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08 December 2015 - NW3775

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has been actively promoting the concept of the African Renaissance with a view to ensuring, as former president, Mr Thabo Mbeki, had observed, that the African upper echelons do not remain as a mere parasite on the rest of society, who continue to enjoy self-endowed mandates to define and use their political power in a manner that keeps Africa at the periphery of the world economy, poor, underdeveloped and incapable of development, if not. Why not; if so, how has he and the Government pushed forward the ideals of the African Renaissance and (b) what outcome has he and the Government achieved in relation thereto since 2009?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will be aware that African stability, development and prosperity have been the bedrock of the ANC-led government since the dawn of our democracy in 1994.

We continue this trajectory by committing to various AU programmes, with the following discernible examples:

  1. Peace, Security and Stability: On 08 November 2015, I presided over the closing ceremony of the Amani Africa Field Training Exercise held in Lohatla, Northern Cape, whose main objective was to test the ‘Rapid Deployment Capacity’ (RDC) of the African Standby Force. The success of this Exercise points to the Continent’s readiness to expeditiously provide solutions to some of our instability challenges.

What was most gratifying about Amani Africa was the fact that Southern African Development Community (SADC), the East African Standby Force, North Africa Regional Command, Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Volunteering Nations of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises (ACIRC), all participated in this historic exercise. Amani Africa is a practical headway that has been made to ensure stability, which is indispensable to continental development. The Honorable Member will also recall the swiftness with which SADC addressed the recent challenges in Lesotho.

 

2. NEPAD: As the Honourable Member will know, NEPAD has been one of the corner stones of the African Renaissance. The initiative is anchored on our collective determination to extricate ourselves and the Continent from underdevelopment and exclusion in a globalising world. It is a call for a new relationship based on domestic, continental and global partnerships to address under-development, founded on the realisation of common interest, obligations, commitments, benefit and equality.

NEPAD has a number of key programmes, one of which is infrastructure development. The Continent continues to make progress in this regard through the implementation of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) and the Presidential Infrastructure Championing Initiative (PICI) chaired by South Africa, and spearheaded by seven dedicated Heads of State and Government. PICI is part of PIDA, serving as an initiative to bring political leadership to bear, to fast-track the implementation of important projects from the PIDA Priority Action Plan by identifying and dealing with blockages, missing links and choke-points.

For example, under PICI, progress is being made in closing the missing link of the trans-Saharan highway project covering 4500 kilometres between Algeria and Nigeria and $40 million has been secured towards its continued construction. It is expected to be completed in 2016. The optic fibre component of the same project has seen substantial progress, with the completion of 60% of the project. The ICT Broadband Fibre Optic Network Linking Neighbouring States project, championed by Rwanda, has been completed. Egypt recently held the first Steering Committee meeting of the footprint states of the Navigational route between Lake Victoria and the Mediterranean Sea. Construction on the Grand Inga project is due to begin soon. The Dakar Financing Summit in June 2014 prioritized 16 PIDA projects for exposure to private and institutional investors.

With an infrastructure deficit of about USD 92 billion per year, NEPAD is making every effort to highlight this very important challenge. In light of this, at its annual meeting in May 2014, the African Development Bank launched the Africa50 initiative in order to mobilise USD 100 billion for regional infrastructure projects, focusing on addressing the key part of the project cycle that is project preparation. There are several projects in this regard, so this is by no means an exhaustible list.

3. APRM:

The APRM derives from NEPAD and its aim is to foster and promote good political, economic, social and corporate governance in Africa by encouraging Member States to adopt international best practice, which should eventually translate into political stability, economic growth, sustainable development and sub-regional and continental economic integration. South Africa is committed to advancing, nationally and continentally, the objectives of the APRM.

South Africa acceded to the APRM in March 2003 and was reviewed in July 2005. This resulted in the release of the Country Review Reports in 2007 and its’ National Programme of Action .South Africa tabled its First Report on the Implementation of the Programme of Action in January 2009. The second such Report was tabled in January 2011, with the Third Report being tabled in January 2014. South Africa will soon enter the second Peer Review phase.

Membership of the APRM has risen to 35 and 17 countries have been reviewed to date. This is an utterly unique system of self-assessment in the world in terms of its transparency and extent, and the underlying benefits cannot be overstated in terms of the shaping of national development discourse and providing models of best practice on key cross-cutting issues.

4. CAADP AND OTHER PROGRAMMES:

Another key priority for African development is agriculture, as reflected in the AU/NEPAD Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP). CAADP is one of NEPAD’s most successful programmes and has been key to driving development on the Continent and responding to poverty, hunger and joblessness. CAADP ensures that the great commodity that we have, arable agricultural land, is used for the benefit of all Africans.

In this regard, 52 states have been engaged in CAADP related interventions, 40 have received direct support under CAADP, 40 have signed CAADP national compacts, 30 National Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans have been developed and reviewed, at least 8 countries have met the 10% of budget target, and 4 RECs have developed their own regional compacts. Ten countries have registered more than 6% annual growth in agriculture.

5. PARTNERSHIPS:

The role of international partners is to help scale up and accelerate our own efforts. Therefore, South Africa continues to play a leading role in engaging Africa’s Strategic Multilateral Partnerships, such as FOCAC, TICAD, Africa-EU, Africa India, Africa-Korea, Africa-Arab, Africa-South America, NAASP, and Africa-Turkey going forward. One of the key NEPAD principles is “New partnerships within Africa and with the international community”. It is for this reason that all of the Partnerships have been constructed on the understanding that engagement with Africa is to be done within the framework of NEPAD, as the socio-economic development programme of the AU, with the aim of assisting in the achievement of AU/NEPAD objectives and programmes.

South Africa continues to play a key role in the review of all of Africa’s partnerships with the North and the South, being conducted by the AU PRC Sub-Committee on Multilateral Cooperation.

South Africa is Co-Chair with China of FOCAC until 2018 and we have hosted a very successful FOCAC Summit in Johannesburg on 4-5 December 2015.

President Xi Jinping of China announced a development partnership with Africa worth $60 billion, accompanied by a 10 point plan focusing on areas that are key priorities for development in the continent. We look forward to taking the win-win cooperation further as the African continent as it holds great promise for the renewal of the African continent economically. This occurred on the backdrop of a very successful India-Africa Summit.

08 December 2015 - NW3753

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Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Government intends to encourage an independent mediation process in respect of disputes with other parties, opposition parties included, as first recourse in order to find amicable resolution so that matters of dispute do not have to be referred to Courts for adjudication; if not, why not; if so, what steps does the Government intend to take in this regard.

Reply:

The general principle is that all political and other disputes should be resolved through discussion, negotiation, mediation, and other forms of non-adversarial dispute resolution mechanisms. We should only resort to the courts when these channels have failed. Parties should refrain from using the courts to resolve political disputes. Parliament has various mechanisms in place to resolve disputes between parties in terms of its Rules, and all parties should make optimal use of those Rules to resolve disputes.

08 December 2015 - NW4089

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a closed circuit television network; if not, why not; if so, how many cameras are (a) on the network and (b) currently active?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4206

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether the National Conventional Arms Control Committee approved any export of arms to foreign states under section 14 of the National Conventional Arms Control Act, Act 41 of 2002 (a) in the (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2015; if not, why not; if so, (aa) to which states, (bb) and what are the further relevant details;

Reply:

There have been exports in terms of Section 14 which were authorised by the NCACC to foreign countries in the years 2010; 2011; 2012; 2013; 2014.The reporting cycle is on a calendar year basis and not on financial year basis, in line with section 23 of the NCAC Act. Therefore the reports are from January to December of each year. This means that the 2015 export report will only be available in 2016.

The NCACC considers all applications against set criteria in terms of section 15 as provided for in the NCAC Act and this occurs after a deliberate process by various Government Departments.

The Reports on Transfers of controlled items are compiled quarterly (4 quarters), as well as annually and are tabled in Parliament through the office of the Speaker of the National Assembly and the Chairperson of the National Council of Provinces. These reports are subsequently referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Defence.

These exports are further reported on to the United Nations in line with International obligations of South Africa in terms of Treaties and Conventions, in accordance with International Law.

From the ensuing, it is the intention of South Africa to ensure that arms transferred do not end up with rogue elements elsewhere in the world. South Africa is committed to contributing to Peace and Security in the world.

Lastly, the NCACC activities are subject to the Auditor-General (AG) of South Africa, who perform annual evaluations and assessments on qualitative aspects of the work undertaken, per given period. The past period performance of the NCACC by the AG in this regard was found to be without qualification.

 

Approved / Not Approved

Mr J T Radebe, MP

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

08 December 2015 - NW3969

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)     Whether his statement on 8 November 2015, that his political organisation comes first, represents his policy position as the President of the Republic of South Africa; if not, (2) whether he will unreservedly retract the specified statement and apologise to the nation for devaluing the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, which he is sworn to uphold through the specified statement; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) how is he going to apologise; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the responsibility of the President of South Africa to place the interest of South Africa above every other endeavour; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. I made the statement that the ANC comes first at an ANC Provincial Conference in my capacity as the President of the ANC. Since its founding in 1912 the ANC has been at the forefront of the struggles to defeat apartheid colonialism, and since its election into power in 1994, to liberate South Africans from the triple challenge of poverty, unemployment and inequality.

Like many South Africans, I joined the ANC to contribute to the achievement of its historic mission of building a non-racial, non-sexist, prosperous and democratic society. Given this important role that the ANC has played and still plays in leading this society towards the achievement of these goals, and considering that a large number of citizens have put their faith and hopes on the ANC to lead them to a better life for all, it is important that the work of building the ANC into a stronger organization that can continue to lead society is vigorously pursued.

There is therefore nothing wrong or untoward in saying the ANC comes first. It does not mean I love my country any less. It is in fact because of the love of my country and my commitment to its success that I believe that the ANC should be stronger so that it can lead us to a united and prosperous society.

2. The statement I made does not devalue the Constitution of the Republic in any way, nor does it contradict the Oath of Office which I took when I was sworn in as the President of the Republic of South Africa. There is therefore no reason to retract the statement I made.

08 December 2015 - NW4058

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 160 military veterans who received burial support and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

The information can be processed through the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans in the new year, as the beneficiaries names are considered confidential.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4050

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 6 795 military veterans who were provided access to healthcare and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4093

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)For each of the metropolitan municipalities, (a) how many officials are currently on suspension and (b) for each suspended official, (i) what is the position of the specified official, (ii) what is the reason for the suspension, (iii) for how long has each specified official been suspended and (iv) what has been their total remuneration during the period of suspension; (2) whether any severance packages were paid to any municipal officials; if so, for each specified official, (a) who was the official, (b) why was the severance package paid, (c) for how long was the specified official employed by each of the specified municipalities and (d) what was the total amount of the severance package?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4057

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 1 343 military veterans who accessed counselling services and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW3790

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

In the light of the Supreme Court of Appeal’s finding on 8 October 2015, in the Hlaudi Motsoeneng case and the implications the specified court’s finding has for the powers of the Public Protector, what action is he going to take to comply with the remedial actions contained in the Public Protector’s report Secure in Comfort?

Reply:

The question concerns matters that are currently before the Constitutional Court in the case of the EFF v the Speaker of the National Assembly and Others.   I cannot respond at this stage in deference to the courts.

08 December 2015 - NW4059

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to various replies received from her predecessors pertaining to the movement of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, and all relevant operational planning requirements (details furnished) and with reference to her replies to question 1221 on 9 June 2015, question 1941 on 9 June 2015 and question 3510 on 20 October 2015, on what basis is she refusing to provide the requested information in each case, since former ministers did provide similar detailed information when it was requested; (2) whether she submitted the specified information requested through a parliamentary channel that protects such security sensitive information; if not, why not; if so, in each case, on what date? NW4930E

Reply:

  1. I am not going to provide security sensitive information about the movement of the President
  2. No

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4090

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)For each metropolitan municipality, what (a) amount was spent on legal fees in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) was this amount spent on; (2) whether any of the officials employed by the specified municipalities are lawyers that have been removed from the roll; if so, (a) what is their current role at each of the specified municipalities and (b) why were they employed?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3717

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, given (a) the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 3509 on 22 September 2015 and (b) his statements on 15 September 2015 during his foreign policy briefing confirming the invitation of a Sudanese delegation to the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan has been (i) invited to and/or (ii) confirmed his attendance at the FOCC Summit to be held in Johannesburg in December 2015?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of Sudan did not attend the Forum of China-Africa Cooperation Summit, (FOCAC).

08 December 2015 - NW3905

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, subsequent to his declaration of 2011 as the year of job creation followed by the announcement of several initiatives to boost job creation, including the setting up of a R9 billion jobs fund, the Government has achieved any significant milestones towards creating five million jobs by 2020 and bringing the unemployment rate down to 15% as it had set out to do; if not, why not; if so,(a) has half that target been reached in half the time that was allocated to achieve that goal and (b) have decent jobs indeed been created on an incremental basis annually?

Reply:

a) Yes, there has been progress in job creation in the South African economy, although the unemployment rate remains unacceptably high.

The most recent Quarterly Labour Force Survey released by Statistics SA puts total employment in September 2015 at 15 828 000. This is an increase of some 2 500 000 over the September 2011 QLFS estimate of 13 318 000 employed persons. It should be noted, however, that a new Master Sample based on the 2011 census data was introduced in 2015, and Statistics SA therefore cautions that year-on-year changes should be interpreted with care. Notwithstanding this caution, the data indicate that if the rate of increase in employment over the past years is continued over the period ahead, approximately 5 million jobs will be created by 2020.

It is also apparent from the QLFS data that the rate of increase in the labour force has exceeded the rate of job creation, and so the unemployment rate has remained broadly unchanged. In September 2011 the estimated rate of unemployment was 25.7 per cent, and in September 2015 it was 25.5 per cent.

b) With respect to the question whether decent jobs have been created on an incremental basis annually, Government is mindful that wages are low and employment opportunities are irregular in some parts of the economy. Between 2011 and 2015, formal non-agricultural employment increased by approximately 1.5 million. In the September 2015 QLFS, informal sector work accounts for 2.7 million jobs, agriculture employment is 900 000 and private households account for 1.28 million jobs. These are important and sizeable shares of the employment total, and working conditions are varied in these sectors.

Programmes and policy initiatives that are aimed at improving conditions amongst lower-income workers include sectoral wage determinations by the Minister of Labour, investment in training and skills development and small enterprise support programmes. Government’s main direct contribution to the expansion of job opportunities is through the Expanded Public Works Programme and the Community Work Programme, and the youth employment incentive has been introduced to encourage firms to create work opportunities for first-time young work seekers.

The objective of the Jobs Fund is to support innovative approaches to employment creation and work seeker support, thereby contributing to evidence and learning about effective employment initiatives and strategies. The Jobs Fund aims to create 150 000 sustainable jobs and will contribute to evidence-based policy making.

To date the Jobs Fund has issued 5 calls for proposals, and approved 108 project applications of which 85 are currently being implemented. R5.6 billion in grants has been committed to the 108 projects. These project partners have committed R7.9 billion in matched funding. To date R2.78 billion in grants have been disbursed to implementing projects and R4.2 billion in matched funding has already been leveraged from these partners. The 85 projects being currently implemented have to date created 60 675 new permanent jobs and an additional 30 358 persons have been placed in vacant positions on a permanent basis. 16 124 short term jobs have been created, 13 291 persons completed internships and 128 196 persons has received work readiness/technical training.

Most of the jobs created have been entry level jobs for which the salary ranges between the sectoral minimum wage and R3500. Most of those employed are youth in their first jobs. Jobs have also been created in the salary cohort of R3500- R8800 with a few jobs created at salary levels in excess of R8000 per month. Jobs are evidenced through the submission of contracts of employment and payroll amongst others.

08 December 2015 - NW4092

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, for each metropolitan municipality, any municipal official or councillor undertook any international travel (a) in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) since 1 July 2015; if so, (i) what was the purpose of each trip, (ii) who undertook each trip and (iii) what was the total cost of each trip including (aa) flights and (bb) accommodation?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4056

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 1 700 military veterans who accessed job opportunities and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4088

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to each metropolitan municipality’s 2015-16 budget, what is the proposed (a) operational and (b) capital expenditure on services to informal settlements?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4055

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 97 military veterans’ co-operatives that were registered and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

The information can be processed through the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans in the new year, as the beneficiaries names are considered confidential.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

07 December 2015 - NW4172

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether each (a) national and (b) provincial government department, unit, entity and component is required to submit a service delivery improvement plan; if not, why not; if so, (i) how often, (ii) by what date for each submission period and (iii) to whom; (2) (a) what process is followed to assess the service delivery plans that have been submitted, (b) what standards are used to assess the value of each specified plan and (c) what action is taken in the event that a specified plan is not considered as acceptable; (3) how is compliance with commitments made in the service delivery plans monitored; (4) whether a member of the public can access the plans of the various departments; if not, why not; if so, how is such access achieved?

Reply:

(1) Yes. In terms of the Directive on Service Delivery Improvements Plans dated 30 October 2008, issued by the Minister for Public Service and Administration, the national and provincial departments are required to submit their Service Delivery Improvement Plans by 31 March every three years and to report on the progress made annually to the Department of Public Service and Administration.

The Service Delivery Improvements Plans should be aligned to the Public Access Information Act (PAIA) and to the Public Administrative and Justice Act (PAJA) and should also provide an indication on how Service Delivery Improvements Plans are cascaded to service points. The Service Delivery Improvements Plans must be signed-off by Head of the Department (HOD) and also the Executive Authority.

(2) (a) The assessment process of the Service Delivery Improvement Plans include; (i) scrutinizing preliminary scoring using an assessment tool, (ii) structured peer and/or sector assessments for verification and validation of scoring by the cross-cutting teams using the same assessment tool, (iii) provision of preliminary feedback to the participants by the Department of Public Service and Administration.

(b) The standards used to assess the value of the specified plan are based on critical compliance areas of the Service Delivery Improvements Plans Assessment Tool and include;

(i) Openness & transparency on the process followed in developing the Service Delivery Improvement Plans (SDIP).

  1. Meaningful utilization of a situation analysis in identifying the critical service areas that should be addressed in the SDIP.
  2. Process mapping, human resources and Unit costing that should lead to a problem statement to be addressed through the mandatory SDIP template.

(c) The cluster and sector of the SDIP assessment and the capacity building workshops organized by the DPSA assist departments to identify their weaknesses, develop and implement corrective measures to address the unacceptable SDIPs developed by the departments.

The workshops provide a platform for technical support, capacity building and practical solutions with departmental cross cutting teams in order to develop realistic, credible and effective SDIPs.

(3) Monitoring and reporting of compliance with commitments is undertaken through annual progress reporting and Annual Operational Plans. Service Delivery Improvement Plan monitoring follow-ups are made through the Khaedu programme and Public Service Month programme.

National and Provincial departments have also put in place internal processes and system to monitor compliance with commitments in the service delivery plans, including reporting to internal departmental structures and eventually to the DPSA in line with the legislative framework.

(4) The Service Delivery Improvements Plan is currently an Internally Driven Plan. However, it is not a confidential document and can be made available on request.

07 December 2015 - NW4164

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether he has taken action against officials who were (a) responsible for the growth of irregular expenditure from R74,3 million in the 2013-14 financial year to R80,6 million in the 2014-15 financial year, considering how constrained the fiscus is currently and (b) implicated in the fruitless and wasteful expenditure of R5,5 million in the 2013-14 and R330 000 during the 2014-15 period; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the details of the consequences the transgressing officials had to bear for their transgression, failures or misdemeanours?

Reply:

(a) Disciplinary action has been taken against the official who was responsible for part of the growth of irregular expenditure from R74,3 million in the 2013-14 financial year to R80,6 million in the 2014-15 financial year

(b) Disciplinary action has been taken against the official who was implicated in some of the fruitless and wasteful expenditure of R5,5 million in 2013-14 and R330 000 during the 2014-15 period

My department has since appointed the service provider to investigate the irregular expenditure and fruitless and wasteful expenditure in order to establish the extent of transgression and deal with consequent management.

Since the investigation report has not yet been released, the recommendations to take disciplinary action against the transgressors have not yet been implemented.

 
 

07 December 2015 - NW4082

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether any reasons have been given by his department as to why ministerial commitments in terms of improving audit findings are still in progress when they were due at the end of March 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Ministerial commitments are ongoing in nature. The assessment as to whether these commitments were implemented or are still in progress is done by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA). Until such time as the department obtains a clean audit outcome, the AGSA is likely to report that these ongoing Ministerial commitments will remain work in progress. Clearly the onus rests on the department to convince the AGSA that it has improved its asset management, accountability of reporting from the regions, leadership, financial accountability, record keeping and has implemented proper financial management processes and credible action plans before the AGSA will agree that these commitments were fully implemented.

07 December 2015 - NW3414

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

In light of the 2022 Commonwealth Games that the country will host, does his department have any programmes in place to promote these games in the rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In the next 7 years all relevant programmes of the Department, including the conditional grant framework will be aligned to the delivery on amongst other, the legacy of the Commonwealth Games 2022 for the country.

In this vein, it is envisaged that the club development programme that is being piloted in 2 provinces presently will be rolled out in the other provinces, targeting mainly the rural areas.

Within these programmes, there will be capacity development initiatives, the provision of equipment and attire and formation of clubs and local sports structures

Through a targeted approach basic sport and recreation infrastructure will be rolled out to those areas most in need.

Sport and Recreation South Africa will work closely with the local Organising Committee to ensure that rural areas are also beneficiaries to other initiatives.

07 December 2015 - NW4071

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to housing delivery in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape, (a) how many Breaking New Ground houses have been built in the specified municipality (i) since 2011 and (ii) in the beginning of the 2015-16 financial year and (b) what were the targets for the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14, (iv) 2014-15 and (v) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

(a) (i) A total of 11 252 houses were delivered in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality since 2011 (01 April 2011 to 31 October 2015) with budgets allocated from the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG).

(ii) Preliminary information indicates that at least 440 houses were completed in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality from 01 April 2015 to 31 October 2015.

The table below provides information on deliverable versus the targets for each year, where available:

FINANCIAL YEAR

HOUSES - TARGET

HOUSES DELIVERED

2011-12

Information is not available

2 983

2012-13

Information is not available

1 560

2013-14

3 978

3 973

2014-15

3 079

3 079

2015-16

2 778

440 (April to October)

Total houses delivered

 

11 252

  1. While the average annual target for houses over the last three years for Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality and for which the information is readily available was 3 278 houses, the municipal level information was included in the HSDG provincial business plan only from 2013-14.

The delivery targets (houses only) per year since 2011-12 were:

(i) 2011-12: Information not available (Municipal level target not catered for at in the HSDG provincial business plan);

(ii) 2012-13: Information not available (Municipal level target not catered for at in the HSDG provincial business plan);

(iii) 2013-14: 3 978 houses;

(iv) 2014-15: 3 079 houses;

(v) 2015-16: 2 778 houses.

07 December 2015 - NW4143

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What is the estimated amount of kilometers of water pipes that were replaced in each of the metropolitan municipalities in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14 and (iv) 2014-15 financial years and (b) what was the estimated cost of the replacement in each specified financial year; (2) how many litres of water pipeline is located in each metropolitan municipality; (3) whether each metropolitan municipality has an official pipeline replacement programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the annual targets?

Reply:

Requesting the Honorable Member to refer the question to the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta) who is in a better position to respond to the estimated amount of kilometers of water pipes that were replaced in each of the metropolitan municipalities.

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07 December 2015 - NW3812

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the 29 notices that were issued for non-compliance by Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Area in the 2014-15 financial year, what was the (a) name of the institution to whom the non-compliance notice was issued and (b) outcome of each notice; (2) with regard to the 31 directives that were issued for non-compliance in the 2014-15 financial year, what was the (a) name of the institution against which the directive was issued and (b) outcome of each directive; (3) (a) how many (i) notices for non-compliance and (ii) directives were issued during the period 1 May 2015 to 30 September 2015, (b) against whom were the notices issued and (c) what was the outcome of each notice?

Reply:

(1) Refer to Annexure A for the list of notices that were issued for non-compliance by Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Area in the 2014-15 financial year.

(2) Refer to Annexure B for the list of directives that were issued for non-compliance in the 2014-15 financial year.

(3)(a)(i) One (1) notice of compliance was issued during the period 1 May to 30 September 2015.

(3)(a)(ii) No directives were issued during the date in question.

(3)(b) The notice was issued against Mbombela LM (SembcorpSilulumanzi).

(3)(c) The matter is not yet resolved.

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Annexure A

 

NOTICES 2014/2015

 

No.

(a) Name of institution

(b) Outcome

1

Barberton Mine: Sheba Gold Mine: Discharge of partially treated sewage and engaging in unlawful water use activity

Not Resolved

2

York Timber Sabie Mill: Discharge of partially treated wastewater

Not Resolved

3

Chief Albert Luthuli LM: Elukwatini WWTW Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

4

Msukaligwa LM: Breyton WWTW Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

5

Bushbuckridge LM: Dwarsloop WWTW Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

6

Bushbuckridge LM: Shopping Complex Sewer pipeline overflow

Resolved

7

Mbombela LM: Hillsview pump station sewer overflow

Resolved

8

Mbombela LM: Hazyview WWTW Discharge of partially treated sewage

Resolved

9

Department of Public Works: Tonga Hospital WWTW

Not Resolved

10

Mbombela LM: Manhole overflow at Hillsview

Resolved

11

NKK Colliery: Failing to take measures to prevent pollution

Not Resolved

12

Bushbuckridge LM: Acornhoek Ponds, blockage of sewer pipeline

Resolved

13

Bushbuckridge LM: Acornhoek Police Station Ponds sewer line

Resolved

14

Chief Albert Luthuli LM: Carolina WWTW pump station sewer overflow

Not Resolved

15

ThabaChweu LM: Manhole overflow along the railway line

Resolved

16

Bushbuckridge LM: Thulamahashi Section manhole overflow

Resolved

17

Chief Albert Luthuli LM: Silobela pump station overflow

Not Resolved

18

Bushbuckridge LM: Thulamahashi Section A sewer pipeline overflow

Resolved

19

Mbombela LM: Telkom Pumpstation sewage spillage

Resolved however sewer line still poses challenges

20

National Dept of Public Works: Barberton Prison Farm WWTW: irrigating with waste

Not Resolved

21

Dept of Public Works: Bongani Hospital WWTW: Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

22

Dayzenza Plaza WWTW: Discharge of effluent to a wetland

Not Resolved

23

Sembcorp Silulumanzi: Kingsvale WWTW: Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

24

Chief Albert Luthuli LM: Ekulindeni WWTW raw sewage overflow from a manhole

Not Resolved

25

Barberton Mines: Sheba Gold Mine: failing to take measures to prevent pollution

Not Resolved

26

Barberton Mines: Fairview Mines: engaging in water use activities without authorisation

Not Resolved

27

Exxaro Coal: Strathrae Colliery: failing to take measure to prevent pollution

Not Resolved

28

Nkomati Anthracite: Madadeni operations: failure to take reasonable measures to prevent pollution

Not Resolved

29

Sappi Ngodwana: failure to comply to license condition regarding the effluent quality used for irrigation

Not Resolved

30

Transnet Freight Rail: diesel spillage

Resolved

Annexure B

 

DIRECTIVES 2014/2015

 

No.

(a) Name of institution

(b) Outcome

1

Department of Public Works: Louiville WWTW

Not Resolved

2

Bushbuckridge LM: Mkhuhlu WWTW

Not Resolved

3

Dept of Public Works: Shongwe Hospital WWTW

Not Resolved

4

Bushbuckridge LM: Mangwazi Bio disk WWTW

Not Resolved

5

Emakhazeni LM: EmakhazeniWWTw

Not Resolved

6

Bushbuckridge LM: Maviljane Ponds

Not Resolved

7

Transnet Fright Rail: Rock Phosphate Spillage

Resolved

8

Marrian Industrial Estate: Diesel Spillage

Resolved

9

Bushbuckridge LM: Maviljane township Manhole overflow

Resolved

10

Eastside Coal company: discharge of polluted water from the RWD into the SwartwaterSpruit

Partially Resolved

11

Droogvallei Rail Siding Company: overflow of pollution control dam

Resolved

12

Nkomazi LM: Sewage overflow from manhole

Resolved

13

Jab Dried Fruits Products, illegal wastewater discharge

 

14

Pembani Coal Carolina: Backfilling a pit with discard

Resolved

15

Bushbuckridge LM: Thulamashi WWTW discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

16

Bushbuckridge LM: Tintswalo WWTW: Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

17

Msukaligwa LM: Breyten WWTW discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

18

National Dept of Public works. Oshoek WWTW: Discharge of partially treated sewage

Resolved

19

Public Works: Shongwe Hospital, Sewage overflow from the ponds to the river

Not Resolved

20

Mbombela LM: Hazyview WWTW, discharge of partially treated sewage

Resolved

21

Chief Albert Luthuli LM: sewage spillage at Silobela pump station

Not Resolved

22

Mbombela LM: Kabokweni Ridge and Bhejukufa pump station overflow

Resolved

23

ThabaChweu LM: Graskop WWTW: raw sewage leakage

Resolved

24

Dept of public works: Tonga Hospital: Discharge of partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

25

Chief Albert Luthuli LM: Carolina Wastewater pump station: Overflow of raw sewage

Not Resolved

26

Ilanga Eggs: disposal of waste into the environment

Not Resolved

27

Mbombela Local Municipality: Rocky’s drift WWTW: discharging partially treated sewage

Not Resolved

28

Pembani Coal Mine: Directive to put measures to prevent pollution

Not Resolved

29

Jab Dried Fruit Product: Illegal Discharge of Effluent

Not Resolved

30

Mbombela LM: Municipal sewer line spillage at Bhejukufa

Resolved

31

Bushbuckridge LM: Dwarsloop WWTW: Discharge of partially treated effluent

Not Resolved

07 December 2015 - NW4126

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Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) What are the terms of reference of the enquiry that she asked National Treasury to conduct into the manufacturing and procurement process of the Set Top Box tender and (b) what is the deadline for the  (i) completion and (ii) delivery of the report; (2) Whether the report of the specified enquiry will be made public; if not, why not; if so, what are further relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The scope of investigation covers the supply chain processes followed by the Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa in the appointment of Ernest and Young to oversee the procurement process and companies to supply digital terrestrial (DTT), direct to home (DTH), satellite dishes and antennas.

(b)(i) & (ii) The investigation is expected to be finalised by end December 2015.

(2) The sensitivities regarding the information contained in the final report will determine whether the report will be made public or not.

 

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

07 December 2015 - NW4190

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What (i) is the total number of appeal applications pending a decision at the Refugee Appeals Board and (ii) are the causes of the delay in the adjudication of these appeals and (b) by when does he envisage that the backlog will be cleared?

Reply:

(a)(i) According to the National Immigration Information System (NIIS) system there are around 144 200 appeal cases defined as backlog, and around 80 315 of these cases appear to be active on the system.

(a)(ii) The causes of the delay in the adjudication of appeal cases is as follows:

  • Presently there are five Refugee Appeal Board Members, including the Chairperson, serving five Refugee Reception Offices (Pretoria, Musina, Durban, Port Elizabeth and Cape Town) in the whole of South Africa. Most of the applications from these offices are rejected as unfounded and they end up at the Refugee Appeal Board.

 

  • In the past members of the Refugee Appeal Board (RAB) used to seat as single members for each appeal hearing. However, following a number of judicial review applications challenging composition of the Board members in the appeal hearing, the RAB is now compelled to seat as a quorum for hearings. Being five members of the Board, three members must be seated to constitute a quorum for each appeal hearing.
  • It is also not helping that previous RAB decisions, back-dating before the Western Cape High Court case of Harerimana in December 2013, are challenged on the quorum issue and end up being settled out of court on condition that they are reheard before a properly constituted quorum, and there are many such cases.

- Present legislation (the Refugee Act 130,1998) does not make provision for appointment of part time Board Members, so it is not legally possible to appoint part-time Board Members for backlog projects.

- As much as the Board makes efforts to adjudicate appeals already heard, there is also a high number of appeals scheduled to be heard by the Board. The RAB tries to balance the number of cases it hears with those that are adjudicated.

- The decision making process requires extensive research on latest possible country of origin information, International Refugee Law and Case Law because of the complexity of most cases that have to be adjudicated and it is not always easy to get access to these sources of information.

- The RAB decisions need to be carefully constructed because sensitive human rights issues are being dealt with; some of which in their nature are matters of life and death. The RAB has to apply its mind to the facts of each case in compliance with Public Administrative Justice Act, The Constitution, The Refugee Act, International Refugee Law and other Human Rights Instruments before coming to a particular decision.

(b) It is presently not possible to provide a time-frame because the appeal cases dealt with differ in terms of their profiles and complexity. Some appeal cases are simple and straightforward and some are high profile and complicated cases that require in-depth research and legal consultation.

However, during the RSA-UNHCR High Level Bilateral Meeting in Geneva, in July 2015, the two parties agreed to development of a backlog project to address the outstanding appeal cases pending with the RAB. Provided enough human capacity and financial resources are made available, the backlog could be cleared by financial year end in March 2019.

07 December 2015 - NW4141

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the details of the infrastructure maintenance plans for the next 10 to 15 years to ensure a reduction in non-revenue water for (a) Makana in the Eastern Cape, (b) Ndwedwe in KwaZulu-Natal, (c) Letsemeng in the Free State, (d) Knysna in the Western Cape, (e) Nama Khoi in the Northern Cape, (f) Moses Kotane in the North West, (g) Emfuleni in Gauteng, (h) Polokwane in Limpopo and (i) Emalahleni in Mpumalanga local municipalities?

Reply:

Requesting the Honorable Member to refer the question to the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta) who is in a better position to respond to the infrastructure maintenance plans for the next 10 to 15 years to ensure a reduction in non-revenue water for the nine provinces.

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07 December 2015 - NW3971

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Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

With reference to the recent widespread destruction of our respective cultural heritages, (a) what has Government done thus far to protect our cultural heritages, with specific reference to the Botshabelo Mission in Fort Merensky near Middleburg in Mpumalanga and (b) what punitive measures are in place to deal with the defacing of statues in this regard?

Reply:

(a). On Friday, the 17 April 2015, I convened a National Consultative Meeting to deal with the challenges facing the transformation of the heritage sector with a focus on statues, place names and symbols that define our public spaces. Amongst the decisions of this meeting was the creation of a special purpose task team to assist with conceptualization, implementation and monitoring as well as impact assessment of a rapid process of transformation of the heritage landscape towards nation-building. The above-mentioned Task Team has been appointed and has conducted consultation workshops in all nine provinces.

 

Botshabelo Mission is a Provincial heritage site which was first protected on the 26th of February 1965. After successful land claim, the site was for some time managed with the assistance of the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality until it was completely transferred to the Botshabelo Community Development Trust which was appointed by the Botshabelo Community to run the affairs of the site as both a heritage site and a tourist attraction. The Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Arts and Culture established a Task Team that will put together a report and recommendations in terms of ensuring the salvaging of the site from total collapse.

This Task Team includes members of the Botshabelo Community, the Department and both Local and District Municipalities. The Task Team has since removed valuable artifacts from the site to a place of safety. The Task Team also recommended the services of a Conservation Architect to evaluate the state of structures/ buildings and the probable costs to repair. Furthermore, the Provincial Department of Arts and Culture has since 2008 assisted the Botshabelo Community Development Trust to solicit funding from the National Lottery. The funding was frozen amid disagreements and infighting among members of the Botshabelo Community.

The Department is now in the process of ensuring the establishment of a legitimate and stable board so that those funds can be released for the restoration and management of the site.

(b). In accordance with the National Heritage Resources Act, a person may be found guilty or liable to pay a fine or imprisonment for defacing a statue.

07 December 2015 - NW4153

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether she will provide the exact details of the formalised communications relations agreement with Vietnam entered into by her in October 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified formalised agreement includes a programme for the training of journalists; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) & (2) The Department is unable to provide exact details of a formalised communications relations agreement with Vietnam because it has not entered into any agreement with Vietnam.

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

07 December 2015 - NW3979

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he will implement an open procurement process involving full public disclosure of all contracts signed by all (a) spheres of government reporting to him, (b) state-owned enterprises, (c) entities and (d) components with government’s service providers, as recently discussed at the Open Government Partnership’s global summit held in Mexico from 27 to 29 October 2015; if not, why not; if so, (i) by what date and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

During the Open Government Partnership (OGP) Global Summit held in Mexico from 27 to 29 October 2015, South Africa was appointed as the Lead and or Chair of the OGP. In accepting the responsibility to Lead the OGP , the South African government reiterated its profound commitment to ensure that the OGP’s Programme's on the Principles of Transparency, Accountability and Responsiveness performs better.

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) will further engage the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer at National Treasury with the intention of finding ways in which the OGP’s commitments and principles around Open Contracting are domesticated.

07 December 2015 - NW4203

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the latest round of the redeterminations of municipal boundaries initiated by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in 2015, what are the full details of the funding appropriations that have been approved to fund the (a) recurrent and (b) capital expenditures which will be incurred by the affected municipalities; (2) whether any other (a) national and/or (b) provincial government (i) organs and/or (ii) entities will provide any form of funding in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified funding provided (aa) prior to, (bb) during and (cc) after the amalgamations of the affected municipalities?

Reply:

1. The Municipal Demarcation Transition Grant was introduced in the 2015 Division of Revenue Act to subsidise the additional institutional and administrative costs that result from the implementation of major boundary redeterminations. The grant is allocated R139 million over the 2015 MTEF. In the 2015 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement it was announced that this grant will receive increased allocations in 2016/17 and 2017/18. These increases include provision for the boundary redeterminations that were finalised by the Municipal Demarcation Board in 2015. Details of the increases will only be made public when the 2016 Budget is tabled.

The Municipal Demarcation Transition Grant only provides funding for operational costs that relate directly to the implementation of major boundary redeterminations. The capital investment needed to eradicate backlogs and upgrade services in these municipalities will continue to be funded through conditional grants in the same manner as they are funded in other municipalities. The data used to determine allocations for conditional grants and the local government equitable share will be updated to reflect the new boundaries.

2. Provincial departments responsible for cooperative governance are accountable for overseeing the implementation of boundary redeterminations in their respective provinces. These departments will be providing support-in-kind to affected municipalities and in some cases provinces may also provide financial support to municipalities. Details of any financial support provided should be published in provincial budgets once these are tabled.

07 December 2015 - NW4163

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether his department has made significant progress in respect of the 2014 – 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework goal that requires his department to drive social cohesion and nation building programme in order to fulfil Outcome 14, namely South Africa achieving a diverse, socially cohesive society with a common national identity, if not, why not; if so, what is the extent of the quantifiable progress made since June 2014?

Reply:

Yes, my department has made significant progress with respect of the 2014 – 2019 MTSF goals to achieve Nation Building and Social Cohesion in order to realize the objective of Outcome 14, namely South Africa achieving a diverse, socially cohesive society with a national identity.

The department has been able to successfully coordinate the various Outcome 14 government departments to develop the outcome 14 MTSF strategic targets in line with the five pillars of chapter 15 of the National Development Plan and quarterly progress reports have been submitted to Cabinet.

Outcome 14 has five (5) broad sub outcomes that direct its ultimate goal of a united, non-racial, non-sexist, democratic and prosperous South Africa, namely: fostering constitutional values, equal opportunities, inclusion and redress, promoting social cohesion across all levels in society, promoting active citizenry and leadership and fostering a social compact.

The progress against outcomes include:

Support to the Moral Regeneration Movement in terms of the promotion of the Code of Positive Values.

We continue to leverage on the national days as key platforms through which to instil constitutional values, build and promote unity and reconciliation.

The report back Summit held in March 2015 offered partners an opportunity to give feedback and renew discussions on matters discussed at the Social Cohesion Summit held in 2012.

The department’s resolve to ensure a generation is raised that knows the history of our country is driven by our visibility in schools as we install flags in schools and educate learners on how to hoist the flag and driving the understanding of the meaning of the preamble as they recite it at assemblies.

The opening of the Matola Monument in September of this year and the Liberation Heritage Route that has been approved by cabinet further emphasis the strides being made in ensuring we tell the correct history of our country.

07 December 2015 - NW4085

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What kind of processes should his department put in place to ensure that better performance records are kept, particularly in the Immigration Branch?

Reply:

The ideal would be for the department to have an electronic Document Management System. An electronic system for all applications for visas, permits and refugee IDs and travel documents would obviate the need to keep paper applications since applications would be scanned. All applications would be electronically available for processing and used when needed. This will also alleviate filing space constraints currently a problem at head office.

In line with the above vision, the department has recently introduced an electronic application process for visas and permits, which allows for applications and supporting documents to be scanned and be available in electronic format, thus easing the process of retrieval of records. It also facilitates obtaining statistics on operations and performance. Whilst there are some implementation glitches, which are being addressed as and when they occur, the department expects the system to be fully embedded during the next financial year. 

07 December 2015 - NW3958

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the upgrading of the Mkhondo Local Municipality’s waste water treatment plant in Mpumalanga, (a)(i) when did the upgrading of the specified plant commence and (ii) when is it expected to be completed, (b) what is the total cost of the upgrade to date in terms of the (i) total expected cost and (ii) actual expenditure and (c) in what category will the upgraded plant be placed; (2) whether the current staffing complement is (a) sufficient and (b) suitably qualified to operate the specified plant; if not, what steps has she taken to address this problem; if so, what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The upgrading of the Mkhondo Local Municipality’s waste water treatment plant (WWTP) in Mpumalanga commenced on 29 June 2012.

(1)(a)(ii) The plant was completed on 30 October 2015.

(1)(b) (i) The total cost of the upgrade to date is R 65 980 058.23.

(1)(b)(ii) The total expected cost for the upgrading of the plant is R 59 159 095.50.

(1)(c) The upgraded category of the plant Inlet works and screw pump station includes the following:

  • Transfer pipeline and distribution chamber
  • Biological Reactor
  • Secondary sedimentation tanks
  • Return activated sludge (RAS) and scum pump station
  • Chlorine contract channels and dosing facility
  • Sludge handling and treatment
  • Anaerobic digesters

(2) No. The municipality is in the process of appointing a consultant for operation and maintenance for the period of two years which shall ensure sustainability and skill transfer to eight (8) process controllers for Mkhondo Waste Water Treatment Works.

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07 December 2015 - NW3973

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether any studies have been undertaken to determine whether there are any duplication of services in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) what were the findings of such studies and (b) how will the findings contribute to (i) advancements of services and (ii) savings in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation in the Presidency is in a better position to respond to this parliamentary question, since it is responsible for “monitoring” in the public service. However, flowing from the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) Outcome 12, various projects were initiated, such as the development of Generic Organisational Structures. The Government’s Outcomes Based Programme identified key service delivery outcomes which necessitate collaboration across government Departments.

As part of the implementation of this Outcome 12 initiatives, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is tasked with the responsibility to support departments with the development of sector specific generic functional structures, with a view to improve the quality of organisational structures in the public service. The aim is to ensure consistency and common understanding with regard to what constitutes departmental core functions in order to ensure alignment of organisational structures to the mandate and strategic objectives of such departments, as well as to achieve appropriate grouping of national and provincial functions to clearly define roles and responsibilities.

Furthermore, the DPSA conducts analysis of proposed organisational structures submitted to the Minister for Public Service and Administration (MPSA) for consultation in terms of the 2015 Directive on the Changes to the Organisational Structures by the Departments, which has been issued in terms of the Public Service Regulations 1/III/B.2.

The analysis of the proposed organisational structures also ensures alignment of organisational structures and functions to the strategic objectives and mandates of departments to ensure the elimination of the duplication of functions, the findings of the analysis are provided to relevant Executive Authority.

07 December 2015 - NW3920

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the Public Service is subject to any requirement to employ (a) students and/or (b) graduate interns; if not, what is his department’s position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in terms of the specified requirement (i)(aa) in the (aaa) 2013-14 and (bbb) 2014-15 financial years and (bb) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (ii) what are the actual achievements for the (aa) specified financial years and (bb) period?

Reply:

Yes. The Human Resource Development Strategic Framework Vision 2015 and the Skills Development Act, 1998, provide for the placement of young people in Learnership and Internship programmes in the national and provincial departments. The intention is to establish an effective and efficient internship programme aimed at bridging the gap between academic study and competent performance in the workplace by offering structured internship opportunities to students and unemployed youths. The intended outcome of this internship programme is to enable school leavers and unemployed graduates to gain practical work experience over a maximum period of 12 months.

In 2009, the Minister for the Public Service and Administration issued a Determination on the Internship Programmes and Implementation Guidelines for Public Service.

Flowing from the signing of the National Skills Accord in October 2011 and a Youth Employment Accord in April 2013, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) issued a Circular directing the scaling up of internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes in the public service. Through the same Circular, the scope of internship programmes in the public service was expanded to include graduates, learners seeking work-integrated learning (experiential learners), graduates seeking to meet statutory requirements for professional registration and those seeking minimum work experience for employment purposes both within the public service and other sectors.

The annual target for internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes is five (5) percent of the departments’ fixed staff establishment on an annual basis.

During 2009-2012, annual target for the public service was 25 000 for each financial years. The following numbers were reported:

(a) 4002 in 2009/10;

(b) 19 278 in 2010/11; and

(c) 20 370 in 2011/12.

For the 2012-2015 period, the target was revised to 50 000. The target for 2012/13 and 2013/14 was 15 000 and 20 000 for the 2014/15 financial year. The following numbers were reported:

  1. 17 820 in 2012/2013;
  2. 27 351 in 2013/14; and
  3. 40 891 in 2014/15.

As at 30 September 2015, a total of 9 320 interns, learners and apprentices have been reported to have been recruited since 1 April 2015.

For the period since January 2012 to 30 September 2015 a total of 50 988 candidates who had been recruited as either interns, learners or apprentices have been absorbed into departments on a permanent or contract employment.

The DPSA has initiated a review of the Determination issued in 2009 to address concerns raised by departments regarding amongst others, the duration of the internship programme, especially for individuals involved in regulated programmes, and to facilitate recruitment and retention of scarce skills.

The outcome of a feasibility study on the development and piloting of a graduate recruitment scheme as recommended by the National Development Plan is currently underway and consultation is also taking place with the national and provincial departments.

Proposals have been made to amend the Public Service Regulations to accommodate the retention of individuals recruited into the public service via internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes when filling entry levels posts.

07 December 2015 - NW3776

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department keeps a register of the fires that regularly ravage townships and informal settlement areas in order to implement a new policy to remove all of the factors that regularly contribute to the specified fires (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) how many such fires were recorded annually from 1 January 2010 to 31 July 2015, (b) how many families suffered losses through runaway fires in the same period, (c) what new and effective measures has her department put in place to prevent runaway fires from occurring in the first place, (d) in which provinces have the new preventive measures been fully implemented and (e) what evaluation has her department made to determine the efficacy and success of the specified new measures?

Reply:

Not being the fire Department, we do not have a register of the fires but we have a register of all support given. The Department keep track of these incidents through its interaction with municipalities and provinces as well as through reports in the media. An important source of information, which the Department relies upon, is the published reports of the Fire Protection Association of Southern Africa (FPASA). Currently, published information by the FPASA is available for four years being 2010 until 2013 as indicated in table 1 below. The 2014 statistics will be available in March 2016 and the 2015 statistics will be available in March 2017.

(a) & (b) Table 1: 2010 - 2013 Fire Incidents Report from the Fire Protection Association of Southern Africa:

Year

No of fire incidents

Financial damage/losses

Highest Causes

 

Formal

Informal

Formal

Informal

Formal

Informal

2010

2 578

2 590

R 525 406 578

R 64 719 575

Undetermined

Undetermined

2011

3 943

4 046

R 576 242 642

R 102 389 740

Undetermined

Undetermined

2012

4 593

4 516

R 556 062 426

R 114 556 248

Undetermined

Undetermined

2013

4 859

4 886

R 770 392 753

R 117 693 080

Undetermined

Undetermined

2010- Narrative of Fire Incidents

Most of the fire incidents occurred in the Metropolitan Municipalities with Ethekwini leading with 490 formal and 508 informal settlements fire incidents, followed by Tshwane with 562 formal and 287 informal dwellings, in third place is Ekurhuleni with 321 formal 385 informal dwellings affected by fire incidents, the City of Johannesburg is fourth place with 264 formal and 239 informal incidents recoded, the City of Cape Town recorded 190 formal and 172 informal dwelling fore incidents, Nelson Mandela recorded 122 formal and 212 informal dwelling fire incidents and Mangaung recorded 128 formal and 129 informal dwelling fire incidents.

The rest of the fire incidents are shared between other District and Local Municipalities. The total damage in rand value cutting across formal & informal dwellings, flats, furniture shops, restaurants, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, warehouses, cinemas and night clubs was worth approximately R 1, 3 billion in 2010.

The causes of the fire incidents vary between formal and informal dwellings. For both formal and informal dwellings, a significant portion of the causes of the incidents were undetermined, with a record of 739 and 965 respectively. In formal dwellings most of the determined causes in order of frequency were electrical, open flames and cooking. In the informal sector most (734) were as a result of open flames, cooking incidents were 249, electrical were 220, arson recoded incidents were 151 followed by heating at 112 incidents and 64 were due to smoking.

The rest of the incidents are minor in terms of frequency and range between welding, lightning, unrest and other.

The Honourable member will no doubt remember that in 2005 we had committed ourselves, through the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), that we would have adhered to the desired goals to eradicate informal settlements by the year 2014. President Mbeki signed these on behalf of the country, a commitment which is in line with the founding policy document of the ANC – The Freedom Charter, which proclaims that there shall be no slum.

2011- Narrative of Fire Incidents

A large portion of the causes of these fire incidents were undetermined but others in order of highest incidents recorded ranges from open flames, electrical faults, cooking, heating and arson. The total damage in rand value cutting across formal & informal dwellings, flats, furniture shops, restaurants, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, warehouses, cinemas, night clubs etc. is worth just above R 2, billion in 2011.

In this financial year, the City of Cape Town leads with the number of incidents with 905 formal and 1007 informal dwelling fire incidents, followed by EThekwini Metro with 559 formal 526 informal dwelling fire incidents, in third place is Tshwane Metro with 689 formal and 346 informal dwelling fire incidents, Ekurhuleni is fourth place with 395 formal 418 informal dwelling fire incidents, the City of Johannesburg recorded 390 formal 345 informal dwelling fire incidents, Mangaung recorded 133 formal and 143 informal dwelling fire incidents, Buffalo City recorded 68 formal 172 informal dwelling fire incidents and last was Nelson Mandela with a record of 18 formal and 34 informal dwelling fire incidents. The rest of the incidents are minor in terms of frequency and range between welding, lightning, unrest and other.

2012- Narrative of Fire Incidents

The total damage of the fire incidents was R 3, 1 billion in the 2012/13 financial year. The causes of the fire incidents vary between formal and informal dwellings. For both formal and informal dwellings, a significant portion of the causes of the incidents were undetermined, with a record of 1248 and 1685 respectively. In formal dwellings most of the determined causes in order of frequency were electrical (934), open flames (744), cooking (486) and heating (298). In the informal sector most (1154) were as a result of open flames, electrical were 506, cooking incidents were 385, arson recoded incidents were 289 followed by heating at 200 incidents and 88 were due to smoking. The rest of the incidents are minor in terms of frequency and range between welding, lightning, unrest and other.

The fire incidents are largely prevalent in Metropolitan areas and again the City of Cape Town leads for the 2nd consecutive year with 1310 formal and 1169 informal dwelling fire incidents, followed by Ethekwini with 588 formal and 508 informal dwelling fire incidents, in third place is the Tshwane Metro with 652 formal and 374 informal dwelling fire incidents, In fourth place is the City of Johannesburg Metro with 372 formal and 353 informal dwelling fire incidents, followed by Ekurhuleni Metro in fifth place with 305 formal and 345 informal dwelling fire incidents, at sixth place is Buffalo City with 82 formal and 177 informal dwelling fire incidents, the Mangaung Metro recorded 134 formal and 122 informal dwelling fire incidents followed in last place by the Nelson Mandela Bay with 19 formal and 25 informal dwelling fire incidents.

2013 – Narrative of Fire Incidents

The direct fire losses in 2013 were in excess of R 2 billion. The fire incidents in 2013 within the formal and informal dwellings resulted in 106 deaths. In this period still, a significant portion of the incident causes were undetermined. As in the previous financial years, the highest determined cause of fire incidents in the formal sector is electrical (925) and in the informal sector it is open flames with a record of 1177 in 2013.

The undetermined causes in the formal dwellings were 1540 and 1926 in informal dwellings.

In terms of highest numbers recorded in the formal dwellings were electrical followed by open flames incidents were 805, cooking incidents were 388, arson incidents were 340, heating incidents were 287 and smoking incidents were 128.

In the informal sector, most determined fire incidents were caused by open flames followed by 511 electrical incidents, 444 arson incidents, 349 cooking incidents, 181 heating incidents and 94 smoking incidents. The rest of the incidents are minor in terms of frequency and range between welding, lightning, unrest and other.

The City of Cape Town recorded the highest number of fire incidents with 1097 formal and 1118 informal dwelling incidents, followed by Tshwane Metro with 713 formal and 393 informal dwelling incidents, in third place is Ethekwini Metro with 577 formal and 532 informal dwelling incidents, in fourth place is Nelson Mandela Bay with 435 formal and 537 informal dwelling incident, followed by Ekurhuleni in fifth place with 404 formal and 461 informal dwelling incidents, the City of Johannesburg recorded 412 formal and 373 informal dwelling fire incidents and lastly is Mangaung with a record of 135 formal and 173 informal dwelling fire incidents.

(c) The Department has the Informal Settlements Upgrading Programme (ISUP) whose primary objective is to cater for improving the basic infrastructure and dwelling standards and quality of life of households living in informal settlements. The ISUP for the current MTSF aims to ensure that 750 000 households living in 2200 informal settlements benefit from improved living conditions, and this include preventative measures from the threats and causes of fires.

There is grant funding allocated for this purpose to assist the municipalities in fast tracking the provision of security of tenure, basic municipal services, social and economic amenities and the empowerment of residents in informal settlements to take control of housing development directly applicable to them. The grants include the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) as well as the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG).

In the Metropolitan areas the Department in conjunction with the Metropolitan Municipalities are funding the roll-out of solar lighting as well as improved cooking facilities for households, in order to limit the use of fossil fuels and liquid fuels, which are a major cause of fires in informal settlements

The ISUP includes, as a measure of last resort, and exceptional circumstances, the possible relocation and resettlement of households on a voluntary and co-operative basis as a result of the implementation of upgrading projects. The ISUP is instituted in terms of Section 3(4) (g) of the Housing Act, 1997 (Act No.107 of 1997)

(d) All Provinces and Metropolitan Municipalities are implementing the ISUP. Provinces implement the ISUP in the District and Local Municipalities as well.

(e) The Department has a Monitoring and Evaluation unit that is responsible for programme and project oversight. In addition, to project level verification, the Department convenes quarterly financial and non-financial performance assessment on Provinces and its Metropolitan Municipalities on all programmes in the Housing Code, including the Upgrading of Informal Settlements Programme.

As a result of reports and recommendations of the monitoring and evaluation process, the Department has initiated a National Upgrading Support Programme (NUSP) to provide support to Provinces and Municipalities to fast track the planning to implement the ISUP programmes. In addition the work of the Department also forms part of the Monitoring and Evaluation programmes and process of the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation, and a focus area is the ISUP.

07 December 2015 - NW4127

Profile picture: Shinn, Ms MR

Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) How many applications for government-sponsored Set Top Boxes have been lodged at post offices around the country; (b) how many of the specified applications: (i) have been approved as at the latest date for which information is available (ii) have been rejected (iii) are still being processed; (2)what is the reason for the rejection of the specified applications?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total number of applications lodged at the 18 SKA area branches up to 30 November 2015 amounts to 2, 336 in total.

(b) (i) A total of 2, 074 qualifying applications has been processed up to 30 November 2015.

(ii) A total of 262 non-qualifying applications has been processed up to 30 November 2015

(iii) A total of 274 applications for the period ending 30 November 2015 stills needs to be processed.

(2) The reasons for the 262 non-qualifying applications to date are the following:

(a) Foreign ID’s (Total: 1)

(b) Unknown address (Total: 207)

(c) Total household income above income threshold of R3200 pm (Total: 54)

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

07 December 2015 - NW4144

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Why were the residents who added extensions to their Breaking New Ground government houses in Mhlaba Village in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality in the Eastern Cape excluded in the rectification programme in the area; (2) whether it is government policy that those who take extra effort to extend their Breaking New Ground houses must be excluded in rectification projects; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The residents of the Mhlaba Village in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality who extended their Breaking New Ground (BNG) government subsidised houses did not qualify for the Rectification Programme because the Rectification Policy clearly states that, “Under no circumstances shall alterations to the original dwellings qualify for rectification nor be included in the rectification programme.”

(2) The National Housing Programme for the rectification of subsidised houses that were built during the period 15 March 1994 and 1 April 2002, was specifically introduced to address cases where dwellings had structurally failed due to design flaws, problematic geotechnical conditions which were not catered for in the specification of the houses or to repair houses that were damaged before occupation by the approved housing subsidy beneficiaries. These affected houses were not enrolled under the National Home Builders Registration Council’s (NHBRC) warranty scheme and the relevant houses were pre-identified and recorded in a register. No additions to the register were allowed. The Rectification Programme is not applicable in cases where lack of general maintenance or neglect has led to the deterioration of the dwellings.

Secondly, the Programme prescripts only apply to the original superstructure that was constructed with the housing subsidy funding; structural failures of any additions or improvements to the houses that were affected by the beneficiaries are thus excluded from the scope of the rectification work.

Honourable Member, I am amazed that this question is even raised. We all know that we are working tirelessly against an ever increasing backlog and diminishing resources. Surely, we should not encourage total dependency in the State. If people are able to incrementally improve their houses, it suggest that they have the means. We should focus on those who are still waiting for shelter. It is a responsible thing to do."

07 December 2015 - NW4173

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) For which (i) departments and/or (ii) municipalities were citizen report cards compiled in the (aa) 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years and (b) on what basis were the specified selections made; (2) (a) what were the scores for each of the entities assessed in the specified financial years, expressed as the (i) overall score and (ii) score per assessed aspect for each assessed entity, (b)(i) what score is considered acceptable for each aspect and (ii) why and (c) what are the details of the action taken in the event of a score that indicates unacceptable customer service?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) (aa)(bb) The Citizen Report Cards (CRC) were compiled for the following:
  • Department of Basic Education;
  • Department of Health:
  • Department of Home Affairs;
  • South African Police Service; and
  • South African Social Security Agency.

(ii) (aa)(bb) The Citizen Report Cards were compiled for the following:

  • Ga-Segonyana Local Municipality;
  • Mookgopong Local Municipality;
  • Okhahlamba Local Municipality;
  • Matatiele Local Municipality;
  • Emalahleni Local Municipality;
  • Moretele Local Municipality;
  • City of Mangaung (Botshabelo);
  • City of Johannesburg (Diepsloot and Alexandra); and
  • City of Cape Town (Gugulethu and Khayelitsha).

(cc) None. The Citizen Report Card survey was conducted in the 2013-14 financial year and the subsequent reports were finalised in the 2014-15 financial year.

(b) The selection was based on the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) priorities, which set out key focus areas of the departments over the MTSF period. One municipality per province was chosen to benefit from the survey and the selection of the municipality in every province was based on the readiness of the municipality to accommodate the study within the set timelines.

(2) (a) (i) The overall scores for each department and municipality are shown herewith below on figure 1 and figure 2 respectively:

Figure 1: Overall Ranking of Departments

Figure 2: Overall Ranking of Municipalities

(2) (a) (ii) The scores are reflected on figure 3 and figure 4 herewith below. The departments were assessed on Accessibility, Reliability, Quality of Service, Staff Performance, Transparency and Openness and also Avenue for Redress whilst the municipalities were assessed using the Batho Pele principles. The satisfaction of citizens against a range of municipal basic services was also assessed.

Figure 3: Ranking of Departments against service delivery attributes

 

Figure 4: Performance of municipalities against Batho Pele principles

(2) (b) (i) The benchmarks reflected in figure 1 and figure 2 above were on the following:

 

  • Minimum level of service expected and
  • Ideal level of service required.

 

 

Minimum service expected

Ideal level of service required

Departments

73.78%

87.78%

Municipalities

67.00%

89.40%

 

(ii) The benchmarks indicated above are considered acceptable as they were sourced from the citizens regarding the level of service they expected and required from the assessed government departments and municipalities..

(c) Action taken was the development of Service Delivery Improvement Plans, which entail interventions to improve performance.

07 December 2015 - NW3957

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) Which (i) metro, (ii) district and (iii) local municipalities in each province are in arrears with their payments to the relevant water boards for the (aa) 2010-11, (bb) 2011-12, (cc) 2012-13, (dd) 2013-14 and (ee) 2014-15 financial years and (b) in each case, what amount was (i) owed and (ii) overdue in terms of each specified municipality in each specified period?

Reply:

Refer to Annexure A for arrears owed to water boards for the financial years 2010/11; 2011/12; 2012/13; 2013/14 and 2014/15 and the overdue amounts in terms of each specified municipality in each specified period.

---00O00---

Annexure A

1. Amatola Water

a)(i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

aa) 2010/11

bb) 2011/12

cc) 2012/13

dd) 2013/14

ee) 2014/15

 

b) (i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

 

Amathole DM

 

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

502 890, 56

502 890, 56

-

-

Buffalo City

   

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

   

5 264, 60

5 264, 60

 

Joe Gqabi DM

 

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

6 942, 14

6 942, 14

432 329, 37

432 329, 37

-

-

   

Makana LM

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 368 767, 75

6 368 767, 75

   

Ndlambe LM

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

176 362, 56

176 362, 56

-

-

3 185 568, 21

3 185 568, 21

 

OR Tambo DM

 

Eastern Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 878 657, 28

3 878 657, 28

   

Blue Crane Route LM

Eastern Cape

-

-

415 329, 45

415 329, 45

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL

-

-

415 329, 45

415 329, 45

183 304, 70

183 304, 70

935 219, 93

935 219, 93

13 438 257, 84

13 438 257, 84

   

13 438 257, 84

2. Bloem Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

Mangaung

   

Free State

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

46 383 541, 63

46 383 541, 63

   

Kopanong LM

Free State

13 069 448, 36

13 069 448, 36

7 927 858, 57

7 927 858, 57

17 830 428, 47

17 830 428, 47

22 028 023, 23

22 028 023, 23

 

31 015 030, 69

31 015 030, 69

   

Mantsopa LM

Free State

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

144 911, 63

144 911, 63

   

Naledi LM

Free State

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 261 355, 86

1 261 355, 86

TOTAL

13 069 448, 36

13 069 448, 36

7 927 858, 57

7 927 858, 57

17 830 428, 47

17 830 428, 47

22 028 023, 23

22 028 023, 23

63 244 636, 77

63 244 636, 77

   

63 244 636, 77

3. Lepelle Northern Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

   

Polokwane LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12 986 883, 16

12 986 883, 16

   

Mogalakwena LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 677 481, 72

2 677 481, 72

 

Capricorn DM

 

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 256 776, 27

3 256 776, 27

 

Mopani DM

 

Limpopo

7 552 828, 66

7 552 828, 66

9 341 166, 95

9 341 166, 95

 

10 135 166, 14

10 135 166, 14

64 135 849, 47

64 135 849, 47

9 169 249, 92

135 380 659, 81

 

Sekhukhuni DM (Fetakgomo)

 

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

24 000 000, 00

24 000 000, 00

1 009 889, 62

4 144 805, 04

 

Sekhukhuni DM (Makhuduthamakga)

 

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 568 796, 28

14 112 917, 78

   

Marble Hall LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

141 480, 04

1 003 765, 37

   

Ba-Phalaborwa LM

Limpopo

182 759 933,00

182 759 933,00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

182 759 933, 90

   

Greater Letaba LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 155 028, 19

1 155 028, 19

   

Greater Tzaneen LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

67 815, 15

67 815, 15

   

Lepelle-Nkumpi LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

985 009, 28

985 009, 28

   

Greater Tubatsi LM

Limpopo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 104 684, 52

11 077 581, 55

TOTAL

25 828 821, 66

25 828 821, 66

9 341 166, 95

9 341 166, 95

 

10 135 166, 14

10 135 166, 14

88 135 849, 47

88 135 849, 47

36 123 094, 15

369 608 657, 22

4. Magalies Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

City of Tshwane

   

Gauteng

10 239 531, 17

7 348 018, 60

5 446 600, 72

3 707 601, 88

 

5 078 109, 68

3 156 529, 33

7 367 985, 49

-

3 915 793, 78

3 915 793, 78

   

Rustenburg LM

North West

1 721 247, 87

18 664, 69

2 327 478, 87

-

2 633 112, 02

-

2 295 830, 14

-

2 750 952, 94

2 750 952, 94

   

Thabazimbi LM

North West

7 048 455, 89

5 789 805, 61

13 776 320, 68

12 243 363, 41

12 549 904, 07

10 668 192, 80

22 293 895, 62

19 966 547, 04

21 938 457, 62

21 938 457, 62

   

Moses Kotane LM

North West

3 703 312, 21

-

4 417 074, 39

-

5 326 971, 39

-

6 249 475, 22

-

7 671 363, 30

7 671 363, 30

   

Modimolle LM

North West

1 546 512, 18

1 026 136, 33

528 700, 70

-

818 488, 18

-

633 857, 89

-

2 177 568, 61

2 177 568, 61

   

Moretele LM

North West

705 998, 09

-

1 739 558, 69

839 075, 17

3 731 282, 82

2 506 850, 75

3 310 838, 12

2 673 951, 18

1 792 971, 45

1 792 971, 45

   

Bela-Bela LM

North West

828 541, 10

381 917, 78

2 012 950, 81

1 438 208, 04

1 326 517, 06

666 660, 27

813 765, 31

-

1 046 378, 03

1 046 378, 03

   

Kgetleng LM

North West

429 293, 99

-

1 404 747, 23

599 806, 96

3 588 897, 47

3 373 510, 32

3 137 565, 86

3 114 380, 61

3 437 631, 92

3 437 631, 92

   

Madibeng LM

North West

6 882 756, 86

5 180 702, 90

8 449 517, 70

7 818 301, 13

9 272 762, 90

8 662 654, 78

4 659 765, 83

2 806 296, 11

3 114 100, 97

3 114 100, 97

TOTAL

33 105 649, 36

19 745 245, 91

40 102 949, 79

26 646 356, 59

44 326 045, 59

29 034 398, 25

50 762 979, 48

28 561 174, 94

47 845 218, 62

47 845 218, 62

   

47 845 218, 62

5. Mhlathuze Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

   

uMhlathuze LM

KwaZulu-Natal

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

27 720, 00

 

Gert Sibande DM

 

KwaZulu-Natal

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 068, 00

 

Amajuba DM

 

KwaZulu-Natal

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

uThungulu DM

 

KwaZulu-Natal

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28 788, 00

6. Overberg Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

   

Theewaterskloof LM

Western Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

286 100, 00

1 993 698, 47

992 835, 52

1 000 862, 95

   

Hassequa LM

Western Cape

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

286 100, 00

1 993 698, 47

992 835, 52

1 000 862, 95

7. Rand Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

City of Tshwane

   

Gauteng

7 940 276, 49

7 940 276, 49

2 601 261, 06

2 601 261, 06

6 720 777, 05

 

6 720 777, 05

3 054 550, 10

3 054 550, 10

1 857 610, 77

1 857 610, 77

Mangaung Metro

   

Free State

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

1 902 787, 15

Ekurhuleni Metro

   

Gauteng

809 412, 12

809 412, 12

               
 

Sekhukhune DM

 

Mpumalanga

634 256, 34

634 256, 34

               
   

Bushbuckridge LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

       

360 689 131, 26

360 689 131, 26

470 921 289, 72

470 921 289, 72

   

Chief Albert Luthuli LM

Mpumalangaq

-

-

           

2 833 847, 23

2 833 847, 23

   

Dipaleseng LM

 

-

-

               
   

Emalahleni LM

 

-

-

1 009 566, 06

1 009 566, 06

1 009 566, 06

1 009 566, 06

1 009 566, 06

1 009 566, 06

32 496 896, 03

32 496 896, 03

   

Emfuleni Lm

Gauteng

32 116 219, 39

32 116 219, 39

9 225 961, 63

9 225 961, 63

51 699 996, 91

51 699 996, 91

74 032 097, 61

74 032 097, 61

137 530 809, 02

137 530 809, 02

 

Gert Sibande DM

 

Mpumalanga

-

-

               
   

Goven Mbeki LM

Mpumalanga

17 844 893, 69

17 844 893, 69

1 287 372, 86

1 287 372, 86

           
   

Kungwini LM

Gauteng

13 210 869, 02

13 210 869, 02

7 593 445, 62

7 593 445, 62

7 593 445, 62

7 593 445, 62

14 094 136, 38

14 094 136, 38

2 805 675, 28

2 805 675, 28

   

Lekwa LM

Gauteng

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 199 101, 99

6 199 101, 99

   

Lesedi LM

Gauteng

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 938 278, 84

3 938 278, 84

   

Madibeng LM

North West

-

-

1 176 444, 04

1 176 444, 04

1 037 095, 71

1 037 095, 71

2 658 665, 72

2 658 665, 72

139 980, 63

139 980, 63

   

Mbombela LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

662 669, 47

662 669, 47

-

-

-

-

7 775 251, 47

7 775 251, 47

   

Merafong LM

Gauteng

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13 090 0456, 22

13 090 0456, 22

   

Metsimaholo LM

Free State

-

-

-

-

4 928 874, 11

4 928 874, 11

9 326 866, 38

9 326 866, 38

-

-

   

Midvaal LM

Gauteng

5 207 621, 89

5 207 621, 89

-

-

-

-

28 478, 34

28 478, 34

301 125, 46

301 125, 46

   

Mkhondo LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 659 865, 05

1 659 865, 05

   

Mogale LM

Gauteng

6 503 898, 06

6 503 898, 06

13 442 138, 12

13 442 138, 12

1 171 524, 42

1 171 524, 42

1 171 524, 42

1 171 524, 42

12 197 117, 14

12 197 117, 14

   

Msukaligwa LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

-

-

-

-

558 263, 56

558 263, 56

-

-

   

Ngwathe LM

Free State

85 921, 41

85 921, 41

288 373, 74

288 373, 74

1 513 660, 01

1 513 660, 01

1 371 300, 43

1 371 300, 43

-

-

   

Nkomazi LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 458 805, 36

7 458 805, 36

   

Dr Pixley Ka Isaka Seme LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14 454 379, 84

14 454 379, 84

   

Randfontein LM

Gauteng

42 875, 35

42 875, 35

4 482 138, 49

4 482 138, 49

-

-

-

-

-

-

   

Royal Bafokeng LM

North West

-

-

-

-

2 567 806, 26

2 567 806, 26

-

-

-

-

   

Thembisile LM

Mpumalanga

7 104 133, 79

7 104 133, 79

6 028 194, 03

6 028 194, 03

6 141 560, 61

6 141 560, 61

6 969 240, 72

6 969 240, 72

34 756 353, 85

34 756 353, 85

   

Umjindi LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 512 803, 07

3 512 803, 07

   

Victor Khanye LM

Mpumalanga

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 826 726, 29

4 826 726, 29

   

Westonaria LM

Gauteng

-

-

2 755 265, 70

2 755 265, 70

17 336 889, 94

17 336 889, 94

9 869 412, 49

9 869 412, 49

7 684 265, 72

7 684 265, 72

TOTAL

93 403 164, 70

93 403 164, 70

52 455 617, 97

52 455 617, 97

 

103 623 983, 85

103 623 983,85

486 736 020,62

 

486 736 020, 62

768 343 015,13

768 343 015, 13

8. Sedibeng Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

 

Dr Ruth S Mompati DM

 

Northern Cape

10 331 772

7 340 812

16 360 781

11 807 293

32 772 420

28 253 059

40 568 091

36 956 571

69 121 670

59 571 346

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema DM

 

North West

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

171 662 841

171 479 675

   

Matjhabeng LM

Free State

310 772 160

288 998 373

478 329 661

452 387 926

588 398 597

564 464 674

867 786 155

836 881 474

1 218 182 660

1 181 667 926

   

Maquassi Hills LM

North West

17 792 293

15 354 056

28 195 513

25 455 921

41 061 185

38 020 402

49 188 194

45 683 162

77 194 939

73 242 725

   

Phokwane LM

Northern Cape

5 762 558

4 593 732

5 762 558

4 593 732

4 042 075

2 873 249

4 042 075

2 345 341

12 322 945

10 406 153

   

Ditsobotla LM

North West

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39 914 648

33 561 358

   

Mahikeng LM

North West

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

182 751 485

178 660 199

   

Nama-Khoi LM

Northern Cape

7 310 477

5 774 169

22 816 982

19 046 076

40 762 755

38 623 115

58 445 314

57 012 844

77 819 232

76 523 394

   

Dikgatlong LM

Northern Cape

8 584 742

8 352 717

5 103 899

4 915 847

4 117 556

3 869 097

2 033 549

1 688 218

5 908 463

5 093 833

   

Nala LM

Free State

32 813 089

30 273 702

53 971 644

51 018 741

55 696 901

52 965 702

66 734 541

63 674 871

86 338 919

82 990 344

TOTAL

393 367 091

360 687 561

610 541 038

569 225 536

766 851 490

729 069 298

1 088 797 919

1 044 242 481

1 941 217 802

1 873 196 953

9. Umgeni Water

a)( i) Metro

a)(ii) District

a)(iii) Local municipality

Province

a)(aa) 2010/11

a)(bb) 2011/12

a)(cc) 2012/13

a)(dd) 2013/14

a)(ee) 2014/15

 

(b)(i) owed R

b)(ii) Overdue

b)(i) Owed R

b)(ii) R

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

b)(i)

b)(ii)

eThekwini

   

KwaZulu-Natal

100 628, 00

100 628, 00

99 685, 00

99 685, 00

-

-

144 612, 00

144 612, 00

157 059, 00

157 059, 00

-

 

iLembe LM

KwaZulu-Natal

4 105, 00

4 105, 00

4 448, 00

4 448, 00

-

-

15 684, 00

15 684, 00

29 817, 00

29 817, 00

   

Msunduzi LM

KwaZulu-Natal

29 772, 00

29 772, 00

30 736, 00

30 736, 00

-

-

36 059, 00

36 059, 00

39 915, 00

39 915, 00

 

Ugu DM

 

KwaZulu-Natal

8 003, 00

8 003, 00

6 325, 00

6 325, 00

-

-

7 114, 00

7 114, 00

5 303, 00

5 303, 00

 

Harry Gwala DM

 

KwaZulu-Natal

4 531, 00

4 531, 00

4 039, 00

4 039, 00

4 087, 00

4 087, 00

6 616, 00

6 616, 00

7 600, 00

7 600, 00

   

uMgungundlovu LM

KwaZulu-Natal

690, 00

690, 00

601, 00

 

601, 00

-

-

1 015, 00

1 015, 00

1 570, 00

1 570, 00

   

Siza Water

KwaZulu-Natal

3 455, 00

3 455, 00

2 989, 00

2 989, 00

1 780, 00

1 780, 00

4 309, 00

4 309, 00

3 983, 00

3 983, 00

TOTAL

151 184, 00

151 184, 00

148 823, 00

148 823, 00

151 184, 00

151 184, 00

148 823, 00

148 823, 00

 

245 247, 00

 

245 247, 00

07 December 2015 - NW4086

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Why has the matter of the irregular expenditure related to the Riverside Office Park in Centurion, Gauteng, not been finalised, in view of the application to the High Court in July 2014 and the National Treasury report on the matter in December 2014; (2) what is the progress on the disciplinary action that was recommended for officials indicated as involved in the flawed lease agreement at the specified Office Park; (3) what alternative accommodation is being planned for the Independent Electoral Commission’s Head Office if the courts set aside the lease for the specified Office Park?

Reply:

1. The Riverside Office Park lease contract was determined to be irregular in the year ended 31 March 2011 and the rental and operating costs relating to the lease for the year then ended were disclosed in the annual financial statements for that year. In terms of the rules relating to irregular expenditure however, the expenditure needs to be incurred before it can be determined to be irregular, and as the lease is a 10 year agreement further irregular expenditure will be incurred and disclosed in each year until such time as the lease expires or is set aside. Each year, as is required, National Treasury is notified of the irregular expenditure incurred.

2. In line with the recommendations as contained in the Public Protector’s Report, a disciplinary process was instituted against the implicated officials. The respective officials sought to review the rulings of the Chairperson of the disciplinary committee made at the commencement of the disciplinary enquiry.

The review was heard in the Labour Court on 15 September 2015 and on 1 October 2015. The officials’ application was dismissed with no order as to costs. The disciplinary proceeding was then scheduled to be continued from 9-13 November 2015. However, the officials filed an application for leave to appeal the judgment of 1 October 2015. Lawyers have been instructed to oppose the application for leave to appeal and have done so.

The officials’ lawyer in the appeal papers requested the judge to consider the matter in chambers, but prior thereto, furnish the parties with dates by when the parties’ heads of arguments must be filed. The parties now wait for directions from judge.

3. The Commission seeks relief for review and set aside of the lease agreement and addenda thereto. The Commission also seeks to institute a new procurement process to conclude a new lease for the premises and to suspend the existing one (assuming the court finds the procurement process was flawed) upon finalisation of a new procurement process.

The Commission is further addressing this matter through its Risk Management Committee.

07 December 2015 - NW4199

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the intergovernmental report commissioned by him on the latest round of the redeterminations of municipal boundaries initiated by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in 2015, was presented by the National Treasury to the National Council of Provinces’ Select Committee on Appropriations; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did the presentation take place and (b) what were the outcomes of the presentation to the specified committee; (2) whether hard copies of the specified report were provided to the members of the specified committee (a) on the day of the specified presentation and/or (b) on a later date; if not, (i) why not, (ii) what are the relevant reasons for the National Treasury Officials’ failure to provide copies of the specified report and (iii) when will the specified report be provided to the specified members; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

  1. National Treasury was requested by the Chairperson of the MDB on 16 March 2015 to submit information on the potential impact on municipal viability of several proposed boundary redeterminations. A report providing this information was submitted to the MDB on 6 August 2015. Honourable van Lingen wrote to the Minister of Finance on 27 August 2015 and requested a copy of this report. In a reply dated 26 October 2015, the Minister of Finance informed Honourable van Lingen that it was not possible to share this report before the budget is tabled as it includes information on budget allocations to affected municipalities and all budget information is embargoed prior to the tabling of the budget. As such no report was presented to the Select Committee on Appropriations.
  2. As outlined above, no report was presented to the Select Committee on Appropriations.

07 December 2015 - NW4083

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, what are the (a) reasons and (b) details of the significant increases in irregular expenditure from previous financial years?

Reply:

(a) The amount of irregular expenditure incurred by the Department of Home Affairs increased from R730 000 in the 2013/14 financial year to R1 809 000 in the 2014/15 financial year. The reasons for the increase in the amount disclosed as irregular expenditure are:

  • Use of single quotation without approval for a deviation;
  • Motivation for a deviation was considered not justifiable by the Auditor General;
  • Failure to incorporate local content component in the bid for the office furniture; and
  • The controls that have been introduced by the department to effectively detect and report all irregular expenditure. In this regard, it should be noted that the department itself identified 50% of the irregular expenditure disclosed in the 2014/15 financial year.

(b) Details of the irregular expenditure for 2014/2015 financial year are attached as Annexure A.

07 December 2015 - NW4181

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(1) Whether he has given any incentive cheques to any athletes since the start of his tenure as Minister of his department in November 2010; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which athletes received the specified cheques, (b) on what date and (c) what was the amount; Monday, 30 November 2015 1604 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: NATIONAL ASSEMBLY NO 51 - 2015 (2) whether any of the specified cheques have been paid to para-athletes since the start of his tenure as Minister of his department in November 2010; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which para-athletes received the specified cheques, (b) for which (i) games and/or (ii) meetings and (c) what was the amount? NW5057E

Reply:

The Department is currently sourcing the information required.

07 December 2015 - NW3744

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

With reference to a technical report on the performance of Bafana Bafana at the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations, (a) when did he or his department commission the specified report, (b) what amount was (i) budgeted for and (ii) spent on the report, (c) which service providers were appointed to produce the report and (d) what are the relevant details of the specified service providers including (i) their names, (ii) physical addresses and (iii) chief executive officers?

Reply:

SAFA routinely interrogates the coaches' reports through its Technical Committee and has done so at the March 2015 Technical Committee meeting.

SAFA also received an independent expert technical analysis of all 3 matches at the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations Final Tournament in Equatorial Guinea and has discussed it thoroughly with a view to making corrections for future matches.

SAFA has its own internal match analysis system which it has used for all national teams.

b) No government funds were used for Bafana Bafana at any time during this period. The independent technical analysis was done by an international match analyst engaged by SAFA;

c) Government did not use any service providers. Instead, SAFA engaged the independent technical analysts who were vying for a long-term relationship with the Association. They produced their analysis to indicate the strengths of their system. SAFA deems its own system to be of equal value and continues to use its own match technical analysis system to adjust/improve the performance of its national teams.

07 December 2015 - NW3966

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the Government has a clear and binding policy on building, maintaining and preserving a given level of contingency funds, expressed as a ratio of the annual approved budget, so as to alleviate the plight of citizens and rebuild the infrastructure adequately and swiftly during a major disaster; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the policy, (b) to what extent is the contingency fund as at 31 October 2015 compatible with the declared policy level, (c)(i) what is the lowest level to which the contingency fund can be allowed to sink and (ii) how does the present situation compare with that baseline and (d) what growth in real terms has there been annually in respect of contingency funds during the period 1 November 2009 to 1 November 2015?

Reply:

Government does not have a binding policy for setting the level of disaster relief contingency funding. Disaster relief funding is mainly included on budget, in conditional grants to municipalities and provinces, and also in the baselines of certain departments, like the Departments of Social Development and Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Where disaster relief grants are insufficient, government can draw down on the national contingency reserve. Historically, immediate disaster relief transfers to provincial and local governments have been less than the provision on budget.

Once a disaster occurs, government distinguishes between two levels of disaster funding: 1) immediate disaster relief and 2) long term disaster reparations relating to infrastructure.

For immediate disaster relief (food, temporary shelter and temporary access roads), government introduced two conditional grants in 2011/12 – the Municipal Disaster Grant and the Provincial Disaster Grant – which allow for the release of funds within a 100-day period from a disaster being declared. Other government grants may also be reprioritised to focus funding in response to immediate disaster needs. The Disaster Grants are included in the baseline of the Department of Cooperative Governance. For 2015/16, the municipal disaster grant amounts to R261.1 million and the provincial disaster grant amounts to R103.2 million. Funds from these two grants have remained underspent for the past 3 years, as the full grant amounts were not required for disaster response. In 2014/15, R197.4 million was allocated to the Provincial Disaster Grant of which R85.9 million was transferred to provinces. For the same period R363.6 million was allocated to the Municipal Disaster Grant, of which R121.4 million was transferred to municipalities.

Required medium term disaster responses are dealt with using the normal MTEF budget process. This is done through the reprioritisation of budgeted funds, mainly within existing government infrastructure grants, or through draw downs on the national contingency reserve. The Department of Cooperative Governance administers the Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant for rehabilitation and reconstruction of disaster damaged municipal infrastructure.

Draw-downs from the contingency reserve are part of the in-year budget process, and need to be tabled by vote. This was done in 2013/14 for floods in the Eastern Cape and the Western Cape (R111.5 million from the contingency reserve) and in 2014/15 for infrastructure reconstruction in the Eastern Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and the Western Cape (R157 million from the contingency reserve). The 2016 MTEF budget process is in progress, with the national contingency reserve standing at R2.5 billion in 2016/17, R9 billion in 2017/18, and R15 billion in 2018/19. Depending on the severity of the current drought, after sector budget reprioritisation, part of the contingency reserve in each year may be allocated for additional disaster relief in the 2016 Budget and / or the 2016/17 Adjustments Budget.

07 December 2015 - NW4200

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to an intergovernmental report commissioned by him on the latest round of the redeterminations of municipal boundaries initiated by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in 2015, he amended the original version of the specified report after consultations with (a) the National Council of Provinces’ Select Committee on Appropriations and/or (b) the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; if not, why not; if so, what are the details in respect of (a) the dates and (b) the outcomes of the specified consultations?

Reply:

a) No. It is not possible to share this report before the budget is tabled as it includes information on budget allocations to affected municipalities and all budget information is embargoed prior to the tabling of the budget. As such no report was presented to the Select Committee on Appropriations.

b) This report was shared with the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs when it was submitted to the Municipal Demarcation Board, for information purposes.

07 December 2015 - NW3811

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the locations of the 200 monitoring sites sampled on a monthly basis to assist in decision making within the Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Area; (2) whether as a result of the monitoring any problem areas have been identified; if so, which areas; (3) what (a) are the names of the wastewater treatment plants in the specified area and (b) is the Green Drop status of each specified plant; (4) what was the outcome of river health monitoring assessments in the specified area; (5) whether any steps have been taken against polluters within the specified area; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) names of the polluters and (b) relevant details of any criminal charges that have been laid against the specified polluters?

Reply:

(1) Refer to Annexure A for locations of the 200 monitoring sampled sites within the Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Area.

(2) Refer to the table below for problem areas that have been identified:

Catchment

Specified Area

SABIE-SAND CATCHMENT

Sabie Town

 

Mkhuhlu

 

Dwarsloop

 

Thulamahashe

 

Bushbuckridge

 

Acornhoek

CROCODILE RIVER CATCHMENT

Emthonjeni

 

WatervalBoven

 

Ngodwana

 

White River

 

Rocky's drift

 

Kabokweni

 

Kanyamazane

 

Barberton

 

Louieville

 

Malelane

 

Hectorspruit

 

Komatipoort

UPPER KOMATI CATCHMENT

Seepage from Union Colliery

 

Tributary of boesmanspruit at Tselentis Colliery

 

Downstream of Tselentis Discard Dumps

 

Coastal fuel @ Witkrans Seepage

 

Carolina sewage Discharge point

 

Elukwatini

LOWER KOMATI CATCHMENT

Driekoppies

 

Tonga Hospital WWTW

 

Tonga Ponds

 

Ka-Maqhekeza

USUTHU CATCHMENT

Piet Retief

 

Heyshope Dam (Downstream of Kangra mine)

 

Amsterdam

 

Assegai

(3) Refer to the table below for the names of the wastewater treatment plants in the specified area:

Requesting the Honorable Member to note that the report of the Blue and Green Drop reports, has been submitted to Cabinet for approval in line with the exercise of executive authority in terms of section 85 of the Constitution hence the information cannot be provided at this point.

Catchment

Name of the wwtw plants

SABIE-SAND CATCHMENT

Sabie WWTW

 

Hazyview WWTW

 

Mkhuhlu WWTW

 

Dwarsloop

 

Thulamahashe

CROCODILE RIVER CATCHMENT

Emthonjeni sewage

 

WatervalBoven sewage

 

(Sappi Ngodwana) Bambi on Elands Rriver

 

White River WWTW

 

Rocky's drift sewage

 

Kabokweni WWTW

 

Kanyamazane WWTW

 

Barberton WWTW

 

Louieville WWTW Final Discharge

 

Mhlatiplaas WWTW final exit

 

Mhlatikop WWTW

 

Hectorspruit WWTW

 

Komatipoort WWTW

UPPER KOMATI CATCHMENT

Carolina WWTW

 

Elukwatini sewage Pump Station

 

U/S of Elukwatini Pump Station

 

ElukwatiniWWTW

LOWER KOMATI CATCHMENT

Shongwe Hospital WWTW

 

Tonga Hospital WWTW

 

Tonga Ponds

 

Ka-Maqhekeza Plaza sewage package plants

USUTHU CATCHMENT

Mkhondo WWTW

 

Amsterdam WWTW

(4) The selection of monitoring sites for river health is completely different from chemical monitoring program. While the selection of monitoring sites for chemical monitoring program is activity based and seeks to establish the impact of land-based activities on the quality of water resources, the selection of monitoring sites for river health purposes looks at the reference conditions that best mimic the natural conditions of the river before development took place. The monitoring points for these respective monitoring programs are therefore far apart from each other in most instances and although it is possible to attribute the health of the river to the quality of the resource, it is not always accurate since it is not activity-based. Hence the number of monitoring sites for the River Health programme are fewer compared to those for chemical monitoring. The eco-status of the various catchment within the Inkomati-Usuthu Water Management Area are summarised below per catchment.

Sabie Catchment – 15 of 20 sites were monitored along the length of the Sabie River (mainstream) from source till it enters the Kruger National Park was recorded to be at category B and even A in some places which is almost pristine. The head-waters of the Sabie River showed degraded eco-status and improved as the river continues downstream, contrary to the norm where the head-waters are more pristine and tend to deteriorate as the river progresses downstream. A detailed study of the upper reaches of the catchment revealed that the impact on the eco-status in the head-waters emanates from the poor maintenance of the road networks in the forestry plantations causing high sedimentation and increased turbidity.

The moderately impacted to near pristine eco-status is attributed to the high flow of water in this river which provides adequate dilution for partially treated waste water discharged into the river. However, in areas where wastewater treatment works discharge partially treated waste, there has also been impact associated with the low levels of dissolved oxygen that results from the high organic loads that utilize oxygen to be broken down. This phenomenon is shown by the high prevalence of air breathing taxa (micro-organisms) recorded and conversely low prevalence of those taxa that get dissolved oxygen from water. These taxa were negatively affected by low levels of dissolved oxygen which occurs as a result of high organic loads found in partially treated domestic waste water. The Sabie River Eco-Status study was conducted in 2012/13.

Crocodile Catchment – 15 of 18 sites were monitored along the length of the Crocodile River (main stem) from source till it enters Mozambique was recorded to be at category C and with 3 sites at category B/C. The level of development in this catchment is extremely high and composed of industry, mining, irrigated agriculture and wastewater treatment works. Two of the tree sites that are rated at category B/C are just upstream of Nelspruit. From Nelspruit down towards the border of Mozambique, the eco-status remains at category C. This is the stretch that contains the highest number of wastewater treatment works in this catchment. The Crocodile River Eco-Status study was conducted in 2013/14.

Komati Catchment – 23 of 31 sites were monitored along the length of the Komati River (mainstream) from source till it enters Mozambique was recorded to be at category C and with 5 sites recording B category and 3 sites at category D. The level of degradation in this catchment is higher due to mining development but not necessarily wastewater treatment works. There are actually fewer wastewater treatment works in this catchment than in both the Sabie and the Crocodile Catchments. The Komati River Eco-Status study was conducted in 2014/15.

Usuthu Catchment – Assessment currently underway and will be completed in the first quarter of 2016/17 financial year.

(5) Yes, steps have been taken against those activities that negatively impact on the water resources including issuing of notices and directives as well as opening of criminal cases and the details of the latter are presented in the table below:

Name of the Polluter (a)

Case Number

Reasons for such actions

Maviljan Ponds (Bushbuckridge Municipality)

Case 127/08/2014

Continuous discharge of partially treated sewage into a water resource.

Thulamahashe WWTW (Bushbuckridge Local Municipality)

Case 89/02/2014

Continuous discharge of partially treated sewage into a water resource

Carolina WWTW (Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality)

Case 57/09/2015

Continuous discharge of partially treated sewage into a water resource

Hillsview Pump Station

Case 35/07/2014

Continuous overflow of raw sewage into the water resource.

Twin City Hazyview (Mbombela Local Municipality)

Case 112/02/2014

Continuous overflow of raw sewage into the water resource

TTC manhole (ThabaChweu Local Municipality)

Case 11/05/2014

Continuous overflow of raw sewage into the water resource

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