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10 October 2017 - NW2278

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many security guards have lost their lives working for security companies, and (b) what is the average payment package as compensation to families?

Reply:

(a) In terms of the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, 2001 there is no statutory obligation by the private security industry to report any injuries or fatalities of security officers to PSiRA. However, all security businesses must be lawfully registered with the office of the Compensation Commissioner and report any workplace accidents to the Compensation Commissioner in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No. 61 of 1997) and the circumstances relating to the injury, illness or death of an employee.

In view of the fact that security businesses are not required to report the above information to PSiRA, the security regulator liaises with the office of the Compensation Commissioner to obtain said information. The Compensation Commissioner’s gave the following information of workplace accidents within the private security industry from 1 April 2016 to 28 February 2017:

1.1 Injuries on duty - 5 705; and

1.2 Fatalities on duty - 14

In addition to the above, the PSiRA also liaises with the Private Security Sector Provident Fund (PSSPF), established in terms of Sectoral Determination 6 by the Minister of Labour. The PSSPF provides for, inter alia, retirement benefits, death benefits and permanent disability cover for security service providers in the guarding sector. Whilst the PSSPF is not in a position to differentiate between death and disability in or outside of the workplace, the following statistics in respect of claims received from 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017 were provided in respect of security officers:

1.1 Death claims - 1 213

1.2 Disability claims - 270

In view of the challenges in obtaining statistical information in respect of the foregoing and PSiRA’s reliance on the office of the Compensation Commissioner to provide said information, the Authority is in the process to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Labour. This agreement will include the sharing of information on injuries and fatalities of security officers on duty.

(b) Compensation for injuries on duty is provided for in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No. 61 of 1997) and depends on the nature of the injury. The Private Security Sector Provident Fund established in terms of Sectoral Determination 6 by the Minister of Labour, also provides for death benefits and permanent disability cover for security service providers in the guarding sector. The benefits includes, inter alia, life cover for a member and spouse up to R30 000-00 as well as life cover for the member’s children.

10 October 2017 - NW2281

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Police

What is the total number of criminal offences that (a) security companies and (b) officials and/or employees have been (i) charged with and/or (ii) convicted of in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

PSiRA is involved in a number of operations with different stakeholders, including the SAPS. These operations are initiated by PSiRA or at times, the SAPS. The focus of these operations is on compliance in terms of the PSIR Act which includes the deployment of registered and trained security officers, illegal immigrants and compliance with the Firearms Control Act. During the 2016/2017 financial year, 26 PSiRA/SAPS operations were held that resulted in the arrest of 390 security officers. Of these 390 security officers, 387 were arrested for not being legally registered with PSiRA.

In addition to PSiRA inspections and investigations conducted, certain areas of non-compliance by the private security industry also warrant criminal prosecution and this forms part of the PSiRA’s enforcement strategy.

Investigations are conducted to detect unregistered security service providers as well as other criminal contraventions of the Act for the purposes of opening criminal cases against them with the South African Police Service.

During the 2016/2017 financial year, a total of 855 criminal cases were opened by inspectors of the Authority compared to 686 cases during the 2015/2016 financial year.

As at 31 March 2017, a total of 2 243 criminal cases were pending with the South African Police Services countrywide against security service providers where PSiRA opened the cases for contraventions of the PSiR Act and regulations.

10 October 2017 - NW2357

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What was the total fixed establishment for the Durban North Police Station (i) in the (aa) 2015-16 and (bb) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017 and (b) what number of posts were vacant at the start of each specified (i) financial year and (ii) time period?

Reply:

(a)(i)(aa) The total Fixed Establishment (FE) for Durban North Police Station, in 2015/2016, was 152.

(a)(i)(bb) The total FE for Durban North Police Station, in 2016/2017, was 150.

(a)(ii) The total FE for Durban North Police Station, since 1 April 2017 to date, is 150 (The FE for 2017/2018 is not yet approved).

(b)(i) The number of vacant posts at the start of each financial year, is as follows:

  • In the 2015/2016 financial year, the number of vacant posts for Durban North Police Station, was nine.
  • In 2016/2017 financial year, the number of vacant posts for Durban North Police Station, was 10.
  • Since 1 April 2017 to date, the number of vacant posts for Durban North Police Station, is 10.

(b)(ii) All vacant funded posts are prioritised by the relevant provinces, to be filled within the conventional six months period, via human resource processes.

10 October 2017 - NW2702

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What (a) is the current status of the investigation of the Bedfordview CAS 152/04/2017 and (b) are the charges contained in the specified docket; (2) whether any suspects have been arrested to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any (a) suspects and/or (b) witnesses have been interviewed; if not, why not in each case; if so, (i) on what date and (ii) what are the further relevant details; (4) by what date does he expect the investigation to be finalised?

Reply:

(1) Bedfordview CAS 152/04/2017 was closed as it was a duplicate of Bedfordview CAS 205/04/2017.

(1)(a) Bedfordview CAS 205/04/2017 is currently still being investigated.

(1)(b) A charge of culpable homicide was registered.

(2) No suspect has been arrested.

(3)(a) A warning statement was obtained from the driver of the vehicle.

  1. The warning statement was obtained on 29 May 2017.
  2. The case docket will be submitted to the Senior Public Prosecutor for a decision, once all the relevant statements have been obtained.

(3)(b) Six witnesses have been interviewed.

 (i) The witnesses’ statements were obtained on 20 April 2017, 29 May 2017 and 30 May 2017.

 (ii) The case docket will be submitted to the Senior Public Prosecutor (SPP), for a decision once the investigation has been completed.

(4) The case docket will be submitted to the SPP, for a decision on prosecution, once the investigation has been completed.

10 October 2017 - NW2276

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(a)What is the total number of security companies that are registered in the country and (b)(i) what is the total number of persons that each specified security company employs and (ii) what are their positions in each case?

Reply:

(a) According to PSiRA’s records as at end August 2017, there are just under 500 000 registered active employee security officers deployed by over 9 000 registered and active security businesses. These security businesses and employee security officers represent all the different categories or classes of security service providers as defined in the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, with the majority, falling within what is generally described as the guarding sector.

The geographic breakdown of the private security industry was at August 2017 as follows:

Registered and active security businesses per province:

  • Gauteng - 3 789
  • Eastern Cape - 707
  • Western Cape - 1 019
  • Limpopo - 827
  • N/West Prov. - 367
  • Free State - 217
  • N/Cape - 141
  • KZN - 1 444
  • Mpumalanga - 533

Total - 9 044

Registered and active security officers per province:

  • Gauteng - 194 358
  • Eastern Cape - 42 996
  • Western Cape - 54 900
  • Limpopo - 37 438
  • N/West Prov. - 26 756
  • Free State - 16 233
  • N/Cape - 4 706
  • KZN - 87 335
  • Mpumalanga - 34 774

Total - 499 496

(b)(i) All security businesses are required to report to PSiRA, in terms of the Private Security Industry Regulation, 2002 the details of any security officer employed or deployed within 10 days. PSiRA therefore keeps records of all security officers employed and reported by the 9 044 registered and active security businesses. Details of each business as well as the details of the security officers in its employ can be provided.

(b)(ii) The positions each of the security officers hold within the security business are not known to PSiRA and it is also not a requirement for businesses to report information of this nature to PSiRA. The regulator does however record the details of the owners/partners/members/directors, etc. of security business on an electronic database or register of security service providers

10 October 2017 - NW2190

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

Has any members of the SA Police Service been deployed (a) recently or (b) over the past three financial years to guard a residence belonging to a certain person (name and details furnished); if not, what are the relevant details in this regard; if so, (i) what number of (aa) police officers are deployed to guard the specified residence at any given time and (bb) police vehicles, inclusive of specialised vehicles such as nyalas, are stationed at the specified residence at any given time and (ii) on what grounds is the aforementioned protection provided to the specified person?

Reply:

a) No, all the duties have been suspended.

b) Members of Public Order Policing (POP) Unit in Empangeni have provided static protection duties at the residence of Minister Nhleko, in the Umthinzini, area since 2014. These duties were suspended on 20 July 2017.

(i)(aa) Two POP members from Empangeni were deployed, per shift - four members per day for 24 hours.

(i)(bb) One Nyala vehicle was deployed on a 24 hour basis. At times, it was supplemented with a soft top vehicle (bakkie/sedan), when the Nyala was required for public order policing duties.

10 October 2017 - NW2543

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

How many drug-related cases from the Rabie Ridge Police Station in Gauteng (a) went to court and (b) ended in successful convictions in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

a) 

DRUG-RELATED CASES THAT WENT TO COURT

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

445

377

511

b) 

DRUG-RELATED CASES WITH SUCCESSFUL CONVICTIONS

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

42

31

90

10 October 2017 - NW2336

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to all cases referred by the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) to the SA Police Service, (a) in how many cases were no disciplinary proceedings initiated, as required by section 30(a) of the Independent Police Investigative Directorate Act, Act 1 of 2011, in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14, (iii) 2014-15, (iv) 2015-16 and (v) 2016-17 financial years and (b) what were the categories of each of the specified cases, in accordance with section 28 of the IPID Act?

Reply:

a) No disciplinary proceedings were initiated in 130 cases, due to service terminations. The details are reflected in the table below:

Types of termination

FINANCIAL YEAR

TOTAL

 

(i) 2012/2013

(ii) 2013/2014

(iii) 2014/2015

(iv) 2015/2016

(v) 2016/2017

 

Resignation

22

19

32

26

21

120

Death

-

-

2

4

2

8

Retirement

-

-

-

1

1

2

TOTAL

22

19

34

31

24

130

b) The categories of offences, in accordance with section 28 of the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) Act, 2011(Act No 1 of 2011), for which disciplinary proceedings were not initiated, as required by section 30, are reflected in the table below:

Categories of offences, in terms of sec 28

(i) 2012/2013

(ii) 2013/2014

(iii) 2014/2015

(iv) 2015/2016

(v) 2016/2017

TOTAL

Death in police custody

-

-

1

-

1

2

Death as a result of Police action

-

-

2

7

2

11

Discharge of firearm

1

2

2

2

4

11

Rape by police officer

-

-

8

1

2

11

Rape in police custody

-

-

-

1

1

2

Torture/Assault

9

9

15

13

10

56

Corruption

3

-

-

3

1

7

Any other Criminal offence

9

8

6

4

3

30

TOTAL

22

19

34

31

24

130

10 October 2017 - NW2550

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 217 on 7 July 2014, his department can now provide Mr H B Groenewald with the requested information; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a)(i)(cc) There were 846 murder cases reported against children, in the 2013/2014 financial year.

(a)(ii) There were 969 murder cases reported against children, in the 2014/2015 financial year.

(b) Weapons used, include the weapons used in the cases reported in question 217 and exclude the cases reported in paragraph (a)(ii) above, as it was included in the totals provided in question 2215)

 

Total cases

Knife

604

Unknown

533

Firearms

397

Sharp instrument

203

Hands

177

Stick

78

Stone/brick

53

String/wire

30

Poison

25

Axe

23

Matches

22

Knobkerrie

19

Iron pipe

12

Booted foot

12

Panga

11

Water

11

Sjambok

11

Bottle

10

Belt

9

Screwdriver

8

Fire hose

6

Hammer

5

Fuel

5

Fist

5

Chain

4

Paraffin

3

Spear

3

Boiling oil

3

Petrol bomb

2

Candle

2

Garden fork

1

Broomstick

1

Iron

1

Hand grenade

1

Crowbar

1

Scissor

1

 

10 October 2017 - NW2546

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1851 on 22 September 2016, did the Tembisa Police Station receive the additional nine detectives; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will the police station receive its full complement of detectives; (2) What is the current complement of detectives at the Tembisa Police Station?

Reply:

1. No, only four members from visible policing were sent to detectives.

(1)(a) Due to the number of pending service terminations and the hampering of service delivery.

(1)(b) The remaining number of members will be allocated upon receipt of the 2017/18 new recruits.

(2) 76 members.

10 October 2017 - NW2617

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What progress has been made with regard to the implementation of the new police reservist policy, (b) what is the total number of reservists who have been enlisted in terms of the policy and (c) of these newly enlisted reservists, how many are from the farming and/or rural areas of the country?

Reply:

a) Since the approval of the reservist policy, by the former Minister of Police in 2012, the implementation of the new reservist policy is still in progress. The approved policy for reservists does not cater only for farming or rural areas but it was developed to cover ALL the provinces of South Africa and to manage the command and control of reservists at police stations.

b) The total number of reservists who have been enlisted in terms of the policy:

PROVINCE

ACTIVE RESERVISTS

Gauteng

3 182

Western Cape

1 649

Eastern Cape

1 191

KwaZulu-Natal

572

Free State

844

Mpumalanga

1 226

North West

934

Northern Cape

815

Limpopo

1 584

TOTAL

11 997

c) The response with regards to the total number of newly enlisted reservists that were employed from the farming and/or rural areas of the country, will be submitted in due course.

10 October 2017 - NW2547

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to the reply to question 1944 on 6 October 2016, did the Tembisa Police Station receive their additional seven visible police vehicles; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will they receive the vehicles; (2) did the Tembisa Police Station receive their additional 64 visible policing members; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will they receive the members; (3) what is the current complement of visible police members at the Tembisa Police Station?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the Tembisa Police Station received the additional seven visible policing vehicles.

(1)(a) Not applicable.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

(2) No, the current shortage of visible policing members is nine, six members were allocated.

(2)(a) The visible policing component is currently only short of three members, due to the number of pending service terminations and the hampering of service delivery.

(2)(b) The remaining number of members will be allocated upon receipt of the 2017/18 new recruits.

(3) The Tembisa Police Station has a current number of 220 visible policing members.

10 October 2017 - NW2701

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of police officers faced disciplinary charges after the (i) injury and/or (ii) death of civilians as a result of action taken by the specified officers while policing public protests (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2017, (b) what are the charges in each case, (c) on what date was the action instituted and (d) what was the outcome of the proceedings?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(b)(c)(d)

(a)

Number of Members

(i)(ii)

Injury or Death

(aa)

Past Three Financial Years

(bb)

April 2017 to date

(b)

Charge

(c)

Date Action Taken

(d)

Outcome of the Proceedings

1

Death

2014/2015

Nil

Murder

Limpopo

Regulation 20(z)

2014-06-02

Dismissal.

5

Injury

2015/2016

Nil

Assault

Mpumalanga

Regulation 20(p)(2)

 

2015-02-06

Three members were found guilty and given written warnings.

Two members were not found guilty.

1

Death

2015/2016

Nil

Inquest

Mpumalanga

Regulation 20(e)(i)(p)(z)

2016-01-13

Counselling and suspension without remuneration for one month.

1

Injury

2015/2016

Nil

Assault Common

KwaZulu-Natal

Regulation 20(z)

2015-09-27

No departmental steps taken.

5

Injury to Dignity

2015/2016

Nil

Sexual Assault

KwaZulu-Natal

Regulation 20(p)(q)

2016-09-05

Pending – departmental hearing set for

2017-07-10 to

2017-07-12.

10 October 2017 - NW2429

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

Whether action has been taken regarding a certain official (name and details furnished), whom it is alleged has a corrupt relationship with a supplier of emergency lights and related products to numerous units and divisions of the SA Police Service (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) what action has been taken and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, action has been taken.

a) The matter is being dealt with internally. The Acting National Head: Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), has also been requested to conduct an investigation.

b) There are no further, relevant details.

10 October 2017 - NW2589

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to him?

Reply:

1. The question refers to “entities” and associated “boards” or “councils”.

2. The inference does not refer to departments such as the South African Police Service (SAPS).  The question therefore, is not appropriate for the SAPS to answer.

3. Public entities are defined in section 1 of the PFMA, 1999 (National and Provincial entities).  PSIRA is listed as such an entity.  The CSP and IPID are also departments as listed in the Public Service Act.

 

10 October 2017 - NW2507

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, a certain person (name and details furnished) was afforded protection services by (a) the Presidential Protection Services (PPS) unit of the SA Police Services (SAPS) or (b) the Protection and Security Services (PSS) unit of the SAPS during the person’s visit to South Africa in the period 10 August 2017 to 20 August 2017; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) was the assigned security detail present at the hotel where the specified person allegedly assaulted a certain person (name furnished) on or about 13 August 2017; if not, why not; if so, (a) did he receive a report from the security detail on their conduct during the incident and (b) what are the relevant details; (3) did the assigned security detail accompany the specified person to the airport from which the person left South Africa for Zimbabwe on or about 20 August 2017; if not, why not; if so; (4) (a) why did they not arrest the specified person, (b) what are the relevant details and did he receive a report from the security detail on their conduct during the trip to the airport?

Reply:

(1)(a) No,

(1)(b) No

(2)(a) Not applicable.

(2)(b) Not applicable.

(3) Not applicable.

(4)(a) Not applicable.

(4)(b) Not applicable.

10 October 2017 - NW2189

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply to question 1044 on 27 June 2017, the internal disciplinary process has been completed; if not, why not; if so, what was the outcome;\ (2) what was the date on which the (a) process was initiated and (b) functionaries were appointed with regard to the specified process; (3) whether he can provide Mr H B Groenewald with a detailed list of all further relevant dates in this matter; (4) (a) on what basis was the specified person awarded a service bonus and (b) how was the service bonus calculated?

Reply:

(1) The internal disciplinary process has not been completed.

Advocate Tip, Senior Council (SC), who was appointed as the Chairperson of the disciplinary inquiry at the time, informed the South African Police Service (SAPS), in December 2012, that he could no longer fulfil the role, due to his involvement in the Marikana Commission of Inquiry.

The former National Commissioner, General Phiyega, was requested to appoint a new Chairperson, early in January 2013, but no such appointment was effected up until her suspension from office, in October 2016.

After his appointment as the Acting National Commissioner, Lieutenant General Phahlane reactivated the process.

(2)(a) The process was initiated on 2 July 2012.

(2)(b) Advocate Tip, SC was initially appointed as the Chairperson, but due to his involvement in the Marikana Commission of Inquiry, his appointment as chairperson was terminated in December 2012. He was replaced with Advocate T Motau, SC in April 2016.

Advocate Myburgh, SC was appointed as the Employer Representative, but was later replaced with Advocate Mokhari, SC in April 2016. Advocate Mokhari’s brief was terminated and Advocate Maenetje, SC was appointed in October 2016.

(3) The employee’s first appearance in the disciplinary inquiry was on, 25 July 2017. At the first appearance the following arrangements were agreed upon:

14 August: employee must deliver request for further particulars

28 August: employer to answer

11 September: point in limine to be raised by employee

25 September: employer to answer

30 September: heads of argument to be exchanged

7 October: points in limine to be argued

1, 2, 3 November: matter to proceed on trial

(4)(a) The employee opted to structure his all-inclusive flexible remuneration package, to make provision for a 13th cheque and as such, no service bonus was “awarded”.

(4)(b) Not applicable, due to paragraph (4)(a), above.

10 October 2017 - NW2277

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

Have investigations been conducted into the involvement of owners and employees of the security industries in (a) human rights violations in South Africa during Apartheid and/or (b) human rights violations in other countries; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) The purpose of the Private Security Industry Regulation Act 56 of 2001 is to provide for the regulation of the private security industry. The purpose of the PSiR Act is to establish a regulatory Authority and to provide for matters connected with the regulation of the industry.

The primary object of PSiRA is to regulate the private security industry and to exercise effective control over the practice of the occupation of security service providers in the public and national interest and the interest of the private security industry itself.

Basic to the regulation of the security industry is the requirement that all those who fall within the definition of “security service provider” and who propose to render a “security service”, must comply with registration procedures and be registered before becoming active in the industry. The PSiR Act therefore set reasonable and appropriate registration requirements that must be satisfied by applicant security businesses, their owners as well as all security officers. The basic object of these registration requirements is to achieve a trustworthy, legitimate and competent private security industry which has the effect that not all applicants will be able to secure legitimate entry to the industry and that the admission to or exclusion from the industry is based on proper grounds.

One of the registration requirements is that a person may not have been convicted of a criminal offence as highlighted in a Schedule to the PSiR Act. Any person convicted of a Scheduled offence will be disqualified from registration. In addition, a person found guilty of a Scheduled offence after registration as a security service provider, registration may be withdrawn by the PSiRA. The PSiR Act therefore provides for screening of all persons prior to registration in order to eliminate undesirable individuals from entering the industry in the first place. Part of this screening also includes an official clearance certificate for any ex-members of any official military, security, police or intelligence force or service (in or outside the Republic) to determine whether the applicant is fit and proper.

In addition, the conduct of the private security industry is also regulated in terms of a statutory Code of Conduct for Security Service Providers, 2003, made in terms of section 28 of the Act. This Code provides for rules and obligations a security service provider has towards the state security agencies, the public, clients, etc. Any contravention of the Code constitute improper conduct and a security service provider convicted, are subject to a variety of penalties or sanctions which includes withdrawal of registration as a security service provider or a fine of up to R1 million per count.

The PSiRA has not convicted any security service provider for human rights violations during apartheid but have generally prosecuted security service providers for human rights offences conducted in the course of their deployment as security officers. This is particularly in cases where security officers abuses their powers and the use of disproportioned force.

(b) As far as violations in other countries are concerned, and although the PSiR Act do have extraterritorial application, there are limitations in the Act. These limitations are being addressed in the Private Security Industry Amendment Act, which is currently with the President for promulgation

10 October 2017 - NW2279

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Police

(1)(a) What is the total number of security guards who have been permanently injured while working for security companies and (b) what does the average compensation consist of; (2) whether medical support for life is guaranteed in respect of the specified security guards?

Reply:

(1)(a) and (b) The response to these questions are similar than the reply under question 2278 above.

(2) Minimum conditions of employment for the private security industry are determined by the Minister of Labour. Other than what is provided for in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No. 61 of 1997), there is currently no other provision for medical cover or aid for security guards in terms of labour legislation or the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, 2001.

10 October 2017 - NW2215

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Police

(1)What number of (a) child murders and (b) child rapes took place in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; (2) how many investigations into the specified cases led to a successful conviction for (a) child murder and (b) child rape and in each specified financial year; (3) what weapon was used to murder the child in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii), (2)(a)(b) and (3) The information is not readily available and must be obtained from the Crime Administration System (CAS). A request is hereby made for an extension, in order for the correct information to be provided.

10 October 2017 - NW2311

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

Is (a) psychometric testing and (b) aptitude assessment done on recruits for (i) 10111 call centres and (ii) SAPS Academy cadets?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) Yes.

(b)(i)(ii) Yes.

10 October 2017 - NW2554

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

In light of the increase in farm murders and the appointment of an Acting National Police Commissioner, (a) what is the current position regarding the prioritisation of investigations into farm murders and (b) what pro-active measures have been put in place by his department to address the increase in the number of farm murders in the country?

Reply:

(a) Trio Crime Task Teams have been established, in Clusters to address Trio Crimes, including farm attacks. The Trio Crime Task Teams are monitored by the Cluster Commander and the Deputy Provincial Commissioner: Crime Detection, in each province.

(b) The South African Police Service (SAPS) has increased police visibility through patrols and continuous engagement with farm owners and residents in rural areas.

The Divisions: Visible Policing and Crime Intelligence, monitor all incidents of violence against persons residing on farms and small holdings, in rural areas, on a daily basis. These incidents, including murder and other serious crimes, which occur on farms and small holdings are analysed and captured on a manual data base. This information is shared as operational information during the Rural Safety Priority Committee meetings, to guide the planning of crime prevention operations, programmes and projects to address root causes or contributing factors to crime, as well as to inform the community of current trends, tendencies and modus operandi of suspects, to enhance awareness.

Weekly incident analysis meetings, involving the Division Visible Policing, the Division: Crime Intelligence and the Crime Registrar, take place to analyse these incidents to determine flash points, particular crime trends, the modus operandi that is employed by criminals and other matters related to rural safety and security.

This operational information forms the basis for presentations to the quarterly National Rural Safety Priority Committee meetings, which is inter alia attended by organised agriculture and farming unions Agriculture South Africa (AGRI SA) and the Transvaal Agriculture Union of South Africa (TAU SA). In the event of an increase in the number of incidents, the relevant Provincial Commissioners are instructed to ensure that preventative measures are implemented with immediate effect.

Stakeholders are encouraged to be a part of these established structures to give constructive advice, regarding the policing of rural communities. These established structures are therefore utilised by stakeholders to enhance cooperation and coordination. The SAPS is committed to addressing all crime-related incidents, in rural areas as a priority.

10 October 2017 - NW2548

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to the reply to question 1943 on 6 October 2016, did the Tembisa South Police Station receive their additional two visible police vehicles by 31 March 2017; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will they receive the vehicles; (2) did the Tembisa South Police Station receive their additional 24 visible policing officers; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will they receive the officers; (3) what is the current number of visible police officers at the Tembisa South Police Station?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Tembisa South Police Station has received two additional vehicles for the visible policing section.

(1)(a) Not applicable.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

2. Yes, the station received 24 additional visible policing members.

(2)(a) Not applicable.

(2)(b) Not applicable.

3. The Tembisa South Police Station has a total number of 74 visible policing members.

10 October 2017 - NW1808

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(1)Which entities reporting to him (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA) is governed by a Council, which is equivalent to a Board. The Council is appointed under section 6 of the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, 2001 (Act No. 56 of 2001), by the Minister of Police, in consultation with Cabinet.

(1)(i)(aa) and (bb)

- Chairperson of the Council appointed on 19 April 2015 until 20 April 2018, for a period of three (3) years.

- Deputy Chairperson of the Council appointed on 1 January 2017 until 31 December 2020, for a period of three (3) years.

- 3 (Three) Members of the Council appointed on 1 January 2017 until 31 December 2020, for a period of three (3) years.

(1)(ii)(aa) and (bb)

The Council has five (5) members as prescribed by the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, 2001, of which three (3) are males and two (2) are females.

(1)(a) The Minister of Police is empowered under section 15V of the South African Police Service Act, 1995 (Act No. 68 of 1995), to appoint the chairperson, deputy chairperson and members on a part-time basis to the National Forensic Oversight & Ethics Board (Oversight and Ethics Board). The functions of the Oversight and Ethics Board are to monitor the implementation of legislation pertaining to the use of DNA in combating crime; to advise the Minister of Police; to provide oversight over functions performed by the South African Police Service; to handle complaints relating to the use of DNA in combating crime and to make recommendations to, amongst others, the South African Police Service and the Independent Police Investigating Directorate.

(1)(i)(aa) and (bb)

Nine (9) members of the Oversight and Ethics Board were appointed on 27 January 2015 until 26 January 2020, for a period of five (5) years and one (1) member was appointed on 01 April 2016 until 31 March 2021, for a period of five (5) years.

(1)(ii)(aa) and (bb)

The Oversight and Ethics Board has ten (10) members of which eight (8) are females and two (2) males.

(1)(b) Section 10 of the South African Police Service Act, 1995, establishes the Board of Commissioners, consisting of the National and Provincial Commissioners. The functions of the board are to promote co-operation and co-ordination in the Service. The board is presided over by the National Commissioner or his or her nominee and the board shall determine its own procedure. The National Management Forum, inclusive of the top management of the South African Police Service on National and Provincial level serves as the Board of Commissioners. It is, however, not a Board in the traditional sense, but an internal management and coordination mechanism.

The Civilian Secretariat for Police is established and regulated by the Civilian Secretariat for Police Service Act, 2011 (Act No. 2 of 2011), which Act does not provide for the appointment of a Board.

The Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) is established and regulated by the Independent Police Investigative Directorate Act, 2011 (Act No. 1 of 2011), which Act does not provide for the appointment of a Board.

(2)(a) and (b) Not applicable.

10 October 2017 - NW2275

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

What is (a) the number of black-owned security companies, meaning 51% black ownership in each case and (b) their share (i) of the overall income of the security industry and (ii) in employment in the specified industry?

Reply:

The current database cannot give the breakdown of such information however it reflect that the majority of the companies are black owned.

10 October 2017 - NW2781

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Police

(1) How many sectors does the Germiston Police Station have; (2) how many (a) officers for visible policing and (b) vehicles are there for (i) each sector, (ii) charge office and (iii) other policing function; (3) (a) what is the shortage of (i) officers for visible policing and (ii) vehicles at the station and (b) by what date will the station receive their full complement of officers for visible policing and vehicles?

Reply:

(1) The Germiston Police Station has five sectors.

(2)(a) The police station has 149 visible policing members.

(2)(b)(i) One vehicle has been allocated to each sector.

(2)(b)(ii) A vehicle has not been allocated to the Community Service Centre, however, should personnel stationed there require a vehicle, one is made available.

(2)(b)(iii) Ten vehicles are available for other policing functions.

(3)(a)(i) According to the fixed establishment, the Germiston Police Station has a shortage of four officers between levels 8 to 12, and has a surplus of 35 employees between levels 3 to 7, within the visible policing environment.

(3)(a)(ii) The police station does not have a shortage of vehicles.

(3)(b) The Germiston Police Station, will receive one vehicle by the end of October 2017. Critical vacancies, for salary levels 8 to 12, were identified and posts were requested from Head Office, as critical funded posts. However, it needs to be mentioned that posts can only be filled, once the moratium on promotion is uplifted and posts are made available.

10 October 2017 - NW2705

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to the Basic Police Development Learning Programme, what number of police recruits (a) entered and (b) graduated (i) nationally and (ii) from each training academy in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

a) A total number of 5 019 recruits were entered into the Basic Police Development Learning Programme at the following training academies:

Academies

Entered

All Saints

205

Bhisho

423

Bishop Lavis

522

Chatsworth

180

Graaff-Reinet

174

Mthatha

211

Oudtshoorn

450

Philippi

655

Tshwane

2 058

Ulundi

141

Total

5 019

(b)(i) 4 881 Police Recruits graduated.

(b)(ii) Graduates, for the 2016/2017 financial year, per academy, are as follows:

Academies

Graduated

All Saints

205

Bhisho

423

Bishop Lavis

543

Chatsworth

180

Graaff-Reinet

174

Mthatha

211

Oudtshoorn

291

Philippi

655

Tshwane

2 058

Ulundi

141

Total

4 881

In addition to above, a total number of 70 police trainees were invited to join the programme, as their Memorandum of Agreements were suspended, due to medical reasons. The aforementioned members were, however, assigned their administrative duties at various police stations and, therefore, graduated in 2016/2017.

10 October 2017 - NW2408

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

Has (a) the SA Police Service or (b) any investigative body or entity in his department (i) recovered and/or (ii) analysed any fingerprint evidence relating to the (aa) break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice in March 2017, (bb) break-in at the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s offices at Parliament in April 2017, (cc) break-in at the headquarters of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation in July 2017, (dd) break-in at the National Prosecuting Authority offices on Church Square in July 2017, (ee) robbery at the office of the Chief Prosecutor at the Pretoria Magistrate’s Court and/or (ff) break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces in July 2017; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii) The Division: Forensic Services of the South African Police Service (SAPS), attended and processed all six crime scenes. Fingerprints and Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) evidence were collected, for further analysis.

(aa) Midrand, CAS 567/03/2017: Fingerprints were lifted and processed. However, there was no linkage through fingerprints or DNA. The DNA samples were submitted, however, there were no full profiles obtained for searching and matching purposes.

(bb) Cape Town, CAS 1351/4/2017: Fingerprints were lifted at the scene of the crime. However, there was no linkage through fingerprints, thus far.

(cc) Silverton, CAS 59/07/2017: Linkage was done through fingerprints. However, the matter is still under investigation for elimination/exclusion of the employees of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), who would ordinarily have left prints at the respective scene(s).

(dd) Pretoria Central, CAS 418/07/2017: a suspect has been arrested and is in custody. The suspect was linked through fingerprints.

(ee) Pretoria Central, CAS 1020/07/2017: a suspect has been linked to the following two cases through fingerprints:

  • Burglary at the Office of National Prosecuting Authority: Pretoria Central, CAS 418/07/2017; and
  • Burglary at the Office of the Chief Prosecutor at Pretoria Magistrate Court: Pretoria Central, CAS 1020/07/2017).

The suspect has been arrested and is in custody. The DNA analysis for Pretoria Central, CAS 1020/07/2017, is in process and the results will be made available once the analysis has been concluded.

(ff) Cape Town, CAS 1823/7/2017: DNA material and fingerprints were lifted at the scene of crime, however, there was no linkage through fingerprints, thus far. The DNA analysis is in process and the results will be made available, once the analysis has been concluded.

10 October 2017 - NW2182

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Police

Is the Acting National Police Commissioner currently reviewing the ranks of SA Police Service members who are members of the Umkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Associations, if so, (a) what is the purpose of this review process; (b) when will this process be completed, (c) what is the total amount budgeted for the completion of the project and (d) from which portion of the budget will the review be paid for?

Reply:

No. The Acting National Commissioner is not currently reviewing the ranks of South African Police Service (SAPS) members, who are members of the Umkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Association.

a) In 2015, the former Minister of Police established a re-Ranking Committee to investigate and make a recommendation on the ranks of all former Non Statutory Force Members (Umkhonto weSizwe and Azanian People’s Liberation Army), who complained that they were prejudiced during the integration of the Security Forces, as their training, experience and responsibility were not considered when granting them their ranks, during the integration into the SAPS process.

The majority of these members were granted the ranks of Temporary Constable and Lance Sergeant, at the time.

b) The SAPS re-Ranking Committee is currently preparing a report and recommendations to the Minister of Police.

c) However, R4 000 000,00 is available for the project team.

d) A decision has not been made as to which portion of the budget this amount will come from.

10 October 2017 - NW2609

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Police

By what date does the SA Police Service (SAPS) intend to put in place the rapid reaction capacity at cluster level, specifically for rural areas, as envisaged in the Rural Safety Strategy of the SAPS?

Reply:

The Clusters do not have a rapid reaction capacity. The reaction capacity towards all incidents is already in place and resorts at the police stations. The Cluster Commander can, at any time, mobilise inter-police stations reaction, when and where needed.

 

10 October 2017 - NW2337

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to the (a) Polokwane and (b) Seshego Police Stations, (i) what is the fixed establishment for the detectives branch, (ii) how many detective posts are filled, (iii) how many detective posts are vacant, (iv) how many officers have been transferred from the stations to the cluster office since the start of the 2016-17 financial year to date and (v) have the fixed establishments of the affected stations been amended to reflect these personnel transfers?

Reply:

(a) Polokwane Police Station.

(a)(i) The Fixed Establishment (FE) for the Polokwane Detective Service, is as follows:

Rank

Posts

Police Service Act

Colonel

1

Lieutenant Colonel

4

Captain

5

Warrant Officer

12

Sergeant

17

Constable

25

Total:

64

Public Service Act

Data Typist

5

Admin Clerk

2

Secretary

1

Total:

8

(a)(ii) A total of 48 South African Police Service (SAPS) Act posts are filled and eight Public Service Act (PSA) posts are filled.

(a)(iii) A total of 16 SAPS Act posts are vacant and no PSA posts are vacant.

(a)(iv) No officers have been transferred from the station to the Cluster Office, since the beginning of the 2017/2018 financial year, to date.

(a)(v) Not applicable.

(b) Seshego Police Station.

(b)(i) The FE for the Seshego Detective Service, is as follows:

Rank

Posts

Police Service Act

Colonel

1

Lieutenant Colonel

4

Captain

5

Warrant Officer

6

Sergeant

7

Constable

9

Total:

32

Public Service Act

Data Typist

0

Admin Clerk

0

Secretary

0

Total:

0

(b)(ii) A total of 30 SAPS Act posts are filled.

(b)(iii) Two SAPS Act posts are vacant.

(b)(iv) Four SAPS members have been transferred from the Police Station to the Cluster Office, since the beginning of the 2017/2018 financial year, to date.

(b)(v) The FE of the Police Station is not affected when officers are transferred from the Police Station and therefore does not need to be amended.

10 October 2017 - NW2541

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether the detective division at the Rabie Ridge Police Station in Gauteng received any new vehicles in the 2016-17 financial year; if so, how many did they receive; (2) (a) What total number of vehicles does the specified detective division currently have, (b) how many are in working order and (c) on what date were the vehicles that have broken down sent to the mechanical workshop; (3) (a) How many detectives are there currently at the specified police station, (b) how many of the specified detectives have (i) attended and (ii) passed the detective course and (c) how many dockets is each detective currently investigating; (4) When will the detectives at the specified police station receive additional vehicles in order to ensure the specified police station complies with the national ratio of the number of detectives to vehicles?

Reply:

1. Yes, the detective division at the Rabie Ridge Police Station in Gauteng, received one vehicle.

(2)(a) The total number of vehicles that the detective division has is 16 vehicles.

(2)(b) The total number of working vehicles is 14.

(2)(c) The first vehicle, on 2017-08-03 and the second vehicle on 2017-08-11.

(3)(a) There are currently 30 detectives at the Rabie Ridge Police Station.

(3)(b)(i) 17 members attended the detective course.

(3)(b)(ii) 17 members passed the detective course.

(3)(c) Each detective is currently investigating a total number of 215 dockets.

(4) The station currently has an ideal number of 16 vehicles for 30 detectives, which complies with the national ratio of two detectives, per vehicle.

10 October 2017 - NW2456

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many employees of the SA Police Service were employed in the police force prior to 27 April 1994, (b) what was their rank and (c) in what unit of the police force were they employed?

Reply:

a) Old Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei (TBVC) States and Self-Governing Territories (Homelands) prior to 1995.

 

Transkei 1994

 

 transkei.jpg

Population:

3.39 million (8.2%)

 transkei.jpg

 

Land Surface:

43 654 Sq Km (3.6%)

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

4 993 (9.7% female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

96

 
 

Other Personnel:

288

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

5 377

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

681

 
 

Police Stations:

61

 
 

Bophuthatswana 1994

 

 fbop.jpg

Population:

2.19 million (5.3%)

 bbop.jpg

 

Land Surface: (3,3%)

40 011 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

6 002 (14.8 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

577

 
 

Other Personnel:

353

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

6 932

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

365

 
 

Police Stations:

56

 
 

Venda 1994

 

 FlagVenda.jpg

Population: (1,5%)

0,61 million

 BadgeVenda2.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,6%)

6 807 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

1803 (2,7 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

164

 
 

Other Personnel:

46

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

2 013

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

341

 
 

Police Stations:

10

 
 

Ciskei 1994

 

 fciskei.jpg

Population: (2,1%)

0,87 million

 ciskei.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,7%)

8 100 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

1 599 (14,9 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

207

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 806

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

550

 
 

Police Stations:

30

 
 

Gazankulu 1994

 

 fgazan.jpg

Population: (2,0%)

0,82 million

 gazankulu.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,6%)

7 484 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

803 (9,2 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

140

 
 

Other Personnel:

69

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 012

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

1 025

 
 

Police Stations:

9

 
 

Kangwane 1994

 

 fkangwane.jpg

Population: (1,8%)

0,76 million

 kangwane.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,3%)

3 917 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

747 (15,3 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

46

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

793

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

1 022

 
 

Police Stations:

9

 
 

Kwandebele 1994

 

 fkwande.jpg

Population: (1,6%)

0,64 million

 kwandebele.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,2%)

2 208 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

1 034 (16,6 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

171

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 205

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

625

 
 

Police Stations:

24

 
 

Lebowa 1994

 

 flebowa.jpg

Population: (7,4%)

3,1 million

 lebowa.jpg

 

Land Surface: (1,8%)

21 833 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

2 805 (6,2 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

358

 
 

Other Personnel:

194

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

3 357

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

1 093

 
 

Police Stations:

26

 
 

Qwaqwa 1994

 

 fqwaqwa.jpg

Population: (0,9%)

0,36 million

 qwaqwa.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,1%)

1 040 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

789 (9,3 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

156

 
 

Other Personnel:

87

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 032

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

457

 
 

Police Stations:

5

 
 

Old South Africa 1994

 

 foldrsa.jpg

Population: (56%)

23,34 million

 saps2.jpg

 

Land Surface: (86%)

1 052 073 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

94 267 (10,6 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

17 790

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

112 057

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

248

 
 

Police Stations:

885

 

Situation after Amalgamation : New South African Police Service : 1995

 

New South Africa 1995

 

 fnsa.jpg

Population: (100%)

41,7 million

 saps.jpg

 

Land Surface: (100%)

1 219 090 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

120 083 (10,5 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

20 236

 
 

Other Personnel:

1 070

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

141 389

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

347

 
 

Police Stations:

1 123

 

(b)and(c) Information regarding the given questions, is not retrievable and no record could be found. It must be noted, that when all the police agencies amalgamated, they were all using different systems, therefore, the recorded they used during the amalgamation process, relating to the staffing establishment, is not available on PERSAL. The annual reports were prepared separately and such information could not be found. The earliest annual report made, was in 1994 and such information was not reported at the time.

10 October 2017 - NW2545

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1940 on 6 October 2016, did the Primrose Police Station receive their two visible policing vehicles by 31 March 2017; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will they receive their two vehicles; (2) Has the Primrose Police Station receive their three additional visible policing members; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will they receive them; (3) What is the current number of visible policing members at the Primrose Police Station?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Primrose Police Station received two vehicles for visible policing.

(1)(a) Not applicable.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

2. Yes, the Primrose Police Station receive three additional visible policing members.

(2)(a) Not applicable.

(2)(b) Not applicable.

3. There are currently 80 visible policing members at the Primrose Police Station.

.

10 October 2017 - NW2428

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) How was a certain official (name and details furnished) appointed to a certain position (details furnished) when he was not in possession of the required security clearance certificate; (2) has the certificate been issued in the interim; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The official was appointed in the position of the Western Cape’s Crime Intelligence Head, in terms of, inter alia, Regulation 45(9) of the South African Police Service’s Employment Regulation, 2008. Appointments to the level of Senior Management Service (SMS), such as the appointment of the official under discussion, were also at the time regulated by the National Instruction 4 of 2010 (Appointments to posts on salary levels 13 to 15), which made provision for the appointment of a person, on condition that such person submits an application for the issuing of a security clearance, of at least up to the level of secret.

2. The official has been issued with a security clearance at the level of Top Secret, with effect from 1 December 2016.

10 October 2017 - NW2333

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What (i) are the criteria for and (ii) factors are taken into account when deciding on the determination of a police station as being at (aa) Colonel level or (bb) Brigadier level and (b) what resource allocation implications does either determination result in?

Reply:

(a)(i) A web-based application system has been developed to calculate the number of human resource posts, per level, that are required to perform the duties associated with police stations. The system is called the Theoretical Human Resource Requirement (THRR). The system was developed, whereby ratio analyses and standard times were established for the activities or tasks performed at police stations. Direct work measurement, in the form of time studies and activity sampling, as well as indirect work measurement, in the form of analytical estimates, was used to determine standard times for these policing activities or tasks. The determining of a human resource allocation for police stations in the South African Police Service (SAPS), is a dynamic process, which is influenced by various factors (variables), the internal environment, the external environment as well as taking contingency factors (i.e. absence/leave from duty) into account.

The level of the station commander is determined according to the job weight range (calculated theoretical ideal number of posts) associated with the level of a station commander post. A benchmark exercise was conducted to determine a correlation between the THRR system and the Equate Job Evaluation System, which is utilised for the grading of posts in the broader public service and the outcome thereof, indicates a high correlation (96%) between the two systems. The table below depicts the job weight ranges for station commander level, as determined by the THRR and Equate Job Evaluation Systems:

STATION COMMANDER LEVEL

JOB WEIGHT RANGE THRR

JOB WEIGHT RANGE EQUATE SYSTEM

 

LOWER LIMIT

UPPER LIMIT

GRADE (PUBLIC SERVICE ACT)

GRADE (POLICE SERVICE ACT)

MINIMUM

MAXIMUM

             

8 – Captain

36

90

8

BAND C (Captain)

454

506

10 - Lieutenant Colonel

91

180

9

BAND D (Lieutenant Colonel)

507

559

     

10

 

560

611

12 – Colonel

181

360

11

MMS Band (Colonel)

612

663

     

12

 

664

716

13 – Brigadier

361

Higher

13

SMS1 Band (Brigadier)

717

769

(ii)(aa)(bb) The weight and grading of the post of a station commander (Colonel and Brigadier included) and the lower-level command structure, is based on the evaluation of various factors including crime, environmental factors and policing activities. These will have a definite impact on the factors considered:

      • Developments in the regulatory framework – in relation to changes to the legislation of the country (By-laws, Traffic Ordinance, Amendments to Acts/Statutes and all other applicable legislation, that will have a direct impact on policing at local level);
      • Environmental developments/factors - New developments in the country in the external environment, for instance: the migration rate, increasing unemployment rate, mushrooming of informal settlements, the integration of undocumented people into the population density factor and residential and business developments, are constantly having an impact on policing methods and human resourcing at local level;
      • Organisational developments – in relation to the need to enhance service delivery at local level;
      • Management needs – in relation to functions that must be added at local level policing to ultimately enhance service delivery;
      • Norms, per type of crime and patterns;
      • Contingency allowances – rest allowances and absenteeism;
      • Demographic layout of a police station area - urban/rural/urban rural mix settlement types;
      • Infrastructure in a police station area;
      • Area size of a police area;
      • Population dynamics;
      • Police station infrastructure; and
      • Distances travelled to courts/places of safety/health and forensic laboratories/mortuaries and correctional facilities.

The annual application of the THRR for police stations, is essential to determine the personnel requirement in a standardised method. This is, however, affected by the fixed establishment (FE), which is purely dependent on the availability of funds, in terms of the current budget and the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). Currently, the SAPS is not able to fund the theoretical requirements for police stations, due to budgetary constraints.

(b) Minimum human resource implication at a Colonel level is 181 personnel and the maximum is 360 personnel. The minimum human resource implication at a Brigadier level is 361 and higher.

Most of the police stations are barely capacitated at their minimum human resource requirement, due to budgetary constraints e.g. a Colonel police station which requires a minimum of 181 personnel, is currently capacitated at 150.

An analysis of a three year comparison of police stations’ THRR, must be conducted. Police stations, whose results are calculated above the upper limit of its assigned category, after a period of three consecutive years, must be considered for upgrading. The rule is that police stations must at least be capacitated to the maximum of their current category, before they can be considered for upgrading (bottom-up approach). Due to the fact that the SAPS is not receiving additional posts, most of the qualifying police stations are upgraded without meeting this requirement (top-down approach), hence the majority of police stations are not capacitated at their minimum requirements.

 

10 October 2017 - NW2608

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1)In light of the arrest of people in the well-known incident (details furnished) by police officers from the Sinoville police station, what criteria does the SA Police Service (SAPS) apply in terms of the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977, when this incident is compared to the incident in which a certain person (name and details furnished) was shot by a certain SAPS member, but the specified SAPS member was not arrested by the specified police station, although they were aware of the identity of the SAPS member; (2) (a) what is the reason and (b) what criteria were applied in the decision not to arrest a certain person (name and details furnished) for assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm; (3) whether he will make a statement regarding the matter?

Reply:

1. In reference to the stated incident, two suspects were apprehended by members of the public, immediately after the incident occurred, whilst the other two suspects were apprehended by members of the Sinoville Police Station. The fifth suspect, subsequently handed himself over to the Sinoville Police Station. All five suspects were profiled and three were found to have no prior, or pending cases against them. A charge of assault, with the intention to cause grevious bodily harm (GBH), was opened and registered at the Sinoville Police Station, Sinoville CAS 41/08/2017.

The suspect, Mr Marakalla, who was a member of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF), reported that he was the victim of an attempted hijacking during which he used his firearm to shoot at the alleged hijackers. A charge of attempted murder was opened and registered at Sinoville Police Station, Sinoville CAS 175/08/2017. Mr Marakalla was profiled and found to have no prior, or pending cases against him. The case docket was fully investigated and handed over to the Senior Public Prosecutor (SPP) to issue a J175 (apprehension of suspect). Mr Marakalla has been charged and the court date has been set for 5 October 2017.

It needs to be mentioned that each criminal case is assessed on its own merits in terms of prevailing circumstances. This implies that two separate cases cannot be compared to each other.

2. Prior to a person being arrested, it is essential that a proper investigation should be conducted in order for the case to be referred to the SPP and placed on the court roll. Deputy Minister Mduduzi Manana was arrested on Thursday, 10 August 2017 and appeared at the Randburg Court on the same day.

3. The South African Police Service cannot respond on behalf of the aforementioned Minister.

10 October 2017 - NW2355

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Police

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1042 on 13 June 2017, why are there no individuals of Lieutenant-General rank listed as under suspension at the time of compilation of the reply; (2) were Lieutenants-General Richard Mdluli and Riah Phiyega omitted from the list; if so, why were they omitted?

Reply:

(1) The reply did not include Lieutenant General Mdluli and General Phiyega, however, the response with regards to the above managers, was provided in question 1042, which specifically requested such details, at the time and a reply was provided.

(2) Yes, Lieutenant General Mdluli and General Phiyega’s suspension details, were provided in other questions, which were dealt with simultaneously in question 1042, which specifically requested their suspension details.

10 October 2017 - NW2780

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Police

(1) How many sectors does the Elsburg Police Station have; (2) how many (a) officers for visible policing and (b) vehicles are there for (i) each sector, (ii) charge office and (iii) other policing function; (3) (a) what is the shortage of (i) officers for visible policing and (ii) vehicles at the station and (b) by what date will the station receive their full complement of officers for visible policing and vehicles?

Reply:

1. The Elsburg Police Station has three sectors.

(2)(a) The police station has 81 visible policing members.

(2)(b)(i) One vehicle has been allocated to each sector.

(2)(b)(ii) One vehicle has been allocated to the Community Service Centre.

(2)(b)(iii) One vehicle is utilised for other policing functions.

(3)(a)(i) According to the fixed establishment, the Elsburg Police Station has a surplus of 12 members within the visible policing environment.

(3)(a)(ii) The Elsburg Police Station does not have a shortage of vehicles.

(3)(b) The Elsburg Police Station has a surplus of 12 members, within the visible policing environment. By the end of October, one vehicle will be provided to the Elsburg Police Station.

10 October 2017 - NW2280

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What is the total number of firearms or weapons that the security industry is currently in possession of and (b) how many of those firearms or weapons are illegal?

Reply:

(a) The PSiRA and SAPS Central Firearm Registry previously embarked on an audit of the Firearm Registry’s database in respect of security businesses. This audit focused on the different categories or classes of security service providers where the use of firearms are more prevalent, such as the general guarding sector, assets in transit services, reaction services, close protection and the anti-poaching sector.

Whilst PSiRA plays a role in assisting with the control of firearms within the industry, the ultimate control responsibility lies with the office of the Central Firearms Register (CFR) of the South African Police Service (SAPS) who is responsible for not only considering firearm license applications, but also monitoring compliance in terms of the Firearms Control Act.

The scope of the audit primarily focused on identifying the security business from the 8 345 institutions licensed for firearms by the Central Firearms Register. From the audit conducted, PSiRA identified 3 340 security businesses licensed for firearms. Although the audit did have some limitations, it revealed that of the 122 788 firearms that were licensed to the 8 345 institutions, 101 612 (83 %) thereof were licensed to the private security industry.

Firearm control within the private security industry is high on the agenda of both PSiRA and SAPS. Following on from a Memorandum of Agreement signed between the two entities, a firearms sub-committee has been established to improve firearm control within the industry. The sub-committee is currently implementing the following:

  • Database integration and access to both entities;
  • Enhancing the institution database to include coding for all security businesses licensed for firearms in order to extract the details of these businesses more accurately and timeously;
  • Sharing of information between the two entities and reporting any changes in relation to registration statuses, addresses, investigations, etc. of security businesses by either entities; and
  • Joint inspections and operations.

10 October 2017 - NW2338

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Police

(1)With reference to his reply to question 2544 on 25 November 2016, what was the position of a certain person (name furnished) in the KwaZulu-Natal division of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) prior to the resignation; (2) were there any provincial heads of the DPCI in place prior to the 2016 appointments; if not, what leadership capacity existed in the DPCI in each province; if so, on what legislative basis were they appointed?

Reply:

1. The Provincial Head: Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), KwaZulu-Natal.

2. Yes, provincial heads were appointed in each province.

10 October 2017 - NW2549

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1483 on 13 June 2016, what is the current status of the 77 police officers who failed their firearm competency tests; (2) (a) what is the total number of police officers at the Boksburg North Police Station and (b) how many of them have (i) attended and (ii) failed their firearm competency test since 1 January 2017?

Reply:

(1) 52 members have been declared competent in their firearm competency. The remaining number of members are awaiting the call–up instruction.

(2)(a) Boksburg North Police Station have 138 members.

(2)(b)(i) 31 members attended their firearm competency test, since 1 January 2017.

(2)(b)(ii) 0 members failed their firearm competency test, since 1 January 2017.

10 October 2017 - NW2335

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to the briefing meeting convened by Acting Crime Intelligence Divisional Commissioner Major-General Mokushane with component heads on 13 June 2017, (a) what are the (i) ranks and (ii) operational positions of certain persons (names furnished) who accompanied him and (b) what was the purpose of their attendance at the meeting?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) At the time of the meeting, held on 13 June 2017, the ranks and operational positions of the members in question were as follows:

Colonel Smanga Simelane

Section Commander: Crime Intelligence Cluster Commander, Orlando West

Colonel Feroz Khan

Section Commander: Counter Intelligence Investigations, Head Office

(b) Both the officers attended the meeting on the instruction of the then Acting Divisional Commissioner: Crime Intelligence, Major General PM Mokushane. This was an open meeting for all personnel of the Division: Crime Intelligence (all ranks).

10 October 2017 - NW2183

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his reply to question 1208 on 13 June 2017, what are the (a) full names and (b) official designation of each of the other Very Important Persons (VIP) that have been protected by the VIP Protection Unit from 1 April 2017 to date?

Reply:

(a) The information that has been requested cannot be provided, as it is sensitive in nature and its disclosure may compromise safety and security.

(b) The information that has been requested cannot be provided, as it is sensitive in nature and its disclosure may compromise safety and security.

10 October 2017 - NW2542

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of (a) officers and (b) vehicles for visible policing does the Rabie Ridge Police Station in Gauteng have for each of its sectors; (2) What is the minimum number of (a) officers and (b) vehicles for visible policing that are supposed to be allocated to any sector; (3) (a) What is the shortfall of (i) officers and (ii) vehicles for visible policing at the specified station and (b) by what date will the specified station receive its full complement in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) Four members per shift, for five sectors.

(1)(b) Two vehicles per shift, for five sectors.

(2)(a) Two members per shift, per sector.

(2)(b) One vehicle per sector, for five sectors.

(3)(a)(i) Short-fall officers – six

(3)(a)(ii) Vehicles – three

(3)(b) Members will be allocated upon receipt of the 2017/18 new recruits. The station has currently four vehicles in the garage, no new allocations will be made for this financial year.

26 September 2017 - NW2407

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

Has (a) the SA Police Service or (b) any investigative body or entity in his department (i) obtained and/or (ii) analysed any closed circuit television (CCTV) camera footage relating to the (aa) break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice in March 2017, (bb) break-in at the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s offices at Parliament in April 2017, (cc) break-in at the headquarters of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation in July 2017, (dd) break-in at the National Prosecuting Authority offices on Church Square in July 2017, (ee) robbery at the office of the Chief Prosecutor at the Pretoria Magistrate’s Court and/or (ff) break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces in July 2017; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b) There is a team, consisting of members from the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) and the Gauteng Provincial Detectives, who are working together on the cases.

(aa)(i) Closed Circuit Television Camera (CCTV) footage was obtained, relating to the break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice, in March 2017.

(aa)(ii) Yes, the CCTV footage was analysed. One suspect was arrested and the case is remanded in court.

(bb)(i) CCTV footage was obtained, relating to the break-in at the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) offices at Parliament, in April 2017.

(bb)(ii) Yes, the video footage was analysed, but no suspect could be identified.

(cc)(dd)(ee)(i)(ii) The CCTV camera footage was obtained, viewed and analysed, in respect of break-ins at the DPCI Head Quarters, the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) offices in, Church Street and the Chief Prosecutor’s office, in the Pretoria Magistrates Court.

The analysis led to the arrest of two suspects who broke into the offices of NPA and the Pretoria Magistrates Court. The two suspects are in custody and will appear in the Pretoria Regional Court, on 21 September 2017.

The suspects at DPCI offices were wearing balaclavas and gloves, which made it impossible to identify them positively. The Detectives are following up on clues.

(ff)(i) CCTV footage was obtained relating to the break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces (NCOP), in July 2017.

(ff)(ii) Yes, the CCTV footage was analysed, but the quality of the image is such that the identity of the male individual could not be established.

26 September 2017 - NW2409

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

Has (a) the SA Police Service or (b) any investigative body or entity in his department identified any suspects in relation to the (i) break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice in March 2017, (ii) break-in at the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s offices at Parliament in April 2017, (iii) break-in at the headquarters of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation in July 2017, (iv) break-in at the National Prosecuting Authority offices on Church Square in July 2017, (v) robbery at the office of the Chief Prosecutor at the Pretoria Magistrate’s Court and/or (vi) break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces in July 2017; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (aa) have they taken a statement from the suspects in question and (bb) by what date are they expecting to make an arrest?

Reply:

(a)(b) There is a team, consisting of members from the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) and the Gauteng Provincial Detectives, who are working together on the cases.

(i)(aa) One suspect was arrested, on 24 March 2017 and his warning statement was taken.

(i)(bb) Not applicable.

(ii)(aa) No suspects have been identified thus far. Fingerprint results were negative.

(ii)(bb) The case docket has been closed, as undetected as a suspect has not yet been identified. However, should new evidence emerge, the docket will be reopened for investigation.

(iii)(aa)(bb) No suspects have been identified as of yet. The three suspects, seen on the video footage, were wearing balaclavas and gloves, and cannot be positively identified.

(iv)(v)(aa)(bb) Two suspects were arrested and their warning statements were taken. The suspects appeared in court, on 7 August 2017. The case was remanded to 21 September 2017, for further investigation and they were not granted bail.

(vi)(aa) No suspects have been arrested, thus far. However, positive fingerprint results have been obtained.

(vi)(bb) The matter is still under investigation.

26 September 2017 - NW2406

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

Is the (a) SA Police Service or (b) any investigative body or entity in his department currently considering the (i) break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice in March 2017, (ii) break-in at the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s offices at Parliament in April 2017, (iii) break-in at the headquarters of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation in July 2017, (iv) break-in at the National Prosecuting Authority offices on Church Square in July 2017, (v) robbery at the office of the Chief Prosecutor at the Pretoria Magistrate’s Court, (vi) break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces in July 2017 and/or (vii) any sub-set of the specified incidents as linked; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b) There is a team consisting of members from the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) and the Gauteng Provincial Detectives, who are working together on some of the cases.

(i) The break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice, in March 2017, is being investigated by the South African Police Service (SAPS), under Midrand CAS 567/03/2017.

(ii) The break-in at the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) offices at Parliament, in April 2017, is being investigated by the SAPS, under Cape Town Central, CAS 1351/04/2017.

(iii)(iv)(v) The team, consisting of members from the DPCI and the Gauteng Provincial Detectives, is investigating break-ins at the offices of DPCI, Silverton; NPA offices, in Church Square and the Chief Prosecutor’s office, in Pretoria Magistrates Court.

(vi) The break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces (NCOP), in July 2017, is being investigated by the SAPS, under Cape Town Central CAS 1823/07/2017.

(vii) The break-ins at the NPA offices, in Church Street and the Chief Prosecutor’s office, in Pretoria Magistrates Court, are linked. The suspects, who were arrested for the NPA Church Street break-in, are the same suspects who broke-in at the Chief Prosecutors Office at the Pretoria Magistrates Court. The arrested suspects are in custody and will appear in the Pretoria Regional Court, on 21 September 2017.

26 September 2017 - NW2358

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of vehicles were assigned to the Durban North Police Station (i) in the (aa) 2015-16 and (bb) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017 and (b) what number of the specified vehicles were fully operational at the start of each specified (i) financial year and (ii) time period?

Reply:

Station

(i)aa)

(i)(bb)

(ii)

(b)(i)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

 

Vehicles Assigned in 2015/2016 F/Y

Vehicles Assigned in 2016/2017 F/Y

Vehicles Assigned Since 1 April 2017

Number of Specified Vehicles Fully operational at Start of 2015/2016

Number of Specified Vehicles Fully operational at Start of 2016/2017

Number of Specified Vehicles Fully operational at Start of 1 April 2017

             

Durban North

32 (four new vehicles)

31 (three new vehicles)

33 (four new vehicles)

32

31

33

11 September 2017 - NW2192

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of vehicles do the SA Police Services currently have in each province, (b) what number of the specified vehicles are (i) currently operational, (ii) currently non-operational and (iii) about to be boarded and (c) what is the (i) ideal ratio of police members to vehicles and (ii) current ratio of police members to vehicles?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(c)(i)(ii) On 5 August 2017, the information was as follows:

 

(a)

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)

(c)(i)

(c)(ii)

Province

Number of vehicles

Operational

Non-operational

About to be boarded

Ideal ratio

Current ratio

EASTERN CAPE

5 533

4 288

918

327

4.51:1

3,87

FREE STATE

3 381

2 579

462

340

4.51:1

3,85

GAUTENG

9 216

7 185

1 377

654

4.51:1

3,92

HEAD OFFICE

5 751

4 744

778

229

4.51:1

4,84

KWAZULU-NATAL

7 164

5 564

1 174

426

4.51:1

3,81

LIMPOPO

3 074

2 540

466

68

4.51:1

4,34

MPUMALANGA

2 554

2 110

243

201

4.51:1

4,61

NORTH WEST

2 947

2 419

338

190

4.51:1

3,63

NORTHERN CAPE

2 227

1 762

337

128

4.51:1

3,8

WESTERN CAPE

6 100

5 234

701

165

4.51:1

3,81

Grand Total

47 947

38 425

6 794

2 728

4.51:1

4.03

The above excludes the bulk of vehicles still to be delivered during 2017/2018.