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30 October 2020 - NW2128

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether the recently commissioned lifestyle audits to be conducted on the (a) Executive Council members of the Eastern Cape, Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal and (b) senior officials in the specified provincial governments, fall within the competence of the State Security Agency; if so, (i) which legislation governs the conducting of such lifestyle audits and (ii) what (aa) exactly will the specified lifestyle audits entail and (bb) is the aim of the lifestyle audits?

Reply:

(i) The conducting of lifestyle audits are implied in the legal prescripts such as those, among others, that govern the enforcement of the provisions in the Prevention of Organised Crime Act, 1998 (Act 121 of 1998)(POCA) and the Prevention and Combatting of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004 (Act 12 of 2004)(PRECCA) by law enforcement agencies, as well as the conducting of vetting by the State Security Agency (SSA).

The SSA is mandated in terms of section 2(1)(b) of the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act 39 of 1994)(NSIA) to fulfil the national counter-intelligence responsibilities and for this purpose to conduct and co-ordinate counter-intelligence and to gather, correlate, evaluate, analyse and interpret information regarding counter-intelligence in order to-

(i) identify any threat or potential threat to the security of the Republic or its people;

(ii) inform the President of any such threat;

(iii) supply (where necessary) intelligence relating to any such threat to the South African Police Service for the purposes of investigating any offence or alleged offence; and

(iv) supply intelligence relating to any such threat to the Department of Home Affairs for the purposes of fulfilment of any immigration function;

(v) supply intelligence relating to any such threat to any other department of State for the purposes of fulfilment of its departmental functions; and

(vi) supply intelligence relating to national strategic intelligence to the National Intelligence Coordinating Committee (NICOC).

The performance of vetting investigations falls squarely within the definition of counter-intelligence in section 1 of the NSIA. Section 2A of the NSIA empowers the SSA to conduct vetting investigations to determine the security competence of a person, if such a person-

(a) is employed by or is an applicant to an organ of state; or

(b) is rendering a service or has given notice of intention to render a service to an organ of state, which service may-

(i) give him or her access to classified information and intelligence in the possession of the organ of state; or

(ii) give him or her access to areas designated national key points in terms of the National Key Points Act, 1980 (Act 102 of 1980).

“Security competence” is defined in section 1 of the NSIA to mean a person's ability to act in such a manner that he or she does not cause classified information or material to fall into unauthorised hands, thereby harming or endangering the security or interests of the State, and is measured against a person's-

(a) susceptibility to extortion or blackmail;

(b) amenability to bribes and susceptibility to being compromised due to his or her behaviour; and

(c) loyalty to the State and the relevant institution”.

Furthermore, the legislative and regulatory framework governing members of the Executive, and the Public Service provides for reporting, mandatory disclosure of financial interests and conflicts of interest, and the referral of cases of non-disclosure, which enable the institutionalisation of lifestyle audits. Where obligations are stipulated in legislation, regulations and Codes of Conduct governing the aforementioned persons, placing a duty on them to disclose personal financial interests and conflicts of interests, misconduct proceedings should be instituted against them for:

(i) failing to disclose personal financial interests or conflicts of interest; or

(ii) making incomplete, incorrect or misleading disclosures of personal financial interests and conflicts of interests.

There are concomitant legal implications for breaches of the relevant legislative and regulatory provisions and Codes of Conduct.

In addition, the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act 1 of 1999)(PFMA) sets the framework for accountable financial administration in the public service. Legislative imperatives on Risk Management that deal specifically with the financial and fraud risk categories are contained in sections 38 to 42 of the PFMA and regulation 3 of the Treasury Regulations, 2005. Section 38(1)(a)(i) of the PFMA requires the all departments, trading entities and constitutional institutions have and maintain effective, efficient and transparent systems of financial and risk management and internal control. Risk management processes, responsibilities and punitive measures for non-compliance are incorporated into the responsibilities of Accounting Officers and Audit Committees, and by extension to all Managers in terms of the provisions of section 45 of the PFMA. Regulation 3.2.1 of the Treasury Regulations requires that:

“The Accounting Officer must facilitate a risk assessment to determine the material risks to which the institution may be exposed and to evaluate the strategy for managing these risks. Such strategy must include a fraud prevention plan. The strategy must be used to direct internal audit effort and priority, and to determine the skills required to manage these risks.”

The internal audit unit must in accordance with regulation 3.2.7 of the Treasury Regulations prepare, in consultation with and for the approval of the audit committee, a rolling three-year strategic internal audit plan based on its assessment of key areas of risk for the institution, having regard to its current operations, those proposed in its strategic plan and its risk management strategy.

Hence, implementing lifestyle audits forms part of a risk management system and strategy, aimed at identifying risks related to unethical conduct, corruption and fraud.

(ii)

(aa) Lifestyle audits are a critical a critical assessment by means of an amalgamation of a variety of information sources in order to compare the subject’s lifestyle with his/her declared income streams. In essence, it is a test to determine whether wealth is commensurate to income.

During vetting investigations, the SSA in terms of the NSIA (section 2A (5), (5A) and (6)), may in the prescribed manner gather information relating to-

(a) criminal records;

(b) financial records;

(c) personal information; or

(d) any other information which is relevant to determine the security clearance of a person:

Provided that where the gathering of information contemplated in paragraphs (c) and (d) requires the interception and monitoring of the communication of such a person, the relevant members shall perform this function in accordance with RICA. Vetting Field Work Units within departments of State may, on request by the SSA, assist the SSA in gathering the information. The head of the SSA or any officials delegated by him or her in writing may, after evaluating the information gathered during the vetting investigation, issue, degrade, withdraw or refuse to grant a security clearance.

In addition, it should be noted that legislative provisions that affect the employee–employer relationship must be considered when conducting lifestyle audits, particularly the Constitution; the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997 (Act 75 of 1997); the Labour Relations Act, 1995 (Act 66 of 1995)(LRA) and its accompanying Codes of Good Practice issued by the Department of Labour.

(bb) Lifestyle audits are utilised as a legitimate fraud prevention and detection mechanism and serve as a tool to understand the financial profile of an individual, in terms of legitimate declared income versus known and observed assets.

30 October 2020 - NW1935

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether her department allocated R3,5 million for the maintenance and renovation of the Malembe Guest House in the Mopani District; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why does her department not upgrade other established facilities which have more rooms available to quarantine repatriated South Africans?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure(DPWI) has established the referred property and according to the Deeds Office’s property report belongs to the Provincial Government of the Limpopo Province (See Annexure 1).Therefore, DPWI would not spend any maintenance or renovation costs to any property belonging to the provincial department.

30 October 2020 - NW2351

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) (a) What is the reasoning behind the Kruger National Park dropping fences to areas bordering members of the Associated Private Nature Reserves (ANPRs) B allow movement of animals that are meant to be safeguarded in protected areas, allowing for trophy hunting of these protected animals, (b) what are the reasons that the decision to drop the fences to surrounding APNRs was not bought before the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries when it undermines the purpo9e of protecting wildlife in national parks, and (c) whether she will furnish Ms H S Winkler with the concept document for the dropping of fences to the APNRs; (2) what are the terms of the agreement on trophy hunting with the APNRs and (b) who provide oversight; and (3) whether she has been informed of the hunting of a young bull elephant that was shot 18 times in a Kruger National Park APNR in December 2016 in an unethical hunt in front of tourists; if not, chat is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) what steps has she taken to hold those responsible for the unethical hunt accountable?

Reply:

 

1. (a) The western boundary fence was dropped alongside fourteen (14) Private, Community and State managed conservation areas and was not limited B the Associated Private Nature Reserves (APNR). The reason this include, but are not limited to, support for integrated ecological management, with ecosystem processes, e.g. catchment processes, ecological corridor, climate change processes, natural species migration routes, following a west-east landscape gradient(from the mountain catchment west of the KNP).

The fence dropping is also in fulfillment of the international Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Treaty (GLTFCA, 2002), promoting integrated land use approaches, including the inclusion of Private, Community and State conservation areas into the open conservation estate within South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. This promotes ecological and socio- economic outcomes, as per Treaty objectives. In addition, the inclusion of these areas is also aligned to South Africa's international commitment to expand the conservation estate in the country.

The fence dropping with Private, Community and State area look place in the late 1990s and early 2000s, as per the above explanation. The GLTFCA Cooperative Agreement (2018), its objectives, associated legislative requirements and workplan were presented to the Portfolio Committee during 2019.

The GLTFCA Cooperative Agreement is the first Agreement that provides a consistent framework for the regularisation of all 14 reserves open to KNP, as guided by the legal framework. The Agreement provides a uniform and consistent management framework based on the protected area and associated legislation. Please find attached a copy of the Agreement(Addendum 1c1-2).

2. (a) Approved protocols need to be formalised within reserves that conduct hunting, as per legislative requirements (NEMPA, NEMBA). Please refer attached Addendum 2 for requirement that need to be met.

(b) The Provincial Conservation authorities; Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency (MTPA) and the Limpopo Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism (LEDET) are responsible for the regulation of the hunting within these reserves, together with the management structures of such reserves overseeing the management plans and associated practices, such as hunting, in the reserves (NEMPAA Act, 2003{Act No. 57 of 2003)).

3. (a) and (b) SANParks does not allow hunting within the Kruger National Park.

According to information at my disposal, the said elephant bull was hunted in a reserve within the APNR, in accordance with the relevant statutory requirements and the APNR Hunting protocol. Such hunts are overseen by the management structures of the reserves, together with the Provincial Conservation Authorities, they being the regulatory authorities tasked with monitoring compliance with the Protocol. I am advised that during the particular hunt being referred to, no "tourist' besides the hunting party were witness to the hunt. I am also advised that the LEDET provided the documentation to substantiate that the permit were legally issued and that no laws were contravened.

According to information at my disposal, the hunt was legal and took place in accordance with the APNR Hunting Protocol. The APNR off-take committee furthermore reviewed the incident and provided a ruling that the hunt was in accordance with the Protocol. The provincial environmental authority (LEDET) conducted a full investigation into this matter.

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER 0F FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2359

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) hunting offtakes recommended by SA National Packs (SANParks) for the individual private nature reserves that form part of the Associated Private Nature Reserves for 2020, (b) latest census information on which the decision was based and (c) copies of the letters of recommendation from SANParks to (i) Timbavati Private Nature Reserve, (ii) Balule Nature Reserve, (iii) Umbabat Nature Reserve and (iv) Klaserie Private Nature Reserve regarding 2020 hunting offtakes, noting that the previous Managing Executive of SANParks promised to make the hunting offtake figures public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, chat are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) SANParks does not recommend hunting off-takes to the Private, Community and State managed reserves open to Kruger National Park (KNP). SANParks comment on the scientific- based animal off-take reque9B reC9ÏVed from such entities, in 00n9Ultation with the provincial regulatory authorities overseeing the allocation of such quotas; namely Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency (MTPA) and Limpopo Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environment (LEDET).

(b) Census and scientific reports are submitted by the neighbouring Private, Community and State managed areas, which inform and support the off-take requests. The reports are then considered, and if supported, they are approved by the MTPA and LEDET, as the regulatory authorities. The MTPA and LEDET are the custodians of the Census information.

© SANParks comment on the hunting off-take request (See Addendum 1). The allocation of quotas is approved by the MTPA and LEDET, as the regulatory authorities. Approved quotas can be obtained Atom the aforementioned provincial regulatory authorities. However, some of the reserves publish the off-takes quotas on their websites and within their annual reports.

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2227

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has been informed of any officials in her department who are still doing business with her department since 3 August 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa witha list of all the officials who are still doing business with her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the value of each contract?

Reply:

1. Yes, I havebeen informed that the Auditor-General South Africa identified three officials during its preliminary audit processes. This audit has not yet been finalised. Once the audit has been finalised, normal government processes will be applied in dealing with the alleged contravention of the law.

2. Yes, the details will be shared once the audit has been finalised by the Auditor General of South Africa.

(a),(b) Falls away.

 

30 October 2020 - NW2306

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What total number of athletes from each sporting code represented the Republic at the past three (a) Olympic Games and (b) Paralympic Games?

Reply:

The following is the information provided by the South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee,

a) Olympic Summer Games

Venue

Year

Female

Male

Total

Beijing

2008

57

79

136

London

2012

58

67

125

Rio

2016

45

93

138

         

b)  Paralympic Summer Games

Venue

Year

Female

Male

Total

Beijing

2008

17

38

55

London

2012

17

45

62

Rio

2016

17

29

46

30 October 2020 - NW2194

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Dr A Lotriet (DA) to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether (a) the SA Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the SA Sports Trust and (c) any national federation pay any amounts to financial consultants; if so, what (i) are the full names of the financial consultants, (ii) amounts do the entities pay per month and (iii) total amount paid does each specified entity pay to each specified consultant? NW2755E

Reply:

(a). In instances where geographical names are changed, the costs associated to such changes will relate to the advertisements in local newspapers; venues of local consultation meetings; honoraria paid to the Provincial Geographical Names Committees and the South African Geographical Names Council for their sittings as well as the costs related to the replacing of road information signs by the South African Roads Agency (SANRAL) and affected Municipalities.

Such costs vary depending on process followed, number of consultations etc. Once process is finalised only then can final costs be determined and subsequently be provided to Hon Member.

(b). The South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC) has not yet received the applications to change the names of (i) East London and (ii) King Williams Town.

30 October 2020 - NW2168

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, in accordance with lockdown regulations with regard to travelling across international borders, any authorisation was given to the passengers who made use of a Falcon 900 airplane (VIP) from the SA National Defence Force on 8 September 2020 for a flight to Zimbabwe; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the full names of each passenger and (b) in accordance with which requirement of Chapter 5, clause 59(2) of Level 2 regulations was authorisation given to each respective Passenger; (2) will he be prepared to make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Honourable member, the matter pertaining to the trip of passengers who made use of falcon 900 airplane from the South African National Defence Force on 08 September 2020 for a flight to Zimbabwe, were dealt with by the President of the country. He took a decision to sanction the Minister of Defence because there were irregularities in the manner in which the trip was undertaken under her stewardship. After the action by the President, I regard the matter as closed except that the Public Protector is doing her own investigations.

END

30 October 2020 - NW2353

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

On what data will her Department set up a meeting to discuss shark fishing quotas, considering that shark numbers are dwindling and that catch-and-release has shown B cause slow and painful death by drowning according to studies?

Reply:

There has been no date set by this Department to specifically discuss 6hark quotas or allocations as yet. Previously, rights in the Demersal Shark Longline sector were allocated by the then Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fi9henes in 2013 and will be expiring at the end of 2020. A Total Applied Effort(TAE) of 5 vessels was allocated in the sector previously.

In May 2020, the Minister appointed an Expert Panel to formally review South Africa's National Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (NPOA-Sharks). The Panel was mandated to, among other things, focus on alignment with the International Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (lPOA-Sharks) of the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO), as well as to advise regarding progress on the current plan. The Expert Panel must also make recommendations on the plan generally with a view to improving it and ensuring its proper implementation so as to ensure the Department’s commitment to the long-term sustainable consumptive and non-consumptive use of the species. The Panel is expected to provide the Minister with a report by mid-November 2020

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER 0F FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 30/10/2020

 

30 October 2020 - NW2048

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)In light of the fact that small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) demand between 10% and 15% Preliminary and General (P&Gs) over and above the 30% to which they are entitled on some projects, what (a) steps is her department taking, especially through the Construction Industry Development Board, to educate and upskill SMMEs on (i) financial matters, (ii) contractual matters and (iii) any other related matters, (b) recourse do the contractors have where SMMEs threaten to close sites unless their demands are met in terms of the P&G and (c) intervention will her department offer in such a case; (2) whether her department will blacklist and/or penalise an SMME for closing down a site on a spurious issue such as P&G to which they are not entitled but demand anyway; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether her department is acknowledging the existence of the so-called Construction Mafia; if not, why not; if so, what steps is she taking to address the matter?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) that the preliminary and General costs (P&Gs) are factored in and priced by the main contractor in the Bill of Quantities. As such, if 30 percent sub-contracting was imposed by the client when going out on tender, in terms the Preferential Procurement Regulations of 2017, the sub-contracting agreement must be 30 percent of the value of the entire contract amount awarded to the main contractor. This therefore means that the P&Gs would be factored in the contract amount due to the sub-contractor. In terms of this the subcontractor would then balance their rates from what was originally priced by the main contractor.

NB: the rates submitted, priced and contracted by the main contractor cannot be increased after the awarding of the contract, as this would mean the change of the original contract terms. Therefore sub-contractors cannot claim any amounts over above what is in the original contract.

(a) (i), (ii) and (iii) The CIDB has programmes to capacitate stakeholders, including SMME’s, and has produced emerging contractor tools and guidelines such as, the Contractor Management Guidelines (CMG 101), as well the basic guide on the 3Rs (Rights, Responsibilities and Risks).

(b) Threats by SMME’s to close off the sites or any interruptions to complete a project are a reportable violation of the CIDB code of conduct. The conduct as such is punishable in terms of Regulation 27A of the CIDB regulations. For any dispute that may push SMMEs to close off sites dispute resolution mechanisms are spelt out in the contract.

(c) The CIDB can only intervene upon such matters being reported in terms of Regulations 28 and as per the provisions of the contract between the conflicting parties.

(2) As stated above in (1) (b) threats to close off the sites or any interruptions to complete a project are a reportable violation of the CIDB code of conduct, and shall be dealt with according to the stipulations of the code.

(3) Yes, this is alleged criminal activities and is dealt with by the Security Cluster.

30 October 2020 - NW2299

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will explain why the National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) who is mandated in terms of the Animals Protection Act, Act 71 of 1962, to support the SA Police Service in enforcing legislation that protects and prevents cruelty to animals, is not funded directly by the Government, but has to rely on funding from the National Lottery and private organisations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) whether her department is considering a more direct budget-related funding model so as to ensure that the NSPCA can fulfil its lawfully mandated tasks; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details? NW2871E

Reply:

1. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1993 [No. 169 of 1993] which is the founding legislation which covers the National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) provides for control of societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals, and for matters connected therewith. These societies are non-profit organizations and through this Act are enabled to collect contributions or raise funds country-wide in any lawful manner; and may receive financial grants from public funds and accept donations and bequests from any person or estatesubject to the provisions of, and as contemplated in, the Fundraising Act, 1978 (Act No. 107 of 1978). The NSPCA has been sustaining itself through revenue streams which are provided for within the Act.

2. No.The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development is not considering direct budget allocations to the NSPCA. The Department is currently working on legislation that will also empower government officials to enforce the Act.

30 October 2020 - NW2298

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she will explain why South Africa has not yet signed the Leaders' Pledge for Nature, which has already been signed by 70 countries, and which will commit South Africa B implement immediately actionable policy in order to ‹averse biodiversity loss over the next decade; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

The Leaders' Pledge for Nature deals with a number of issues that are currently the subject of multilateral negotiations within the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), amongst others.

Given the fact that this Leaders' Pledge for Nature is not a multilaterally agreed document, nor did not form part of any multilateral negotiations and that it contains element which are the subject of ongoing negotiations as well as its requirements for a commitment to act and take accountability, it is prudent for any responsible Government to study the actions required and it implications on the country, prior to committing. The Leaders' Pledge for Nature is still open for endorsement and therefore, South Africa may still sign it after careful study of its content and the implications thereof on its biodiversity policy.

Our country remains committed to the implementation of its goals and objectives, and are committed to working towards an adoption of a post-2020 global biodiversity framework at the COP15 of the CBD in Kunming, China next year.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF F0RE8TRY, FISHERES AND THE ENVIRONNENT

DATE: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2286

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she will furnish Mr K P Sithole with an update regarding her statement dated 30 May 2020, entitled Covid-19 alert level 3 risk adjusted strategy tourism sector response measures and directions, and in particular advice on the progress of the R30 million financial relief package that was set aside for tour guides as there are many registered tour guides who are yet to receive financial relief; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Following the Minister’s address earlier this year, a budget of R30million was set aside to provide financial assistance to the tourist guiding sector, particularly to tourist guides that operate as freelancers. To be eligible to access the fund, the following minimum requirements had to be met:

  • Be a registered tourist guide with the relevant Provincial Registrar; and
  • Be a freelance tourist guide (i.e. not registered with the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) as an employee)

2. The Department implemented a “no application’’ process. As the custodians of the information pertaining to registered tourist guides, Provincial Registrars (from all nine (9) provinces) provided the Department with their respective databases of registered tourist guides whose details (including cellphone numbers) had been verified and updated.

3. Based on the information that was received by the respective Provincial Registrars, further verifications were conducted with UIF. Based on the outcome of the UIF verification process, payments to a total of 4415 tourist guides have been processed to date. The 4415 tourist guides that were processed for payment met the criteria that is outlined above. As per the UIF data, 4778 tourist guides did not qualify for the funding.During the verification process it was found that 260 were duplications or their information was incomplete or incorrect.The breakdown of the number of guides submitted by the respective provinces and the payments that have been processed per province is outlined in the table below:

Province

Number of guides submitted by province

Number of guides that met the criteria for payment

% of guides received funding

1. Eastern Cape

505

 

179

35%

2. Free State

38

 

24

63%

3. Gauteng

1167

 

963

83%

4. KwaZulu-Natal

745

 

410

55%

5. Limpopo

418

 

145

35%

6. Mpumalanga

1197

 

434

36%

7. Northern Cape

109

 

105

96%

8. North West

242

 

116

48%

9. Western Cape

5032

 

2039

41%

Totals

9453

4415

47%

4. A total of R19 867 500.00 has been committed for the payment to 4415 tourist guides. By end of October 2020, all 4415 tourist guides will have received a total payment of R4500 (R1500per guide X 3 months).

30 October 2020 - NW2224

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether the State Security Agency has the forensic capabilities to conduct lifestyle audits of the (a) Executive Councils of (i) the Eastern Cape, (ii) Gauteng and (iii) KwaZulu-Natal and (b) senior officials in each specified province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The State Security Agency possess partial forensic capabilities to conduct lifestyle audits and where there is a lack, collaborate with other organs of state such as the South African Police Services (SAPS), Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC), e.t.c. to compensate the discrepancy.

The lifestyle audit framework currently at the drafting stages will, once completed, lay a foundation of the requisite capabilities to conduct a lifestyle audit.

30 October 2020 - NW2223

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(a). What (i) is the total amount that was given by FIFA to the 2010 World Cup Trust, (ii) is the total amount that was spent on each specified project, (iii) was the nature of each project and (iv) is the name of each person who is a signatory to the account and (b) how were the projects approved?

Reply:

This is the reply to both question number: 2162 and 2223.

The FIFA 2010 World Cup Legacy indicated the following. That;

a) (i) FIFA donated R450,762,816 to the Legacy Trust. The Legacy Trust held this amount in interest bearing bank accounts.

(ii) The total amounts spent on each project are shown on the Management report. See the attached management report as at the end of August 2020, prepared by the appointed independent financial platform performed by EY South Africa.

(iii) The following is the nature of each project

1. Funding for development projects as identified by SAFA: R392,433,691

2. Funding to SAFA regions : R45,755,000

3. Funding to SAFA Local Football Associations : R10,750,000

4. NGO Funding : R36,079,107

i. Funding to the 20 Football for Hope centres

ii. Funding to NGO’s that use football for social development

5. Bursary allocation to approved beneficiaries within football : R2, 569,886

(iv) The following are persons who are signatory to the account

1. Yusuf Carrim – 2010 FWC Legacy Trust manager

2. Mansoor Parker – ENSafrica (Edward Nathan Sonnenbergs Inc)

(v) The projects are approved as follows;

1. The Legacy Trust’s management team compiles the applications for grant funding which it presents to the Legacy Trust’s board of trustees, the highest decision making body within the Legacy Trust, for approval.

2. The Trustees consider the applications for grant funding and approve (with or without modifications) or reject these applications at their Trustees’ meetings.

 

30 October 2020 - NW2220

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)(a) What type of entity is Infrastructure South Africa (ISA), (b) under which legislative prescript was the ISA established and (c) where in the organogram of her department does the ISA sit; (2) under what legislative prescripts was the appointment of a certain person (name and details furnished) done; (3) whether the organisational structure for the ISA is available; if not, (a) who will draft the organogram and (b) by what date will the organogram be drafted; if so, will she provide Ms S J Graham with a copy of the organogram; (4) whether appointments will be made without an organogram being in place; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the position(s) in which appointments will be made (details furnished); (5) (a) where is the funding for the ISA emanating from, (b) how much funding has been allocated to ISA in the current financial year, (c) where is the budget and (d) how is the budget allocated?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) ISA was not established as an entity but a function to oversee the implementation of the mandate of Infrastructure. It is part of the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (NDPWI) functional organisational structure reporting to the Minister, responsible for PICC & IDMS roles emanating from the National Macro Organisation of Government (NMOG) processes including the urgent need for targeted infrastructure investment.On the 27 May 2020, Cabinet resolved to create Infrastructure South Africa (ISA) to be housed within DPWI to serve the purpose of being a single-entry point and to ensure that DPWI has a system accounting for all infrastructure projects at all levels of government.

(b) Public Service Regulations, 25 (2)(a) states that, based on the strategic plan of the department, an executive authority shall determine the department’s organisational structure in terms of its core mandated and support function. Public Service Act, section 41 stipulates the alignment with the said regulations as well as the role of the Minister of Public Service and Administrations.

(c) The structure depicts ISA at a macro level within the department with the Head of ISA reporting to the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure.

2. Dr Kgosientsho Ramokgopa is appointed in the Presidency on contract. The Ministerrequested the permission of the Presidency to utilize the expertise of Dr Ramokgopa in introducing the functions of Infrastructure within DPWI.

3. The organisational structure of ISA was concluded by the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure and submitted to the Minister of Public Service and Administration for his concurrence in accordance with the Public Service Act and Regulations and approved.

4. No, the Department of Public Service and Administration must approve the organogram, which was done in September 2020. The recruitment process has started.

5. The Department reprioritised the budget to fund the function of ISA which will be subject to approval by National Treasury. For the current financial year, an amount of R23.062 million has reprioritised to provide funding for compensation of employees. Other funding requests such as computers, software licenses, cell phones and office furniture will be procured from the centralised budget under Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Supply Chain Management (SCM) budgets for goods and services and payments for capital services.

30 October 2020 - NW2189

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the full details of the persons who are the delegated officials with regard to the Subdivision of Agricultural Land Act, Act 70 of 1970?

Reply:

The delegations in terms of the Subdivision of Agricultural Land Act, No 70 of 1970 are attached to official posts and not persons. This has been purposefully provided to accommodate any changes arising from resignation and movement of officials without impacting on service delivery. Delegations are assigned to the posts of Director, Chief Director and Deputy Director-General levels as per table below:

SECTION

TYPE OF POWER

POSITION TO WHICH POWERS ARE DELEGATED

1(f) of the definition of agricultural land

To determine which land the Minister may after consultation with the executive committee concerned and by notice in the Gazette excludes from the provisions of this Act.

Non delegable.

3 (a-e)

To consent in writing that an action regarding subdivision of agricultural land which is otherwise prohibited, may be executed.

Chief Director: Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

3 (f)

To consent in writing that an action regarding establishment of a township or enlargement of activities other than agriculture which is otherwise prohibited, may be permitted.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

3(g)

To provide consent in writing regarding public notice to the effect that a scheme relating to agricultural land or any portion thereof has been prepared or submitted under the ordinance in question.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

4(1)(a)(ii)

To determine the place, form, plans and documentation which must accompany the application for the purpose of section 3 of the act.

Director: Land and Soil Management.

4(2)

To refuse or grant any such application on such conditions.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

4(3)

To enforce a condition in terms of section 4 (2.)

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

4(4)

To vary or withdraw any condition imposed by section 4 (2)(b), and if it has been registered against the title deed of the land, direct that it is varied or cancelled.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resourcesand Disaster Management

6A (1) (a) (aA) (b) (2)

To give consent for the registration of servitudes over agricultural land and subdivision.

Chief Director: Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

7

To authorise any person to enter upon any land at all reasonable times to carry out thereon investigations or to perform thereon such other acts as are necessary for achieving the objectives of the Act.

Director: Land Use and Soil Management

10

Regulations

Non delegable

30 October 2020 - NW1936

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether her department allocated R2,8 million to the Limpopo Department of Public Works to accommodate 11 technical assistants from Cuba, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department allocated any funding for the accommodation of the Cuban officials; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, from which budget line item was the funding sourced?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has not allocated funds to Limpopo Department of Public Works for 11 technical assistants from Cuba. Limpopo Department of Public Works is responsible for the payment of its own technical assistants from Cuba for salaries, accommodation, logistics or any other costs.

(2) Yes, DPWI has allocated funding for the accommodation of the Cuban Officials throughthe Department’s Cuban Technical Advisory programme

30 October 2020 - NW2178

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) What total number of households (a)(i) nationally and (ii) provincially have benefited from the Integrated National Electrification Programme (INEP) over the past five financial years and (b) who initially benefited from infrastructure under the mixed development category, no longer qualify for subsidisation of INEP and free basic electricity; (2) what is (a) total number of electricity meters have been installed under the INEP programme in the past financial year and (b) total amount is still outstanding for the installation of the electricity meters?

Reply:

(1)(a)

(i) The total number of households electrified over the past five financial years is 1,266,240.

(ii) Provincial breakdown of number of indigent households electrified in last 5 years:

(b) The Mixed Developer Policy Guideline was introduced in October 2018. Before this date, all applications received by the Department on mixed developer projects were treated as normal Bulk and Households applications. Funding for infrastructure under the mixed development category is provided for on a pro-rata basis based on the percentange consumption of indegent customers within the development. If the percentage power consumption of indegent customers within the development is 70% and above, the bulk infrastructure qualifies for fullfunding through the INEP Grant.

All indigent customers qualify for free basic electricity as per the Free Basic Electricity policy.

(2)

(a) A total of 214 517 households were electrified in the past financial and these households have electricity meters installed.

(b) No outstanding meter installations have been reported by our electrification programme implementing agents (Eskom and Municipalities).

30 October 2020 - NW2303

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) With reference to his department’s partnership with the Department of Small Business Development, (a) what are the reasons that the amount of R22 million was ring-fenced before the Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) had been determined and (b) by what date will the MOA be submitted to Parliament for referral to the Portfolio Committee (PC) on Sport, Arts and Culture. (2) How was the amount of R22 million established? (3) Whether he will advise if the specified PC will receive a copy of the Cultural and Creative Industries of South Africa’s (CCIFSA) problem statement; if so, why does the CCIFSA need more money, since they, like all entities , receive a budget allocation from his department; (4) Whether, given that the PC needs clarity because the ring-fencing of money for the specified entity was not discussed within the PC, he has found that the entity has managed its finances well; if not, will the proposed allocation be additional to their budget allocation?

Reply:

1.(a) Processes to obtain National Treasury approval for the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture to contribute an equal amount to what the Department of Small Business Development had set aside for this partnership, and the signing of Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) were undertaken in parallel to each other.

1.(b) The Director General of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture and the Acting Director General of the Department of Small Business Development signed the MoA between the two departments on 07 October 2020, prior to the call for applications going out. The MoA is ready and available to be shared with the Portfolio Committee.

2.The total amount of R22 282 000. was solely based on what both departments had available for the COVID-19 Relief funding; and took into account the size of the sub-sectors that needed to be supported.

3.This Relief Funding is being managed by both DSAC and DSBD; with Provincial Implementing Agents that will be doing the end-to-end administration of application, to whom funding will be transferred for processing to successful applicants. This funding is not being routed through CCIFSA

4.This Relief Funding was not routed through CCIFSA; neither is it being managed by them. See response above.

30 October 2020 - NW1943

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What are the details of the Sneeuwitjie Creche in Nieu-Bethesda that is part of the Non-State Sector Extended Public Works Programmes (EPWP) run by the Independent Development Trust and her department in terms of the (i) normal non-sector EPWP programme, (ii) Youth EPWP Covid-19 programme, and (iii) Non-State Sector EPWP School Cleaning programme, (b) on what date did the non-profit organisation commence with the programme, (c) what total number of beneficiaries are on the programme, (d) what are the rates paid to the beneficiaries, (e) what number of days do the beneficiaries work each month and (f) have the beneficiaries been issued with Protective Personal Equipment in each programme?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) as follows:

(a) (i) The NPO was appointed in October 2019 to implement the EPWP NSS NPO Programme for a period of two financial years ending 31 March 2021. The budget allocation for 2019/2020 financial year was R2 463 840.22

(ii) As at 14 August 2020, a total of 126 work opportunities were created, of which 116 (93%) are youth as shown in the table below.

Table 1: Breakdown of overall work opportunities created

Dr. Beyers Naude

103 (including Gender-Based Violence)

Blue Crane Route

9

Sundays River Valley

14

(iii) The Non-State Sector did not participate in the EPWP School Cleaning programme. The latter is implemented by provincial departments responsible for education function.Hence the NPO did not participate in the aforementioned programme.

(b) The Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) Programme was first introduced as part of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) in the 2009/10 financial year, and has since then been implementedby the Independent Development Trust. In 2020/21 financial year, 189 of the 339NPOs started implementing the EPWP COVID-19 project in support of the Department of Health Public Health Hygiene Strategy with effect from 01 June 2020.The implementationis currently under way through district municipalities and primary health care facilities in provinces.

(c) To date, 19 794 participants (i.e. 1 June – 31 July 2020) have been deployed to work at various sites, primarily within communities to demonstrate on how to wash hands, construct tippy taps, cleaning of public places such as taxi ranks and others.

(d) Guided by the EPWP Ministerial Determination, participants are paid a daily wage rate of R101.00 per person day of work.

(e) Participants work 7 days in a fortnight, that is, they work 4 days in week 1 and 3 days in the following week. Therefore all participants should work 14 days a month. However, the work schedule may be amended, as required.

(f) Personal Protective Equipment’s (PPEs) have been made available for all participants. It was recently discovered that some participants were not fully complying with the regulations linked to PPEs. This was raised with the Implementing Agent to be corrected immediately.

30 October 2020 - NW2159

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether she will furnish Ms S J Graham with the details of the role that the Presidential Infrastructure Co-ordinating Commission (PICC) played in (a) the BeitBridge Border Fence project, (b) the determination of quarantine sites and (c) any other interventions within the purview of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI); if not, why not; if so, what are the details of (i)(aa) which officials were involved, (bb) the scope of their involvement, (cc) the duration of their involvement and (dd) why they were seconded and/or used instead of DPWI officials and (ii) any cost to the DPWI for the interventions by the PICC?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) The Presidential Infrastructure Co-ordinating Commission Technical Task Team (PICC TTT) provided technical support during the investigation of BeitBridge BorderFence project.

(b) The PICC has a Geographical Information System (GIS) and geo-spacing capability

that was used to list and relocate sites proposed for quarantine. This list wasprovided to the Department of Health to conduct inspections and operationalize sitesas may be deemed necessary during the Covid-19 response.

(c) A specialist from the PICC TTT has been appointed as part of the IDT Exit Strategy TaskTeam that was tasked with investigating the sustainability of the IDT.

(i)

(aa) PICC TTT officials that provided technical support during the investigation of theBeitBridge project were Mr Tshepo Chuene, Mr Thabang Tladi, Mr MuzwandileButhelizi and Dr Hilton Macdonald.

(bb) The scope of the technical evaluation during the investigation focused on three keyaspects of the project, namely the contractual matters as related to the GeneralConditions of Contracts (GCC), analysis of the contract scope and costs ascontained in the Bills of Quantities (BoQ) as well as observations made during aproject site visit on 05 May 2020. This included:

  • Reviewing contractual matters as captured in project documents, including themotivation and conditions for the accelerated appointment of both the Contractorand Principal Agent. The review team also checked whether those conditions inthe appointment contracts were upheld / adhered to;
  • Analysing and comparing the rates of the 2016 BoQ with those of March 2020,in order to verify the compliance to the conditions set out in the motivation forthe emergency appointment of the Contractor and Principal Agent;
  • Developing an independent BoQ to determine a fair price of the contract,through the team’s own market research, site visit observations and analysis ofcontract documents; and
  • Assessing fitness for purpose and the quality of work of the implemented fencesolution, to effectively secure the 40km stretch of the border between SouthAfrica and Zimbabwe.

(cc) The duration of the Technical Task Team’s evaluation was an estimated 65 ours.

(dd) As departmental officials were involved in the implementation of the project andpossible conflict interest, the Department used an independent team to assist withthe technical aspects of the investigation. The team was complimenting theinvestigating team of the Department with engineering quantity surveying andproject management capabilities. The team is independent as it didn’t participate inthe planning and implementation of the project.

The Department recognised the need to work together with the PICC and SIU onthis investigation in order to enhance the effectiveness of dealing with corruption andmaladministration. The Department further recognised that effective and efficientmutual assistance in this investigation was fundamental to successful investigation,disciplinary proceedings, prosecution of crime and civil proceedings.

(ii) No cost to DPWI.

30 October 2020 - NW1726

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

How many hectares of land does the Ingonyama Trust own in KwaZulu-Natal; (2) what percentage of the specified land is considered viable for (a) agriculture, (b) livestock and (c) crop farming in particular; (3) how many hectares of the land is currently being used for (a) subsistence farming and (b) commercial farming; (4) what mechanisms are currently in place to allow occupants of Ingonyama Trust Board land to gain access to financing from (a) the Government and/or (b) commercial banks for agricultural purposes; (5) whether she has found that female farmers have equal access to land rights on Ingonyama Trust Board land as men; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Approximately 2.8million hectares.

(2)(a),(b),(c) No study has been conducted to determine the viability of land.

(3)(a),(b) The Ingonyama Trust Board has not conducted any audit regarding the extent of land being used for subsistence or commercial farming.

(4)(a),(b) The Lease Tenure Instrument issued by the Ingonyama Trust Board (ITB) is accepted by all financial institutions, but has no influence on the funding criteria used by government and/ or commercial banks for agricultural projects.

(5) According to the information from the ITB, Yes every farmer has equal access to ITB land regardless of the gender.

30 October 2020 - NW1857

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Mr M Tshwaku (EFF)asked the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What are the reasons that a certain company (name furnished) has been awarded the contract to manage the funeral of Mr A M Mlangeni while it is under investigation by the Standing Committee on Public Accounts for inflating invoices during the funerals of the former President, Mr N R Mandela and Mrs W N Madikizela-Mandela?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) that at the time of awarding the bid, the specified company was not restricted from doing business with Government. It was part of six (6) companies that submitted quotations forthe service.

This company could not have been excluded by the Department without following due process for restriction. This could be construed to be anunfair process which may also be irregular on the basis of passing over the highest scoringNational Treasury SCM Instruction Note 3 of 2016/17.

The due process for restriction isoutlined in the Preferential Procurement Regulations 2017 and National Treasury SCMInstruction Note 3 of 2016/17. The Department has issued an internal Circular No 40 of2019 to establish a Restriction Committee and provide Standard Operating Procedures togive effect to the above-mentioned Prescripts.

The matter of restricting Crocia Events has subsequently served at the duly constitutedRestriction Committee and Crocia has been given 14 days to provide reasons why theDepartment must not recommend their restriction to the National Treasury.

30 October 2020 - NW2369

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether, in relation to the recommendations of the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, there has been an investigation into and a report on the (a) impact on the work of the civilian intelligence agencies of the amalgamation of the previous services into one agency and the appropriateness of the change, (b) appropriateness of the current structure of the agency to its core mandates and to effective command, control and accountability, (c) mandate and capacity of the State Security Agency (SSA) and to examine the compatibility of its structure in relation to this mandate, (d) effectiveness of controls to ensure accountability and (e) institutional culture, morale, systems and capacity to deliver on the mandate; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

All the matters raised above by the Honourable Member of Parliament have extensively been dealt with in the Findings and Recommendations of the High-Level Review Panel, particularly as outlined in Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 13 of the High-Level Review Panel’s Report. These matters therefore do not require additional investigation as doing so would duplicate the work done by the Panel. The Honourable Member is also reminded that the President of the Republic, HE President MC Ramaphosa, accepted the High-Level Review Panel report with all its findings and recommendations.

Processes such as drafting of a new legislative framework and the review of internal departmental regulatory processes have been initiated to address the implementation of the recommendations and these are at various degrees of development and implementation. Some of the recommendations in relation to capacity, etc., are however dependent on the finalisation of a new legislative framework.

30 October 2020 - NW1872

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of identity documents has his department issued to matric learners as a result of the roll-out of mobile units to assist the specified learners to obtain identity documents since June 2020?

Reply:

Since the start of the schools project to assist leaners with identity documents on 16 June 2020, the total number of identity documents issued to learners is 229 954.

END

30 October 2020 - NW2231

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What are the details of how the money of the relief funding will be distributed between the (a) sports sector and the (b) arts and culture sector; (2) what are the reasons that practitioners from the arts and heritage sector only allocated R12 million while practitioners from the sports sector were allocated R65 million; (3) (a) whether R11 million has been ring-fenced, therefore leaving R66 million and what are the details of how the money is split?

Reply:

(1). The Department regards all sectors under it as of equal importance; and as per the presentation made to the Portfolio Committee in September 2020; the projections were based on the total balance of budget, to cater for sport, arts and heritage practitioners, there was never a distinction for distribution of funds for either Sports or Arts and Culture. The department approached National Treasury to get approval to utilise the balance, to cater overall for Sport, Arts and Culture.

(2). Initially the available balance of the Budget was for Sport; but after approval from National Treasury; the department was then able to redirect its existing conditional grants toward responding to the outcry due to the pandemic to cater for all practitioners serviced by the department.

(3). Yes, R11 million has been ring-fenced and committed to enable entering into a partnership with the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) to cater for audio-visual, crafts, visual arts and design sector which were not catered for in the second wave. The rest of what remains of the budget was aimed at responding to applications received from both sports and all other cultural domains within the arts, culture and heritage for the second wave of relief funding.  

30 October 2020 - NW1848

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Ms N Tafeni (EFF)asked the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructuree

(1) Whether her department owns the land next to the East London Airport where houses were demolished; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department went to court to obtain an order to demolish the houses; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. The Remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Grey-Dell No. 871, East London Registration Division as depicted on S.G.-diagram 1288/1900 and registered vide deed of transfer T409/1952 in the name of the National Government of the Republic of South Africa.

The property is 271, 9114 ha in extent and is commonly known as Bongweni.The property falls under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) in terms of the State Land Disposal Act, Act 48 of 1961.

2. Yes, the DPWI approached the HighCourt for intervention by taking legal action against the erection of illegal structures and this was granted on the 16th March 2017. In line with the Court Order, only unoccupied structures and structures under construction were demolished.

The demolition is in line with a Court Order that permits the landowner to prevent the illegal invasion of its property. This was a joint operation between DPWI, South African Police Service and Sheriff of the Court.

The illegal structures are within a restricted area in the direct flight path to/from East London Airport which also constitutes a serious risk to residents.

30 October 2020 - NW2225

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)Whether her department commissioned the recent lifestyle audits of the (a) Members of the Executive Councils of (i) the Eastern Cape, (ii) Gauteng and (iii) KwaZulu-Natal and (b) senior officials in each specified province; if so, (2) Whether she will make the findings of the lifestyle audits available to the public; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the State Security Agency was approached by the aforesaid provincial governments to conduct lifestyle audits of the members of the respective Executive Councils.

2. Reports of the lifestyle audits will be submitted to the respective provincial government, which will decide whether or not to make them available to the public.

30 October 2020 - NW2365

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and RuralDevelopment

What total number of farmers received loans with the backing of the R200billion guarantee scheme announced by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, to fight the effects of Covid-19?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development does not grant loans to farmers and is therefore unaware which farmers received loans from the said amount.

30 October 2020 - NW1786

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, in view of several job fund schemes that were agreed to with certain commodities groups (names furnished) with the Land Bank providing additional funding and with the Land Bank’s liquidity challenges, she will provide details of (a) her efforts to ensure that emerging beneficiaries who are targeted to receive the intended support do receive the supportand (b) on what date will the Land Bank resume lending to the farmers?

Reply:

(a) The Minister is aware that some commodity groups applied on their own to the Jobs Fund with the Land Bank agreeing to provide additional funding as per their agreement. However, the department was not party to most of those agreements nor was asked to intervene in anyway.

(b) The Minister is not aware of when the Land Bank will resume landing as she has not been advised by the board or management.

30 October 2020 - NW2174

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether, based on Mr Edwin Sodi’s recent testimony at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, which implicated her Deputy Minister as a beneficiary of Mr Sodi’s company, her Deputy Minister declared the funds he had received in accordance with the requirements of the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998, to the Registrar of Members’ Interest in Parliament; if not, what (a) total number of contracts have been awarded to Mr Sodi’s company under his leadership in his current executive position and (b) is the monetary value of each specified contract so awarded?

Reply:

The Deputy Minister has submitted a Reply in this regard to the Parliament Office of the African Transformation Movement (ATM)

30 October 2020 - NW2352

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What(a) pollutants require mandatory monitoring and reporting in all air quality monitoring stations, (b) are acceptable levels of the specified pollutants and (c) steps are taken once a station reports on excessive levels of pollution at a station of the SA Air Quality Information Systems or a municipal station?

Reply:

 

  1. In terms of Section 9 of the National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act 20 of 2014 (NEMAQA), the Minister is empowered to identify ambient air pollutants which present a threat to human health and well-being of the environment, and to establish National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for the identified pollutants. In this regard, the Minister established national ambient air quality standards for particulate matter (PM10. articles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 micrometres (10-6 m) and PM2.5, particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres), sulphur dioxide (SO2). nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), ozone (O3) and benzene (CsH6). The NAAQS include averaging periods, limit values or concentrations, permitted frequency of exceedance per year, and compliance dates.
  2. The table below shows the ambient standards for the criteria pollutant.
  3. Where excessive levels of pollution at a station are reported by the South African Air Quality Information System or a municipal station, the information is shared with the public to empower them about the possible impacts their human health, as well as to guide them on how to carry out their daily activities to minimise the effects. In addition, tailor-made interventions are designed in air quality management plans or other strategic government programs to identify sources contributing to the pollution levels, and to implement necessary emission reduction measures. Within the regulated pollution sources such as industries, these interventions include enhanced compliance monitoring and enforcements through the atmospheric emission licencing command and control regime. For non-regulated pollution sources, air quality management interventions are designed to target those pollutants with reported excessive levels, towards progressive realisation of air that is not harmful to the health and wellbeing of the public.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2304

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Ms V Van Dyk (DA) to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) With reference to his department’s partnership with the Department of Small Business Development and the established panel to distribute funding, (a) what reasons has he found deemed it necessary to appoint yet another panel and (b) at what cost total cost will the additional panel be appointed; (2) What are the names of the companies that will benefit from the R22 million that will be ring-fenced; (3) Whether he will furnish the Portfolio Committee on Sport, Arts and culture with (a) a list of all specified successful companies and (b) the criteria applicable to ascertain why the ring-fencing of the R22 million was done before the Memorandum of Understanding had been reached; if not why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1.a) Both Departments went through a consultation process with sector organisations and to provide them with the opportunity to nominate panel members specifically for the targeted sub-sectors. The Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, working with each of the nine provinces, have set up adjudication panels comprising of representatives from the following entities/organizations in each province:-

    • A representative from the province’s craft hub or development agency
    • A representative from the Visual Arts Network of South Africa (VANSA)
    • A representative from the South African Screen Federation (SASFED)
    • A representative from the Creative & Cultural Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA)

The Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, together with the provincial Departments’ of Art and Culture, as well as Economic Development will provide over-sight and support to the above Provincial based adjudication panel.

1. (b) The Department uses Treasury Guidelines for remuneration of committees, which is R327.00 per hour for committee members and R570 for chairpersons of committees. In this case the total amount to be spent will depend of actual number of committee members and the number of hours they spend adjudicating received applications/requests.

2. The names of the companies that will benefit from the R22 282 000.will be known once the adjudication panels in each of the Provinces have sat to evaluate received application/requests.

3. (a) Yes; upon request.

3(b) Processes related to approval of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture contribution to the R 22 282 000. from National Treasury and the signing of the MoA were done parallel to each other.

30 October 2020 - NW2305

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). What is the current financial status of (i) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee, (ii) the SA Sports Trust and (ii) all national federations and (b) which of the specified entities are not currently financially viable?

Reply:

(a)(i)&(b). SASCOC indicated that the Audited Annual Financial Statements for the year-end 31 March 2020 will be presented for adoption at the Annual General Meeting scheduled to be held on the 7 November 2020. These financials contain independently audited financial reporting that provides information on the financial viability and going concern concept for SASCOC. Once the Audited Annual Financial Statements has been adopted by the membership on the 7 November 2020 it will be available for circulation/public consumption.

(a)(ii). The Sports Trust indicated that based on the analysis done regarding financial status of The Sports Trust is moderately healthy. The current ratio (current assets/current liabilities) determines that The Sports Trust will be able to honour its operational expenses for the next 12 months 1.57:1.The business cash flow is also in a moderately healthy position to honour the day – to – day operations of The Sports Trust.

(ii)(b). The Sports Trust further indicated that with the current economic situation, The Sports Trust as an NGO is mainly reliant on collaborations and partnerships with government and the private sector companies for donations and grants. The Sports Trust has also been affected by the current Covid-19 pandemic and is pleased to announce that we managed to secure a few partnerships and collaborations during this time of uncertainty.

The financial viability of The Sports Trust can therefore be defined as moderately healthy and place us in a position to deliver on our mandate, our day-to- day operations and some of the contractual agreements that we have in place.

Another lifeline of The Sports Trust is the interest that we receive from our investments due to our Seed Capital solution.

(a)(iii)&(b). The following federations provided responses / information regarding their financial status and viability:-

See information below:

Federations

Responses

Jukskei South Africa (JSA)

(a) Current financial status

Jukskei indicated that they have sufficient resources to continue as a going concern in the medium to long term. However, the Pandemic may have a temporary impact on their Revenue in the 2021 Financial year.

(b) Financially viability?

Indicated that they are viable and have two streams of revenue.

Affiliation fees, these fees were due and payable by mid-July. We have received 8 of the 9 Provinces affiliation fees and are in contact with the last Province to pay their fees.

Registration fees, fees for athletes to be registered at JSA. JSA has implemented a Covid operational plan for jukskei activities to continue under Level 3, 2 and 1. Based on the current lockdown regulations the federation is able to host events without spectators and therefore athletes will need to be registered in order to participate.

In terms of expenses, the federation has cut down operational budgets to ensure reduced revenue is sufficient to cover all expenses.

Indicated that they were able to cut expenses for operational activities, however will not be able to run any of the development projects including high performance programme, development programme on grassroots level (schools and rural areas) and support to national teams in respect of national tours.

Softball South Africa (SSA)

a) Current financial status

Federation indicated that the organization is stable

b) Financially viability

Indicated that they are viable for an amateur sport

South African Hockey Association (SAHA)

a) Current Financial status

The federation indicated the following;

The SA Hockey Association has the following annual funding streams:

Provincial Affiliation Fees – this is a nominal amount that Provinces pay to SA Hockey annually to Affiliate as a Province or Affiliate Member.

Member Affiliation Fees – this fee relates to amounts paid annually by all registered hockey players. These fees are set based on our National Office Operational Costs and charges to affiliated members

Sponsorship Revenue – this revenue covers specific projects such as the respective 6 National Teams per Gender

Coaching Education Fees – these fees are generated from hosting courses

Broadcast Rights Fees – these fees are generated from broadcast rights annually for specific projects such as the Premier Hockey League

Project Partner Fees – these fees are generated from specific projects such as the Modified Hockey Programme where funders can partner on CSI projects

DSAC Grants – these grants have a set portion to assist with operational costs - 10% of the grant and the balance to deliver programmes to grow the game

Player Payments – these fees paid by players relate to events that players participate it – leagues, provincial interprovincial tournaments, national camps and events that national teams participate in

b) Financially viability

The federation indicated that this is a very broad question for the current financial year and can confirm the following regarding the above.

As at to date only line item no. 1 has been collected in the current financial year due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. We continue to receive line item no. 4 as these are offered online

Funds related to projects, events, national teams etc. have not been received and all events for the hockey season were cancelled. Hockey is a Winter Sport and as such the entire competition season of 2020 was impacted by the National State of Disaster from Levels 5 to Level 1

South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB)

a) Current Financial status

The federation indicated that the South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB)’s financial status is sound.

b) Financially viability

Indicated that the federation is financially viable

Swimming South Africa (Swimming SA)

(a) Current financial

Indicated that the organization was only just solvent at the last financial year end 30 April 2020

(b) Financially viability

Indicated that normally the organization is viable but due to the lockdown it is in need of financial assistance

South African Equestrian Council (SAEC)

a) Current financial status

Indicated that due to Covid-19, memberships stagnated from March to the end of July. In order to get memberships

Kick-started we implemented a 50% reduction of membership fees. The SAEF is currently is still in a positive position but expect an impact on memberships moving forward.

b) Financially viability

Indicated that the SAEF runs a tight ship and are financially viable.

Darts South Africa (DSA)

Indicated that Darts South Africa confirms that despite the Covid-19 pandemic, the organisation is financially viable.

South African National Archery Association (SANAA)

a) Current financial status

Indicated that currently the federation’s financial status is sound

b) Financially viability

Indicated that at the moment the federation is viable, however expect membership income to drop drastically in 2021 due to financial strains on members. This means that clubs could also suffer.

Badminton South Africa (Badminton SA)

Indicated that the Federation is in a) a financially status and (b) financially viable position

Ringball Association of South Africa (RASA)

Federation indicated that a) it is non-profitable national sport federation b) only viable when receiving membership fees however not viable without receiving membership fees

Snow Sports South Africa (SSSA)

Indicates that the federation is a) financially sound and b) financially viable

South African Confederation of Cue Sport (SACCS)

(a) Current financial status

The federation indicated that;

SACCS is a National Composite Confederation with autonomous membership that includes full members of South African Blackball Federation (SABF) established in 2008, Pool South Africa (PSA) established in 1995 and Snooker and Billiards South Africa (SABSA) established in 1920, also have an associate member called Pool 4 Change established in 2019.

The members of these organisations form the Executive Committee on the SACCS Board. These organisations are self-sufficient and generate their income from their members to run their operations. SACCS and their members SABF, PSA and SABSA administrative costs are derived from DSAC funding, and if DSAC funding is reduced in a given year then the administrative contributions to SABF, PSA and SABSA are reduced accordingly.

The main purpose of SACCS is to establish itself as a member of good standing with SASCOC and thus get recognition from DSAC. SACCS is funded by DSAC in meeting their goals of mass participation and thus more than 50% of DSAC funding allocations are geared towards projects for our people in the previously disadvantaged communities.

SACCS through the years has built up contingency funds of approximately R100,000 to fund the operating costs through the year until our administrative funding is released by DSAC. SACCS is very much a DSAC project driven operation as all National Tournaments are the responsibility of our autonomous members.

SACCS is therefore financially stable and can only engage in projects that are DSAC approved.

(b) Financially viability

Indicated that SACCS is financially viable and a well-managed organisation that does not operate on any loans or bank overdrafts. The SACCS Board’s Treasurer publishes monthly management accounts that are distributed to the Board’s members monthly. SACCS is also managed strictly by an approved budget.

South African Body Building Federation

(a) Current Financial status

The Federation indicated that Bodybuilding South Africa current financial status is solvent as its realizable value of its assets is greater than its liabilities. Its cash flow statement, contains 3 sections: cash from operations, cash from grants and sponsors and cash from investing

(b) Financially viability

Indicated that Bodybuilding South Africa has employed sound financial management practices to remain financially viable over the last 3 decades.

 

30 October 2020 - NW2075

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether the contractor involved in the Beitbridge project is doing any other work for her department; if so, which projects is the company involved in?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) that the contractor for Beitbridge Project, Caledon River Properties (Pty) Ltd T/A Magwa Construction, is involved with the following projects:

STATUS

STATUS DESCRIPTION

AWARD AMOUNT

AWARD DATE

PRACTICAL COMPLETION DATE

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

1,619,160.24

12/1/2006

1/28/2010

VARIOUS CENTRES: NORTH WEST, LABOUR CENTRE, POTCHESTROOM: RAMP FOLLOW ON CONTRACT: GROUP E

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

3,808,523.40

1/20/2009

2/19/2012

MEMEL, MAGISTRATE'S OFFICE, REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

4,818,673.03

3/24/2010

3/28/2013

MOKOPANE, MAGISTRATE'S OFFICE, RAMP: FOLLOW-ON CONTRACT

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

18,516,513.68

2/9/2007

2/7/2010

BRAY, BORDER POSTS , BOSHOEK AND MAKOPONG: RAMP OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND ELECTRICAL WORK

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

10,319,747.00

8/30/2007

11/30/2010

MANANGA, BORDER POST , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

3,898,927.68

9/6/2010

3/5/2014

GLENCOE, PRISON , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF WATER SEWERAGE SERVICE

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

6,776,392.33

3/19/2010

9/18/2013

NEWCASTLE, EKUSENI YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTRE , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF WATER SEWERAGE SERVICE

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

5,468,679.18

12/8/2010

11/9/2016

MANANGA, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

15,062,097.24

1/28/2011

7/14/2016

RAMATLABAMA, BRAY AND MAGOBISTAD, BORDER POSTS , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

17,411,120.42

1/25/2011

7/14/2016

SWARTKOP, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

3,340,148.70

3/11/2011

11/10/2016

KOSI BAY, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

20,234,569.08

12/11/2013

3/15/2017

SKILPADHEK, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

11,898,484.38

2/3/2012

10/4/2017

MAHAMBA, BOTHASHOOP AND EMAHLATHINI, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

7

FINAL DELIVERY

5,721,845.82

12/17/2008

12/19/2011

KROONSTAD, PRISON , FOLLOW ON CONTRACT:REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE OF CIVIL WORKS, ROAD, STORMWATER AND SERVICES

7

FINAL DELIVERY

7,986,888.56

9/29/2010

5/28/2012

ZONDERWATER, PRISON , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF WATER SEWERAGE SERVICE

7

FINAL DELIVERY

15,612,816.42

1/30/2012

1/31/2017

MASERU BRIDGE, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL INSTALLATIONS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

6A

PRACTICAL COMPLETION

37,328,167.98

6/23/2016

10/22/2019

RAMATLABAMA, KOPFONTEIN AND DERDEPOORT, BORDER POSTS , 36 MONTH MAINTENANCE, SERVICE AND REPAIR OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL INSTALLATIONS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

5B

CONSTRUCTION

67,023,061.83

10/20/2016

 

BEIT BRIDGE, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

34,725,058.92

6/23/2016

 

GROBLERS BRIDGE AND STOCKPOORT, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

19,638,243.06

3/30/2016

 

BRAY, MOGOBISTAD AND SWARTKOPFONTEIN, BORDER POSTS , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

30,216,992.15

1/23/2017

 

BORDER POS , BORDER POSTS , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

36,362,828.52

3/3/2017

 

SKILPADHEK, BORDER POST , 36 MONTHS REPAIRS MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

37,176,843.50

3/18/2020

 

BEIT BRIDGE, BORDER POSTS , BEITBRIDGE BORDERLINE BASE: (PHASE 1) SANDF 40KM BORDERLINE FENCE INFRASTRUCTURE AND INSTALLATION ON THE BORDERS BETWEEN ZIMBABWE AND RSA

5B

CONSTRUCTION

16,466,905.20

7/7/2020

 

LPOE: BOESMANSHOEK, ONGELUKSNEK AND RAMATSELISO APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND INSTALLATIONS FOR A 36 PERIOD MONTHS

30 October 2020 - NW2186

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether (a) the SA Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the SA Sports Trust and (c) any national federation pay any amounts to financial consultants; if so, what (i) are the full names of the financial consultants, (ii) amounts do the entities pay per month and (iii) total amount paid does each specified entity pay to each specified consultant? NW2755E

Reply:

a) SA Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee indicated that they do not utilize the services of Financial Consultants

b) The Sports Trust indicated that they do not utilize the services of Financial Consultants. They have a full time Accountant and Assistant Accountant to manage the day-to-day financial functions of The Sports Trust.

c) The following is the status from the federations that responded;

Federations

Responses

Badminton South Africa (Badminton SA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Canoeing South Africa (Canoeing SA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Cricket South Africa (CSA)

Cricket South Africa indicated that they use consultants for the elite part of pathway (National Teams and High Performance Programme). Nothing from the grant received from the Sports Ministry on Hubs and Development of Girls / Women is used on consultants

Darts South Africa (DSA)

Indicated that DSA does not utilize financial consultants

Karate South Africa (KSA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Lifesaving South Africa (LSA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Motorsport South Africa (Motorsport SA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Ringball Association of South Africa (RASA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Roller Sport South Africa (RSSA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Rowing South Africa (Rowing SA)

Rowing South Africa indicated that they do not contract any financial consultants or make any payments to financial consultants

SA Association for the Intellectually Impaired (SAAII)

Sasa-II Indicated that they do not use services of financial consultants

South African Amateur Fencing Association (SAAFA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

South African Body Building Federation

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

South African Confederation of Cue Sport (SACCS)

SACCS indicated that they do not pay any amounts to financial consultants

South African Ice Hockey Association (SAIHA)

Indicated that they do not make use of any financial consultants

South African Korfball Federation (SAKF)

South African Korfball Federation indicated that they do not engage any consultants

South African Powerlifting Federation (SAPF)

SA Powerlifting Federation indicated that they do not pay amounts to financial consultants

South African Rugby Union (SARU)

Indicated that they do not procure the services of financial consultants

South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB)

The South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB) indicated that they do not pay any amounts to any financial consultants

South African Tug-of War Federation (SATWF)

The South African Tug-of-War Federation indicated that they do not utilise financial consultants, nor do they pay any consulting fees to consultants

South African Weightlifting Federation (SAWF)

South African Weightlifting indicated that they do not make use of consultants

Squash South Africa (Squash SA)

Squash indicated that they do not pay any consultants. Their Treasurer is an accountant and has his own firm. He does not receive an Honorarium from the Federation

30 October 2020 - NW2302

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

2. What are the reasons that the money from Relief Fund was reduced from R20,000.00 to R2,200.00 (b) why did some artists receive R53,000.00; 3. whether he stated on 3 August 2020 that the rationale of expanded public works rate structure is used to determine the R2, 200, 00; (b) if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, why is the allocated amount R2, 200.00 and not at least R3, 000.00- R3, 500.00 per month when the government self-stipulated that the minimum wage is the bare minimum living wage of R3, 500.00.

Reply:

(1).     a) There was a difference in approach between the first wave and the second wave of the Covid-19 Relief Funding. In the first wave the amounts were based on loss of confirmed income by art practitioners and this was capped at R20 000, 00 per application to accommodate the demand. The second wave approach was open to all arts practitioners regardless of whether they had confirmed gigs or not. The intention was to reach as many art practitioners as possible in an attempt to respond to the outcry from the sector that, many did not have the opportunity in the first wave due to the indicated criteria.

b) The first wave Relief Fund had two categories, first was for loss of income and the second was for new digital solutions projects. The loss of income category was capped at R20,000.00 and the new Digital Solutions projects at R75 000,00 per application. In administering all approved Digital Solutions applications the disbursement of funds was divided into two tranches. All applicants awarded the maximum of R75 000,00 grant received R53,000,00 as the first tranche and R22,000,00 as second tranche. This accounts for the figure in question.

(2).    Yes.  The EPWP guidelines for wages were used with slight adjustments. That is, R100 per day on a 22-day month period. It is to be noted that this was not remuneration as no work or services were performed by the applicants. In this case, the Department’s intention was to, within the available resources, provide relief to as many practitioners as was anticipated due to the relaxation of criteria. 

30 October 2020 - NW1925

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and RuralDevelopment

What (a) is her department doing to ensure 2019 winners of Youth in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Awards (i) receive their prize money and (ii) on what date will the prize money be paid out and (b) what has been the cause for the delay in paying out the prize money to the winners?

Reply:

(a)(i) It is regrettable that of the 8 winners,5 will not receive their prize money. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development sought approval from National Treasury for the shifting of funds to effect payment of the prize money, but the request was declined and National Treasury further advised the Department to discontinue annual prize awards hosted by the Department due to fiscal constraints. Therefore, the Department is in the process of procuring agricultural equipment and production inputs for the remaining 5 winners of the 2019 #Youth in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Awards (YAFF) who did not receive prize money. Of the 5 outstanding prize payments, one of the winners already received his equipment on 19 August 2020.

(ii) No prize money will be paid out to the remaining winners; instead they will receive equipment and agricultural production inputs. The procurement processfor equipment and agricultural production inputs for the remaining 4 winners is at an advanced stage and the Department anticipates concluding the procurement process for the remaining winners by 30 November 2020.

(b) Falls away. Please refer to (a)(i) above.

30 October 2020 - NW2267

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What (a) role does his department have in the process of accrediting basketball coaches, (b) is the Basketball Association of South Africa doing to develop and accredit basketball coaches in the Republic and (c)(i) total number of black coaches are currently accredited and/or are affiliated with the Basketball Association of South Africa and (ii) areas are the basketball coaches from?

Reply:

(a). The Department supports the Federation by providing Basketball South Africa with Financial Support for capacity building programs towards training of coaches programs across the country through our Provincial Associations working with Provincial Departments.

(b). Basketball SA indicated that the Federation has National and Provincial Accredited Facilitators from Basketball's world governing body, Federation of International Basketball (FIBA) to train and accredit coaches who are ready for all Level 1 up to an International coaching license. Basketball South Africa through its National Coaching Commission trains coaches at district and provincial levels with the assistance of Provincial Department of Sport Arts and Culture. During the Lockdown, FIBA organised virtual coaching sessions and at least 50 of the coaches both Men and Women had an opportunity to participate in these sessions. In this capacity building program of coaches, schoolsport coaches are also provided with an opportunity to be trained.

c)(i) Basketball SA further indicated that there are 350 trained black coaches currently involved in active coaching of clubs, schools and universities. (ii) The coaches are situated in all nine provinces including previously disadvantaged communities, coaching clubs, schools and universities.

29 October 2020 - NW2391

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Health

What plans does he have in place to ensure that the communities of Tlhabane, between Delareyville and Vryburg in North West, have unrestricted access to health services, in view of the fact that the mobile clinic service visits the specified communities only twice a month?

Reply:

The village mentioned as Tlhabane could not be identified in this area, between Delareyville and Vryburg as stated in this Question. There is however a village called Broedesput in the area. Tlhabane is a township in Rustenburg in Bojanala District. Broedesput is a village between Delareyville and Vryburg and has a population of 780. Initially, this village was part of Ngaka Modiri Molema (NMM) District but it was redemarcated into Naledi Sub-district in Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District.

Given the population size, there is no fixed health structure in this area, but the community is serviced through mobile clinic from both Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati (Naledi Sub District) and NMM,which services are delivered as follows:

1. Mobile clinic from Naledi Sub-district visits the area fortnightly, twice a week each fortnight; The first day of the visit is focused on the youth and children and the second day is dedicated for Chronic health services;

2. Mobile clinic from NNM visit the area once a month; and

3. The Medical Officer from Naledi Sub-district assisted by a Professional Nurse also visit the area twice a month.

The latest patient headcounts are as follows:

MONTH

NALEDI HEADCOUNT

NMM MOBILE CLINIC

July

362

45

August

202

41

September

201

37

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2402

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How will she ensure that immediate measures are taken by her department to limit the use of consultant firms in compiling financial statements in municipalities in order to reduce unnecessary expenditure?

Reply:

Capacity gap is one of the root causes for use of consultants by municipalities. The Department is in the process of promulgating Municipal Staff Regulations, which set out uniform standards for staff members below the senior management level. The regulations includes amongst others:

    • Providing a governance framework for appointment of municipal employees with the necessary technical and professional skills;
    • Incorporates a competency framework occupational classes in local government that regulates minimum standards for recruitment, selection, appointment, performance management laying the basis for skills audit and skills development programmes.

In addition, the Department will roll out a training in 2020/21 financial year on the implementation of Municipal Staff Regulations.

While the Department focus on the governance and institutional matters that seeks to address capacity gap, the National Treasury provides measures and capacity building to municipalities on financial reporting including preparation of annual financial statements.

I THANK YOU.

29 October 2020 - NW2497

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has any plans to employ community healthcare workers on a permanent basis at B J Vorster Hospital, in Kareedouw; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has assessed the impact of the 16 community healthcare workers who were employed at the hospital on a temporary basis; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health,

1. Community Health Workers (CHWs) at BJ Vorster Hospital in Kareedouw in the Eastern Cape Province were employed on a temporary basis for a fixed term contract to specifically capacitate the Health Services to respond to the additional demand for services due to Covid-19 at the Hospital. These CHWs were contracted with funding for Covid-19, of which the term will end on 31 March 2021.Assessment of anyfurther employment of these CHWs will be conducted towards the end of their contract and a decision will be taken then, which would also be guided by the availability of funding.

2. Performance of CHWs in the Province is continuously being assessed and this includes the 16 CHWs contracted at BJ Vorster Hospital and necessary support is provided to ensure that their performance is of acceptable standards, since CHWs play a critical support function in the management of Covid-19 in the Province.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2417

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What progress has been made to fill the important vacant positions of hospital management in Gauteng after such staff were implicated in alleged corruption related to the procurement of personal protective equipment; (2) whether the implicated officials have been officially charged for their misconduct; if not, what are the reasons for this; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Gauteng Provincial Department of Health confirms that there are alleged corruption implications laid against some Hospital managers in the Gauteng Health Department related to the procurement of personal protective equipment. However, investigations are still underway by the Security Agencies. The Hospital Managers are still occupying the posts and therefore no process to fill the posts has commenced yet. It should be noted that in accordance with the Public Service Regulations, only vacant funded posts can be advertised to be filled.

2. The implicated officials have not yet been officially charged because the investigations are still proceeding and no further details can be provided to safeguard the interest of the investigation process.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2404

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What are the mechanisms that her department has put in place to ensure that the City of Ekurhuleni is supported and its capacity strengthened to manage and pay its water bill in full for each month since 1 July 2020? NW2998E

Reply:

The Provincial CoGTA Department together with Gauteng Provincial Treasury has already set up a Government Debt Management Committee. The objectives of the Committee are to fast-track payment of monies owed to Municipalities by National and Provincial Government Department. The committee meets on a quarterly basis and the National CoGTA plays an oversight. The Government Debt Management Committee comprises of at least:

  • Official representatives of all owing National and Provincial Departments
  • Debt Managers from Parastatals (Rand Water, Eskom, Prasa, Telkom and Transnet),
  • Revenue Managers from all Municipalities.

The Provincial CoGTA Department is planning to deploy revenue experts specifically within the City to assist the City to facilitate the integration of Revenue Enhancement and Debtor Management. Furthermore, the experts will develop Integrated Revenue enhancement and debtor Management and support its implementation. The Municipality is paying within 30 days as per the legislative definition of a current account.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2500

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Health

(a) On what date will he ensure that the Reivilo Clinic in the North West has (i) a sufficient number of nurses and (ii) enough medicine and (b) how is the specified clinic expected to operate without nurses and medicine?

Reply:

(a) (i) A sufficient number of nurses

We can confirm today that Reivilo Community Health Centre (CHC) has ten (10) professional nurses. These include eight (8) permanent nurses and two (2) community service professional nurses. The headcount for 2019/2020 was 18,722 and the headcount seen by professional nurses is 17,722. The workload per professional nurses is 11.9 per day. The headcount for the year 2020/2021 (April – September 2020) is 8,506. The workload is nine (9). The workload per professional nurse to date is 9 clients/professional nurse per day. The normal workload per professional nurses is 25 clients per day. This means that Reivilio CHC has sufficient number of nurses

(ii) Enough medicine

The availability of medicines as at 26 October 2020 was 94% against a target of 80%. This is regarded as enough medicines in terms of drug availability and Stock Availability System (SVS).

b) Based on the above workload the number of professional nurses and 80% medicine availability, at Reivilo CHC will be able to operate well to render quality health services.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2362

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the Level 1 lockdown regulations to curb the spread of Covid-19, what are the reasons that day students travelling between Eswatini and the Republic are not required to undergo Covid-19 tests but weekly boarders do?

Reply:

Yes, daily students travelling from Eswatini are not required to produce COVID-19 test results as they are screened daily on arrival and departure through the point of entry by health officials to determine if they are experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Weekly learners are taken through the same screening protocol at the border, however this is conducted once weekly on entry and departure. As the weekly learners do not travel daily, a health official is not in a position to detect whether or not they are symptomatic during their weekly stay. Should a student potentially become symptomatic during their weekly stay, this may result in further transmission as well as importation of COVID-19 as they would not have undergone the daily screening by a health official. It is important to also note that the Department of Basic Education has issued a directive  that all schools conduct daily screening of  learners so both day students and weekly boarders are screened.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2388

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has a system in place to scrutinise the quality of personal protective equipment in all (a) hospitals and (b) clinics; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) where do healthcare workers report quality issues and (b) how does his department intervene when such grievances are raised by healthcare workers?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Health in collaboration with South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) and the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA), the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) set the quality standards for the various personal protective equipment items. Each province is responsible for ensuring that the quality standards of PPE procured are maintained. The National Department of Health has also supported the provinces with availing a Policy on Respiratory Protective Equipment and a list of PPE specifications that provinces can utilise to guide the PPE procurement process. In addition, PPE quality assurance training was conducted for provinces. The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) also provides support to the manufacturers and distributors in respect of applicable standards and conformity assessments to assist them to prepare for the licensing and approval processes. The Department of Health intends to approach National Treasury to seek approval for single sourcing of Quality Assurance Companies to undertake assessment of the PPE procured and to be delivered in all health care facilities for quality assessment. This will ensure that such PPE is of acceptable quality and standards. This intervention will be executed in line with or in compliance to section 79 of the Public Finance Management Act, which allows organs of state to apply for deviations from open competitive bidding process based on good grounds and urgency of this matter in protecting health care workers. This is to further ensure that health care workers are provided with PPE that is complaint to standards and quality requirements subject to concurrence and approval of National Treasury.

2. Each province, district and facility have Occupational Health and Safety Committees that since 1 October 2020 are verifying the availability of PPE reported by health facilities on the Stock Visibility System on a weekly basis. The Occupational Health and Safety grievance processes are followed at a local level and escalated accordingly.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2398

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) total number of the suppliers of the government-wide Covid-19 tender were unlicensed by the SA Health Products Regulator to provide medical devices therefore not subject to regulatory oversight and (b) are the names of the specified suppliers and their board of directors; (2) (a) what total number of the unlicensed suppliers supplied class A low risk and class B low-moderate risk medical devices and (b) did any unlicensed suppliers provide class B medical devices to hospitals; (3) whether any amendments to procurement guidelines and medical regulations were made to facilitate the awarding of contracts to unlicensed providers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures were taken to ensure that the amendments were monitored and enforced?

Reply:

(1) (a) The awarding of tenders to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for COVID-19 does not fall within the mandate of the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) therefore, SAHPRA does not have record of the unlicensed suppliers in this regard. SAHPRA publishes a list of licence holders who are authorised to manufacture, distribute (including import and export) and wholesale medical devices and in-vitro medical devices (IVDs). This list is available on the SAHPRA website which can be accessed at this address: www.sahpra.org.za

(b) SAHPRA does not have record of the names of government-wide unlicensed suppliers for PPE tenders and their Board of Directors.

(2) (a)-(b) Not applicable to SAHPRA. The Entity does not have record of unlicensed suppliers who were awarded tenders to supply Class A and Class B medical devices to hospitals.

(3) There were no amendments made to the guidelines and regulations made in terms of the Medicines and Related Substances Act, 1965 (Act 101 of 1965) as amended, to facilitate the awarding of contracts to unlicensed providers. SAHPRA has published a series of communication documents during the pandemic to communicate the existing regulatory requirements and processes to stakeholders in accordance with SAHPRA’s mandate.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2389

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of complaints have been lodged with the Health ProfessionsCouncil of South Africa against a certain doctor (name and details furnished), (b) are the details of each complaint, (c) number of the specified complaints resulted in an investigation that included, but was not limited to, site visits to his practice to verify that he maintains proper patient records that are in line with his medical fees and treatments he claims to provide, (d) number of the complaints resulted in him being charged and (e) were the outcomes of each complaint?

Reply:

a) Four (4) complaints were lodged against Dr Pretorius;

b) The details of each complaint are as follows:

    1. Complications following cancer treatment;
    2. Incompetence;
    3. Use of off-label insulin to treat cancer; and
    4. Negligence related to cancer treatment: allegations of misrepresentation as a cancer treatment doctor and further investigation related to whether the amount of R400,000.00 charged over a period of 7 months was in line with the treatment provided.

c) All the complaints were investigated but the investigations did not include a site visit to his practice;

d) Below is the list of cases and (e) the outcomes of each complaintare as follows:

Case

Outcome

(i) Complications following cancer treatment

The complaint was withdrawn in Feb 2020 at Inquiry by the complainant. File closed

(ii) Incompetence

At Inquiry awaiting an expert opinion and the matter will be set down for a hearing

(iii) Use of off-label insulin to treat cancer

Inquiry matter. Hearing set down for February 2021

(iv) Negligence

Matter under investigation. Lodged in Oct 2020

END.