313

251

288

161

192

176

Motorcycle accidents

38

33

17

21

25

19

Cyclist deaths

34

15

25

41

25

7

TABLE 9: WESTERN CAPE

 

(1)(i) 2010

(1)(ii) 2011

(1)(iii) 2012

(1)(iv) 2013

(1)(v) 2014

(1)(b) 2015

Total bodies received in:

9372

9394

9800

9989

10297

7692

Gunshot wounds

607

712

875

1045

1343

982

Stabbings

1265

1239

1330

1338

1402

962

Motor vehicle accidents

1451

1355

1279

1227

1289

943

Drowning

181

204

210

197

200

117

Fires

370

359

341

350

302

261

Pedestrian deaths

619

614

587

588

573

436

Motorcycle accidents

66

64

80

70

75

48

Cyclist deaths

23

40

28

22

27

19

END.

26 October 2015 - NW3649

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

What (i) contracts, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding and/or (iv) any similar documents have been signed with the People’s Republic of China for the (aa) construction of locomotives or (bb) manufacturing of parts for locomotives, (b) when were the specified documents signed, (c) who signed the specified documents, (d) what are the locomotives going to be used for, (e) where will the locomotives be built, (f) when will the locomotives be completed and ready for operation and (g) what is the projected cost of each specified project?

Reply:

(i) (ii) (ii) None

(iv) (aa) (bb) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) The rest of the question falls away

Please refer this question to Department of Public Enterprise for response

26 October 2015 - NW3591

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(a) How many ambulances are currently registered for use and (b) how many of the specified ambulances are fully operational in respect of each province?

Reply:

a) A total of 2690 ambulances are currently registered for use in the country.

b) There is a total of 1431 fully operational and stipulated in the table below by Province:

Provinces

Total Ambulance Fleet

Number of Operational Ambulances

Eastern Cape

425

200

Free State

186

135

Gauteng

667

389

Kwa Zulu Natal

531

290

Limpopo

381

165

Mpumalanga

212

110

North West

120

59

Northern Cape

166

95

Western Cape

259

156

Total

2690

1431

END.

26 October 2015 - NW3400

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Public Works:

Whether the Government has launched any investigation into new buildings contracted for the state which on the date of delivery showed such serious structural defects that it made the brand new building unsafe to occupy as was evident at Scottsdene Secondary School in Cape Town; if not, why not; if so, what was the reason for such building(s) proceeding to completion without proper engineering checks at every stage to ensure that construction met the standard requirements?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

As per the earlier undertaking to provide a reply to this question to the Honourable Member the response is as follows:

The Department of Public Works has not launched an investigation to date, as the Department has not received reports of its buildings having structural defects such as the one the Honourable Member is alluding to.

Within the current system of managing infrastructure projects, there is a process to address latent defects (defects that happen or are detected after the practical handover of projects / buildings) which goes as such:

  • When a project is practically completed and declared fit for the intended use, the Practical Completion Certificate is issued by the Principal Agent.
  • From the practical completion date an allowance of 3 to 12 months is made for the unforeseen defects to be reported and corrected. The defects have to be corrected by the Contractor who was responsible for the project within a reasonable time after an instruction has been issued by the Principal Agent. This is done by way of retainer provisions within the contract between the Department and the contractor. Once these defects have been corrected the final account can be signed off, paving a way for a well completed project, free of defects.

The school referred in the question is a project that was implemented by the Western Cape Provincial Department of Transport and Public Works.

____________________________________________________________________

26 October 2015 - NW3651

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) agreements, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding or (iv) any similar document have been signed with the Peoples Republic of China by (aa) her department and (bb) any of the entities reporting to her and (b) in each respect of each specified case, (i) when were such documents signed, (ii) who signed the documents, (iii) what are the relevant details, (iv) where would the realisation of such projects take place, (v) when will the projects be completed and ready for operation and (vi) what are the projected costs for each project?

Reply:

Department

i) Agreements NONE

ii) Tenders NONE

iii) Memorandum of Understanding;

  • Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the People’s Republic of China on Cooperation in Transport Related Matters.
  • Signed in 2010.
  • Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the People’s Republic of China on Cooperation in Railway Related Matters.
  • Signed in 2010.
  • The above mentioned agreements have lapsed and are due for review and renegotiation.

Air Traffic & Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) ATNS has not signed any documents with the Peoples Republic of China.

(i) None

(ii) None

(iii) None

(iv) None

(b) Not applicable

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

(v) Not applicable

(vi) Not applicable

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa (SOC) Limited does not have any (i) agreements, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding or (iv) any similar document signed with the People’s Republic of China.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a)(i) N/A (ii) N/A (iii) N/A (iv) A Letter of Intent (LoI) was signed (aa) N/A (bb) between the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) and the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC). (b) (i) The LoI was signed on the 15th April 2015.(ii) The LoI was signed by Mr Gawie Bestbier, in his capacity as acting Director of Civil Aviation on behalf of SACAA and by Mr Li Jian, the Deputy Administrator of CAAC. (iii) The SACAA and CAAC agreed to cooperate in the field of civil aviation safety, especially in the airworthiness certification of aircraft and to start the process of the certification of aircraft LE500. (iv)The type acceptance of the LE500 will be done in accordance with the Civil Aviation Regulations, 2011. The process requires Certification Engineers of SACAA to audit the manufacturer of the aircraft in China. This is followed by the consideration of the application in the SACAA offices in Midrand. (v) The type acceptance process will commence once the manufacturer applies for the type acceptance of the aircraft and will be completed once the type acceptance certificate is issued by SACAA. (vi)The costs of the visit to the manufacturer are borne by the applicant, in this case, the manufacturer.

Cross Border Road Transport Limited (CBRTA)

(a) (i), (ii), (iii), (iv); (bb), (b) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) does not have any agreements, tenders, memorandums of understanding with the People’s Republic of China. (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v) and (vi) are not applicable as the C-BRTA does not have any agreements, tenders, memorandums of understanding with the People’s Republic of China.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

SANRAL has no agreement, tenders or memorandums of understandings or any similar documents with the People’s Republic of China.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a)(bb) The Road Accident Fund has not signed any (i) agreements, (ii) tenders, (iii) memorandums of understanding or (iv) any similar document with the Peoples Republic of China, and (b) therefore none of the further questions under this paragraph are relevant to the Road Accident Fund.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

The RTMC has not signed any agreements, tenders, memoranda of understandings with the Peoples Republic of China

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

The RTIA has not signed any agreements, tenders, memoranda of understandings with the Peoples Republic of China

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The RSR as an agency of the DoT does not have authority to enter into international agreements with states and therefor the RSR has no agreements, tenders, and memorandums of understanding or any similar document signed with the People’s Republic of China.

Passenger Rail of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. PRASA has no agreement, tender or memorandum of understanding with the People’s Republic of China. PRASA has a contract with Huawei, a global information and communications technology solutions provider from the People’s Republic of China.
  1. (i) PRASA entered into the contract with Huawei in March 2013.

(iii) I am told that after an open and competitive procurement process, Huawei was selected as the successful bidder, to provide PRASA with a digital radio railway signaling system for passenger rail services in South Africa. The system provides digital communications to the train driver and equipment on train protection (best practice), which replaces the current antiquated analogue system.

(iv) The system is being implemented across PRASA’s rail system.

(v) the completion date is January 2017. Gauteng is 70% complete while Kwa-Zulu Natal and the Western Cape is 30% complete.

(vi) The total cost of the project is R750 million.

Ports Regulator (PR)

  1. The Ports Regulator has not signed any agreements, tenders, memorandums of understanding with the Peoples Republic of China.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

SAMSA does not enter into bilateral arrangements with countries. Accordingly SAMSA has not signed any agreements or tenders with the People’s Republic of China.

26 October 2015 - NW3592

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Which third parties have been contracted for the provision of ambulance services in each province and (b) what is the (i) length and (ii) value of each contract in each case?

Reply:

a) Free State Province: There is an existing contract between the Provincial EMS and Buthelezi Ambulance Service.

North West Province: Private Emergency Medical Services are contracted for provision of services only when there are outstanding emergency calls.

 

b) (i) Free State Province: The contract with Buthelezi Ambulance Service is for three years, which commenced on 1 December 2013.

North West Province: The MOU with the private Emergency Medical Services is for a year, which is renewed on a yearly basis.

(ii) Free State Province: Buthelezi Ambulance Service is mainly used for inter-hospital transfers and benefits include:

  • EMS ambulances are available for primary response community emergencies;
  • Improved EMS response times;
  • There is a positive impact on maternal and obstetric cases;
  • The life span of the provincial ambulances is increased because of reduced kilometres being travelled. This has a direct impact on the on the monthly fleet expenditure;
  • There is a reduction in overtime for EMS staff;
  • Nurses do not leave their facilities during transfers.

North West Province: The MOU states that the private service will be used as and when the need arises and the services are rendered at the Uniformed Patient Fee Schedule rates.

The main benefit is that the response time to the Priority 1 patient (emergency) has improved.

END.

26 October 2015 - NW3532

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How many bodies were received at State mortuaries in each province (a) in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014 and (b) since 1 January 2015; (2) how many of these bodies in each specified year in each specified province were deaths as a result of (a) motor cycle accidents, (b) cyclist deaths, (c) Aids, (d) tuberculosis, (e) other diseases and (f) old age; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The reply to questions (1) and (2) are summarized in Table 1 to 9 below: Forensic Pathology Service (FPS)

TABLE 1: EASTERN CAPE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

7812

9713

10747

9131

8763

6430

Motorcycle accidents

4

8

7

1

3

2

Cyclist deaths

1

3

4

2

2

1

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 2: FREE STATE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

4020

3799

4000

3086

3472

1853

Motorcycle accidents

21

23

22

27

32

10

Cyclist deaths

Included in a above

Included in a above

Included in a above

Included in a above

Included in a above

Included in a above

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 3: GAUTENG

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

14761

14019

13602

14586

14866

6601

Motorcycle accidents

Data not available

Data not available

148

177

188

20

Cyclist deaths

Data not available

Data not available

1881

Including Motor Vehicle Accidents

1927

Including Motor Vehicle Accidents

1707

Including Motor Vehicle Accidents

206

Including Motor Vehicle Accidents

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 4: KWA-ZULU NATAL

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

13330

12551

12643

12824

12718

6935

Motorcycle accidents

Data not available

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Cyclist deaths

Data not available

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 5: LIMPOPO

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

2401

2376

2277

2224

2321

3167

Motorcycle accidents

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

1

Cyclist deaths

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Not specified

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 6: MPUMALANGA

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

3855

3802

4271

4635

4561

3014

Motorcycle accidents

4

3

20

20

9

6

Cyclist deaths

3

2

3

7

2

5

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 7: NORTHERN CAPE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

1626

1634

1713

1707

1803

705

Motorcycle accidents

Included in c above

3

2

3

4

2

Cyclist deaths

Included in c above

9

20

7

5

4

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 8: NORTH WEST

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

3627

3539

3316

3695

3560

2678

Motorcycle accidents

38

33

17

21

25

19

Cyclist deaths

34

15

25

41

25

7

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

TABLE 9: WESTERN CAPE

 

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total bodies received in:

9372

9394

9800

9989

10297

7692

Motorcycle accidents

66

64

80

70

75

48

Cyclist deaths

23

40

28

22

27

19

Aids

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Tuberculosis

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Other diseases

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

Old age

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

* FPS only conducts autopsies on unnatural deaths

END.

26 October 2015 - NW3335

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Public Works:

(1) What is the total cost and purpose of work or contracts awarded relating to renovations and building works carried out at the Ministerial Executive Estate in Newlands, Cape Town, from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) whether any representations were made or decisions taken to replace any existing tarred surfaces within the Estate with any other type of surface such as cobble stones; if so, (a) what was the rationale in arriving at that decision, (b) when was the decision taken, (c) from whom did the representations emanate that resulted in the matter being considered and (d) what were or are the costs associated with the replacement of the tarred surfaces?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

No.

Residence Name

Purpose of work

Cost

Project Concluded in year

1.

Groote Schuur Estate, Avenue 4 – Heritage Residence

Kitchen, floors, roof, bathrooms, electricity, cottage and garage.

R7 256 956.72

2012

2.

Groote Schuur Estate, Mecklenburg - Heritage Residence

Kitchen, floors, roof, bathrooms, electricity, cottage and garages.

R10 283 780.27

2013

3.

Groote Schuur Estate, Avenue 5 – Heritage Residence

Kitchen, floors, roof, bathrooms, electricity, cottage and garages.

R17 804 451.59

2013

4.

Groote Schuur Estate, La Maisonette – Heritage Residence

Kitchen, floors, roof, bathrooms, electricity, cottage and garages

R13 612 785.00

2013

(2) No.

(a), (b), (c) and (d) Fall away.

___________________________________________________________________________

23 October 2015 - NW3415

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has a new turnaround strategy to speed up the process of providing persons with Breaking New Ground houses in order to prevent protests that continue to take place in the Eastern Cape, Gauteng and Limpopo?

Reply:

Yes, Honourable member, the Department does have a turnaround strategy to speed up the provision of housing and specifically in the areas where we have witnessed protests. The Department adopted the War Room Strategy which involves the allocation by the Department of Professional Response Teams (PRTs) in each region. PRTs are qualified professionals who are on the database to provide services as needed. These include engineering, town panning, and other technical services employed in the built environment. It is intended that when problems are identified in respect of any project, a municipality or province will, in the joint teams with the Department, identify the professional services required then bring on board the PRT required.

23 October 2015 - NW3644

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 1943 on 29 May 2015, will she provide the full details on the current status of the process of attaining information from provinces which relates to the current socio-economic status of residents occupying old hostel buildings?

Reply:

The National Department of Human Settlements did embark on a process of attaining information from provinces which related to the socio-economic status of residents who occupy old hostel buildings. It has since been established that provinces do not have databases that contain personal information for individuals who are residing in old hostel buildings in question. The efforts to obtain this information will continue so that my department is properly informed of the situation in the drafting of the new policy.

23 October 2015 - NW2873

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

(1)How many SA Police Service (SAPS) officers in each province were charged with aiding an escapee (a) in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) how many such cases against the specified SAPS officers have been (a) withdrawn and/or (b) are pending; (3) how (a) many escapees did a SAPS officers assist in escaping and (b) did they assist the escapee in each specified case?

Reply:

(1)(a) and (b)

 

Province

(1)(a)

2014-2015

(1)(b)

1 April – 30 June 2015

Eastern Cape

40

1

Free State

30

14

Gauteng

51

4

KwaZulu-Natal

34

16

Limpopo

4

2

Mpumalanga

44

10

North West

16

13

Northern Cape

6

3

Western Cape

102

15

Total

327

78

(2)(a) and (b)

(2)(a)

Cases withdrawn

(2)(b)

Cases pending

1

0

0

3

10

3

8

0

0

0

3

0

6

1

0

0

11

13

39

20

(3)(a) and (b).

Province

(3)(a) Escapees assisted by SAPS officers

(3)(b) How escapees were assisted by SAPS officers

Eastern Cape

106

The members of the Service failed to comply with the existing governance, governing custody management. The prescripts regarding the safe and secure detention management of persons which are in SAPS custody were not complied with. The provisions of the National Plan to prevent escapes from and deaths in police custody (NCCF Instruction 16/2015) were not complied with.

Free State

16

 

Gauteng

55

 

KwaZulu-Natal

63

 

Limpopo

4

 

Mpumalanga

13

 

North West

29

 

Northern Cape

58

 

Western Cape

64

 

Total

408

 

23 October 2015 - NW3537

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she is taking any steps to assist the residents of Malvern flats at Arundel Road in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality who were forcefully removed from the houses that the Government had provided to them; if not, why not; if so, what steps?

Reply:

The Arundel Garden Flats in Malvern were previously government owned rental units and managed by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality. The households occupying the Arundel Gardens were given the opportunity to acquire ownership of the units through the Enhanced Extended Discount Benefit Scheme. This is a government subsidy programme aimed at assisting beneficiaries, who rented state property prior to 27th April 1994, to purchase their units at discounted prices. All the households occupying the units in question were transferred for individual ownership because the occupants elected to take ownership of their units. In that case, these are privately owned houses now which the responsibility of the owners. The role of government has been served and concluded.

Thus the units have been converted to sectional title ownership. The units form part of a body corporate and these are currently being managed by private body corporates. The body corporates charge owners levies for the maintenance and repairs. In instances where owners default on their levy payments, the body corporate then undertakes legal process to recover such amounts.

The Department unfortunately is not able to intervene in the legal processes, which have been activated in this matter.

It is however suggested that should the tenants’ grievances be legitimate, a complaint should be lodged with the Community Schemes Ombud Services (CSOS), for investigation and a ruling on the matter. The CSOS is a state entity established to ensure the regulation, compliance and monitoring of matters related to community ownership schemes and this includes related disputes between owners and managing agents.

23 October 2015 - NW3685

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a) 3287 and (b) 3280 on 18 September 2015, her department’s annual report for the 2014-15 financial year outlines the specified information as requested in questions 3287 and 3280; if not, why not, in each case; if so, in each case, what are the costs incurred by her department regarding (i) air travel between Cape Town and Gauteng, (ii) accommodation in Cape Town and (iii) car rental for officials in Cape Town?

Reply:

The Honourable member is referred to the audited financial statements in the 2014/15 Annual Report of the Department of Human Settlements.

22 October 2015 - NW3629

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What steps has she taken to address the grievances of the Khoisan Kingdom and All People Party regarding the re-integration of former Khoisan soldiers into the SA National Defence Force?

Reply:

The integration process under the Termination of Integration Intake Act of 2001 terminated on 31 March 2002.

21 October 2015 - NW3731

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What is his department’s total financial contribution, under the Film Incentive Programme, to the filming of Mad Max: Fury Road; (2) why was the specified movie selected for financial support in spite of the fact that it was filmed mainly in Namibia; (3) considering that the film was a commercial failure, does his department assess the likely commercial success of the films it decides to support prior to awarding the incentive?NW4415E

Reply:

 

1) The Financial contribution under the Film Incentive Programme to the Film of Mad Max: Fury Road was R 72 340 609

2) The objective of the Foreign Film and TV production incentive is to attract Foreign Direct Investment and to create jobs that expose local film practitioners to work that they would, otherwise, never be exposed to given the budget sizes applicable to local productions. The film incentive provides a rebate to filmmakers based on the Qualifying South African Production Expenditure (QSAPE) of the amount spent on the production in SA. The film Mad Max: Fury Road complied with the requirements of the incentive to generate more than R 289 million QSAPE injected into South Africa’s economy.

3) nThe film incentive is a means to attract investment and create jobs while supporting the growth of the industry. The dti incentive evaluation does not assess commercial viability of productions, but rather the economic impact to be derived from the production of films in South Africa. In this instance, the committed value of spending in the economy did take place and committed number of actors were employed for the production of the movie.

21 October 2015 - NW3470

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What is her department doing to resolve the signal problem in Beauvallon, Northern Cape, where residents cannot pick-up a radio and/or television signal and (b) when will her department complete putting measures in place to ensure that the specified residents have access to a radio and/or television signal?

Reply:

The Department is still in the process of investigating the signal distribution challenges in Beauvallon. The report will be made available once completed.

 

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

21 October 2015 - NW3555

Profile picture: James, Ms LV

James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department did monitor the implementation of the HIV/AIDS conditional grant and produced a report in the first quarter in accordance with its annual performance plan; if not, why not; if so, will he table a copy of the specified report in the National Assembly?

Reply:

The National Department of Health conducted the quarter 1 review for the Comprehensive HIV and AIDS Conditional grant during August and September 2015 in line with the Annual Performance Plan and the relevant Conditional Grant Framework. All provinces were visited and the relevant reports are available.

END.

21 October 2015 - NW2911

Profile picture: Filtane, Mr ML

Filtane, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to the public hospital in Butterworth, Eastern Cape, which is experiencing a shortage of doctors (details furnished) whilst servicing areas like Butterworth, Centane and Idutywa which constitute a large population, his department intends to (a) increase the supply of doctors to this public health facility, (b) improve the conditions of the basic necessities for the functionality of a public health facility, including the oxygen cylinders which are in many instances empty, the non-availability of drinking and washing water as well as repairing non-functioning toilets and (c) interact with the relevant authority to improve the access road to the hospital as it is full of potholes; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details, in each case?

Reply:

a) Yes Honourable Member, we are trying our best to increase the number of doctors in public health facilities, especially in rural areas. We are even trying to contract Private doctors in NHI Pilot Sites to work in public clinics.

b) Yes we are planning to do so through Operation Phakisa.

c) Yes, Operation Phakisa aims to improve total infrastructure including roads, water supply, electricity, telecommunications, etc.

END.

21 October 2015 - NW3478

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Communications

Which independent community publications were given advertising business opportunities by the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) in the (i) 2012-2013, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) what amount did GCIS spend on the specified advertising business opportunities in each case? (

Reply:

 

(a)(b) The GCIS supplier database has been evolving to improve the quality of data over time.

   (i) In 2012-13, no data for individual community publications was captured, however data is available at media sales representative level with amounts spent on advertising submitted below (refer table 1).

   (ii) Detailed information for 2013-14 listing community publications and amounts spent on advertising is submitted below (refer table 2)

    (iii) Detailed information for 2014-15 listing community publications and amounts spent on advertising is submitted below (refer table 3)

TABLE 1

 

2012/2013

Adspend (R's)

Capro

R 92 987.40

Kasilocator Media

R 23 760.00

Milele Group

R 6 321 371.79

Nab

R 37 195.78

 

 

Total

R 6 475 314.97

   

TABLE 2

 

2013/2014

Adspend (R's)

 

 

The Farm Worker Magazine

R 8 721.00

Alex

R 341 550.00

Alex Pioneer

R 20 002.37

Aliwal Weekly

R 4 343.50

Chatsworth Rising Sun

R 25 649.60

Cosmo Chronicle

R 136 147.52

Courier

R 6 311.76

De Aar

R 2 043.99

Die Courant Swartrand & Weskus

R 4 879.00

Die Plattelander

R 5 075.91

Die Pos

R 3 357.60

Dizindaba

R 28 118.28

Eastern Cape Today

R 59 148.35

Eastern Free State Issue

R 23 789.22

Ethekwini Times

R 82 934.21

Excelsior News

R 2 312.00

Free State News

R 2 816.88

Free State Sun

R 3 701.24

Hammarsdale Izindaba

R 50 536.81

Highlands Panorama

R 9 047.17

Highveld Tribune

R 24 894.63

Highway Izindaba

R 4 318.00

Innercity Gazzete

R 79 414.45

Jeffreys Bay Courant

R 4 806.75

Kathorus Mail

R 9 347.11

Kathu Gazette

R 15 357.46

Kokstad Advertiser

R 10 582.50

Limpopo Combo

R 53 580.00

Limpopo Mirror

R 14 753.96

Madibeng Times

R 6 443.85

Mangaung Issue

R 30 955.13

Midlands News

R 4 046.00

Mmega District News

R 11 223.08

Newcastle Express

R 9 460.50

North West Independent

R 8 619.00

Northern Bulletin

R 32 843.73

Northern Star

R 4 590.00

Nw Independent

R 14 468.72

Ons Kontrei

R 3 790.15

Overvaal

R 2 840.00

Phoenix Tabloid

R 14 642.10

Pinetown Express

R 8 032.50

Pintown Izindaba

R 19 795.51

Polokwane Observer

R 25 707.40

Pondo News

R 23 275.60

Seipone

R 17 161.19

Somerset Budget & Pearston Adv

R 5 056.31

Soweto Times

R 17 306.00

Stanger Weekly

R 9 847.25

The Beat

R 2 422.84

The Reporter

R 3 315.34

Tshwane Sun Atteridgeville

R 7 861.14

Tshwane Sun Mamelodi

R 21 386.34

Tshwane Sun Soshanguve

R 12 022.74

Umlazi Times

R 30 158.00

Umvoti Lights

R 8 833.20

Weekly Gazette

R 24 816.60

Winelands Echo

R 35 683.41

Witzenberg Herald

R 6 009.50

Zithethele

R 54 024.30

Zoutpansberger

R 8 109.00

Kasilocator

R 153 084.00

Public Eye

R 18 487.46

Alex Pioneer

R 48 651.21

Bushbuckridge News

R 105 173.18

Cape Flats

R 136 472.58

Cape Times

R 30 072.81

Chalkline

R 48 294.26

Coal City

R 66 048.70

Cosmo Chronicle

R 62 147.74

Delmas News

R 38 199.00

Die Horison

R 10 052.00

Dikekelethu

R 43 585.20

Dizindaba

R 116 123.56

Express

R 15 128.26

Ezakwazulu

R 55 451.10

Free State News

R 161 753.98

Ganyesa

R 36 475.81

Greater Alex Today

R 45 348.72

Ikansi

R 28 236.10

Ikwezi

R 67 806.95

Impact 24/7

R 67 850.32

Inhloso Yezwe

R 79 579.01

Innercity Gazzete

R 13 701.32

Inthuthuko

R 71 892.10

Isibani Somhakati

R 44 455.28

Issue

R 22 345.60

Khanyisa News

R 123 442.60

Kuruman Chronicle

R 65 419.46

Lentswe

R 30 458.03

Mapepeza Comm Newspaper

R 16 898.10

Mash News

R 18 487.46

Masilonyana

R 95 393.06

Metro

R 54 355.46

Mhluzi Reflection

R 26 133.68

Mmegadigang

R 13 886.00

Ngoho

R 87 221.34

Nkomazi Observer

R 30 031.69

Northern Bulletin

R 152 639.17

Northern Cape Times

R 14 574.55

Northern Review

R 14 855.24

Nthavela

R 96 415.69

Pheteho

R 49 891.59

Pioneer Express

R 48 651.21

Pioneer Mirror

R 48 651.21

Pioneer North

R 48 651.21

Platinum Express

R 37 067.98

Pondo News

R 43 656.00

Public Eye

R 17 563.09

Puisano

R 20 334.28

Rainbow News

R 110 190.77

Religious News

R 15 471.42

Rise N Shine

R 30 246.80

Sebatokgomo

R 8 820.80

Seipone

R 51 447.52

Shift

R 15 471.42

Sosh Times

R 40 612.20

Sportseye

R 15 471.42

The Voice

R 20 740.88

Thembisile

R 24 721.28

Tsibani Somphakati

R 17 709.22

Ubhaqa

R 43 656.00

Ukholo

R 43 656.00

Umamgobhozi

R 45 174.90

Umaqeketha

R 28 346.15

Umzinyathi

R 27 476.87

Vutha News

R 13 270.40

Winelands Echo

R 78 250.81

Xhariep Independent

R 35 455.18

Zithethele

R 101 631.11

Ziwaphi News

R 14 807.35

Bloemfontein Courant

R 11 689.56

Bonus

R 11 511.72

Brits Pos

R 6 648.48

Capricorn Voice

R 24 241.94

Chatsworth Rising Sun

R 5 057.77

Express

R 3 545.86

Eyethu Bay Watch

R 4 595.66

Gemsbok

R 5 372.13

George Herald

R 4 584.18

Klerksdorp Rekord

R 12 118.62

Lentswe

R 6 366.04

Letaba Herald

R 11 158.16

Lowvelder

R 27 593.50

Mpumalanga Mirror

R 59 211.64

Mpumalanga News

R 19 481.45

Noordwester

R 10 216.22

Parys Gazette

R 6 843.00

Phalabora Herald

R 4 303.04

Polokwane Express

R 4 299.35

Randburg Herald

R 4 555.44

Review Makhado

R 1 183.59

Rustenburg Herald

R 20 682.34

Southern Courier

R 26 513.66

Stellander

R 2 988.91

The Mail

R 26 589.48

Weekend Revies

R 3 623.82

Witbank News

R 13 081.50

Zululand Observer

R 13 707.00

 

 

 

R 5 397 774.61

 

 

TABLE 3

 

2014/2015

Adspend (R's)

 

 

Agribulletin

R 5 211.67

Aliwal Weekly

R 10 343.11

Al-Qalam

R 7 530.76

Bus Sedibeng News

R 10 241.94

Chatsworth Tabloid

R 24 854.85

Coastal Weekly

R 22 472.62

Community Focus

R 10 206.01

Courier

R 8 822.16

De Aar Echo

R 10 815.53

Die Courant Swartland & Weskus

R 6 985.52

Dizindaba

R 11 098.34

Durban North News

R 27 004.48

Eastern Cape

R 13 325.67

Eastern Cape Mirror

R 4 923.89

Eastern Cape Today

R 52 008.38

Eastern Free State Issue

R 12 321.09

Ekurhuleni News

R 6 143.07

Ethekwini Times

R 40 779.40

Excelsior News

R 11 267.53

Frankfort Herald

R 7 770.41

Free State Sun

R 17 740.41

Glenwood Weekly Gazette

R 5 693.07

Greater Alex

R 10 214.05

Hammarsdale Izindaba

R 11 023.34

Highlands Panorama

R 6 069.82

Highveld Tribune

R 17 579.60

Jeffreys Bay Courant

R 4 918.64

Katharorus Mail

R 4 988.41

Kathu Gazette

R 19 221.54

Kokstad Advertiser

R 8 441.93

Kwêvoël

R 5 352.95

Ladysmith Herald

R 22 029.25

Limpopo Mirror

R 8 852.30

Makhulu News

R 11 715.79

Mangaung Issue

R 36 207.31

Meander Chronicle

R 7 604.71

Midlands News

R 4 989.81

Mmega District News

R 10 488.66

Mountain Echo

R 6 805.17

Newcastle Express

R 21 471.10

North West Bulletin

R 7 205.29

North West Independent

R 10 165.49

Northern Star

R 10 674.50

Orange Farm Poortjie Indaba

R 6 614.01

Overvaal

R 6 043.65

Phoenix

R 73 036.24

Phoenix Tabloid

R 24 525.20

Pinetown Izindaba

R 18 889.69

Platinum Press

R 4 344.99

Polokwane Observer

R 3 589.17

Pondo News

R 28 813.66

Primary News

R 6 209.35

Recorder

R 8 308.90

Rekord

R 8 869.26

Seipone

R 8 947.75

Selpone

R 8 491.50

Somerset Budget & Pearston Adv.

R 6 339.12

South Coast News

R 24 295.48

Southern Star

R 31 325.22

Soweto Express

R 7 172.32

Stanger Weekly

R 12 235.91

The Bugle

R 21 669.94

The Herald Middelburg

R 15 234.89

The Reporter

R 4 534.92

Township Times

R 13 289.06

Tshwane Sun Hammanskraal

R 22 604.83

Umlati Times

R 13 571.10

Umlazi Times

R 37 864.84

Umvoti Light

R 7 264.24

Uphongola News

R 6 189.82

Victoria West Messenger

R 3 564.97

Weekly Gazette

R 39 941.26

Westville Weekly Gazette

R 5 651.21

Zeerust News

R 10 705.34

Free4All

R 23 954.89

Kasilocator

R 80 655.00

Boa Bokone

R 13 452.00

Bua Bokone

R 27 713.40

Bushbuckridge News

R 74 711.64

Cape Flats

R 58 659.84

Cape Flats News

R 129 207.24

Chalkline

R 30 942.85

Cosmo Chronicle

R 134 825.76

Dikelethu

R 30 942.85

Dizindaba

R 132 660.13

Ezakwazulu

R 42 427.08

Free State News

R 164 990.07

Free State Sun

R 69 976.03

Ganyaessa News

R 15 476.88

Ganyesa News

R 24 471.24

Hamanskraal News

R 79 252.79

Ikansi

R 32 571.42

Ikwezi

R 76 083.30

Ikwezi Lase Mthatha

R 22 745.28

Impact 24/7

R 36 304.43

Inhkoso News

R 11 861.02

Inhloso Yezwe

R 87 319.45

Inthuthuko

R 152 907.29

Isibani Somphakathi

R 49 767.84

Issue

R 10 886.32

Khanyisa News

R 292 356.99

Kuruman Chronicle

R 62 815.60

Kuruman Cronicle

R 15 563.28

Kuruman News

R 75 524.53

Lenstwe

R 14 838.53

Limpopo News

R 46 422.42

Limpopo Youth Chamber

R 39 900.00

Luziki Adv Space

R 41 268.00

Maluti Observer

R 39 429.18

Mammgobhozi

R 22 401.00

Mapapeza

R 11 931.24

Mapepeza

R 10 738.01

Masilonyana

R 215 193.19

Masilonyana News

R 91 722.09

Metro News

R 43 388.97

Nel Mams Times

R 82 338.10

Ngobo

R 15 830.04

Ngoho

R 133 506.18

Nkomazi Observer

R 163 614.25

Northern Bulletin

R 146 004.57

Northern Cape Times

R 12 169.50

Nthavela

R 121 527.51

Phetoho

R 11 334.68

Platinum Kosh

R 64 815.84

Platinum Press

R 164 145.96

Platinum Weekly

R 55 404.00

Puisano

R 21 122.95

Rain World

R 41 005.80

Rainbow News

R 121 231.48

Rise 'N Shine

R 211 903.34

Seipone

R 36 394.77

Selpone

R 17 287.52

Shift

R 30 942.85

Sosh Time

R 96 935.12

Sosh Times

R 23 269.68

Township Times

R 67 137.32

Umamgobhozi

R 77 246.86

Umaqetheka

R 22 581.02

Umzinyathi

R 113 516.91

Winelands Echo

R 16 791.95

Xhariep Independent

R 47 279.45

Zithele

R 24 634.09

Zithethele

R 45 833.99

African Reporter

R 9 064.00

Alex News

R 8 240.00

Bosveld Review

R 1 648.00

Chiawelo Urban News

R 10 300.00

Chlawelo Urban News

R 10 508.29

Cxpress

R 4 120.00

Diepkloof Urban News

R 12 360.00

Dobsonville Urban News

R 13 390.00

Eldorado Park Urban News

R 12 360.00

Eyethu Amajuba

R 6 180.00

Eyethu Edendale

R 18 540.00

Eyethu Intshonalanga

R 12 360.00

Eyethu Ugu

R 14 832.00

Eyethu Umlazi

R 12 360.00

Eyethu Uthukela

R 6 180.00

George Herald

R 14 042.73

Go Express East London

R 5 909.76

Higvelder

R 7 416.00

Jabavu Urban News

R 21 838.29

Klerksdorp Record

R 8 652.00

Knysna Plett Herald

R 1 771.60

Krugersdorp News

R 11 647.77

Ladysmith Gazette

R 2 575.00

Mafikeng Mail

R 8 310.60

Meadowlands Urban News

R 11 330.00

Mid South Coast Rising Sun

R 8 312.10

Mossel Bay Advertiser

R 3 811.00

Mpumalanga News

R 4 581.89

Newcastle District Advertiser

R 5 273.60

Orlando Urban News

R 22 868.29

Outshoorn Courant

R 1 236.00

Pe Express Indaba

R 20 088.00

Pimville Urban News

R 10 300.00

Pretoria Record Central

R 7 642.60

Pretoria Record Mamelodi

R 8 343.00

Pretoria Record North

R 12 992.24

Pretoria Record Soweto

R 11 948.00

Protea Urban News

R 20 808.29

Public Eye

R 12 360.00

Randburg Sun

R 18 401.52

Rustenburg Herald

R 45 199.37

Sasolburg Ster

R 6 180.00

Sedibeng Star

R 13 995.05

Sedibeng Ster

R 41 612.00

South Cape Forum

R 1 771.60

Standerton Advertiser

R 1 895.20

Weekend Review

R 4 326.00

West Side Urban News

R 6 592.00

Zola Urban News

R 12 360.00

 

 

 

R 6 236 615.93

   

 

 

MR DONALD LIPHOKO

ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL

GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

21 October 2015 - NW3586

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether, with reference to the broadcast of the Legal Research Group Workshop of a certain political organization (name furnished) on the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) news channel, DSTV 404 and live streaming of the specified workshop on sabcnews.com, the SABC charged (a) the specified political organization and/or (b) any other entity a fee for this broadcast; if not, (i) why not, (ii) on what grounds did the SABC broadcast the specified event free of charge and (iii) will this opportunity be afforded to other political parties free of charge; if so, what amount did the SABC charge the specified organization?

Reply:

The decision to broadcast the workshop was based on the view that the subject matter under discussion was topical and in the public interest, given the discomfort many individuals express at the seemingly unfettered practice of certain media organizations to publish whatever it pleases about targeted individuals, and the lack of recourse available to those said individuals.

The SABC did not charge any organization, a fee (or otherwise) to cover the event.

The event was deemed news worthy and warranted coverage.

Editorial decisions i.e. what to cover and why, is firmly vested in the newsrooms of the SABC News department.

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

21 October 2015 - NW2854

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

Did a certain person (name and details furnished) conduct an enquiry into SA Broadcasting Corporation Board members without their knowledge; if so, (a) on what statutory provisions did the specified person rely when she did so, (b) on what date was the enquiry instituted, (c) what were the terms of reference and (d) what where the findings?

Reply:

The Company Secretary did not conduct any enquiry into the SABC Board members.

(a), (b), (c) and (d) are therefore not applicable.

 

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

21 October 2015 - NW2510

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) How many times has the National Communications Task Team met since the date of its inception up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) in each case, (i) what was the purpose of the meeting, (ii) who attended the meeting and (iii) what was the venue of each specified meeting?

Reply:

The National Communications Task Team (NCTT) presented a comprehensive report to the Minister which is being evaluated. All the details relating to the work of the NCTT are contained in the report and will be made available in due course.

 

 

MR N MUNZHELELE

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

21 October 2015 - NW3477

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Communications

Does the Department use the All Media Product Survey produced by the South African Audience Research Foundation to guide its planning in respect of (a) media and (b) advertising; if not, what do they use? (NW4138E) MINISTRY:COMMUNICATIONS REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Private Bag X 745, Pretoria, 0001, Tel: +27 12 473 0164 Fax: +27 12 473 0585 URL: http://www.gov.za NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NUMBER: 3477 of 2015 DATE OF PUBLICATION: 11 September 2015 Mr E J Marais (DA) to ask the Minister of Communications Does the Department use the All Media Product Survey produced by the South African Audience Research Foundation to guide its planning in respect of (a) media and (b) advertising; if not, what do they use? (NW4138E) Reply: Minister of Communications The Government Communication and Information System uses the All Media Product Survey for (a) media planning and (b) advertising strategies. MR DONALD LIPHOKO ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS DATE: MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS DATE:

Reply:

Minister of Communications

The Government Communication and Information System uses the All Media Product Survey for (a) media planning and (b) advertising strategies.

 

 

 

MR DONALD LIPHOKO

ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

21 October 2015 - NW3289

Profile picture: Chewane, Dr H

Chewane, Dr H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) The department spent R 195 808 on travel costs for the Minister between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014/15 financial year.

(ii) Undertook 31 trips.

(b) (i) (aa) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides Accommodation;

(bb) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides Accommodation;

(ii) (aa) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides Accommodation;

(bb) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides accommodation

 

2. (a) (i) Spent R 185 335 on Deputy Minister's travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014/15 financial year.

(ii) Undertook 24 trips.

(b) (i) (aa) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides Accommodation;

(bb) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides Accommodation;

(ii) (aa) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides Accommodation;

(bb) None Applicable. The National Department of Public Work provides accommodation

END.

21 October 2015 - NW3362

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2855 on 26 August 2015, a reporter accompanied her on her trip to the Atlanta Lifestyle Hub Show and Sante FE Folk Art Festival in July 2015; if not, what is her position regarding a report in a certain online publication of 10 July 2015 (details furnished); if so, (a) what was the name of the reporter, (b) what organisation does the reporter represent, (c) what was the purpose of taking the reporter with her on the specified trip, (d) who paid for the reporter to accompany her, (e) what amount did it cost for the reporter to accompany her and (f) what amount did her department spend on (aa) flights, (bb) accommodation and (cc) other expenses in respect of the reporter?

Reply:

Minister was only accompanied by officials from the Ministry/Department of Communications.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE