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08 November 2023 - NW3360

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Myburgh, Mr NG to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) number of criminal charges has his department laid against municipal mayors and/or executive mayors who are in flagrant breach of legislation pertaining to the management of wastewater treatment facilities and water treatment plants (i) in the (aa) 2021-22 and (bb) 2022-23 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2023 and (b) are the relevant details in each case; (2) what (a) are the details of all criminal charges that his department is currently in the process of instituting against municipal managers and/or executive mayors who are in serial transgression of water and sanitation legislation in the 2023-24 financial year and (b) are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) Municipal- and executive mayors are generally not charged in matters against the local or district municipality as they are not accounting officers. Municipal Managers are also not as a general rule charged in their personal capacity, but the Municipal Manager is cited as the accounting officer in civil and charged in criminal matters as the head of the municipality (corporate entity). Should gross negligence or misconduct be reported or detected we are obliged to investigate and these individuals including the mayors can be charged. The matters below are cases against municipalities where the Municipal Manager has not been charged in their personal capacity. The Department of Water and Sanitation together with Department of Forestry Fisheries and Environment has however recently had a successful engagement with the National Director Public Prosecutions to reinstate and charge the delinquent Municipal Manager of Lephalale Local Municipality. There are also three contempt of court applications for Lekwa LM, Mookgopong LM and Dr Ruth Segomotsi DM where the Municipal Managers will be held personally liable.

Criminal Enforcement Actions Taken Against Non-Compliant Municipalities

Sector

2021 – 2022 financial year

2022 – 2023 financial year

1 April 2023 onwards

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

3

10

11

Total

3

10

11

2. (a) The criminal charges instituted against municipalities and their municipal managers vary on a case by case basis. Based on section 151(1) of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act no. 36 of 1998) this can include subsection (a) use of water other than permitted under this Act; subsection (c) failure to comply with any condition attached to a permitted water use under this Act; subsection (d) failure to comply with a directive issued under section 19, 20, 53; subsection (i) unlawfully and intentionally or negligently committing any act or omission which pollutes or is likely to pollute a water resource. Cases opened in the 2023/ 2024 financial year are listed in the table below:

Wastewater Treatment Works

Municipality

SAPS CAS Number

Bushkoppies and Goudkoppies WWTW

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

62/07/2023 & 423/07/2023

Hoedspruit WWTW

Maruleng LM

10/10/2023

Percy Stewart WWTW

Mogale City

76/08/2023

Hlelo Lunathi Hendrina

Nkangala District Municipality

108/08/2023

Thabazimbi WWTW

Thabazimbi LM

112/08/2023

Lindley WWTW

Nketoana LM

116/09/2023

Koffiefontein WWTW

Letsemeng LM

12/09/2023

Zandspruit pumpstation

Johannesburg Water

127/09/2023

Giyani WWTW

Mopani District Municipality

404/10/2023

Ermelo WWTW diversion

Msukaligwa LM

108/10/2023

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08 November 2023 - NW3359

Profile picture: Myburgh, Mr NG

Myburgh, Mr NG to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) total number of directives have been issued to public entities, including municipalities responsible for the management of water treatment plants and wastewater treatment facilities, for non-compliance with legislation (i) in the (aa) 2021-22 and (bb) 2022-23 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2023 and (b) number of the specified directives have been fully complied with; (2) what follow-up measures have been taken in respect of the entities who are not adhering to departmental and/or ministerial directives?

Reply:

1. In terms of administrative justice, prior to the issuance of an administrative directive, a notice of intent has to be issued indicating suspected non-compliance and what actions the transgressor will be expected to take should the directive be issued. Upon receipt of the notice the alleged transgressor must respond within a stipulated timeframe and provide a response or plan to rectify the non-compliance. Should no response or representation be received or if the plan submitted is not acceptable, a directive is issued. If the representation brings other facts to light and illustrates that there is no transgression, or an acceptable plan is tabled, then the process does not proceed to the issuance of a directive and the department continues to monitor compliance.

(i)(aa) During the 2021/2022 financial year, the Department had issued a total of 75 Notices of Intention to Issue a Directive in response to identified contraventions related to requirements stipulated under Sections 19 (3) and 22 of the National Water Act (Act 36 of 1998). The Department also issued 36 Directives in response to contraventions. These administrative actions pertain to instances where sewer systems failed to contain wastewater, or treated wastewater insufficiently resulting in water pollution, and also water users that are engaging in unlawful water uses.

Enforcement Actions taken against non-compliant Municipalities *from April 2021 to March 2022

Sector

NWA Notices Issued

NWA Directives Issued

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

71

33

Government (National/Province]

4

3

Total

75

36

(bb) During the 2022/2023 financial year, the Department had issued 67 Notices of Intention to Issue a Directive and 25 Directives in response to contraventions in response to identified contraventions related to requirements stipulated under Sections 19 (3) and 22 of the National Water Act. These administrative actions pertain to instances where sewer systems failed to contain wastewater, or treated wastewater insufficiently resulting in water pollution and unauthorised water uses.

Enforcement Actions taken against non-compliant Municipalities *from April 2022 to March 2023

Sector

NWA Notices Issued

NWA Directives Issued

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

62

23

Government [National/Province]

5

2

Total

67

25

From 1 April 2023 to date, the Department had issued 22 Notices of Intention to Issue a Directive and 5 Directives in response to identified contraventions related to requirements stipulated under Sections 19 (3) and 22 of the National Water Act. These administrative actions pertain to instances where sewer systems failed to contain wastewater, or treated wastewater insufficiently resulting in water pollution and unauthorised water uses.

(ii) Eight (8) public entities have fully complied with the administrative enforcement actions taken by the Department for the period 2021-22, 2022-23 and current financial year. There was partial compliance in other instances which has led to criminal charges being laid against public entities that did not comply.

2. The Department has laid 25 criminal charges against public entities that have not complied with the directives issued to compel their compliance with the provisions of the NWA. The Department obtained 3 Plea Sentencing Agreements against Rand West City Local Municipality (LM), Thaba Chweu LM and Lekwa LM for contravening NWA provisions. Criminal charges including causing pollution of water resources were laid, and the municipalities pleaded guilty on all counts. Fines were imposed on each Local Municipalities. The Department is actively monitoring the implementation of compliance with the plea sentencing agreement.

Enforcement Actions taken against non-compliant Municipalities in the past three FYs

Sectors

Cases Registered at SAPS

Plea Sentencing Agreement

 

FY 21/22

FY 22/23

FY 23/24

FY 21/22

FY 22/23

FY 23/24

Local Government [WSA/WSP]

3

10

11

-

2

1

Government [National/Prov]

-

1

-

-

-

-

Total

3

11

11

0

2

1

Furthermore, the Department obtained a court order against Msukaligwa LM. The Department will continue to monitor the implementation of the court order.

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08 November 2023 - NW3452

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2356 on 16 August 2022, she will furnish Ms A L A Abrahams with an updated report on the child support grant received by learners over the age of 18 years in Grades (a) 9, (b) 10, (c) 11 and (d) 12 for the year 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Table 1: Number of learners  above 18 who received social grant, in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12, in 2022

Province

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

EC

834

3 018

4 552

6 063

FS

370

2 023

1 973

2 764

GT

76

636

914

1 563

KZN

1 420

7 225

12 321

12 655

LP

677

3 330

4 539

7 074

MP

607

2 785

4 443

5 817

NC

97

810

809

1 120

NW

355

1 978

2 175

2 905

WC

205

2 462

4 318

7 632

Grand Total

4 641

24 267

36 044

47 593

Source 2022 LURITS

07 November 2023 - NW3428

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of learners who have dropped out of school in each province in 2023, (b) has she found be the reasons and (c) steps have been taken to curb dropouts?

Reply:

Please find response attached.

07 November 2023 - NW3411

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether her department has taken any specific steps to promote the values and principles contained in section 195(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, by establishing a framework that creates a unified system of public administration that traverses all three spheres of government; if not, why not; if so, what time frames have been put in place to implement the specified steps?

Reply:

Section 16(1)(a) read with section 16(2) of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014 (PAMA) provides for the Minister to issue minimum norms and standards regarding the promotion of values and principles referred to in section 195(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa subject to the approval by all relevant executive authorities, which includes all municipal councils. The latter provision has created challenges in the issuing of such norms and standards under the PAMA as obtaining the consent of all municipal council is impractical. Therefore, the Department has, as part of the Public Administration Management Amendment Bill currently before Parliament, proposed amendments in respect of section 16(2) to assist with the issuing of those norms and standards. Once the Amendment Bill is passed, the Department will be better placed to develop norms and standards regarding the promotion of values and principles referred to in section 195(1) of the Constitution that traverses all three spheres of government.

In any event, the Department has and continues to promote the values and principles espoused in section 195 of the Constitution in all the norms and standards that it develops. In addition, the Department is working to institutionalise the Service Charter adopted in Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council Resolution 1 of 2013 and to reaffirm the Batho Pele Principles.

End

07 November 2023 - NW3390

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether the Border Management Authority (BMA) administrative personnel will undergo lifestyle audits, in light of the announcement by the Commissioner of the BMA, Dr Mike Masiapato, that regular lifestyle audits will be conducted on the BMA guards to curb corruption, and in view of the fact that the BMA staff complement is constituted of approximately 221 armed law enforcement officers out of the total of 2 100; if not, why not; if so, how often?

Reply:

The Border Management Authority has as part of its strategic enterprise risk management process, identified seven (07) strategic enterprise/organisational risks of which ‘Fraud and Corruption’ is one. As a mitigation strategy to curb this risk, and given the lack of capacity within the BMA, the Authority has already commenced the process towards appointment of various service providers to “conduct the lifestyle audit of its employees” starting with critical areas which may be susceptible to fraud and corruption such as employees at all Ports of Entry, deployed at the borderline, SCM and HR units. The BMA is guided by the risk assessment and no employee of the BMA is immune to the lifestyle audit.

The request for issuance of the Request for Proposal or Expression of Interest has already been submitted to the BMA’s Supply Chain Management Unit to source the service providers with vast experience in conducting the exercise of this nature.

END

07 November 2023 - NW3331

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What licences are requested from his department to run a (a) coal and (b) chrome wash plant; (2) (a) what enforcements have been put in place in terms of a licence breach, (b) how regular does his department inspect the wash plants, (c) what number of violations have been found in each (i) province and (ii) wash plant in the past three years and (d) what actions were taken to rectify the violations?

Reply:

1. A Water Use License is required to operate a washing plant. The License largely depends on the location of the site, but the following water uses in terms of section 21 of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998) could be applicable:

(a) taking water from a water resource:

(b) storing water:

(c) impeding or diverting the flow of water in a watercourse:

(e) engaging in a stream flow reduction activity contemplated in section 36; engaging in a controlled activity identified as such in section 37(1) or declared under section 38(1):

(f) discharging waste or water containing waste into a water resource through a pipe, canal. sewer. sea outfall or other conduit:

(g) disposing of waste in a manner which may detrimentally impact on a water resource; disposing in any manner of water which contains waste from

(i) altering the bed, banks. course or characteristics of a watercourse.

2. (a) In cases of non-compliance with water use authorisations; the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has enforcement tools in place to address transgressions and manage unlawful water use. This ensures that a set of actions (administrative, criminal, and civil) are taken against non-compliance with the provisions of the National Water Act (NWA) through various measures including notices, directives, and legal action.

(b) The frequency of inspections of authorised wash plants varies across Water Management Areas (WMA) or Provinces. Some Provinces have a higher concentration of wash plants compared to others leading to more frequent inspections. Generally, some inspections occur quarterly or annually depending on the priorities or plans of WMAs. Furthermore, it is important to note that other provinces like Free State, Northern Cape and Western Cape do not have coal and chrome wash plants. Eastern Cape has one coal wash plant which is currently not operational.

Furthermore, unauthorized wash plants are being investigated on a continuous basis when reported or detected. Where enforcement action has been initiated, follow-up is conducted to assess progress on implementation of instructions/requirements stipulated in the notices, directives issued and/or action plans.

(c)(i) The table below depicts the number of reported non-compliant coal and chrome wash plants that have been found in other provinces and (ii) wash plant in the past three years and

(d) the table below also depicts actions taken to rectify the contraventions.

Table 1: Number of non-compliant cases related to Coal and Chrome Wash Plants investigated since April 2021

(c)(i) Province

Number of reported non-compliance cases investigated

Administrative Enforcement Action (i.e. Notices and Directives

Administrative Enforcement Actions currently in Process

-

Number of Criminal Cases Opened

Wash Plant Closed as result of Enforcement Action taken

Gauteng

1

1

-

-

-

KwaZulu Natal

9

9

-

-

-

Mpumalanga

21

19

-

2

-

North-West

22

11

8

-

2

(c)(i) Total

53

40

8

2

2

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07 November 2023 - NW3324

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)With generation capacity most likely to remain a problem for Eskom in the foreseeable future, and notwithstanding that independent power producers are ready to fill the gap with renewable energy, what (a) are the reasons that private sector funding for transmission development cannot coincide with private sector supply of energy generation and (b) amount of the generation supply gap will be filled by power generated from renewables; (2) whether the development of new transmission infrastructure with private sector financing can occur in tandem with increased supply to the grid from renewables; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) when and (b) at what cost?

Reply:

1. (a) It is estimated that more than R390 billion will be required over the next decade to meet the demand for grid capacity, largely due to the increase in generation capacity through renewable energy projects and insufficient grid capacity following the various Bid Windows.

Eskom’s current financial position places significant limitations on its ability to attract sufficient capital towards expanding the transmission grid, with the delivery of transmission infrastructure taking, on average, between 7 to 10 years. It is estimated this delivery rate needs to be scaled-up by eight times to connect the energy generation required for energy security by 2030.

It is anticipated that the transmission gridbuild rate needs to increase from 300km to 2300km per year with a greater rate of investment and delivery required through to 2050.

The Ministry in the Presidency for Electricity co-hosted a Transmission Financing Seminar with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and is currently finalising a cabinet submission on transmission financing pathways aimed at fast-tracking transmission infrastructure investments to support the anticipated growth in generation capacity and secure long-term energy security.

1 (b) The generation supply gap will be addressed through a combination of base-load and renewable technologies, acting in concert to close the demand/supply deficit whilst maintaining frequency control in the management of the National grid. Closing South Africa’s supply gap will, therefore, require a balance between these technologies and not a choice between one or the other. The Eskom Winter 2023 demand analysis projected a maximum demand of 34 000 MW, and supply for the period June 2023 to October 2023 averaged at around 28 400 MW. This suggests a supply deficit (based on peak demand) of around 6000 MW. In the medium term, accounting for growth based on an industrial-intensive path will increase the demand for baseload supply to guarantee energy security.

2 (a) Refer to 1(a) above.

2 (b) REfer to 1(a) above.

07 November 2023 - NW3232

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to his compliance with the judgment in Miriam Ali and others vs Minister of Home Affairs by publishing regulations related to the citizenship applications in terms of section 4(3) of the South African Citizenship Act, 88 of 1995 on 12 June 2023, which he later withdrew on 7 July 2023 with a notice indicating that amended regulations would be published in due course (a)(i) what are the reasons he withdrew the regulations published on 12 June 2023 and (ii) on what date does he intend to publish final regulations, (b) what total number of section 4(3) applications are currently pending and (c) how long will it take to adjudicate and finalise the pending applications; (2) whether the amended regulations referred to in the notice of 7 July 2023 will be open for public comment, since they differ from the original regulations in material respects; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The regulations were withdrawn and subsequently replaced with new regulations which were gazetted on 7 July 2023.

(1)(a)(ii) The final regulations were published on 7 July 2023 in Government Gazette No. 11603.

(b) There are 71 citizenship applications in terms of Section 4(3) that are pending.

(c) The above applications will be adjudicated before the end of November 2023.

2. The amended regulations were open for public comments and the new regulations have already been published as indicated above.

 

END

07 November 2023 - NW3378

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of new bulk water projects have been established in each province since June 2022, (b) total amount has been spent during the specified period and (c) are the details of each municipality where the projects have been established?

Reply:

a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) established twelve (12) new bulk water projects in various provinces since June 2022. The details are provided in the table below;

Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant Projects

No

Province

(c) Municipality

Project Name

(b) Amount Spent (April 2022 to October 2023) R’000

1.

Eastern Cape

Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela Bay - Water Security Programme

R71,840

2.

Free State

Maluti a Phofung LM

Maluti-a-Phofung BWS - Intervention

R72,660

3.

Free State

Matjhabeng Local Municipality

Matjhabeng Bulk Sewer (Welkom)

R106,561

4.

KwaZulu Natal

Zululand District Municipality

Mandlakazi Bulk Water Supply - Intervention

R240,015

5.

Limpopo

Polokwane

Ebenezer & Olifantspoort Scheme

R422,000

6.

Mpumalanga

Thembisile Hani Local Municipality

Thembisile Water Scheme (Loskop)

R419,472

7.

Mpumalanga

Lekwa Local Municipality

Lekwa Water Services and Sewer - Interventions

R41,676

8.

Northern Cape

Hantam Local Municipality

Calvinia Bulk Water Supply Project

R60,000

9.

North West

Moses Kotane Local Municipality

Pilanesberg South Bulk Water Supply Phase 2

R421,972

10.

North West

Moretele Local Municipality

Moretele North Bulk Water Supply

R421,972

11.

North West

Kagisano Molopo Local Municipality

Kagisano Molopo Bulk Water Supply

R145,000

12.

Western Cape

Drakenstein Local Municipality

Drakenstein Local Municipality - Sanitation Infrastructure Project

R9,100

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07 November 2023 - NW3261

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) time frames have been put in place by his department to resolve the water challenges which are currently being experienced by residents of Wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the Emakhazeni Local Municipality in Mpumalanga and (b) are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has put in place the following interventions to address water supply challenges in the various Wards within the Emakhazeni Local Municipality:

Ward

Water supply status and Challenges

Plans and Time Frames

1; 2; 8

The wards comprise parts of Siyathuthuka township and farming areas

The municipality supplies these wards through the municipal water supply system in the township and boreholes/ground water in the farms/rural areas.

Siyathuthuka township is serviced through the Belfast Water Treatment Works with a design capacity of 4 ML/D which is shared with ward 2, 3 and 8. Belfast is abstracting the raw water from the Belfast dam.

The total estimated demand as per the areas serviced by the plant is 5.2 Ml/d against the 4 Ml/d design capacity of the plant.

The farms are supplied with water through boreholes/ground and water tankering.

Inadequate water infrastructure in the farms/rural areas.

Upgrading of the Belfast Water Treatment Works (WTW) from 4 ML/D to 8ML/D.

The project is currently at procurement stage implemented by the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport.

Start Date: January 2024

End Date: March 2025

4

Ward 4 comprises of Dullstroom town, Sakhelwe township and farming areas.

Both Dullstroom town and Sakhelwe are serviced by the Dullstroom Water Treatment Works. The plant abstracts raw water from the Dullstroom Dam which has a design capacity of 2 Ml/d.

Farming areas receives water through boreholes and water tankering in particular where the water infrastructure is inadequate.

Inability to retain sufficient raw water in the Dullstroom dam due to the leaking and collapsed spillway.

Water rationing is currently being implemented as a short-term intervention for water supply to the community

Upgrading of Dullstroom WTW Project funded through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant.

Start Date: July 2024

End Date: June 2025

Drilling of a borehole and provision of storage facility in Meschunfontein (Tonteindoos) farm funded through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant. This project is currently at design stage.

Start Date: January 2024

End Date: June 2024

5; 6

The ward comprises parts of Emthonjeni township and farming areas

The municipality supplies this ward through both conventional water supply in the township and boreholes/ground water in the farms/rural area.

Emthonjeni township is serviced through Machardodorp WTW with a design capacity of 2.7 Ml/d which is shared with parts of Ward 6 (Entokozweni town). The Machardodop WTW abstracts raw water from Elands River.

The total estimated demand as per the areas that are serviced by the plant is 3.5 Ml/D.

Upgrading of the Machardodorp WTW is incomplete due to budget constraints

Inadequate water infrastructure in the farming areas

Upgrading of the Machardodorp WTW project from 2,7Ml/d to 4Ml/d.

Start Date: July 2024

End Date: June 2025

7

Emgwenya town and township are both supplied with water through Waterval Boven WTW. The plant draws water from Elands River through rising main. Waterval Boven WTW has a design capacity of 3 Ml/d against the estimated current demand of 2,2 ML/D which depicts a surplus of +0.8 Ml/d.

Interrupted water supply is experienced during load shedding or power outage due to lack of stand by generator at the raw water pump station and Waterval Boven WTW. Plans are in place for the procurement of stand by generators which are prioritized in the 2024/2025 financial year.

Procurement and Installation of standby generators.

Start Date: February 2024

End Date: June 2024

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07 November 2023 - NW3277

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Considering the environmental impact of the depletion of underground water sources due to water sources being overutilised by gum plantations owned by Sappi, which disadvantages communities living in and around the plantations, how does his department monitor and/or oversee the use of water so that the usage of water is not skewed in favour of large corporations such as Sappi?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) manages use of water resources by commercial afforestation where this activity is declared as engaging in a streamflow reduction activity (SFRA) as contemplated in s36(1) of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998) (NWA) from the water use authorisation process. Upon receipt of a water use licence application for s21(d) water use (SFRA), the Department undertakes technical assessment to estimate the impacts associated with the activity on the water resource and any decision to issue a water use licence is based on sustainable water availability. The application must satisfy the requirements of the Reserve, both ecological and basic human needs, and where a water use licence is granted, conditions are attached to ensure that efficiency, equity, and sustainability in the use of water resources are promoted throughout the project’s lifetime.

The impact of commercial forestry plantations on surface water resources has been researched extensively, and impact assessment tools have been developed and are being applied in the water use authorisation processes. However, in recent decades, researchers have also shown interest of studying the impact of commercial forestry plantations on groundwater resources. These studies show that commercial afforestation trees may influence evapotranspiration rates and deep roots, lowering groundwater water tables. These studies make recommendations which are considered in the authorisation process.

The other factors considered when authorising a water use for commercial forestry plantations are found in s27(1) of the NWA, where factors, including the need to redress the results of past racial and gender discrimination, and efficient and beneficial use of water in the public interest are considered. These factors ensure that when allocating water resources, the principle of fair allocation is considered for equitable water allocation.

Water use authorisation instruments issued by the Department are continuously monitored for compliance by the Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement component of the Department to ensure that water users comply with the conditions attached to their water use entitlements and any best management practices (SFRA best management practices) recommended for the sector. Compliance is assessed via the auditing process and corrective actions are addressed as enabled by the NWA.

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07 November 2023 - NW3405

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What are the relevant details of the actions that has been taken since he assumed Office to increase the ratio of nuclear in the energy mix of the Republic since, according to industry experts, nuclear is not only clean but also cheaper than renewable energy?

Reply:

The supply of South Africa’s energy demand is broadly determined by the energy mix as set out in The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) 2019. Based on the 2019 IRP, Coal constitutes 43% of installed capacity followed by Wind (22.53) Solar PV (10.5) CSP (0, 76) Nuclear (2,36) and Gas and Diesel (8.1) Hydro (5.84).

Whilst the IRP is currently being reviewed, Coal, Nuclear and Gas is expected to continue to be significant contributors to SA’s base load demand in the foreseeable future, with investments in cleaner technologies to mitigate negative environmental impacts, coupled with and battery storage to neutralise and solar/wind hybrid solutions to stabilise the intermittency challenges of renewables.

07 November 2023 - NW3404

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What (a) measures have been put in place to ensure that the transmission network does not have leakages that compromise the 1:1 ratio of energy transmitted to energy delivered, (b) was the cost of the measures and (c) is being done to safeguard the transmission network from being vandalised?

Reply:

a) The transmission losses are the difference between the total energy that came into the transmission network from the generating sources and the energy delivered to Transmission customers. These are purely technical losses incurred in the transportation of energy. In the 2022/23 financial year, the transmission losses were 4 700 GWh or 2.32%. There are meters at all transmission boundaries to ensure accurate accounting of energy flows. There are processes in place to ensure that this data is accurate, which include routine maintenance of meters and associated infrastructure, and data validation processes to identify errors.

The losses are affected by the generating pattern, as they are sensitive to the proximity between sources and loads. Independent power producers (IPPs) have an overall positive impact because of the way that they are distributed. The usage of open-cycle gas turbines (OCGTs) has a positive impact as well. Network strengthening projects also have a positive impact on losses.

b) Maintenance and data verification processes are normal operational processes, so there are no additional costs.

Generation dispatch is done to optimise overall system energy costs. Network strengthening is done according to the Transmission Development Plan (TDP).

(c) Conductor theft is one of the primary security threats that face the Eskom network and critical infrastructure. Transmission Security has embedded a strategy to reduce network theft by dealing with the product (precious metals), the market (scrap metal dealers), and the thief (crime syndicates).

The following security operations have been initiated:

  • Weekly operations meetings are held with the South African Police Service (SAPS) to visit illegal and legal scrap metal dealers to enforce the Second-Hand Goods Act. Fines are issued to non-compliant vendors, and illegal vendors are arrested. The operations deter the illegal purchase of Eskom material.
  • A specialised investigation contract has been procured to deal with high-profile cases and organised crime.
  • Transmission incident management is conducted via the Mission Area Joint Operation Centre (MAJOC SAPS) to ensure that all reported criminal cases that affect Transmission critical infrastructure receive immediate attention.
  • Technology (vibration sensors) is being rolled out on high-risk lines for early warning, as well as improved security systems at high-risk substations, to ensure deterrence, detection, delay, and response.

07 November 2023 - NW3262

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

In light of the rampant corruption and financial mismanagement across government departments, what measures have been put in place to ensure that the R163 million which was donated by the People’s Republic of China is spent in a transparent manner?

Reply:

The Donation of emergency power equipment by the People’s Republic of China to South Africa is a consolidation of the strategic diplomatic partnership between the respect Republics, in an attempt to resolve the energy crisis, which presently besets South Africa.

The donation is in the form of emergency power equipment procured and supplied by the Chinese government, which will be distributed/dispatched in line with the differentiated energy demands in public facilities, in particular, public heath, educational and justice facilities to mitigate the impact during loadshedding.

07 November 2023 - NW3284

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(a) What has been the uptake from companies since they were allowed to generate up to 100 megawatts without applying for a generation license and (b) how will the uptake in small-scale embedded generation be monitored?REPLY

Reply:

(a) the 100MW threshold has been lifted as part of the deregulation of the energy sector. Currently, no limit exists for embedded generation.

The pipeline of confirmed private sector generation projects has increased to 126 projects representing more than 12 GW of new capacity since the amendment of Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act to remove the licensing threshold for generation facilities. 1338 MW is expected to connect to the grid in 2023 and 3081 MW in 2024. A survey by Eskom showed that the total number of projects in the pipeline is 66 GW.

(b) All Generators are required to Register their Projects with the National Electricity Regulator of South Africa (NERSA).

07 November 2023 - NW3167

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the relevant details pertaining to the (a) total budget allocated towards and/or (b) actual expenditure with regard to the (i) salaries, (ii) travel expenses and (iii) accommodation of public servants?

Reply:

The details pertaining to the (a) total budget allocated towards and (b) actual year to date expenditure with regards to the

(i) salaries of public servants for the 2023/2024 financial year are as follows:

ii) travel expenses and (iii) accommodation of public servants for the 2023/2024 financial year are as follows:

End

07 November 2023 - NW3283

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether there are any resources allocated to enable municipalities in good financial standing to procure their power from the independent power producers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Municipalities can purchase electricity from Independent Power Producers (IPP) through the Small Scale Embedded Generation Project, subject to section 217(1) of the Constitution, read with their respective Supply Chain Management Policies.

Further, Municipalities may apply to the Minister in the Presidency for Electricity under s34(1)(d) of the ELECTRICITY REGULATION ACT 4 OF 2006, as amended, for a determination that will enable a Municipality to purchase energy from an IPP.

07 November 2023 - NW3233

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

When does he intend to publish regulations to section 2(2) of the South African Citizenship Act, 88 of 1995 in compliance with the order of the Supreme Court of Appeal of South Africa in the DGLR matter?

Reply:

The Department, in compliance with Pretoria High Court order, accepts, adjudicates and processes applications submitted on affidavit in terms of section 2(2) of the South African Citizenship Act, 88 of 1995. The amended regulations published on 7 July 2023, are in essence reciprocating the order.

END

07 November 2023 - NW3205

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the incomplete Vlakfontein site that is part of efforts by Rand Water to augment its water storage, which broke ground on 12 May 2020 and was expected to be completed on 25 April 2023, on what date will the project be completed; (2) with reference to the Zuikerbosch Water Treatment facility which is continuously being affected by power failure, with areas that receive water from Vlakfontein reservoir having had very low pressure and/or no water, what are the reasons for the lack of communication and/or feedback on the specified water outages and/or restrictions; (3) what are the reasons that the (a) water shortages experienced in the specified areas continue and (b) reservoir is never above 50% capacity; (4) what are the reasons that the Vlakfontein 3 reservoir has not been brought online?

Reply:

1.  The Vlakfontein Reservoir was substantially completed on the 31 March 2023. Subsequently, it had to be filled to full capacity to test for leaks and to allow for backfilling around the reservoir which was completed on the 20 September 2023. The reservoir was then commissioned on the 21 September 2023 for normal operations.

2. Two major water outages affected the Mapleton System supply (which supplies Vlakfontein) because of power failures at Zuikerbosch Water Treatment Plant. These water outages were promptly communicated to customers through various media platforms. Unfortunately, power failures cannot be communicated in advance as they are not planned. The system has however experienced multiple and extended power failures at Mapleton Pumping Station which receives power from Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. Rand Water is in the process of installing generators at Mapleton Pumping Station which will be used as alternative power supply. The full commissioning of the generators is planned for first quarter of 2024.

3. There are municipal areas that are dependent on Rand Water’s reservoir levels being high. These areas will then get affected if reservoir levels are lower. Reservoir levels depends on consumption downstream as well as consistent pumping/supply. Besides failures experienced at Zuikerbosch and Mapleton Pumping Station; the municipalities have also been consuming more than what was allocated to them and as a result depleting the reservoir storages. Ideally, municipalities are also expected to have booster pumping stations to counteract reliance on higher Rand Water reservoir levels.

4. Please refer to the answer provided under Question 1.

--00O00---

07 November 2023 - NW3282

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What (a) progress has been made with discussions and/or plans to fast-track Small-scale Embedded Generation applications by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa and (b) are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Small-Scale Embedded Generation (SSEG) project are “behind the meter” solutions and not subject to regulator approval, but simply require a generator to register with the Regulator. The financial viability of SSEG projects is subject to a generator securing a concomitant power purchase agreement with a prospective buyer of the electricity produced.

Where the electricity is required to be wheeled, the wheeling agreements are subject to approval by the respective distributor (Municipality or Eskom) through whose distribution infrastructure the energy is evacuated from the point of production to the point of consumption.

To assist municipalities/Eskom to structure and price wheeling agreements, a National Wheeling Framework has been developed and is currently being reviewed by NERSA

06 November 2023 - NW3288

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 2018 on 28 June 2023, what (a) steps have been taken to introduce automated online tourism visa applications and not e-visas, (b)(i) measures, (ii) processes, (iii) procedures and (iv) mechanisms are in place to introduce such a system and (c) are the (i) deadlines, (ii) milestones, (iii) time frames and (iv) timelines in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The type of automated online tourism visa application system the Department has launched is the electronic-visa (e-Visa) system which is similar to the ones many other countries have implemented. The e-Visa platform is designed to accept tourism visas. This is a fully automated system whereby clients apply for their tourist visas online, pay online as well as upload their supporting documents for adjudication at the hub in Pretoria.

(b)(i – iv) The e-Visa is a fully automated system that was launched to allow clients to apply for their tourist visas from the convenience of their homes.

(c) The e-Visa system was piloted in 2022, enhanced in April 2023 and expanded to 20 additional non-visa exempted countries. In total there are 34 countries who are utilising this system.

END

06 November 2023 - NW3370

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Regarding impediments to the registration of births, what is the status of (a) establishing birth registration systems at all clinics and/or public hospitals with birth facilities in the Republic and (b) discussions with the Department of Health and/or any other relevant department(s) to provide free DNA testing to indigent South African fathers in order to prove the South African citizenship of a child for the purposes of the late registration of birth?

Reply:

a) The Department of Home Affairs in collaboration with the National Department of Health (DOH) facilitated the allocation of office space to the Department of Home affairs in health facilities.

There are 41 Priority 1 public health facilities responsible for the delivery of approximately 32.5% births, followed by 109 Priority 2 contributing to the delivery of approximately 36.50% births, 101 Priority 3 responsible for the delivery of approximately 15.50 % of births, 95 Priority 4 contributing to about 7.21% births delivered and 1099 Priority 5 which are mostly clinics and health community centres accounting for approximately 8.28% births delivered in public health facilities.

To date the Department rolled out the online birth registration system in 161 health facilities which contributes to approximately 68.35% of births delivered across the country.

b) The Department has a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with DOH regarding registration of births at health facilities. The Department is engaging DOH and National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) in relation to exploring the provision of providing paternity tests free of charge or at a minimal fee to indigent clients. A revised agreement has been prepared to engage both DOH and NHLS.

END

06 November 2023 - NW3381

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he will furnish Prof C.T Msimang with the figures for the total (a) recorded number of prisoners in correctional facilities in each province and (b) number of beds (i) in correctional facilities and (ii) available as at the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

It should be noted that Department of Correctional Services (DCS) is demarcated into Six Regions and not aligned to the provincial dispensation.

a) Total number of inmates in correctional facilities in each region as on 19 October 2023:

Region

Unsentenced Inmates

Sentenced Offenders

Total Inmates

Eastern Cape

6 889

13 944

20 833

Free State & Northern Cape

6 408

14 094

20 502

Gauteng

15 540

20 485

36 025

KwaZulu-Natal

7 078

16 203

23 281

Limpopo Mpumalanga & North West

5 740

15 506

21 246

Western Cape

12 875

13 624

26 499

TOTAL

54 530

93 856

148 386

(b)(i) Number of beds in correctional facilities as on 19 October 2023:

Region

Bedspace

Eastern Cape

12 427

Free State & Northern Cape

18 462

Gauteng

23 247

KwaZulu-Natal

17 778

Limpopo Mpumalanga & North West

14 789

Western Cape

17 855

TOTAL

104 558

(b)(ii) The information is provided in part (a) and (b)(i) as requested.

END

06 November 2023 - NW3369

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Regarding the Ministerial Review Panel and data recovery process at the Government Printing Works, (a) what are the total costs (i) of the ministerial review panel to date, and (ii) incurred on the project to recover and/or recompile data lost in (aa) February 2021, (bb) January 2022, (cc) March 2022 and (dd) April 2022 and (b) from which budget item were the costs taken in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total cost incurred on the implementation of the Ministerial Review Panel recommendations amounts to R4 184 843.18.

(a)(ii)(aa) No costs were incurred by the GPW on the project to recover and/or recompile data lost in February 2021.

The following organisations were consulted to assist with data recovery:

• Hewlett Packard (OEM)

• CSSI data recovery specialists

• State Security Agency (SSA)

GPW did not raise purchase orders for all the above organisations, therefore no costs were incurred.

(a)(ii)(bb) No data loss was experienced in January 2022, therefore no costs were incurred.

(a)(ii)(cc) GPW did not raise purchase orders on the project to recover and/or recompile data lost in March 2022, therefore no costs were incurred.

(a)(ii)(dd) No data loss was experienced in April 2022, therefore no costs were incurred to recover/recompile data lost.

(b) Funds were allocated to Professional Services and the R4 184 843.18 budget was taken against this budget item.

END

03 November 2023 - NW3386

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether any South African doctors who were trained abroad have taken up the 2023 Health Professions Council of South Africa examination in order to register to practice in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), 217 foreign trained applicants sat for theory examinations on the 25th of October 2023.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3320

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a list of all the critical skills vacancies in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled and (b) what is the total annual cost of each position?

Reply:

The Department of Home Affairs compiles a list of critical skills needed in the country as their reference for approving work permits. The current Home Affairs Critical list as published 2022 includes only Medical and Nursing Specialists for Health services.

The Department of Health provides essential services to the country. This is based on the nature of services being provided. It is imperative to note that ideally the Department of Health wishes to fill all health care worker posts in order to improve the health outcomes of the population.

(1)-(2) Due to current financial constrains that are also affecting human resources budgets, Provinces annually appoint Employment Recruitment Teams lead by Heads of Health Departments or delegated officials at senior positions to develop recruitment plans prioritising the filling of critical posts with a required skills mix to address the burden of diseases at all our levels of care guarding against overspending on provided/available budgets.

Annexure A as attached is provincial submission of prioritised posts per province with envisaged dates to fill the posts and total costs per province. Outstanding province Free is Gauteng.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3258

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Mrs L F Tito with the graft probe report with regard to a security contract in the North West Provincial Department of Health; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, Minister of Health is unable to furnish the Member with the referred report regarding the security contract in the North-West Provincial Department of Health as is not an official document of the Department. It has no legal status as its drafting and processing were never concluded, as such never necessitated the Department to give it consideration whatsoever.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3281

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether she has a system in place that tracks and/or supports retired personnel; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what kind of support is offered to them beyond processing their pension payouts?

Reply:

The department does not have a system in place that tracks and/or supports retired personnel and there is no support offered to them beyond processing their pension payouts. It can be noted that there is no legislated obligation for a department to support people after they have retired.

END

03 November 2023 - NW3351

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 3081 on 22 September 2023, why (a) were the deceased taken to the Diepkloof Government Mortuary and not to Hillbrow; (b) were families of the deceased charged R700 for the release of bodies from the Diepkloof Mortuary, what (c) is the capacity of (i) Diepkloof Mortuary, (ii) Hillbrow Mortuary and (iii) Roodepoort Mortuary and (d) number of bodies are still at the respective mortuaries as at 1 September 2023?

Reply:

(a) According to the Gauteng Department of Health, bodies were taken to both Hillbrow (Johannesburg) and Diepkloof Forensic mortuaries for the following reasons.

  • The Diepkloof Forensic Mortuary was used for the postmortem examinations. It was also as a central storage for bodies so that families can access one central point for identification of family members.
  • The Hillbrow (Johannesburg) Mortuary was used to conduct advanced scientific investigations such as DNA harvesting, Fingerprint Taking and use of the LODOX/ X-Ray services.

(b) The Gauteng Department of Health did not charge any family money for the release of the bodies. The following are free services provided by Forensic Pathology Services: Body Autopsy, DNA collection, Histology, Toxicology, and Anthropology examination.

(c) Table 1 below indicates responses to (i)(ii) and (c) and (d)

Mortuary name

(c)Capacity

(d) Bodies in the mortuary as of 1 September 2023

(i) Diepkloof

300

205

(ii) Hillbrow

200

160

(iii) Roodepoort

100

84

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3385

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Ms M D Hlengwa with the records of the procurement of new ambulances in the 2023-24 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the statistics of (a) each hospitals (b) in each province?

Reply:

a) Ambulances are allocated to EMS stations which are either stand-alone or co-located in hospitals, clinics, and other public facilities. Ambulances are therefore not allocated to each hospital.

b) The number of ambulances procured in 2023-24 financial year per province is as per table below:

Province

Number of Ambulances

Eastern Cape

58

Free State

20

Gauteng

170

KwaZulu-Natal

32

Limpopo

500

Mpumalanga

10

Northwest

3

Northern Cape

0

Western Cape

120

Total

913

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3400

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the current patient to psychiatrist ratio in all the public facilities in the Republic; (2) whether the ratio is in compliance with the Norms and Standards of his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. and (2) The table below reflects the details in this regard.

Province

Facility Name

No of psychiatrists

No of usable beds

Patient to psychiatrist ratio

Ratio compliant with the Norms and Standards (1:28 – 1:42 for acute beds and 1:50 for medium to long stay beds)

Eastern Cape

Elizabeth Donkin Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

2

163

1:82

No

 

Fort England Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

2

313

1:156

No

 

Komani Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

0

440

None

No

 

Tower Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

0

352

None

No

 

Dora Nginza Regional Hospital

1

35

1:35

Yes

 

Cecilia Makiwane Regional Hospital

1

50

1:50

No

 

Mthatha Regional Hospital

1

30

1: 30

Yes

Free State

Free State Psychiatric Complex

5

760

1: 152

No

 

Mofuhadi Manapo Mopedi Regional Hospital

1

30

1:30

Yes

 

Boitumelo Regional Hospital

1

34

1: 34

Yes

Gauteng

Sterkfontein Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

18

613

1:34

Yes

 

Tara Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

8

137

1:17

Yes

 

Weskoppies Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

16

780

1:49

Yes

 

Cullinan Psychiatric Care and Rehabilitation Hospital

0.5 (sessional)

180

1: 360

No

 

Dr George Mukhari Central Hospital

4

48

1: 12

Yes

 

Charlotte Maxeke Central Hospital

7

65

1:9

Yes

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Central Hospital

10

165

1:17

Yes

 

Kalafong Provincial Tertiary Hospital

1

45

1:45

No

 

Steve Biko Central Hospital

2

18

1:9

Yes

 

Helen Joseph Provincial Tertiary Hospital

3

60

1:20

Yes

 

Thembisa Provincial Tertiary Hospital

0

30

None

No

 

Leratong Regional Hospital

1

40

1: 40

No

 

Mamelodi Regional Hospital

0

28

None

No

 

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

1

20

1: 20

Yes

 

Kopanong District Hospital

1

54

1:54

No

KZN

Ekuhlengeni Specialised Psychiatric Care and Rehabilitation Hospital

0

700

None

No

 

Fort Napier Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

5

378

1:76

No

 

Town Hill Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

7

242

1:35

Yes

 

Umngeni Specialised Psychiatric Care and Rehabilitation Hospital

0

392

None

No

 

Umzimkhulu Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

0

284

None

No

 

King Dinuzulu Regional Hospital

4

78

1:20

Yes

 

Madadeni Regional Hospital

1

250

1: 250

No

 

Port Shepstone Regional Hospital

1

8

1: 8

Yes

 

Ngwelezane Provincial Tertiary Hospital

2

30

1:15

Yes

 

Prixley KaSeme Regional Hospital

3

28

1:9

Yes

 

St Benedictine District Hospital

0

15

None

No

 

Prince Mshiyeni Regional Hospital

3

25

1:8

Yes

 

Addington Regional Hospital

2

18

1:9

Yes

 

King Edward IV Central Hospital

3

20

1:7

Yes

 

General Justice Gizenga Mpanza Regional Hospital

1

20

1:20

Yes

 

RK Khan Regional Hospital

1

20

1:20

Yes

 

Northdale District Hospital

0

10

None

No

 

Ladysmith Regional Hospital

1

14

1:14

Yes

 

Harry Gwala Regional Hospital

3

15

1:5

Yes

 

Mahatma Ghandhi Regional Hospital

1

18

1:18

Yes

Limpopo

Evuxakeni Specialised Psychiatric Care and Rehabilitation Hospital

0

354

None

No

 

Hayani Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

2

250

1:125

No

 

Thabamoopo Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

2

500

1:250

No

 

Mankweng Provincial Tertiary Hospital

1

20

1:20

Yes

 

Donald Frazer District Hospital

0

40

None

No

 

Elim District Hospital

0

36

None

No

 

Letaba Regional Hospital

1

40

1:40

No

 

Malamulele District Hospital

0

20

None

No

 

Nkhensani District Hospital

0

14

None

No

 

Siloam District Hospital

0

30

None

No

 

Tshilidzini Regional Hospital

0

12

None

No

 

Matlala District Hospital

0

12

None

No

Mpumalanga

Ermelo Regional Hospital

1

30

1:30

Yes

 

Rob Ferreira Provincial Tertiary Hospital

1

30

1:30

Yes

 

Tintswalo District Hospital

0

50

None

No

 

Themba Regional Hospital

1

27

1:27

Yes

 

Embhuleni District Hospital

20

0

None

No

Northern Cape

Kimberly Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

2

170

1:85

No

North West

Bophelong Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

1

314

1: 314

No

 

Witrand Specialised Psychiatric Care and Rehabilitation Hospital

2

797

1: 399

No

 

Mahikeng Provincial Regional Hospital

1

26

1: 26

Yes

 

Job Shimankane Tabane Provincial Tertiary Hospital

1

60

1: 60

No

 

Taung District Hospital

1

20

1:20

Yes

 

Potchestroom Regional Hospital

1

11

1: 21

Yes

 

Tshepong Provincial Tertiary Hospital

 

10

   

Western Cape

Alexandra Specialised Psychiatric Care and Rehabilitation Hospital

0

300

None

No

 

Lentergeur Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

9

690

1:77

No

 

Stikland Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

9

423

1:47

Yes

Medium

 

Valkenberg Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

8

391

1:49

Yes

 

Worcester Regional Hospital

2

24

1: 12

Yes

 

Paarl Regional Hospital

2

30

1:15

Yes

 

George Regional Hospital

2

12

1:6

Yes

 

Tygerberg Central Hospital

5

42

1:8

Yes

 

Red Cross Provincial Tertiary Hospital

3

6

1: 2

Yes

 

Groote Schuur Central Hospital

2

55

1: 28

Yes

 

Mitchell’s Plain District Hospital

1

44

1: 44

No

 

Khayelitsha District Hospital

0

55

None

No

 

Eerste River

0

30

None

No

 

New Somerset Hospital

0

32

None

No

 

Victoria District Hospital

1

15

1: 7

Yes

  • There is a limited number of psychiatrists in the country.
  • Facilities that are in rural areas struggle to attract specialists
  • In all provinces where the ratio is low, the psychiatrists do outreach (care and training) to areas where there are no psychiatrists.
  • The academic hospitals have more psychiatrists because over and above caring for patients, they provide training at universities.
  • In the Limpopo Province, hospitals without psychiatrists, have medical officers with diplomas in psychiatry.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3508

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What was the total (a) number of (i) unsuccessful and (ii) successful applications for Unemployment Insurance Fund in the 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years and (b) expenditure in this regard?

Reply:

The table below shows the total number of unsuccessful and successful UIF applications and expenditure for the financial years 2021/22 and 2022/23.

FINANCIAL YEAR 2021/22

FINANCIAL YEAR FINANCIAL YEAR 2022/23

Number of successful UIF Applications

Number of unsuccessful UIF Applications

Expenditure

Number of successful UIF Applications

Number of unsuccessful UIF Applications

Expenditure

1 073 548

207 299

R22 599 302 590.69

982 124

185 284

R15 648 732 618.33

The number of claims was high in the 2021/2022 financial year and have started to decline in the 2022/2023 financial year.

a) The table below depicts the expenditure of all benefit types for 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years.

Benefit payments to beneficiaries

2021/2022 Financial year

2022/2023 financial year

COVID

R4 534 768 051.07

R449 587 581.73

WABU

R14 148 233.36

R7 657 043.20

BEN-Unemployment 

R14 976 052 618.47

R12 417 076 372.27

BEN-Reduced Work Time

R294 161 421.79

R 321 199 678.30

BEN-Illness Benefits

R394 575 411.48

R395 953 173.85

BEN-Maternity 

R1 625 630 329.92

R1 503 523 855.80

BEN- Parental Paternity

R3 797 326.54

R3 352 519.75

BEN-Adoption

R465 723.40

R416 574.00

BEN-Dependants Benefits

R755 703 474.66

R549 965 819.43

Total

R22 599 302 590.69

R15 648 732 618.33

NB: In the 2021/2022 financial year the UIF paid a high number of companies Covid-19 TERS and WABU benefits, which significantly decline in the 2022/2023 financial year, as businesses started showing signs of recovery from the impact of the pandemic and returned to normal business operation.

03 November 2023 - NW3265

Profile picture: Makamba-Botya, Ms N

Makamba-Botya, Ms N to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his statement that his department will be prioritising funds to help with water storage infrastructure, following the rising infections at Gauteng hospitals due to the water crisis, (a)(i) in what way and (ii) in which period will his department be doing this and (b)(i) to what effect will the intervention take place and (ii) which areas, facilities and communities will be affected by this intervention?

Reply:

On the 19 September 2023, the Zuikerbosch water treatment plant had a breakdown caused by a power trip, which affected the production of water supply.

(a) Short-term temporary intervention should there be a similar crisis: (i)&(ii) water tankers are on standby to prevent health services being affected by such crisis. Some of the hospitals in Gauteng have reservoirs and some have boreholes as part of the back-up alternative in case there are similar crisis.

(b) Long-term permanent intervention: (i)&(ii) Rand Water is in the process of commissioning a new purification plant which will be impacting all health facilities within the City of Tshwane, the City of Ekurhuleni and the City of Johannesburg, among others. This plant is intending to deliver 150-million litres of potable water a day into Rand Water’s system, and by the end of 2024.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3257

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Health

Given that in his address at the United Nations on 22 September 2023 wherein he stated that the Republic has made progress in transforming the public healthcare sector, despite the sustained regression in the public healthcare sector that has even been noted by the Auditor-General in consecutive years, (a) which progress in transformation was he referring to and (b) how is the progress measured?

Reply:

a) Progress on public healthcare sector transformation

The Minister was referring to transformation of health services in South Africa since 1994, which began with the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) that emanated from the Freedom Charter. RDP aimed at redressing the harmful effects of apartheid and complete transformation of the entire health delivery system.

Key milestones in health transformation were: the establishment of a national health system (NHS) made up of various role players; the implementation of an extensive programme of public clinic building & upgrading; provision of free primary health care (PHC) health services and essential drugs in PHC facilities; the orientation of services and emphasis on PHC approach enshrined in the White Paper on the Transformation of the Health System in 1997 and the National Health Act of 2003; as well as the establishment of the district health system (DHS) as a vehicle to deliver & manage PHC services closer to where people live.

Several other initiatives were undertaken to transform health services delivery to ensure better access for all including:

  • The Bilateral Health Cooperation Agreement signed between the Governments of the Republic of South Africa and Cuba in 1996 provided an opportunity for recruitment of young South African students to undergo medical training in Cuba through the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Training Programme (NMFC). To date, 3071 doctors have been produced through the NMFC.
  • The pricing legislation introduced Single Exit Prices (SEPs) in 2006 for registered and unregistered medicines, determining appropriate logistics fees for wholesalers and distributors of pharmaceuticals, as well as formulating the dispensing fees for pharmacists and licensed persons. This pricing legislation reduced medicines prices by 45%, which reduced financial barrier and increased access to much needed medicines for ordinary people.
  • The shift from curative care to preventive care was strengthened by “PHC Reengineering” strategy adopted in 2010. PHC reengineering involved the deployment of community health workers, school health services and the district clinical specialist model which focussed on disease prevention and addressing key drivers of maternal and infant mortality.
  • The Office of Health Standards and Compliance established in 2013 has been instrumental in safeguarding the quality of healthcare services in health facilities and ensuring compliance to norms and standards.

The health system strength was tested during COVID-19, and proved to be resilient enough to curb the pandemic and provide care to all those who needed it. Currently, the country is engaged in National Health Insurance (NHI) as a major health reform in pursuit of Universal Health Coverage.

The latest Auditor-General Report for FY2022/23 Annual Report acknowledged the progress that the Department is making to improve audit outcomes.

b) Public health service transformation is measured by monitoring indicator performance, evaluations of each individual component/intervention, conducting research surveys and analyzing civil registration vital statistics data to monitor outcomes at a population level. The examples are a) the District Health Barometer which gauges district performance on service delivery; b) Early Childhood Development programme evaluation; and c) the South African Demographic & Health Survey (SADHS)

The World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the UHC service coverage index to measure progress in the provision of UHC as required for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is a single composite indicator that includes reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health; infectious diseases; non-communicable diseases; as well as service capacity and access among the general and the most disadvantaged population. The WHO Tracking Universal Health Coverage: 2023 Global Monitoring Report shows that SA UHC index improved from medium (43%) in 2000 to high (71%) in 2021.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3279

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Tetyana, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Health

Given that Medico-legal claims of more than R20 billion in Gauteng at present are concerning, (a)(i) which healthcare facilities account for most of the specified claims and (ii) what steps has he and/or his department taken to intervene in such healthcare facilities, (b) how has he found that the intervention steps have improved the situation and (c)(i) what is the nature of the majority of claims and (ii) how are they resolvable in the long term?

Reply:

a) (i) According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, the top 10 (Ten) healthcare facilities which account for the most specified claims are as follows:

Health facilities:

  • Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital
  • Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital
  • Tembisa Hospital
  • Dr. George Mukhari Hospital
  • Charlotte Maxeke Academic Hospital
  • Sebokeng Hospital
  • Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital
  • Bertha Gxowa Hospital
  • Pholosong Hospital
  • Mamelodi Hospital

(ii) According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, the Department is taking the following steps to intervene in the Gauteng Healthcare facilities:

• The Department is conducting root cause analysis at clinical level of cases that result in medico-legal claims and adverse incidents and also working at eliminating the challenges at the root cause level i.e the shortage of staff & medical equipment, theatres and generally improved service delivery;

• Improving clinical care as part of the clinical risk management process, based on specific clinical audits of adverse events;

• Implementing intervention strategies with the CEO’s of the Hospitals and implementation of consequence management;

• Increasing in the number of Doctors to enhance the patient to Doctor ratio and improving midwifery training of nurses;

(b) It is difficult to say that the intervention steps have improved the situation as the Department is currently undertaking these interventions.

(c) (i) According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, the majority are Cerebral Palsy.

(ii) According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, these matters would be resolved by intervention from clinical services through an intensive training of the clinicians dealing with patients at the healthcare facilities.

It is critical to note that not all medico-legal cases that have been laid against Provincial Departments are as the result of negligence as some are fraudulent.

The following are clinical interventions coordinated from the national level as the result of the Medico-Legal Summit Declaration where Provincial Departments are encouraged to implement:

  • A culture of patient safety and medical accountability must be enforced by the Head of the institution i.e. in the case of hospitals, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO);
  • All hospital managers must implement the Patients’ Rights Charter;
  • Clinical governance must be uniformly implemented;
  • Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) reviews and clinical audits of all adverse events must be implemented immediately;
  • There must be a compulsory multidisciplinary approach in ward rounds, M&M and other peer review meetings;
  • Continuous patient safety campaigns must be conducted;
  • The referral of patients must occur at an early and appropriate time; and
  • There must be strict adherence to standard operating procedures (SOPs) and scope of practice at all times to avoid preventable safety failures.

Furthermore, the Provinces are also encouraged to have facilities that are properly equipped to provide future medical treatment to address the issue of future medical expenses which normally constitute 80% Medico-Legal claims quantum.

The abovementioned interventions are assisting in reducing the actual amounts payable to the Plaintiffs.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3273

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) assistance has been provided to residents of Dunoon in the Western Cape who have complained about the poor service they have been receiving from the Dunoon Community Health Centre and (b) are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

According to the Western Cape Department of Health:

The Dunoon Community Health Centre operates 24 hours and 7 days a week. On daily basis the facility attends to:

Adults :

  • 150-200 Un-booked patients
  • 180-200 Booked patients.
  • 15-35 TB clients
  • 75-100 Family planning

Staff allocation for these services is 6 Clinical Nurse Practitioners and 2 Medical Officers.

Children:

  • 100-150 Sick Children
  • 80-120 Immunizations

Staff allocation for these services is 2 Clinical Nurse Practitioners, 1 Professional Nurse and 2 Medical Officers.

Patients do experience long waiting times due to failures to adhere to bookings and non-booking appointments. All walk-in patients are attended to and also prioritizing the patients who require urgent medical assistance. Patients who missed appointments are handled through Standard Operating Procedure. Patients are advised to lodge complaints personally or to use the suggestions box at the facility. The facility has a functional clinic committee to attend to patients’ complaints.

A wellness hub that operates once a week to provide wellness services will be piloted in Dunoon Community Hall in November 2023.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3285

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of health facilities in KwaZulu-Natal have experienced water shortages and (b) steps has he taken to assist the specified facilities with a sustainable solution to the water shortage threats and crisis affecting the health facilities?

Reply:

According to the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Health, there are 59 facilities that have experienced water shortages. The Table below is providing a list of health facilities that have experienced water shortages including the steps that were taken in resolving the crisis:

District

Facility name

Issues Experienced

Steps for sustainable Solution

Uthukela

St Chads Community Health Centre

No reliable water supply from the Municipality

Water is currently supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Amajuba

Niemeyer Hospital

Intermittent water supply from the District Municipality water scheme

Backup Steel water tank installation is in progress. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ilembe

Maphumulo Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Installation of borehole project at planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ilembe

Ntunjambili Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Installation of borehole project at planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ilembe

Montebello Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Installation of borehole project at planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ilembe

Chibini Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Installation of borehole project at planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Harry Gwala

Umzimkhulu Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole was installed and went dry after three months. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Harry Gwala

Franklin Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation in progress. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Mthimude Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Ezingolweni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Thembalesizwe Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Thonjeni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Mgayi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Installation additional borehole is in progress. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Ugu

Morrison Post Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Planning for installation of a borehole in progress. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Gqayinyanga Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Mgangeni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Installation of borehole in progress. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Philani Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Installation of borehole is in progress. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Nhlalwane Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Elim Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Pisgah Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Gamalakhe CHC

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Bhomela Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Braemer Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Ntabeni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Mvutshini Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Ludimala Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Ugu

Gcilima Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Ezwenelisha Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Umkhanyakude

Madwaleni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Umkhanyakude

Mpembeni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Umkhanyakude

Inhlwathi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Umkhanyakude

Mseleni Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Umkhanyakude

Ezimpondweni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

Umkhanyakude

Kwambuzi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Bethesda Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Ophansi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Othobothini CHC

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Nondabuya Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Gwaliweni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Ophondweni Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umkhanyakude

Makhathini Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umzinyathi

CJM Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is at Tender Stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umzinyathi

Greytown Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is at Tender Stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

Umzinyathi

Church of Scotland Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is at Tender Stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Sokhulu Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation has been awarded. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Ntambanana Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation has been awarded. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Cinci Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Water is supplied through a borehole. Water trucks are on standby in case there is more demand for water supply.

King Cetshwayo

Halambu Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is on planning. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Ndabaningi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is on planning. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Vumanhlavu Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is on planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Chwezi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is on planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Nkandla Hospital

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Ewangu Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Vumanhlavu Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Halambu Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Ndabaningi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Nongamlana Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Nxamalala Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

King Cetshwayo

Chwezi Clinic

Water supply from the Municipality is not reliable

Borehole installation project is under the planning stage. Currently, water is supplied by the water trucks that were purchased by the KZN Provincial Health. These trucks are managed at a District Level.

In addition, the National Department of Health has provided financial support through the Hospital Facility Revitalization Grant (HFRG) for the following measures:

  • The purchasing of water trucks; and
  • The installation of boreholes to various facilities that are affected by the shortage of water supply.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3364

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, given that the Minister of Public Enterprises did not table in Parliament the annual reports for SA Airways (SAA) for the 201920, 202021, 202122 and 202223 financial years, notwithstanding clause 17(6)(e) of the International Air Services Act, Act 60 of 1993, that requires the International Air Services Council to take into account the financial capability of the applicant (details furnished), the SAA currently has a valid international air services license; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what basis was the financial capability of SAA taken into account by the international air services council and (b) what date was the international air services license issued to SAA?

Reply:

a) The Council was satisfied that SAA (Soc) Ltd is fit and able to operate a Class I international air service based on the supporting/financial information submitted.

The IASC is an independent entity established under the International Air Service Council Act No. 60 of 1993, which specifically governs the regulation of air services, specifically international. Council operates within the provisions of the Act, in considering and continuous monitoring of applications and or licensee’s such as SAA.

Under the Act, one of the considerations taken into account is the financial capability of the airline. Financial resources of an airline are considered to be of the factors in determining whether an airline is capable of providing air services in line with regulations. This includes the airline's ability to finance and operate flights, as well as its capacity to maintain and repair aircrafts, provide on-board services and facilities, and meet other operational costs. The Council has utilized both the management accounts and operational plans to assess the capabilities for the airline to operate or continue operating.

In addition to financial capability, other key considerations considered in licensing include the operational ability of the airline. This encompasses various aspects related to the safety and security of passengers, crew members, and the public. This includes the airline's operational standards, their compliance with regulations, and their ability to maintain and enhance the quality and safety of their service delivery.

Another important factor that may be considered is the route utilization of the airline. This refers to whether the airline operates certain routes and the frequency at which they are operated. The IASC, when considering licensing for an airline may review the current routes and the capacity of the airline to operate those routes.

In summary, the IASC considers a range of factors when deciding on the licensing of an airline, including financial capability, operational ability and route utilization, among others.

b) SAA (Soc) Ltd’s last amended licence was last issued on 13 February 2020 and is still valid.

03 November 2023 - NW3286

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What plans has his department put in place to (a) increase the capacity to carry out caesarean sections and (b) provide the necessary equipment for the specified operations in public hospitals as infants die as a result of the lack of adequate equipment; (2) whether he has found that the lack of equipment and capacity resulting in injuries to women and deaths of infants are challenges for his department in providing quality health care for women in labour and their babies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1..(a) The National Department of Health has put the following interventions in place to increase the capacity to carry out caesarean sections:

  • Department developed various support services to strengthen capacity at lower levels of care. Support services include in/outreach programmes by specialists, use of District Clinical Specialist Teams to address the issues of knowledge and skill to performance of C/Section. Use of family physicians to support midwives in identification of risk factors for women who may require caesarian section to be referred early to next level of care.
  • The Provincial Departments implement the continuous drills at facility level to upskill the staff to timeously and efficiently prepare women for caesarian section even in the case of emergency, this is part of the Essential Steps on Management of Obstetric Emergency ( ESMOE) training course.

b) Each health facility conducts an essential equipment audit as described within the Caesarian section guideline (monologue) to determine the equipment deficit status and develop the replacement plans as prescribed by the supply chain management systems.

2. Department conducts an in-depth analysis of the causes of both maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity which are communicated through the saving mothers and babies report. The latest report (2020-2022) indicate that the key causes of neonatal deaths are prematurity, asphyxia and infections. While the department acknowledges that there are incidences of human resource and equipment shortages, they are not documented as causes of neonatal deaths in public health facilities.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3271

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Ms N

Mhlongo, Ms N to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of South African doctors who have trained abroad since 1 January 2020, who are waiting to write the board examination of the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) in order to be admitted as doctors in the Republic, (b) by what date will the HPCSA be in a position for the foreign-trained South African doctors to write the board examinations to be admitted as doctors, (c) what is causing the delay and (d) how long has the problem persisted unresolved by his department?

Reply:

According to the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA):

a) There were 405 foreign-qualified doctors eligible to write the HPCSA Board examination which includes both South Africans as well as foreign nationals. The eligible foreign-qualified doctors were invited to write the HPCSA examinations however only 217 applicants confirmed that they would write the examination.

b) A total of 217 foreign-trained doctors participated in the HPCSA examinations which were written on 25th October 2023.

c) The HPCSA examinations are conducted through medical schools. The HPCSA had embarked on a procurement process before its contract with Sefako Makgatho University had expired. The University of KwaZulu-Natal was successful, however, there were delays in the finalization of the contract between HPCSA and UKZN due to certain administrative requirements not being met by the University. These matters have now been resolved and the contract finalised which then led to the applicants being able to sit for the examination on 25th October 2023.

The National Department of Health is not involved in the contracting process of the HPCSA. HPCSA had previously contracted Sefako Makgatho University and this contract expired in March 2023. The new contract with the University of KwaZulu-Natal was signed in September 2023.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3365

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to a video that was allegedly recorded in a ward in the Ladysmith Provincial Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, in which a naked boy who was tied to a hospital bed and being assaulted by two security guards (details furnished), the actions by the security guards are regarded as appropriate; if not, what are the details of the action that has been and/or will be taken to (a) hold the responsible security guards accountable, (b) hold the hospital management and nursing staff accountable and (c) prevent such treatment of patients being repeated in the specified hospital and/or in any State hospital in the Republic; (2) what are the reasons that the (a) boy was being held captive on the hospital bed and (b) nursing staff did not intervene to stop the assault on the boy; (3) whether the boy is still in the hospital; if not, (a) where is he currently being treated and (b) what is the reason that he was discharged from the hospital; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) According to the KZN Department of Health, the two Security Officers implicated have since been suspended by the Private Security Company and are in the process of being subjected to a disciplinary inquiry. A case was opened (CAS No.586/9/2023) with South African Police Service following the incident and the Security Officers were arrested, detained, and thereafter released on bail. The Security Officers also appeared before Mental Health Review Board.

(b)-(c) The Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Health has instituted an investigation into this matter to determine the role of the five nurses that were on duty on the night of the incident. The five nurses have been precautionarily suspended pending the outcome of the investigation.

2. (a) The patient in question was admitted under Mental Health Care Act for 72-hour observation, as he presented with a history of aggressive behavior, intimidating other children at the Morester Children’s home, threatening to stab them and he had numerous abscondments from the Centre. At the time of the incident, the patient was mechanically restrained with the restraining devices to subdue his movement for the primary purpose of behaviour control.

(b) The Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Health has instituted an investigation into this matter to determine the role of the five nurses that were on duty on the night of the incident. The five nurses have been precautionarily suspended pending the outcome of the investigation.

(3)  (a) The patient was transferred and admitted to the Child and Adolescent unit at a King Dinuzulu Hospital in Durban.

(b) The patient was transferred to a more specialised psychiatric care.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3321

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a list of the (a) age demographics and (b) field of specialisation as a percentage in each category of nurses employed in the public health sector; if not, why not; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) in which provinces are the specified nurses employed; (2) (a) what is the current vacancy rate for all the specified fields of specialised nursing in each province and (b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled?

Reply:

1. (a) In accordance with the Persal data set as extracted for the month of September 2023 below is the table of the age demographics of all nurses employed in the public health sector

Age demographics: All Nurse categories per province (June 2023)

Age demographics of all nurses employed in the public health sector as at September 2023

Province

20-24yr

25-29yr

30-34yr

35-39yr

40-44yr

45-49yr

50-54yr

55-59yr

60-64yr

65-69yr

70-74yr

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

394

1602

2261

2735

3264

3676

2900

2538

1639

9

 

21018

Free State

38

225

728

930

931

967

1202

1282

529

1

 

6833

Gauteng

355

2219

3705

4839

5290

4978

4248

3555

1812

22

2

31025

KwaZulu Natal

586

1233

3140

5191

6516

6595

4779

3661

1613

5

 

33319

Limpopo

251

466

995

2084

2741

2842

2870

2424

825

1

 

15499

Mpumalanga

158

702

1177

1379

1801

1817

1535

1171

362

 

 

10102

North-West

69

621

1200

1210

1349

1551

1366

1100

476

45

9

8996

Northern Cape

5

155

275

238

338

405

399

438

244

10

4

2511

Western Cape

256

939

1690

1947

1964

2145

2091

1760

658

7

 

13457

Grand Total

2112

8162

15171

20553

24194

24976

21390

17929

8158

100

15

142760

(b) The table below provides data of nurses in their specialization per percentage of each category per Provinces in which they are employed

NB. Persal does not provide the breakdown percentage of each specialized category since they are all grouped under category specialty.

Age demographics: Specialized Nurses vs all filled Nursing posts.

Professional Nurse (Specialized) 2023

Province

25-34yrs

35-44yrs

45-54yrs

55-64yrs

*Above 65

 

Total Specialized

% vs Total Nurse

Total Specialized

% vs Total Nurse

Total Specialized

% vs Total Nurse

Total Specialized

% vs Total Nurse

Total Specialized

% vs Total Nurse

Eastern Cape

67

1.6%

343

5.7%

703

10.7%

772

18.5%

2

22.2%

Free State

32

3.2%

89

4.8%

307

14.2%

397

21.9%

0

0.0%

Gauteng

162

2.6%

799

7.9%

1321

14.3%

1189

22.2%

7

29.2%

KwaZulu-Natal

107

2.2%

1047

8.9%

1776

15.6%

1284

24.3%

3

60.0%

Limpopo

67

3.9%

302

6.3%

535

9.4%

694

21.4%

0

0.0%

Northern Cape

6

0.3%

25

0.8%

63

1.9%

72

4.7%

0

0.0%

Mpumalanga

13

0.7%

157

6.1%

400

13.7%

355

22.5%

0

0.0%

North-West

23

5.3%

145

25.2%

364

45.3%

285

41.8%

0

0.0%

Western Cape

119

4.1%

469

12.0%

706

16.7%

464

19.2%

2

28.6%

Total

596

2.3%

3376

7.5%

6175

13.3%

5512

21.1%

14

12.2%

* Aged above 65 are regulated in accordance with the Public Service Regulation and Act- to employ professionals over the age of 65

(2) (a) Current vacancy rate for all the specified nursing specialties in each province and

Nursing Specialty Vacancy Rate

Province

Vacant (funded and unfunded)

Vacancy rate %

Eastern Cape

282

13.0%

Free State

419

34.4%

Gauteng

571

14.1%

KwaZulu Natal

1016

19.4%

Limpopo

214

11.8%

Mpumalanga

93

9.1%

North West

172

17.4%

Northern Cape

65

28.1%

Western Cape

224

11.3%

Grand Total

3056

16.3%

(b) The Department is unable to state the envisaged time frame to fill the vacant positions due to general budget cuts that negatively affects the Compensation of Employment (CoE) a specific date of when the specified challenges will be eradicated. However, it can confirm that measures are applied across Provinces to prioritize filling of vacant posts where the budgets permit.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3327

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) period of time did the disciplinary proceedings against a certain person (name furnished) take and (b) was the cost of the specified disciplinary proceedings to the State; (2) (a) on what (i) date and (ii) grounds was the specified person fired from her department and (b) what are the reasons that she consented to the firing of the person; (3) on what date will her department implement the ruling of the Labour Court in the matter between the person and her department and reinstate the person to the former position?

Reply:

1. (a) The disciplinary processes against the employee commenced from 13 October 2020 and was concluded on 27 September 2023.

(b) Approximately R2.7 million was paid to date and includes the costs related to the disciplinary process, the dispute referred to the General Public Service Sectoral Bargaining Council by the employee and the Labour Court application instituted by the employee.

2. (a) (i) The employee was retired from the public service with effect from 15 October 2023.

(ii) The employee was retired in terms of section 16 of the Public Service Act, 1994.

(b) The retirement of the employee was as a result of a court order.

3. The Department has fully implemented the ruling of the Labour Court, including the employee’s retirement.

END

03 November 2023 - NW3407

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has recently taken any specific measures to deal with the problem of the shortage of oncologists in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the measures that have been taken?

Reply:

The Department has introduced the Human Resources Training Grant (HRTG) to amongst other required speciality areas create a pool of trained specialists to enhance capacity in essential services that includes radiation oncology. The Grant is funding 52 Registrar posts of Radiation Oncology that are in various years of their training programme between first to fourth year.

END.

03 November 2023 - NW3319

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a list of all (a) hospitals, (b) clinics and (c) other public health facilities that have upgraded to electronic record-keeping in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a list of all the specified public health facilities that do not have working (a) telephones, (b) computers and/or laptops, (c) access to the internet and/or WiFi and (d) any other information and communications technology infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons that each facility does not have the specified equipment; (3) what are the reasons that some public health facilities have not yet been electronically upgraded; (4) what is the envisaged (a) cost and (b) time frame for each province to upgrade to electronic systems?

Reply:

1. We are not in a position to provide a list of all (a) hospitals, (b) clinics and (c) other public health facilities that have upgraded to electronic record-keeping per province because each province has a complex set of different solutions. However, we can report on the systems that are installed as follows:

The national department of Health together with provinces implemented the Health Patient Registration System (HPRS) as the first step to the development and implementation of a shared electronic health record. The HPRS records a patient’s visit and categorise the patient’s reason for visit.

A list of facilities where the HPRS has been installed is provided in a separate spreadsheet of 3474 public health facilities.

The following responses were received from the provinces

Eastern Cape

Eastern Cape is in the process of installing the Health Management System Version 2 (HMS2) system in the following 32 facilities and services:

A green and red chart with white text

Description automatically generated

Free State

Only 1 facility (National Hospital) has been upgraded to an electronic record-keeping system in the province.

Limpopo

41 hospitals are using ‘Enterprise Manager’ known in the province as Provincial Health Information System (PHIS). Clinics are using the Health Patient Registration System (HPRS).

Northern Cape

All Facilities are making use of manual record keeping. The province is upgrading the record keeping at facilities (new files, cabinets, etc) first and will then start to look at implementing an electronic version (digitization).

North West

No health facility in North West Province has upgraded to an electronic record keeping system. The province has approved a pilot project to be implemented in three health facilities as proof of concept for digitalization of patient record. The project is ongoing.

Mpumalanga

The Mpumalanga Department of Health appointed a service provider in 2022/23 financial year to scan and archive patient records in the following hospitals: Rob Ferreira Hospital, Themba Hospital, Ermelo Hospital, Witbank Hospital, Mapulaneng Hospital, Tintswalo Hospital, Middelburg Hospital, Bernice Samuel Hospital and Tonga Hospital.

Western Cape

The Western Cape Department of Health (WCDOH) has embarked on a journey to upgrade from paper record-keeping to electronic record-keeping which is a complex, medium to long term programme.

Patient Administration systems: Clinicom Patient Administration system in 53 hospitals. Primary Healthcare Information system (PHCIS) in all 308 primary healthcare facilities in the province. The PREHMIS primary care system in 95 of the City of Cape Town (CoCT) clinics.

Clinical investigations: The Trakcare laboratory system, can be accessed by all facilities. The RIS PACS is a digital imaging system in 13 Facilities.

The NDOH has not yet received an update from KwaZulu Natal (KZN) and Gauteng

2. Regarding the situation with public health facilities’ (a) telephones, (b) computers and/or laptops, (c) access to the internet and/or WiFi and (d) any other information and communications technology infrastructure.

A summary of Communication and ICT Infrastructure at PHC facilities is provided in tables and are provided in an Excel document. Data has been collected through self-assessment by facilities during the Ideal Clinic Assessment in 2023.

Tot # PHC Facilities:

3474

     

Tot # PHC Facilities that didn't conduct a self-assessment:

46

     

 

   

 

     

Number/Percentage of facilities that have a functional telephone/computer and internet access

Province

# Facilities conducted a self-assessment

# Facilities with Telephone

% of Facilities with Telephone

# Facilities with Computer

% of Facilities with Computer

# Facilities with Internet

% of Facilities with Internet

EC

773

564

73%

760

98%

661

86%

FS

212

205

97%

210

99%

210

99%

GP

364

332

91%

362

99%

345

95%

KZN

602

581

97%

598

99%

532

88%

LIMP

477

439

92%

471

99%

380

80%

MPU

291

266

91%

288

99%

167

57%

NW

305

292

96%

303

99%

293

96%

NC

159

147

92%

156

98%

141

89%

WC

245

241

98%

245

100%

243

99%

South Africa

3428

3067

89%

3393

99%

2972

87%

361 PHC Facilities indicated not to have telephones.

20 PHC Facilities indicated not to have computers.

452 PHC Facilities indicated no access to internet connectivity.

All hospitals have Telephones, Computers and Internet Connectivity

3. There are several factors that need to be considered that include the general communication infrastructure of the geography of where facilities are situated to ensure appropriate ICT infrastructure. Provinces reported that where facilities do not have access to fix line telephones they are provided with mobile telephones. The National Department of Health is working with the Department of Communication and Digital Technology through the SA Connect project for the provision of appropriate broadband connectivity at Health Facilities.

4. Because of the complexities involved the full costing of the upgrade of health facilities to appropriate ICT Infrastructure with specific reference to broadband connectivity to enable the digital health transformation, will be completed by September 2024.The estimated amount based on preliminary costing is R 500 million for infrastructure and annual recurring cost of approximately R 7 million.

END.

02 November 2023 - NW3169

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the findings of the investigation that was conducted by her department into allegations of cheating in the National Senior Certificate examinations which involved 1 189 pupils from six provinces?

Reply:

Learners in these cases have been found guilty of engaging in irregular practices to obtain an unfair advantage during the writing of the examination and they have been sanctioned for a maximum period and are prohibited from writing the next three examinations. They will only be allowed to write the November 2024 examination, once the sanction period has expired. 

The learners at these schools either colluded with each other or were supported by their teachers in obtaining answers to certain questions in the question paper while the examination was in progress. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) in conjunction with the Provincial Education Department (PED), conducted an extensive investigation of all learners that were alleged to be implicated in this irregular practice and this included a detailed investigative analysis of the learner’s scripts. Based on the findings from the investigation, every implicated learner was given an opportunity to present their version of events to an independent presiding officer, in the presence of their parents/guardian or supported by a legal representative. The decision of the independent presiding officer was presented to the Provincial Examinations Irregularities Committee (PEIC), a committee appointed by the Head of Department to ensure that due process is followed in the management of all the irregularities. The recommendations from the PEIC were then reviewed by the National Examinations Irregularities Committee (NEIC), a committee established by the Minister to ensure fairness and uniformity in the handling of these irregularities across all the PEDs. The final decision relating to these candidates was presented to Umalusi, the Quality Assurance Council, for ratification.

It needs to be noted that candidates were found guilty in specific subjects, where there was evidence of wrongdoing. The results in those subjects were declared null and void and the candidates  received the results of subjects that were not tarnished by any examination irregularity.

01 November 2023 - NW3263

Profile picture: Makamba-Botya, Ms N

Makamba-Botya, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Following his visit to Japan, what (a) actual tangible plans are in place to build a hydrogen economy in the Republic and (b) steps will he take to ensure that a hydrogen economy is built in the Republic?

Reply:

The Minister participated in hydrogen economy-related ministerial engagements from 25 to 27 September 2023 that were held in Tokyo, Japan, to profile the work of the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) as well as promote collaboration, investment, and innovation in support of the deployment of hydrogen at scale, which is essential for the successful implementation of the National Hydrogen Society Roadmap (HSRM).

(a) Subsequent to the Ministerial Visit to Japan, the following plans are in place to build a hydrogen economy in the Republic:

1. Energy Sector Support Programmes

In support of the energy sector, the DSI will continue to support the following energy research, development and innovation (RDI) programmes with academic institutions and corporate partners:

  • Hydrogen South Africa (University of Cape Town, Mintek, North-West University, Council for Industrial Research, University of the Western Cape, Anglo American, Impala Platinum, Bambili (SMME), etc.);
  • Platinum Valley Project (Anglo American Platinum, Engie and Bambili);
  • Green Ammonia project (Sasol); and
  • Carbon Capture and Use (PPC Cement, EPCM (SMME)).

2. Design of Appropriate Operating Models

The DSI has initiated engagements with private sector and international partners to design appropriate operating models that will ensure better coordination and partnerships for the effective implementation of the Hydrogen Society Roadmap.

(b) The following steps will be taken to ensure that a hydrogen economy is built in the Republic:

1. Strengthen Current Existing Strategic Partnerships

The DSI will continue to explore ways to strengthen the following current existing strategic partnerships through active participation in related platforms:

  • International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy (IPHE). South Africa is the current Chair of the IPHE and aims to use its tenure to encourage more African countries to join IPHE;
  • International Energy Agency;
  • United Nations Industrial Development Organization;
  • Hydrogen Council (private sector-led); and
  • African Hydrogen Alliance (Egypt, Kenya, Mauritania, Morocco, Namibia and South Africa).

2. Opportunities for Partnerships

The DSI will continue to seek partnerships with both the public and private sector in:

  • Testing and validation of the technology through field trials;
  • Further development and optimisation of the technology;
  • Developing a supply chain that supports the deployment of technology;
  • Supporting skills development through internships (universities & TVETs) to support technology deployment;
  • Training the end users of the technologies through local municipalities;
  • Stimulating local demand for emerging technologies to power social and economic infrastructure; and
  • Facilitating the establishment of manufacturing facilities in the country that allow for the integration of locally developed intellectual property and inbound technology where appropriate.

01 November 2023 - NW3185

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 2018 on 28 June 2023, what (a) steps have been taken to improve the average turn-around time and (b)(i) processes, (ii) procedures, (iii) milestones and (iv) deadlines are being put in place to assist and facilitate applicants who have incomplete and/or incorrectly completed applications?

Reply:

a) The Department has instituted weekly management meetings chaired by the Director-General. The purpose of the meeting is to monitor performance on the turnaround times for targets that are at risk of not being achieved. The Acting Deputy Director-General: Immigration Services also has weekly performance monitoring meetings with the management of Permitting where a status report is tabled on the progress being made against the visa and permits backlog.

(b)(i-iii) The department has developed a backlog eradication plan which aims to have the backlogs cleared. The plan aims to move the older Temporary Residency Visas applications from 2022 concurrently with the current applications of 2023. This will be done by splitting the temporary residence visa team into two. The same approach is being implemented for Permanent Residence Permits. The plan includes the utilisation of current capacity in the Immigration Branch supported by the additional officials from other branches including those in Provinces. It also includes those officials who have returned from the Foreign Missions after serving their four-year deployment term. Other options to supplement existing capacity and resources are also being looked at and may be implemented should it be deemed necessary to do so to support the eradication plan. The Department is also reviewing the immigration permitting delegations as well as Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s). The department envisages to have cleared the backlog by June 2024 for all categories of visas.

(b)(iv) With regards to incomplete or incorrectly completed applications, Immigration Regulation 9 prescribes that an application for any visa referred to in section 11 up to and including sections 20 and 22 of the Act shall be made together with all supporting documents. Once an application is received at Home Affairs it is processed with the documents that were submitted by the applicant. The Department is therefore unable to assist applicants with incomplete documents once an application has been received at the adjudication hub. A checklist available at the time of applications is one tool that assists and guides applicants to submit all required documents.

 

 

END

01 November 2023 - NW3415

Profile picture: Makesini, Ms M

Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the online Branch Appointment Booking System of his department, which specific assistance is provided to computer illiterate clients who are unable to make online bookings at the Bloemfontein Home Affairs offices?

Reply:

The Office is assisting clients without appointments on two counters dedicated for walk in clients. There is also a tablet in the office for those who need assistance to do bookings.

END