Questions and Replies

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19 October 2015 - NW3640

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 3321 on 17 September 2015, his department’s annual report for the 2014-15 financial year outlines the specified information as requested in question 3321; if not, why not; if so, what are the costs incurred by his department regarding (a) air travel between Cape Town and Gauteng, (b) accommodation in Cape Town and (c) car rental for officials in Cape Town?

Reply:

According to Treasury guidelines on the compilation of Departmental Annual Reports, the 2014-15 annual report does contain information on the costs incurred for travel, accommodation and transport rentals by departmental staff.

19 October 2015 - NW3639

Profile picture: Matshobeni, Ms A

Matshobeni, Ms A to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 3284 on 8 September 2015, his department’s annual report for the 2014-15 financial year outlines the specified information as requested in question 3284; if not, why not; if so, what are the costs incurred by his department regarding (a) air travel between Cape Town and Gauteng, (b) accommodation in Cape Town and (c) car rental for officials in Cape Town?

Reply:

As I indicated in my response on the 05 September 2015 to question no: 3284, which I stated the following: “Government officials are expected to travel between Gauteng and the Western Cape to carry out official duties, including ministerial and department support to the Executive who carry out parliamentary duties according the Parliamentary Programme.

“Costs incurred by Government Officials are readily made available in Annual Reports which will be tabled in Parliament”.

To further assist the Honourable Member, page 106 of the latest annual report do highlight the item on travel and subsistence.

19 October 2015 - NW3524

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether any new aircraft (a) have been or (b) are to be procured for use by the (i) President, Mr Jacob Zuma, or (ii) the Deputy President, Mr Cyril Ramaphosa; if so, in each specified case, what are the (aa) costs of the aircraft and (bb) reasons for their procurement; (2) whether any aircraft (a) have been or (b) are to be procured for use to transport the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, to his residence in Nkandla; if so, in each case, what are the (i) costs of the aircraft and (ii) reasons for their procurement

Reply:

(1) Nothing procured yet but processes are in place for additional VVIP aircraft procurement.

(2) No

19 October 2015 - NW3660

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Can educators who resign from the employ of any provincial education department be re-employed at a later stage; if not, why not; if so, under what conditions in each specified province are these educators re-employed?

Reply:

Yes, educators who resign from the employ of any provincial education department can be re-employed at a later stage in each province under the same conditions of employment stipulated in section 4 of the Employment of Educators Act, 1998 which states:

Salaries and other conditions of service of educators

4. (1) Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in any law but subject to the provisions of this section, the Labour Relations Act or any collective agreement concluded by the Education Labour Relations Council, the Minister shall determine the salaries and other conditions of service of educators.

(2) Different salaries and conditions of service may be so determined in respect of different ranks and grades of educators, educators appointed at or outside educational institutions or educators appointed in different sectors of education.

(3) A determination of the Minister under this section involving expenditure from the National Revenue Fund may only be made with the concurrence of the Minister of Finance.”

19 October 2015 - NW3455

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether he is aware of the secondment of a certain person (name and details furnished) by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs of KwaZulu-Natal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the specified person’s permanent position within the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; (2) whether the specified person meets the minimum competency requirements for a certain position (details furnished); (3) whether the specified person is eligible to be employed in positions of fiduciary responsibility in any municipality or within the department, given the specified person’s disciplinary record at a certain entity (name furnished); if so, why; (4) whether it is the policy of his department that the appointment or secondment of certain positions (details furnished) by the provincial and local government spheres are reported to his department; if not, whether he will consider making it policy; if so, (a) which details are reported and (b) what is the timeframe of such reporting?

Reply:

The following response is based on information received from the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

1. Ms. Gabi Gumbi- Masilela was not seconded by Cogta KZN. She was appointed by Umngeni Local Municipality as an Acting Municipal Manager for an initial period of three months. Ms Gabi Gumbi-Masilela is not an employee of Cogta KZN.

2. The MEC responsible for local government in the KwaZulu-Natal Province is currently assessing whether Ms. Gabi Gumbi- Masilela meets the minimum competency requirements for the position of municipal manager.

3. The assessment in (2) above includes whether Ms Gabi Gumbi-Masilela meets the minimum academic and work related experience requirements (b) within 28 days of her appointment as Acting Municipal Manager. As far as could be ascertained, Ms Gabi Gumbi-Masilela resigned her position from the MDB.

4. Yes.

Appointment of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to municipal managers

Municipal councils are required in terms of section 54A and 56(4A)(a) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000) (“Systems Act”) to inform the MEC for local government about the appointment process and outcome of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to a municipal managers within 14 days of the date of appointment as prescribed. The Systems Act further obliges the MEC to submit the information referred to herein to the Minister within 14 days from the date of receipt of the report thereof.

Regulation 17(4) of the Regulation on Appointment and Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers (the “Regulations”) prescribes a written report regarding the appointment process and outcome which must be submitted to the MEC by the municipality. The report referred to herein must contain the following:

  1. details of the advertisement, including date of issue and the name of newspapers in which the advert was published, and proof of the advertisement or a copy thereof;
  2. a list of all applicants;
  3. a report contemplated in regulation 14(2) on the screening process and the outcome thereof;
  4. the municipal council’s resolution approving the selection panel and the shortlisted candidates;
  5. competency assessment results;
  6. the minutes of the shortlisting meeting;
  7. the minutes of interviews, including scoring;
  8. the recommendations of the selection panel submitted to the municipal council;
  9. the details of executive committee members and recommendations, if the selection panel comprised of all members of the executive committee;
  10. the recommendation of the executive committee or executive mayor to the municipal council, if any;
  11. the municipal council resolution approving the appointment of the successful candidate;
  12. the application form, curriculum vitae, proof of qualifications and other supporting documentation of the successful candidate;
  13. a written confirmation by the successful candidate that he or she does not hold political office as contemplated in section 56A of the Act, as at the date of appointment;
  14. the letter of appointment, outlining the term of contract, remuneration and conditions of employment of the senior manager; and any other information relevant to the appointment.

Secondment of municipal managers

Section 54A(6) of the Systems Act provides that municipal council may request the MEC for local government to second a suitable person, on such conditions as prescribed, to act in the advertised position until such time as a suitable candidate has been appointed. The section also permits the municipal council to request the Minister to second a suitable person, on such conditions as prescribed, until such time as a suitable candidate has been appointed if the MEC for local government has not seconded a suitable person within a period of 60 days after receipt of the request.

In terms of Regulation 20, a person seconded by the MEC or the Minister must report monthly to the MEC or the Minister on the following:

  1. steps taken to fill the vacant post to which he or she is seconded;
  2. the development and implementation of any municipal institutional recovery plan for which the seconded official is responsible;
  3. monitor and assess the adherence to policy, principles and frameworks applicable to the municipality;
  4. develop a turnaround strategy for the municipality including a strategy to promote good governance;
  5. ensure implementation of municipal council resolutions by the administration;
  6. implement a system to control and approve all expenditure;
  7. implement all governance systems and procedures; and
  8. ensure implementation of financial systems, policies and procedures.

19 October 2015 - NW3074

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(a) How does (i) his department and (ii) entities reporting to him define red tape and (b) what (i) specific interventions and /or (ii) systems have been implemented to (aa) identify and (bb) reduce red tape in (aaa) his department and (bbb) the entities reporting to him?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii)

Complicated or unnecessary processes and procedures which impede or delay service delivery or decision making.

b) Boxing South Africa (BSA) is currently reviewing its standard operating procedures.

South African Institute of Drug free Sport (SAIDS) is experience no red tapes.

19 October 2015 - NW3548

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the MINISTER OF ARTS AND CULTURE:

1. Whether his department meets the Government’s 2% employment equity target for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not why not, if so, what are the relevant details? QUESTION NO: 3548 FOR WRITTEN REPLY DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 18 SEPTEMBER 2015 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER REF NO 38-2015) “MS L L VAN DER MERWE (IFP) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF ARTS AND CULTURE: Whether his department meets the Government’s 2% employment equity target for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not why not, if so, what are the relevant details? (NW4213E) REPLY: Yes, the department currently employs 10 persons with disabilities which represent 2.1% of the staff complement.

Reply:

  1. Yes, the department currently employs 10 persons with disabilities which represent 2.1% of the staff complement.

19 October 2015 - NW3564

Profile picture: Figg, Mr MJ

Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)Whether, the investigation that was instituted into allegations of espionage relating to the Public Protector, Advocate Thuli Madonsela, and other political leaders, has been completed; if not, why not; if so, when was the investigation completed; (2) whether a final report of the investigation was compiled; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the title of the report, (b) on what date was the report (i) completed and (ii) submitted to him and (c) what are the main (i) findings and (ii) recommendations of the report; (3) whether the investigation found any veracity to the alleged allegations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The investigation of the blog and related matters on African Intelligence leak is at an advanced stage and the team is expected to conclude the remaining scope of the investigation as soon as possible.

19 October 2015 - NW2793

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the Government has initiated rescue plans to revitalise any towns in the country that were experiencing a prolonged economic slump exacerbated by mining, industrial, commercial or agricultural shedding of jobs and therefore regressing to become informal settlements without economic opportunity, amenities or basic services; if not, (a) how many such towns are collapsing and (b) why is there no plan to revitalise them; if so, (i) how many such towns were identified for revitalisation and (ii) what progress has been made in that regard?

Reply:

Government has initiated a rescue plan to revitalise fifteen mining towns in five provinces that were experiencing a prolonged economic slump exacerbated by mining, industrial, commercial or agricultural shedding of jobs. Twelve of labour sending areas in two provinces have also been prioritised for the revitalisation of distressed mining communities.

 

MINING TOWNS

PROVINCE

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

Limpopo

Sekhukhune

Fetakgomo, Greater Tubatse, Elias Motsoaledi

 

Waterberg

Lephalele

Gauteng

West Rand

Westonaria, Randfontein, Mogale City, Merafong

North West

Bojanala

Rustenburg, Moses Kotane, Madibeng

 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Matlosana

Mpumalanga

Nkangala

Emalahleni, Steve Tshwete

Free State

Lejweleputswa

Matjhabeng

Twelve labour sending areas in two provinces have been prioritised for the revitalisation of distressed mining communities.

LABOUR SENDING AREAS

PROVINCE

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

Eastern Cape

OR Tambo

King Sabata Dalindyebo, Nyandeni, Nquza Hill, Mhlontlo, Port St Johns

 

Alfred Nzo

Mbizana, Ntabankulu

KwaZulu Natal

Zululand

AbaQulusi, eDumbe, Nongoma, Ulundi, uPhongolo

An integrated strategy and Back to Basics Programme was approved by the Inter-Ministerial Committees (IMC), late last year for the different work streams to address the socio economic conditions in mining towns and labour sending areas holistically. Various Programmes are in place and being implemented. The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) is coordinating the national departments, provinces and municipalities. The following departments/institutions participate in the work of the Economic Work Stream:

  • The Department of Trade and Industry – overall strategy is to promote Industrial Development through Special Economic Zones and Industrial Parks in Bojanala District Municipality (DM), Greater Tubatse and Lejweleputswa.
  • Economic Development Department through Industrial Development Corporation conducted economic assessments in 6 Districts to assist municipalities attract investment and job opportunities to their regions by creating enabling economic development in West Rand, Sekhukhune, Lejweleputswa, Bojanala, Waterberg and Nkangala.
  • South African Local Government Association (SALGA) – Small Town Regeneration – developed a comprehensive strategy to address the socio economic decline of towns. It is currently working in the following towns across the 9 provinces focusing on Mining and Industrial Towns, Tourism Towns, Transit and Commuter Towns: Lukhanji, Port St Johns, Letsemeng, Matjhabeng, Randfontein, Bela Bela, Emalahleni, Matlosana, Zululand, Umkhanyakude, Madibeng etc.
  • DCoG – Establishment of Business Development Forums to stimulate large scale employment at a local level through private sector driven catalytic business ventures Bojanala DM, Greater Tubatse DM, Matlosana LM and Waterberg DM. Furthermore, the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) in mining towns and labour sending areas has been aligned to respond to Back to Basics priorities.

Progress has been made in diversifying the economies of mining towns by conducting economic assessments to identify investment opportunities in the following Provinces:

In Limpopo, sectoral opportunities in agriculture, mining and quarrying, manufacturing, wholesale and retail, and tourism has been identified in Sekhukhune and anticipated to attract investments at De Hoop Dam tourism development, Potlake Nature Reserve, fresh produce market, Tubatse special economic zone, R55 doubling and tarring, De Hoop augmentation, mining sector support businesses, bio diesel production, vegetable processing plant, flag boshielo dam development, Mountain Resort Linked to Drakensburg Escarpment Cluster of Projects and Tsate heritage site.

Sectoral opportunities in Waterberg District Municipality were also identified in agriculture, mining and quarrying, manufacturing and tourism. The envisaged investment attraction include agricultural hubs, logistics hub, opportunities linked to mining expansion in the region, mining product beneficiation opportunities, water sorting plant ( green economy), and tourism projects linked to biosphere and nature reserves.

Gauteng sectoral opportunities in agriculture, tourism, green economy, economic infrastructure, transport and logistics were identified and hope to attract the following investments to West Rand:

  • Establishment of the Food Hubs ( Agro- processing Park)
  • Development of Logistics hub/ Park
  • Development of Township Industrial Parks/ Enterprise Hubs
  • Development of a Municipal Precinct
  • Smart city ( Broad band network)
  • The Lanseria Airport City

Free State’s sectoral opportunities were identified in agriculture, mining, tourism, automotive/transportation and energy, hope to attract the following investments in Lejeleputswa:

  • The Processing Plant (Hides processing plant & Agro-processing)
  • Redevelopment of existing Airport
  • Methane gas extraction

Sectoral opportunities in agriculture and agro processing, mining, chemicals/electronics and automotive, manufacturing and trade and tourism have been identified in the North West Province and anticipated to attract investments into Bojanala District in the following areas:

  • Catalytic Converter manufacturing plants
  • Distribution and Logistics Hub
  • International Convention Centers
  • Traditional Art Gallery and cultural information centre
  • Implementation of Heritage Park
  • Establishment of an incubator network and Development Agency
  • Rural Integrated Energy Centre
  • Lurcene Plant
  • Bio-fuel plant
  • Sisal Farming Project (Pella)
  • Further development of tourism facilities around Sun City node
  • Commercialization of small scale farming and agro-processing
  • Development of tourism facilities at Borakolalo Reserve (Klipvoordam) jointly with Madibeng
  • Upgrading of Phapatso cultural village and establishment of incubator for arts, crafts and cultural industries.
  • Pilot waste collection and recycling

Sectoral opportunities in Mpumalanga have been identified in agriculture, mining, food products, wood products, chemicals, and automotive and hope to attract the following investments into Nkangala District Municipality:

  • A catalytic convertor component manufacturing plant;
  • A truck port/ logistics hub;
  • An agro-processing bio-fuel production facility;
  • An international convention centre;
  • The Moloto corridor rail system;
  • Delmas International Cargo Airport – linked to a Free Trade/ Special Economic Zone.
  • Loskop-Zithabiseni tourism belt development;
  • Rust de Winter tourism development;
  • Kusile Power Station project.

19 October 2015 - NW3479

Profile picture: Terblanche, Ms JF

Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)   (a) What is the total amount of outstanding debt owed to Northern Cape municipalities, (b) what amount is owed in respect of each municipality, (c) what amount of the specified amounts is owed by (i) households, (ii) businesses and (iii) government departments and (d) what amount of the outstanding debt is older than (i) 30 days, (ii) 60 days and (iii) 90 days; (2) in respect of the specified debt owed by government departments, (a) what are the reasons that government departments have not settled the specified outstanding debts and (b) what commitments have been made to the affected municipalities with regard to the specified outstanding debts; (3) (a) what total amount of the specified outstanding debt has been written off in respect of each municipality in the past five financial years and (b) what is his department doing to assist municipalities to collect the specified outstanding debts? NW4140E

Reply:

The following information is supplied by the Northern Provincial Government:

  1. (a)The total amount of outstanding debt owed to Northern Cape municipalities is R2.7 billion as at end of June 2015

(b) The table below specified the amount owed to each municipality

(c ) (i) (ii)& (iii) (d) (i) The amount of debt owed by households amounts to R1.7 billion, organs of state R426 million, commercial R373 million and other category of debt amounted to R191 million. The table below illustrates the debt in terms of consumer types and age analysis.

(2) (a) the reasons for government departments not settling outstanding debt are following:

  • Incorrect invoices sent by municipalities to departments;
  • Late issuing of invoices to departments;
  • Payments made by Departments not using a reference number so municipalities cannot identify payments made;
  • Inaccurate billings and interest charged on inaccurate accounts;
  • Claims not timeously submitted to National Department of Public Works

(b) The department in collaboration with National Task team on payment of outstanding government debt has appointed a service provider to undertake verification and auditing of outstanding debt in all municipalities for possible payments upon confirmation.

3. (a) The information has been requested from the Province; they are in the process of collecting the information from the municipalities. The information will be forwarded to the honourable member as soon as it becomes available.

(b) The department through Provincial COGHSTA and Provincial Treasury has established Provincial Debt Management Committees to mediate and assist municipalities in collecting outstanding debt. Continuous interaction with sector departments and municipalities to assess and verify correct billing for timeous payments.

19 October 2015 - NW3659

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How many non-teaching personnel in each category of non-teaching personnel are employed in each district in each province by each (a) provincial education department and (b) school governing body?

Reply:

(a) The number of non-teaching personnel in each category of non-teaching personnel employed in each district in each province by each provincial education department is as follows:


Source PERSAL: August 2015

Province, District

ADMINISTRATIVE LINE FUNCTION & SUPPORT PERSONNEL

AGRICULTURAL RELATED AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

ARCHITECT

ARTISAN AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE SUPERVISOR

COMMUNICATION + INFORMATION RELATED PERSONNEL

ECONOMIC ADVISORY AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

EDUCATION SPECIALIST

Education Therapists

ENGINEERING RELATED AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

GISC PRODUCTION

HEALTH ASSOCIATED SCIENCES AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

HUMAN RESOURCE AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND RELATED PERSONNEL

LEGAL AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL SUPPORT

MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL SUPPORT PERSONNEL

MEC

NATURAL SCIENCES RELATED & SUPPORT PERSONNEL

QUANTITY SURVEY

REGULATORY AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

SAFETY AND RELATED PERSONNEL

SOCIAL SERVICES AND SUPPORT PERSONNEL

TOWN AND REGIONAL PLANNER

Grand Total

EASTERN CAPE

2307

51

2

102

35

1

0

1394

29

0

1

716

0

21

1

1

10953

1

0

3

0

0

2

1

15621

BIZANA DISTRICT OFFICE

67

1

0

2

0

0

0

54

0

0

0

98

0

1

0

0

400

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

623

BUTTERWORTH

103

0

0

1

0

0

0

64

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

529

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

699

COFIMVABA

86

3

0

0

1

0

0

49

4

0

0

2

0

1

0

0

366

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

512

CRADOCK

53

8

0

16

0

0

0

35

0

0

0

21

0

0

0

0

218

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

351

DUTYWA EDUCATION

55

6

0

3

0

0

0

61

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

473

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

599

EAST LONDON

154

0

0

1

0

0

0

51

3

0

0

64

0

1

0

0

658

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

932

FORT BEAUFORT

103

2

0

1

0

0

0

47

4

0

0

13

0

0

0

0

432

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

602

GRAAFF REINET

30

0

0

1

0

0

0

38

0

0

0

49

0

1

0

0

269

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

388

GRAHAMSTOWN

63

1

0

1

0

0

0

46

1

0

0

14

0

0

0

0

242

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

368

HEAD OFFICE

220

0

2

1

0

0

0

151

0

0

1

0

0

4

1

0

640

1

0

3

0

0

0

1

1025

KING WILLIAM'S TOWN

145

1

0

3

11

0

0

62

3

0

0

53

0

2

0

0

934

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1215

LADY FRERE

41

5

0

1

0

0

0

41

0

0

0

9

0

1

0

0

296

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

394

LIBODE

151

0

0

2

0

0

0

77

0

0

0

4

0

1

0

0

606

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

841

LUSIKISIKI

70

0

0

2

0

0

0

65

0

0

0

16

0

1

0

0

391

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

545

MALUTI

59

0

0

1

0

0

0

52

4

0

0

19

0

0

0

1

379

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

515

MOUNT FLETCHER

43

0

0

0

0

0

0

49

0

0

0

5

0

1

0

0

288

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

386

MOUNT FRERE

74

1

0

4

0

0

0

47

0

0

0

25

0

1

0

0

568

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

720

MTHATHA

162

0

0

19

1

0

0

71

1

0

0

131

0

1

0

0

653

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1040

NGCOBO

59

7

0

2

0

0

0

50

4

0

0

27

0

0

0

0

389

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

538

PORT ELIZABETH

130

5

0

4

0

1

0

78

4

0

0

84

0

1

0

0

730

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1037

QUEENSTOWN

115

4

0

1

18

0

0

45

0

0

0

11

0

1

0

0

401

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

596

QUMBU

69

0

0

1

0

0

0

56

0

0

0

22

0

1

0

0

400

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

549

STERKSPRUIT

98

1

0

1

0

0

0

48

0

0

0

17

0

0

0

0

322

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

487

UITENHAGE

157

6

0

34

4

0

0

57

1

0

0

31

0

0

0

0

369

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

659

FREE STATE

1533

155

0

37

0

0

0

58

11

0

0

1247

0

0

0

0

1894

0

0

0

0

0

19

0

4954

FEZILE DABI

249

28

0

1

0

0

0

5

1

0

0

174

0

0

0

0

277

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

737

LEJWELEPUTSWA

343

12

0

0

0

0

0

4

1

0

0

170

0

0

0

0

383

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

917

MOTHEO

425

83

0

4

0

0

0

47

9

0

0

482

0

0

0

0

602

0

0

0

0

0

11

0

1663

THABO MOFUTSANYANA

429

18

0

32

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

267

0

0

0

0

533

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

1283

XHARIEP

87

14

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

154

0

0

0

0

99

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

354

GAUTENG

21192

373

3

27

12

40

0

2041

115

3

0

474

19

2

7

18

1876

1

0

2

1

0

31

0

26237

EKURHULENI NORTH

1718

11

0

0

0

1

0

133

11

0

0

34

0

0

0

0

90

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2000

EKURHULENI SOUTH

2190

9

0

0

0

0

0

114

6

0

0

25

3

0

0

3

92

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2443

EKURHULENI WEST

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

GAUTENG EAST

1672

24

0

0

0

1

0

150

18

0

0

44

0

0

0

0

115

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

2029

GAUTENG NORTH

363

1

0

0

0

1

0

75

2

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

32

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

476

GAUTENG WEST

1881

30

0

1

7

3

0

115

7

0

0

35

0

0

0

2

115

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

2200

HEAD OFFICE

776

2

3

26

0

10

0

270

2

3

0

1

10

2

7

1

496

1

0

2

0

0

5

0

1617

JOHANNESBURG CENTRAL

1465

70

0

0

0

9

0

138

5

0

0

32

0

0

0

0

114

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

1839

JOHANNESBURG EAST

1332

15

0

0

0

1

0

114

7

0

0

13

0

0

0

3

62

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1547

JOHANNESBURG NORTH

1155

56

0

0

5

3

0

119

7

0

0

37

0

0

0

1

90

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1474

JOHANNESBURG SOUTH

963

4

0

0

0

5

0

112

6

0

0

17

0

0

0

0

99

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1206

JOHANNESBURG WEST

1155

35

0

0

0

1

0

119

9

0

0

11

0

0

0

0

75

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

1409

SEDIBENG EAST

659

12

0

0

0

0

0

98

6

0

0

47

0

0

0

0

65

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

887

SEDIBENG WEST

1076

53

0

0

0

1

0

90

1

0

0

2

3

0

0

2

66

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1294

TSHWANE NORTH

1932

11

0

0

0

1

0

115

8

0

0

39

2

0

0

1

118

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2227

TSHWANE SOUTH

1642

27

0

0

0

1

0

150

11

0

0

73

1

0

0

0

126

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2031

TSHWANE WEST

1212

13

0

0

0

2

0

129

9

0

0

62

0

0

0

5

121

0

0

0

1

0

3

0

1557

KWAZULU/NATAL

4566

383

0

85

0

130

0

1442

93

26

1

1585

3

53

7

0

9251

1

0

0

0

0

13

0

17639

AMAJUBA

221

19

0

8

0

7

0

93

6

1

0

118

0

2

0

0

457

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

935

EMPANGENI

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

ETHEKWINI

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

HEAD OFFICE

191

0

0

14

0

20

0

97

1

1

1

1

0

10

7

0

516

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

860

ILEMBE

291

16

0

3

0

10

0

92

7

3

0

67

0

5

0

0

627

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1121

KOKSTAD

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

PINETOWN

470

48

0

10

0

22

0

137

9

3

0

230

0

5

0

0

696

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1630

SISONKE

161

9

0

3

0

3

0

104

8

1

0

103

0

5

0

0

510

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

907

UGU

358

12

0

6

0

5

0

86

2

1

0

167

0

5

0

0

722

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1364

UMGUNGUNDLOVU

403

56

0

7

0

10

0

122

2

2

0

184

0

3

0

0

834

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1623

UMKHANYAKUDE

384

9

0

2

0

0

0

106

12

1

0

53

1

3

0

0

699

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1270

UMLAZI

503

59

0

10

0

33

0

178

7

3

0

185

0

3

0

0

994

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1975

UMLAZI

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

UMZINYATHI

322

16

0

3

0

5

0

96

10

3

0

122

0

2

0

0

641

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1220

UTHUKELA

336

16

0

1

0

5

0

104

3

2

0

84

0

4

0

0

747

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

1312

UTHUNGULU

440

51

0

12

0

5

0

105

14

2

0

167

0

2

0

0

778

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1576

ZULULAND

485

72

0

6

0

5

0

122

12

3

0

104

2

4

0

0

1026

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1841

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

1626

20

2

14

0

0

0

776

67

1

1

273

452

2

2

0

4675

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

7914

CAPRICORN

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

27

0

0

0

0

62

2

0

0

424

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

516

HEAD OFFICE

5

0

2

2

0

0

0

92

0

1

1

0

84

0

2

0

416

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

608

LEBOWAKGOMO

45

0

0

0

0

0

0

30

2

0

0

29

10

0

0

0

132

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

248

MOGALAKWENA

60

0

0

0

0

0

0

45

2

0

0

3

7

0

0

0

112

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

229

MOPANI

173

8

0

5

0

0

0

99

3

0

0

27

70

0

0

0

835

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1220

POLOKWANE

266

2

0

1

0

0

0

97

3

0

0

124

28

0

0

0

351

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

872

RIBA CROSS

46

0

0

0

0

0

0

28

4

0

0

0

5

0

0

0

129

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

212

SEKHUKHUNE

377

3

0

3

0

0

0

102

17

0

0

18

71

0

0

0

619

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1210

TSHIPISE-SAGOLE

49

0

0

0

0

0

0

17

7

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

88

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

163

TZANEEN

111

3

0

2

0

0

0

46

5

0

0

44

10

0

0

0

194

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

415

VHEMBE

295

3

0

0

0

0

0

146

18

0

0

11

63

0

0

0

799

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1335

WATERBERG

198

1

0

1

0

0

0

47

6

0

0

17

40

0

0

0

576

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

886

MPUMALANGA

2401

82

2

23

12

11

0

793

16

1

0

269

0

26

3

0

4465

1

1

4

0

0

2073

0

10183

BOHLABELA

519

8

0

3

0

0

0

148

3

0

0

49

0

2

0

0

901

0

0

0

0

0

504

0

2137

EHLANZENI

570

5

0

5

0

0

0

160

2

0

0

37

0

6

0

0

1065

0

0

0

0

0

520

0

2370

GERT SIBANDE

552

36

0

4

12

0

0

164

4

0

0

109

0

6

0

0

990

0

0

0

0

0

521

0

2398

HEAD OFFICE

69

1

2

8

0

11

0

142

1

1

0

3

0

9

3

0

420

1

0

4

0

0

0

0

675

NKANGALA

691

32

0

3

0

0

0

179

6

0

0

71

0

3

0

0

1089

0

1

0

0

0

528

0

2603

NORTH WEST

2942

51

1

25

0

15

44

882

23

2

0

333

85

19

1

0

898

1

0

2

0

3

1

0

5328

BOJANALA

754

4

0

3

0

1

9

248

9

0

0

22

12

1

0

0

179

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1243

DR KENNETH KAUNDA

454

12

0

2

0

0

5

133

7

0

0

213

9

2

0

0

225

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1062

DR RUTH S. MOMPATI

501

7

0

3

0

0

7

144

4

0

0

43

9

1

0

0

105

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

825

HEAD OFFICE

493

0

1

15

0

13

15

126

0

2

0

3

47

14

1

0

146

1

0

2

0

1

1

0

881

NGAKA MODIRI MOLEMA

740

28

0

2

0

1

8

231

3

0

0

52

8

1

0

0

243

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1317

NORTHERN CAPE

771

11

0

10

0

4

0

430

45

0

0

176

1

2

4

0

1859

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

3314

FRANCIS BAARD

151

7

0

0

0

0

0

72

18

0

0

52

0

0

0

0

478

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

778

HEAD OFFICE: KIMBERLEY

151

0

0

10

0

4

0

144

9

0

0

2

1

2

3

0

291

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

618

JOHN TAOLE GAETSEWE

177

0

0

0

0

0

0

60

0

0

0

12

0

0

1

0

259

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

509

NAMAQUA

74

1

0

0

0

0

0

47

8

0

0

26

0

0

0

0

269

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

425

PIXLEY KA SEME

104

1

0

0

0

0

0

54

2

0

0

36

0

0

0

0

289

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

486

SIYANDA

114

2

0

0

0

0

0

53

8

0

0

48

0

0

0

0

273

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

498

WESTERN CAPE

2508

3972

7

16

0

26

0

804

127

0

0

1386

262

3

1

2

715

1

0

0

0

0

55

1

9886

CAPE WINELANDS EDUCATION DISTRICT

355

641

0

4

0

0

0

102

19

0

0

321

1

0

0

0

54

0

0

0

0

0

12

0

1509

EDEN & CENTRAL KAROO EDUCATION DISTRICT

293

490

0

2

0

0

0

81

12

0

0

330

2

0

0

0

46

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

1263

METRO CENTRAL EDUCATION DISTRICT

302

626

0

0

0

0

0

134

24

0

0

140

1

0

0

0

59

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

1293

METRO EAST EDUCATION DISTRICT

319

513

0

0

0

1

0

103

22

0

0

126

0

0

0

0

46

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

1135

METRO NORTH EDUCATION DISTRICT

363

635

0

0

0

0

0

89

14

0

0

58

2

0

1

0

43

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

1210

METRO SOUTH EDUCATION DISTRICT

323

585

0

0

0

0

0

90

13

0

0

69

2

0

0

0

70

0

0

0

0

0

9

0

1161

OVERBERG EDUCATION DISTRICT

81

168

0

0

0

0

0

51

5

0

0

47

0

0

0

0

46

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

401

WEST COAST EDUCATION DISTRICT

127

298

0

3

0

0

0

61

8

0

0

292

1

0

0

0

54

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

850

WESTERN CAPE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT:HEAD OFFICE

345

16

7

7

0

25

0

93

10

0

0

3

253

3

0

2

297

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

1064

Grand Total

39846

5098

17

339

59

227

44

8620

526

33

3

6459

822

128

26

21

36586

8

1

11

1

3

2194

4

101076

(b) Information as to how many non-teaching staff are appointed by School Governing Bodies at schools is not readily available.

19 October 2015 - NW3535

Profile picture: Matlhoko, Mr AM

Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Were communities in (a) Ha-Mashamba, (b) Ha-Masakona and (c) Ha-Mashau consulted regarding the process for their inclusion in the newly demarcated municipality in the Vhembe district; if not, why not; if so, (i) what concerns did each specified community raise and (ii) how were these concerns addressed, in each case?

Reply:

The Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB) is only accountable to the Department for its finances. The MDB reports on its activities to Parliament through the Portfolio Committee.

From the Departments’ point of view, this matter is now sub-judice.

 

19 October 2015 - NW3468

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Which areas did his department declare as disaster areas in terms of the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, as a result of the recent and/or current drought; (2) Did his department receive submissions for any other areas to also be declared disaster areas; if so, (a) which areas did these submissions cover and (b) what was the reason for each specified area not being declared a disaster area? NW4129E

Reply:

  1. No. In terms of the Disaster Management Act, 2002, the Minister only has the power to declare a national state of disaster. I have not declared any national state of disaster as a result of the recent or current drought.

2. (a) Kindly note that the law empowers the relevant authorities to declare events as disasters and not areas as “disaster areas”. Yes, submissions have been received from four provinces to declare drought disasters. The Premiers in all four provinces, being KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Free State and North West, have declared disasters in terms of Section 41 of the Disaster Management Act No. 57 of 2002, in the following areas.

KwaZulu-Natal Province:

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

Ugu

Umdoni, Umzumbe, Vulamehlo, and Umziwabantu

Umgungundlovu

Umshwathi, Richmond, Mpofana and Mkhambathini

uThukela

Emnambithi/Ladysmith, Indaka, Umtshezi and Imbambazane

Umzinyathi

Umvoti, Nquthu, and Msinga

Zululand

Ulundi and Nongoma

Umkhanyakude

Umhlabuyalingana, Jozini, Big Five False Bay, Hlabisa and Mtubatuba

UThungulu

Ntambanana, Umlalazi, Nkandla and Mfolozi

iLembe

Maphumulo, Ndwedwe and KwaDukuza

Harry Gwala

Greater Kokstad, Ubuhlebezwe and KwaSani

 

Limpopo Province:

NAME OF DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

AFFECTED LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES

Mopani

Maruleng, Letaba and Giyani

Waterberg

Mookgopong, Thabazimbi, Lephalale, Bela-Bela and Mogalakwena

Sekhukhune

Tubatse

Capricorn

Aganang and Blouberg

Free State Province:

NAME OF DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

AFFECTED LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES

Thabo Mofutsanyane

Mantsopa, Setsoto, Dihlabeng, Nketoana, Maluti-a-Phofung and Phumelela

Fezile Dabi

Moqhaka, Ngwathe, Metsimaholo and Mafube

Gariep

Letsemeng, Kopanong, Mohokare and Naledi

Lejelweputswa

Masilonyana, Tokologo, Tswelopele, Matjhabeng and Nala

North West Province:

NAME OF DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

AFFECTED LOCAL MUNICIPALITIES

Bojanala

Moretele, Madibeng and Moses Kotane

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Ganyesa and Bloemhof

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Ventersdorp and Tlokwe

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ramotshere Moiloa and Ratlou

(b) Disasters have not been declared in areas that have not been affected by drought as determined by the provincial assessments.   
     

The NDMC is currently busy with the classification processes in North West Province and Limpopo and still awaiting detailed drought reports from Free State Province.

KwaZulu-Natal declared a state of provincial disaster in July 2014 and is currently implementing its recovery plan with support from the Department of Water and Sanitation and National Disaster Management Centre.

 

                                            

19 October 2015 - NW3540

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) What assistance is his department offering emerging farmers who have been hit hard by drought particularly in the North West Province

Reply:

( 1) Drought assessments were undertaken with farmers, Provincial Departments of agriculture (inclusive of North West) and the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) (with support of Organized Agriculture) to establish the extent and number of emerging farmers affected by drought. Provincial drought reports from the Departments of Agriculture were submitted to relevant Disaster Management Centres (Local, Provincial/ National). The provincial departments of agriculture requested assistance from their respective Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs) regarding their classification and declaration of state of disaster by Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (DCOGTA) through Disaster Management Act (57 of 2002).

In respect of drought incident, five provinces KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), Mpumalanga, Free State, Limpopo and North West conducted assessments. Declaration process is completed in Free State, Limpopo and North West. National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) is currently assessing North West province for classification of the drought disaster. Free State and Limpopo submitted classification requests. KZN and Mpumalanga provinces submitted their declaration requests to their respective PDMCs. NDMC will submit the provincial requests to National Treasury for funding.

While awaiting the process to unfold, DAFF has approached all the affected provinces to mobilise resources within their respective provinces. KwaZulu-Natal developed and is currently implementing a provincial drought scheme with a provincial budget of R6 mill ion on emerging farmers, while Limpopo has committed to spent R3 million.

In addition, DAFF continues to monitor conditions in the provinces and issue updated early warning information/ advisory information to the sector which includes strategies to implement during dry conditions. Also, coping strategies of various natural hazards are developed by the department. To date coping strategies for drought have been developed and published into all official languages to be understood by all. These strategies are issued to farmers and officials. Farmers are further encouraged to adapt to the changing conditions i.e. consider suitable farming activities and implement good farming practices as conditions are also aggravated by poor practices.

Furthermore, roving seminars on weather and climate are continually being conducted in the provinces. The main objective of these seminars is to make farmers more self-reliant by helping them become better informed about effective weather and climate risk management for the sustainable use of natural resources for agricultural production.
 

Answer tabled in Parliament on:
DAFF'S RESPONSE:

CLASSIFICATION: CONFIDENTIAL

SUBJECT: QUESTION NO. 3540 FOR ORAL REPLY TO MR N PAULSEN (EFF) ASKED TO THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

19 October 2015 - NW3293

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did her department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The trips undertaken were in line with the Parliamentary and Cabinet Programme as approved by Parliament and Cabinet respectively. The costs for trips undertaken by the Minister and the Deputy Minister were catered for in the 2014/15 financial year under programme 1: Administration.

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19 October 2015 - NW3163

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Mudau, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the sphere of local government is ready to implement the Public Administration Management Act, Act 11 of 2014, with regard to the transfer and/or secondment of employees to improve service delivery?

Reply:

The Public Administration Management (PAM) Act, 2014 (Act No. 11 of 2014) (“PAM Act”) provides in section 5(1) that any employees of the transferring institution may, subject to sections 151(3), 153 and 197 (4) on the Constitution, be transferred within an institution or transferred to another institution in a manner and on such conditions as prescribed.

The PAM Act imposes an obligation on the Minister for Public Service and Administration to develop regulations providing guidelines on how to manage horizontal transfers of staff at senior management levels across all the three spheres, in consultation with the Minister responsible for local government. The Department of Public Service and Administration is currently developing minimum norms and standards, inter alia, including transfers between the three spheres of government. The regulations are not yet in place. The regulations, once finalised, will provide guidance on the implementation of the PAM Act to help improve service delivery, taking into consideration the different conditions of employment of senior managers and categories of municipalities.

This provision will enable municipalities to draw on staff with the necessary experience and competence in other spheres once the legal framework is in place.

19 October 2015 - NW3412

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether, with reference to the reply by the Minister of Environmental Affairs to question 2808 on 24 August 2015 and given the large-scale exploitation of the Blacktip Shark, Bronze Whaler Shark and Dusky Shark in South Africa's fishing waters and the lack of scientific research available on the sustainability of the specified species, he will consider granting protection in the interim through regulation that the specified species may not be caught or landed within all marine protected areas along the South African coastline?

Reply:

Answer tabled in Parliament on:

DAFF'S RESPONSE:

Requiem sharks (common name for all the Carcharhinus species) such as the bronze whaler shark (Carcharhinus brachyurus), dusky shark (C. obscurus) and blacktip shark (C. limbatus/melanopterus) are caught as by-catch or targeted in a suite of fisheries, including the commercial linefishery, demersal shark longline fishery, pelagic longline fishery, bather protection programme, recreational linefishery, beach seine and gill net fishery, small pelagic and mid-water trawl fishery and prawn trawl fishery.

This study mentioned by the Honourable Mr. N. Singh (da Silva et al. 2015) was the first attempt by DAFF to evaluae DAFF fisheries data in an attempt to understand the effect of these fisheries on bycatch species. It informed the National Plan Of Action (NPOA) for Sharks South Africa published recently, which lists a number of tasks to be undertaken over the next few years to improve the management of chondrichthyes in South Africa. Once completed, these tasks will ensure that chondrichthyes are managed in a sustainable and responsible manner.

The most recent assessment (Dudley and Simpfendorfer 2006) on requiem sharks caught by the KZN bather protection programme, show stable catches of bronze whaler and dusky sharks between 1978 and 2003. These species represent the majority of by-catch as listed in the review by da Silva et al. 2005. Blacktip sharks do show a decline (Dudley and Simpfendorfer 2006) between 1978 and 2003. However less than 10 t (dressed weight) on average of blacktip sharks were reported between 2010 and 2012. Although this study represents data from catches in KZN, the bather protection programme is a good indication of long-term trends due to standardized fishing procedures. Declines have been shown for other species caught by the KZN bather protection programme, and this has been used in the past to inform management strategies. Therefore there is little evidence to suggest that overharvesting of these species is occurring. These trends continue to be evaluated by the scientists based at the KZN Sharks Board.

DAFF research on sharks is currently directed at the 4 main shark species caught as target in the highest quantities. These include the smoothhound shark (Mustelus mustelus), soupfin shark (Galeorhinus galeus), shortfin mako shark {lsurus oxyrinchus) and blue sharks (Prionace glauca). Over the next 5 years the Department will be evaluating the list of 99 of 204 South African chondrichthyes caught in commercial fisheries in South Africa to select the next set of species for directed research. This is set out in the NPOA for sharks.

CLASSIFICATION: Confidential

SUBJECT: ANSWER: Question 3412 for written reply: National Assembly to ask Minister for Agriculture,

Forestry and Fisheries

19 October 2015 - NW3545

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Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the finding of the Auditor-General that Councillors of Nala Local Municipality in the Free State contravened section 167 of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, when they paid themselves salaries inconsistent with the regulations of the specified Act, did his department intervene in this matter in order to ensure that the specified municipality recovers the monies overpaid to the specified councillors; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister intervened in terms of section 106 of the Municipal Systems Act by requesting the MEC for local government in the Free State Provincial Government to investigate this matter.

According to the information received from Nala Local Municipality, the municipality has entered into an arrangement with affected councillors to recover the monies overpaid to them.

19 October 2015 - NW3512

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Economic Development

In light of South Africa’s business confidence levels slipping to their lowest in 16 years, due to poor domestic economic activity, what measures does his department (a) have in place and (b) intend to put in place to (i) improve domestic economic activity, (ii) ensure greater growth in domestic product and (iii) stimulate job creation?

Reply:

I draw the attention of the Honourable Member to my remarks during the debate on the state of the economy, held in the National Assembly on 18 August 2015, available in Hansard. For ease of reference, an extract form the speech follows:

“These two global storms, in the mineral and steel sectors, are what we have to navigate with as little damage as possible, recognising that production and job losses in these sectors can have a multiplier effect on the economy.

So what are we doing to respond to these conditions and to address the still-continuing high levels of unemployment?

First, we are maintaining a high level of public investment in infrastructure, which is a true game-changer for the economy. We are spending close to a quarter trillion a year, or R1 billion rand per working day, on economic, industrial and social infrastructure. The BRICS New Development Bank is a major potential source of new funding for South African and regional infrastructure.

Second, we are expanding trade with the rest of Africa, particularly exports of South African made cars, machinery, iron and steel and food products.

Honourable Members will be pleased to note that exports to the rest of the continent now account for 244 000 direct jobs and it has been estimated as much as 885 000 total jobs; that last year, Zambia was our number one global export market for televisions, Zimbabwe for plastic products, Mozambique for clothing and the DRC for electrical equipment.

Third, we are implementing actions in the domestic economy, summed up in the 9-point plan announced by the President in the State of the Nation Address in February.

The nine priorities are:

  1. Resolving the energy challenges through practical actions, including cogeneration, new IPPs and completing the public energy-build programme
  2. Revitalising the agriculture and agro-processing value chain
  3. Advancing beneficiation through adding value to our mineral wealth
  4. More effective implementation of a higher impact Industrial Policy Action Plan
  5. Unlocking the potential of small business, cooperatives and township and rural enterprises
  6. Stabilising the labour market
  7. Scaling up private sector investment
  8. Growing the Oceans Economy and
  9. Diversifying and boosting the economy through science, technology and innovation, expanding transport, water and ICT infrastructure and reforming state-owned companies.

To respond to the steel industry's problems:

  • We fast-tracked a tariff investigation by the trade authorities on three steel products
  • We completed a competition commission probe into steel pricing by the dominant company
  • We extended short-term industrial funding of R150 million to one steel-mill to give it the space to restructure rather than close its doors
  • We appointed a panel of steel industry experts to identify options for steel that would not damage downstream factory users, and
  • We are meeting with business and labour to identify further steps to be taken,

To respond to the mining industry's problems:

  • We convened a dialogue with stakeholders to consider options to reduce or avoid job losses
  • We are investing in technologies and innovation to boost demand and localisation, such as platinum fuel-cell pilot projects
  • We have initiated a Mining Phakisa to address the future of the industry

To respond to the clothing and industry's challenges:

  • We implemented a tariff increase on finished products at the start of the previous administration
  • We set a reference price on imported clothing to identify smuggling and import-fraud
  • We created a competitiveness fund that has already invested over R3 billion in new technologies and work organisation to boost output and jobs.

More generally, the IDC expanded its industrial funding envelope over the past five years, particularly in green energy, putting some R14 billion into the Independent Power Producer programme that has already seen almost 2000 megawatts of energy coming onto the grid.

The IDC is now focusing on expanding investment in manufacturing, agro-processing and new industries.

During a time of declining mineral exports in dollar value, our auto exports have actually accelerated after 2011 and now constitute one of our top five exports, speaking to the success of the partnership built with investors.

To boost competitiveness, the competition authorities have acted against monopolies and cartels in sectors such as fertilisers, bread and poultry, steel, construction and telecomms.

To promote partnership, the Deputy President has led discussions with the business community and trade unions on reducing workplace conflict, including the role of strike ballots, action against violence in strikes and picketing rules. To reduce income inequality in the workplace, proposals for a national minimum wage are under discussion.

To boost youth employment, government is revamping its skills and entrepreneurship support programmes to make them more effective. The President convened a meeting with the business community 10 days ago at which stronger partnerships on skills development and work placement were considered.

…as we navigate our way through the minerals and steel turbulence and storms generated by falling global demand, we need to pull South Africans together, address domestic challenges such as energy and labour-business partnerships and speak with one voice.”

-END-

19 October 2015 - NW3663

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

Whether any incarcerated persons receive a salary from his department; if so, in respect of each province, what are the (a)(i) names and (ii) ranks of the specified persons, (b) reasons for the disbursement and (c) time frames under which such disbursement have taken place?

Reply:

Kindly note that the information requested is depended on feedback from the Provinces, therefore an extension is requested to enable this office to gather and verify the information before it can be provided.

19 October 2015 - NW3361

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Labour

With reference to her reply to question 2707 on 25 August 2015, (a) what are the (i) names and (ii) positions of each of the eight senior officials of her department which accompanied the Deputy Minister to China as part of a delegation during 2014-15 financial year, (b) what was the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of such costs for the specified visit and (c) what (i) were the focal areas of co-operation and (ii) are the relevant details of the signed Memorandum of Understanding with China?

Reply:

Minister of Labour Reply:

The officials that accompanied the Deputy Minister were from the following Branches: International Relations, Public Employment Services, Compensation Fund, Unemployment Insurance Fund and Deputy Minister’s Office. The Department has tabled its 2014/2015 Annual Report to Parliament, the Honourable member may get a copy from the Clerk of Papers.

The focal areas for cooperation were inter alia:

Youth employment approaches; Strategic issues relating to Employment Services provisions; Models for Compensation to injured workers; unemployment Insurance benefits; Job Creation initiatives and Technical exchange programmes.

The details of the Memorandum of Understanding are the same as the areas on which the two Countries shared experiences as mentioned above.

19 October 2015 - NW3377

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to his 2015 Budget Vote speech, what are the details of the (a) socio-economic and (b) job creation work that traditional leaders do in traditional communities, including information about each traditional community where this is taking place; (2) What are the details of the best practices of collaboration between traditional leadership and municipalities in (a) (i) Ehlanzeni District Municipality and (ii) Gert Sibande District Municipality in Mpumalanga and (b) other provinces?

Reply:

  1. (a) and (b)

Traditional Leaders are involved in various development programs as part of job creation and improving the socio-economic well-being of their communities. The following are examples:

  • Empangisweni Traditional Community: INKOSI ZONDO
  • Stock farming – in Nguni cattle. The project has resulted in the capacitation of many black farmers.
  • Soil utilization – particularly maize. This project has resulted in the employment of many locals and their capacitation.
  • Dzumeri Traditional Community: HOSI DZUMERI
  • Hosi Dzumeri awarded 50 wheelchairs to needy men, women children, not only from Dzumeri, but even other neighboring communities as well.
  • Hosi has committed himself to increasing the number to over 100.
  • Bakgatla Ba Kgafela Traditional Community: KGOSI PILANE
  • Mining – has resulted in the employment of many locals and the development of the area.
  • Mphebatho Museum – a major tourist attraction and a source of employment.
  • Clothing factory – has resulted in the employment of many locals. It supplies major clothing retailers (e.g. Truworths ) with raw material.
  • Farming – include goat farming. The aim with the project is to utilise available resources and land to make available employment opportunities to the community.
  • Hospitality industry – to advance job creation and sustainable economic development.
  • Moruleng Shopping Centre – the state of the art shopping center is a major source of employment for the community in Moruleng.
    • Road construction: The TC through its development wing constructed a road (tar road)

2. (a)(i)

Ehlanzeni District Municipality

The support provided by the District Municipality to nine (9) traditional leaders participating in Municipal Councils includes, sitting allowances and the provision of communication tools. All traditional leaders within the district are provided with financial assistance towards holding of traditional/cultural ceremonies (Immemo).The special designated seating arrangements for royalty in the council chambers and joint formal procession with the speaker into the chamber during council meetings are some of the protocol matters that are highly appreciated within the traditional institution.

Meetings that precede council meetings are held regularly between the district municipality speaker and the traditional leaders participating in municipal councils. Traditional leaders also participate in an IDP forum constituted by all mayors from local and the district municipalities in the region which focuses on development and other service delivery issues.

3. (a)(ii)

Gert Sibande District Municipality

The support provided by the District Municipality to seven (7) Traditional Leaders participating in Municipal Councils includes, sitting and cell phone allowances and other communication tools as well as office accommodation and office furniture. Traditional leaders have been enrolled on a training programme for leadership development by the district at the University of Zululand.

All traditional leaders within the district are also provided with financial assistance towards holding of traditional/cultural ceremonies (Immemo).Traditional leaders are part of the mayoral imbizo which is held annually. There is also an IDP forum constituted by traditional leaders and all mayors from local and the district municipalities in the region which focuses on development and other service delivery matters.

b) Other Provinces

In KwaZulu-Natal Province in the ILembe District and its local municipalities of Ndwedwe, Maphumulo, Mandeni and KwaDukuza, the strengthening of participation of traditional leadership in Municipal Councils proceedings is commendable. The Provincial CoGTA traditional leaders are not only attending meetings of full municipal council, but the municipalities have allocated seats for traditional leaders in Portfolio Committees of Municipal Councils. This enables traditional leaders to deliberate on policy matters.

Furthermore, the following effective partnerships with the traditional communities focusing on cooperatives, health and welfare, education, enterprise development, supply chain focusing on local procurement have been established in both Limpopo and North West within the platinum belt:

In Limpopo Province, R27 million has been invested in building a school, which is yet to be handed to the traditional community in Magadimana-Ntweng Traditional Council in Serafa Village within the Greater Tubatse Municipality. Traditional communities in Mapela, Ga-Chaba, Gamolekana, Phofola, Rooibok Sterkfontein in Mokopane are benefiting R39, 8 million agriculture projects. A market has been created for these flourishing projects. These farms supply their produce to the informal sector, local fruit and vegetable retailers and wholesalers including fresh produce markets. These projects are run by community structures supported by the traditional leaders and external capability to ensure high level of effectiveness and productivity.

Working with both Kgoshikgolo Thulare Thulare and Kgoshikgolo KK Sekhukhune and various other community leaders the ARM Broad Based Empowerment Trust built the Mampuru Thulare Primary School for R2.3 million in 2010. The school, which is currently being attended by approximately 700 pupils, has 8 classrooms and 6 ablution blocks and has been a positive catalyst for development in the area with children from the area now spared the hardship of walking long distances to school every day.

In 2014 the Trust spent a further R1.4 million on renovations and building a nutritional centre at the school. The Limpopo Rural Upliftment Trust has also been hard at work providing water to communities around the province. The Trust has spent approximately R1.2 million drilling and equipping 18 boreholes in the province. The boreholes now supply clean drinking water to these communities

In North West Province a SEDA Platinum project of glass beads jewelry has been established. The required machinery has been purchased and the cooperative members have been trained. At the moment, about R2,3 million is invested for this project. The second project is a craft hub called Tsakane Arts Cooperative. This project targets the youth and provides an opportunity for them to further explore the skills in arts and crafts and to have sustainable source of income. Almost R4.1 million has been invested in this project. Almost 7 people who were farming pigs on a casual subsistence basis have been assisted through the partnership by commercializing the farms into income generating activity at a higher scale. Almost R3.4 million has been spent to upgrade infrastructure, training for farmers on business development, product quality control, marketing and administration.

Anglo Platinum has agreed to appoint a professional videographer to capture all the projects to promote sustainable development and self-reliance in rural communities.

In the Eastern Cape Province R12 million to date has been distributed to the Eastern Cape Rural Upliftment Trust.Two new child care centers, the Kwathamsana Child Care Centre and the Zanci Child Care Centre were built in the Mqanduli area in the Eastern Cape to the value of R1.7 million. The Zanci Child Centre which was proposed by Nkosi Phatekile Holomisa benefits approximately 160 infants from the Zanci Village.

At the Ntabakandoda Secondary School, located in the Ngcamngeni Village the Trust built a soup kitchen at a cost of R200 000. The kitchen caters for 500 students and [will] cater for children from the Ntabakandoda School as well as primary school and pre-school children within the village.The Trust has spent a further R4.5 million building and renovating schools throughout the province.

Agriculture has also been a key focus for the trust in the Eastern Cape. The Manguzela Crop Production Project, in the Matatiele area, received in excess of R800 000 for farming equipment and supplies for crop production.

The Mpumalanga/ Northern Cape Rural Upliftment Trust has received approximately R7.3 million to date. In Mpumalanga, the Ipopeng Agricultural and Chicken Project received a total of R790 000 for the vegetable garden and for chicken farming. A tractor, a plough, a diesel cart, a trailer and a ploughing disc have been bought for the vegetable garden. Members of the community have been able to benefit from this project as poor families identified by the tribal council are able to receive vegetables and or chickens free of charge from the project. In addition the ARM Broad-Based Economic Empowerment Trust drilled and equipped 7 boreholes in various communities in the Ekhangala district.

The Mamathlake Vegetable Project has also been a great success having been developed in 2012 by the Trust at a cost of R780 000.The Trust’s projects in Mpumalanga also include the provision of water to the Xanthia High School in Thulamahashe, the Ngungunyane High School in Bushbuckridge, and the JP Khoza Primary School in Thulamahashe at a total cost of R198 000.

In the Northern Cape the African Rainbow Minerals (ARM) Broad Based Economic Empowerment Trust renovated and erected fencing around the Ikageng High School in John Taolo Gaetsewe and funded the purchase of 100 bicycles for learners from various schools in the area. In Kuruman a vegetable and chicken project for the Batlhaping Ba- Ga Phetlhu has been allocated R974 000.

In addition to the projects of the ARM Broad-Based Empowerment Trust R 736 million has been spent by ARM’s operations through Local Economic Development and Social Labor Plans in the preceding 5 years. The Trust continues to be committed to working with our local community leaders, government, church groups, trade unions, women and youth groups to develop sustainable projects that will improve the living conditions and standards of living of all our people.

Since inception, the ARM Broad Based Economic Empowerment Trust has distributed a total of R120 million to its beneficiaries for projects in education, health, water, enterprise development, farming, agriculture and rural development initiatives throughout South Africa.

Five provincial rural development trusts led by trustees who are key leaders in their respective communities and provinces were created for the purpose of uplifting and benefiting rural communities. The partnership between community leaders and the Trust assists in identifying the needs of the communities to ensure that projects undertaken by the provincial trusts have maximum impact in the upliftment and development of communities.

Traditional leaders, especially kingships have had partnerships with the Motsepe Foundation and the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry. The Department of Traditional affairs will be engaging the Motsepe Foundation, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry to extend and establish partnership relations as they operate within our sector. Furthermore, the DTA will also try to synchronize the work that other stakeholders are doing within the traditional communities to ensure effective and efficient service delivery and desired impact.

19 October 2015 - NW3547

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Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture:

In view of the country having a rich pool of raw talent from which to grow the arts and culture industry, but which is not nurtured from a young age, especially in rural areas, what is his position regarding the need to set up centres in rural areas where children can explore and develop their artistic talent? QUESTION NO. 3547-2015 FOR WRITTEN REPLY DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 18 September 2015 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.38-2015) “Mr JA Esterhuizen (IFP) asks the Minister of Arts and Culture: In view of the country having a rich pool of raw talent from which to grow the arts and culture industry, but which is not nurtured from a young age, especially in rural areas, what is his position regarding the need to set up centres in rural areas where children can explore and develop their artistic talent? NW4212E REPLY The importance of community arts and the development and upgrading of community arts infrastructure has been recognised as a driver of social cohesion and nation building in Outcome 14: Nation Building and Social Cohesion. The community arts programme is a contributor to the Sub-Outcome: Equal Opportunities, Inclusion and Redress. Approved by Cabinet, Outcome 14 stipulates that the Department of Arts and Culture, within the 5 year Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), will build 15 new community arts centres, refurbish 80 centres and activate 500 community arts programmes by 2018/19. The focus of this work will be rural and township areas.

Reply:

The importance of community arts and the development and upgrading of community arts infrastructure has been recognised as a driver of social cohesion and nation building in Outcome 14: Nation Building and Social Cohesion. The community arts programme is a contributor to the Sub-Outcome: Equal Opportunities, Inclusion and Redress. Approved by Cabinet, Outcome 14 stipulates that the Department of Arts and Culture, within the 5 year Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), will build 15 new community arts centres, refurbish 80 centres and activate 500 community arts programmes by 2018/19. The focus of this work will be rural and township areas.

19 October 2015 - NW3549

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Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

(1).Whether, with reference to the high levels of non-compliance with the implementation of the Use of Official Languages Act, Act 12 of 2012, his department, with or without the Pan South African Language Board, has organised a policy drafting workshop to assist the departments and government entities in formulating their language policies; if not, when will his department host such a workshop; (2). in terms of the Act, what assistance was given by his department to departments to ensure that the policies it has received comply with adherence to standard it set (3). what measures does his department propose to enforce compliance with the specific Act

Reply:

  1. Yes, my department conducted various workshops and National Language Fora with national government departments, national public entities and national public enterprises during which the department workshoped them on how to write their language policies.
  2. The workshops conducted by my department yielded positive results as policies received, comply with the prescripts of the Act. The department also gives advice and makes comments when and where necessary.
  3. The department is in a process of appointing a service provider to enforce compliance on the Use of Official Languages Act, 12 of 2012.

19 October 2015 - NW3507

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How many schools in each district in Mpumalanga are paying municipalities for the use of flush toilets, (b) what amount does each specified school pay for each flush toilet and (c) how many schools in Mpumalanga do not have access to adequate flush toilets?

Reply:

District

Number of Schools

Bohlabela

8

Ehlanzeni District

61

Nkangala

11

Gert Sibande

The province, through the district is in the process of verifying the number of schools paying Municipalities for use of flushing toilets. This information will be provided when available

District

Amount being paid by each school per flush toilet

Bohlabela

Schools are paying on average an amount of R116.58 per month per toilet

Ehlanzeni District

The District is unable to quantify the amount paid per flush toilet as schools are billed differently depending on the Municipality and different Financial Reporting Standards adopted by each school.

Nkangala

The District is unable to quantify the amount paid per flush toilet as schools are billed differently depending on the Municipality and different Financial Reporting Standards adopted by each school.

Gert Sibande

The District is unable to quantify the amount paid per flush toilet as schools are billed differently depending on the Municipality and different Financial Reporting Standards adopted by each school.

**The difficulty in soliciting the required financial management information points at different Financial Reporting Standards adopted by each school. In future, and as part of continuous improvement, there might be a need to provide guidelines to Districts and schools that would enable this type of information to be extracted with fair ease.

District

Number of Schools without access to adequate flush toilets

Bohlabela

226

Ehlanzeni District

286

Nkangala

40

Gert Sibande

334

**However it should be noted that In terms of the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure all schools should be provided with acceptable basic services. Acceptable basic services include: waterborne sanitation, small-bore sewer reticulation, septic or conservancy tanks, Ventilated improved pit latrines and composting toilets, Municipal water supply, boreholes, rainwater harvesting (purified) and different forms of power supply. Therefore, the choice of appropriate sanitation technology, which includes any of those indicated above, may only be based on an assessment conducted, which will include the availability and reliability of services in the particular locality.

19 October 2015 - NW3693

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Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What steps has he taken to resolve the disputes between Northern Cape municipalities and a certain company (name and details furnished) which has recently forced through the courts, the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality to pay for services that the specified company allegedly failed to deliver in relation to the screening of the memorials and funeral of the late former President of the country, Mr Nelson R Mandela?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality:

The John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality entered into an agreement with the service provider (Buhle Buzile Investments) to screen the memorials and funeral of the late former President of the country, Mr Nelson R Mandela, in villages across the three local municipalities in the district (Joe Morolong, Ga-Segonyana and GaMagara) in December 2014. The purpose of the screening of the memorial was to ensure that deprived members of the community in these municipalities also get an opportunity to be part of the proceedings to bid farewell to the former President. The service was delivered as agreed upon.

The initial agreement that each Local Municipality within the District Municipality contributes a pro rata amount towards the cost, did not materialize due to financial constraints, resulting in payment delays. This delay caused the service provider to institute a civil claim against the municipality in the Kimberley High Court (Case No. 1589/2014) and the court ordered the District Municipality to make payment of a specified amount to the service provider. The matter has been tabled before the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Council for a resolution authorising the payment to the service provider. The Council is to consider the matter during its October 2015 sitting.

19 October 2015 - NW3569

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What (a) is his position on developmental pricing in order to stimulate the growth of the domestic manufacturing sector and (b) does the developmental pricing model entail?

Reply:

Developmental pricing refers to arrangements to supply locally-produced inputs at lower than market prices to locally-based downstream producers, in order to stimulate value-add production in a country. It is one of the means that is used to promote beneficiation of minerals so as to expand the national value-chain, grow the number of jobs in manufacturing, deepen the economic development benefits in a country and help to reduce vulnerability of economies that are reliant principally on exports of minerals or agricultural products.

In South Africa, government has supported efforts to beneficiate a greater quantity of locally-mined iron ore through a developmental pricing regime that had been in place for many years.

It is government’s view that pricing of inputs is one element of a number of factors that need to be addressed to expand beneficiation significantly. Other key factors include availability of energy at competitive prices, local know-how or partnerships with international technology partners and availability of key skills. Pricing of raw material inputs remain a critical component in efforts to substantially expand beneficiation of minerals.

-END-

16 October 2015 - NW3672

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What was the (i) total amount spent on direct charges against the National Revenue Fund and (ii) breakdown of the specified amount in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) in each specified case, what legal authority was used to make such direct charges to the National Revenue Fund?

Reply:

(a) (i) The total amount spent on direct charges against the National Revenue Fund is   R 512 465 319 000 and the breakdown is listed in the table below. The audit for the National Revenue Fund for the 2014-15 financial year has not yet been finalized. These figures are therefore unaudited. 

(ii) and (b)

Department

Unaudited Amount

(R’000)

Legal authority

Presidency – President’s salary

4,830

Sections 2(7) and 3(7) of the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers Act, 1998 (Act No 20 of 1998)

Parliament – Members of Parliament salaries

481,781

 

Provinces – Equitable share

362,468,075

Schedule 2 of the Division of Revenue Act (Dora Bill)

General Fuel levy

10,190,162

Schedule 1(2) of the Taxation Laws Amendment Act 17 of 2009

State Debt

Interest

Management

Cost of raising loans

114,703,789

37,937

8,245,351

Section 73 of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) (Act no1 of 1999)

Higher Education and Training – SETA funds collected

13,838,798

Section 6(4) of the Skills development Levies Act, 1999 (Act No 9 of 1999)

Justice and Constitutional development – Salaries and allowances of Judges and magistrates

2,494,596

Section 2 of Judges’ Remuneration and Conditions of Employment Act, 1989 (Act 88 of 1989) and Section 12 of Magistrates Act, 1993 (Act No. 90 of 1993)

16 October 2015 - NW3588

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the Minister of Women in The Presidency’s reply to oral question 336 on 26 August 2015, what (a) measures, (b) policies and/or (c) legislation is the National Treasury currently considering to facilitate the growth of financial co-operatives, particularly those aimed at the financial empowerment of economically excluded women living in both (i) urban and (ii) rural areas; (2) is the National Treasury currently working on any (a) financial and/or (b) economic empowerment initiatives in collaboration with the Department of Women in The Presidency; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified initiatives?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the National Treasury does promote broader empowerment objectives through the Financial Sector Charter and financial inclusion policies, as outlined in the policy document “A safer financial sector to serve South Africa better” published in February 2011. The policy aims at increased access to affordable, convenient and appropriate financial services for all South Africans, particularly the poor and vulnerable, and takes into account the legacy of both racial and gender exclusion policies of the past.

Progress has been made in improving financial inclusion in South Africa, resulting in 80% of South Africans using some form of financial services from a regulated financial institution in 2014, up from 55 per cent in 2005. More will be done by setting stretched targets for the financial sector in the Financial Sector Code (FSC) (first adopted in 2003), and focused initiatives by National Treasury’s Cooperative Banks Development Agency (CBDA) established by the Co-operative Banks Act (No. 40 of 2007).

Through the FSC, the National Treasury advocates and promotes the advancement of women via specific targets in respect of access to finance and enterprise and supplier development for women as entrepreneurs and owners of small enterprises. For example:

  • The target for procurement spend on suppliers that are 30% black women is 8% of total procurement spend
  • The target for transformational infrastructure, black SME financing, black agricultural financing and affordable housing is R48 billion for banks and R17 billion for long-term insurers with recognition levels for certain types of beneficiary entities including 150% for 30% black-women-owned exempt microenterprises (EMEs), 100% for 30% black-women owned qualifying small enterprises (QSEs)

With regard to co-operatives, the CBDA has the mandate to regulate and supervise as well as provide capacity building to deposit taking financial co-operatives, commonly known as Co-operative Financial Institutions (CFIs). The Honourable Member should note that the financial sector is a highly regulated sector to protect both depositors, customers and taxpayers, and this cannot be regarded as overly stringent regulation as suggested by the Honourable Member in the original Question 336 on 26 August 2015 to my colleague the Honourable Minister of Women in The Presidency. The objective of the CBDA includes capacity building, to ensure that the CFI sector is adequately capacitated and therefore facilitates the growth of financial co-operatives.

Based on the sectoral analysis done by the CBDA, as at February 2015 women were empowered by CFIs as follows:

  • The 26 CFIs serviced an estimated 7,274 females versus an estimated total of 17,318 members. This ultimately means that there is a 42% women ownership in the registered CFIs.
  • CFIs are required to elect board members, for efficient and effective governance. 47% of an estimated 167 board members elected are women.
  • 73% of an estimated total of 60 people employed by the CFIs are women.

The capacity building programmes developed and conducted covers a vast number of women particularly from the rural areas. Women have been empowered through financial management training and other training courses and coaching provided by the CBDA.

2. Yes, National Treasury is working with the Department of Women through the CBDA. For example, on 31 July 2015, the CBDA team met with officials in the Department of Women in the Presidency about the overall mandate of the CBDA and capacity building programmes for the CFI sector and discussed possible areas of collaboration. The CBDA will continue to work closely with both the Departments of Women and Small Business Development to assist vulnerable women to set up co-operatives and co-operative financial institutions thereby ensuring the financial empowerment and economic inclusion of these women.

National Treasury in line with its broader financial inclusion objectives, will work towards ensuring all South Africans have access to the benefits of using financial services both as part of the broader development agenda and to address poverty and the inequalities in South African society.

16 October 2015 - NW3668

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What is the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of such costs of the public sector wage agreement in the (aa) 2015-16, (bb) 2016-17 and (cc) 2017-18 financial years, (b) what is the sum total cost of the specified financial years combined for each specified provincial department in respect of each province and (c) how will the public sector wage agreement be financed in each specified case?

Reply:

Question 1: Preliminary indications are that the 2015 public sector wage agreement will cost as much as R63.9 billion over and above what is provided for this purpose in the budget baseline over the 2015 MTEF. Of the above amount R41.5 billion is for cost of living adjustments, R11.1 is for medical assistance and R11.4 billion is for housing allowance.

Salary negotiations are taking place at the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC), which is established in terms of section 35 of Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995. The main purpose of the PSCBC is to allow Public Service parties to negotiate on transverse matters including terms and conditions of employment, resolve disputes and facilitate hearings to resolve disputes that arise in the Public Service. This excludes matters pertaining to Constitutional Institutions and Public Entities.

Question 2: National Treasury is certain that the agreement can be accommodated within the current expenditure limits. Contingency reserves will play a role in accommodating higher compensation budgets this year, and so will resources available due to projected underspending. Some reprioritisation from other budget lines will also be required from Departments and provinces.

National Treasury is currently coordinating the budget process in preparation for the Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS) in Parliament in October 2015. The Minister of Finance will make an announcement at the MTBPS on how costs of the wage agreement will be financed.

16 October 2015 - NW3633

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)How many (a) flight stewards and stewardesses and (b) pilots of the SA Airways (SAA) have been arrested abroad (i) in (aa) 2011, (bb) 2012, (cc) 2013 and (dd) 2014 and (ii) since January 2015; (2) (a) in which countries were the specified (i) flight stewards and stewardesses and (ii) pilots arrested in each specified year, (b) of what crimes were they (i) convicted and (ii) acquitted and (c) which cases have not yet been finalised; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) (aa) 1

(bb) 1

(cc) 0

(dd) 0

(b) (i) (aa) 0

(bb) 0

(cc) 0

(dd) 0

(ii) 0

2. (a) (i) Sao Paulo, South America

(ii) N/A

(b) Possession

(i) 8 years imprisonment

(ii) None

(c) None

3. No, this is an operational matter of the company that management and the board can deal with.

 

16 October 2015 - NW3647

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Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Is her department aware of three pension pay-out centres at Tsakane Mall in Brakpan; if so, is her department aware that (a) recipients of grants, namely the elderly, sick and mothers with children, wait for hours in the queues to receive their grants and (b) there is no shelter or benches resulting in recipients having to stand in all weather conditions while waiting for their grants to be paid out; (2) whether her department intends to go into partnership with the owners of the specified mall in order to build shelters and provide shelters; if so, what process will her department undertake with the owners of the mall; (3) will a progress report be provided on a monthly basis; if not, why not?

Reply:

  1. The department has established a paypoint in Tsakane where beneficiaries can draw their cash - grants over the first five days of the months and it is a kilometer away from Tsakane Mall.
  2. & (3) There is no pay point at Tsakane Mall in Brakpan. Because of the multiple options and benefits beneficiaries derives in receiving their grants, other distribution channels exist and in this regard there are 3 merchants stores which are pay out centres. The beneficiaries opting these pay – out centres not only withdraw money but also access other services in the mall. The department is constant contact with the service provider to improve queue management during the pay days.

16 October 2015 - NW3652

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Has the enquiry set up by her department into the train crash that occurred in Denver, in Johannesburg, on 28 April 2015, been concluded; if so, what were the (a) findings of the specified enquiry and (b) costs associated with the damage arising from the specified incident; (2) have any of the recommendations arising from the specified enquiry been implemented to date? NW4319E

Reply:

RSR RESPONSE

1 a) The Board of Enquiry set up into the train accident at Denver Station has concluded its work. The main finding of the Board of Enquiry is that the driver of the Express Train passed the ‘signal at danger’, and rear ended train number 0600 that was stationery at Denver train station.

b) The cost of the damage is R22 million.

2. PRASA has started implementing the recommendations of the Board of Enquiry, in order to prevent a recurrence of an incident of a similar nature.

16 October 2015 - NW3279

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) total amount did her department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that her department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The hounourable member should get this information from the Department’s annual reports as tabled in Parliament

16 October 2015 - NW3601

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Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Labour

Is her department currently on any (a) financial and/or (b) economic empowerment initiatives in collaboration with the Ministry of Women in the Presidency; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified initiatives?

Reply:

The Government has policies and programmes on economic empowerment which all Departments should implement, the Department of Labour policies and programmes are derived from those of National Government. With regards to Ministry of women, there is no collaboration at this stage.

16 October 2015 - NW3691

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to (a) the statement by the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, that it is crucial to tighten the belt on expenses and (b) the fact that departmental staff travel from Johannesburg to Cape Town weekly to attend portfolio committee meetings, do financial statistics exist in his department regarding ministerial and departmental travel expenses; if not, why not; if so, what was the actual cost incurred by (i) each Minister, (ii) each Deputy Minister and (iii) each State department for (aa) car rentals, (bb) hotel accommodation, (cc) domestic flights, (dd) international flights and (ee) chartered flights in the (aaa) 2012-13, (bbb) 2013-14 and (ccc) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

All the statistics that the Honourable Member is requesting already exist within specific breakdowns. The records are accessible from each Department.

16 October 2015 - NW3325

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Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Works:

(1) (a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year? MINISTRY PUBLIC WORKS REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Department of Public Works l Central Government Offices l 256 Madiba Street l Pretoria l Contact: +27 (0)12 406 2034 l +27 (0)12 406 1224 Private Bag X9155 l CAPE TOWN, 8001 l RSA 4th Floor Parliament Building l 120 Plain Street l CAPE TOWN l Tel: +27 21 468 6900 Fax: +27 21 462 4592 www.publicworks.gov.za NATIONAL ASSEMBLY WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NUMBER: 3325 [NW3906E] INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.: No. 36 of 2015 DATE OF PUBLICATION: 04 SEPTEMBER 2015 DATE OF REPLY: 16 OCTOBER 2015 Mr M M Dlamini (EFF) asked the Minister of Public Works: (1) (a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year? NW3906E ___________________________________________________________________________ REPLY: The Minister of Public Works (1)(a)(i) R290 379.07 (ii)41 (b)(i) and (ii)(aa) and (bb)R0.00 (2)(a)(i) R451 441.74 (ii)57 (b)(i) and (ii)(aa) and (bb)R0.00 ___________________________________________________________________

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(1)(a)(i) R290 379.07

(ii) 41

(b)(i) and (ii)(aa) and (bb) R0.00

(2)(a)(i) R451 441.74

(ii) 57

(b)(i) and (ii)(aa) and (bb) R0.00

 

___________________________________________________________________

16 October 2015 - NW3678

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

What amount of prospective tax revenue was forfeited for each specified (a) goods and (b) service which has been exempted from value-added tax in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13, (iv) 2013-14 and (v) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

(a)(b) Exempt supplies are supplies of goods or services where VAT is not chargeable at either the standard or zero rate. A person who only makes exempt supplies is not allowed to register as a vendor, charge VAT on supplies over deduct input tax incurred on its acquisitions.

Some examples of exempt supplies include:

  • Financial services, including life insurance policies
  • Residential accommodation in a dwelling;
  • Passenger transport in South Africa by taxi, bus or train;
  • Educational services provided by recognised educational institutions;
  • Childcare services provided at crèches and after-school care centres;
  • Services supplied by a bargaining council to any of its members; and
  • Goods and services supplied by a political party to the extent of membership contribution.

The National Treasury publishes a tax expenditure estimate in the annual Budget Review. Included in this tax expenditure is the estimated cost of exemption of VAT in respect of public transport and education. The estimated cost reflects the net of the VAT that would have been charged and the input tax that is not refunded.

Estimates are not available for the other exemptions. It should be noted however that financial services is not purely exempt. South Africa introduced VAT on certain supplies of fee based financial services in 1996 which has resulted in a net output tax payable by the affected financial institutions.

 

The tax revenue forfeited on public transport and education according to Budget 2015 amounted to:

(i) 2010-11 - R999 million

(ii) 2011-12 - R1 088 million

(iii) 2012-13 - R1 175 million

(iv)(v) 2013-14 and 2014-15 is not available as yet and is expected to only be tabled in the 2016 and 2017 Budget Reviews respectively.

16 October 2015 - NW3542

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Finance to question 448 on 29 November 2013 in the National Council of Provinces (details furnished) and the findings of the investigation conducted by a certain company (name furnished) on behalf of the National Treasury that the contract that a certain company (name furnished) had with the Free State provincial government transgressed applicable legislative framework and must be terminated (details furnished), what steps does he intend to take in respect of the decision of the Premier of the Free State who allegedly went ahead and renewed the specified contract (details furnished)?

Reply:

The relevant provincial authorities are empowered in law to take action; hence the report was handed to the Premier of the Free State as the executive head of the provincial administration.

16 October 2015 - NW3561

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the (a)(i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of specified total costs of the public sector wage agreement in the (aa) 2015-16, (bb) 2016-17 and (cc) 2017-18 financial years and (b) sum total of the total costs of the specified financial years; (2) how will the public sector wage agreement be financed; (3) what are the implications for the (a) spending ceiling, (b) contingency reserve, (c) budget deficit, (d) borrowing requirements and (e) debt service cost?

Reply:

1. Preliminary indications are that the 2015 wage agreement will cost as much as R63.9 billion over and above what is provided for this purpose in the budget baseline over the 2015 MTEF. Of the above amount R41.5 billion is for cost of living adjustments, R11.1 billion is for medical assistance and R11.4 billion is for housing allowance.

Line departments at national and provincial level are being engaged to assess the magnitude of shifts required for reprioritisation.

2. National Treasury is certain that the agreements can be accommodated within the current expenditure limits. Contingency reserves will play a role in accommodating higher compensation budgets this year, and so will resources available due to projected underspending. Some reprioritisation from other budget lines will also be required.

3. National Treasury is currently coordinating the budget process in preparation for the Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS) in Parliament on 21 October 2015. The Minister of Finance will make an announcement at the MTBPS on how costs of the public sector wage agreement will be financed.

16 October 2015 - NW3669

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What is the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of such costs of the public sector wage agreement in the (aa) 2015-16, (bb) 2016-17 and (cc) 2017-18 financial years, (b) what is the sum total cost of the specified financial years combined for each specified municipality in respect of each specified province and (c) how will the public sector wage agreement be financed in each specified case?

Reply:

The collective bargaining for local government is under the auspices of the South African Local Government Bargaining Council (SALBC). SALBC recently entered into a 3 year salary and wage agreement. The agreement reached is as follows:

  • 2015/16       -     7%
  • 2016/17       -     average CPI (February 2015- Jan 2016) + 1%
  • 2017/2018   -     average CPI (February 2016- Jan 2017) + 1%

                             

The following responses were provided by SALGA:

a) (i) The total cost of the negotiated 3 year collective agreement is estimated by SALGA to amount to approximately R16.682 billion. This increases the national wage bill for local government from R77.888 billion in 2014/15 to R94.570 billion in 2017/18. This calculation is based on the assumption of an average CPI of 5% for the 2016/17 year and an average CPI of 5.5% for the 2017/18 financial year.

 

(aa) 2015/16 - R5.884 billion; and

(bb) 2016/17 - R5.026 billion; and

(cc) 2017/18 - R5.772 billion

 

(b) The requested detail is not available per municipality. However, SALGA estimates that the increases applicable to each municipality’s current wage bill will be as follows:

 

2015/16 - 7.55%;and

2016/17 - 6.00% and

2017/18 - 6.5%

 

(c) These increases in the respective wage bills of municipalities will be funded from municipal income generated from property rates, trading services such as electricity, water and other related service charges such as refuse removal and sanitation charges coupled with equitable share transfers from national government.

16 October 2015 - NW3409

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether current pensioners of the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) can opt out of the GEPF and invest their funds elsewhere; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Arrangements that apply to retiring members of the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) are governed by rule 12.3 of its rules, which provides that "if a member resigns, retires or dies as contemplated in rules 14.3.2, 14.4.1 or 14.5.1, he or she has the right to transfer his or her actuarial interest in the Fund to an approved retirement fund: Provided that such transfer shall be subject to the provisions of rule 14.4.1(b)...".

A pensioner who is already receiving a pension from the GEPF after retiring would have had more than 10 years of pensionable service, and would have received a gratuity/lump sum on retirement and a monthly pension or annuity – the pensioner would thus have had the opportunity to invest elsewhere (or spend) the gratuity/lump sum received on retirement as he or she sees fit, but cannot do so with the portion invested in an annuity. It should be noted that there are benefits to an annuity as they provide a monthly income to the retiree, and in most cases, the benefits of the GEPF after retirement are good for members as they provide significant value compared to other annuities on the market. Further, there is no investment risk for retirees, as the GEPF is a defined benefit fund.

For those members still employed and contributing to the GEPF, only those members with more than 10 years of pensionable service will be able to qualify for the gratuity/lump sum and the monthly pension. These members cannot transfer their actuarial interests to an approved retirement fund if they retire from the GEPF.

Members with less than 10 years of pensionable service do not qualify for a monthly pension or annuity but can purchase an annuity/pension with an approved retirement fund of their choice with the gratuity/lump sum provided by the GEPF upon reaching retirement. Therefore, pensioners who fall within the provision of rule 14.3.2, which applies to pensioners with less than 10 years of pensionable service, are entitled to transfer their pension benefit to an approved retirement fund of their choice on retirement.

I would like the Honourable Member to join me in encouraging South Africans to preserve their retirement savings, given the risks and vulnerabilities they face when resigning from their jobs and cashing out their pensions prematurely. Government last year expressed its concern when some members of the GEPF were resigning from their jobs, probably because they were over-indebted or falling for false rumours on retirement reforms. Those resigning were not only giving up on their pension fund benefits (which are far better than most private pension funds), but also on certain non-contributory benefits (e.g. post-retirement medical benefits), which are funded by Government as the employer. No law has changed with regard to members’ access to their pension benefits; meaning that members of the GEPF will always be entitled to a gratuity/lump sum and an annuity, as per the Fund rules. Further, members resigning from pension funds before retirement will still be able to withdraw their benefits, though the withdrawal may attract higher tax liabilities.

16 October 2015 - NW3577

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

Whether, she has found that the statement of the Chief Director of Labour Relations, Mr Thembinkosi Mkalipi, that if there is evidence that there are serious job losses due to the amendments of the Labour Relations Act, 66 of 191945, her department will have to look at the matter, although he is not sure whether that will fly politically, (a) constitutes political interference and (b) will contribute to the destruction of job creation; if not, why not in each case ; if so, will she make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Prior to the introduction of legislation and legislative amendments, the Department assess the socio-economic impact of legislation, including its impact on jobs and the labour market. This was done in respect of the amendments to the Labour Relations Act through a regulatory impact assessment conducted in 2010.

16 October 2015 - NW3288

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did her department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The hounourable member should get this information from the Department’s annual report as tabled in Parliament.

 

16 October 2015 - NW3223

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Did National Treasury approve her department’s requested rollover of (a) R1 600 899 000 for Programme 1, 2, 4 and 5 and (b) R1 557 184 000 in respect of each economic classification from the 2014-15 to the 2015-16 financial year; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what is the implication of this decision; if so, when?

Reply:

National Treasury has not yet approved my Department’s request for rollovers of R1 600 899 000 for Programme 1, 2, 4 and 5; and R1 557 184 000 in respect of each economic classification from the 2014-15 to the 2015-16 financial year.

National Treasury will only communicate the outcome of the rollover process on or before 11 September 2015 through the approved allocation letters as per the Guidelines of 2015 Adjustment Estimates of National Expenditure.

The non-approval of the requested rollover funds will necessitate the need for my Department to reprioritise the existing allocations for 2015/16 financial year within the programmes. This will result in the rescheduling of some of the infrastructure projects earmarked for the current year.

---00O00---

16 October 2015 - NW3434

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the (a) total amount(s) and (b) breakdown of the specified amount(s) of funds that have to be transferred to the New Development Bank for the (i) 2015-16, (ii) 2016-17 and (iii) 2017-18 financial years; (2) how will these amounts be financed in each specified financial year; (3) what are the implications for the (a) spending ceiling, (b) contingency reserve, (c) budget deficit, (d) borrowing requirements and (e) debt servicing costs in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The matter is part of the budget process and consideration, if any, will be part of the Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS) which will be announced by the Minister on 21 October 2015.

16 October 2015 - NW3320

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) How many transactions under all categories applicable to BOPCUS non-resident rand outward payments were recorded from all authorised foreign currency dealers in (i) 2013 and (ii) 2014 and (b) what are the (i) names of the countries and (ii) relevant amounts in each specified case?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honorable Member is an element that forms part of the more aggregated figure used to prepare the regular reports on the current account and on the financial account, both of which are published in the Reserve Bank Quarterly Bulletin.

The South African Reserve Bank (“SARB”) records all inward and outward transactions for goods and services, for residents and non-residents through, “BOPCUS” - the “Balance of Payments Customer Transaction Reporting Electronic Message System”. Authorised Dealers in foreign exchange report all such transactions to SARB via the BOPCUS system, according to balance of payments categories.

The most recent SARB Quarterly Bulletin published (in September 2015) published the following figures for the first two quarters for 2015 (Table; page 34).

At the aggregated level, this shows the total outflow on the ‘net service, income and current transfer payments’ account of R138 billion on a seasonally adjusted and annualised basis. These are flows on the current account that are not related to trade flows. Indeed, the trade balance recorded a small (R14 billion) surplus on a seasonally adjusted and annualized basis.

Taken together with the services, income and current transfer payments, the balance on the current account has improved every quarter since 2014Q2; and now stands at 3.1 per cent of GDP.

On the financial account, however, financial inflows reached 2.9 per cent of GDP in the first half of 2015 from 5.9 per cent in 2014, as net outflows in ‘foreign direct investment’ and ‘other investment’ rose. Net portfolio inflows far exceeded total 2014 inflows of R49.5 billion, with demand for equities particularly robust.

a) (i) (ii) According to the information provided to me by the Reserve Bank, outward cross-border payments from non-resident rand accounts totalled 52,000 transactions amounting to R30 billion in 2013 (all figures are rounded off in this response); and 47,000 transactions amounting to R144 billion in 2014. These outflows were transferred to 161 countries in 2013 and to 138 countries in 2014. The average transaction value for 2013 was R586,000 and R3 million in 2014.

The Honourable Member should note that this should be compared to inward cross-border receipts, as they are linked in the sense that no inward flows are possible unless outward flows are allowed. Inward cross-border receipts into non-resident rand accounts totaled 42,000 transactions, amounting to R93 billion in 2013 and 40,000 transactions amounting to R194 billion in 2014; averaging R2 million and R5 million per transaction respectively.

b) (i) (ii) Table 1 sets out the highlights for the top 7 destination countries for transactions over R1 billion per annum.

In 2013, the top 7 destination countries represented 86% of the total transaction value, R26 billion, through 33 thousand transactions, averaging R778 000 per transaction. In 2014, the top 7 destination countries represented 96% of the total transaction value, R139 billion through 31 000 transactions, averaging R4,5 million per transaction.

 

Table 1

Outward Cross-Border transactions over R1 billion from Non-Resident Rand Accounts in top 7 countries

 

2013

2014

 

R billion

No. of transactions

R billion

No. of transactions

United Kingdom

16,3

17,319

102,6 *

16,686

United States

1,3

4,124

27,0

3,643

Germany

4,0

2,266

1,7

1,958

Switzerland

2,0

456

2,0

293

Australia

0,83

8,297

2,7

7,102

Thailand

0,2

82

1,1

84

Ireland

1,1

698

1,7

871

Total

25,7

33,242

138,7

30,637

* A sharp increase in outflows during 2014 was due to increased transfers to the UK resulting from the Disinvestment of money market instruments by a non-resident” category.

Table 2

Outward transactions over R1 billion from Non-Resident Rand Accounts in 25 countries with the most transactions per annum

Table 2 reflects a further breakdown by the most active continents, i.e. Africa, Asia and Europe. Together with the top seven destination countries listed in table 1, in 2014, the transactions comprise 98% of the total transaction value (2013: 94%).

 

2013

2014

 

Africa

Rm

No. of transactions

Rm

No. of transactions

2Y average R'000

Malawi

2

73

5.2

94

39

Zimbabwe

85

762

48.8

486

106

Namibia

36

260

109.6

213

327

Swaziland

57

101

11.5

90

346

Botswana

488

782

122.2

229

579

Mauritius

273

225

342.5

193

1495

Mozambique

439

198

513.7

208

2343

Total

1380

2,401

1153.5

1,513

5234

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asia

 

 

 

 

 

India

81

584

82.2

393

174

Taiwan

15

22

17.0

94

433

China

36

278

157.5

148

597

Singapore

53

115

329.0

90

2059

Total

186

999

585.6

725

3263

           

Europe

 

 

 

 

 

Poland

2

151

2.2

172

14

Portugal

30

2,130

42.4

2,272

16

Czech Republic

1

111

3.5

129

20

New Zealand

160

4,024

209.0

3,693

48

Canada

140

2,561

119.7

2,471

52

Israel

69

738

99.6

657

123

Spain

25

226

38.9

260

129

Italy

86

439

30.1

425

134

Greece

5

132

49.8

163

172

France

58

431

109.1

469

183

Austria

58

161

49.9

144

352

Netherlands

200

922

985.5

907

651

Sweden

133

164

176.9

109

1218

Jersey C.I

320

119

69.8

98

1703

Total

1288

12,309

1986.4

11,969

4815

16 October 2015 - NW3667

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the (a)(i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of such costs of the public sector wage agreement for each specified (aa) department, (bb) constitutional institution and (cc) public entity listed on Schedule 2 and 3 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, for the (aaa) 2015-16, (bbb) 2016-17 and (ccc) 2017-18 financial years and (b) sum total of the total cost of the specified financial years; (2) how will the public sector wage agreement be financed in each specified case in each province?

Reply:

Question 1: Preliminary indications are that the 2015 public sector wage agreement will cost as much as R63.9 billion over and above what is provided for this purpose in the budget baseline over the 2015 MTEF. Of the above amount R41.5 billion is for cost of living adjustments, R11.1 is for medical assistance and R11.4 billion is for housing allowance.

Salary negotiations are taking place at the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC), which is established in terms of section 35 of Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995. The main purpose of the PSCBC is to allow Public Service parties to negotiate on transverse matters including terms and conditions of employment, resolve disputes and facilitate hearings to resolve disputes that arise in the Public Service. This excludes matters pertaining to Constitutional Institutions and Public Entities.

Question 2: National Treasury is certain that the agreement can be accommodated within the current expenditure limits. Contingency reserves will play a role in accommodating higher compensation budgets this year, and so will resources available due to projected underspending. Some reprioritisation from other budget lines will also be required from Departments and provinces.

National Treasury is currently coordinating the budget process in preparation for the Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS) in Parliament in October 2015. The Minister of Finance will make an announcement at the MTBPS on how costs of the wage agreement will be financed.

16 October 2015 - NW3677

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

What amount of prospective tax revenue was forfeited for each specified (a) goods and (b) service which has been zero-rated for value-added tax in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13, (iv) 2013-14 and (v) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

(a)(b) Zero-rated supplies of goods and/or services are taxable supplies on which VAT is levied at a rate of 0%. Any VAT incurred to make zero rated supplies may be deducted as input tax.

Some examples of zero rated supplies include certain basic foodstuffs; fuel levy goods; paraffin: certain farming goods; the export of goods and services in certain instances; international transport and municipal property rates.

The zero rating of basic food items are intended to provide relief to low-income groups.

The list of zero rated food items includes the following:

  • Brown bread
  • Brown bread flour (excluding wheaten bran)
  • Dried mealies, and mealie rice
  • Samp
  • Maize meal
  • Dried beans
  • Lentils
  • Edible legumes.
  • Rice
  • Vegetable cooking oil (Excluding olive oil)
  • Fresh fruit and vegetables
  • Hen's eggs
  • Milk, cultured milk, milk powder and dairy powder blend
  • Pilchards or sardinella in tins or cans

The zero-rate is also applicable to goods or services that are exported provided the relevant legislative provisions are met. This is in line with the destination principle of South Africa’s VAT system whereby exports are free of domestic VAT as consumption of these goods and services takes place outside South Africa and the import of goods attracts VAT.

(i)(ii)(iii) The National Treasury publishes a tax expenditure estimate in the annual Budget Review. The tax revenue forfeited on zero rated items according to Budget 2015 for 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 are set out in the table below:

Tax expenditure estimates (R million)

Fiscal Year                                         2009/10               2010/11   2011/12   2012/13      

Value-added tax                                  

Zero-rated supplies                             

19 basic food items                                            14 258                   15 497   17 106   18 628  

Petrol                                                                       9 660                    10 845   13 797   15 343

Diesel                                                                         903                      1 107      1 532      1 759

Paraffin                                                                      519                          367        585         611

Municipal property rates                                     3 973                       6 032     7 568      9 598

Reduced inclusion rate for commercials              127                          147       153          175

Accommodation

Subtotal zero-rated supplies                          29 440                   33 989    40 742   46 115

  1. Vat relief in respect of basic food items based on National Treasury research of 2010/11 and expenditure survey data
  2. Based on fuel volumes and average retail selling prices

Because petrol, diesel and illuminating paraffin are zero-rated for VAT purposes, the resulting difference from a standard rating, when used by final consumers, is regarded as tax expenditure. It was assumed that 20 per cent of petrol sales was used for business purposes (by VAT vendors) and would have qualified as input tax should VAT have been levied at the standard rate. For diesel, it was assumed that 90 per cent of sales was used for business purposes and would have qualified for input VAT should VAT have been levied at the standard rate.

(iv)(v) 2013-14 and 2014-15 expenditure is not available as yet and is expected to only be tabled in the 2016 and 2017 Budget Reviews respectively.

The revenue foregone in respect of exports that qualify to be zero rated was not calculated.

 

14 October 2015 - NW2969

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the refurbishment of the Beechcraft King Air B200 by ExecuJet Aviation Group which was handed over to the SA Air Force on 30 June 2015, (a) what (i) were the reasons why the specified aircraft required refurbishing, (ii) was the nature of the refurbishment and (iii) were the total costs of this refurbishing and (b) prior to the refurbishment, (i) when last was this aircraft refurbished and (ii) when is the next refurbishment scheduled to take place?

Reply:

(a)(i) Due to avionic obsolesce and interior degradation due to age.

(ii) Full avionic refurbishment and interior refurbishment.

(iii) Avionic refurbishment was R10.2 million and the interior refurbishment was R381000.

b) (i) Never before

(ii) No future refurbishment is planned.