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26 November 2020 - NW1268

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What are the details of the (a) scope of work, (b) bill of quantities, (c) list of specifications from the client departments and (d)(i) progress and (ii) implementation reports from the project manager and/or contractor on certain bids that were awarded (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

With respect to the details requested for the projects, a summary of the attached documents is shown below for item (a) to (d):

Description

Document Attached

(a) Scope of Work

(b) Bills of Quantities

(c) List of Specifications

(d) Progress/

Implementation

report

H18/038AI – Awarded on 10 May 2019

Annexure A

Refer to Page 80, 99 and 107

N/A

Consultants Appointment

N/A

Procurement Instruction received from Key Account Management

N/A

Contractor not yet appointed

H18/034AI – Awarded on 10 May 2019

Annexure B

Refer to Page 78

N/A

Consultants Appointment

N/A

Procurement Instruction received from Key Account Management

N/A

Contractor not yet appointed

H18/026AI – Awarded on 26 April 2019

Annexure C

Refer to Scope of work document

N/A

Consultants Appointment

Refer to Procurement Instruction

N/A

H18/047AI – Awarded on 14 May 2019

Annexure D

Refer to Scope of work document

Refer to BoQ document

Refer to list of specifications

Refer to completion certificate reports

H18/029AI – Awarded on 14 March 2019

Annexure E

Refer to Page 66 to 102

N/A

Consultants Appointment

N/A

Procurement Instruction received from Key Account Management

N/A

Contractor not yet appointed

H18/027AI – Awarded on 11 June 2019

Annexure F

Refer to Scope of work documentation

N/A

Consultants Appointment

Refer to Procurement Instruction

N/A

H16/022 – Awarded on 20 October 2016

Annexure G

Refer to Scope of work document

Refer to BoQ document

Refer to tender document

Refer to progress report

H16/075 – Awarded on 3 March 2017

Annexure H

Refer to Scope of work document

Refer to BoQ document

Refer to tender document

Refer to progress report

H15/043 – Awarded on 23 June 2016

Annexure I

Refer to Scope of work document

Refer to BoQ document

Refer to tender document

Refer to progress report

H15/044 – Awarded on 23 June 2016

Annexure J

Refer to Scope of work document

Refer to BoQ document

Refer to tender document

Refer to progress report

25 November 2020 - NW2788

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What measures has her department put in place to ensure that child support grant recipients remain in school until matric?

Reply:

The Child Support Grant (CSG) is part of the social assistance programme which is administered by the Department of Social Development (DSD).  However, it must be stressed that the right to basic education for all South African children is an unfettered right, provided for in our Constitution.  On the average, more than 80% of our learners are in no fee schools, which are fully funded by the State.  Therefore, learners who receive the CSG, who attend these schools, are fully covered.  But those, whose parents choose to send their children to fee-paying schools, those parents are expected to pay for their children's fees; pending the approval by the Provincial Education Departments to grant such parents fee exemptions.

25 November 2020 - NW2764

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with regard to the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative which was introduced in the 2011-12 financial year to eliminate the backlog in schools infrastructure, there has been any meaningful improvement in terms of monitoring and accounting of the school infrastructure programme; if not, why not; if so, what is the current backlog in school infrastructure in each province?

Reply:

Overall progress on ASIDI is summarised as follows:

  • Of the 365 schools that need to be replaced, 252 have already progressed to Practical Completion
  • Of the 977 schools that required upgraded sanatition, 897 have already progressed to Practical Completion
  • Of the 1214 schools that required upgraded water supply, 955 have already progressed to Practical Completion
  • Of the 373 schools that required upgraded electricity supply, all 373 have progressed to Practical Completion

There are ASIDI schools which have been completed on both Inappropriate Structures and Basic Services which currently in occupied, and schools under construction which are in advance construction stages (Annexure B) and schools that requires funding (Annexure A-Backlog).

25 November 2020 - NW2850

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total number of turnaround strategies has Mr Vuyo Mafata implemented since he was appointed a Commissioner of the Compensation Fund, (b) number of the strategies has (i) worked and/or (ii) not worked and (c) are the reasons that strategies put in place to turn around negative audit outcome are not working?

Reply:

One Turnaround Strategy has been developed implemented in two phases. First phase (Action Plan 1.0) was to stabilise the operations of the Compensation Fund and the second phase (Action Plan 2.0) was to improve controls in order to improve the audit outcomes. The implementation of the strategy is in progress.

25 November 2020 - NW2691

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What was the outcome of the meeting that the Director-General of Basic Education had with teachers’ unions to discuss the invigilation of COVID-19 positive National Senior Certificate candidates; (2) what measures were agreed on regarding the invigilation of COVID-19 positive National Senior Certificate candidates; (3) whether her department has considered a contingency plan to allow students with COVID-19 to write exams at a later stage; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Regarding the invigilation of candidates that are tested positive, teachers are not be compelled to invigilate the examination at the isolation venue, where a candidate who has tested positive is writing. Teachers are fully briefed about the task to be performed; and if the teacher agrees to carry out the task, a written consent of the teacher is obtained. 

2. Given that teachers are not compelled to invigilate, the Provincial Education Departments have appointed private invigilators who could be used to replace teachers who refuse to invigilate. However, private invigilators are fully briefed of the at hand, and their consent is obtained to perform this task.

3. Learners who will not be able to write the November 2020 examination due to their severe COVID-19 symptoms, will be allowed to write the May/June 2021 examination.   

25 November 2020 - NW2765

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What interventions is she empowered to make in cases where schools blatantly exclude pupils on the basis of race from partaking in school activities; (2) whether she will meet with the leadership of Brackenfell High School regarding the alleged exclusion on the basis of race of learners in the school’s farewell event; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education (DBE), in terms of the South African Schools Act, compels schools to develop School Codes of Conduct and policies on extramural activities, co-curricular activities, cultural events and excursion, based on the founding principles and values of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Part of the values and principles pertain to non-discrimination, non-sexism, non-racism and non-prejudice. Through the Education Management, Development and Governance (EMDG), all School Governing Bodies are inducted and capacitated on how to develop, implement and monitor school codes of conduct and other mandated school policies, so that when unintended instances of racial discrimination are identified, and solutions sought. Already, within the current review of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2019 - 2024 on Social Cohesion and Nation Building that is in process, the DBE has included an indicator on surveying and monitoring the compliance of school codes of conduct and other mandatory policies for SGBs. 

2. The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) is dealing with the matter of Brackenfell High School.

25 November 2020 - NW716

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 34 on 13 March 2020, and given that professional consultants have been working on the project since 2012 or before and have already done most if not all the required planning and design work, the plans and designs already done for the project will be disregarded; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why; (2) what are the details of the work to be done on the feasibility study that is currently undertaken by Umgeni Water; (3) what are the tendered costs of the feasibility study; (4) what are the reasons that the feasibility study undertaken by Umgeni Water will take 24 months to complete?

Reply:

1. The consultant who undertook the Detailed Feasibility and Detailed Design of the project was appointed by uThukela District Municipality, not Umgeni Water, and had not considered whether there was sufficient resource (water) in Spioenkop Dam to support the project demands. As a result, the project could have been constructed but would not have had the raw water resource needed to supply the demand in the area. After much of the planning and detailed design had been completed, the Department of Water and Sanitation undertook a due diligence study to determine whether there would be sufficient water available in Spioenkop Dam to support the scheme. When it became apparent that there would not be sufficient resource available the project was discontinued in the planned format

(2) Umgeni Water has recently completed a Framework Tender process and now has a panel of consultants to draw from for planning and detailed design projects. A consultant will be appointed from this panel to undertake the Detailed Feasibility Study of the project and this appointment is likely to be made the end of 2020, after the completion of the Terms of Reference, which are currently being developed by the project team.

(3) The procurement process has not, as yet, been completed and hence it is not possible to present the expected costs of the detailed feasibility study for this project.

(4) The bulk water supply scheme to supply Ladysmith will be a large and complex project and will have to include the development of a new resource (dam) and appropriate bulk infrastructure to treat and supply the water. Large projects of this complexity take time to plan and implement and the risk of rushing or curtailing the process can have huge risk and capital consequences. The planning study would include, amongst others, an options analysis, water resource assessment for each option, water quality monitoring and assessment, process investigation, pipeline alignments, water treatment plant, pump station and reservoir positioning, land and geotech surveys, economic and financial analyses and environmental investigations. All of these studies take time to undertake and are important to fully investigate to ensure the success of the project.

25 November 2020 - NW2671

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, considering the troubling figures presented by both the Gauteng Education Department and her department regarding the ever decreasing numbers of both public and private schools, while learners in Gauteng alone grow by some 2,5% and/or 70 000 annually, as well as the fact that learners have a legitimate expectation and constitutionally enforceable right to basic education in terms of section 29(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, she has put any constructive measures in place to address the shortage of schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the time frames set; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Parliamentary Question was sent to Gauteng Education for response.

25 November 2020 - NW2665

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In light of the fact that her department has urged all teachers and learners in the public schooling system to download and make use of the Teacher Connect Application (App) following its recent launch, what exactly has informed the timing of the delivery of the App, given that the Matric learners will be beginning their final examination on 5 November 2020 and all the other grades are concluding their school year; (2) whether her department has ensured that the App service does not exclude the most indigent pockets of society who, even if they have access to cell phones, might not have the telecommunications infrastructure to reap all the benefits of the App; if not, why not; if so, in what way?

Reply:

(1)          

  • The TeacherConnect app was first set up in the first half of July, initially to get the platform up-and-running and for Beta testing purposes. 
  • HealthCheck was then integrated in late July and officially launched on the 8th of September. (Daily Covid-19 Symptom Tracker). The urgency and the timing of launching the App, related to the Covid-19 tracking health application designed to provide an early warning system so that lives could be protected and saved, and also that school closures could be prevented as much as possible, and that schools could stay open at this critical time of the year.  This need took precedence despite it being so close to Matric examinations,
  • To date, we have supported just under 4 000 users on TeacherConnect. 
  • To support Matric learners where helpful, the Woza Matric schedule is included under the Materials section of the App. 

(2)

  • The first learning resources added to the TeacherConnect platform were exclusively to zero-rated websites. 
  • Please note that further the TeacherConnect teacher-training platform has now as of 12'th November become zero rated by every network except for Cell C, which we believe is imminent.
  • The large majority of other teacher resources we link through to on the platform are still made up of zero rated websites. 
  • An estimated 90% of internet users (and in fact a full 38-million South Africans per day) in South Africa use WhatsApp, making it one of the most accessible digital channels for reaching even the poorest in our nation.  
  • Many mobile network operators offer discounted Data Vouchers exclusively for use on WhatsApp. 

25 November 2020 - NW2840

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What plans have been put in place to refurbish Siqongweni High School in Ward 17 in Msunduzi Local Municipality, KwaZulu-Natal?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the KwaZulu Natal Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

25 November 2020 - NW2411

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) current status of overcrowding in our prisons over the past 12 months and (b) breakdown of such overcrowding in each month in each province?

Reply:

a) As on Friday, 23 October 2020, the current national overcrowding level in correctional centres stood at 15.17% over the approved accommodation. (Table 1)

The current status of overcrowding over the past 12 months is reflected in Table 2.

Table: 1

INMATE POPULATION - 23 OCTOBER 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

12846

89

5766

5855

156

12698

12854

18709

145.64%

45.64

GP

25204

425

13713

14138

530

19199

19729

33867

134.37%

34.37

KZN

21278

106

5910

6016

102

15763

15865

21881

102.83%

2.83

LMN

18929

71

5426

5497

269

15434

15703

21200

112.00%

12.00

FSNC

21585

78

4723

4801

227

13776

14003

18804

87.12%

12.88

WC

20725

403

10586

10989

391

13018

13409

24398

117.72%

17.72

National

120567

1172

46124

47296

1675

89888

91563

138859

115.17%

15.17

Table: 2 overcrowding status over the past 12 months per region

Region

Oct 2019

Nov 2019

Dec 2019

Jan 2020

Feb 2020

Mar 2020

Apr 2020

May 2020

Jun 2020

Jul 2020

Aug 2020

Sep 2020

EC

59.66%

59.42%

60.03

55.39%

53.81%

54.65%

54.94%

28.96

45.73%

46.23%

43.83%

45.64%

GP

52.06%

52.56%

52.72

47.63%

47.53%

45.56%

52.20%

48.88

44.84%

37.21%

35.46%

35.33%

KZN

33.64%

33.52%

34.63

31.32%

25.04%

23.86%

26.14%

22.67

16.05%

4.17%

2.69%

3.44%

LMN

44.27%

45.96%

46.70

41.09%

39.36%

38.56%

39.29%

33.84

27.60%

14.85%

11.13%

12.01%

FSNC

2.21%

3.56%

6.32

0.54%

0.18%

12.32%

0.38%

98.31

8.24%

11.86%

14.04%

13.70%

WC

42.29%

41.24%

36.81

31.07%

30.16%

29.17%

29.16%

26.07

19.51%

14.55%

16.13%

16.93%

National

37.83%

38.03%

38.17

33.27%

31.45%

30.25%

32.66%

28.96

23.35%

16.15%

14.56%

15.20%

  1. The breakdown of the overcrowding level in each month and in each region over the past 12 months in (End of month: October 2019 to September 2020) is provided from (Table 3 to Table14):

Table: 3

INMATE POPULATION - 31 OCTOBER 2019

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

83

5522

5605

290

15330

15620

21225

159.66%

59.66%

GP

24877

497

11958

12455

839

24535

25374

37829

152.06%

52.06%

KZN

20281

155

6185

6340

495

20269

20764

27104

133.64%

33.64%

LMN

17799

99

6169

6268

477

18934

19411

25679

144.27%

44.27%

FSNC

21542

76

4840

4916

393

16710

17103

22019

102.21%

2.21%

WC

20779

472

10547

11019

696

17851

18547

29566

142.29%

42.29%

National

118572

1382

45221

46603

3190

113629

116819

163422

137.83%

37.83%

Table: 4

INMATE POPULATION - 30 NOVEMBER 2019

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

92

5553

5645

290

15258

15548

21193

159.42%

59.42%

GP

24877

507

12185

12692

842

24419

25261

37953

152.56%

52.56%

KZN

20281

164

6163

6327

19745

1007

20752

27079

133.52%

33.52%

LMN

17799

102

6453

6555

442

18982

19424

25979

145.96%

45.96%

FSNC

21542

82

4908

4990

402

16916

17318

22308

103.56%

3.56%

WC

20779

452

10391

10843

668

17645

18313

29156

141.24%

41.24%

National

118572

1399

45653

47052

22389

94227

116616

163668

138.03%

38.03%

Table: 5

INMATE POPULATION - 31 DECEMBER 2019

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

103

6273

6376

251

14648

14899

21275

160.03

60.03

GP

24877

497

12922

13419

744

23830

24574

37993

152.72

52.72

KZN

20281

172

6822

6994

423

19887

20310

27304

134.63

34.63

LMN

17799

124

7434

7558

390

18163

18553

26111

146.70

46.70

FSNC

21542

114

5764

5878

385

16640

17025

22903

106.32

6.32

WC

20779

460

11141

11601

556

16084

16640

28241

136.81

36.81

National

118572

1470

50356

51826

2749

109252

112001

163827

138.17

38.17

Table: 6

INMATE POPULATION - 31 JANUARY 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

105

6224

6329

236

14092

14328

20657

155.39%

55.39%

GP

24877

522

13514

14036

677

22013

22690

36726

147.63%

47.63%

KZN

20281

170

7066

7236

418

18978

19396

26632

131.32%

31.32%

LMN

17799

125

7157

7282

417

17413

17830

25112

141.09%

41.09%

FSNC

21542

98

5453

5551

343

15764

16107

21658

100.54%

0.54%

WC

20779

515

11772

12287

467

14482

14949

27236

131.07%

31.07%

National

118572

1535

51186

52721

2558

102742

105300

158021

133.27%

33.27%

Table: 7

INMATE POPULATION - 29 FEBRUARY 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

116

6106

6222

238

13987

14225

20447

153.81%

53.81%

GP

24877

521

13666

14187

677

21837

22514

36701

147.53%

47.53%

KZN

20281

163

6889

7052

402

17905

18307

25359

125.04%

25.04%

LMN

17799

116

6939

7055

386

17363

17749

24804

139.36%

39.36%

FSNC

21542

94

5420

5514

343

15647

15990

21504

99.82%

0.18%

WC

20779

519

11545

12064

496

14485

14981

27045

130.16%

30.16%

National

118572

1529

50565

52094

2542

101224

103766

155860

131.45%

31.45%

Table: 8

INMATE POPULATION - 31 MARCH 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

119

6221

6340

238

13981

14219

20559

154.65%

54.65%

GP

24877

477

13662

14139

661

21412

22073

36212

145.56%

45.56%

KZN

20281

157

6784

6941

400

17779

18179

25120

123.86%

23.86%

LMN

17799

121

6879

7000

374

17289

17663

24663

138.56%

38.56%

FSNC

21542

91

5221

5312

349

15382

15731

21043

97.68%

12.32%

WC

20779

470

11394

11864

512

14464

14976

26840

129.17%

29.17%

National

118572

1435

50161

51596

2534

100307

102841

154437

130.25%

30.25%

Table: 9

INMATE POPULATION - 30 APRIL 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

130

6596

6726

219

13653

13872

20598

154.94%

54.94%

GP

24877

580

15762

16342

645

20877

21522

37864

152.20%

52.20%

KZN

20281

187

7745

7932

378

17273

17651

25583

126.14%

26.14%

LMN

17799

138

7380

7518

354

16921

17275

24793

139.29%

39.29%

FSNC

21542

99

6006

6105

351

15167

15518

21623

100.38%

0.38%

WC

20779

479

11973

12452

445

13942

14387

26839

129.16%

29.16%

National

118572

1613

55462

57075

2392

97833

100225

157300

132.66%

32.66%

Table: 10

INMATE POPULATION - 31 MAY 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

117

6296

6413

195

13362

13557

19970

128.96

28.96

GP

24877

541

15296

15837

627

20572

21199

37036

148.88

48.88

KZN

20281

176

7723

7899

303

16676

16979

24878

122.67

22.67

LMN

17799

107

6913

7020

323

16479

16802

23822

133.84

33.84

FSNC

21542

85

5524

5609

357

15213

15570

21179

98.31

98.31

WC

20779

411

11671

12082

386

13556

13942

26024

126.07

26.07

National

118572

1437

53423

54860

2191

95858

98049

152909

128.96

28.96

Table: 11

INMATE POPULATION - 30 JUNE 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

13294

108

6147

6255

183

12935

13118

19373

145.73%

45.73%

GP

24877

509

15017

15526

567

19939

20506

36032

144.84%

44.84%

KZN

20281

136

7017

7153

277

16107

16384

23537

116.05%

16.05%

LMN

17799

96

6274

6370

300

16042

16342

22712

127.60%

27.60%

FSNC

21542

74

4757

4831

267

14668

14935

19766

91.76%

8.24%

WC

20779

396

11494

11890

328

12615

12943

24833

119.51%

19.51%

National

118572

1319

50706

52025

1922

92306

94228

146253

123.35%

23.35%

Table: 12

INMATE POPULATION - 31 JULY 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

12846

103

6073

6176

163

12446

12609

18785

146.23%

46.23%

GP

25204

460

14380

14840

540

19202

19742

34582

137.21%

37.21%

KZN

21278

134

6424

6558

275

15332

15607

22165

104.17%

4.17%

LMN

18929

70

5848

5918

284

15538

15822

21740

114.85%

14.85%

FSNC

21585

131

4599

4730

217

14078

14295

19025

88.14%

11.86%

WC

20725

354

10953

11307

296

12138

12434

23741

114.55%

14.55%

National

120567

1252

48277

49529

1775

88734

90509

140038

116.15%

16.15%

Table: 13

INMATE POPULATION - 30 AUGUST 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

12846

96

5823

5919

148

12409

12557

18476

143.83%

43.83%

GP

25204

421

14146

14567

535

19039

19574

34141

135.46%

35.46%

KZN

21278

129

6253

6382

281

15188

15469

21851

102.69%

2.69%

LMN

18929

67

5408

5475

259

15301

15560

21035

111.13%

11.13%

FSNC

21585

79

4592

4671

196

13688

13884

18555

85.96%

14.04%

WC

20725

372

11038

11410

273

12385

12658

24068

116.13%

16.13%

National

120567

1164

47260

48424

1692

88010

89702

138126

114.56%

14.56%

Table: 14

INMATE POPULATION - 30 SEPTEMBER 2020

Region

Accommodation

Unsentenced

Sentenced

Grand Total

Population level %

Overcrowding Level %

   

Females

Males

Sub total

Females

Males

Sub total

     

EC

12846

92

5901

5993

158

12558

12716

18709

145.64%

45.64%

GP

25204

422

14058

14480

523

19105

19628

34108

135.33%

35.33%

KZN

21278

107

6293

6400

295

15314

15609

22009

103.44%

3.44%

LMN

18929

70

5622

5692

269

15242

15511

21203

112.01%

12.01%

FSNC

21585

72

4736

4808

213

13606

13819

18627

86.30%

13.70%

WC

20725

373

10819

11192

352

12690

13042

24234

116.93%

16.93%

National

120567

1136

47429

48565

1810

88515

90325

138890

115.20%

15.20%

END.

25 November 2020 - NW1869

Profile picture: Dyantyi, Mr QR

Dyantyi, Mr QR to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he and/or his department have determined how the next tranche of the funds set aside for the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic will be allocated; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has found that a fair, transparent, competitive bidding process was followed in the disbursement of the first tranche of the allocation; if so, what are the relevant details including the quality of personal protective equipment that was procured?

Reply:

1. The Department of Correctional of Correctional Services (DCS) did not receive any allocation from the R500 billion economic support package but viremented funds from its 2020/21 baseline allocation to fund the financial impact of COVID-19. The virement is part of the Adjustments Appropriation Act, 2020 assented to by the President on 14 August 2020. The total estimated COVID- 19 expenditure for 2020/21 financial year amounts to R606. 947 million broken down follows:

Componsation of Employees- R63. 8 million

Increase in capacity of Health Care Workers through the recruitment on a one- year contract of 366 enrolled/ retired nurses to enhance the provision of primary health care services and the screening of staff on health-related matters.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs) and Medical Supplies- R212. 237 million 

Procurement  of PPEs and infrared thermometer scanners for DCS members and inmates (masks including N95 and surgical masks, surface and hand sanitizers, and gloves). Provision for increased medical supplies including flu vaccines and other medicines.

Quarantine/ Isolation Units and Generators- R21. 640 million

 Installation and rental of eleven (11) temporary quarantine/ isolation units required in several correctional facilities nationwide, and procurement of generators.

Laundry Machines for Isolation, / Quarantine Sites – R1. 375 million

Procurement of mattresses for inmates quarantine/ isolation sites.

Information Technology- R250 million

  • Maintaining inmates contact with families by communicating through video visits, Inmates Telephone System and Message Link.
  • Integrated Security System- Security management system and implementation of body security scanners as a threat detection solution which combines ultra- low radiation with maximum visibility.

Computer  Equipment and Medical Equipment- R1.117 million

Procurement of laptops and medical equipment such as pharmaceutical fridges.

Decontamination of Correctional Facilities- R33. 585 million

Decontamination of Correctional Facilities especially in instances of confirmed infected officials and inmates.

 

2.  The National Treasury Note 8 of 20219/20: Emergency Procurement in Response to National State of Disaster specified that institutions may place orders with suppliers listed on the transversal contract for the specific items required. The nature of the goods required were  not goods ordinarily procured and the high demand of these items by both the private and public sector led to a shortage of supplies in the market leading to the inability of service providers on the transversal contracts to meet demand and they failed to deliver the required Personal Protective  Equipment (PPE)

Department of Correctional Services communicated with the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer (OCPO) at National Treasury by email on 27 March 2020 to inform the OCPO that the Department would deviate from the National Treasury Instruction Note 8 2019/20 and procure items required for immediate delivery as an interim measure while awaiting deliveries from those suppliers listed on the transversal contract.

Department of Correctional Services Health Services was requested to verify and or approve samples before placement of purchase orders from the respective suppliers. This was to ensure that the quality of procured personal proactive equipment was in accordance with the required quality standards determined by the Department of Health, Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC), South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) and South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

25 November 2020 - NW2736

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What number of educators with qualifications in African mother tongue languages graduated for the foundation phase in (a) 2013, (b) 2014, (c) 2015, (d) 2016, (e) 2017, (f) 2018, (g) 2019 and (h) 2020?

Reply:

Since 2011, the Department has had a dedicated focus on strengthening Foundation Phase teacher education in the public university system, particularly on developing capacity for the preparation of African mother tongue language teachers.

The Strengthening Foundation Phase Teacher Education Programme involved an investment of R141 million and was implemented between 2012 and 2016.

From 2017 onwards, the Department has been implementing the Primary Teacher Education Project. An investment of R32.984 million has been made focusing on strengthening the numeracy and literacy component of Foundation and Intermediate Phase teacher education programmes. This includes the use of African languages as the language of learning and teaching, and on the teaching of the African languages.

This has led to a significant expansion in the number universities that offer Foundation Phase Teacher Education programmes from 13in 2011 to 22 currently, as shown in the table below.

NO.

INSTITUTION

NAME OF QUALIFICATION

AFRICAN LANGUAGES OFFERED

1

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

2

Central University of Technology

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Sesotho / Setswana / isiXhosa / IsiZulu

3

Nelson Mandela University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

4

North West University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

5

Rhodes University

 

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

   

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

6

Sol Plaatje University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Setswana / isiXhosa H/L

7

Stellenbosch University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

8

Tshwane University of Technology

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sepedi / Setswana / Xitsonga / Tshivenda

9

University of Cape Town

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

10

University of Fort Hare

 

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

   

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

11

University of the Free State

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sesotho H/L

12

University of Johannesburg

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sesotho H/L

13

University of KwaZulu-Natal

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu H/L

14

University of Limpopo

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Sepedi / Xitsonga H/L

15

University of Mpumalanga

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isNdebele / isiSwati

16

University of Pretoria

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / Setswana

 

 

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / Setswana

17

University of South Africa

 

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / isiXhosa / Sesotho / Setswana / siSwati / Tshivenda / Xitsonga

   

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / isiXhosa / Sesotho / Setswana / siSwati / Tshivenda / Xitsonga

18

University of Venda

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Tshivenda / Siswati / isiNdebele / xiTsonga / Sepedi

19

University of Zululand

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu

20

University of the Western Cape

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

21

University of the Witwatersrand

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sesotho H/L

22

Walter Sisulu University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

Many of these programmes are new, recently accredited by the Council on Higher Education and it is anticipated that the number of graduates produced through them will increase over time.

The Department does not collect HEMIS data at the level requested. However, in order to track graduate output, the Department requests universities to annually submit information about their initial teacher education graduates on a standard template. The following data has been extracted and consolidated from individual reports that universities submitted from 2014 to 2018. Information for 2019 is currently being collected.

The Table shows the number of graduates from Bachelor of Education and Postgraduate Certificate in Education programmes that have specialised in Foundation Phase teaching and that have an African language as home language / mother tongue[1].

Year

isiNdebele

isiXhosa

isiZulu

Sesotho

Sepedi

Setswana

Tshivenḓa

Xitsonga

siSwati

Total

2014

11

192

514

142

30

46

75

25

0

1 035

2015

20

75

660

41

98

26

82

49

0

1 051

2016

4

122

263

64

29

55

101

40

0

6781

2017

45

155

859

111

41

99

111

71

90

1 5822

2018

32

214

421

355

42

241

123

62

73

1 563

Total

112

758

2 717

713

240

467

492

247

163

5 909

1 In 2016, UNISA data was not received. The institution contributes a large portion of the total Foundation Phase graduates in African languages.

2 In 2017 TUT indicated that there were 44 African Foundation Phase graduates, but a language breakdown was not provided, hence not included in the 2017 total.

It is assumed that graduates that have an African Language, as their mother tongue would have developed this as a teaching specialisation, in order to meet the language requirements of the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications. The specialisation would be at home language level or at first additional language level.

24 November 2020 - NW2153

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) are the details of the processes that his Office put in place to ensure that all tenders related to Covid-19 are monitored and (b) have been the findings in this regard?

Reply:

a) The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) only procured PPE’s and related equipment for internal use by staff. By 31st of August 2020, 15 Contracts to a total value of R 202, 064.14 had been awarded. All procurement was monitored in terms of the DPME Supply Chain Management Procedures.

b) None.

Thank You.

24 November 2020 - NW2835

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has a database of companies that are ignoring verdicts of the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration ruling in favour of workers; if not, why not; if so, what (a)(i) is the name of each company, (ii) are the details of the judgment and (iii) is the date of the verdict in each case and (b) steps is his department taking to intervene in each case?

Reply:

Section 143 of the Labour Relations Act states that an arbitration award issued by a commissioner is final and binding and it may be enforced.

 In the event that a party fails to implement anaward which orders one party to compensate the other a sum of money by a certain date, the party entitled to the compensation may approach the CCMA to certify the award in terms of section 143(3).

 In such instances the certified award is furnished to the local Sheriff, instructing the latter to attach and take into execution the movables of the non-compliant party

For each case where there is non-compliance with the award, CCMA Case Management Officers, in terms of Standard Operating Procedures,contact the non-compliant party telephonically regarding the impending enforcement. This is meant to give the defaulting party a final opportunity to comply with the arbitration award.

Once the enforcement application has been processed the role of the CCMA is to pay for the costs of the enforcement for employees earning below the statutory threshold.

24 November 2020 - NW2154

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) role has his Office played in respect of its officials that have been found to have behaved unethically in terms of Covid-19 tenders and (b) disciplinary actions have been taken against such officials?

Reply:

a) Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and the Auditor – General did not identify any cases where officials behaved unethically in terms of Covid – 19 tenders.

b) None

Thank you.

24 November 2020 - NW2771

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

When were the last inspections performed at companies to ensure that they are compliant with (a) immigration laws, (b) the Employment Equity Act, Act 55 of 1998 and (c) labour laws with regard to their hiring of non-South African citizens?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Home Affairs and its team of inspectors check compliance with immigration laws in the RSA as this falls within its mandate;

(b) For the financial year 2020/21 to date, the following inspections pertaining to the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998 were conducted:

- Designated Employers Assessed : 75

- Designated Employers Reviewed : 299

- Designated Employers Re-Assessed : 217

(c) Labour Inspectors are conducting inspections on a continuous basis as part of their normal inspections at workplaces not only to determine compliance with labour legislation but also to determine the number of foreign nationals being employed.

23 November 2020 - NW1899

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the Government Employees Pension Fund is experiencing any cash-flow problems; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The GEPF is not experiencing any cash-flow problems.

23 November 2020 - NW1637

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the Public Protector’s report on the Masiphumelele Informal Settlement in Noordhoek which was presented to the Portfolio Committee for oversight purposes (details furnished), (a) he will require the Public Protector to revisit the matter to address the plight of the African child, women and the elderly living in horrific conditions on the sides of the seven canals and (b) the residents will be moved to a dry site; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Public Protector South Africa that the Western Cape Provincial Office of the PPSA attended to complaints lodged by the Masiphumelele Informal Settlement Community (Complainant) pertaining to service delivery failures on the part of the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality, which resulted in a Settlement Agreement entered into between the Complainant and the City of Cape Town on 18 December 2017.

In terms of the Settlement Agreement, the City of Cape Town undertook to inter alia develop a Spatial Development Framework for the Masiphumelele Community to provide for the delivery of basic services within the City of Cape Town’s financial and administrative capacity.

The PPSA monitored the progress made in terms of the Settlement Agreement, and the City of Cape Town provided regular progress reports. In terms of the monthly reports, the City of Cape Town indicated that the canals in the area had been cleared by April 2019.

I have been informed by the PPSA has indicated that the Honourable Member, lodged a complaint with the PPSA in connection with the living conditions of residents of the Masiphumelele area on 13 July 2020, and in particular, the resettlement of those still living on the sides of the canals. The Honourable Member’s complaint is currently being investigated, and the investigation team in the PPSA has arranged to meet with the Honourable Member. The City of Cape Town has already been approached for a response to the complaint.

23 November 2020 - NW1955

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he reappointed the acting board of the Public Investment Corporation led by a certain person (name furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how did a certain newspaper (name furnished) gain access to information that was not publicly communicated by any official National Treasury platform?

Reply:

The COVID-19 pandemic and the national lockdown had a negative effect on the appointment process of the new Public Investment Corporation (PIC) Board which was to be effective from 1 August 2020. In accordance with the Memorandum of Incorporation of the PIC, the terms of office of the Interim Board was extended until the appointment process is finalised or 15 months after the expiry of their initial term of office, whichever is earlier.

The Ministry isnot aware of the information accessed by the certain newspaper (name furnished) and how the newspaper gained access to the information.

23 November 2020 - NW1600

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether he has found that the cost of employing consultants to assist municipalities in managing their finances often outweighs the benefits they bring, given that only 15 out of 183 municipalities who used consultants in the 2018-19 municipal financial year managed to achieve clean audit results; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has found that the use of consultants results in the transfer of skills to municipal employees; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The HonourableMember to note that information provided in the General Report 2018/19 by the Office of the Auditor-General and other reports, on the use of consultants generally, is equally of concern. Municipal appointment practices are also a direct contributing factor. The use of consultants and support provided must however be contextualised within the FM reforms for municipalities and the varies capacity levels in municipalities.In an attempt to address these concerns, the National Treasury issued MFMA Circulars and Guides assisting municipalities with best practices in financial management, covering a range of financial disciplines, the establishment of Budget and Treasury Offices, supporting the rollout of minimum competencies, supporting the appointment of appropriately qualified staff with the requisite skills to perform financial management responsibilities. These have been coupled with awareness and training initiatives. The efforts to improve financial management practices in municipalities and the resultant improved audit outcomes, may require a number of financial cycles to show desired changes, but is receiving attention by both the National and Provincial Treasuries. It must however be recognised that in some instances, the use of consultants with specialists’ skills and knowledge will be required. Therefore, it may not always be cost effective for municipalities to appoint these scarce skills on a permanent basis.

2. The design of national and provincial support programmes has at its core specific focus on the transfer of skills and capacity, on-the-job training, to municipal officials, covering institutional and technical areas.For example, a total of 1 434 capacity building sessions were completed, with 9 716 officials capacitated during the 2018/19 financial year, from the national support programme to selected municipalities. The principles of skills transfer are also embedded in the Cost Containment Regulations for Municipalities issued in 2019, where measures must be implemented by municipalities when appointing consultants to perform specific responsibilities. The absorption capacity of municipalities also must be factored. The details relating to the use of consultants and transfer of skills, for those contracts entered into by municipalities would be best obtainable from the municipality directly, given the different specialised areas and contractual arrangements.

23 November 2020 - NW1690

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether he has found that the cost of employing consultants to assist municipalities in managing their finances often outweighs the benefits they bring, given that only 15 out of 183 municipalities who used consultants in the 2018-19 municipal financial year managed to achieve clean audit results; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has found that the use of consultants results in the transfer of skills to municipal employees; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The HonourableMember to note that information provided in the General Report 2018/19 by the Office of the Auditor-General and other reports, on the use of consultants generally, is equally of concern. Municipal appointment practices are also a direct contributing factor. The use of consultants and support provided must however be contextualised within the FM reforms for municipalities and the varies capacity levels in municipalities.In an attempt to address these concerns, the National Treasury issued MFMA Circulars and Guides assisting municipalities with best practices in financial management, covering a range of financial disciplines, the establishment of Budget and Treasury Offices, supporting the rollout of minimum competencies, supporting the appointment of appropriately qualified staff with the requisite skills to perform financial management responsibilities. These have been coupled with awareness and training initiatives. The efforts to improve financial management practices in municipalities and the resultant improved audit outcomes, may require a number of financial cycles to show desired changes, but is receiving attention by both the National and Provincial Treasuries. It must however be recognised that in some instances, the use of consultants with specialists’ skills and knowledge will be required. Therefore, it may not always be cost effective for municipalities to appoint these scarce skills on a permanent basis.

2. The design of national and provincial support programmes has at its core specific focus on the transfer of skills and capacity, on-the-job training, to municipal officials, covering institutional and technical areas.For example, a total of 1 434 capacity building sessions were completed, with 9 716 officials capacitated during the 2018/19 financial year, from the national support programme to selected municipalities. The principles of skills transfer are also embedded in the Cost Containment Regulations for Municipalities issued in 2019, where measures must be implemented by municipalities when appointing consultants to perform specific responsibilities. The absorption capacity of municipalities also must be factored. The details relating to the use of consultants and transfer of skills, for those contracts entered into by municipalities would be best obtainable from the municipality directly, given the different specialised areas and contractual arrangements.

23 November 2020 - NW1900

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the prescribed period within which a member of the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) should receive the first retirement payment after completing and submitting all relevant documentation; (2) what (a) number of members of theGEPF have been affected by delays in first payments after retirement in the each of the financial years from 2010-11 to 2019-20 and (b) were the reasons for each of the specified delays; (3) what was the total amount of interest paid due to the late payments since the 2010-11 financial year; (4) whether the GEPF has put in place any measures to ensure that delays in the payment of pensions are mitigated; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. A benefit is payable to a member, pensioner or beneficiary entitled to such benefit within a period of 60 days from the benefit becoming payable to the member, pensioner or beneficiary.

2. (a)The under mentioned table details the retirements paid within 60 days and those retirements paid outside of 60 days

Financial Year

Total Retirement Cases Paid

Claims paid within 60 days

% age paid within 60 days

Claims not paid within 60 days

%age Not paid within 60 days

2011

23,913

23171

97%

742

3%

2012

29,391

26830

91%

2,561

9%

2013

27,699

22849

82%

4,850

18%

2014

29,546

22043

75%

7,503

25%

2015

28,802

24797

86%

4,005

14%

2016

31,845

27693

87%

4,152

13%

2017

32,196

26848

83%

5,348

17%

2018

35,571

29966

84%

5,605

16%

2019

35,931

32236

90%

3,695

10%

2020

34,134

29944

88%

4,190

12%

(b) The reason for delayed benefit payments varies and arises due to many factors.  The delays amongst others include:

  • Claim documentation has not yet reached the GPAA. Claimants should ensure that their HR departments send all required documentation to the GPAA once finalised
  • Incomplete or incorrect documentation which requires the documents to be referred back to employee departments for rectification
  • Incorrect payment information such as incorrect bank accounts which results in bank verification process failing thereby payment cannot be made
  • GPAA awaiting tax directives from SARS before payment is made.
  • Issues with members’ tax affairs requiring members to attend to these with SARS. Member’s tax affairs need to be in order to ensure that the required tax liability is paid over to SARS before benefits can be paid to members.
  • Required divorce documentation outstanding to pay benefits
  • Other reasons pertaining to specific claims.
  • The impact of the lockdown regulations has impacted operational activity of the GPAA since March 2020.

3. The table below depicts the interests paid in respect of all benefits paid by the GEPF and not specifically in respect of retirements only. The interest paid would be in respect of retirement, resignation, death, ill-health retirement, and transfer benefits.

Financial Year

Benefits Paid for the year

R’000

Interest Paid for the

R’000

2010 – 2011

31 098 727

653 748

2011 – 2012

35 581 583

881 093

2012 – 2013

39 769 902

756 179

2013 – 2014

52 570 775

1 158 520

2014 – 2015

78 341 762

1 421 880

2015 – 2016

85 196 350

1 845 820

2016 – 2017

86 290 613

1 883 182

2017 – 2018

91 071 319

1 954 491

2018 – 2019

94 876 686

1 469 311

2019 – 2020 (Unaudited)

108 742 851

1 752 019

4. The Government Pensions Administration Agency (GPAA) which administers payments for the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) like many other organisations, was negatively impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. In support of the national agenda in combating COVID-19 the entity was also initially closed for a short period of time during the first lockdown until it was subsequently classified as an essential service. The GPAA has implemented various measures to increase production since the declaration of the National State of Disaster.

These measure include:

• The acquisition of additional technology and mobile devices to enable and increase remote working arrangements;

  • A combination of remote working and staff coming into the office is being followed in order to ensure improved capacity;
  • Implementation of automation of processes, where possible, to allow for faster capability in processing of pension claims;
  • A dedicated focus on processing pension retirement claims to accelerate claims of retirees.
  • Continuous improvement of processes are being attended to allow for remote and faster capability of processing of claims

It is important to emphasise that these initiatives notwithstanding, service to members, pensioners and beneficiaries is impacted by COVID-19 and delays may still be experienced as staff contract COVID -19.

5. It is not necessary for the Minister to make a statement on the matter as there has been acknowledgement by the GEPF and GPAA of late payments.

20 November 2020 - NW2255

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the (a) recent unrest in Mpumalanga, particularly in the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality, Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality and Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality and (b) weeks-long protest at the Union Buildings by the specified communities demanding the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor, his department is still committed to the specified project, if so, (2) what total amount has his department budgeted for the (a) current financial year and (b) next two financial years for the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor; (3) whether he will commit to have a series of public meetings in the affected areas to give information regarding the (a) updated project time lines or time frames and (b) implementation, if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) On 30 October 2014, the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), submitted the Moloto Rail Corridor, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Treasury Approval 1 application to National Treasury for consideration. On 3 December 2015, the DirectorGeneral of National Treasury responded to the CEO of PRASA informing him that the Treasury Approval 1 application was not granted.

On 31 October 2017, the Department motivated funding through the National Treasury’s Budget Facility on Infrastructure (BFI) for the development of the Moloto Rail Corridor. On 5 April 2018, the Department received the outcome of the application indicating that the request for funding was not supported and that no funding will be made available to further develop a rapid rail solution because the exploration of non-transport solutions should be investigated in addition to transport solutions to comprehensively respond to corridor challenges.

(2) Please refer to response in (1)

(3) Seven (7) public engagements in the form of Imbizoshave been conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities. These were conducted as part of providing progress on the planned Moloto Rail Project, Road expansion project and the overall exposure of the service delivery by Government and the Department of Transport’s public entities. The last public engagement conducted with a purpose of providing information on the status of both the road and rail initiatives status was held on 5 June 2017.

With regard to the Moloto Road Project, SANRAL concluded 12 stakeholder engagements sessions prior to Covid-19 Lockdown, details listed in the table below. With the easing the COVID19 lockdown restrictions, SANRAL will be resuming the stakeholder engagements as planned or necessitated by events on the ground in project sites.

SANRAL Moloto Road Corridor Stakeholder Engagements

TYPE OF ENGAGEMENT

ROAD SECTION / TARGET AREA (COMMUNITY)

DATE

Stakeholder engagement: Taking SANRAL to Moloto

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

2 March 2018

Mpumalanga Youth Dialogue - Engagement

R573 Section 2 - KwaMhlanga

5 December 2018

Stakeholder Engagement - Taking SANRAL to Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

R573 Section 3- Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

30 May 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B

29 August 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

11 October 2019

Ministerial Event: Signing of MOU – Transfer of R573 Sec 1 to SANRAL

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

15 November 2019

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Kwaggafontein A & B

4 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mandlethu (Vlaklaagte No.1) &Mobhoko Village

5 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mzimkhulu

6 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Tweefontein E &Buhlebesiswe (Vlaklaagte No.2)

18 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Slovo, Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

10 March 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Stompo/Waalkraal B, Waalkraal A and Waalkraal Ext Villages

11 March 2020

20 November 2020 - NW2579

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to the discussions on an action plan for economic recovery, the social partners at the National Economic Development and Labour Council did consider any other job-creation interventions apart from public employment programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

An emphatic point has to be made that the nature of unemployment in our country is such that, it is high, it is structural, systemic and deep-seated. This already outlined nature of unemployment in South Africa is compounded bylack of requisite skills as well as misalignment of them. Given this sad reality, a focussed, in touch, alert and forward-thinking government would bring among its interventions mass employment and Public Employment Programmes (PEPs) offer such. So, Public Employment Programmes are tremendously important in the context of countries like ours, they are key!

Do we rely only on them for job creation? Of course not! One of the key aspects of Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan is the Infrastructure Programme. Infrastructure development has a huge potential, almost guaranteed job creation, whether you talk of transforming of cities, towns, rural areas landscape or creation of bulk water infrastructure, national roads improvements projects, school construction, network infrastructure such as ports, rail, roads, etc – those go concurrently with creation of employment.

In the South African Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, there is reindustrialisation. Reindustrialisation will create employment and will also grow business. Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan among many, seeks to create an economy that will create jobs. The creation of jobs is one of the key objectives of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan. There is also an aim to reverse the decline of the local manufacturing sector, the resuscitation of tourism, you should know the capacity of tourism in terms of labour absorption. There will also be unchartered terrain especially when we go deeper to digital advancement, the space is alive with possibilities particularly when it comes to youth employment. This Plan will invest in our human capital even for the future. So, Dr Cardo, yes, NEDLAC social partners considered job creation interventions beyond the Public Employment Programmes.

20 November 2020 - NW1933

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) By what date is the R3,5 billion loan and/or equity bridge from the Development Bank of South Africa to South African Airways repayable; (2) whether the loan will be repaid under the business rescue process; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, who will be responsible for the repayment of the loan? NW2449E

Reply:

1. The loan from the Development Bank of Southern Africa to South African Airways (SAA) was paidON THE DIRECTION OF THE NATIONAL TREASURY,on 27 August 2020.

2. The loan was repaid from the 2020 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) allocation for the period 2020/21 to 2022/23 financial year, for the purchase of equity in SAA.

20 November 2020 - NW2509

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What progress has been made with the Port St Johns Local Municipality (Turnkey) Electrification Project; (b) What total amount has been spent on the specified project to date and (c) By what date does he envisage the project will be completed?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

The Port St Johns Local Municipality (Turnkey) Electrification Project is a schedule 5B project that is managed by the municipality. The question should therefore be directed to the municipality.

20 November 2020 - NW2510

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with reference to the reply by the Deputy President to oral question 15 in the National Assembly on 22 October 2020, wherein he indicated that there will be no load shedding in the Republic over the next 18 months, although not guaranteed, he is in a position to confirm that indeed there will be no load shedding in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

Eskom recognizes the negative impact that load shedding has on the lives of the people and the economy of South Africa. Eskom endeavours not to load shed and does so only as a last resort to ensure the security of the electricity network. However, Eskom’s generating fleet is ageing, at around 39 years on average, and it is both unreliable and unpredictable. As Eskom has often stated, until all the required reliability maintenance has been executed, all the new build units come on line and the DMRE emergency generation comes on line, the system remains constrained and the risk of load shedding remains high in the foreseeable future.

20 November 2020 - NW2753

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has any plans to refurbish and/or rebuild the dilapidated Mthingwevu Secondary School in Cofimvaba, Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details of the plan?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and a response will be forwarded as soon as it is received. 

20 November 2020 - NW2177

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Regarding the maintenance of prepaid electricity meters under Eskom, what is the current status of reported faults of electricity meters in terms of reported issues and maintenance outstanding; (2) Under what circumstances will Eskom carry out calibration tests and/or maintenance on electricity meters to ensure that the equipment reflects the correct consumption and usage?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. As at 9 October 2020, 7 038 prepaid electricity meters faults were reported in October 2020. Of these, 3 698 prepaid electricity meters have been maintained and faults were resolved/closed.

The 3 340 prepaid electricity meter work orders that are still open are reported by zero-buying customers, that is the meters indicated that the customers are not consuming electricity. In these cases, Eskom first scheduled the fault for investigation, after which the following actions will follow:

Where a customer is found to have tampered with the supply or meter, a tamper fine will be issued, the meter will be maintained and then the customer’s supply restored.

Where a meter is found to be bypassed, a tamper fine will be issued. The meter will be maintained however then the customer’s supply will be restored once the tamper fine is paid or a deferred payment form is signed.

Where the customer is zero buying but no tamper is found, the prepaid electricity meter will be maintained and the work order closed.

(2) Prepayment meters are full electronic devices with no moving parts on the measurement circuit that require calibration during the lifespan of the meter. They are electronically calibrated during the manufacturing process using high-tech calibration equipment embedded in the production line.

The accuracy is regularly certified by the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS). All the calibration results of individual meters are loaded into the Eskom Customer Care and Billing System for future reference. The calibration is not expected to drift in anyway during the lifespan of meter.

In instances where a customer complains that a meter is inaccurate, Eskom uses SABS certified equipment to verify the accuracy of the meter. In the unlikely event that the meter is found to be inaccurate, the meter is replaced with a new one. The faulty meter is then sent to the supplier for full analysis and the supplier is expected to submit a comprehensive report to Eskom.

20 November 2020 - NW2284

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What informed the use of Treasury Regulation 16A6.6 to appoint Rand Merchant Bank as transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner transaction of Air Chef by SAA?NW2858

Reply:

SAA did not use Treasury Regulation 16A6.6 to appoint Rand Merchant Bank (RMB) as a transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner transaction of Airchefs. SAA used normal open competitive procurement processes to appoint RMB as transaction advisor for Airchefs.

The Department however, used Treasury Regulation 16A6.6 to appoint RMB as a transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner (SEP) transaction for SAA. This was carried out in order to speed up the process of assessing the best SEP for SAA as part of the work of concluding the business rescue process given the fact that RMB was already underseeing this SEP transaction with Airchefs.

20 November 2020 - NW909

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the challenges that the SA Airways (SAA) is going through in relaunching itself, (details furnished), what steps will he take to ensure that: (a) the new SAA pilot structures reflect the economically active population; and (b) all the Black pilots are retained.

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA:

(a) The failure to transform the pilot corps at SAA is a symptom of the general failure of leadership at the airline to make pertinent decisions and ensure their implementation. The Regulating Agreement (RA) entered into in 1988’s primary objective was to preserve undeserved privileges accrued through unjust laws that preserved aviation careers to a small minority in this country.

These privileges came with unaffordable perks and salary framework which should have long been remedied. The airline (i.e. the Business Rescue Practitioners) on insistence of the Department is addressing the matter of RA as it cannot become part of the new SAA.

The following is the background to the RA:

1.1  The Regulating Agreement, (“The RA”) is an evergreen collective agreement entered into between South African Airways Pilots Association (SAAPA) and South African Airways (SOC) LTD (SAA) in 1988. The RA regulates the terms and conditions of employment of pilots and contains volumes of onerous provisions on SAA.

1.2. It is our view that the RA is unconstitutional and unlawful, and it is imperative that it be terminated.

1.3. The unconstitutionality and unlawfulness of the RA relates to the following:

1.3.1 First, the evergreen nature of the regulating agreement is in breach of section 23(4) of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 (“the LRA”). Section 23(4) of the LRA does not contemplate or permit collective agreements which have no fixed term, no specific notice period and which may not be terminated on reasonable notice – in other words it does not contemplate or permit evergreen collective agreements.

1.3.2 The regulating agreement precludes and impedes SAA achieving meaningful and expeditious transformation which is in breach of the Constitution and the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998. In particular, in terms of the RA, the principle of seniority rigidly and directly affects and controls all elements of the manner in which pilots are employed and dealt with by SAA, including promotions, demotions, salaries and so on. Given the make-up of SAA’s pilot list, which comprises overwhelmingly of white males, this operates to the detriment of and discriminates unfairly against white women, black men, and especially black women.

1.3.3 The regulating agreement effectively removes core elements of decision-making from the board and management of SAA and precludes SAA from giving effect to its procurement obligations. This is in breach of the Constitution, the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 and the Companies Act 71 of 2008. The effect of the Regulating Agreement is that SAA is precluded from reaching any agreement to wet-lease SAA aircraft without the consent of SAAPA. The RA has a “succession of ownership” provision which means that notwithstanding any changes in ownership of SAA, the RA will remain in full operation. Considering the fact that Government has taken a decision to find a strategic equity partner (SEP) for SAA, the RA in its current form, combined with succession clauses, will no doubt make SAA less attractive to potential partners.

The RA also subjects key SAA procurement decisions such as which hotels to contract with to the control of SAAPA in that SAAPA is entitled to select the short-list of three hotels from which SAA can choose and even within this short-list, SAA is required to take SAAPA’s preferences into account. It requires SAA to act in breach of Treasury instructions – such as requiring SAA to accommodate pilots and crew in four- or five-star hotels when the Treasury instruction requires that three-star hotels be used.

1.3.4 The negotiations at the LCF with the DPE. After more than two and a half months of engagements, no agreement on the restructure of SAA was concluded and no agreement was reached on the VSP offered by DPE. In fact, SAAPA are on record at different forums and in writing to SAA that they never agreed to the VSP and reserve their rights in that regard.

(B) In engagement with potential Strategic Equity Partners (SEPs), the Department has placed the transformation of pilot corps as an imperative to the partnership. This is to ensure that National developmental objectives in Aviation should still receive priority in the new SAA. An appropriate balance must be attained to correct historical discrimination, retention of key skills, and achieving the correct demographic and gender objectives. This is a non-negotiable set of objectives. It is important that all pilots cooperate in achieving these objectives.

20 November 2020 - NW2294

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What progress has been made with the upgrading of the Moloto Road (R573) which stretches from the Mpumalanga and/or Gauteng border, north of Pretoria to Marble Hall in Limpopo, specifically with regard to the (a) planning and design of upgrades, (b) completion of the required environmental impact assessments, (c) appointment of contractors to undertake the specified upgrades and (d) projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in each instance; (2) what (a) progress has also been made with the proposedMoloto rail link thatwould ease pressure on the road and (b) is the projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in this regard; (3) what total amount has been spent annually since the 2016-17 financial year onimpact studies and other professional services for the upgrade of the (a) Moloto Road and (b) proposed rail link; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1.a) Please see column 1 (a) in Table 1 below for planning and design status.

(b) The Environmental Impact Assessment process commenced in 2016 for Moloto Road Corridor and the Environmental Authorization was issued on 12/05/2017 (DEA Ref 14/12/16/3/1/162).

(c) Please see column 1 (c) in Table 1 below for status of contractor appointments.

(d) (i) Please see column 1 (d) (i) in Table 1 below for projected costs.

(d) (ii) Please see column 1 (d) (ii) in Table 1 below for projected timelines.

(2) (a) There has not been any progress on the proposed rail link project due to funding availability. The application for funding the Moloto Rail Project submitted to National Treasury in October 2014, in the form of a Treasury Approval (TA 1) was not approved. The subsequent request for funding submitted to National Treasury in 2017 under the Budget Facility for Infrastructure (BFI), was also not granted.

(b) Refer to (2) (a)

(c) Refer to (2) (a)

(3) (a) Please see Table 2 below for the SANRAL Moloto Road expenditure to date.

(b) No budget has been spent on the proposed Rail Project since the last feasibility study was completed in 2014.

(4)

Table 1: SANRAL R573 Road Projects

SANRAL Project

(Project Numbers)

SECTION & PROVINCE

1 (a) Planning and Design update

1 (c) Appointment of contractors

1(d)(i) projected cost

(Incl. VAT)

1(d)(ii) Timelines

Comments

R.573-010-2021/1

Stormvoel (km 0,0) to Baviaanspoort road (km 2,4)(Moepel road)

Design 95 % Completed

No

R423 million

December 2021 to May 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/1

Km 2,4 to km 4,0 (Interchange)

Design 90 % Completed

No

R488 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 4,0 to km 8,4 and PWV 2

Design 90 % Completed

No

R1 300 million

April 2022 to March 2025

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/1

Km 8,4 to km 18,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/2

Km 18,4 to km 28,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/2

Km 28,4 to km 37,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 37,4 to km 48,568

Design 80 % Completed

No

R600 million

December 2022 to November 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-020-2016/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

Yes

R105 million

Completed

4 intersections upgraded

R.573-020-2019/4

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R560 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R573-020-2019/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R346 million

April 2022 to October 2023

Finalising bridge designs.

R573-020-2019/2

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R197 million

June 2022 to June 2023

Covid19 delayed Resolution of the Kwamhlanga business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R573-020-2019/3

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R413 million

November 2021 to February 2023

Planning Pre-community resolution meeting and Community resolution meeting as part of land acquisition process.

R573-020-2019/5

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R406 million

March 2022 to June 2024

Resolution of the Kwaggafontein business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R.573-030-2016/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

Yes

R244 million

January 2017 to October 2021

The Contractor has since re-established the site after experiencing cashflow problems.

R.573-030-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R362 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R.573-023-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R405 million

January 2022 to June 2024

Covid19 delayed the Community Resolution meetings required to finalise the land acquisition process.

R.573-030-2019/2

Section 3 – Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R450 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Finalising the bridge designs.

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

20 November 2020 - NW2285

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)On what date did a certain senior Eskom official (name furnished) complete his Master of Business Administration degree; (2) Whether the degree was verified with the SA Qualification Authority; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. Mr André de Ruyter obtained his Master of Business Administration qualification on 17 September 1998.

2. The qualification was verified on behalf of Eskom, prior to Mr de Ruyter’s appointment, by Lexis Refcheck. Eskom did not request SAQA to evaluate or verify the qualification.

As part of all executive appointments in Eskom, a full verification by a reputable company has to be done to verify ID number, driver’s license and criminalrecords and ensure the candidate has obtained all the qualifications listed on their résumés.

SAQA evaluation/verification of overseas qualifications is not a specific requirement for the appointments of executives at Eskom. A SAQA verification by the qualification holder will be requested only when the foreign qualification is a minimum requirement.

It is also important to note that as of 16 September 2019, only qualification holders (QHs) may apply for the evaluation of their foreign qualifications.

The above requirement according to SAQA, is to ensure that QHs are the prima facie owners of their applications and the outcomes thereof, including the protection of their private details. For this reason, SAQA will only interact directly with QHs, and involve third parties only when they are the parents or legal guardians of the affected QHs.

Please note that the change in the SAQA approach took place before Mr de Ruyter’s appointment and verification of his qualification. 

Government has total confidence in Mr de Ruyter who has already made a substantial difference in Eskom. We call on all stakeholders to support the efforts of the Board and management team in their efforts to restore good governance, operational effectiveness, financial stability and efficiently implement the Eskom Roadmap.

20 November 2020 - NW2529

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Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the plans of schools and educational programmes under the Transnet Academy in (a) funding the activities in order to invest in the academy and give it the necessary technology, facilities and faculties required to function at an optimal level and (b) forming and improving strategic partnerships with technical and vocational, education and training colleges, universities and research institutions?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

a) The Transnet Academy has identified the requisite technology requirements, developed the strategy and agreed business requirements with the Transnet Information, Communication and Technology Management (ICTM). Budget provisions have been made by ICTM as part of the Transnet Capex funding requirements.

b) Transnet has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding with the TVET Directorate. This approach has an advantage of building capacity across the country on an integrated basis.

University partnerships form the bedrock of the Academy strategy and this includes previously disadvantaged Universities to be included in the partnering review.

The Transnet Head of Academy serves as a Board member on the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) and Transnet plays a pivotal role in the SETA’s. To date, three Transnet Employees serve in the Rail, Freight Handling, and Maritime Chamber. As members’ their role is to advise as industry experts in skills development.

20 November 2020 - NW2517

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a)What are the reasons that Eskom has cut off the electricity for the community of Braamfisherville in Phase 3, Soweto, in Gauteng for the past six months and (b) By what date does he envisage the electricity will be restored in the specified community?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. Eskom has not cut off electricity supply for the Phase 3 customers in Braamfisherville. The transformers have failed as a result of overloading networks caused by meter bypasses and ghost vending, as well as the illegal operations by third parties. In order to avoid this phenomenon from repeatedly reoccurring, Eskom has decided to audit the meters, fine those who have illegally bypassed their meters or are purchasing ghost vouchers, and replace the damaged meters before replacing the transformers. This process has been resisted by customers and hence delayed the process of transformer replacement across Braamfisherville.

We have currently agreed with ward councilors and the Gauteng Province to defer the payment of fines where customers who cannot afford them will have to agree to a payment arrangement by signing the relevant forms.

It was only after the payment arrangement was agreed upon that customers agreed that we implement the process. This process has created a backlog of about 70 transformers that need to be replaced. We have drafted a schedule to replace these transformers and are progressing very well.

2. A number of transformers are offline in Phase 3 as a result of the reasons provided above. The replacement of transformers in Phase 3 is expected to be completed by 21 December 2020 subject to the customers signing the deferred payment agreements and material availability. Eskom will have to be provided with the meter or reference number in order to provide a more specific date.

19 November 2020 - NW2633

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What (a) total number of government guarantees have been granted to the SA Airways for the purposes of assisting the public entity to secure loans from credit providers since the Minister of Public Enterprises took charge of the airways on 31 March 2007 (details furnished), (b) was the monetary value of each government guarantee, (c) was the date of each government guarantee that was granted and (d) was the justification for each government guarantee that was granted; (2) which of the specified guarantees have had to be paid out to creditors, either partially or in full, by Government due to SAA not being able to repay the loans on its own?

Reply:

Government guarantees granted to SAA

SAA GUARANTEES

Date issued

Amount (R' Million)

Going Concern Guarantee

March 2007

1 300

Going Concern Guarantee

September 2009

1 600

Going Concern Guarantee

July 2012

5 006

Going Concern Guarantee

December 2014

6 488

Going Concern Guarantee

September 2016

4 720

Total Guarantees issued

 

19 114

SAA has been granted several guarantees since being unbundled out of the Transnet Group in 2007. All the guaranteed issued to SAA were for the granted to allow the airline to meet the going concern requirements for signing off the airline’s financial statements. Total guarantees granted from 2007 to date amount to R19.1 billion.

Due to the poor financial performance and deteriorating solvency position of the airline, SAA could not raise debt funding on the strength of its balance sheet. Local and international lenders thus required any funding provided to SAA to be backed by a sovereign guarantee. Each of the guarantees provided to SAA was based on business plans which forecasted that the airline would attain financial sustainability and be able to settle its debts from internally generated funds.

Government guaranteedobligations settled through recapitalisations from government

Since June 2017, R26.4 billion of the recapitalisations that government provided to SAA have been made to settle the airline’s government guaranteed obligations. This includes R10.3 billion of the R16.4 billion announced in the February 2020 budget that will be provided to SAA over the 2020 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for the settlement of government guaranteed obligations but excludes the R10.5 billion for business rescue implementation announced in the 2020 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS).

Historically, once SAA’s guaranteed obligations have been settled, the airline had used its freed-up guarantee facility to raise additional government guaranteed debt. Conditions have been put in place to reduce this risk to the fiscus.

19 November 2020 - NW2501

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of persons are currently on the housing waiting list, (b) is the breakdown of the waiting list in each province and (c) total number of houses is her department planning to build each year in the next 10 years?

Reply:

(a) In terms of our Constitutional delineation of responsibilities, municipalities are responsible for housing lists. The National Department of Human Settlements sets norms and standards, and monitor their implementation. Having realised the lack of capacity in certain municipalities, we decided to institute a National Housing Needs Register on which household can record their housing needs.

This National Housing Needs Register is different from a waiting list as it is used by provinces to select household who can be approached with an offer to apply for specific housing opportunities as these are created within Greenfield projects. Provinces and municipalities are encouraged to make use of the National Housing Needs Register system as it provides for a fair, transparent and just process of selection of prospective subsidy beneficiaries and allows for regional specific preferential selection criteria.

The System is linked to National Guidelines for the Allocation of Housing Opportunities created through the National Housing Programmes. The total number of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter as on 23 October 2020 is 2,537,968. The Honourable Member should note that the Western Cape does not utilize the National Housing Needs Register

(b) Below breakdown of number of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter per province as on 23 October 2020 on the National Housing Needs Register:

(c) The number of houses build by provinces depends on the HSDG budget allocation to each province every financial year. In the 2020/21 financial year the Department has planned to deliver the number of housing units and serviced as indicated below:

 

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Province

Total No of projects

Serviced sites

Housing Units

CRU (units)

FLISP

Planned sites

Planned units

Planned sites

Planned units

Eastern Cape

465

3 727

7 025

0

200

5 056

7 805

5 413

8 172

Free State

155

3 778

2 431

100

100

1 000

5 858

1 000

5 107

Gauteng

184

13 851

9 563

0

100

9 977

16 011

10 177

16 311

KwaZulu Natal

346

5 208

11 020

400

252

2 846

13 176

2 458

14 877

Limpopo

163

2 839

5 214

150

25

2 500

5 664

2 500

2 896

Mpumalanga

153

3 426

4 369

128

100

4 400

4 436

5 000

3 793

Northern Cape

47

2 329

376

190

20

4 352

909

2 470

103

North West

351

3 692

6 381

0

40

5 198

6 156

7 663

5 776

Western Cape

147

5 697

7 843

0

598

10 736

11 450

6 323

10 241

Nat Total

2011

44 547

54 222

968

1 435

46 065

71 465

43 004

67 276

 

Further to the above, the Department will through the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) deliver the following in the 2020/21 MTEF:

 

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Planned Social Housing Units

5 800

6 700

8 000

 

19 November 2020 - NW2632

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) number of cash recapitalisation cases have been granted to the SA Airways by the National Treasury since the airline was placed under the Minister of Public Enterprises on 31 March 2007 (details furnished), (b) was the monetary value of recapitalisation that was granted in each case, (c) was the date of each cash recapitalisation that was effected and (d) was the justification for each cash recapitalisation that was granted?

Reply:

HISTORIC SAA RECAPITALISATIONS

Purpose

Date

Repayment of debt (R')

Working Capital Requirements

Total

SAA Labour Restructuring Plan and provision of working capital

2007

 

744 000 000

744 000 000

 

2009

 

1 560 000 000

1 560 000 000

Repayment of Government guaranteed debt

Jun-17

2 208 000 000

 

2 208 000 000

Repayment of Government guaranteed debt

Sep-17

1 800 000 000

1 200 000 000

3 000 000 000

Repayment of government guaranteed debt; settlement of outstanding creditors and provision of working capital

Dec-17

3 600 000 000

1 192 000 000

4 792 000 000

Repayment of domestic lenders

Feb-19

5 000 000 000

 

5 000 000 000

Working capital requirements

Aug-19

 

2 000 000 000

2 000 000 000

Repayment of domestic lenders

Sep-19

3 500 000 000

 

3 500 000 000

Repayment of government guaranteed Post Commencement Funding

Aug-20

10 300 000 000

 

10 300 000 000

Total

 

26 408 000 000

6 696 000 000

33 104 000 000

SAA has been recapitalised by R33.1 billion since being unbundled out of the Transnet Group in 2007. Of the total amount historically provided for recapitalization, R26.4 billion has been provided for the repayment of government guaranteed debt whilst R6.7 billion has been for the provision of working capital.

19 November 2020 - NW2590

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total amount of (a) profit and (b) loss that the City of Ekurhuleni’s Bus Rapid Transit system has made since its inception?

Reply:

a) Profit – Internationally well performing mass public transport systems cover between 30% and 60% of operational costs. Only a few systems in dense Asian cities can cover a higher amount of direct operating costs. Given that Ekurhuleni is still in an unfinished pilot phase, which has witnessed delays in ramping up to envisaged 200 buses, the current fare box coverage of direct operating costs is disproportionally low.

Currently the city is yet to negotiate the final contract with the Bus Operating Company which they plan to conclude by July 2021. This final contract will include a market related profit margin for the Bus Operating Company.

b) Loss - From 2017/18 to 2019/20 financial years, the total operational deficit was approximately R290 million to June 2020, due to the fact as highlighted in (a) above that the pilot ramp up has been delayed, thus limiting the amount of fare revenue collected. Currently the city is covering the operational deficit.

19 November 2020 - NW2730

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What is the status of the turnaround strategy aimed at ensuring that the SA National Defence Force Intelligence Division achieves its targets in relation to vetting decisions and (b) what other measures has the division put in place to ensure that it achieves its targets in relation to vetting decisions?

Reply:

1. The Defence Intelligence, Directorate Vetting Strategy and Implementation Plan is being implemented, however, due to capacity challenges the previous vetting targets of FY2019/20 could not be achieved.

2. Defence Intelligence has managed to make progress to achieve the vetting targets which relates to:

a. The staffing of vacant post to capacitate Directorate Vetting.

b. The decentralisation of confidential clearances to the lowest level within the SANDF.

19 November 2020 - NW2386

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What assistance does her department offer the community of Lwamondo-Habelemu outside Thohoyandou in Limpopo to have a stable supply of water?

Reply:

Any assistance with water required by our communities is rendered by municipalities. Should a municipality have difficulties, it approaches the Water Board that services the area. In this case, Lepelle Northern Water would assist the said municipality.

Notwithstanding, the information available on the matter raised by the Honourable Member, is that three (3) Eskom poles were damaged due to heavy rainfalls in the area since 07 October 2020, which affected the transmission of electricity.

However, Eskom reconnected the supply of electricity on 16 October 2020. Water is currently being pumped from the package plant and the supply is back to normality. The community is now receiving water without difficulties.

19 November 2020 - NW2428

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What evidence does the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) have that (a) all stakeholders were engaged in the process of the establishment of the central executive committee and (b) SACAA regulations have been followed and executed?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a)  There is no provision in the Regulations for the establishment of a “central executive committee” in relation to this operator.

During the approval process for Ultimate Heli, the following stakeholders were consulted:

  1. Johannesburg Metro,whose responsibility is the proper zoning and use of land in accordance with their restrictions, as mandated by the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA), Act 16 of 2013, as well as enforcement of environmental requirements in their areas of jurisdiction. No restrictions were imposed by the Metro.
  2. Grand Central Airport.
  3. The National Airspace Committee (NASCOM), comprising of industry stakeholders and associations including Airports Company of South Africa, Department of Transport, Department of Environmental Affairs Forestry and Fishing (DEFF), SA Airforce (SAAF), Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company (ATNS), etc.
  4. Waterfall property management.
  5. SA National Roads Agency (SANRAL).
  6. Johannesburg Roads Agency (JRA).

b) All Civil Aviation Regulations have been followed in certifying Ultimate Heli as an operator. Records are kept by the SACAA for all oversight activityon all operators.

19 November 2020 - NW2577

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What total number of (a) international lenders does Government still have in their State-Owned Entity (SOE) debt portfolio and (b) facilities of international lenders who have exited the SOE debt were called prematurely?

Reply:

a) There are 9 international development finance institutions that lend to the SOEs as listed below. The typical financing instrument they use are foreign currency and domestic currency bilateral loans. MIGA is listed below as one of the institutions, however, their participation is usually in the form of providing credit enhancing guarantees on behalf of the SOE and to the benefit of other lenders that would otherwise not lend to a South African SOE owing to the credit rating.

China Development Bank

African Development Bank

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

New Development Bank (BRICS Bank)

European Investment Bank

AgenceFrançaise de Développement (AFD)

World Bank

KreditanstaltfürWiederaufbau (KfW)

Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

In the case of SOEs that issue bonds in foreign jurisdictions, information of registered holders is not recorded in such a manner as to be able to establish how many different individuals or institutions (hedge funds for example) are the ultimate beneficial holders of those bonds.

b) There are no facilities that have been called prematurely in the sense of accelerating debt is due. Rather, some guaranteed debt has been called to service interest and capital payments that became due, but these facilities did not accelerate. The call on guarantees to international lenders for the current fiscal year were in respect of the Land Bank and amounts to R74 million.

19 November 2020 - NW2427

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) follows up with routine inspections to ensure that regulations and equipment are operated in accordance with the stipulated regulations and licence conditions; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the last routine inspection undertaken at a certain company (name furnished), (b) what were the findings and (c) who were the inspectors; (2) what are the reasons that SACAA has allowed the specified company to operate for all the time without adhering to SACAA regulations?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

1. (a) The SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) does follow up with routine inspections as part of its mandate andan inspection on Ultimate Heli was conducted on 20 March 2019. A meeting was held with the operator on27 June 2019 regarding environmental complaintsfrom the Buccleuch residents.The last physical inspection was conducted on 23 October 2019 for compliance monitoring. In addition, a meeting was held with the operator on 24 January 2020,relating to continued operational compliance. Further interaction occurredvirtually during the lockdown period, in relation to compliance, as it was not possible to conduct physical oversight during lockdown. Physical inspections are now resumed during level 1 lockdown with a routine compliance inspection scheduled for Ultimate Heli for 28 October 2020.

(b)The facility was found to be compliant with requirements. Third party information can only be released with the consent of the approval holder. The reports contain 3rd party proprietary and commercially sensitive information, is confidential in nature and may contain personal information, which was provided in confidence, and the SACAA does not have consent from the operator to release such.

(c) The SACAA Inspectors were from the areas of Aviation Infrastructure and Flight Operations.

2. Ultimate Heli has been operating in accordance with the SACAA regulations and there is no evidence of the company not operating in compliance with regulations.

19 November 2020 - NW2647

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to his statement in his Budget Speech on 26 February 2020 that provisional allocations will only be confirmed once certain requirements have been met, and considering the fact that SA Airways (SAA) has now been allocated its initial provisional allocation of R6,5 billion in the 2020 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS), what (a) were the requirements that had to be met for SAA to qualify for the provisional allocation of R6,5 billion, (b) were the reasons for the specific requirements that were chosen and (c) date/s was/were each requirement met; (2) whether he has found that the allocation in February of R16,4 billion, along with the MTBPS bailout of R10,5 billion, coupled with the confirmation of the R6,5 billion allocation, puts the total monies allocated to SAA in the 2020 calendar year at R33,4 billion; if not, (a) what total amount has he found the total allocation for the 2020 calendar year to be and (b) how did he calculate it; (3) what framework did he use to determine whether it was worth spending yet more money on SAA compared to rather being able to cover the costs of building more than 66 000 RDP houses?

Reply:

1. Provisional allocation

The R6.5 billion formed part of the R16.4 billion announced by during the February 2020 budget speech for payment of guaranteed debt and interest. This amount was split as follows:

(i) R10.3 billion in 2020/21

(ii) R4.3 billion in 2021/22; and

(iii) R1.8 billion in 2022/23.

Of the R10.3 billion in 2020/21, only R3.8 billion was included in the Appropriation Act (7 of 2020) leaving R6.5 billion unappropriated. SAA had R3.6 billion government guaranteed debt maturing on 31 July 2020 and the amount already included in the Appropriation Act was utilised to settle this debt.Additional government guaranteed debt of R6.7 billion matured on 31 August 2020 for which section 6 of the Appropriation Act (7 of 2020) was invoked in order for the debt to be settled.

2. Total allocation to SAA for 2020/21

Of the R16.4 billion allocated to SAA at the time of the February budget speech, R10.3 billion was allocated in the current financial year to pay for maturing government guaranteed debt. The balance of R6.1 billion will be allocated to SAA over the next two fiscal years as and when the airline’s government guaranteed debt matures.

An additional R10.5 billion was allocated to SAA in 2020/21 to provide for the implementation of the airline’s business rescue.

Therefore, the total amount that has been allocated to SAA in the 2020/21 fiscal year amounts to R20.8 billion.

3. Framework used to determine funding allocation to SAA

SAA was placed into voluntary business rescue on 6 December 2019, following which the business rescue practitioners concluded a creditor approved business rescue plan which required additional funding for implementation.

Cabinet advised by Inter-ministerial Committee (IMC) on SAA, took a decision not to place SAA under liquidation but rather to support the business rescue plan. The allocation of the R10.5 billion for the implementation of SAA’s business rescue plan is proposed by Cabinet for parliament’s consideration and approval.

19 November 2020 - NW2238

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, given that the Department of Community Safety and Transport Management in the North West Province is under section 100(1)(b) intervention, his department will be funding the establishment of the North West Public Transport Intervention Team; if not, what is the positon in this regard; if so, from which budget?

Reply:

No, the National Department of Transport will not be funding the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team. The National Department does not provide funding to the Provincial Department as a consequence of Section 100(1)(b) intervention.

19 November 2020 - NW2731

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What is the (a) current status of her department’s Cyber Defence Strategy, (b) total amount that has been spent on developing the capacity of the specified strategy and (c) number of personnel that have been trained and/or hired to fulfil this capacity; (2) how will the funding constraints due to COVID-19 impact on the development of the capacity of her department’s Cyber Defence Strategy?

Reply:

1. (a) The Cyber Defence Strategy was approved by the Council of Defence.

(b) The Defence Intelligence presents bi-annually to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI), which includes the funds spend and members trained towards the fulfilment

19 November 2020 - NW2252

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since the North West Department of Community Safety and Transport has been placed under section 100(1)(b) intervention and one of the priorities for the intervention is to bring financial stability to the department, he approved the formation of a task team called the North West Public Transport Intervention Team that has since been reversed and will be re-established according to the North West MEC for Community Safety and Transport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister was informed by the MEC about the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team, as supported by the Provincial Executive Council and consent given by the Section 100 Inter-Ministerial Task Team (IMTT), as provided for in the Section 100 MOU signed by the Province and the IMTT. No approval was sought from the Minister. As indicated in the question, the process has since been reversed.

19 November 2020 - NW2729

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the SA National Defence Force Intelligence Division met its targets related to vetting decisions for the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the figures in each financial year; (2) what was the number of personnel working in the vetting division in the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

1. The vetting target for the financial years as indicated was as follows:

Financial Year

Target

Achievement

2017/18

6500

4328

2018/19

7000

3584

2019/20

7500

7167

2. The Defence Intelligence presents bi-annually to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI), which includes the personnel strength of both uniform and civilian members of the Division.