Questions and Replies

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16 October 2023 - NW2910

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Finance

What mitigation strategies has the National Treasury put in place to ensure that fiscal consolidation efforts in 2024 do not further hamper the ability of government departments to deliver crucial services?

Reply:

Since the 2020 MTBPS fiscal consolidation measures have been driven by multiple goals: to eliminate the primary fiscal deficit and stabilize debt; support economic growth through fiscal stability and a composition of spending focused on investment rather than consumption; and to protect funding for the most vulnerable. Accordingly, the budget has retained the percentage spent on the social wage at around 60 per cent of the total budget. Government intends to broadly maintain this approach.

In the meantime, and to limit the negative effects of weaker-than-anticipated revenues and more difficult financial conditions, proposed savings and cost-cutting measures are meant to protect the ability of government to sustain the spending on its key service-delivery priorities.

16 October 2023 - NW2954

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Given that the 6th Administration has been in the Executive since 2019, (a) on what dates were performance agreements for (i) him and (ii) his Deputy Ministers concluded and (b) what are the relevant details of how each specified performance agreement was performed?

Reply:

The 2019-2024 Executive Performance Agreement was entered into in November 2020 following an agreement on Ministerial priorities and activities with the President.

Key elements of the Performance Agreement are included in Annual Performance Plans by the department and entities. Detailed quarterly reports are provided to the portfolio committee setting out performance on key areas, as shaped by the performance agreements.

In addition, the annual reports of the Department and Entities for the following years provide further details:

  • 2020/21
  • 2021/22
  • 2022/23

In May 2023, a review of the department's priorities and the executive's performance occurred, resulting in a revised priorities agreement for the 2023/24 financial year. These have mainly been incorporated in or are reflected in the Annual Performance Plan of the dtic-group for 2023/24.

-END-

16 October 2023 - NW3024

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What total number of months did (a) an import duty investigation take pre-COVID19 from the day the investigation was published for public comment to when the SA Revenue Service either changed the duties or the application was rejected and (b) it take in the 2022-23 financial year; (2) (a) what total amount did the cost in delay cause in duties not collected and (b) how much duties were collected where there was no local production in a specified financial year? NW4091E

Reply:

During the course of the current Administration, two factors required a different approach to the administration of applications and recommendations relating to trade.

First, the new industrial strategy framework was based on a more careful coordination of trade policy measures with industrial policy. This required

1. the development of masterplans and sector growth strategies in particular sectors

2. consideration of the principles underpinning masterplans to other sectors, and

3. consideration of the impact of a trade measure on the growth of the industry and on downstream sectors.

Second, COVID-19 caused a slowdown in world trade, disruption in global supply chains and changing trade flows. Some of these had significant impacts on consumer prices. Following Covid-19, four other shocks affected the domestic market: the July 2021 unrest, the April 2022 floods and the war in Ukraine. The latter in particular saw a spike in food, fuel and fertiliser prices. A number of proposed trade measures were put on hold to enable the effects of extraordinary events to be considered and monitored, and for normal market conditions to return, except where circumstances required otherwise.

The timeframes therefore for introducing specific trade measures have changed, based on the above. Certain tariff recommendations were therefore only considered at a later stage than would have applied in the past. A supplementary reply will be compiled to the question, to provide specific examples of these.

In respect of the costs associated with timing of trade measures, there is no agreed methodology to calculate costs. While local industries may benefit from a tariff increase, importers may see it as a cost. Public policy carefully balances a number of policy goals in setting of trade policy.

More research will be conducted in the form of impact assessments trade measures, including tariff increases. This research may provide additional information that relate to the question above and the results will be made available publicly once these are available.

-END-

16 October 2023 - NW2877

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) What total number of (a) magistrates and (b) prosecutors (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2023 have been (aa) criminally charged and (bb) convicted in each specified financial year; (2) what (a) were the criminal charges in each case and (b) number of each specified charge was raised?

Reply:

(1)(2). The breakdown detail for Magistrates is as follows:

1(A) MAGISTRATES-

(i)Year.

(aa) charged.

(bb) convicted.

(2) (a) what charges.

(b) Numbers of each specific charge.

2018

1

1

Crimen injuria.

1 Charge.

 

1

Passed Away

Corruption.

1 Charge

 

1

Acquitted

Exceeding the Speed Limit.

1 Charge.

2019

1

Pending

Corruption.

1 Charge.

2020

1

Pending

Driving a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol.

1 Charge.

2021

1

Withdrawn.

Theft.

1 Charge.

 

1

Resigned.

Driving a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol.

1 Charge.

(ii) 01 April 2023

1

Withdrawn.

Assault.

1 Charge.

 

1

Pending.

Defeating the ends of justice.

1 Charge.

.

(1)(2) The total number of prosecutors criminally charged and convicted in the past five financial years and the current year, since 01 April 2023, is 41. The breakdown detail, which includes number of counts / charges where relevant, is as follows:

PROSECUTORS

Charges

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

Total

Defeating the ends of justice

   

1

1

1

 

3

Reckless and negligent driving

   

1

(Plus defeating ends of justice)

     

1

Driving under influence

2

(1:C & 1:A)

   

1

   

3

Fraud

1

1

(1: C)

 

1

2

(1 includes money laundering,S5 & S6 POCA)

 

5

Corruption

1

4

(1:C)

2

4

(2:C)

2

2

(1:A)

15

Rape / SO

     

1

1

2

1 (x2 counts)

4

Domestic Violence

       

1

1

2

Stock Theft

         

1

1

Unlawful possession of firearm and discharge

         

1

1

Theft

   

1

convicted

1

   

2

Assault

     

1 (GLD) - mediated

   

1

Malicious injury to property

     

1 (GLD)

Includes Assault - mediated

   

1

Bribery

1

1

       

2

Total

41

Legend: C = Convicted; A = Acquitted; M = Mediated

16 October 2023 - NW2920

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What were the reasons that the National Treasury failed to anticipate and include the 7,5% public sector wage increase agreed to recently in the main 2023-24 Budget and (b) on what basis was the 0% increase modelled?

Reply:

The mis-alignment between the budget process and the finalisation of wage agreements has been a feature of South Africa’s public sector remuneration system for many years.

The budget included a 1.5 per cent pay progression increase for civil servants in 2023, which was the baseline that existed at the time, taking into account the projected change in staffing numbers. The National Treasury excluded any further adjustments to compensation of employees to steer clear of pre-empting the outcome of the wage settlement in 2023/24. This was in line with the discussions at the Public Service Labour Summit on collective bargaining, that was convened and attended by both Government and Labour Unions, from 28 to 31 March 2022. It was also agreed in the Summit that parties will work towards the alignment and the timing of the annual budget process, with the PSCBC wage negotiations process for public service employees.

An ideal situation moving forward, as agreed with labour unions, would be to conclude the wage negotiations processes before the finalisation of the budget for the subsequent financial year to ensure the credibility of the fiscal framework.

16 October 2023 - NW3064

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) (a) What total number of disciplinary cases within the Public Service are currently outstanding and (b) how long have the specified cases been outstanding? and (2) (a) what total number of public servants within the Public Service are currently on suspension with full pay, (b)(i) how long has each specified public servant been on suspension with full pay and (ii) at what total cost to the (aa) State and/or (bb) public purse and (c) what total number of such public servants occupy a senior position within the Public Service?

Reply:

The response is based on the FOSAD reports submitted by National and Provincial departments for quarter one of the 2023/2024 financial year.

1. (a) What total number of disciplinary cases within the Public Service are currently outstanding?

The total number of disciplinary cases outstanding are 3265 cases.

(and)

(b) How long have the specified cases been outstanding?

The oldest outstanding cases is from 2016 with the latest case being from June 2023.

2. (a) What total number of public servants within the Public Service are currently on suspension with full pay?

417

Questions (b) and (c) are responded to in the table below:

(b)(i) How long has each specified public servant been on suspension with full pay? See table below

(b)(ii)At what total cost to the (aa) State and/or (bb) public purse? See table below

(c) What total number of such public servants occupy a senior position within the Public Service?

A total number of 42 public service employees occupy a senior position within the Public Service. See areas highlighted in yellow.

PROVINCE

b(i) Duration

b(ii)Cost of suspension(ii)

(c) Levels

  1. Eastern Cape
     

Public Works

141 days

R391 980,00

12

DEDEAT

17/05/2023

R35 033,50

8

       
  1. Free State
     

Education

30 days

R83 053, 19

3

 

30 days

Not disclosed

9

 

30 days

Not disclosed

8

Provincial Treasury

8 days

R38 070, 07

13

       

Health

21 days

R 24 187,51

7

 

28 days

R26 348

7

 

21 days

R9 324,00

3

 

24 days

R19 309,81

7

 

53 days

R29 001,07

5

 

221 days

R106 301,00

5

       

Sport, Arts and Culture, and Recreation

46 days

R26 798,22

5

Public Works and Infrastructure

400 Days

R1 201 587,83

13

 

267

R89 311,50

3

       

DESTEA

29 Days

R28 735.58

8

 

29 Days

R21 498.03

7

       

Community Safety, Roads and Transport

79 days

R294 957,56

14

 

39 days

R146 549,91

14

Social Development

40 days.

R44, 308,28

5

 

13 days.

R48, 335,57

5

       

Human Settlement

1047 days

R3 586 959,10

13

 

385 days

R838 716,68

11

 

301 days

R1 217 194,50

14

 

243 days

R869 916,69

14

 

308 days

R1 157 369,40

14

 

347 days

R 805440.22

11

 

223 days

R687 832,79

12

 

131 days

R483 661,32

14

 

223 days

R230 609,33

9

 

54 days

R286 394,30

14

       

Office of the Premier

4 months

R 530 660,00

15

       

Agriculture & Rural Development

790 days

R2 333 620, 22

13

 

86 days

R119 586,96

6

  1. Gauteng
     

Social Development

8 months

R115 635,76

3

 

1846 days

R1 403 025,75

7

 

1144 days

R2 792 245,86

12

 

778 days

R890 859,02

9

 

11 days

R6 352,00

5

 

71 days

R23 719,87

6

 

30 days

R10 936,29

4

 

377 days

R1 371 630,32

14

Infrastructure Development

04/02/2022

R415 895,25

15

 

04/02/2022

R408 974,25

14

 

04/02/2022

R270 357,00

12

 

04/02/2022

R295 147,50

12

 

04/02/2022

R408 974,25

14

       
  1. Mpumalanga
     

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

26/05/2023

R73 554,37

13

Social Development

240 days

R32 858,00

7

Health

24 months

R4 294 695,89

12

 

18 months

 

6

 

16 months

 

7

 

5 months

 

13

 

11 months

 

11

 

4 months

 

5

 

3 months

 

7

 

8 months

 

7

 

7months

 

2

 

7 months

 

2

 

7 months

 

2

 

2 months

 

7

 

2 months

 

9

Office of the Premier

23 months

R278 341,39

14

Education

2 months

R76 836,00

7

 

20 days

R100 470,00

13

 

10 months

R221 441,07

PL1

 

6 months

R152 063,50

5

 

8 months

R321 566,04

PL3

 

4 months

R109 263,00

PL1

  1. Limpopo

13/02/2020

R381 537,00

2

COGTA

01/05/2023

Not disclosed

8

Health

970 days

R316 696,00

2

 

970 days

R321 423,00

2

 

970 days

R321 423,00

7

 

970 days

R783 585,00

2

 

240 days

R53 591,10

4

 

104 days

R37 957,50

9

 

90 days

R9 067,00

13

 

120 days

R27 388,80

2

 

120 days

R31 949,64

3

 

950 days

R3 217 486,00

12

 

150 days

R101 534,80

5

Transport and Community Safety

60 days

Not disclosed

5

       
  1. KwaZulu-Natal

COGTA

821 days

R1 240 091.68

8

 

821 days

R981 717,9

7

 

792 days

R2 803 223.35

13

       

EDTEA

14/02/2022

R482 027,47

15

       

Education

45 months

R826 188,75

6

 

44 months

R1 095 402,00

7

 

26 months

R653 724,50

7

 

21 months

R657 557,25

8

 

21 months

R1 048 995,78

11

 

40 months

R362 780,00

2

 

20 months

R702 455,00

9

 

15 Months

R373 432,50

7

 

17Months

R304 419,00

6

 

13 Months

R364 854,75

7

 

10 Months

R376 582,50

9

 

13 Month

R379 681,25

8

 

10 month

R477 653,80

11

 

12 month

R421 473,00

9

 

11 month

R124 723,50

3

 

8 month

R267 366,00

9

 

9 month

R389 571,75

7

 

8 months

R128 524,00

8

 

8 months

R386 504,00

11

 

6 Month

R148 578,00

7

 

6 Months

R162 498,00

7

 

6 months

R150 057,00

7

 

6 months

R147 840,00

7

 

4 Month

R108 332,00

7

 

4 month

R190 243,00

10

 

4 month

R100 547,00

7

 

2 Months

R63 542,00

8

 

2 Months

R51 536,00

7

 

1 Month

R65 708,50

12

 

5 Months

R169 731,85

8

 

5 months

R152 890,00

8

 

5 Months

R410 823,10

12

 

1 Month

R6 360,25

Intern

 

1 Month

R18 809,81

8

 

1 Month

R32 836,00

8

 

1 Month

R33 623,75

8

 

1 Month

R26 932,25

7

 

1 Month

R40 398,26

8

 

1Month

R56 778,75

11

 

16 Month

R154 836,00

10

       

Health

279 Days

R 108 910,70

3

 

70 Days

R 57 898,00

7

 

544 Days

R 142 620,00

2

 

150 Days

R 95 082,69

7

 

150 Days

R 97 398,40

7

 

122 Days

R 81 880,00

6

 

156 Days

R 166 063,00

9

 

149 Days

R 106 601,93

7

 

127 Days

R 552 676,25

12

 

127 Days

R 206 861,25

9

 

127 Days

R187 102,50

9

 

105 Days

R62 056,11

6

 

77 Days

R68 233,00

7

 

25 Days

R32 240,00

Not disclosed

 

96 Days

R78 730,50

8

 

133 Days

R 192 891,70

10

 

93 Days

R 34 847,25

2

 

564 days

R 412 364,22

5

 

564 days

R 412 364,00

5

 

251 days

R203 497.98

7

 

203 days

R171 619. 83

7

 

30 days

R24 517. 83

7

 

30 days

R16 582.75

5

 

30 days

R16 582.75

5

 

719 Days

R 3 419 697,50

15

 

278 Days

R1 025 983

14

       

Office of the Premier

20/01/2023

R3 510 519,00

15

 

20/01/2023

R3 025 003,00

13

 

13/06/2023

R35 000,00

9

 

13/06/2023

R28 000,00

8

 

29/12/2022

R384 132,00

11

Social Development

09 months

R 269 640.00

SW-7

       

Transport

2 months

R199 659,00

12

 

2 months

R199 659,00

9

  1. Northern Cape

Sports, Arts and Culture

29-Mar-23

R 12 915,12

3

Economic Development and Tourism

608 days

R2 855 247,04

15

 

295 days

R105 161, 60

3

 

175 days

R390 094,26

11

       

Education

742 days

R726 556, 25

PL

 

591 days

R471 972,00

PL2

 

494 days

R416 475,50

PL1

 

479 days

R425 678,50

PL2

 

228 days

R105 932,75

L5

 

228 days

R112 430, 05

L5

 

415 days

R673 175, 75

L10

 

57 days

R10 523

L4

 

43 days

R34 765,00

PL1

 

141 days

R152 199,50

L9

 

181 days

R207 603,00

PL1

 

70 days

R53 864,50

PL1

 

219 days

R165 084,50

PL1

Health

25months

R1 055 366,50

9

 

3months

R57 395,00

5

 

3months

R48 424,00

5

 

5 months

R78 495,60

3

 

2 months

R30 109, 19

4

 

2months

R408 030,42

OSD

 

157 days

R265 790,02

4

       

Roads and Public Works

4 months

R63 299, 00

5

 

4 months

R60 555,00

5

       

DAERDLR

36 months

R1 243 207, 52

8

       
  1. North-West
     

COGTA

79 days

R165 504,00

13

Community Safety

156

R115 764,35

6

Community Safety

71

R38 290 ,74

5

Economic Development

407 Days

R501 088,1

7

Education

161Days

R55 219, 50

2

 

212 days

R180 295, 50

PL 1

 

181 days

R234 628, 42

PL4

 

121Days

R35 977,50

6

 

121Days

R112 694,31

7

 

51 days

R29 548.62

PL1

 

12Days

R114 296.50

14

 

5Days

R96 850,00

13

       

Health

1148 Days

R4 742 038,59

12

 

1016 Days

R934 778,27

7

 

1016 Days

R1 207 441,13

9

 

1016 Days

R807 786,02

7

 

1016 Days

R1 198 167,36

8

 

885 Days

R656 293,87

12

 

430 Days

R1 019 954,29

12

 

252 Days

R625 308,17

12

 

484 Days

R339 262,96

13

 

58 Days

R50 083,24

6

       

Office of the Premier

234 Days

R62 602,58

13

       

Public Works and Roads

14 Months

R1171426,34

13

 

03 Month

R 241 298,40

13

 

03 Month

R 251 472,36

12

       
  1. Western Cape

159 days

R40 905,31

9

Cultural Affairs

61 days

R185 202,22

13

DSD

126 days

R60 688,11

4

 

123 days

R120 922,46

8

 

92 days

R91 759,43,

8

 

42 days

R20 102, 70

4

Health

34 days

R30 117,98

5

 

34 days

R37 815, 08

7

 

11 days

R17 428,95

9

       

Local Government

86 days

R297 890, 36

13

PO&CS

30days

R18 832,63

5

 

53 days

R30 190,40

5

       

Education

79 days

R94 996,95

8

 

376 days

R579 113,31

9

       

National Departments

  1. Duration

(ii)Cost of suspension(ii)

(c) SMS

Department of Sports, Arts and Culture

57 days

R63 757,00

12

Statistics South Africa

157 days

R104 626,22

6

Department of Water and Sanitation

72 days to date

R 65 193,52

9

South African Police Service

19/06/23 to date

R7 201,67

Band A

 

28/06/23 to date

R1 800,42

Band A

 

11/05/23 to date

R40 956,97

Band A

 

11/05/23 to date

R39 267,82

Band A

 

11/05/23 to date

R31 289,08

Band A

 

16/05/23 to date

R71 626,38

Band D

 

16/05/23 to date

R59 595,18

Band C

 

09/06/23 to date

R16 801,79

Band A

 

01/06/23 to date

R22 588,00

Band A

 

12/06/12 to date

R14 510,64

Band A

 

27/06/23 to date

R3 054,87

Band A

 

09/06/23 to date

R31 598, 08

Band D

 

27/06/23 to date

R2 476,24

5

 

21/06/23 to date

R7 637,18

Band A

 

15/05/23 to date

R35 709,04

Band A

 

23/05/23 to date

R31 398,13

Band A

 

08/06/23 to date

R26 715,85

Band C

Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

475 days

R1 808 694,58

14

Department of Correctional Services

06/03/23 to date

R16 224,26

5

 

01/10/21 to date

R318 368,41

15

 

01/10/21 to date

R198 286,86

13

 

01/10/21 to date

R202 323,61

13

 

28/03/23 to date

R11 211,14

5

 

21/12/23 to date

R30 332,84

5

 

13/01/23 to date

R64 218,58

5

 

20/02/23 to date

R41 812,38

5

 

09/01/23 to date

R45 021,07

5

 

13/01/23 to date

R83 013,09

5

 

12/04/23 to date

R61 503,12

5

 

11/05/23 to date

R25 737,53

5

 

19/05/23 to date

R21 619,53

5

 

11/05/23 to date

R25 737,53

5

 

29/05/23 to date

R34 168,90

7

 

25/05/23 to date

R18 531,02

5

 

11/04/23 to date

R104 305,24

7

 

31/03/23 to date

R66 884,65

5

 

31/03/23 to date

R66 884,65

5

 

31/03/23 to date

R47 951,78

5

 

03/03/23 to date

R43 066,54

5

 

26/04/23 to date

R33 458,79

5

 

23/03/23 to date

R10 389,48

6

 

12/01/23 to date

R23 278,29

5

 

12/01/23 to date

R23 278,29

9

 

04/04/23 to date

R15 442,52

5

 

14/06/23 to date

R8 580,82

5

 

05/06/23 to date

R19 219,73

6

 

19/05/23 to date

R12 062,58

7

 

13/04/23 to date

R55 012,41

5

 

18/04/23 to date

R42 309,60

5

 

26/05/23 to date

R34 538,10

6

 

27/03/23 to date

R51 439,54

5

 

10/05/23 to date

R27 351,37

8

 

10/05/23 to date

R59 860,31

7

 

15/03/23 to date

R89 799,05

5

 

06/02/23 to date

R69 959,80

5

 

09/12/22 to date

R46 842,31

5

 

23/12/22 to date

R102 820,03

8

 

03/11/22 to date

R79 405,60

7

 

14/10/22 to date

R159 059,07

12

 

04/11/22 to date

R41 812,38

5

 

31/03/23 to date

R35 577,62

7

 

18/01/23 to date

R29 659,32

7

 

12/02/23 to date

R13 402,65

5

 

20/06/23 to date

R6 919,10

5

 

13/03/23 to date

R36 509,56

5

 

04/04/22 to date

R61 370,04

7

 

06/06/23 to date

R19 219,73

5

 

28/06/23 to date

R1 609,15

7

 

23/06/23 to date

R4 532,19

5

 

03/04/23 to date

R69 763,86

7

 

11/04/23 to date

R64 994,59

7

 

06/06/23 to date

R23 317,40

9

 

19/05/23 to date

R22 134,28

5

 

20/05/23 to date

R22 542,66

5

 

26/04/23 to date

R50 740,08

5

 

26/04/23 to date

R50 740,08

5

 

26/04/23 to date

R77 466,28

8

 

26/04/23 to date

R35 395,89

5

 

15/05/23 to date

R62 700,96

CB4

 

08/02/23 to date

R64 191,65

7

 

07/03/23 to date

R86 431,41

6

 

20/03/23 to date

R106 809,57

9

 

09/11/22 to date

R61 400,32

5

 

28/11/22 to date

R63 243,25

5

 

28/10/22 to date

R71 800,29

5

 

15/09/22 to date

R45 687,48

5

 

15/08/23 to date

R43 063,69

5

 

08/08/22 to date

R57 8880,49

5

 

04/08/22 to date

R61 401,07

5

 

30/07/22 to date

R40 593,81

5

 

10/11/21 to date

R60 493,81

5

 

10/11/21 to date

R16 619,18

5

 

08/03/22 to date

R5 283,71

5

 

01/12/22 to date

R40 858,32

7

 

17/11/22 to date

R11 525,09

5

Department of Higher Education and Training

268 days

R669 775,10

13

 

268 days

R452 247,80

10

 

268 days

R386 108,91

10

 

268 days

R498 682,36

12

 

268 days

R342 747,83

3

 

219 days

R442 432,35

12

 

214 days

R528 714,22

12

 

212 days

R529 806,28

13

 

154 days

R181 011,85

9

 

126 days

R115 549,22

1

 

104 days

R42 345,90

3

 

107 days

R222 559,50

12

Government Printing Works

21/12/22 to date

R162 885,75

6

 

20/02/23 to date

R353 010,96

12

 

02/06/23 to date

R19 351,29

5

 

02/06/23 to date

R21 508,71

8

 

02/06/23 to date

R21 508,71

5

 

02/06/23 to date

R16 858,93

4

 

31/03/23 to date

R97 880,21

7

 

01/11/22 to date

R229 284,61

7

 

24/06/22 to date

R695 917,58

12

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

103 days

Not disclosed

9

 

103 days

Not disclosed

5

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

825 days

R435 901,45

5

 

542 days

R2 125 501,17

SMS

 

548 days

R1 433 339,75

SMS

Department of Mineral Resources

305 days

R466 639,00

10

National Prosecuting Authority

456 days

R1 649 743,22

14

 

456 days

R557 892,50

9

 

348 days

R633 012,57

10

 

340 days

R456 438,05

9

 

248 days

R533 730,65

9

 

249 days

R297 745,23

9

 

220 days

R896 251,08

12

 

214 days

R264 509,32

7

 

218 days

R349 459,07

7

 

210 days

R261 794,20

9

 

200 days

R194 784,77

8

 

199 days

R421 653,71

11

 

192 days

R177 220,80

8

 

165 days

R208 316,06

9

 

127 days

R396 187,24

12

Department of Public Enterprise

342 days

R2 083 033

16

Department of Public Service and Administration

989 days

R4 374 399,82

15

 

211 days

Not disclosed

11

Department of Science and Innovation

983 days

R1 921 430.00

11

END

13 October 2023 - NW2906

Profile picture: Wolmarans, Mr M

Wolmarans, Mr M to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What (a) is the status of the projects that are yet to reach financial close and sign agreements under the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme aside from the three projects of Karpowership and (b) steps has his department taken to resolve some of the challenges faced by Karpowership’s three projects?

Reply:

With regard to 1 (a) the status is as follows:

• Two (02) projects reached Legal Close on 30 August 2023 and are working towards reaching financial close;

• Project Agreements for two (02) additional projects are being prepared for legal Close. One (01) of the 2 projects is experiencing port access issues which are currently being attended to in conjunction with the relevant authorities; and

• One (01) project is experiencing difficulties with its project economics and bankability.

With regard to 1 (b) in so far as the department’s role in assisting all the projects including Karpowership, we have engaged, to the extent permitted by law, the Ports Authority to facilitate logical resolution of the port access challenges. What remains is for the projects to engage the relevant authorities and finalise all the outstanding matters.

13 October 2023 - NW2871

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of children on substance abuse (a) in the Republic and (b) in each province have been assisted through the rehabilitation programmes of her department in the past three years?

Reply:

a) For the period under review, the Department provided treatment services to 5 966 children. This number only relates information on children who received treatment services through public treatment centres as guided by the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse.

The actual number is likely to be higher given the prevalence of illegal drugs in South Africa (Act No. 70 of 2008). The Department does not have information on children who receive treatment services from other treatment facilities, including privately-owned rehabilitation centres.

b) The following are the number of children who received treatment services in the past three years, per province:

Province

Financial Years

Children who Received Treatment Services

Eastern Cape

2020/2023

259

Free State Province

2020/2023

51

Gauteng

2020/2023

1889

Kwazulu-Natal

2020/2023

214

Limpopo

2020/2023

150

Mpumalanga

2020/2023

112

North West

2020/2023

156

Northern Cape

2020/2023

52

Western Cape

2020/2023

3 083

13 October 2023 - NW3036

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will furnish Mrs C Phillips with the (a) prescribed monthly returns with accurate and correct information and data from 1 July 2020 to 31 July 2023 from a certain plant (details furnished) situated on Portion 71 of the Farm Groenkloof, in the Bojanala District, North West, (b) audited annual financial reports and/or financial statements for the specified period, reflecting the balance sheet and profit and loss account, (c) annual reports detailing the extent of the holder’s compliance with the provisions of section 2(d) and (f), the charter contemplated in section 100 and the prescribed social and labour plan, as required by section 28(2) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002 (MRPD Act); if not, (i) why not, (ii) what steps will he take to ensure compliance by the specified company and (iii) what actions will be taken against Saferro Chrome and Resources Limited for non-compliance with the provisions of section 26(3) and 28(2) of the MPRD Act; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The Department does not have information on the owner of Portion 71 of the Farm Groenkloof in the Bojanala District, North West. Saferro Chrome and Resources Limited are not the holder of a mining right or mining permit. Section 28 (2) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 applies to the rightful holders of a mining right or mining permit.

  1. Please refer to the above paragraph
  2. Please refer to the above paragraph
  3. Please refer to the above paragraph

The National Environmental Management Act, 107 of 1998 (NEMA) provides for regulation of activities which cannot be undertaken without an Environmental Authorisation, such listed activities includes mining and prospecting activities. If any person conducts a listed activity without an approved Environmental Authorisation they are committing an offense in terms of section 49A of NEMA and can be prosecuted following an investigation.

 

 

13 October 2023 - NW2995

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

Regarding the Enterprise Investment Programme bank account that the Republic has opened jointly with the United States African Development Foundation (USADF), (a) what total amount in funds have been deposited into the bank account by (i)(aa) the USADF and (bb) her department and/or acting Director-General Mchunu and (ii) were the date(s) of the specified deposit(s) and (b) from which budget did the money come?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development has not opened any bank account with the United States African Development Foundation (USADF).

In relation to (a) this question is not applicable as no bank account has been opened.

In relation to (i) (aa) this question is not applicable as no bank account has been opened.

In relation to (i) (bb), this question is not applicable as no bank account has been opened.

In relation to (b), this question is not applicable as no bank account has been opened.

13 October 2023 - NW3118

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What measures has she put in place to ensure that time frames set for clearing the housing backlog are met, particularly in the rural parts of the Republic?

Reply:

The following measures have been put in place to ensure that the time frames for clearing the housing backlog are met, particularly in the rural parts of the Republic:

  • The Department has a multi-year development plan that outlines projects that are going to be funded and implemented over a number of years. The multi-year development plan is a bottom-up plan, which is informed by the need for housing that is identified at the local municipality ward level, escalated to a consolidated local, district municipalities and finally provincial level. The plans cover projects that respond to the housing needs in both urban and rural areas. The multi-year development plan gets disaggregated into annual business plans with clear timelines to achieve the project deliverables and budgets to fund the projects.
  • The Department funds the Provincial annual business plans through the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) and the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grants (ISUPG) to fund the development of human settlements projects and upgrade informal settlements.

The Department also funds the Metropolitan Municipalities’ annual business plans through the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) and the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grants (ISUPG) to fund the development of human settlements projects and upgrade informal settlements.

  • To ensure that the plans are implemented within the set time frames and allocated budgets, the Department conducts ongoing monitoring and oversight in all projects under implementation.

13 October 2023 - NW3023

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the fact that the Masters’ Offices around the country continue to be dysfunctional to a degree that is totally unacceptable, which all have ceased to function, with waiting time for essential documents now reaching months (details furnished), what are the (a) details of what he intends to do to turn the situation around and (b) timeframes thereof?

Reply:

The Master’s Offices deals with not only deceased estates, but also bankruptcy matters, registration of Tests, Curatorships as well as the Guardian’s Fund.

Performance on all of the above is measured against targets set in terms of the Masters’ Annual Performance Plan.

The statement that all the Master’s Offices are dysfunctional and have ceased to function is wide as there are no specifics provided in order for the Master to respond to same.

However, in a bid to improve service delivery, the Master’ Branch together with the ICT Branch, have been developing an Online Deceased Estates Solution to address challenges experienced by our clients when reporting an estate with the Master.

The Online Deceased Estate System seeks to enable South African citizens to submit their deceased estate applications online, giving the user the ability to register an estate from the comfort of their home or office without the need physically to visit any Master’s Office or Service Point of the Master. This system was already successfully piloted in 3 Master’s Offices (Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Town) and it is envisaged that it will be launched into live production during October 2023 in five Master’s Offices (Johannesburg, Durban, Cape Town, Pretoria and Thohoyandou).

Together with this Online System, a QR-coded appointment letter has been developed. This appointment letter is being sent electronically to the applicant instantly, upon approval of the appointment by the Assistant Master. The client then merely downloads the appointment letter, which can now be verified by scanning the QR-code, and then proceed with the administration of the estate. This alleviates the challenges experienced with collecting of original appointment letters at the Master’s Office, delays caused by postal services not being available, relevant institutions causing delays due to first awaiting verifications of appointments letters from the Master and the need for requesting copies from the Master in this regard. QR-coded appointment letters have already been implemented with great success in three Master’s Offices (Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Town) and the rest of the country is to follow suit as soon as possible.

Though the Master’s Offices are hard hit by challenges such as loadshedding, struggling to obtain files from off-site facilities, understaffing, budget cuts and constant network challenges, we are forever striving to implement solutions to better service delivery and ease the frustrations of not only the citizens, but also the employees of the Branch, who are working in a challenging environment.

13 October 2023 - NW2780

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the current status of the implementation of the Framework for the Professionalisation of the Public Sector?

Reply:

Since the approval of the Framework for the Professionalisation of the Public Sector by Cabinet in October 2022 the following has happened:

1. A Directive on its implementation has been drafted to guide Departments on how to go about implementing it. The Directive will be issued before the end of the current calendar year and will cover areas related to revisions on recruitment and employment management, human resource development, and performance management;

2. A partnership approach has been adopted where the DPSA is coordinating the implementation of the Framework with the support of the Public Service Commission (PSC), and the National School of Government (NSG);

3. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has been engaged to provide technical support, as well as the development of an independent monitoring capacity for the implementation. To this end, a senior technical assistant resource has been appointed to specifically work on the Professionalisation Framework;

4. In August 2023, the Cabinet endorsed the guiding principles for revising the Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) specifically for Heads of Departments (HoDs). This revised PMDS will be implemented from the next cycle (1 April 2024) and will prioritise productivity, introduce objectivity, and provide a direct link between the performance of the institutions and that of the HODs and DDGs;

5. The revised set of Public Service Regulations has been consulted and a SEIAS assessment conducted. These will provide clarity on a number of definitions to improve interpretation and compliance.

From the above, it should be noted that the Framework comprises multiple pillars, with targeted interventions for phased implementation, which have commenced.

End

13 October 2023 - NW3006

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)With reference to the old Somerset West Police Station located on Somerset West Main Road, which is currently used by the Department of Correctional Services, what (a) progress has been regarding filling and moving the files that are filling the ceiling space and (b) are the details of the relevant precautions that have been taken given that the building is a national monument;

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Correctional Services (DCS) is not able to dispose of any public records in its custody, be it records of deceased members or deceased offenders due to the moratorium on the destruction of records imposed by Cabinet as per Circular 02 of 1998 due to non-completion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

As a result, files and records are inundating DCS offices.

On numerous occasions, DCS has written to the Department of Sports, Arts and Culture (DSAC) requesting them to approach Cabinet to consider partial upliftment of the moratorium on the destruction of records that are not related to the TRC and feedback is awaited in this regard.

As at, 18 September 2023, 50 boxes have been filled with inactive files and stored in one of the offices with the intention of moving them to the Regional Office.

As at, 19 September 2023, boxes of inactive files have been moved to appropriate archive facilities at the Regional Office, the active files will remain at the Community Corrections office in Stellenbosch.

The remainder of the inactive files will be packed in boxes and moved to the Regional office with the due date of 30 September 2023, for the project to be completed.

(b) The Minor renovations of the building listed below are underway using own resources. However, it must be indicated that major renovations must be done by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. Cleaning all ceilings
  2. Prepare internal walls, doors and doorframes.
  3. Prepare wooden floors and tiled floors
  4. Prepare and varnish all wooden window frames
  5. Paint internal walls, doors and doorframes
  6. Repair Electrical and DB board
  7. Repair Plumbing
  8. Repair broken door handles and locks
  9. Replace broken window panes and restore old putty
  10. Prepare walls and external window frames
  11. Repair broken tar floors
  12. Clean court house wall
  13. Steel frames
  14. Kitchen cupboard
  15. Steel cabinet for gas
  16. Shift all IT cabling into trunking
  17. Replacement of Carport nets
  18. Removing of stored files

DPWI RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. Replace gutters and facial boards
  2. Replace broken asbestos roof sheets
  3. Repair roof leaks

The target date for the completion of all minor renovations by DCS is
01 December 2023.

2. (a) Somerset Community Corrections office serves 07 Areas.

Namely: Macassar, Somerset West, Lwandle / Nomzamo, Strand, Gordons Bay, Sir Lowry’s Pass and Faure Farms.

(b) The current caseload is 183 with 25 parolees reporting to the office on a weekly basis for consultations and interventions.

3. (a) There are no parolees registered in the system of Community Corrections without confirmed addresses. Confirmation of address is a pre-requisite for admission.

(b) Regular monitoring and Monthly Special Monitoring:

Special monitoring is to check on absconders and also to ensure that parolees comply with their conditions;

  • Involve relevant stakeholders such as South African Police Service (SAPS), Community Policing Forums (CPFs), Neighbourhood Watch members and Private Security with Special Monitoring as part of stakeholder’s engagement and visibility in the communities;
  • Arrange employment where possible;
  • Parolees in programmes by stakeholders (Badisa, Help Me Network and Helderberg Cares) e.g. Parenting, Drug Addiction Programmes etc;
  • Hope Prison Ministry (Restorative Justice Awareness Program);
  • Social work programmes presented are Life Skills, Anger Management, Sexual Offenders Treatment Program, Group work and Individual interviews; and

These activities are aimed at ensuring that reintegration into the communities becomes successful.

 

END.

13 October 2023 - NW2833

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details of the emergency response plans and contingency measures that her department has implemented to assist farmers to mitigate the impact of fires on farmlands; (2) (a) by what means have the specified plans been communicated to the farming community and (b) what is the budget allocation for the implementation of the plans?

Reply:

1) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) implements the following mitigation measures to address the risk of veld fire:

  • DALRRD compiled contingency plans which were shared with provinces for their consideration and implementation during fire emergencies;
  • The South African Weather Services (SAWS) issues monthly seasonal weather forecasts and highlights the dry winter season with the possibilities of fires being experienced during the forecast period. SAWS also issue early warning information in case of high possibilities of fires and this information is shared with provinces to alert the farming communities of possible fires; and
  • DALRRD shares the advisories on the issued winter forecasts and early warnings, as well as strategies for farming communities to be able to respond once they experience such fires. These allow the provinces and farming communities to put measures in place to address the risks associated with the predicted weather forecast for the fire season such as creation of fire breaks and moving their livestock to barred lands during possible fires.

(2) (a) The contingency plans are discussed and shared with all provinces through emails, virtual and physical meetings. The plans are also discussed during farmers’ days outings.

(b) Both national and provincial departments of agriculture have operational funding to implement these plans. In cases where the hazard leads to a disastrous situation, DALRRD approaches the National Disaster Management Centre for financial assistance.

13 October 2023 - NW2927

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether prior to appointing a certain person (name and details furnished) he was informed that the specified person (a) was allegedly earning a salary as the Chief Operating Officer of a state-owned entity while also serving as a member on the entity’s Board of Directors and/or (b) allegedly submitted a fraudulent court order clearing him of misconduct while serving in a certain position (details furnished); if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) No, I was not informed.

b) No, I was not informed.

13 October 2023 - NW2755

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What total amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her pay for printed copies of the integrated annual reports in the (aa) 2020-21, (bb) 2021-22 and (cc) 2022-23 financial years, (b) who were the suppliers in each case and (c) what total number of copies of the report were printed (i) in each case and (ii) in each specified financial year?

Reply:

a) (i) In September 2020, the Department of Social Development engaged in a three-year (202-2023) contractual agreement with LSM Communications through a competitive bidding process. The service level agreement encompasses a range of crucial services, including editing, design, layout, printing, finishing, packaging, labelling, and the timely delivery of essential documents such as the DSD Strategic Plan, Annual Performance Plans, Operational Plans, Annual Reports, and CDA Annual reports and the quarterly Social Budget Bulletin.

The rationale behind opting for a multiyear printing contract was rooted in the Department's historical practice of separately commissioning these materials from different service providers. This approach presented several challenges, including difficulties in maintaining uniformity in the visual presentation of these documents, in line with the Department's branding guidelines and guidelines on compilation of strategic plans and APPs. Additionally, it often led to delays in the procurement process due to the Department's limited internal capacity.

By adopting a multiyear contract with LSM Communications, the Department has successfully mitigated the risk of potential delays and inconsistencies in meeting critical deadlines for tabling these strategic documents. The arrangement has not only streamlined the process but also ensured a consistent and timely production of these materials. Furthermore, it has saved the department from the year-in year out cost escalation that comes with inflation adjustment, hence the price is fixed for the duration of the contract.

(ii) (aa) (b) (bb) (c) (cc) (i) (ii) for DSD Refer to the table below:

Financial Year

Total Amount in Rands

Names of suppliers

Total number of copies

(aa) 2020-2021

R372 612,54

LSM COMMUNICATIONS

100 X printed copies

1 X electronic flip book,

3 X Large font,

20 X Braille

(bb) 2021-2022

R372 612,54

LSM COMMUNICATIONS

100 X printed copies

1 X electronic flip book,

3 X Large font,

20 X Braille

(cc) 2022-2023(Yet to be printed by the same Service Provider for the same amount

R372 612,54

LSM COMMUNICATIONS

100 X printed copies

1 X electronic flip book,

3 X Large font,

20 X Braille

(ii) (aa) (b) (bb) (c) (cc) (i) (ii) for the Central Drug Authority refer to the table below:

CDA

Financial Year

Total Amount in Rands

Names of suppliers

Total number of copies

(aa) 2020-2021

R372 612,54

LSM COMMUNICATIONS

100 X printed copies

1 X electronic flip book,

3 X Large font,

20 X Braille

(bb) 2021-2022

R372 612,54

LSM COMMUNICATIONS

100 X printed copies

1 X electronic flip book,

3 X Large font,

20 X Braille

(cc) 2022-2023 Not yet printed and will be printed separately by the CDA since it is not part of the existing contract

Not yet printed and will be printed separately by the CDA since it is not part of the existing contract

Not yet printed and will be printed separately by the CDA since it is not part of the existing contract

Not yet printed and will be printed separately by the CDA since it is not part of the existing contract

(ii) (aa) (b) (bb) (c) (cc) (i) (ii) for SASSA refer to the table below:

Financial year

Total Amount in Rands

Names of suppliers

Total number copies printed

2020-21

R296 457.11

45th Media

  • 1000 A4 copies.
  • 1 A3 (large font size).
  • Braille Copy
  • 5 CDs.

2021-22

R237 971.17

45th Media

  • 1000 A4 copies.
  • 1 A3 (large font size).
  • Braille Copy
  • 5 CDs.

2022-23

R203 821.40

Shereno Printers

  • 1000 A4 copies.
  • 1 A3 (large font size).
  • Braille Copy
  • 5 CDs.

(ii) (aa) (b) (bb) (c) (cc) (i) (ii) for NDA refer to the table below:

Financial year

Total Amount in Rands

Names of suppliers

Total number copies printed

2020-21

R147 501-00

Atlarela Consulting

300

2021-22

R78 699-00

Add Markable

300

2022-23

   

The plan is to print 250 copies

13 October 2023 - NW3106

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether, with reference to the widespread reports that hundreds of thousands of grant recipients did not receive their payments for September 2023 due to technical glitches with the new payment system at the SA Postbank, all the monies have now been paid out; if not, why not; if so, what (a) measures have been put in place to prevent the nonpayment from happening in October 2023 and (b) are the full relevant details of how the new payment system at Postbank was tested before going live?

Reply:

All September 2023 payments to social grants recipients were made.

a) Postbank has assured the Department that they have implemented the following measures in relation to the October 2023 social grants payments preparations.

  • Enhanced monitoring mechanisms to track the payment process in real-time.
  • Strengthened their technical infrastructure to handle higher transaction volumes, ensuring swift and uninterrupted disbursements.
  • Engaged specialists for a comprehensive review of their system and to continuously rectify any vulnerabilities.

(b) The new payment system was tested in accordance with acceptable industry system testing protocols including Component Integration Testing (CIT), System Integration Testing (SIT) and Industry Testing prior to system go-live.

National Assembly written Reply: 3106 of 2023

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

13 October 2023 - NW2874

Profile picture: Makesini, Ms M

Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) progress has been made in the construction of Talana Hostel in Tzaneen, Limpopo Province and (b) are the main reasons for the delays in completing the Hostel?

Reply:

a) As advised by the Limpopo Department of Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs (COGHSTA), the Talana Hostel has been identified as a priority for upgrading. The planning, design and packaging phase was recently concluded for the hostel.

It consists of fifty-five (55) residential block units with residents comprising of families and individuals- The hostel is highly overcrowded.

It is envisaged that the old/ existing hostel blocks as well as the informal houses erected on the site will be demolished and redeveloped into three-storey medium density walk-up buildings comprising of one and two-bedroomed units. The upgrades will be effected via the Community Residential Units programme.

b) There is no delay in the upgrading of the hostel. The planning phase has just been concluded and the province is in the process of procuring an implementation agent that will take the project further in preparation for the construction upgrade.

13 October 2023 - NW3093

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Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 5 on 9 March 2023 by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that the Department of Public Enterprises will cease to exist after the 2024 national elections when the new administration is sworn into office (details furnished), his department has taken any steps to start the handover process of the entities that currently report to him; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The process to reconfigure Government is underway. DPE participates in this process which is coordinated by Presidency. The steps to start the handover / reconfiguring of Government will be informed by this process.

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not approved

Jacky Molisane PJ Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

13 October 2023 - NW2859

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, considering that rhino poaching has been declared a national priority crime, he shares a joint corresponding database with the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment and the Minister of Police, of all rhino poachers (a) who have been arrested and (b) details regarding the (i) trial and custody status, (ii) convictions, (iii) prison status and (iv) the associates of each person in order to understand the linkages and/or networks; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) There is currently no database that is shared among the Ministers. The National Integrated Strategy to Combat Wildlife Trafficking (NISCWT) recently adopted by Cabinet requires law enforcement agencies to nationally consolidate all forms of wildlife compliance and enforcement efforts, which would enhance the sharing of the information, cases enrolled and identification of linkages, networks, and associations.

Various stakeholder forums have been established between the NPA, DFFE, SAPS and DPCI inter alia, addressing the sharing of information and identification of linkages and association between persons and networks, to institute organised crime prosecutions and to centralise cases, where an association or linkages between the accused persons have been identified.

With respect to information about people who have been arrested, law enforcement agencies are unable to share information relating to cases under investigation that link perpetrators to other persons or networks. The identification of networks and persons involved in these offences are intelligence-based. This information can only be shared between the law enforcement agencies with an investigative mandate, viz. DFFE, SAPS and the DPCI.

Working together, law enforcement agencies managed to achieve a conviction rate of 99% in relation to the cases involving rhino poaching over the five (5) year period. This is significant considering the challenges associated with identifying and arresting perpetrators of these heinous crimes.

(b) With respect to (i) trial and custody status; (ii) convictions of rhino poachers, the NPA manually monitors the progress on rhino related cases. The table below represents rhino poaching cases that were manually collated for the past five years:

YEAR

NUMBER OF FINALISED CASES

NUMBER OF CONVICTIONS

NUMBER OF ACQUITTALS

NUMBER OF PERSONS CONVICTED

2019-20

41

41

0

59

2020-21

42

40

2

63

2021-22

46

46

0

72

2022-23

65

65

0

94

2023-24

21

21

0

28

TOTAL

215

213

2

316

With respect to (iii) prison status and (iv) associates of each person, the NPA can report that in the first six months of this financial year (2023-24), and through the efforts of the relevant law enforcement agencies and the NPA, 28 offenders were convicted. The majority of sentences were custodial.

END

13 October 2023 - NW3059

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With major financial institutions, both local and international, intending to stop the financing of fossil fuel-powered energy projects with the next decade and Eskom projecting that it will only end its fossil fuel dependence by 2050, how does the Government intend to obtain low-cost concessionary funding for the green energy economy during a time when the Republic is still dependent on coal for the basic functioning of its electricity supply; (2) Whether the Government envisages to intervene directly in the financing of fossil fuel projects, when private finance institutions exit the sector; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

This question should be referred to the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment.

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

13 October 2023 - NW2814

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1509 on 11 May 2023, what (a) are the reasons for the inability of the surveillance measures in the livestock biosecurity to detect the outbreak of African horse sickness and report the carnage and (b) steps has she and/or her department taken to address the challenges of dying horses faced by horse farmers; (2) whether she intends to compensate those farmers who lost their horses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3229E

Reply:

1.(a) Both passive and active surveillance for African Horse Sickness (AHS) are

implemented within the AHS controlled area. Our passive surveillance has been shown to be excellent for the rapid detection of AHS outbreaks within the AHS controlled area while our active surveillance provides assurance that no outbreaks circulate undetected in these areas. In the AHS infected zone, only passive surveillance is implemented as active serological surveillance using unvaccinated sentinel animals would be impractical and even detrimental to the welfare of such horses in this zone.

b) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development periodically sends out media alerts which encourages all horse owners to protect their animals from AHS by shielding horses from midges by stabling them two hours before sunset to at least two hours after sunrise; using registered insecticides and repellents to repel and kill midges; keep horses away from areas where midges breed such as damp and wet areas as well as refrain from moving infected horses to other properties or uninfected horses to properties where there are cases of AHS.

Reporting challenges regarding AHS outbreak in the Eastern Cape Province earlier in 2023 have been addressed with the relevant officials. The officials have indicated education and awareness was to be undertaken with farmers and reporting would be improved.

The map below shows the AHS controlled area consisting of the free, surveillance and protection zones vs the AHS infected zone.

(2) No. Compensation in terms of section 19 of the Animal Diseases Act,1984 (Act No. 35 of 1984) is only applicable for animals which have been destroyed under supervision of Veterinary Services pursuant to a control measure. Table 2 of the Animal Diseases Regulations R2026 of 1986 states that AHS infected horses shall be isolated for a certain period and destruction of infected horses is not prescribed. The horses mentioned in the question died and were not destroyed pursuant to any control measure or order. Section 19 of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 is therefore not applicable to these animals.

13 October 2023 - NW2972

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Mogale, Mr T to ask the MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

(1)(a) On what date will she pay an oversight visit to the Thembelihle housing project in Ward 58, Tshwane, which her department has erected without electrical services or any source of power provided for over a year, in order to get first-hand information on what is happening, (b) what are the reasons that the situation in Thembelihle has been allowed to reach the level in which it is and (c) what role has her department played in resolving the problems in Thembelihle; (2) whether she has found that the intervention measures that her department has put in place are appropriate and will resolve the challenges; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Date for oversight visit for Thembelihle Housing project has not been determined. Information about the oversight visit will be made available once it has been determined.

Thembelihle Project is one of the completed and tenanted social housing projects and was completed with all services including electrical services. The services were only disconnected by the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality due to default in payments of services as a result of rental boycott by residents.

(b)The primary reason for the current situation at Thembelihle is a result of the rental boycott that has been ongoing for over 5 years. The consequences of rental boycotts are the suspension of municipal services, lack of maintenance and non payment and default by the delivery agents on their senior debt covenants. All these factors ultimately expose any project to illegal invasion and hijacking thus posing a real threat to the sector’s stability.

(c) It must be restated that rent payment is a non- negotiable for sustainable social rental programme. Until now the approach by the Department has been to avoid evictions but to engage the tenants to start paying for their stay at Thembelihle. The evictions are only considered as a measure of last resort.

(2). On the 19 September 2023 the board of Yeast City Housing, the Social Housing Institution responsible for the management of Thembelihle, convened an urgent board meeting to consider amongst other matters the low levels of rent collection, the financial stability of the project, the possibility for business rescue and finding ways of restoring municipality services.

It must be noted that recently there has been a change of management at Thembelihle to try and turn around the current situation. The new management must be supported and given space to attempt to rescue the situation. A comprehensive report will be made available by the SHRA and Yeast City Housing which will allow for a more focused intervention.

13 October 2023 - NW2545

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What has she found was the estimated turnaround time for which an applicant has to wait for an approval of his or her application for the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grant; (2) whether, since the pandemic has been overcome, the SRD grant will be changed into a Basic Income Grant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1). The COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress (cSRD) operates differently to other grants in that applicants are assessed every month to determine if they meet the qualifying criteria. The estimated time a client has to wait each month for his grant to be assessed is 3 weeks or less (depending on the turnaround time for receipt of all databases).

The various databases from other organisations, which are used for the verification of clients are received from the 8th of each month. SASSA is only able to complete the verification process of all clients following receipt of all various databases which is usually by the 3rd week of the specific month. The approved clients are then paid in the following week.

(2). Given the ongoing vulnerability of the beneficiaries to hunger and poverty because of continuing high unemployment and the escalating food prices, the Department is proposing the extension of the cSRD until end of 2025/26 financial year, this will allow the Department to finalize the Basic Income Support (BIS) policy on a more permanent and sustainable intervention. DSD is intending to approach Cabinet to seek approval to publish the draft BIS policy for public comments in the current financial year.

 

13 October 2023 - NW2806

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2163 on 26 June 2023, she will indicate which specific (a) members of (i) her department, (ii) industry, (iii) research institutions and (iv) sector entities are involved in the Sector Energy Crisis Task Team and (b) criteria the farms and/or businesses in agriculture must meet to be taken into account for (i) reducing load shedding and/or load curtailment and (ii) grants from the Agro-Energy Fund for the construction of renewable energy infrastructure; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

(a)(i),(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Yes. Please refer to table 1 below.

Table 1(METTA)

MEMBER

ORGANISATION

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Mooketsa Ramasodi

Director-General, DALRRD (Chairperson)

[email protected]

Clinton Heimann

[email protected]

Nasele Mehlomakulu

[email protected]

INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES

Theo Boshoff

[email protected]

Wandile Sihlobo

[email protected]

Annelize Crosby

[email protected]

Kulani Siweya

[email protected]

Christo Van der Rheede

[email protected]

M Matlou

[email protected]

Dr S. Ntombela

[email protected]

Ferdi Meyer

[email protected]

LAND BANK

Mr T. Rikhotso

Chief Executive Officer / Land Bank

(b) (i),(ii) The focus of the Agro-Energy Fund is on energy intensive agricultural activities. These include irrigation, intensive agricultural production systems, and on-farm cold chain related activities. Criteria for accessing the Agro-Energy Fund as part of the measures to reduce the impact of load shedding on farming enterprises is as follows:

QUALIFYING CRITERIA

  • To be eligible, a company must be applying to implement an energy efficiency project or to implement a project that offsets electricity from the grid, through self-use renewable energy;
  • Only one application per entity or applicant will be considered;
  • No debt takeovers; debt settlements or refinancing;
  • South African citizens with a valid ID and/or registered business entity;
  • Must be 18 years and above;
  • The Applicant must be operating an Agricultural Business at the Primary/ Secondary level;
  • Applicants must demonstrate the capacity to utilize the energy requirements applied for;
  • The grant will not be eligible to fund any alternative energy project/transaction on a stand-alone basis BUT will always be utilised to blend with a loan from the Land Bank. Furthermore, the grant cap per category may not be exceeded, however, depending on the business’s ability to afford a loan, the loan component may exceed the threshold stated;
  • Smallholder, medium-scale, large-scale and mega commercial producers as defined;
  • Producers involved in energy-intensive farming enterprises including on-farm cold chain related activities;
  • Proof of land ownership or proof of access to land (e.g. Leases or PTOs – must be aligned to the term of the loan at the minimum);
  • Allocation to prioritize Women, Youth, People with Disabilities and Military Veterans;
  • Co-funding by DFIs, equity participants, private sector grants, other debt/equity programmes for the same purpose and project (sharing risks) is allowed if it forms part of the total project proposed. The process will be handled in-line with Land Bank policies and procedures;
  • Producers meeting the Credit policy, procedures and processes of the Land Bank; and
  • Product offering and product terms for the Agro-Energy Fund to be guided by the Land Bank Product Manual.

REQUIREMENTS

  • Operating entities - Financial statements for the last three years as a minimum if operating for more than 3 years (if available);
  • New entrants – will be assessed in-line with the cash flow projections of the proposed business;
  • Business Plan demonstrating the impact of the grant on the business’s operations, to be supported by cash flow projections of at least 24 months;
  • All the normal Land Bank requirements for the blended Agro Energy facility will apply;
  • Feasibility/ energy expert report determining the energy requirement and significant energy uses of the farm. This must include the Infrastructure design;
  • For existing farmers proof of historical energy consumption (three months municipality bill or equivalent) and for new entrants as per the energy expert requirements report;
  • Environmental authorisations (EIA/EA) where applicable (an EIA is not required for ground mount systems below 10MW and with a physical footprint of less than 1 ha. Rooftop systems, floating PV on dams etc. do not require EIA as they are on existing infrastructure. However, if the installations require activity clearance of vegetation or working off a watercourse might trigger the need for an EIA);
  • A generation license from NERSA where applicable in terms of the regulations;
  • Health and Safety requirements to be complied with;
  • Quotations for Capex requirements: Specifying the aftercare service, warranties, lifespan;
  • Certification of the service provider of choice as a qualified entity/individual for installation registered with relevant competent authorities e.g. South African Photovoltaic Industry Association (SAPVIA) https://www.sapvia.org.za/members-service-directory/ for the solar energy industry; as well as other similar bodies for the various other energy solutions that the fund will consider; and
  • Technical support pre and post installation: Possibly provided by DBSA (through DALRRD partnership with DBSA). The technical support will be used to obtain certification or confirmation that the installations meet the requisite standards and requirements.

(2) No, since the Ministerial launch of the fund was done on 29 August 2023.

13 October 2023 - NW2579

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Stock, Mr D to ask the Minister of Social Development

How (a) will the DSDTV material be packaged to make it more appealing and accessible to the youth to address socioeconomic challenges affecting them, such as substance abuse, teenage pregnancy and gender-based violence and (b) interactive will the platform be for the users?

Reply:

(a) Like their global counterparts, South African young people are increasingly using download sites to access video entertainment and social media sites as tools for communication and a source of news and information. Mobile data continues to be the most used means through which South African young people access the internet. Social network platforms such as Facebook, WhatsApp and twitter have become an integral part of everyday life with over 60% using social media as their primary source of information.

The current audio-visual platform caters to all South Africans, with specific focus on young people. Key features such as video-on-demand, live streaming, podcasts and children’s corner are all targeted at young people.

(b) Yes, the platform is interactive and participatory by enabling users to provide suggestions to ensure meaningful engagement and fresh content.

13 October 2023 - NW3022

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the fact that the Potchefstroom Magistrates Court has been unusable for well over a year, after the roof collapsed and portions of the building were condemned and noting that the court is meant to serve not only Potchefstroom, but also all surrounding areas and the Circuit Court (details furnished), what has he precisely done to (a) ensure that the sorry state of affairs is attended to and (b) expedite the obviously essential repairs?

Reply:

a) Attached is the mitigating operational plan of the court see Annexure (A).

b) The roof members – trusses, rafters, brandering etc. had decayed and this led to the collapse of the roof. The roof was not part of the original contractor’s scope of work for the repairs onsite.

The collapsed roof specification is now part of the scope of work which will be executed through a variation order. The variation order has since been approved on the 08 September 2023 by the DPWI and the contractor is currently on site undertaking remedial repairs.

REPLY:

OBJECTIVE

ACTIVITIES

TARGET DATE

PROGRESS (Daily)

Interim Court sittings arrangements

Daily court sittings

ongoing

There are Daily Court sitting

Court clerks are preparing the court rolls daily, and supplied to the

  • Information desk,
  • And Prosecutors.

01. Town Hall (JB Marks) 2 halls converted to 2 court rooms

:District and Regional Court sitting no in-custody inmates )

02. Ikageng Court

: Criminal District and Family, Civil

03. Ventersdorp

: Proceeds with normal Periodical Court & Regional court 2 sitting @ Ventersdorp

04. Children’s Court and adjacent judicial boardroom

: Children’s Court Domestic Violence and harassment

: Maintenance (Family Court and Civil)

 

05. High Court (Potchefstroom)

: District Criminal Court (Prisoners awaiting trial/ custody inmates)

:Regional Criminal Court (Prisoners

awaiting trial Custody inmates)

: Bail applications(Formal and Informal)

: First appearances and new cases

: Prioritised cases in custody awaiting trials

JB Marks Traffic Court- Traffic cases held at the court on Tuesday and Friday

Virtual setup for postponements

   

On the 6th September 2023 Meeting was held with Correctional Services for the possibility to have virtual court sitting (MS Teams) for awaiting trial detainees. Office space has been provided; Matter tabled to the management meeting, support staff and DEEC meeting. All parties gave their blessings

Logistics needed identified;

Laptop- to Utilise current ACM laptop and data application made for a pool phone

Court Roll

Outstanding Criminal roll as at 31 August 2023

On going

District Court 21.15% backlog

Court

Current court roll

Backlog

A

155

29

B

183

40

E

168

39

Ikageng

14

2

Regional Court 46.8 backlog

Court

Current court roll

Backlog

RC1

57

22

RC2

68

23

RC3

43

6

RC Ventersdorp

52

35

OBJECTIVE

ACTIVITIES

TARGET DATE

PROGRESS (Daily)

Facilities management:

Movement of staff from the offices with mould

Occupation of the available space on the 2nd floor

Office space occupied by DOJ in the building

Increase scope of work within the existing project - variation order approval

Completed

Completed

On going

On going

7 Officials were moved from the ground floor to the 2nd floor.

3 Regional Magistrates,3 district court Magistrates, 7 prosecutors, intermediary and ACM including support staff moved to the 2nd floor( renovated area)

Part of ground floor(not yet renovated)

1st floor( not yet renovated)

2nd floor( renovated)2 court rooms created at the Town Hall

The variation order was approved by the DPWI variation order committee on 08 September 2023.

The construction of the roof commenced on the 11 September 2023.

The contractor is currently busy removing the damaged roof and has ordered the new roof trusses to re-roof the building as of 15 September 2023

13 October 2023 - NW3134

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, in light of the allegations that prison officials in the Kutuma Sinthumule Correctional Centre are selling food to the inmates, any investigation had been initiated to determine the facts and veracity thereof; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, the officials in Kutuma- Sinthumule Correctional Centre are not selling food to inmates.

The allegations were found to be baseless as inmates received their daily ration as prescribed by the contract.

The kitchen in Kutuma-Sinthumule Correctional Centre (KSCC) provides daily rations to inmates as prescribed by the contract. Over and above what the kitchen provides on a daily basis, the kitchen also avails special meals on weekends and public holidays to inmates who can afford to buy meals. The proceeds of the sales thereof are channelled in sponsoring annual sports events for inmates.

END

REPLY:

(a) There is currently no database that is shared among the Ministers. The National Integrated Strategy to Combat Wildlife Trafficking (NISCWT) recently adopted by Cabinet requires law enforcement agencies to nationally consolidate all forms of wildlife compliance and enforcement efforts, which would enhance the sharing of the information, cases enrolled and identification of linkages, networks, and associations.

Various stakeholder forums have been established between the NPA, DFFE, SAPS and DPCI inter alia, addressing the sharing of information and identification of linkages and association between persons and networks, to institute organised crime prosecutions and to centralise cases, where an association or linkages between the accused persons have been identified.

With respect to information about people who have been arrested, law enforcement agencies are unable to share information relating to cases under investigation that link perpetrators to other persons or networks. The identification of networks and persons involved in these offences are intelligence-based. This information can only be shared between the law enforcement agencies with an investigative mandate, viz. DFFE, SAPS and the DPCI.

Working together, law enforcement agencies managed to achieve a conviction rate of 99% in relation to the cases involving rhino poaching over the five (5) year period. This is significant considering the challenges associated with identifying and arresting perpetrators of these heinous crimes.

(b) With respect to (i) trial and custody status; (ii) convictions of rhino poachers, the NPA manually monitors the progress on rhino related cases. The table below represents rhino poaching cases that were manually collated for the past five years:

YEAR

NUMBER OF FINALISED CASES

NUMBER OF CONVICTIONS

NUMBER OF ACQUITTALS

NUMBER OF PERSONS CONVICTED

2019-20

41

41

0

59

2020-21

42

40

2

63

2021-22

46

46

0

72

2022-23

65

65

0

94

2023-24

21

21

0

28

TOTAL

215

213

2

316

With respect to (iii) prison status and (iv) associates of each person, the NPA can report that in the first six months of this financial year (2023-24), and through the efforts of the relevant law enforcement agencies and the NPA, 28 offenders were convicted. The majority of sentences were custodial.

END

13 October 2023 - NW2955

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) By which date will the amended proclamation be signed as the Special Investigating Unit has since amended the Fort Hare proclamation, following the court challenge by a certain person (details furnished) regarding the scope of the probe and (b) what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) The Special Investigating Unit submitted a motivation to amend the scope of Proclamation R.84 of 2022 to the Department of Justice and Correctional Services on 07 July 2023. The Department of Justice and Correctional Services is processing the motivation.

b) The motivation is in relation to allegations of maladministration in the affairs of Fort Hare University in the awarding of degrees.

END.

13 October 2023 - NW2959

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the reply to question 1927 on 18 July 2023 by the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure, what are the details of the time frames that have been put in place for initiating repairs to the Qalakabusha Correctional Services facility in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal?

Reply:

Following the storm that affected the Qalakabusha Management Area on the
03 April 2023, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) visited the site on 04 April 2023, to prepare an assessment report on the damages that occurred. The DPWI inspection was limited to the crafting of a damage report and indicated that a follow-up inspection will be conducted to provide a detailed report and specification.

Qalakabusha and Empangeni Medium Correctional Centres were affected, with some parts of the property left torn down, including the security fence, office accommodation, in-mate housing units and staff accommodation.

At the time of submission of this response the DPWI had not submitted the detailed specification and condition assessment for the required repair and renovation of the damaged Correctional Centres, which prompted the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) to implement urgent repair and renovations, considering that the roof structure suffered major damages and the perimeter fence was completely compromised, posing a security risk.

Following several inspections and evaluations by DCS in-house build environment professionals’ comprehensive specifications were compiled and subsequently prospective contractors were also briefed during the month of April 2023 for the repair and refurbishment of the perimeter fence, area lights and roof structures.

The following project activities have either been achieve or are on schedule for completion:

  • Replacement of the 1620-meter perimeter fence at Qalakabusha was completed;
  • Refurbishment of the damaged roof structure was partially completed, by prioritising the inmate housing units;
  • Replacement of damaged area lights (street lights) is in progress and under construction, which is scheduled for completion by 30 October 2023; and
  • Replacement of the 30-meter perimeter fence at Empangeni is in progress and under construction, which is scheduled for completion by 30 October 2023.

The DCS is currently compiling specifications for the refurbishment of the entire damaged roof structure, which is scheduled to be completed by 30 March 2024.

END.

12 October 2023 - NW2929

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 2451 on 30 August 2023, what are the relevant details of the economic returns and benefits the Republic has received from the Government’s substantial investment in agri-hubs to date?

Reply:

A total of 1 578 temporary jobs have been created to date.

  • In Zanyokwe Farmer Production Support Unit (FPSU), Eastern Cape: vegetable farmers have been assisted with market access to several Boxer Retailers to supply cabbage and spinach. Corporate Enterprise Development (CED) is also facilitating relations with other retailers such as Spar etc. where farmers can also supply.
  • Three (3) entities have benefited through leasing of the infrastructure at the Tarlton FPSU sites, Gauteng.
  • Farmers can easily access Government programmes.
  • FPSU Packhouses is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers and sorted, washed, and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hubs and Markets.
  • The packhouse facility will be used as a point of trade for the farmers for market access through the auction facility.
  • Farmers will benefit from the Market. (Agro-processing infrastructure).
  • Secondary Cooperatives have been registered to manage allocated resources.
  • Farmers are allocated mechanization and production inputs.
  • Training facilities are being utilised by the local farmers to conduct their meetings.
  • FPSUs act as a distributing centre for production inputs for farmers within 30km radius.
  • Agri-Hubs are meant to handle pre-handled fresh produce from the FPSU packhouses before sending them to the Market.
  • Farmers are continuously selling their livestock monthly through auctions.
  • The Bulk Irrigation System (revitalisation of the Ebenhaeser Irrigation System) completed in 2021 provides water to 153 emerging farmers. This includes a reservoir with capacity of 35 000 m3. A gravity pipeline system from the reservoir delivers water to each of the 153 plots through 53 water clusters (distribution points). To date the revitalisation of the Ebenhaeser Irrigation System has resulted in increased agricultural activity for 153 farmers. The famers supply their produce to well established market players like Tiger Brands and Up-To-Date fruit and vegetable store.

Please refer to the table below for details per province.

PROVINCE/ AGRIPARK

ECONOMIC RETURNS AND BENEFITS

EASTERN CAPE

Butterworth Agri-hub (Mnquma)

  • Mnquma Abattoir being implemented by Eastern Cape Development Corporation. Scheduled for completion by May 2025.
  • Livestock improvement in Amathole District.
  • Market access for their livestock.
  • Skills development.
  • Economic upliftment to the Amathole District.
  • Approximately 200 cooperatives will benefit and 15 permanent jobs will be created.

Zanyokwe FPSU

  • Zanyokwe FPSU has created 28 temporary jobs.
  • The repairs, refurbishments and additions to Zanyokwe FPSU reached practical completion on 29 August 2023.
  • Corporate Enterprise Development (CED): facilitated the appointment of 1 administrationistrative person, 3 tractor drivers for a period of 3 years.
  • Vegetable Farmers have been assisted with market access to several Boxer Retailers to supply cabbage and spinach, etc
  • CED is also facilitating relations with other retailers such as SPAR. where farmers can also supply.

FREE STATE

Thaba-Nchu Agri-Hub

  • Construction of abattoir project under implementation and the progress is sitting at 97% and the holding pens project completed.
  • 28 temporary job opportunities created.
  • The FPSU Abattoir is where livestock will be received directly from farmers within the Thaba-Nchu area and neighbouring towns. Slaughtering and processing of the meat will be done at this Abattoir and graded before sent to larger Market.
  • Market access will contribute to job creation.

Springfontein Agri Hub

  • Construction of mechanization centre and boundary fence completed.
  • 21 temporary job opportunities created.
  • The Agri-Hub is meant to handle pre-handled fresh produce from FPSU packhouses before sending them to the larger Market. That’s a value adding process to the Market.
  • Farmers and community will benefit from Market access and job creation.

Kroonstad FPSU

  • Secondary Cooperative is registered to manage allocated resources.
  • The farmers are allocated mechanization and production inputs.
  • The construction of mechanization centre, bulk services, boundary fence and guard house completed.
  • The FPSU has created 15 temporary jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market.
  • Farmers will benefit from Market. (Agro-processing infrastructure).

Ondedaalsrus FPSU

  • Secondary Cooperative is registered to manage allocated resources.
  • The farmers are allocated mechanization and production inputs.
  • The construction of mechanization centre, bulk services, boundary fence and guard house completed.
  • The FPSU has created 15 jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers and sorted, washed and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market.

Ficksburg FPSU

  • Construction of mechanization centre, boundary fence and guard house completed.
  • The FPSU has created 21 temporary jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed, and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market.
  • Farmers will benefit from Market and create jobs for the community.

Makholokoeng FPSU

  • Construction of Pack house and mechanization centre, boundary fence, guard house, control room and weigh bridge completed.
  • Secondary cooperative registered.
  • The FPSU has created 10 jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed, and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market.
  • Opportunity for local job creation.

Zastron FPSU

  • Mechanization in place and business operating for farmers and affiliated cooperatives.
  • Secondary cooperative registered.
  • The FPSU has created 10 jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed, and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market.

GAUTENG

Tarlton FPSU

  • 150ha and 27 farmers supported.
  • The Secondary cooperative is in the process of being registered.
  • This FPSU has created 48 temporary jobs.
  • Mobile Offices, Boardroom, Cold Rooms, Packaging house and production tunnels have been constructed.
  • Farmers have access to cold rooms, packaging facilities and add value on their produce.
  • 3 entities benefited through leasing of the infrastructure at the FPSU sites. Their production is viable, and they are sustaining the project.
  • Government officials and farmers now meet at the FPSU as there is a venue and facilities for meetings. Farmers can easily access Government programmes. Also used as distribution centres for production inputs to other local farmers.

Carmel Estate FPSU

  • The Secondary cooperative is in the process of being registered.
  • This FPSU created 25 temporary jobs.
  • 20 Production Tunnels have been completed. Beneficiaries selection and recruitment is in the process and will be finalised in 30 September 2023.
  • Local farmers will have access to tunnels and primary production. Locals will have access to food as there will be production this summer.

Bekkersdal FPSU

  • Secondary Cooperative is registered to manage allocated resources.
  • The farmers are allocated mechanization, shade net, production tunnels and production inputs. The Farmers are producing on the shade nets, and production tunnels. There is an existing administrationistration office with offices and boardroom.
  • The farmers are taking ownership of daily operations within FPSU.
  • The farmers are allocated a truck, bakkie and crates to assist them with harvesting and transporting of produce to the market. Farmers access land for production. Training facilities: Local farmers conduct their meetings at the facilities. Access to research trial onsite.
  • The FPSU also acts as a distributing centre for production inputs for farmers with 30km radius.
  • This FPSU created 23 temporary jobs.
  • The Department is in the process of completing a warehouse that will assist the farmers with storage.

Eikenhof FPSU

  • This FPSU created 35 temporary jobs.
  • Production tunnels were completed whereby farmers are producing vegetables.
  • 30ha and 10 cooperatives supported.
  • The farm facilities also benefit 35 cooperatives residing within 30km radius. The Cooperatives benefit through access to mechanisation, access to training facilities, access to poultry abattoirs and access to government information as there is permanent officials onsite.

Sokhulumi FPSU

  • This FPSU created 6 temporary jobs.
  • NPC is registered to manage allocated resources.
  • The farmers are allocated mechanization, shade net, tunnels and production inputs.
  • The FPSU shed has been revamped, is used to store Mechanisation and Implements.
  • Currently 51 farmers affiliated to be members of the FPSU, planting on more than 7400 hectares of land.

KWAZULU-NATAL

Hlathikhulu FPSU

  • 15 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project will allow for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administrationistration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Makhathini FPSU (Oil Seed Storage)

  • 10 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • Storage facility allows for the seed to be stored under shelter before being sold, increasing the selling price.

Noordsbereg FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Qwabe FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Jozini FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Felixton FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Fezela FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Matikulu FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Bernsdorp FPSU

  • 7 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The feedlot facility, after construction, will act as a value adding facility and guaranteed market for livestock farmers to get higher process for their animals.

KwaShinga FPSU

  • Contractor not yet appointed.
  • The project allows for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administrationistration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Mkhuze Rail Logistic Hub

  • 25 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Nsuze FPSU

  • 9 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project will allow for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administrationistration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Tugela Ferry FPSU

  • 50 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project will allow for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Jiki Jela FPSU

  • 25 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project will allow for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

St Paul FPSU

  • 10 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Clanso FPSU

  • 12 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project allows for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Amanzabomvu FPSU

  • 39 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Hopewell FPSU

  • 05 temporary jobs were created during construction.

Hlabisa FPSU

  • 10 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project allows for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Pomeroy FPSU

  • 20 temporary jobs were created during construction.
  • The project allows for farmers to buy in bulk and store their inputs; do basic packing and sorting of their produce before it leaves for market; facility for training; use of offices for administration and ablutions and changerooms for labour.

Makhathini Cotton Ginnery

  • Currently Professional Service Provider is busy with the designs.
  • Once completed the Ginnery will be able to gin 15000 tons of cotton as compared to the current 6000 tons. This will allow for the expansion of the planting area from the current 2000 ha dry land to about 8000 ha, supporting an additional 800 beneficiaries.

LIMPOPO

Witpoort FPSU

  • The investment towards infrastructure development of this FPSU resulted in the creation of 61 temporary jobs.
  • The packhouse facility will be used as a point of trade for the farmers for market access through the auction facility, crop farmers will have access to mechanisation and it will also serve as a training centre.
  • The facility is complemented by the local extension services office which is within the same premises.

Vleeschboom FPSU

  • The FPSU has a registered Secondary Co-operative with 10 members of Board of Directors.
  • This FPSU employed 6 contract workers (security officials) and 90 temporary jobs were created during the construction of infrastructures.
  • The packhouse facility will be used as a point of trade for the farmers for market access through FPSU to various mills to be contracted with secondary cooperative.
  • Crop farmers will have access to mechanisation and it will also serve as a training centre.
  • The centre has a storage for both inputs and chemicals, this will assist the farmers to access their daily inputs as and when they need them.
  • The facility will also serve as a service point for the local extension services. Currently the facility is being used as a dispatching and receiving area for inputs and chemicals

Masalal FPSU

  • FPSU provided support to farmers with mechanisation services and production inputs.
  • This FPSU also employed 6 contract workers (security officials) and 45 temporary jobs were created.
  • The packhouse facility will be used as a point of trade for the farmers for market access through the FPSU to various fresh produce markets.
  • The FPSU will be capacitated with washing, sorting and packaging machinery to support farmers. Crop farmers will have access to mechanisation and it will also serve as a training centre.
  • The facility will also serve as a service point for the local extension services. The facility is currently being used as a receiving and dispatching area for inputs and chemicals.

Sekhukhune Agri-hub

  • Construction of this Agri-hub created 20 temporary jobs.
  • The facility will be used as a point of trade for the farmers for market access through the FPSU to various fresh produce markets.
  • The FPSU will be capacitated with washing, sorting and packaging machinery to support farmers. Crop farmers will have access to mechanisation and it will also serve as a training centre.
  • The facility will also serve as a service point for the local extension services.

MPUMALANGA

Mkhuhlu Agri-hub

  • A service provider is appointed by Provincial Agriculture to operate the Hub.
  • This FPSU has created 45 temporary jobs.
  • The Agri-Hub is meant to handle pre-handled fresh produce from FPSU packhouses before sending them to the Market. Farmers will benefit from Market access.

Thulamahashe FPSU

  • Primary co-operatives are producing on farms and selling directly to the market.
  • This FPSU created 40 temporary jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market. Farmers will benefit from Market. (Agro-processing infrastructure)

Huntington FPSU

  • Secondary co-operative engaging Mathumi Fresh Produce Market for a potential strategic partnership.
  • There is currently a proposal of having strategic partners to provide mentorship and address the issue of markets, and to ensure the packhouse is utilised for the intended purpose of packaging.
  • Primary co-operatives are producing in their farms and selling directly to the market.
  • This FPSU has created 30 temporary jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market. Farmers will benefit from Market. (Agro-processing infrastructure).

Mzinti FPSU

  • The packhouse is in the process of GAP certification.
  • This FPSU has created 10 temporary jobs.
  • The FPSU Packhouse is where fresh produce will be received directly from farmers sorted, washed and graded before sent to secondary Agri-Hub and Market. Farmers will benefit from Market. (Agro-processing infrastructure).

Dundonald FPSU

  • Secondary co-op has been established with 10 primary co-ops affiliated.
  • Farmers are active on the ground.
  • The grain mill is part of Agro-processing infrastructure which will provide storage and processing of grains of the farmers before the Market. It will enable farmers to access the market.

Sydbrandskraal FPSU

  • Iphakeme Secondary coop established.
  • Grain Production and Vegetables access mechanisation from FPSU.
  • This FPSU has created 20 temporary jobs.
  • The grain mill is part of Agro-processing infrastructure which will provide storage and processing of grains of the farmers before the Market. It will enable farmers to access the market.

Kameelrevier FPSU Hydroponics

  • There are about 10 young people producing vegetables in the tunnels under the support of provincial Agriculture.
  • This FPSU has created 19 temporary jobs.
  • The young farmers at this project produce vegetables in the tunnels built and primary handling in the mini packhouse with cold room before sending them to the Market.

Malelane-Nkomati FPSU

  • Farmers are producing sugarcane and SAFDA assist with markets.
  • This FPSU created 45 temporary jobs.
  • The small holder Sugar Cane farmers will improve their yield per hector and sucrose quality through improved drip irrigation infrastructure and FPSU centre where irrigation maintenance team comprised of young people from NARYSEC will be housed, farmers training and mechanisation centre and fuel depo meant for supporting the farmers production. The farmers goal is to have their sugar mill which will produce renewable energy to lower their production cost.

 NORTH WEST

 

Makweleng FPSU

  • The Makweleng FPSU has created 32 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: Farmers are continuously selling their livestock monthly through Auctions.
  • Value adding to farmers: Emerging small-scale farmers can easily buy and sell at a market related price and improve profit margins.

Jericho FPSU

  • The Jericho FPSU has created 23 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: Boost the input and production aspects of the commodity value chain (red meat).
  • Value adding to farmers: The feedlot will improve the intensive production system of growing and or fattening cattle until they reach required slaughter weight and thus improve profit margins.

Bedwang FPSU

  • The Bedwang FPSU has created 19 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: The auction facility will ensure that farmers are continuously selling their livestock monthly through Auctions.
  • Value adding to farmers: Emerging small-scale farmers can easily buy and sell at a market related price and improve profit margins.

Taung FPSU

  • The Taung FPSU has created 20 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: Boost the input and production aspects of the commodity value chain (red meat and crop) and ensure that farmers are continuously planting and selling their produce and livestock monthly through auctions.
  • Value adding to farmers: Emerging small-scale farmers will easily buy and sell at a market related price and improve profit margins. It will also bring under-utilized land (especially in Communal Areas and land reform farms) into full production and expand irrigated agriculture.

Springbokpan Agri-hubs

  • The FPSU created 79 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: The project will support small- holder farmers through the provision of infrastructure, extension services, production inputs and mechanization input to improve grain production.
  • Value adding to farmers: Processing for local markets and providing market information while paving the way to complete the value chain.

Makapanstad Agri-hub

  • The FPSU created 16 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: The project will support small- holder farmers through the provision of infrastructure, extension services, production inputs and mechanization input to improve production.
  • Value adding to farmers: Processing for local markets and providing market information while paving the way to complete the value chain in mixed farming.

Vryburg Agri-hub

  • The FPSU has created 14 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: The project will support small- holder farmers through the provision of infrastructure, extension services, production inputs and mechanization input to improve production and access to market.
  • Value adding to farmers: Processing for local markets and providing market information while paving the way to complete the value chain in red meat production.

Matlosana Agri-hub

  • The FPSU has created 13 temporary jobs.
  • Benefit to farmers: Sustainable livelihoods.
  • Value adding to farmers: Increased commercial output of livestock production, processing for local markets and providing market information in the project area while paving the way to complete the value chain.

NORTHERN CAPE

Heuningvlei FPSU

  • 600 farmers organised into 57 Primary Cooperatives with a Secondary Cooperative as a governing structure.
  • Cooperatives supported with logistics, equipment, mobile and permanent infrastructure and production inputs.
    The Heuningvlei FPSU consists of security fencing, borehole, auction facilities, staff housing, administration block, boardroom facility and storage shed.
  • The new boardroom was constructed for meetings and training of farmers. The farmers will also have access to ICT facilities which will be installed soon.
    The storage shed will be used to store implements, equipment, and inputs for the farmers in the area.
  • The auction facility has been renovated for the farmers to sell their cattle at competitive prices.
  • The staff houses and administration block were renovated for use by technical staff who will provide extension and technical support to farmers.
  • 6 temporary jobs have been created.

Eksteenskuil FPSU

  • 8 temporary jobs have been created.
  • The administration portion of the FPSU which is situated at the Eiland Research station has been renovated.
  • The staff houses and administration block were renovated for use by technical staff who will provide extension and technical support to farmers.

WESTERN CAPE

Haarlem FPSU

  • 71 small scale farmers supported including women and youth. Anhalt farm currently employs 25 permanent workers and up to 149 seasonal workers.
  • 10 Primary Cooperatives registered under the Haarlem FPSU. There are nine (9) vegetable primary cooperatives and one for youth who are former NARYSEC participants.
  • Currently, the department is facilitating the process of registering the 10 primary cooperatives into a secondary cooperative that will manage the Haarlem FPSU.
  • 13 temporary job opportunities were created during the construction of the mechanization centre.
  • With the investment (construction of a mechanization centre, production inputs and machinery) from government these farmers can access services such as storage and primary processing and packaging of their produce which would have been otherwise costly. Having a mechanization centre close to where they harvest from enables the farmers to save on transport cost. Machinery and equipment that were traditionally leased from the commercial market is accessible and available at a cost-effective lease rate (amount).
  • The farmers can take their own produce to the mechanisation centre without the involvement of a middle-man.
  • Feeder projects such as Anhalt Farming are able to increase their capacity to export their produce because they make use of the services at the Haarlem FPSU and can get materials such as the crates used for fruit export from the Haarlem Youth project operating from the Haarlem FPSU.
  • Farmers have access to and are given training on how to run the FPSU (e.g. governance training, financial and business management training). Ability to have a greater market access.

Benefits and Future Plans:

  • The Haarlem FPSU plans to employ support staff such an administration, security, tractor drivers, truck drivers as well as mechanics for service and repairs.
  • The Haarlem FPSU plans to have temporary job opportunities to support the vegetable farmers during planting and harvesting seasons.
  • The Haarlem NARYSEC youth plans to employ additional youth as temporary workers during the harvesting season and in assisting them to increase production.

 

Ebenhaeser FPSU

  • The management of the assets of the FPSU is the responsibility of the Eben-Agric (PTY) LTD which was registered with CIPC during 2021 and consists of Ebenhaeser beneficiaries. Also providing input to the management of the FPSU are 5 Primary Co-operatives and 1 secondary Co-operative, which includes:
  • FPSU Ebenhaeser Secondary Cooperative
  • Ebenhaeser Lucerne Farmers Primary Cooperative
  • Grapes of Ebenhaeser Primary Cooperative
  • Eben Fruit and Vegetables Primary Cooperative
  • Ebenhaeser Livestock Primary Cooperative
  • The farmers received their production inputs support from the Land Claims Commission.
  • The Bulk Irrigation System (revitalisation of the Ebenhaeser irrigation system) completed in 2021 provides water to 153 emerging farmers. This includes a reservoir (with capacity of 35 000 m3). A gravity pipe line system from the reservoir delivers water to each of the 153 plots through 53 water clusters (distribution points).
  • The construction of the reservoir and bulk irrigation system created 29 temporary jobs in the local community.
  • To date the revitalisation of the Ebenhaeser irrigation system has resulted in increased agricultural activity for 153 farmers. In addition to the 76 lucerne farmers, the following results have already been realised:
    * 12 wine grape farmers (13 ha);

* 1 raisin grape farmer (1 ha);

* 4 hybrid seed farmers (1 ha);

* 4 processing tomato farmers (4 ha); and

* 62 permanent jobs and 200 seasonal jobs have been created during harvesting periods.

  • The famers supply their produce to well established market players like Tiger Brands and Up-To-Date fruit and vegetable store.

Saron FPSU

  • The Department registered 10 primary cooperatives and formulated the Saron secondary cooperative.
  • Saron has been identified as one of the FPSUs in the Cape Winelands for the following reasons:
    • It is close in proximity to emerging farmers and the Agri-hub in Ceres; and

• The proximity to production of main and support commodities.

  • The FPSU site is on municipal land and will be re-developed and used as a mechanisation centre, packing facility and storage.
  • The FPSU has a catchment area of Saron, Tulbagh (37km), Gouda (18km), Porterville (19km) and Riebeek west (87km) to support stock farmers (cattle, sheep and goats) vegetable and grain farmers. The Agri-hub in Ceres will support the feeder FPSUs from Saron.
  • The project will improve farming operations in this catchment area by the provision of much needed infrastructure to boost production and feed the Agri-hub in Ceres. The Agri-hub in Ceres will support the feeder FPSUs from Saron.
  • During construction phase of the mechanization centre (Saron FPSU), training in labour-based construction will assist local and emerging contractors and it is estimated that 10-15 local residents will benefit from job creation.

Suurbraak FPSU

  • 20 small scale farmers have been supported.
  • The Department registered 5 primary cooperatives in the Suurbraak FPSU.
  • The identified Agri-hub is in Bredasdorp about 110km from the FPSU. The development of the infrastructure is to boost the production of emerging farmers.
  • The Agri-hub will receive Lucerne, vegetables and livestock from the FPSU.
  • The planned mechanization centre (Suurbraak FPSU) will include a small produce handling facility; a packing and cooling facility; storage facility; local market and administration facility.
  • The site is in close proximity to small scale and emerging farmers and to the production of main and support commodities.
  • During construction phase of the mechanisation, training in labour- based construction will assist local and emerging contractors and it is estimated that 10-15 local residents will benefit from job creation.

12 October 2023 - NW2911

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) How has the Government assisted black-owned farms to reach successful yields of crops and other farm produce and (b) what impact has COVID-19 had on the ability of the specified farm owners to produce a sufficient yield to mitigate food and/or produce scarcity within the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is implementing various financial assistance programmes to enable farmers to improve production together with the provision of production inputs and access to the markets. These include the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) and the Ilima/Letsema programme. These conditional grants are aimed at promoting and facilitating agricultural development and increased production by beneficiaries of land reform or other black producers who have acquired land privately. The Ilima/Letsema in particular is aimed at supporting rural communities and vulnerable households to produce their own food. Since its inception in 2008, the Ilima/Letsema programme has supported 1,572,952 (one million five hundred and seventy-two thousand nine hundred and fifty-two) beneficiaries to produce their own food. The support includes starter packs for households, schools and community gardens, mechanization support as well as production inputs.

In 2020/21, the DALRRD started implementing the Presidential Employment Stimulus (PES) initiative with the support from Presidency. Through PES, the DALRRD is supporting the Subsistence Producers with agricultural production inputs. This initiative is aimed at supporting the agricultural sector to retain self-employment and strengthening local food value chains. The agricultural production inputs support is through the e-voucher system for commodities such as fruit and vegetables, grains, poultry, and small and large stock. The support targets women, youth, child-headed households, people living with disabilities and Military Veterans.

Moreover, the Agricultural Research Council has assisted farmers with technological support, drought-resistant cultivars, and advice on cultivars and soils to support their decision-making on their farms. The Provincial Departments of Agriculture (PDAs) have provided support to farmers by providing services like Extension and Advisory Support, Agricultural Engineering, Veterinary, and Agricultural Economics such as business plans, market access, training and mentorship.

To mitigate the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on production, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development ensured that agricultural activities were designated as essential services so that farm operations and related backwards and forward linkages were not affected or restricted during the lockdown. The agricultural activities were gazetted as such in the Disaster Management Act Regulations.

In addition, the Department provided support measures for all main categories of farmers as follows:

  • Commercial farmers had an amount of R100 million available (though only about R10 million was accessed) at the Land Bank to support them to carry on with production during the COVID-19 pandemic; these measures were over and above the business support administered by banks.
  • Smallholder farmers: the department made available a grant of up to R50 000.00 [fifty thousand rands] and an amount of R1,1 billion was applied and approved for this category of farmers benefitting 15746 smallholder farmers.
  • Household and subsistence farmers: the department has allocated more than R991 million since the pandemic. To date, about 110 225 subsistence producers have been supported through PES.

FINANCIAL YEAR

EXPENDITURE

ON PES SUPPORT

 

NUMBER OF FARMERS SUPPORTED

 

 

2020/21

242 677 000

104 906

2021/22

518 680 600

 

2022/23

229 805 470,00

5 319

(a total of 36 895 is targeted for support in 2023/24

TOTAL

991 163 070

110 225

Table 1: PES support 2020/21 – 2022/23

11 October 2023 - NW2957

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether she is aware that the SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd awarded a R4,7 billion tender to a certain company (name furnished) whose directors are charged with fraud; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has confirmed that SANRAL is aware of the allegations Aqua Transport and Plant Hire (‘Aqua’) is facing.

However, according to information at SANRAL’s disposal, Aqua is neither blacklisted nor restricted on the National Treasury’s Central Supplier Database and, as such, the company is not prohibited from doing business with government and/or its entities. Aqua is also not a blacklisted/restricted service provider on SANRAL’s database.

Aqua also provided all statutory information and secretarial information for a bidder which is in good standing with the relevant regulatory bodies. In the light of the above, there was no legal issue which prevented SANRAL from awarding the contract SANRAL N.003-010-2017/9: National Route 3 Section 1 from the Westville Viaduct (km 11.80) to Paradise Valley Interchange (km 17.54), in tendered amount of R4 726 396 217.26, to the Aqua/EXR joint venture as it was the highest scoring bidder in the evaluation and adjudication.

In consideration of the issues surrounding Aqua, SANRAL sought external legal advice to determine if there were any legal impediments to making the award in line with the tender outcome. Legal advice indicated that under South African law, Aqua directors are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law, and as such SANRAL was legally duty bound to award the tender to the Aqua/EXR joint venture as the highest scoring bidder.

 

To mitigate any possible risk down the line SANRAL has, however, built in an award provision that should the company’s directors be found guilty in a court of law, SANRAL reserves the right to terminate the contract.

The Department shall also monitor the developments and any future Court Rulings, with regards, Aqua and ensure that SANRAL complies with implementing the laws.

11 October 2023 - NW3138

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Tetyana, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the allegations that Intercape buses are sharing permits, she will furnish Mr Y Tetyana with proof of operating permits issued for the entire fleet of Intercape buses, including all routes that each bus is permitted to use; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Public Transport Regulator issued to Intercape Ferreira Mainliner PTY (LTD) 74 operating licences comprising of 40 operating licences authorising the conveyance of tourist, charter and bus services; 16 operating licences which authorises tourist and bus services, 05 operating licences authorising tourist and charter services and 13 operating licences authorising tourist services only.

Over and above 74 licences, there are 17 applications for renewal of licences comprising of 2 operating licences authorising tourist and charter services and 15 operating licences authorising tourist, charter and bus services applications that were approved by the National Public Transport Regulator but were not uplifted.

Detailed routes are attached

11 October 2023 - NW3052

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether there are ongoing studies on the adverse effects of the COVID-19 vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether donor blood is tested for COVID-19 vaccinations and labelled as such; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there have been reported cases of patients reacting negatively to vaccinated blood in the medical sector, including the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the position of citizens who wish to access unvaccinated blood due to medical and religious reasons?

Reply:

1. Applicants are required to submit safety data on vaccines before they are registered by regulatory authorities (SAHPRA in the case of South Africa). Once registered manufacturers and regulatory authorities are required by law to conduct post-marketing surveillance of adverse events following immunisation, and to update or amend registration and product information based on this surveillance.

In addition, health care workers and the public are encouraged to report adverse effects following immunization to SAHPRA. After notification, provincial authorities investigate each case in a systematic manner and provide results to the National Immunisation Safety Expert Committee (NISEC). Experts on this committee evaluate each case to determine causal associations with vaccines. Results of these case evaluations are reported on the SAHPRA website https://aefi-reporting.sahpra.org.za/.

2. No. There is no scientific reason nor evidence to support the notion that exposure to COVID vaccine through a blood transfusion can cause harm to the person who receives the blood. As a result, donated blood is not routinely tested to determine whether it contains COVID vaccine.

3. There are no reported cases of patients reacting negatively to blood as a result of the donor having received a COVID vaccine. Blood donated by vaccinated and unvaccinated persons is processed and made available to potential recipients using the same standardised safety and other procedures.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3082

Profile picture: Smalle, Mr JF

Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) number of (i) mortuaries, (ii) pathologist who are allocated to each mortuary and (iii) bodies examined in each mortuary in each month and (b) current backlog of bodies to undergo postmortem; (2) where is each mortuary located; (3) whether there are regulations in place that give effect to the period for (a) postmortems and (b) temperature-controlled environment; if not, why not; if so, who regulates the conditions?

Reply:

1. (a)(i) is indicated in Table 1 below as received from Provincial Departments of Health.

Table 1: (i)Number of Forensic Mortuaries including holding Facilities.

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

22

Free State

11

KwaZulu Natal

33

Gauteng

11

Limpopo

12

Mpumalanga

21

Northern Cape

11

Northwest

7

Western Cape

16

Total

145

 

(1)(a)(ii)(iii) and (b) is indicated Table 3 below as received from the provincial departments of Health.

Table 2(ii): Number of Forensic Pathologists per Province

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

2

Free State

7

KwaZulu Natal

2

Gauteng

 

Limpopo

7

Mpumalanga

2

Northern Cape

1

Northwest

2

Western Cape

16

Tables below indicate (ii) Number of medical officers(iii) Bodies examined, (b) Backlog per facility.

EASTERN CAPE

 

Facility

(ii)Number of Medical officers including pathologists

(iii)Bodies examined for month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Adelaide

 

Holding Facility

Not applicable

2

Aliwal North

1

25

None

3

Bizana

1

45

None

4

Butterworth

2

70

None

5

Bhisho

1

80

None

6

Dutywa

 

Holding Facility

Not applicable

7

Gelvandale

2

45

None

8

Grahamstown

1

35

None

9

Graaff-Reinet

1

15

None

10

Joubertina

 

Holding Facility

None

11

Lusikisiki

1

45

None

12

Mdantsane

1

70

None

13

Mount Fletcher

1

45

None

14

Mount Frere

1

45

None

15

Mount Road

3

35

None

16

Molteno

 

Holding Facility

Not applicable

17

Mthatha

4

200

None

18

New Brighton

2

65

None

19

Port Alfred

 

Holding Facility

Not applicable

20

Queenstown

2

80

None

21

Uitenhage

0

40

None

22

Woodbrook

1

80

20

 

FREE STATE PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including pathologists

(iii)Bodies examined for the month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Bethlehem

1

25

None

2

Bloemfontein

7

95

None

3

Botshabelo

1

26

Not applicable

4

Ficksburg

0

Holding facility

Not applicable

5

Jagersfontein

0

Holding facility

Not applicable

6

Harrismith

0

Holding facility

Not applicable

7

Kroonstad

1

30

None

8

Phuthaditjhaba

1

50

None

9

Sasolburg

1

20

None

10

Smithfield

1

Holding facility

Not applicable

11

Welkom

2

55

None

GAUTENG PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including pathologist

(iii)Bodies examined for the month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Bronkhorspruit

01

29

None

2

Carletonville

02

46

None

3

Diepkloof

06

256

None

4

Ga-Rankuwa

08

121

None

5

Germiston

11

400

None

6

Heidelberg

01

27

None

7

Johannesburg

12

410

None

8

Pretoria

12

219

None

9

Roodepoort

04

161

None

10

Sebokeng

04

230

None

11

Springs

04

164

None

KWAZULU NATAL PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including pathologists

(iii)Bodies examined Jan to Dec 2022 monthly average

1

Bulwer

Shares with Ixopo

Holding Facility

2

Dannhauser

Shares with Newcastle

Holding Facility

3

Dundee

1

20

4

Estcourt

Shares with Ladysmith

32

5

Eshowe

Shares with Richards Bay

26

6

Greytown

2

37

7

Harding

1

19

8

Howick

1

19

9

Ixopo

1

30

10

KwaDukuza

2

73

11

Kokstad

Shares with Ixopo

10

12

Ladysmith

1

60

13

Madadeni

1

44

14

Manguzi

Shares with Richards Bay

Holding Facility

15

Mkhuze

Shares with Richards Bay

Holding Facility

16

Mtubatuba

Shares with Richards Bay

Holding Facility

17

Mosvold

Shares with Richards Bay

Holding Facility

18

Newcastle

3

17

19

New Hanover

Shares with Greytown

10

20

Nkandla

Shares with Richards Bay

Holding Facility

21

Nongoma

1

43

22

Park Rynie

4

141

23

Paulpietersburg

Shares with Vryheid

Holding Facility

24

Pietermaritzburg

4

166

25

Pinetown

8

216

26

Phoenix

3

321

27

Pongola

Shares with Nongoma

Holding Facility

28

Port Shepstone

3

67

29

Richards Bay

3

141

30

Richmond

Shares with Pietermaritzburg

Holding Facility

31

Ulundi

Shares with Nongoma

Holding Facility

32

Umzimkulu

Shares with Ixopo

14

33

Vryheid

1

26

(b) The KwaZulu Department of Health indicates that there is a backlog of 52 bodies as of 31 August 2023.

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including pathologists

(iii)Bodies examined for the month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Polokwane

8

148

None

2

Lebokwakgomo

1

42

None

3

Bela Bela

1

45

None

4

Elim

1

38

None

5

Maphutha Malatjie, Phalaborwa

0

30

None

6

Nkhensani, Giyani

1

for Phutha Malatjie and Nkhensani

 

40

None

7

Kgapane, Tzaneen

1

35

None

8

Tshilidzini

2

21

None

9

Letaba, Tzaneen

2

24

None

10

St Ritas

1

for both St Ritas and Groblersdal

12

None

11

Mokopane

2

21

None

12

Groblersdal

0

17

None

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including pathologists

(iii)Bodies examined for the month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Balfour

1

6

None

2

Barberton

1

12

None

3

Belfast

0

11

None

4

Bethal

1 for Bethal and Standerton

21

None

5

Carolina

1 for Carolina and Embhuleni

8

None

6

Delmas

1

8

None

7

Embhuleni

0

13

None

8

Ermelo

1

27

None

9

Evander

1

31

None

10

KwaMhlanga

2 for KwaMhlanga and Mmamethlake

36

None

11

Lydenburg

1 for Lydenburg and Mapulaneng

10

None

12

Mmamethlake

0

0

None

13

Mapulaneng

0

43

None

14

Middelburg

1 for Middleburg and Belfast

30

None

15

Piet Retief

1

14

None

16

Themba

2

65

None

17

Tintswalo

1

23

None

18

Tonga

1

26

None

19

Standerton

0

16

None

20

Volksrust

1

11

None

21

Witbank

2

56

None

 

Mpumalanga Department of Health has additional:

  • Forensic Pathologist responsible for the whole province
  • 1 Forensic Pathologist responsible for Nkangala District
  • 1 Senior Medical officer responsible for Ehlanzeni District
  • 1 Senior Medical office responsible for the Gert Sibande District.

NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including a pathologist

(iii)Bodies examined for the month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Kimberley

2

50

None

2

Upington

1

33

None

3

De Aar

1

20

None

4

Kuruman

1

30

None

5

Calvinia

1

5

None

6

Springbok

1

15

None

7

Postmasburg

 

Holding facility

Not applicable

8

Hartswater

 

Holding facility

Not applicable

9

Douglas

 

Holding facility

Not applicable

10

Prieska

 

Holding facility

Not applicable

11

Victoria West

 

Holding facility

Not applicable

NORTHWEST PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number of medical officers including pathologists

(iii)Bodies examined on the month of August 2023

(b) Backlog as of 31 August 2023

1

Phokeng

2

82

None

2

Vryburg

1

26

None

3

Klerksdorp

1

23

None

4

Lichtenburg

1

11

None

5

Brits

3

54

None

6

Potchefstroom

2

13

None

7

Mafikeng

1

17

None

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

No

Facility

(ii)Number medical officers including Pathologists

(iii)Average Bodies examined for the period April 2022/2023 financial year monthly average

Garden Route / Central Karoo

3

 

1

Beaufort West

 

7

2

George

 

24

3

Knysna

 

12

4

Laingsburg Mossel

 

2

5

Mossel Bay

 

10

6

Oudtshoorn

 

10

7

Riversdale

 

5

City of Cape Town

   

8

Salt River

15

355

9

Tygerberg

15

318

Westcoast/Cape Winelands

4(2 vacant)

 

10

Malmesbury

 

14

11

Vredenburg

 

11

12

Vredendal

 

16

13

Paarl

 

40

Winelands/Overberg

4

 

14

Hermanus

 

26

15

Ceres

 

17

16

Worcester

 

44

(b) The Western Cape Department of Health indicates that the number of outstanding postmortems as of 2023/09/28 is 202 with no mortuaries indicated.

(2) Tables below indicate Forensic pathology mortuary by name and location.

EASTERN CAPE

 

Facility

Location

1

New Brighton

New Brighton

2

Mount Road

Mount Road

3

Gelvandale

Gelvandale

4

Grahamstown

Grahamstown

5

Graaff-Reinet

Graaff -Reinet

6

Woodbrook

Woodbrook

7

Mdantsane

Mdantsane

8

Bizana

Bizana

9

Butterworth

Butterworth

10

Bhisho

Bhisho

11

Queenstown

Queenstown

12

Adelaide

Adelaide

13

Aliwal North

Aliwal North

14

Middelburg

Middelburg

15

Mthatha

Mthatha

16

Mount Fletcher

Mount Fletcher

17

Mount Frere

Mount Frere

18

Molteno

Molteno

19

Lusikisiki

Lusikisiki

20

Port Alfred

Port Alfred

21

Uitenhage

Uitenhage

22

Joubertina

Joubertina

FREE STATE PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Bethlehem

Bethlehem

2

Bloemfontein

Bloemfontein

3

Botshabelo

Botshabelo

4

Ficksburg

Ficksburg

5

Jagersfontein

Jagersfontein

6

Harrismith

Harrismith

7

Kroonstad

Kroonstad

8

Phuthaditjhaba

Phuthaditjhaba

9

Sasolburg

Sasolburg

10

Smithfield

Smithfield

11

Welkom

Welkom

GAUTENG PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Johannesburg

Hillbrow Johannesburg

2

Roodepoort

Roodepoort

3

Germiston

Germiston

4

Carletonville

Carletonville

5

Springs

Springs

6

Heidelburg

Heidelburg

7

Diepkloof

Diepkloof, Soweto

8

Sebokeng

Sebokeng

9

Pretoria

Pretoria

10

Bronkhorspruit

Bronkhorspruit

11

Garankuwa

Ga- Rankuwa

 

KWAZULU NATAL PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Phoenix

Phoenix

2

Pinetown

Pinetown

3

Park Rynie

Park Rynie

4

Port Shepstone

Port Shepstone

5

Harding

Harding

6

KwaDukuza

KwaDukuza

7

Pietermaritzburg

Pietermaritzburg

8

New Hanover

New Hanover

9

Howick

Howick

10

Richmond

Richmond

11

Ladysmith

Ladysmith

12

Estcourt

Estcourt

13

Dundee

Dundee

14

Greytown

Greytown

15

Newcastle

Newcastle

16

Madadeni

Madadeni

17

Dannhauser

Dannhauser

18

Kokstad

Kokstad

19

Ixopo

Ixopo

20

Umzimkulu

Umzimkulu

21

Bulwer

Bulwer

22

Nongoma

Nongoma

23

Paulpietersburg

Paulpietersburg

24

Vryheid

Vryheid

25

Pongola

Pongola

26

Richards Bay

Richards Bay

27

Eshowe

Eshowe

28

Richards Bay

Richards Bay

29

Mkhuze

Mkhuze

30

Mosvold

Mosvold

31

Manguzi

Manguzi

32

Nkandla

Nkandla

33

Ulundi

Ulundi

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Polokwane

Polokwane Hospital

2

Lebokwakgomo

Lebowakgomo

3

Bela Bela

Bela Bela Hospital

4

Elim

Elim Hospital

5

Maphutha Malatjie

Maphutha Malatjie Hospital

6

Nkhensani

Nkhensani Hospital

7

Kgapane, Tzaneen

Kgapane Hospital

8

Tshilidzini

Tshilidzini Hospital

9

Letaba, Tzaneen

Letaba Hospital, Tzaneen

10

St Ritas

St Ritas Hospital

11

Mokopane

Mokopane Hospital

12

Groblersdal

Groblersdal Hospital

MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Balfour

Balfour Community Health Centre

2

Barberton

Barberton Hospital

3

Belfast

HA Grove Hospital

4

Bethal

Bethal SAPS

5

Carolina

Carolina Hospital

6

Delmas

Bernice Samuel Hospital

7

Embhuleni

Embhuleni Hospital

8

Ermelo

Ermelo Hospital

9

Evander

Evander Hospital

10

KwaMhlanga

KwaMhlanga Hospital

11

Lydenburg

Lydenburg Hospital

12

Mmamethlake

Mmametlhake Hospital

13

Mapulaneng

Mapulaneng Hospital

14

Middelburg

Middleburg Hospital

15

Piet Retief

Piet Retief Hospital

16

Themba

Themba Hospital

17

Tintswalo

Tintswalo Hospital

18

Tonga

Tonga Hospital

19

Standerton

Standerton Hospital

20

Volksrust

Amajuba Hospital

21

Witbank

Witbank SAPS

NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Kimberley

Kimberly

2

Upington

Upington

3

De Aar

De Aar

4

Kuruman

Kuruman

5

Calvinia

Calvinia

6

Springbok

Springbok

7

Postmasburg

Postmansburg

8

Hartswater

Hartswater

9

Douglas

Douglas

10

Prieska

Prieska

11

Victoria West

Victoria West

NORTHWEST PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Phokeng

Doves Private Mortuary, Rustenburg

2

Vryburg

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital, Vryburg

3

Klerksdorp

Tshepong Hospital Complex, Joubert on, Klerksdorp

4

Lichtenburg

Lichtenburg SAPS Station Lichtenburg

5

Brits

427 Crocodile St, Primindia, Brits

6

Potchefstroom

25 OR Tambo Street, Potchefstroom

7

Mahikeng

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

No

Facility

Location

1

Salt River

Salt River

2

Tygerberg

Tygerberg

3

Paarl

Paarl

4

Vredendal

Vredendal

5

Malmesbury

Malmesbury

6

Vredenburg

Vredenburg

7

Worcester

Worcester

8

Wolseley

Wolseley

9

Hermanus

Hermanus

10

George

George

11

Laingsburg

Laingsburg

12

Mossel Bay

Mossel Bay

13

Knysna

Knysna

14

Oudtshoorn

Oudtshoorn

15

Beaufort West

Beaufort West

16

Riversdale

Riversdale

3. (a) There are no specific regulations in place that regulate the period for post-mortems. The regulations regarding the rendering of Forensic Pathology Service (R359; 23 March 2018) in terms of section 90(1) of the National Health Act does not specifically state any such timelines.

The Forensic Pathology Service in each province does however set targets and measure the turn-around time of post-mortem examinations and most provinces set the 3 to 7 days turnaround time. This also is depended on the number of bodies received and capacity that is available to conduct post-mortems. However, most postmortems are conducted between (1) to (3) days in majority of facilities.

(b) There are regulations that govern mortuaries in terms of the National Health Act (Chapter 8). These are R363; 22 May 2013; Regulations regarding the management of human remains.

The National Code of Guidelines for Forensic Pathology Practice in South Africa, issued in relation to the Regulations of the National Health Act 61 of 2003 provide guidance on period for postmortem examinations and body storage temperatures. The Code of Guidelines stipulate only that postmortem examinations must be conducted as soon as possible. These Code of Guidelines and are currently being revised.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW2884

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the relevant details of (a) all writs issued against the Road Accident Fund and (b) all assets removed by the Sheriff from the Road Accident Fund including (i) asset descriptions, (ii) asset values, (iii) dates of asset removals and (iv) details of judgments in terms of which assets were removed for the period 1 January 2017 to 30 June 2023?

Reply:

a) all writs issued against the Road Accident Fund

b) all assets removed by the Sheriff from the Road Accident Fund including:

  1. asset descriptions
  2. asset values
  3. dates of asset removals and
  • Attachment 2 – “Asset Removals” refers to all the assets removed by the Sheriff for each region over the period 2017 to 2023. The information in attachment 2 includes the asset descriptions, value and removal dates to address parts (i), (ii), and (iii) above.
  • Overall, across all the regions, 1,182 assets were removed by the Sheriff over the period. The value of these assets at the time of removal amounts to R417,261.

4. details of judgments in terms of which assets were removed for the period 1 January 2017 to 30 June 2023?

  • Attachment 3 – “Removal Writs or Auctions Matters” refers to all the specific writs and / or auction matters with their details by region that resulted in the removal of assets.
    • Asset removals in EL were due to 2 writs
    • Asset removals in PTA were due to 2 separate auction notices and lists from the Pretoria East Sheriff. The notices can be made available.

11 October 2023 - NW3132

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What are the relevant details of the steps that he has taken to deal with the challenge of cats roaming inside the wards of patients in the Siloam District Hospital, in Vhembe, Limpopo?

Reply:

According to Limpopo Department of Health;

Cats in Siloam District Hospital, in Vhembe, Limpopo come from nearby households for the purpose of food. The cats increase in numbers due to reproduction. The hospital has an informal agreement with farmers from the area to periodically collect cats to assist them with rodents on their farms. The first collection already happened in September 2023. The NDoH is advising the Limpopo Department of Health to consult the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) to arrive at a good solution to this problem.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3053

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What total number of (a) doctors, (b) nurses and (c) other healthcare workers have not been paid within a 30-day period in each province in the past financial year?

Reply:

Employees are generally paid on time by means of the PERSAL system. Some delays in payments for newly appointed staff may be experienced at the end of December due to calendar year end processes or at the end of February due to tax year end processes, but this is not commonly experienced problem and delays would only be for one or two weeks, not 30 days or more.

When an employee who was previously dismissed for misconduct is reinstated/ re-appointed due to an Arbitration Award or Settlement Agreement, the unblocking of the previous service termination is implemented by National Treasury following the process required after the Head of Department has approved a submission for reinstatement/re-appointment.

The National Department of Health has requested information from the provinces in relation to the question.

Financial Year 2022 - 2023

Province

Category

Salaries

Overtime

Rural Allowance

PMDS related (Notch progression / bonuses)

Any Other (Please Specify)

EC

  1. Doctors

8

8

4 (4 of 8)

0

0

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

FS

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

GP

  1. Doctors
         
 
  1. Nurses
 

Outstanding information

   
 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers
         

KZN

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

13

DC outcomes: suspension without pay

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

 
 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

 

LP

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

MP

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

NC

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

NW

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 
  1. Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

WC

  1. Doctors

0

0

0

0

0

 

(b) Nurses

0

0

0

0

0

 

(c) Other Healthcare Workers

0

0

0

0

0

The table above excludes employees that have been through disciplinary processes and received sanctions of suspension without remuneration.

Eastern Cape:

  • Two Community Service Doctors assumed duties based on institutional appointment letters which still required approval by the delegated authority.
  • Six Medical Officers who applied for renewal of work permits on time but were only issued with instruction letters from Home Affairs which are acceptable for them to continue their services under Government-to-Government agreement. However, treasury regulations on PERSAL appointments necessitates individual work permits.

 

Northern Cape:

  • An update from the province indicates that all remuneration for the identified personnel were settled within the calendar month.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3044

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, given that Muslim women, to whom it is customary to have their heads covered, are being restricted while on duty in healthcare facilities all over the Republic from wearing their head gear, and noting that the head gear poses no risk and/or danger to patients or the worker wearing it, he intends to intervene in the specified matter; if not, why not; if so, by what date will such intervention take place?

Reply:

While it is customary for women of the Muslim faith to have their heads covered, not all Muslim women cover their heads. The nursing profession has members of the Muslim faith who currently do not wear head gear.

It is the employer’s responsibility to provide the uniform or give a cash allowance to its employees if the wearing of a uniform is a condition for their work. This is also aligned to the prescripts and regulatory framework of the nursing profession as reflected in the SA Nursing Council regulations. Chief amongst these is the imperative to uphold and portray professional identity and image, in addition to minimising any potential risk to patient safety. The regulations stipulate that the wearing of the uniform should enable all nurses to display the devices which distinguish a nurse providing care in line with her professional qualifications from others.

The dress code for nurses has always served as an administrative instrument to give effect to all these service obligations that are imposed by the profession on their members. However, since 2005 nurses were provided with an allowance to purchase own uniform. The unintended consequence has been a lack of standardisation in terms of colour, material composition and quality of garment. Thus, posing a threat to historic professional image of a nurse. Hence the recent circular intended to restore standardisation in wearing of uniform. In addition to affirming the historic position of the department regarding wearing of adornment while on duty

The National department of Health is aware of the objection raised by Muslims organisations. This is the first time that the decade old practice reading wearing of adornment while on duty is being challenged. The Department remains open to engage with any affected stakeholder in this regard.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3087

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With respect to the devastating fire that occurred in Johannesburg and claimed the lives of 76 people, 12 of whom were children, (a) what are the reasons that the bodies were taken to the mortuary in Diepkloof and not the Hillbrow mortuary for postmortems and (b) to what extent is the Stage 6 load shedding affecting the identification of bodies given that very few mortuaries have generators; (2) how effective has the biometric system been in helping to identify the bodies of the 76 victims whose remains can still be identified bearing in mind that many of the victims are believed to be immigrants; (3) whether he has been informed that an amount of R700,00 has been demanded from the family members collecting and/or identifying the bodies or remains of their loved ones before the bodies or remains are released to them; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) steps will he take regarding allegations of the illegal practice as neither the Gauteng Department of Health nor the Gauteng Forensic Pathology Services are allowed to charge for rendering the specified services and (b) consequences will there be for officials who have been found guilty of contravening the law by demanding illegal payment for the services rendered?

Reply:

1. (a) Bodies were taken to both Hillbrow (Johannesburg) and Diepkloof Forensic mortuaries.

  • The Diepkloof Forensic Mortuary was used for postmortem examination, but also as a central storage for bodies so that families can access one central point for identification of family members.
  • The Hillbrow (Johannesburg) was also used to conduct advanced scientific investigation such as DNA harvesting, Fingerprint taking and use of the LODOX/ X-Ray services.

(b) All mortuaries in Gauteng province operate with back-up/emergency generators.

(2) The Gauteng Department Health indicates that there were 21 fingerprints taken from the bodies using Forensic Pathology Digital Fingerprint system, 12 bodies were verified of which four (4) bodies were that of immigrants with valid Republic of South Africa permit.

(3) Currently, Gauteng Department of Health Forensic Pathology Service offers a no-fee for the investigation service. The said allegations were investigated by means of CCTV footages, security access control register and media announcements with no success in identifying the complainant.

In addition, Department of Health in Gauteng held a live TV interview session with Newsroom Africa on 07 September 2023 to create public awareness regarding free investigative services provided by Gauteng Forensic Pathology service.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3039

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Health

What measures have been put in place to (a) ensure that all medical graduates who have completed their community services are placed at relevant health facilities and (b) address the difficulty doctors experience in being allowed to write their board examinations to be integrated into the medical field of the Republic so that they can contribute effectively to the health of the people?

Reply:

a) To date from January 2023, a total of 3 974 posts of medical doctors were advertised and filled as compared to 2 053 medical doctors’ posts of the previous year (2022) for the same periods of employment. This means that an additional 1 921 posts for medical doctors were funded to accommodate unemployed medical doctors.

It is also acknowledged that not all unemployed medical doctors after completing community service, applied for these positions due to their different personal interests (e.g., Preference of urban areas rather than rural).

It remains the obligation for the Department of Health to ensure that sufficient platform is available for all eligible South African Citizens and Permanent Residents for medical internship and community service and after qualifying for independent practice, doctors are allowed to seek employment either in public or private sector.

The National Department of Health remains accessible/open to refer unemployed medical doctors, either individually or through their Associations, to Provinces for recruitment to available funded posts.

b) The National Department of Health has been working with the HPCSA throughout the process to ensure that all South African Citizens who studied abroad are eligible and given a fair opportunity to sit for the Medical Board examinations.

Following engagements with HPCSA, the Department can now confirm that the next schedule of exams will be held as follows:

  • Theory Medical Board examinations: 25 October 2023.
  • Practical/OSCE Medical Board examinations: Planned between 05 and 08 December 2023.
  • HPCSA has since invited applicants who meet the requirements for these examinations.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3111

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Health

What measures has he taken about reports that the Limpopo Department of Health is allegedly embroiled in a coal tender fraud and/or corruption debacle regarding procuring services for coal delivery in 14 hospitals whereas some of the specified hospitals do not require the supply of coal on their facility?

Reply:

The National Department of Health has not received any report about the coal tender in Limpopo and therefore not privy to any report or allegation of coal tender fraud in the Limpopo Department of Health.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3054

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the last National Health Facilities Baseline Audit was conducted within the past five years; if not, by what date does he intend to conduct a new audit; if so, (2) whether he will furnish Mr G R Krumbock with the relevant details of the latest audit conducted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Most Provincial Departments have conducted the National Health Facilities Baseline Audits. Some were conducted within the last five years and some are in the process of being reviewed. The table below indicates the last dates of the audits that were conducted/performed by the provincial health departments:

Province

Last date of conditional assessment

EC

June 2013

FS

June 2018

GP

Aug 2017

KZN

Nov 2022

LP

Sep 2023

MP

June 2011

NC

June 2016

NW

April 2015

WC

Sep 2017

2. Yes, all reports will be furnished to Mr G R Krumbock

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3112

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to an acute shortage of doctors in rural areas that affects service delivery, especially in Limpopo where there were over 80 doctors who had still not been placed in health facilities in July, (a) what are the reasons for the specified shortage, (b) out of the 80 doctors, what total number has been placed to date and (c) on what date will all healthcare workers in the province be placed?

Reply:

It was actually 81 medical doctors who were allocated/placed for community service at the Limpopo Department of Health by the National Department of Health on 15 June 2023. Their assumption of duty was delayed because the Limpopo Provincial Treasury requested that these 81 medical doctors, must first confirm whether they will be taking up this position prior to granting approval for the creation of the posts for their employment.

(a) Shortages in the public health sector especially in rural areas is due to budget constraints and lack of appetite by health professionals to work in rural areas,

(b) As mentioned above 81 medical doctors were placed and subsequently all of them have since assumed duty to date, and

(c) Placement for medical interns and community service doctors occurs twice in each year (i.e., 1 January and 1 July of each year).

END.

11 October 2023 - NW2887

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to R/7/77-IR Rem of ptn 7 of the farm Benoni 77-IR (the Benoni Train Station), (a) by which date will the land be fenced off to prevent cable thieves from using it to burn cables, (b) by which date will the grass be cut and cleared in order to prevent the land from being used by criminals, (c) by which date is it envisaged that the Benoni Train Station will be restored and (d) what total amount has been allocated towards the restoration of the Benoni Train Station?

Reply:

a) Capital Intervention Programme has been earmarked for fencing off the area identified. A budget allocation of an estimated value of R5,000,000-00 for the project has been set aside. The project is currently being scoped and anticipated to be advertised by the end of October 2023. The estimated project duration would be three (3) months.

PRASA Rail Protection Service Department has also confirmed that Protection Services Officials are posted at Benoni Station on a rotation shift of 24 hours.

b) A horticultural ‘As and When Maintenance’ contractor has been appointed for this Corridor. Safety Induction is currently being executed by the Risk and Compliance Department for the appointed contractor. The anticipated date of clearing the site should be no later than the 25th of September 2023.

c) The resumption of the train service at Benoni and other train stations in the Daveyton Corridor are largely dependent on the restoration of the Boksburg Bridge, which was damaged during the gas explosion accident late last year. Fortunately, the contractor has been appointed to restore the bridge and the work is expected to be completed by August 2024. With the anticipated completion date of August 2024, the upgrade and rehabilitation of stations including Benoni train Station, will also be aligned for completion at the end of 2024 to ensure full operation of the trains and stations thereof.

d) A budget has been set aside for this current financial year. For the construction of Benoni Station for basic functionality of the station, once the corridor has been resumed for operational service.

11 October 2023 - NW3115

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether provinces report matters related to fraud and corruption of provincial staff to him and/or his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what has been the progress on the matter at the Limpopo Department of Health concerning a certain person (name furnished)?

Reply:

There is no obligation on the Provincial Departments of Health to report to the National Department of Health matters that relate to discipline, fraud and/or corruption committed by the provincial staff members. The National Department of Health is not privy to any matter that relates to Mr Ntshane Lephoto as that matter has not been reported to the National Department of Health.

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3051

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has been informed of electricity bills of hospitals; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the total amount in outstanding electricity bills at each hospital in each province and (b) measures has the provincial health departments put in place to mitigate the outstanding debts?

Reply:

The responsibility for the payment of electricity bills resides with the respective provincial Departments of Health. Indicated below are the amounts owing as received from the provinces for various hospitals as appears in the tables:

a) The amounts owing to the various municipalities shown here are as the end of July 2023.

EASTERN CAPE

No.

Municipality

Outstanding Debt

 

Sarah Baartman

R

1

Sarah Baartman DM

1 044 492,88

2

Blue Crane Route

1 047 910,64

3

Camdeboo

0,00

4

Kouga

1 363 996,64

5

Koukamma

564 841,14

6

Makana

1 902 886,27

7

Ndlambe

332 805,52

8

Sundays River Valley

628 719,94

9

Baviaans / Ikwezi / Dr Beyers Naude

1 215 075,41

 

 

 

Total

8 100 728,44

 

 

 

     
     

 

Nelson Mandela

 

10

Nelson Mandela Metro

24 145 981,30

 

 

 

Total

24 145 981,30

 

 

 

 

Amathole

 

11

Amathole DM

15 204 200,95

12

Amahlathi

1 004 040,50

13

Great Kei

128 909,13

14

Mbashe

75 952,00

15

Mnquma

29 136,00

16

Ngqushwa

76 581,50

17

Nkonkobe / Nxuba / Raymond Mhlaba

20 811 489,12

 

 

 

Total

37 330 309,20

 

 

 

 

Buffalo City

 

18

Buffalo City Metro

6 600 804,35

 

 

 

Total

6 600 804,35

 

 

 

     

 

Chris Hani

 

19

Chris Hani DM

20 986 174,81

20

Emalahleni

1 964 407,15

21

Engcobo

522,35

22

Sakhisizwe

2 478 085,35

23

Intsika Yethu

468 884,20

24

Inxuba Yethemba

844 200,73

25

Inkwanca / Lukhanji /Tsolwana / Enoch Mgijima LM

4 539 032,16

 

 

 

Total

26 742 274,59

 

 

 

 

Joe Gqabi

 

26

Joe Gqabi DM

1 382 332,82

27

Elundini

103 544,30

28

Senqu

1 410 656,03

29

Garriep / Maletswai / Walter Sisulu

3 464 505,18

 

 

 

Total

6 361 038,33

 

 

 

     

 

OR Tambo

 

30

OR Tambo

7 085 527,07

31

KSD

9 608 874,60

32

Mhlontlo

8 429,53

33

Nyandeni

844 423,00

34

Ingquza Hill

8 686,65

35

Port St Johns

2 120,31

 

 

 

Total

17 558 061,16

 

 

 

 

Alfred Nzo

 

36

Alfred Nzo DM

18 052 297,74

37

Matatiele

6 987 581,43

38

Mbizana / Winnie Madikizela

4 828 870,90

39

Ntabankulu

3 900,69

40

Umzimvubu

69 166,84

 

 

 

Total

29 941 817,60

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

161 320 047,13

       

a) Acknowledgement of debt has been made to the relevant municipalities. There are ongoing mechanisms in place to ensure disconnection by the municipalities is avoided. After Budget Adjustment Estimates the Department will further engage relevant municipalities again with a purpose of re-arranging payments terms for this financial year and negotiate the payment terms for the next financial year.

The Department has engaged Reonet (Pty) LTD through the EC Department of Public Works with the aim of verifying all outstanding debts and billings by certain municipalities are valid and accurate.

FREE STATE

a) The Free State Department of Public Works & Infrastructure is responsible for payment of all property rates, sanitation and refuse removal accounts for all Provincial Departments. The Department of Public Works & Infrastructure is also responsible for the electricity and water accounts excluding for the schools and leased out properties where the electricity and water is metered separately and paid for by the user.

The following table indicates hospitals in the Free State province with verified outstanding electricity accounts:

FACILITY NAME

MUN CODE

TOWN

SUBURB

VERIFIED OUTSTANDING ELECTRICITY

DIAMOND HOSPITAL

FS162

JAGERSFONTEIN

JAGERSFONTEIN

R356 083,95

TROMSBURG - ALBERT NZULA HOSPITAL

FS162

TROMPSBURG Farm

TROMPSBURG Farm

R905 032,78

SMITHFIELD HOSPITAL

FS163

SMITHFIELD

SMITHFIELD

R273 713,70

EMBEKWENI HOSPITAL

FS163

ZASTRON RD

ZASTRON RD

R322 470,39

WINBURG HOSPITAL

FS181

WINBURG RD

WINBURG RD

R548 546,84

THUSANONG DISTRICT HOSPITAL

FS184

ODENDAALSRUS

ODENDAALSRUS

R1 039 539,70

KATLEHO HOSPITAL

FS184

VIRGINIA

VIRGINIA

R1 098 783,50

BONGANI REGIONAL HOSPITAL

FS184

WELKOM RD

WELKOM RD

R6 456 031,14

NALA HOSPITAL

FS185

BOTHAVILLE

BOTHAVILLE

R235 524,37

MOHAU HOSPITAL

FS185

HOOPSTAD

HOOPSTAD

R771 548,09

JOHN DANIEL NEWBERRY HOSPITAL / CLINIC

FS191

CLOCOLAN

CLOCOLAN

R168 413,33

PHUTHULOHA DISTRICT HOSPITAL

FS191

FICKSBURG

FICKSBURG

R164 537,07

ITEMOHENG HOSPITAL - SENEKAL

FS191

SENEKAL

SENEKAL

R225 643,91

PHEKOLONG HOSPITAL

FS192

BETHLEHEM

BETHLEHEM

R10 854 908,76

DIHLABENG HOSPITAL

FS192

BETHLEHEM

BETHLEHEM

R5 061 231,19

NKETOANA HOSPITAL

FS193

REITZ RD

REITZ RD

R334 285,13

THEBE DISTRICT HOSPITAL

FS194

HARRISMITH

HARRISMITH

R0,00

ELIZABETH ROSS HOSPITAL

FS194

HARRISMITH RD

HARRISMITH RD

R0,00

MOFUMAHADI MANAPO MOPELI HOSPITAL

FS194

QWA-QWA

PHUTHADITJHABA-A

R0,00

PHUMELELA HOSPITAL/VREDE CLINIC

FS195

VREDE

VREDE

R0,00

SENORITA NHLABATHI HOSPITAL

FS196

LADYBRAND

LADYBRAND

R857 455,55

BOITUMELO HOSPITAL

FS201

KROONSTAD RD

KROONSTAD RD

R3 915 423,49

TOKOLLO HOSPITAL

FS203

HEILBRON

HEILBRON

R1 594 812,28

PARYS HOSPITAL

FS203

PARYS

PARYS

R1 131 364,09

Fezi Ngumbentombi Hospital

FS204

PARYS RD

PARYS RD

R12 565 856,06

MAFUBE HOSPITAL

FS205

FRANKFORT

FRANKFORT

R0,00

NATIONAL DISTRICT HOSPITAL

MAN

BLOEMFONTEIN

BLOEMFONTEIN

R20 785 268,98

PSYCHIATRIC COMPLEX

MAN

BLOEMFONTEIN

BLOEMFONTEIN

R31 590 119,88

PELONOMI HOSPITAL

MAN

BLOEMFONTEIN

BLOEMFONTEIN

R43 334 465,10

UNIVERSITAS ACADEMIC HOSPITAL

MAN

BLOEMFONTEIN

BLOEMFONTEIN

R66 108 250,22

BOTSHABELO HOSPITAL

MAN

BOTSHABELO

BOTSHABELO-BA

R18 733 852,05

DR J S MOROKA HOSPITAL

MAN

THABA `NCHU

THABA 'NCHU

R0,00

b) The Free State Department of Public Works & Infrastructure continue to negotiate with service providers not to disconnect the electricity supply as it will hamper service delivery and may cause loss of lives if a hospital electricity is disconnected. The Province is continuously assisting the department in identifying savings which are then re-directed to augment the budget pressure in this regard.

GAUTENG

a) The total amount in outstanding electricity bills at each hospital in each province amount to R285,357,103.13, from the amount R102,478,398.20 already processed on the system for payments. The total outstanding electricity bill amount to R182, 878, 704.93 of which the institutions to conduct verification for payment.

Refer to the table as below mentioned:

Vendor details

Institution

Awaiting Payment Run

Institution to approve, before payment is done

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Charlotte Maxeke

-

114 174 074,96

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

19 202 124,74

966 713,30

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Edenvale Hosp

2 205 293,14

-

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Health Head Office

-

593,14

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Helen Joseph

7 329 585,56

12 245 916,03

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Johannesburg Metro District Health

-

176 929,11

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Rahima Moosa Hosp (Coronation Hosp)

1 812 301,43

17 542 309,44

City of Johannesburg Municipality

South Rand Hosp

-

6 896 388,53

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Tara Hosp

207 047,83

523 177,46

City of Tshwane

Forensic Pathology Services

-

342 328,32

City of Tshwane

Jubilee District Hosp

-

3 286 238,53

City of Tshwane

Kalafong Hosp

1 589 028,09

-

City of Tshwane

Lebone College of Emergency

-

448 876,27

City of Tshwane

Mamelodi Hosp

589 336,07

-

City of Tshwane

Masakhane Cookfreeze

49 675,80

-

City of Tshwane

ODI District Hospital

-

399 425,03

City of Tshwane

Pretoria West

-

2 497 959,24

City of Tshwane

Steve Biko Hosp (PTA Academic Hosp)

-

96 503,47

City of Tshwane

Tshwane District Health

229 719,49

19 406,52

City of Tshwane

Tshwane District Hosp

-

-

City of Tshwane

Tshwane Rehab

-

501 685,89

City of Tshwane

Weskoppies

-

1 797 203,68

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Dunswart Hosp

884 844,00

-

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Ekurhuleni District Health

53 751 000,00

-

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Far East Rand Hospital

-

2 002 165,09

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Tambo Memorial Hosp

6 126 127,08

45 473,62

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Tembisa Hosp

-

3 268 538,16

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Thelle Mogoerane

-

220 000,04

Emfuleni - GP Local Municipality

Kopanong Hosp

7 094,31

521 335,48

Emfuleni - GP Local Municipality

Sebokeng Hosp

62 501,63

2 831 029,82

Emfuleni - GP Local Municipality

Sedibeng District Health

-

-

Lesedi - GP Local Municipality

Forensic Pathology Services

-

47 196,14

Lesedi - GP Local Municipality

Heidelburg

73 551,13

733 037,29

Merafong City - GP Local Municipality

Carlton Vill Clinic

-

8 815,87

Mogale City - GP Local Municipality

Dr Yusuf Dadoo

-

809 736,78

Mogale City - GP Local Municipality

Leratong Hosp

3 022 440,53

-

Mogale City - GP Local Municipality

Sterkfontein Hosp

2 251 647,14

-

Mogale City - GP Local Municipality

West Rand District Office

168 332,38

-

Rand West City - GP Local Municipality

West Rand District Office

402 852,88

21 284,42

ESKOM

Charlotte Maxeke

-

97 313,13

ESKOM

Ekurhuleni District Health

4 348,81

-

ESKOM

EMS

-

13 876,81

ESKOM

Johannesburg Metro District Health

1 224 494,37

409 322,98

ESKOM

Jubilee District Hosp

-

7 298 418,97

ESKOM

ODI District Hospital

-

265 607,22

ESKOM

Pholosong Hosp

-

397 829,63

ESKOM

Sedibeng District Health

117 874,95

75 465,31

ESKOM

Tara Hosp

497 564,22

-

ESKOM

Thelle Mogoerane

-

1 607 620,72

ESKOM

Tshwane District Health

469 739,63

138 186,88

ESKOM

West Rand District Office

199 872,99

150 721,65

Grand Total

 

102 478 398,20

182 878 704,93

b) The department conduct weekly meetings with Eskom and bilateral meetings with Municipalities, which are arranged and attended to by Representatives from Gauteng Treasury, COGTA, Department of Health: Head Office and Health Institutions (Hospitals & Entities).

KWAZULU-NATAL

a) The Department’s electricity bill across the province is all current, sitting at just over R31million.

b) The Department prioritise the water and electricity on a month-to-month basis resulting to the total debt owed being current.

LIMPOPO

a) Yes, The department has as at 31 August 2023 municipal bills of hospitals amounting to R8 590 999,33, of which the balances were within 30 Days.

The breakdown of the total bills as per the tables below:

Capricorn district

Mopani district

Sekhukhune District

Vhembe District

Waterberg District

b) All bills listed above were settled during the month of September 2023. The department is paying the municipalities monthly, hence all transactions reported are within 30 days. The department will continue reconciling the accounts and settle the debts accordingly.

MPUMALANGA

a) The hospitals will be able to process the electricity bills soon as the outstanding invoices are received and when the system is back. Attached hereunder, please find table detailing the outstanding electricity bill per hospital and payment status.

Name of Facilities

Status

Amount in Arrears

Comments

GERT SIBANDE DISTRICT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bethal Hospital

Paid until September

604 953,00

Emzinoni Clinic billing from 2018, new matter still under investigation. A meeting schedule for tomorrow with CFO Govan Mbeki

Evander Hospital

Paid until September

300 000,00

A shortfall on the committed order, a new order to be generated

Carolina Hospital

Paid until July

-

waiting for August and September invoices. The municipal has implemented a new system which causes the delay.

Embhuleni Hospital

Paid until August

-

Invoice received after the cut-off date, yet to be processed

Ermelo Hospital

Paid until August

-

Awaiting for September invoice, a dispute was lodged on the initial invoice.

Msukalingwa Clinic

Paid until August

-

Invoice received after the cut-off date, yet to be processed

Total

 

904 953,00

 
       

EHLANZENI DISTRICT

     
       

Tintswalo Hospital

Paid until August

234 770,70

Invoice received after cut-off date

Themba Hospital

Paid until August

-

Waiting for invoice

Barberton TB Hospital

Paid until August

300 980,00

Invoice received after cut-off date.

Barberton Hospital

Paid until August

-

Waiting for invoice

Sabie Hospital

Paid until August

219 970,43

Invoice received after the cut-off date.

Total

 

755 721,13

 
       

NKANGALA DISTRICT

     
       

Kwamhlanga Hospital

Paid until 31st August 2023

37 450,00

September invoice received in process

Benice Samuel Hospital

Paid until 31st August 2023

 

September invoice not yet received

Middleburg Hospital

Paid until 31st August 2023

650 323,18

September invoice received in process

Mmamethlake Hospital

Paid until 31st July 2023

 

August and September invoice not yet received

Impungwe Hospital

Paid until 31st August 2023

253 361,19

September invoice received in process

Waterval boven

Paid until 31st August 2023

 

September invoice not yet received

HA Grove Hospital

Paid until 31st August 2023

 

September invoice not yet received

TB Hospital

Paid until 31st August 2023

192 141,36

September invoice received in process

PHC Facilities

Paid until 31st August 2023

 

September invoice not yet received

Total

 

1 133 275,73

 
       

Grand Total

 

2 793 949,86

 

b) Outstanding invoices will be processed upon receipts and captured invoices will be paid soon as the system is back.

NORTHERN CAPE

No response, after several engagement and follow ups with the province.

NORTH WEST

a) The department owes electricity bills of R5 017 155,17 outstanding as of September 2023, However, the R631 134.69 is in dispute with ESKOM.

Name of the Hospital

Total outstanding electricity bills

Ventersdorp CHC (Hospital)

352 035.81

Mafikeng Provincial Hospital

631 134.69

JST Hospital

2 879 515.91

Taung Hospital

1 154 468.76

 

1 506 504.57

b) The outstanding bills are current. The department conduct regular reconciliation of the accounts with facilities when a need arises for settlement.

WESTERN CAPE

a) As of 31 August 2023, 99% of our outstanding balances are current. Some have been settled and reflect as 0 and some in credit reflected in brackets:

Hospital

Current electricity bill

Alexandra Hospital

(R1 023,27) in credit

Beaufort West Hospital

R 406 456,64

Brewelskloof Hospital

R 380 534,96

Caledon Hospital

R 365 431,18

Ceres Hospital

R 287 907,87

Citrusdal Hospital

R 421 045,97

DP Marais Hospital (vacant land)

0

Eerste River Hospital

0

False Bay Hospital

0

George Hospital

R 1 219 583,28

Groote Schuur Hospital

R 5 986,75

Harry Comay

R 166 705,81

Helderberg Hospital

0

Hermanus Hospital

R 35 710,22

Karl Bremer Hospital

0

Khayelitsha Hospital

0

Knysna Hospital

R 391 993,44

Ladismith Hospital

R 78 459,00

Laingsburg Hospital

R 75 264,00

Lapa Munnik Hospital

R 150 800,53

Lentegeur Hospital

0

Metro TB Hospital

0

Mitchells Plain Hospital

0

Montagu Hospital

0

Mosselbay Hospital

R 151 655,87

Mowbray Hospital

0

Murraysburg Hospital

R 45 654,65

Nelspoort Hospital

R 12 777,66

Oudtshoorn Hospital

0

Paarl Hospital

R 1 107 137,61

Prince Albert Hospital

R 135 198,70

Radie Kotze Hospital

R 68 478,58

Red Cross Childrens Hospital

R 2 994 987,92

Riversdale Hospital

R 210 159,68

Robertson Hospital

0

Somerset Hospital

R 805 743,74

Stellenbosch Hospital

R 270 917,51

Stikland Hospital

R 6 822,08

Swartland Hospital

R 2 582,18

Swellendam Hospital

R 168 770,49

Tygerberg Hospital

0

Valkenberg Hospital

0

Victoria Hospital

(R 400,00) in credit

Vredenburg Hospital

R 418 976,96

Vredendal Hospital

R 170 159,95

Wesfleur Hospital

R 227 512,42

Worcester Hospital

0

b) Measures in place:

  • Monthly reporting to Provincial Treasury (PT) Local Government Directorate on Rural debt, which manages outstanding Provincial municipal debt, based on identifying long outstanding debt. PT will engage with the said municipality and the Department to address the debt and identifying and resolving disputes,
  • Receipt of month-end outstanding billing from the City of Cape Town (Metro) to ensure all payments processed in that month are allocated to the correct accounts and all Metro accounts are reflected as current.
  • BAS reports are monitored monthly.

 

END.

11 October 2023 - NW3055

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Health

What total number of health facilities serve a population of 100 000 in (a) rural and/or (b) urban areas (i) nationally and (ii) in each province?

Reply:

In response to the question, all health facilities in both public and private sector were included. The total number of facilities was divided by population using the 2022 Mid-Year Population Estimates by Statistics South Africa. The South African Health Facilities are classified into three categories, Peri-urban, Rural and Urban.

The total number of health facilities that serve a population of 100 000:

 

(i) Province

Peri-Urban

(a) Rural

(b) Urban

Eastern Cape

2,10

9,95

14,75

Free State

1,81

8,35

24,64

Gauteng

0,35

0,16

15,05

KwaZulu-Natal

1,53

7,60

16,47

Limpopo

1,53

14,78

5,44

Mpumalanga

1,02

6,08

10,19

Northern Cape

4,66

17,57

28,73

North West

1,39

8,07

8,77

Western Cape

1,77

7,57

24,61

  1. National

1,34

6,75

15,43

The Urban category has a higher facility density per 100 000 population followed by the Rural with Peri-Urban having the lowest density. This is comparable to the WHO density assessment which had the hospital density for South Africa per 100 000 population at 0,67 in 2013, Malasia at 0,47 and Sri Lanka at 0,099.

END.