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07 April 2022 - NW596

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What is the current total number of (a) doctors and (b) nurses that are being trained at higher education institutions in the Republic; (2) what are the requirements at the various medical schools for admission, including (a) targets for transformation, (b) academic achievements and (c) any other criteria; (3) what role does race play in relation to academic achievement for admission to the medical schools?

Reply:

(1) (a) 11 881 MBChB students (Audited figures for the 2020 academic year)

(b) 9 210 Nursing students (Audited figures for the 2020 academic year)

(2) There are ten universities in South Africa with medical schools with each of these universities having different admission criteria. As competition for places is intense, each university has its own methodology of calculating its admission scores based on a combination of academic criteria, e.g. National Senior Certificate results in compulsory subjects, National Benchmark Tests, etc., and non-academic criteria, e.g. extracurricular activities, measures of disadvantage, personal reports and interviews, etc. 

(3) Universities are required to select their medical students by ensuring equitable and fair access to students from all population groups, whilst ensuring optimal student throughput and success, equity and demographic representivity, and training future healthcare practitioners who can fulfil the needs of society. 

07 April 2022 - NW274

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Police

(1) In view of the finding by the panel of experts appointed by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in the Report of the Expert Panel into the July 2021 Civil Unrest, that the SA Police Service (SAPS) was woefully incompetent and/or unwilling to deal with the unrest, what steps will he take to resolve the issues identified by the experts;(2) whether, in light of the damning finding by experts, it is his position that he is still fit to lead the SAPS; if so, what is his position based on?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

07 April 2022 - NW850

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) him, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of his department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Organization

What total amount in Rand has been spent on

a) Catering

b) Entertainment

c) Accommodation

Departments of Higher Education and Training and Science and Innovation

(i) Minister

R78 992.35

R56 562.13

R2 010 038.00

 

(ii) Deputy Minister

Nil

R2 209.50

R1 210 453.79

 

(iii) Departmental Officials

R17 163 787.11

R226 096.59

R53 954 822.98

Kindly note that the expenditure incurred by the Minister and Deputy Minister on these items is for official purpose use only.

06 April 2022 - NW1078

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, given the reports that more than 89 000 illegal immigrants have already been arrested and/or deported as at 9 January 2022 for attempting to cross the border illegally, she will account on what her department is doing to attend to the lack of a proper border fence at Beitbridge, since the expenditure on the current one was found to be irregular; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What (a) plans are in place to build a suitable fence and (b) are the timelines that can be given to assure the public that her department is aware of the crisis?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. I have been informed by the Department that the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has finalised a technical condition report on the constructed fence. In its current form, the fence is not fit for purpose and is in material non-compliance with the project specifications. For this reason, the DPWI has resolved not to carry out any repairs on the fence as this will constitute wasteful expenditure.

The DPWI is also currently collaborating with the Department of Defence (DOD), the Department of Home Affairs (DHA), the Border Management Authority (BMA) and the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) to develop a multi-party Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to integrate and align the collective roles, responsibilities and operational plans of each organisation on the matter of border fencing and control as a precursor to implementing a new integrated border-line solution.

2. (a) Currently, the DOD, supported by the DPWI and the DALRRD through the above-mentioned processes, is consulting its internal DOD structures to develop user specifications and user asset management plans in compliance with the Government Immovable Asset Management Act No. 19 of 2007 Section 6 (1) (b) and Section 14 (1) (a) (b).

(b) The tasks and projected timelines are as follows:

i. Request for Information: To support the DOD in the development of an integrated Borderline solution, a Request for Information (RFI) was commissioned by DPWI on 28 March 2021. The RFI closed on 26 of April 2021 and 16 Proposals have been received. The Bid Evaluation Committee completed the evaluation of bids in June 2021. Three bids were compliant to the terms of reference of the RFI. Compliant bids were submitted to DOD in July 2021 to be incorporated into the final specifications for border fences.

DOD indicated in a meeting held on the 11th November 2021 that engagements are transpiring internally and will confirm the submission date of their approved specifications by 25 November 2021. To date DOD has not submitted their approved specifications.

ii. Feasibility studies: Site acquisition feasibilities completed.

Construction feasibilities will require 12 to 18 months to complete, upon receipt of DOD output specifications.

The above processes have been commissioned, some completed and the remainder are underway as indicated above. This will ensure that all legal and legislative frameworks are complied with to allow for the formalisation of the RSA borderline to meet South African and International Standards.

The collective body of work from the above processes will identify viable engineering options, risk analysis and mitigation strategies, funding models and budget co-ordination. These would input into subsequent bid and construction processes, and enable informed funding requests to be submitted to National Treasury.

06 April 2022 - NW836

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)What has she found are the legal and material impacts of the Protection of Personal Information Act, Act 4 of 2013 (POPI) on the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 (STSMA), and Regulations; (2) whether the Community Schemes Ombud Service received any legal opinions on the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with a copy of such legal opinions; (3) whether any adjudicators have received training on any material impacts of the POPI Act; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is being done to ensure that management agencies and boards (i) still have access to all relevant member information and (ii) are able to disseminate this information openly and transparently as before and (b) steps should home owners take to access contact information for members of their respective schemes and body corporates?

Reply:

1. The purpose of the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPI) Act, is to protect data subjects (internal and external stakeholders of the Community Schemes Ombud Service) from security breaches such as unauthorised dissemination of personal information belonging to or relating to data subjects, amongst others. The POPI Act achieves this goal by outlining 8 principles which data processors, such as the Community Schemes Ombud Service and scheme executives, must adhere to when collecting, processing, storing and deleting personal information belonging to internal and external stakeholders. Like most entities, the POPI Act has changed the manner in which the Community Schemes Ombud Service and scheme executives engage with personal information. Some of the legal and material impacts introduced by the POPI Act and experienced by the Community Schemes Ombud Service include:

(a) At an operational level, amending the agreements concluded with third party service providers and ensuring that they are bound by the responsibilities and principles of the POPI Act when processing information given for purposes of delivering or providing services to the Community Schemes Ombud Service. All entities regulated by the POPI Act are required to have similar provisions which give effect to the POPI principle in their contracts with third parties such as managing agents.

(b) The development and implementation of the entity’s POPI Compliance Framework which consists of the POPI Policy, Manual, Breach Incident Policy, Flow Charts and Risk Register. In addition, the Community Schemes Ombud Service procured the services of an expert service provider to facilitate training sessions for all business units and staff of the Community Schemes Ombud Service on the compliance requirements.

(c) Adoption of data protection standards aimed at ensuring that personal information is collected, processed, and stored lawfully.

(d) In relation to all community schemes, the 8 principles governing the collection, storing, and processing of personal information belonging to members of a community scheme are also applicable. Community Schemes should only collect personal information necessary for the purpose for collection and further put in place measures which protect such personal information belonging to members and their visitors from unauthorised disclosure or theft. Failure to do so will result in the imposition of fines or other enforcement steps taken by the Information Regulator. Accordingly, all entities need to invest in the resources they have identified to ensure that the principles of the POPI Act are upheld.

(2) Since the implementation of the Community Schemes Ombud Service POPI Act Compliance Framework the entity has not experienced any queries or challenges relating to the POPI Act necessitating the sourcing of external legal advice in the form of formal legal opinions from external attorneys. All queries have been from internal business units and legal guidance and support has been provided by the Community Schemes Ombud Service Legal Section.

(3) During 2021, the Community Schemes Ombud Service provided training to all business units, including its adjudicators, on the 8 principles of the POPI Act and its impact on the relevant business unit. Continuous refresher training is also being offered by the Community Schemes Ombud Service Legal Team together with the POPI Act expert service provider as and when requested by the business unit.

(a) & (b) The POPI Act has not changed the type or nature of information which scheme executives, managing agents or body corporates can obtain from their members. The POPI Act has changed the manner, in other words how scheme executives go about in collecting, storing and processing their personal information and as already mentioned above, all community schemes need to do so in accordance with the principles set out in POPI Act.

06 April 2022 - NW830

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What (a) number of (i) financial, (ii) forensic and/or (iii) other investigations that were commissioned by her Office in the (aa) 2019-20, (bb) 2020-21 and (cc) 2021-22 financial years have been completed and (b) in each case are the relevant details of the (i) investigation(s) including a synopsis of the facts and/or findings of each case, (ii) persons and/or third parties responsible for each investigation, (iii) total cost to date of each investigation and (iv) appropriate steps taken against officials and/or third parties implicated in wrongdoing in the findings of the investigations?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

06 April 2022 - NW444

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the (a) current unfinished water and sanitation infrastructure projects in each province, (b) reasons for the delays in the completion of the specified projects, (c) proposed and/or implemented interventions and (d) projected completion dates of the projects?

Reply:

Projects that are incomplete are indicated in Annexure A below as follows;(a) grant funded projects, (b) augmentation projects and, (c) the bucket eradication projects.

--00O00---

ANNEXURE A:

PROVINCE

PROJECT

REASON FOR NON- ACHIEVEMENT

RECOVERY PLAN

PROJECTED COMPLETION DATE

Grant funded projects

Eastern Cape

Xhora BWS phase 1 of 2 (Weir, WTW, dam Bulk pipeline)

Shortage of material available coupled with delays in resolving SMME appointments and delays in approval of concrete mix design caused delays in project completion.

  • To speed up the process of procuring material, an SMME desk has been established and appointment process to go ahead with finalisation of concrete mix design.

December 2022

 

Sundays river (Paterson) BWS phase 6 of 6

The purchase order of the Professional Service Person’s (PSP) was depleted, and the PSP suspended.

The Contractor cannot work without the supervision of the PSP and has been off site since 14 September 2020

  • Amatola Water is currently in the process of rectifying the issue of the PSP’s purchase order. Once this process is done, a formal process will be followed to get the contractor back to site and continue with the work.

June 2023

Free State

Rouxville/ Smithfield / Zastron BWS (Mohokare BWS)

Hydro – Tech new Mechanical Contractor has not commenced with their scope of work due to the required process of assessing the existing equipment and components prior to commencing with the works

  • MLM has finalized the assessment of the equipment scope of work for the new contractor.

April 2022

Mpumalanga

Driekoppies Phase 1C of 5

Graves were found on site which resulted in the relocation of the reservoir. This required re-design exercise

Some materials were imported and were affected by the COVID 19 lockdown restrictions

  • A revised program was submitted and an extension of time due to additional scope

July 2022

 

Sibange Phase 2 of 5

Delays due to community unrest and heavy rains

  • Contractors are back on site and acceleration plan will be implemented to catch up and complete the project

September 2022

 

Sibange Phase 4 of 5

Delays due to community unrest and heavy rains

  • Contractors are back on site and acceleration plan will be implemented to catch up and complete project.
  • New method of sealing the reservoirs after the rainfall is being implemented

May 2022

 

Sibange Phase 5 of 5

Delays due to community unrest and heavy rains

  • Contractors are back on site and acceleration plan will be implemented to catch up and complete project

April 2022

 

Balfour/Siyathemba RBWS Phase 2 of 6

Delays due to rainfall, non-payment to suppliers and community unrests

  • Community issues have been addressed and budget made available to pay service providers. The Contractor will provide acceleration plan to catch up for the time lapsed.

May 2022

 

Balfour/ Siyathemba Phase 3 of 6

  • Community unrest due to employment demands
  • Land servitude unavailability issues
  • Hard Material encountered during excavations
  • The Municipality has intervened, and community issues were resolved successfully
  • The Compensation for the Land has been finalised

May 2022

Augmentation projects

KZN

Raising of Hazelmere Dam

  • Unforeseen technical challenges during dam construction
  • Delays in procurement of critical instrumentation for the dam
  • The site was handed back to contractor in October 2021 and the site establishment was completed in December 2021.
  • Critical instrumentation procurement and installation included in scope of contractor

October 2022 (completion of construction)

 

Cwabeni OCS Dam KZN

  • Lack of funding
  • The Minister issued a Directive to Umgeni Water to fund and implement the project.
  • Umgeni Water has submitted a draft Implementation Agreement for consideration by DWS.

TBC

 

Stephen Dlamini Dam

  • Lack of funding
  • The Minister issued a Directive to Umgeni Water to fund and implement the Stephen Dlamini Dam project.
  • Umgeni Water has submitted a draft Implementation Agreement for consideration by DWS.

TBC

 

Umkhomazi Water Project (UWP) - Phase 1

  • Delay in finalising Water Supply Agreements
  • The Heads of Agreement for the Water User Agreement have been drafted and negotiations are ongoing.
  • Funding of R60 million has been transferred to TCTA for project preparation activities.\
  • The Project Steering Committee is in place

2028

Western Cape

Raising of Clanwilliam Dam

  • Delays in procurement outsourced services and goods
  • Previous funding constraints
  • Process for resumption of construction activities has been initiated
  • Establishment of an Infrastructure Procurement Office to unlock procurement challenges

Apr 2026

(to be revised on resumption of construction activities)

Eastern Cape

Mzimvubu Water Project

  • Long-term funding for the project not assured
  • Delays in procurement outsourced services and goods
  • Challenges with obtaining the project documentation from the professional service provider
  • The processing of tenders for the procurement of construction materials is underway
  • Alternative options are being considered for the completion of construction of the access roads

TBC

North West

Mokolo Crocodile Water Augmentation Project- Phase 2 (MCWAP-2A)

  • Impact of delay in the Environmental Authorisations appeal decision on project activities
  • Delay in procurement of project and support services
  • Delay in finalisation of tender design due to delay in appointment of Panel of Experts
  • The Implementation Agreement has been signed and the Water Supply Agreements are being finalised.

April 2028

Limpopo Province

Great Letaba Water Augmentation Project (GLEWAP): Nwamitwa Dam

  • Insufficient funding for project implementation
  • Outstanding sign-off on design work undertaken under LNW as the Implementing Agent such as the dam boundary line.
  • Project activities to be planned as per the availability of funding and in stages
  • Engagement with previous IA to unlock impasse with regards to outstanding dam boundary line

TBC

 

Olifants River Water Resources Development Project- Phase 2D

(ORWRDP-2D)

  • Due to funding limitations, a strategic decision was taken by DWS to re-sequence the project and project implementation will need to be reviewed. A Memorandum of Intent (MOI) was signed between DWS and Commercial Users Consortium.
  • Project to be deferred as per new implementation approach

Project deferred

TBC

 

Olifants River Water Resources Development Project- Phase 2E & 2F

(ORWRDP-2E & F)

  • Due to funding limitations, a strategic decision was taken by DWS to re-sequence the project and project implementation will need to be reviewed. A Memorandum of Intent (MOI) was signed between DWS and Commercial Users Consortium.
  • Project to be deferred as per new implementation approach (ORWRDP 2E)
  • ORWRDP 2F to form part of the re-sequencing implementation model

2E deferred

2F -TBC

TBC

 

Raising of Tzaneen Dam

  • Delay in conclusion of design work with previous Implementing Agent and application for licence to construct which is required for construction to commence
  • The appointment of a new IA was approved on 17 Feb 2022.
  • The establishment of a Project Management Office as well as the commencement of construction will start as soon as the process to appoint the Implementing Agent is finalised.

June 2023

(to be revised on resumption of construction activities)

Eastern Cape

Coerney Dam

  • Delays in procurement of professional service provider
  • The Coerney Dam project was declared by the Minister as an Emergency Works on 10 July 2020 to enable the detailed design to be undertaken in parallel with the environmental impact assessment process.
  • DWS Internal Engineering Unit was appointed on 08 October 2020 to undertake the detailed design on the project and is in the process of procuring an external professional service provider to undertake the engineering design work.

Dec 2025

 

Zalu Dam (Lusikisiki)

  • Delays in procurement of specialist services
  • Lack of sufficient funding for the implementation of the project
  • The design work is approximately 40% complete.
  • Process for procurement of specialist services is currently underway
  • Funding to advance the design work has been provided in the 2021 MTEF.

TBC

 

Foxwood Dam

  • Lack of funding
  • The process of appointing Chief Directorate: Engineering Services for the provision of engineering services for the project has been initiated
  • Funding to advance the design work has been provided in the 2022 MTEF.

TBC

Western Cape

Berg River Voëlvlei Augmentation Scheme (BRVAS)

  • Delay in securing funding
  • Delay in finalising Water Supply Agreements
  • TCTA is continuing with stakeholder consultations to conclude the institutional arrangements.
  • Funding of R75 million has been transferred to TCTA for project preparation activities.

TBC

Bucket Eradication Project

Free State

Ficksburg

  • Contractor appointed in March 2021, however, took site in June 2021 after review of the Engineering Designs
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

 

Clocolan

  • Contractor appointed in March 2021, however, took site in June 2021 after review of the Engineering Designs
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

 

Senekal

  • DWS Construction appointed – delays in acquisition of material through local tenders (however service providers are non-responsive, and this has delayed construction activities)
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

 

Reitz

  • Contractor appointed took site in July 2021, after review of the Engineering Designs
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

 

Petrus Steyn

  • Contractor appointed took site in July 2022, after review of the Engineering Designs
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

 

Arlington

  • Contractor appointed took site in September 2022 (re-advertisement of tender), after review of the Engineering Designs
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

 

Dealesville

  • Contractor appointed took site in September 2022 (re-advertisement of tender), after review of the Engineering Designs
  • Revised Construction Programme submitted and will be monitored accordingly.

March 2023

Northern Cape

Campbell

  • Contractor appointed in December 2022 however, appointment found to be irregular and will be terminated. A new contractor to b sourced and appointed within 2 months.
  • A new contractor will be sourced and appointed within the next 3 months.

March 2023

06 April 2022 - NW1157

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) whether, she has found that her department’s statement on 24 February 2022 calling for Russia to immediately withdrawn its forces from Ukraine in lie with the United Nations Charter is contradictory to her department’s initial position on the war in Ukraine, which was purported to be same with the position of the Presidency of sitting on the fence and requesting increased efforts for diplomacy and to find a solution to help de-escalate tensions and avert armed conflict by both Russian and Ukraine, even after the war had broken out, if not, why not, if so, what (a) is the name and/or are the names of the officials responsible for issuing the statement on 24 February 2022 and (b) action has been taken against the officials responsible for issuing the statement; (2) whether she had sight of the statement before it was released; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

06 April 2022 - NW542

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) price and (e) purchase date of each vehicle purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) the deputy minister since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) Official

(b) Make

(c) Model

(d) Year of Manufacture

(e) Purchase Price

Date Purchased/ ordered

Status

Deputy Minister Magadzi (PTA)

BMW

X3

2021

R799 563.97

11 Oct 2021

Delivered

Deputy Minister Magadzi (CT)

Lexus

UX 250 Hybrid SE

2021

R735 004.10

19 Nov 2021

Ordered

Deputy Minister Mahlobo (PTA)

Audi A6

40TDI 140 KW S Tronic

2021

R 698 133.00

19 Nov 2021

Ordered

---00O00---

06 April 2022 - NW1187

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What steps have been taken in the past two years to ensure that (a) persons with disabilities are employed within her Office and (b) service providers comply with requirements to use the services of persons with disabilities?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

06 April 2022 - NW1156

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

whether, in view of our BRICS partnership with India, who successfully assisted to evacuate 23 000 of its Indian students, 170 foreign students from 17 countries, including Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Nepal, she engaged with authorities in India to assist with the evacuation of South African students from Ukraine; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

06 April 2022 - NW867

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Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her Office since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

06 April 2022 - NW177

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he and/or his department ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

Neither the Office of the Minister not the Department of Water and Sanitation received the correspondence referred to in the question posed by the Honourable Member.

---00O00---

06 April 2022 - NW881

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

what (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incident and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty ?

Reply:


Attached find here: Reply

06 April 2022 - NW1283

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

what (a) number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her office currenctly (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) period has each property been rented for, (ii) are the details of the owner of each property that is rented and (iii) is the monthly rent fee for each property?

Reply:

Attached find here: Reply

05 April 2022 - NW885

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

(a) DPE has a zero / No cases

(aa) there was zero reported in the past three financial years.

(bb) there was zero reported since 1 April 2021.

(b) Number of cases opened and concluded:

  1. There was zero opened and concluded.
  2. There was zero withdrawn.
  3. Zero remained opened or pending based on incidences.

(c) There was zero sanctions meted out on guilty findings.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi P J Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

05 April 2022 - NW1038

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has quantified the damage caused to the road infrastructure by the recent heavy rains; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the extent of the damage and (b) on what date will his department begin with the repair work?

Reply:

The Department of Transport and various other Departments are working closely with the Department of Cooperative Governance (DoCG) and the National Disaster Management Center (NDMC), the designated government body responsible for handling of natural disasters taking place in South Africa.

The NDMC received incident reports from various provinces and shared same with affected sector departments for support coordination and intervention measures.

Relevant structures were activated in all affected provinces through the coordination of Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs) for activation of provincial response plans as well as coordination of reports by organs of state and relevant stakeholders. This was done in line with the 2021/22 National Summer Seasonal Contingency Plan.

All PDMCs and some Sector Departments also submitted their Summer Seasonal Plans. The NDMC activated and coordinates the National Joint Flood Operational Committee (NJFCC) that constitutes all relevant organs of state for preparedness measures, contingency arrangements and intervention measures

a) Based on the initial assessments conducted by provincial road authorities, the extent of the damages is estimated at R11 919 909 965 in the various provinces.

Province

District Municipalities

No of Local Municipalities

  Assessments Estimated Cost

     

Reprioritisation

Shortfall

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman, Joe Gqabi, Amathole and OR Tambo

27

Not Quantified

 

R1 469 393 770

Free State

Lejweleputswa, Xhariep, Fezile Dabi, Mangaung and Thabo Mofutsanyana

 

Not Quantified

R504 400 000

Kwa-Zulu Natal

eThekwini Metro, Ugu, iLembe, Umgungundlovu, Amajuba, Harry Gwala Uthukela and uMzinyathi,

32

Not Quantified

 

 R2 794 650 801

Limpopo

Capricorn, Sekhukhune, Waterberg, Vhembe and Mopani

22

R29 370 000

 R2 021 780 000

Mpumalanga

Bohlabela, Ehlanzeni, Gert Sibande and District Nkangala District

16

R4 000 000

R157 600 000

North west

Dr. Kenneth Kaunda, Bojanala, Ngaka Modiri Molema and Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati 

10

R99 300 000

 

 R4 632 900 560

Northern Cape

Francees Baard, John Taolo Gaetsewe, Namaqua, ZF Mgawu and Pixley ka Seme

 

0

R309 814 834

Grand Total

   

R132 670 000

R11 919 909 965

Table 1: Estimated Cost of Flood Damages

b) The restoration works of infrastructure will be planned, scheduled and undertaken based on the inspections and assessments. Officials from the Department shall assist the teams to conduct the detailed site inspections and assessments (already in progress) as per details provide below:

Province

District / Region

Roads / Sites

Date

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Ladysmith, Durban, Pietermaritzburg

D2502, D91, P40, P549, P205/2, P213, D96

10-11 March 2022

Eastern Cape

Amathole, Alfred Nzo, Sarah Baartman, Joe Gqabi, OR Tambo, Chris Hani

DR08047, DR08403, DR08044, DR08331, DR08346, DR2764

16-17 March 2022

Free State

Lejweleputswa, Thabo Mofutsanyana, Mangaung, Fezile Dabi, Xhariep

S556, S570, S118, S571, P8/1

24-24 March 2022

Mpumalanga

Nkangala, Bohlabela, Gert Sibande, Ehlanzeni

D1175, D957, D2685, D1604, D2950, D1604, P77/2

29-31 March 2022

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati, Ngaka Modri Molema, Bojanala, Dr Kennet Kaunda

D141, P34/2, P48/1, D171, D970

5-6 April 2022

Limpopo

Capricon, Sekhukhune Waterberg, Vhembe, Mopani

D3830, D3749, D3653

9-11 April 2022

Table 2: Details of Inspections and Assessments

In the case of the National Route R61 at Tsomo junction between Ngcobo and Cofimvaba in the Chris Hani District Municipality, the repairs were completed by SANRAL and this road officially opened to motorists on the 28 February 2022.

In case of provincial and municipal roads, the implementation of emergency repairs works was activated by the various road authorities to the affected road infrastructure that falls within their respective areas of jurisdiction.

It must be noted that:

  • In terms of the Disaster Management Act No 57 of 2002, when a disaster occurs:
    • the cost of repairing or replacing public sector infrastructure should be borne by the organ of state responsible for the maintenance of such infrastructure.
    • any financial assistance provided by a national, provincial or municipal organ of state must be in accordance with the national disaster management framework and any applicable post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation policy of the relevant sphere of government
  • as storms continue to cause floods in some areas, the road authorities continues to assess and intervene by repairing damages to restore access, including temporary bypasses and alternative routing for continued access to basic amenities and socio-economic facilities.
  • the reconstruction and rehabilitation to infrastructure damaged by floods, including road infrastructure will depend on the approval of budget reprioritisation and allocation of additional funds by the NDMC and National Treasury;
  • National Government shall assist provinces through the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG) and municipalities through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), as allowable with the provisions of these grant frameworks in terms of the Divisional of Revenue Act (DORA);
  • discussions are taking place at the Inter-Governmental Committee on Disaster Management (ICDM) and the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC)’s Disaster Operations Centre (DOC) remains activated to coordinate and facilitate the implementation of focused intervention and response measures including the monitoring and reporting of summer-related incidents and declared disasters;
  • The Department shall comply with any policy changes approved by ICDM.

05 April 2022 - NW1032

Profile picture: Maotwe, Ms OMC

Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the projected return on investment for the (i) Medupi and (ii) Kusile Power Stations, and over what period?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) ( i & ii)

In terms of the economic regulation framework applicable to the regulated parts of the Electricity Supply Industry (ESI), all investments should earn a return equal to its weighted average cost of capital (WACC), on the depreciated asset value, over its full life cycle – in line with globally-accepted regulatory practice.

This is dependent on the initial asset construction cost, as well as the ongoing annual operating and maintenance cost, and the performance of the asset being assessed as prudent and efficient.

The electricity regulator assessed the %WACC for Eskom for the current MYPD4 revenue cycle as 7.1% pre-tax ‘real’. The regulator also commented in a Reasons for Decision and a subsequent affidavit that the overnight construction cost of Medupi is approximately 6% above the international benchmark norms, and that of Kusile fell within the international benchmark norms. The current operating and maintenance costs are at or below international benchmark norms. After some initial teething problems, Eskom is confident that both Medupi and Kusile will perform according to their design parameters.

Therefore, once the electricity price reaches the level of cost-reflectivity the power stations should earn a return on investment of equal to the %WACC, which for the current MYPD4 revenue cycle is assessed as 7.1% pre-tax ‘real’. However, in the interest of a gradual transition to cost-reflective electricity prices the electricity regulator is not yet awarding the full return on investment in its revenue and price determinations.

For the current MYPD4 revenue cycle the electricity regulator awarded a return of 1.5% on the regulatory asset value, however due to the regulator having reduced the revenue by the amount of the government equity support of R23bn per year the actual returns are close to zero.

(b) In terms of the economic regulatory framework applicable to the regulated parts of the ESI, the return on investment on the depreciated asset values should annually be equal to the %WACC, over the full life cycle of the asset. This will apply once electricity prices are cost-reflective.

05 April 2022 - NW916

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What steps is her department taking to assist emerging rural black farmers in order to (a) access markets and (b) sell their products?

Reply:

The role of the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) in marketing, as envisioned by the Agricultural Marketing Policy, is to provide a range of agricultural marketing support services in order to enhance participation by all role players across the various agricultural value chains. DALRRD implements various marketing support programmes that are aimed at enabling producers, particularly smallholder producers to gain access to markets.

(a),(b) The above-mentioned support programmes include provision of marketing information, marketing skills development programme, Good Agricultural Practices Certification Programme (SA-GAP), marketing infrastructure and market linkages program.

Marketing Information: DALRRD disseminates a wide range of market information to producers and other value chain players through the Marketing Information System, which is a web-based system that can be accessed on the internet and through cellular phones. The information distributed through the system includes daily prices for agricultural products (fresh produce and grains) and weekly prices for meat, as well as standards and grading information and contact information for various markets and market agents. This information is distributed to get producers to understand the prevailing market conditions; to inform them about the existing alternative marketing channels; and to bring to the fingertips of farmers the contact information for various markets. DALRRD runs a user-awareness campaign for smallholder producers on the use of the system, which has reached 473 producers in the current financial year. Furthermore, 11 804 people have accessed the MIS system to date this current financial year.

The marketing skills development programme is being implemented on a continuous basis to empower producers on how the market operates (mechanics) and to provide them with an exposure to different marketing channels. e.g. fresh produce producers are capacitated on fresh produce marketing and are also given an opportunity to participate in market exposure visits in order for them to meet with market management and agents. The goal is to empower producers with knowledge about markets and to give them an opportunity to meet with market managers and organize deals (on their own) with those markets. This program has reached 473 producers during the current financial year.

Marketing infrastructure: the Department is currently facilitating a funding programme for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) falling within the agriculture sector through the Agri-BEE Fund and Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP). The programme is aimed at establishing basic agricultural marketing infrastructure to collate fresh produce from several smallholder farmers in a given production area/hub with a view to performing first stage marketing functions such as grading, washing and packaging before forwarding to either wholesale or retail markets. This project will in part further facilitate the development of economic activities in the rural nodes via facilitating commercialization of fresh agricultural products within and outside the identified nodes. This current financial year, 20 projects were funded under CASP for the provision of marketing infrastructure.

DALRRD also implements the SA-GAP certification program that is aimed at providing assurance to potential buyers that the food produced by smallholder producers is safe for human consumption. Smallholder producers identified to participate in the program are taken through pre-audit exercises to identify any non-conformances on their farms and this is then followed by training/workshops on good agricultural practices, food safety, responsible use of pesticides and product safety and quality as outlined in Regulation 707 of 2005 under the Agricultural Products Standards (APS) Act of 1990. These producers will then be given an opportunity to rectify any identified non-conformances before the final audit and certification can be concluded. This financial year, 82 farms were identified to participate in the program and pre-audits were conducted on all identified farms. One-on-one consultations were conducted on 46 farms. Final audits were conducted on 46 farms and renewal audits were conducted on 21 farms.

Finally, DALRRD administers the preferential market access programme through which it issues import and export quotas and permits to traders to enable them to import and export certain agricultural products at reduced rates of duty. This system gives preference to previously disadvantaged companies and/or traders. A total 1 036 traders (660 established companies and 330 SMEs) benefitted from this programme during 2021/22 financial year.

While the abovementioned initiatives will continue to be implemented to create a conducive environment for producers to gain access to markets, it is acknowledged that there are legislative gaps in the market that still expose our producers to market risks, particularly in areas where the produce is sold on behalf of producers by agents. To close these gaps, DALRRD has initiated a process of amending the Agricultural Produce Agents Act, 1992 (Act No. 12 of 1992) to improve legislative provisions that provide protection to producers and to provide for more accountability on the part of agents.

05 April 2022 - NW1150

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What is the current (a) total number of (i) registered and (ii) unregistered early childhood development centres (ECDs) in the Republic and (b) breakdown of the number of ECDs in each province; (2) what (a) has she found to be the demand for such facilities and (b) number of the specified facilities meet compliance standards; (3) what number of children (a) need access to the facilities and (b) can the facilities accommodate; (4) what (a) is the current state of ECD infrastructure in the Republic, (b) number of ECDs do not have access to water, sanitation and electricity and (c) is the budget that was allocated to ECD infrastructure?

Reply:

The DBE has just completed the fieldwork on the National ECD Census and is busy with data analysis. The honourable member is therefore humbly requested to allow the DBE to finalise the analysis process and release the Census data as this will enable the DBE to respond.

05 April 2022 - NW1139

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(What (a) is the staff capacity of the offices of his department that are located in Somerset West Main Road in Helderberg, Western Cape, that are heavily congested and oversubscribed, (b) number of positions have been filled, (c) is the current situation regarding the full capacitation of the specified office in terms of ensuring all the workstations are properly equipped, (d) are the causes of the alleged congestion and (e) steps will he take to ameliorate the situation as the queue outside the offices impairs the dignity of the citizens of the Republic who make use of the offices where hundreds of persons wait many hours for services that are not forthcoming?

Reply:

a) The Somerset West Office has twenty-four (24) posts on its fixed staff establishment.

b) Fifteen (15) posts are currently filled.

c) It is envisaged to fill two (2) front office clerks, two (2) Immigration Officers and one (1) Control Immigration Officer posts before the end of July 2022. All workstations are currently equipped and will be further capacitated once the above mentioned appointments are concluded.

d) The building is shared with the Department of Labour. Clients for both Departments are using the same entrance. The Department is looking at the possibility of using an alternative entrance, unfortunately the building is classified as a heritage site and no alterations may be considered to the facade of the building. A secondary cause for the congestion is the various lockdowns due to the Coronavirus pandemic and the limited services available to clients as per the lockdown restrictions.

e) Several overtime projects have been conducted to increase access and alleviate the congestion.

END

 

05 April 2022 - NW990

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of hectares of land are registered in the name of her department in each province; (2) what number of hectares of land has been made available for long-term leases by her department in the past five years in each district municipality; (3) what number of hectares of land with title deeds have been transferred from her department to (a) individuals and (b) communities in the past five years in each district municipality?

Reply:

1. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development is the custodian of a total of 10 454 652 hectares (ha) of land.

Province

Area (ha)

Eastern Cape

1,759,362

Free State

394,955

Gauteng

98,003

Kwazulu-Natal

822,401

Limpopo

2,636,848

Mpumalanga

928,663

North West

1,979,980

Northern Cape

1,728,766

Western Cape

105,675

Grand Total

10,454,652

2. A total of 1 289 583 hectares under the custodianship of the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development are subject to active long-term agricultural leases in the past five years.

Province

Area (ha)

EASTERN CAPE

 

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

9,621

Amathole District Municipality

34,232

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

4,262

Chris Hani District Municipality

33,707

Joe Gqabi District Municipality

30,779

Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality

161

Sarah Baartman District Municipality

74,285

FREE STATE

 

Fezile Dabi District Municipality

16,156

Lejweleputswa District Municipality

32,253

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

15,736

Thabo Mofutsanyane District Municipality

36,839

Xhariep District Municipality

34,993

GAUTENG

 

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

6,623

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

789

Sedibeng District Municipality

17,249

West Rand District Municipality

10,751

KWAZULU-NATAL

 

Amajuba District Municipality

3,836

Harry Gwala District Municipality

12,125

Ilembe District Municipality

1,510

King Cetshwayo District Municipality

12,811

Ugu District Municipality

1,237

Umgungundlovu District Municipality

9,198

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

2,233

Umzinyathi District Municipality

4,781

Uthukela District Municipality

5,473

Zululand District Municipality

17,540

LIMPOPO

 

Capricorn District Municipality

27,968

Mopani District Municipality

1,357

Sekhukhune District Municipality

3,236

Vhembe District Municipality

5,434

Waterberg District Municipality

60,237

MPUMALANGA

 

Ehlanzeni District Municipality

19,699

Gert Sibande District Municipality

103,201

Nkangala District Municipality

54,162

NORTH WEST

 

Bojanala District Municipality

66,197

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality

20,979

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality

192,838

Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality

53,783

NORTHERN CAPE

 

Frances Baard District Municipality

18,216

John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality

16,533

Namakwa District Municipality

34,222

Pixley Ka Seme District Municipality

29,019

ZF Mgcawu District Municipality

84,938

WESTERN CAPE

 

Cape Winelands District Municipality

1,871

Central Karoo District Municipality

42,642

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

1,285

Eden District Municipality

5,403

Overberg District Municipality

975

West Coast District Municipality

16,210

Grand Total

1,289,583

3. The past five years 8 173 ha was transferred to individuals and businesses, while 104 850 ha was transferred to communities by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

Area (ha)

 

(a)

(b)

 
 

Individual/Business

Community

Total

EASTERN CAPE

 

 

 

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

 

5,641.13

5,641.13

Amathole District Municipality

834.15

 

834.15

O.R.Tambo District Municipality

 

201.36

201.36

Sarah Baartman District Municipality

0.86

822.91

823.77

FREE STATE

 

 

 

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

0.11

215.72

215.83

Thabo Mofutsanyane District Municipality

 

417.90

417.90

Xhariep District Municipality

 

1,520.40

1,520.40

GAUTENG

 

 

 

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

170.04

 

170.04

West Rand District Municipality

 

189.43

189.43

KWAZULU-NATAL

 

 

 

Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality

0.04

 

0.04

Ilembe District Municipality

 

2,009.56

2,009.56

King Cetshwayo District Municipality

259.52

3,497.81

3,757.33

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

 

847.87

847.87

Zululand District Municipality

 

16,446.04

16,446.04

LIMPOPO

 

 

 

Capricorn District Municipality

11.18

6,072.82

6,084.00

Mopani District Municipality

97.52

4,447.19

4,544.71

Sekhukhune District Municipality

345.05

1,600.58

1,945.63

Vhembe District Municipality

3,274.74

4,694.87

7,969.61

Waterberg District Municipality

3,079.79

1,848.26

4,928.05

MPUMALANGA

 

 

 

Ehlanzeni District Municipality

19.78

10,391.62

10,411.40

Gert Sibande District Municipality

 

2,820.96

2,820.96

Nkangala District Municipality

 

2,992.75

2,992.75

NORTH WEST

 

 

 

Bojanala District Municipality

 

22,326.02

22,326.02

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality

 

190.66

190.66

Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality

 

8,649.90

8,649.90

NORTHERN CAPE

 

 

 

John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality

42.83

 

42.83

ZF Mgcawu District Municipality

 

4,507.26

4,507.26

Western Cape

 

 

 

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

1.79

2,466.09

2,467.89

Eden District Municipality

 

30.80

30.80

West Coast District Municipality

 

0.22

0.22

Grand Total

8,137

104,850

112,988

05 April 2022 - NW978

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which degrees offered across universities has he found have the least job opportunities, (b) which universities offer the specified degrees and (c) what amount of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding goes towards funding students studying towards the degrees?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The Department does not collect data on job opportunities linked to qualifications. However, the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) — Quarter 3 of 2021 indicates that only 2.7% of unemployed persons were graduates, while 7.2% had other tertiary qualifications as their highest level of education.

(c) As at 31 December 2021, the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) reported that R33.652 billion was paid to new and continuing students registered at public universities.

05 April 2022 - NW1146

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In view of the 465 826 learners without identity (ID) numbers that were recorded on the Department of Basic Education’s Learner Unit Record and Information Tracking System (Lurits) in 2021, what (a)(i) steps is his department taking to ensure that learners without ID numbers are assisted to register their births and receive an ID number before and/or in their matric year, (ii) is the total number of schools that were visited by a mobile unit of his department in each province in the period 1 January to 31 December 2021 and (iii) were the total number of (aa) birth registration and (bb) ID applications were made by learners during the school visits in each province in the specified period and (b) criteria were used to select schools to be visited by the mobile units?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Department of Home Affairs obtained a database from Department of Basic Education (DBE), at the beginning of the school year and then determines the number of learners with a qualifying age for Identity documents (matriculants and non-matriculants). Learners 16 years of age without an identity document are also assisted irrespective of the grade they are in, to ensure that by grade 12 they are in possession of a Smart ID Card.

(a)(ii) The breakdown below is the total number of services provided per province:

Province

(ii) Total Number of Schools visited (01 January – 31 Dec 2021)

(iii) (aa) Total number of birth registration within 30 days

(bb) Smart ID cards applications

Eastern Cape

207

40

6 226

Free State

57

0

1 825

Gauteng

487

0

2 696

Kwazulu-Natal

244

407

7 595

Limpopo

202

2

8 160

Mpumalanga

208

0

6 482

Northern Cape

209

264

4 204

North West

127

83

4 225

Western Cape

22

3 463

2 872

TOTAL

1763

4 259

44 285

(b) Collaboration by all stakeholders (i.e Councillors, religious groups, Amakhosi, DBE District Directors and School Principals) advise on the areas where there is a dire need for learners without ID documents, especially where there is no DHA footprint in close proximity, and then a schedule of schools to be visited is developed on monthly basis. Dates for visits and lists of requirements are determined and shared with the school authorities and an implementation schedule is developed and actioned

END

05 April 2022 - NW1140

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What steps will he take to ensure that (a) citizens are treated with dignity and (b) the old and infirm are particularly assisted at the offices of his department that are located in Somerset West Main Road in Helderberg, Western Cape, that are heavily congested and oversubscribed (details furnished)?

Reply:

a) District Manager: Operations and Office Manager to ensure compliance to basic queue management principles of communicating with clients at regular intervals and to educate the staff to conduct themselves in a professional manner.

b) All offices prioritise the aged, persons with disabilities, pregnant mothers, mothers with babies as well as school learners in uniform. The Departmental Service Charter is displayed in front offices and staff pause areas and two (2) front office clerk posts will be filled before July 2022.

END

05 April 2022 - NW965

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) On what date did he (i) depart South Africa and (ii) land in Ukraine, (b) for what period was he in Ukraine, (c) who did he meet with in Ukraine, (d) what were the total costs to his department for his trip to Ukraine and (e) what were the objectives of his trip to Ukraine; (2) whether he received signed and written approval from the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, for his trip to Ukraine; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Ministry has never travelled to Ukraine and is therefore not in a position to respond this question.

05 April 2022 - NW921

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the internationally benchmarked systemic tests that were conducted by the Western Cape Education Department in January 2021, which provide for an independent analysis of learning losses suffered by learners during the COVID19 pandemic and rotational attendance by learners, her department has any plans to increase funding to support catching up of the curriculum, as the specified systemic tests have clearly showed that gains achieved in mathematics and language have reversed; if not, why not; if so, what amount in funding is being considered?

Reply:

The question asked has direct implication to the work of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of the Western Cape Provincial Government who has direct jurisdiction to the work referred to, not the Minister of Basic Education. The question has therefore been referred to the MEC of the Western Cape Department of Education for response. 

05 April 2022 - NW947

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Tourism Relief Fund and the ruling of the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA), (a) what changes and/or amendments have been made to meet the SCA ruling, (b) on what dates were these changes and/or amendments completed, (c)(i) on what date and (ii) in what manner was the call for applications opened under the amended criteria and (d)(i) what total number of applicants were received and (ii) over what period?

Reply:

(a) No amendment or changes were ordered by the Supreme Court of Appeal whose ruling came after the once off Tourism Relief Fund’s implementation was already completed. Thus, no changes or amendements were applicable.

(b) - (d) Not applicable.

05 April 2022 - NW797

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) (a) Where does SA Tourism have offices internationally, (b) on what date did each office open, (c) what number of officials are at each office, (d) what are the main functions and mandate of each office and (e) how is the success of each office measured; (2) what (a) amount has been budgeted for and (b) expenditure was incurred in each office in the (i) past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2021 to date?

Reply:

(1)

(a) Where does SA Tourism have offices internationally

(b) On what date did each office open

(c) What number of officials are at each office

Nigeria

2014

5

US

1984

3

Germany

1960

4

UK

1989

6

France

1993

4

Netherlands

1983

3

India

2004

5

China

2014

6

Japan

1978

2

Australia

2000

5

(d) Each office operates as a regional hub servicing key source markets, to ensure effective marketing initiatives, support to the value chain partners and effective delegation of authority and responsibility. Mandate of each office is to create demand through traveller acquisition by working with the distribution channels to sell South Africa as a tourism destination.

(e) Annual and/or quarterly targets are set for all deliverables of the various country offices before the start of each financial year and success is measured against the delivery of those targets as per portfolio of evidence.

(2) Continue next page

(2) Annual budgets for each office below include both overhead costs and marketing costs. In the 2020/21 fiscal, country offices were only allocated funding for overhead costs and contractual obligations due to Covid 19 pandemic. Budget allocation to South African Tourism was limited as funds were channelled to support efforts to fight the spread of the pandemic in the country.

Country Office

(i) 2018-2019

(i) 2019-2020

(i) 2020-2021

(ii) Since April 2021 to Jan 2022

 

(a) What amount has been budgeted for each office.

(b) What expenditure was incurred in each office.

(a) What amount has been budgeted for each office.

(b) What expenditure was incurred in each office.

(a) What amount has been budgeted for each office.

(b) What expenditure was incurred in each office.

(a) What amount has been budgeted for each office.

(b) What expenditure was incurred in each office.

Nigeria

R30 036 783

R22 698 046

R26 210 153

R18 976 722

R12 020 803

R12 285 452

R40 466 333

R21 857 770

US

R72 265 152

R77 432 730

R87 000 000

R79 844 087

R23 106 798

R15 244 438

R76 199 296

R22 745 990

Germany

R77 994 899

R69 949 316

R75 543 793

R55 517 274

R18 304 367

R11 827 980

R43 695 320

R38 274 172

UK

R71 851 647

R75 062 613

R69 127 524

R92 697 559

R18 441 741

R16 593 867

R43 616 747

R29 628 639

France

R31 392 564

R33 749 174

R45 425 302

R22 634 046

R16 989 398

R10 046 920

R23 379 480

R11 766 050

Netherlands

R49 998 733

R54 533 645

R46 827 089

R37 836 009

R13 881 719

R12 407 193

R36 220 803

R 23 149 700

India

R49 595 332

R47 920 764

R44 694 662

R 4 474 387

R17 190 343

R15 807 495

R50 198 776

R28 609 854

China

R36 631 210

R39 627 027

R57 401 566

R28 225 979

R11 301 529

R11 298 210

R31 369 746

R20 705 142

Japan

R20 463 251

R19 760 242

R15 513 332

R15 684 849

R7 248 486

R 4 653 471

R18 671 315

R16 916 187

Australia

R40 428 712

R37 375 197

R43 993 558

R37 660 105

R14 227 593

R11 045 308

R41 296 569

R27 959 719

05 April 2022 - NW1138

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) What steps will he take to resolve the ongoing complaint that offices of his department that are located in Somerset West Main Road in Helderberg, Western Cape, are heavily congested and oversubscribed; (2) how does he intend to deal with employees of his department who refuse to assist the general public in a respectful and dignified manner when they conduct themselves in a rude and obstreperous manner with the public and refuse to address them in English and/or Afrikaans while the public that are served by their office is mainly Afrikaans and/or English Home Language speakers; (3) whether there have been any disciplinary hearings and/or conduct enquiries regarding any member of the staff employed at the specified branch; if not, why not; if so, what (a) were the outcomes of the hearings and/or enquiry and (b) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Office Managers are responsible for sharing of information i.e. capacity intake, client volume inside and system stability with clients queueing outside. This must be done at regular intervals throughout the day. Furthermore, there are plans to strengthen capacity with the filing of vacant positions of additional front office staff during the financial year 2022/23.

2. As part of the Western Cape Complaint resolution mechanism, the contact details of the Office Manager, District Manager and Provincial Manager are displayed in all front offices. Complaints escalated to the Provincial Manager are being recorded and monitored. All Front Office staff are required to wear name tags. Once a specific complaint related to a staff member’s conduct was received the District Manager will investigate and apply the necessary corrective measures. The aggrieved client will be provided with feedback and assisted as part of redress. All the staff members from the Somerset West Office are multilingual and are required to address clients in English. The Office has staff who is proficient in other languages should there be a specific request from a client.

3. Yes. The complaint was related to the alleged discrimination against a member from the LGBTQI community in August 2021.

a) There was no disciplinary hearing due to a lack of evidence against any specific employee.

b) A training session for all staff was facilitated by the District Manager: Operations to update staff on prevailing policies.

END

05 April 2022 - NW878

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

The department did not have sexual harassment incidents and sexual assault incidents reported for the past three financial years and the period 1 April 2021 to March 2022. The table below provides a response to the questions asked.

QUESTION

3 Financial years

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021

2019 - 2020

2020 - 2021

2021 - 2022

(b) Number of cases

0

0

0

(i) Opened and concluded

0

0

0

(ii) Withdrawn

0

0

0

iii) Remain open or pending based on the incidents

0

0

0

(c) Sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

0

0

0

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

a i) There were 13 sexual harassment cases reported during the period 2018/19 to 2020/21 

  ii) There were no cases of sexual assault that were reported during the period 2018/19 to 2020/21 

(aa) The following breakdown applies in each three past financial years: 

(i) 2018/19: there was one (1) reported case

(ii) 2019/20: there were three (3) reported cases 

(iii) 2020/21: there were nine (9) reported cases 

(bb) Two (2) cases of sexual harassment were reported and there was no case of sexual assault reported since April 2021 

b) Out of a total of 15 misconduct cases opened:

i) A total of 11 cases were concluded

 ii) A total of 2 misconduct cases were withdrawn 

iii) A total of 2 misconduct cases remain open or pending 

c) The following sanctions were meted out against the alleged persons: - 8 sanctions of dismissals were meted, - 1 sanction of a final written warning was meted; - 1 sanction of a 3 months suspension without pay; was meted; and - 1 case was not found guilty.

05 April 2022 - NW833

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the details of the Government’s position regarding the value of mothertongue education in the Republic and (b) percentage of schools are able to teach in mother-tongue education?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) values mother tongue education and thus encourages learners to learn through their Home Languages wherever it is feasible and practicable. This position is in alignment with the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Section 6 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa lists the official languages as IsiZulu, IsiXhosa, IsiNdebele, Siswati, Sesotho, Setswana, Sepedi, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, English and Afrikaans. All these languages can be used as languages of learning and teaching or as subjects. Section 29(2) of the Bill of Rights provides that “everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is REASONABLY PRACTICABLE.” 

The above are reiterated in the National Education Policy Act, the South African Schools Act and the Language in Education Policy. The South African Schools Act goes further and provides that “A recognised Sign Language has the status of an official language for purposes of learning at a public school.” Whilst waiting for the enactment of the South African Sign Language as the twelfth official language, in the education sector, it has been long that the system has been operating with 12 official languages. 

In its attempts to elevate the status of the previously marginalised languages, the Department of Basic Education developed the National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Grades 1-12, which makes provision for equal use of all 11 official languages and the South African Sign Language in the schooling system. The National Curriculum Statement Grades 1-12 encourages learners to learn through their home language(s), particularly, though not limited, in the Foundation Phase. The policy does not restrict the use of home language instruction up to Grade 3, but emphasises the use of the home language in Grades 1-3 to reinforce the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and counting. The NCS recognises the importance for learners to learn in their home language. The Language of Learning and Teaching (LoLT) can be selected from any official language. The NCS and the LiEP advocate for an additive bi/multilingualism approach that encourages learners to learn through their home language as long as it is feasible, as well as to learn other languages. Additive bi/multilingualism allows maintenance of learners’ home language as they acquire additional languages as subjects or as languages of instruction.

The National Development Plan (NDP) recommends that learners’ home language be used as LoLT for longer periods and English be introduced much earlier in the foundation phase. Chapter 15 of the NDP emphasises the need to develop African languages or mother tongue as integral to education, science and technology, in order to develop and preserve these languages.

Despite all these noble efforts, the reality on the ground reflects otherwise. The hegemony of English as a preferred medium of instruction and communication seems to prevail, which together with Afrikaans are still the dominant languages of learning and teaching in majority of South African schools.

The Eastern Cape initiated the Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education pilot, wherein 2 015 schools are using IsiXhosa and Sesotho as LoLT beyond Foundation Phase (up to Grade 9). Learners in these schools are taught Mathematics, Natural Science and Technology in their home languages IsiXhosa and Sesotho. This initiative was started in 72 Confimvaba schools in Grade 4 in 2012 and incrementally in subsequent grades and it is now being implemented up to Grade 9 in 2022. The province is planning to roll it out to all the schools where it is feasible.

The DBE is currently putting prudent plan in place to roll out African Languages Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education to the other eight provinces.  

(b) As detailed under (a) English and Afrikaans are used as LoLT throughout the schooling system. African languages are used as LoLT mainly in the Foundation Phase. Only IsiXhosa and Sesotho, through the Eastern Cape Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education are used as LoLT post the Foundation Phase.

05 April 2022 - NW801

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, in light of the fact that his department closed the illegal mining of a certain company (name and details furnished) on 8 September 2021 and the specified company was given 14 days’ notice to follow the correct procedures by applying for a valid and legal permit or licence, the company received a valid licence and/or permit from his office in eMalahleni; if not, (a) what are the reasons that the company is still operating and (b) to whom is the company selling its coal; if so, (i) on what date did the company acquire its licence and (ii) will he provide Ms A M M Weber with a copy of the licence and/or permit issued to the company?

Reply:

According to the records of the Department, there is no company by the name of Liquid Mist.

 

05 April 2022 - NW966

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the latest (a) plans and (b) timelines for the construction of the N2/T2 bypass through Somerset West to Sir Lowry’s Pass by the SA National Roads Agency Limited?

Reply:

a) The consulting engineering service providers are finalising the required detail plans and construction tender documents, subject to finalisation of various outstanding matters such as land acquisition.

b) Based on the current SANRAL planning and timelines as submitted and already considered by the City of Cape Town (CoCT), SANRAL can only commence with road construction when in possession of a ‘vacant road reserve’, which for now is planned for the period January 2025 to July 2025, as per the two planned construction sections. It must be emphasized that the conclusion of the land acquisition by the CoCT and the securing of all development rights to enable the alternative land procured to be developed into integrated townships, is on the “critical path” that will determine the timeline for the N2 Construction Projects. This aspect is complex, and the consents required in terms of the Planning and Environmental Laws are not within the control of SANRAL and the CoCT.

05 April 2022 - NW812

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) (a) What steps will his department take to rehabilitate the Wilge River in Mpumalanga where effluent water from an un-rehabilitated coalmine destroyed the ecology over a distance of 55 km, (b) what interventions will his department put in place to prevent the ecological destruction from happening again and (c) who is held responsible for the disaster. (2) what measures will his department put in place in order to (a) monitor and (b) protect our rivers, streams and wetlands from contamination in future; (3) (a) what total number of un-rehabilitated mines pose a danger of damaging our rivers, (b) will he provide Mr L J Basson with a list of the specified un-rehabilitated mines and (c) how is his department dealing with un-rehabilitated mines that pose a danger of contaminating the water systems?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) issued a Directive instructing the responsible company to appoint a suitably qualified environmental consultant to compile a rehabilitation plan for all the areas affected by the pollution incident. The issued Directive also indicated that the rehabilitation plan ought to have clear timeframes and descriptions of how and when each remedial action will be implemented. The company subsequently submitted the draft rehabilitation plan. The Department has assessed and accepted the rehabilitation plan for implementation however, there are still further investigations that need to be conducted to ensure sustainability.

One of the important aspects that were committed in the draft rehabilitation plan is the ecological restoration of the system. This aspect will be implemented over time as containment or curbing of pollution is prioritised to prevent potential immigration. The DWS is currently monitoring implementation of compliance to the Directive to ensure all reasonable measures are taken to contain and minimise the effects of the incident.

Further, the Department together with the representative from the responsible company held a meeting wherein the following matters were confirmed:

  • The company will appoint an independent qualified environmental consultant as prescribed in the Directive to develop sustainable rehabilitation plan
  • The company will implement remedial measures to minimise and curb pollution, these measures include, amongst others, clean-up of the pollutants from the river system, the removal of fish carcass from the stream
  • The company requested approval from the DWS to release water from Bronkhorspruit and Witbank Dams to assist with the flushing of affected areas and the request was granted
  • Final Rehabilitation Plan will be submitted on or before 30 April 2022

(1)(b) The Department conducted an investigation after receiving reports of fish kill at Wilge River system. Findings of the investigation revealed that there was a pollution incident that had occurred at Kwezela Colliery on approximately 14 February 2022. The incident was caused by an old Mine shaft that collapsed which led to an overflow of polluted water from the facility into the watercourse. The Department served the facility with a Directive to immediately rectify the contravention. The Department directed the facility to, amongst others:

  • take reasonable measures to contain, minimise the effects of pollution incident,
  • undertake clean-up procedures,
  • remedy the effects of the incident.

The facility submitted an action plan, and the Department is currently monitoring implementation thereof. The DWS has recently engaged the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) to request the inclusion of criminal investigators from DFFE on the investigative team. The DFFE will therefore be supporting the other government officials, in relation to the criminal investigation, which will determine the criminal liability based on the evidence collected. A decision would then be made by the National Prosecuting Authority on whether or not to prosecute and which parties should be prosecuted.

(1)(c) Kromdraai Mine which is a section of Khwezela Colliery.

(2)(a) The DWS has a compliance monitoring programme to monitor compliance with the conditions of the water use authorisation in terms of water uses including the discharges of water into the water resources. Furthermore, the department has a regular sampling programme which serves as an early warning system to non-compliance or water quality risks.

2(b) The Department has identified and assessed catchments at high risk for acid mine drainage and is developing mitigation plans to proactively manage these aspects.

3(a) The lead authority for mining is the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE). The total number of the un-rehabilitated mines can be obtained from the DMRE.

3(b) Although my Department is not the lead authority on un-rehabilitated mines, the DWS is currently in the process of drafting mitigation strategies to address the impacts of Acid Mine Drainage and amongst other things, these include mitigation measures for un-rehabilitated mines which may pose a danger to water resources.

3(c) Until mine closure certificates are obtained, mines are monitored in accordance with their water use authorisation. The department provides comment and input in this process to DMRE. Water use authorisations also include provisions for progressive rehabilitation and mines are monitored in accordance with these provisions.

---00O00---

05 April 2022 - NW799

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the performance agreement that she signed with the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, (a) what are her main key performance indicators, (b) how is each performance indicator measured and (c) how often is she assessed?

Reply:

(a) The following are the Minister of Tourism’s Key Responsibility Areas:

1. Political leadership contributing to the country’s triple challenges, NDP priorities and Medium term Strategic Framework (NTSF) 2019 – 2024. This contributes to the following outcomes:

  • Re-industrialisation of the economy and emergence of globally competitive sectors.
  • Transformed, representative and inclusive economy which prioritises women, youth and persons with disabilities.
  • A better South Africa.

2. Building a capable, ethical and developmental state. The outcome to which this KRA contributes is functional, efficient and integrated government

3. Institutional oversight of the HOD and Department. This KRA contributes to the following outcomes:

  • Executive Authority oversight over the Deputy Minister
  • Executive Authority oversight over the Accounting Officer
  • The oversight and achievement of departmental strategic goals and annual performance plans and budget
  • The oversight and achievement of gender responsive departmental strategic goals and annual performance plans and budget as per the gender responsive planning, budgeting, monitoring, evaluation and auditing framework.
  • National Department facilitation of public involvement, participation and service delivery improvement initiatives.
  • National Departments’ and entities’ involvement and contribution to the District Development Model.

4. Political leadership and oversight, in respect of Government Structures, Parliamentary Accountability, and Oversight on State Owned Companies and Public Entities / Agencies

(b) The DPME prepares the scorecard, which includes key issues affecting delivery, early warning risks and emerging policy issues for the President, a copy of which is sent to the Minister. In preparation of the scorecard, DPME obtains initial progress reports with supporting evidence from the Department.

(c) The Minister is expected to table bi-annual progress reports to Cabinet on progress with regard to the Minister’s commitments in the MTSF. These bi-annual progress reports also forms the basis of the Executive discussions to identify and tackle obstacles to implementation.

05 April 2022 - NW948

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the SA National Parks and the training of tour guides by her department (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 January 2022, (i) what total number of tour guides have completed their training in each province in each month, (ii) what (aa) total number of students started the course and did not complete the course and (bb) were their reasons for not completing the course and (iii)(aa) how are potential students identified and (bb) what criteria are used in this regard?

Reply:

Training of Tourist Guides

(a) 2018-2019

(i) What total number of tour guides have completed their training in each province in each month.

 

Kruger National Park Orientation

January 2019

Mpumalanga (MP) – 20 guides

Limpopo (LP) – 3 guides

February 2019

MP – 14 guides

LP – 8 guides

A total of 45 guides were trained.

(ii) (aa) What total number of students started the course and did not complete the course.

All participants that started the course completed it.

(ii) (bb) What were their reasons for not completing the course.

N/A

(iii) (aa) How are potential students identified.

Adverts were developed and circulated to guides from MP and LP (via the respective Provincial Registrars) to apply for the up-skilling opportunity. The advert was also distributed to guides that work in the Kruger National Park and this was done via SANParks.

(iii) (bb) What criteria are used in this regard

Applicants needed to be registered tourist guides with a minimum qualification or competency as a Nature Site Guide with Kruger National Park being listed as one of the areas of operation. Those with qualifications over and above the minimum requirements were also acceptable.

No training of tourist guides was done with SANParks in the Financial Years of (a) 2019- 2020, 2020- 2021 and (b) since 1 January 2022 to date.

(i)- (iii) Not applicable

05 April 2022 - NW967

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the construction of the N2/T2 bypass through Somerset West to Sir Lowry’s Pass, (a) what are the details of the plans of the SA National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) to resettle the people who are currently occupying and living on the SANRAL land, (b) where will the people be relocated and (c) by what date is it envisaged that the people will be resettled?

Reply:

SANRAL and the City of Cape Town (CoCT) signed an Implementation Protocol (IP) in terms of section 35(1) of the Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act, 2005 (Act No. 13 of 2005) ("IRFA"), in Dec 2020. This IP is a codification of the Constitutional obligation placed upon all organs of the state to cooperate with one another when embarking on major projects that will draw on the resources of two or more such organs of the state. It also allows for the exercising of statutory powers by both parties in a coordinated manner.

The IP sets out in detail the role and responsibilities of each party thereto.

In this instance, the statutory function or the provision of a service, depends on the participation of organs of state in different governments who must co-ordinate their actions. This has been done as it would be in the best interest of both the CoCT and SANRAL to construct the N2 through Somerset West, thus positively impacting the economy of Western Cape Province and that of the country. This initiative by SANRAL is accordingly in the national and local public interest.

In brief, the IP requires that SANRAL would design and construct the proposed extension of the 13 km of Greenfields N2, amongst others, whereas the CoCT would be responsible for the procurement of alternative land suitable for housing, take transfer of such alternate land, procure all necessary development rights and to develop such land to enable the main relocations and other relocations of the informal settlements within the N2 Road Reserve to be effected in keeping with the N2 Project Timeline.

The IP established an Intergovernmental Forum (the IgF) which consists of delegated management officials from both SANRAL and the CoCT. Both parties provide the alternating chairperson for the “IgF”. Various work plans have been prepared and adopted by the IgF which set out all the tasks relating to the full spectrum of the IP in support of the N2 Project. There are but two outstanding work plans which are currently being finalised. These work plans, inter alia, are geared and detailed to the extent that the projected timelines for the both the construction of the N2 Project and the relocation of all occupants from the road reserve is achieved. The CoCT has identified various land parcels for the main relocation and is currently finalising the acquisition thereof. Once this process is finalised a more detailed timeline for the main relocation will be submitted to the IgF for approval and adoption.

Once all work plans are approved and adopted by the IgF, each party is bound to these and the timeframes that flow therefrom. In terms of the IP, the IgF is empowered to intervene and seek higher authority and assistance to ensure any risk of “slippages” are addressed before they are realised. In this regard the IgF will also shortly be required to consider and adopt a full “Risk Register” that will guide the whole process under the IP. Further the IP will also be requested to consider, adopt and manage a joint communication strategy that will ensure there is a unified approach to all aspects of communication both with the communities settled in the N2 Road Reserve, the wider community of Somerset West and the greater CoCT Community. .

The work plan for project timelines will be submitted to the next IgF meeting on the 17 May 2022. At this point the provisional timeline is for the main relocation to commence from September 2024 and be concluded by December 2026. This will be in a phased manner allowing the affected section of the N2 Project to commence from July 2025.

Based on the current SANRAL planning and timelines as submitted and already considered by the CoCT, SANRAL must be able to commence with road construction when in possession of “a vacant road reserve “by the fourth quarter of 2024/2025”, as per the two planned construction sections.

It must be emphasized that the conclusion of the land acquisition by the CoCT and the procurement of all development rights to enable the alternative land procured to be developed into integrated townships, is on the “critical path” that will determine the timeline for the N2 Project construction activities. This aspect is complex, and the consents required in terms of the Planning and Environmental Laws are not within the control of SANRAL and the CoCT.

05 April 2022 - NW983

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with regard to the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan, she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with a comprehensive plan of her department to address the (a) safety of the farming community and (b) theft of their livestock since 2019; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Yes, the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan provides practical interventions to address the issues of safety of the farming community aligned to the Rural Safety Strategy developed by the Department of Police. This notwithstanding, safety and security remain the primary responsibility of the South African Police Services.

The two specific measures addressed by the AAMP are as follows:

a) Farm safety – establish and promote farming community forums aligned to local policies and expand visibility of police in farming communities, including mobile police stations; all these to form part of Rural Safety Strategy.

b) Stock theft – Full implementation of Livestock Identification and Traceability System to all farmers. Expand the installation of livestock anti-theft cameras in the entry points of key routes in rural and farming areas.

In both areas, the AAMP promotes the Public Private Partnership (PPP) approach to leverage resources from government and business sectors. The Master Plan also addresses the measures required to curb livestock theft in rural and commercial farming areas. The Master Plan will be made available after sign-off by social partners in the first quarter of 2022.

05 April 2022 - NW896

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

To date, there are no sexual harassment cases that are pending. For the past three financial years, only one case was reported, which has since been withdrawn.

---00O00--

05 April 2022 - NW855

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Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (a) him, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of his department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

ITEMS

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

 

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

DEPARTMENT

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

DEPARTMENT

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

DEPUTY MINISTER

DEPARTMENT

a) CATERING

1,272.90

24,164.50

1,041,642.70

15,468.00

-

272,099.64

7,832.00

1,572.40

432,669.69

b) ENTERTAINMENT

-

-

-

-

-

-

888.90

-

-

c) S&T - LOCAL ACCOMMODATION

822,741.16

258,903.06

22,248,865.44

352,939.89

117,943.62

10,506,194.13

510,031.34

694,075.03

15,643,483.33

c) S&T - FOREIGN ACCOMMODATION

387,307.17

143,021.00

1,236,889.29

183,157.94

12,379.75

140,784.86

3,735.89

23,908.67

176,859.52

TOTALS

1,211,321.23

426,088.56

24,527,397.43

551,565.83

130,323.37

10,919,078.63

522,488.13

719,556.10

16,253,012.54

.

05 April 2022 - NW782

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has been informed of any assessment conducted by the Financial and Fiscal Commission on the capability of (a) municipalities and/or (b) other organs of the State to implement the provisions of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 4 of 2019; if not, will he request such an assessment to be done; if so, what (i) are the details of the assessment, (ii) are the findings of the specified assessment and (iii) is his response to the assessment?

Reply:

1. (a) No

(b) No

The Minister of Transport will not ask for the capability assessment to be conducted;

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

05 April 2022 - NW891

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

a) What is the total number of incidents reported in the department:

 

(aa) 2018-2019

(aa) 2019-2020

(aa) 2020-2021

(bb) Since 1 April 2021

(i) Sexual harassment

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

(ii) Sexual assault

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

b) (i) - (iii) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

05 April 2022 - NW785

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport in Port Elizabeth, the Airports Company South Africa has (a) completed the review of the precinct plan announced in the 2018-19 financial year and (b) developed a plan to upgrade the airport infrastructure to increase capacity; if not, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details of the plan, including dates of commencement and completion, (ii) relevant details of the successes achieved as a result of the Airport Airlift Project and (iii) any further, relevant details?

Reply:

“Whether, with reference to the Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport in Port Elizabeth, the Airports Company South Africa has:

a) completed the review of the precinct plan announced in the 2018-19 financial year;

Yes

b) developed a plan to upgrade the airport infrastructure to increase capacity; if not, why not; if so, what are they?

No. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic impact, passenger traffic demand declined with more than 80% over the entire ACSA airport system. Passenger traffic at Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport decreased from approximately 1.7 million passengers in the 2019/2020 FY to approximately 400 000 passengers in the 2020/21 FY. As a result of low traffic volumes and ACSA’s financial position (-R2.6 billion loss in 2020/21) it was decided to suspend all capacity projects, including the Development Plans for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport. The business strategy was refocused on critical refurbishments and replacements and, all capacity projects had to be deferred. ACSA continues to monitor traffic and intends to re-initiate capacity projects of this nature in line with passenger demand.(i) relevant details of the plan, including dates of commencement and completion, See Sections 2-4, for the approach, capacity projects, and detailed process followed.

1. Background and Context

The development of Airports in the ACSA group is guided by a hierarchy of plans at a macro and micro level. At a macro level, development is guided by the Airport Master Plans followed by Precinct Plans, where precinct plans focus on specific areas or precincts as identified in the Airport Master Plan, e.g., terminal precinct, cargo precinct. etc. On a micro level, development plans focus on a specific infrastructure, e.g., passenger terminal, parking area, etc., within a specific precinct.

For the purpose of this response, the focus will be placed on the Landside Terminal Precinct Plan and the Development Plans for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport. The Precinct Plans do not identify specific infrastructure projects to increase capacity, but the Development Plans respond directly to interventions to increase capacity in line with traffic demand.

The Airports Company South Africa commenced with the development of a Landside Terminal Precinct Plan/Urban Design Framework for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport in the 2019/20 financial year and successfully completed the Precinct Plan in the 2020/21 financial year. The study area for the Precinct Plan consists of the landside terminal precinct area as identified in the Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport Master Plan.

The primary focus of the Precinct Plan was to ensure clear linkages of the precinct with the land uses in the airport’s adjoining and surrounding areas to create a fully integrated precinct in the urban context.

The main purpose of the Precinct Plan is to determine sustainable land use and to define a development strategy, based on the commercial development potential of the airport property that is not required for core aviation uses. This is in accordance with ACSA’s strategic objective of generating non-regulated revenue/non-aeronautical revenue.

The process to arrive at the Precinct Plan consisted of the following phases, each with associated deliverables:

  • Phase 1: Inception / Scoping Report
  • Phase 2: Data Collection and Consolidation
  • Phase 3: Future Conceptualisation and Objectives
  • Phase 4: Conceptual Design Framework
  • Phase 5: Final Precinct Plan / Framework

2. Development Plans - Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport

Two major projects for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport were planned to commence during the 2019 to 2023 Permission Period i.e., Terminal Re-development and Landside Parking. The details of these projects or developments at the time (pre-Covid-19) are indicated below:

Project Name:

terminal Development

PrOJECT CATEGORY

New Capacity

Project Motivation

The terminal was last renovated in 2009. The renovations took the overall capacity of the terminal to 2 Million Annual Passengers (MAP) with limitations on the departure lounge, concourses, and queuing areas. The 2 MAP overall capacity was expected to be reached by 2019.

Project Scope/Description

The cost estimate of R 10 million at this stage only consisted of initial fees to initiate design development. Construction or implementation of the development was not included in the estimated cost. The fees were also to be utilised to finalise scoping.

It was envisaged that the eventual terminal development will entail the demolition of a part of the existing terminal and reconstruction of a new building on the existing site. The new building was to have double the footprint of the existing terminal. Passenger loading bridges were to be introduced.

PROJECT BENEFITS

This terminal development project was targeted at addressing the current constraints at the time and to provide additional capacity to meet future demand. Benefits included improvement of the ASQ score for the airport along with the IATA Levels of Service (LOS). An additional 2 MAP capacity was also anticipated.

ASSOCIATED Opex/NON-AERO REVENUE

This was going to be determined once the scope was finalised and it was going to be realised once the development of the terminal was complete.

Project Cost

The full project cost was estimated at R 1,2 billion, however only R 10 million was required for this Permssion period to commence with the intial design development.

PrOJECT TIMELINES

The design was to commence in 2023. The terminal development was estimated to be completed by 2026.

Project Name:

PARKING

PrOJECT CATEGORY

New Capacity

Project Motivation

The demand for car rental bays was expected to exceed the current allocation. The airport has sufficient bays to meet the overall demand, however, the allocation between car rental and public parking needed to be re-assigned.

Project Scope/Description

This project entails re-organising and optimising the existing parking. The boundary between car rental and public parking was to be relocated, with parking re-assigned between car rental and public parking. The ingress and egress layout were intended to be re-organised in-line with the parking reassignment.

PROJECT BENEFITS

This project was aimed at improving utilisation of the existing parking facilities and to optimise utilisation of the landside.

ASSOCIATED Opex/NON-AERO REVENUE

Parking revenues were to be generated for the reallocation of public and car rental bays.

Project Cost

The project was estimated to cost R 17 million.

PrOJECT TIMELINES

The project was planned for completion in 2022.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic impact, passenger traffic demand declined with more than 80% over the entire ACSA airport system. Passenger traffic at Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport decreased from approximately 1.7 million passengers in the 2019/2020 FY to approximately 400 000 passengers in the 2020/21 FY. As a result of low traffic volumes and ACSA’s financial position (-R2.6 billion loss in 2020/21) it was decided to suspend all capacity projects including the Development Plans for Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport mentioned above. The business strategy was focussed on critical refurbishments and replacements, therefore, all capacity projects had to be deferred. ACSA continues to monitor traffic and intends to re-initiate capacity projects of this nature in line with passenger demand.

(ii) relevant details of the successes achieved as a result of the Airport Airlift Project;

(iii) any further, relevant details?”

3. Airport Airlift Project

The Nelson Mandela Bay Airlift project is a collaboration between Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, Airports Company of South Africa, Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism, and the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber.

The main objective of the project is to increase the number of tourists to Gqeberha, to stimulate economic growth for the city and region.

The key strategic pillars for the project are:

  • Improving airlift – by partnering with airlines to develop new air routes whilst maintaining and expanding existing routes at Chief Dawid Stuurman Airport.
  • Collaborative destination marketing – to create/stimulate demand and drive inbound tourist arrivals into the city and region.

Other objectives are to:

  • increase our market share of tourists.
  • inspire travellers and change perceptions regarding Nelson Mandela Bay.
  • increase awareness and positivity for the destination.
  • increase searches and engagement on our destination marketing channels.

Progress to date:

  • The development of an Airline Incentive Framework/Policy, which has been included in the City’s Investment Incentive Policy. An incentive programme is vital to mitigate the risk in the early stages of a new airline operation and thereby ensuring the sustainability of route development opportunities.
  • Partnership with Mango Airlines to increase airlift between Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport and Lanseria in 2019.
  • Partnership with Cemair to develop direct routes between Chief Dawid Stuurman International Airport to Braam Fischer International Airport and King Phalo Airport.
  • Development of a route pipeline, with targeted routes earmarked for development.

05 April 2022 - NW802

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) What steps will (a) he and/or (b) his department take to prevent contamination of water flowing in the rivers (details furnished); (2) whether he will furnish Ms A M M Weber with a list of all mines in Mpumalanga that (a) have been rehabilitated in the past 10 years and (b) are currently being rehabilitated; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the current cost of (a) all rehabilitated mines and (b) mines that are being rehabilitated at the moment; (4) whether he will provide Ms A M M Weber with the names of all un-rehabilitated mines in Mpumalanga; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW981E

Reply:

1.a) All water resources are managed through the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998), under the competency of the Minister of Water and Sanitation, all mines are mandated to acquire water use License prior commencing with mining activities

2(a)(b) The Department has record of the Authorised mining operations conducting concurrent rehabilitations on portion/s of the disturbed environment, however there’s no recorded of a complete rehabilitated and closed mining operations in Mpumalanga. All mining operations conduct concurrent rehabilitation in accordance with the approved Environmental management Program/Environmental Authorisation

3(a)(b) Mining companies submit an annual Environmental Audit report which describe the current environmental disturbances and conducted rehabilitation process with a quantum calculation on the extent of the activities within the mining operations. This report further provides the operational cost on the management of the potential impacts with the adjustment of the financial provision. All mining operations conduct concurrent rehabilitation in accordance with the approved Environmental management Program/Environmental Authorisation

4) All holders of rights and permits whose operations are underway or placed under Business Rescue Practice have some level of outstanding rehabilitation, and the Department continuously monitor these operations to ensure that the State is not exposed to the risk of inheriting liability.

 

 

05 April 2022 - NW1164

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What amount remains unspent on the budget for the (a) Basic Education Infrastructure Grant, (b) conditional grants and (c) funds from the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

What amount remains unspent on the budget for the 

(a) Basic Education Infrastructure Grant:

No amount was unspent on the budget. The total budget was transferred to provinces.

(b) conditional grants and 

The other conditional grants budgets were transferred fully, with exception for Learners with Profound Disability Grant where an amount of R17.1 million was not transferred to two province, namely, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape.

(c) funds from the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI) in the 2020-21 financial year?

Unspent amount for ASIDI was R321 million.

05 April 2022 - NW901

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the increase of automation, more use for robotic components and an urgent need to upskill those whose jobs are in danger of becoming redundant and the many opportunities for the Republic to benefit from the changes 4IR will bring, her department has a plan to focus on skills development to ensure that (a) young persons are ready for this new development in the world and (b) the Republic does not fall further behind on a global scale; if not, why not; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

Whether with reference to the fourth Industrial revolution, the increase of automation, more use for robotic components and an urgent need to upskill those whose  jobs are in danger of becoming redundant and the many opportunities for the Republic to benefit from changes 4IR will bring, her department has a plan to focus on skills development to ensure that (a) young persons are ready for the new development in the world and (b)the Republic does not  fall further behind on a global scale, if not why not; if so what are the further, relevant details?

Response

Basic Education Sector is at the centre of realigning the output of young people that the economy requires. The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) is at the centre of this realignment of the required skills of the future. The Department of Basic Education has a roadmap which it has followed by the development of a Coding and Robotics Curriculum for Grades R-9 which will eventually be offered in the FET Band (Grades10-12) responding to the changing work environment. This roadmap is aligned with the National Development Plan (NDP) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) to ensure that learners going through the educations system, are being exposed to Coding and Robotics will develop the Foundational Skills required from a workplace that has been changed by the 4IR e.g. Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Automation of production systems, etc.  

Through the Coding and Robotics Curriculum, the DBE aim is to upskill the educators, education officials and youth in these areas. The Application Skills envisaged in the draft Coding and Robotics targets these specific skills required. In a short to medium term, the public-private partnerships including industry and Higher Education Institutions should activate plans that will mediate the required 4IR skills to the current workforce, to cushion the impact of change management and negative impact of automating the economic tools of production on labour.

The DBE has awakened to the realisation that the “Skills of a Changing World” is a reality that the country requires. Thus, the development and piloting of the Three Steams Model (Academic, Vocational and Occupational Steams) and the Multi-Certification Strategy in the curriculum offering by the DBE

The DBE has Orientated the Grade R-8 piloting schools’ teachers in the Draft Coding and Robotics Curriculum. The University of South Africa is currently training 950 Foundation Phase teachers in Coding and Robotics. This training will realise its objectives in the third quarter of 2022 with the support from the ETDP-SETA.

(b)the DBE does not believe that we are falling behind from the 4IR space since we are the country is amongst the first in the world to develop a formal Coding and Robotics curriculum which provide learners with necessary skills and competencies. There is no need to panic, as automation of the economic tools is not equal to job losses automated Machinery and Robots will need skilled personnel to design, manufacture, programme and code them. The   capacitation of our Human Resources both active in the economy through in-service programmes that the youth can be   part of and those in our education system will contribute to job creation and economic development noting the required “Skills of the changing world. The DBE is partnering with the private sector to resource and fund the programmes for teacher development and the youth at large

05 April 2022 - NW811

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) By what date will the work on the 4km feeder canal into the Brandvlei Dam near Worcester be completed, (b) what will be the cost of the work done on the feeder canal and (c) what will be the volume of water increase; (2) whether there will be further upgrades on the dam; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1.  (a) The projected date of completion for the project is 22 November 2022.

(b) The total budgeted cost for the project is R21 065 353.73.

(c) 33 million mᶾ of additional water will be stored after completion of the project

(2) The dam safety rehabilitation programme for Kwaggaskloof Dam which forms part of Greater Brandvlei Scheme will commence in the 2022/23 financial year.

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05 April 2022 - NW798

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) With reference to the proposal of dual pricing structure for (a) international and (b) local tourists, what (i) research has been undertaken in this regard and (ii) has been the outcome of the specified research; (2) whether the proposal has been considered; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will it be considered; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)

(i) No research has been undertaken by the Department of Tourism or SA Tourism.

(ii) Not applicable

2. (a) & (b) The concept is already existing in South Africa with different packages and prices for South African Citizens, SADC citizens and foreign visitors. The setting of prices falls within the ambit of the private sector. SA Tourism does engage the sector to consider special offers as part of the domestic tourism promotion activities they conduct i.e. Sho’t Left programme.

05 April 2022 - NW977

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which degrees offered at universities has he found have the most job opportunities in the Republic, (b) which universities offer the specified degrees and (c) what amount of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding goes towards funding students studying towards the degrees?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The Department does not collect data on job opportunities linked to qualifications. However, the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) — Quarter 3 of 2021 indicates that only 2.7% of unemployed persons were graduates, while 7.2% had other tertiary qualifications as their highest level of education.

(c) As at 31 December 2021, the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) reported that R33.652 billion was paid to new and continuing students registered at public universities.