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06 November 2020 - NW2406

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) In view of a recent letter, dated 9 October 2020, and signed by more than 350 scientists and conservationists from 40 countries, which calls for global action to protect whales, dolphins and porpoises from extinction and specifically calls on countries like South Africa where there are whales, to take precautionary measures to ensure that these species are being protected from human activities, and to work with regional fishing bodies to ensure that overfishing does not impact whales, what precautionary measures does her department intend b take to ensure(a) the long-term survival of whales and (b) that whales have sufficient access to food during their migration to their breeding grounds; (2) how will her department work together with local fishing authorities to ensure that (a) there is a framework for sustainability and (b) the specified policy framework is adhered to?

Reply:

(a) Whales are fully protected in South African waters. Legal instruments are in place to ensure the long-term survival of whales, including the following:

The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004). In the Threatened or Protected Marine Species Regulations, whales are listed as a threatened or protected species. In terms of these regulations, certain aMvitl99 are prohibited, such as hunting, catching, killing, capturing, importing or exporting of a listed species. Human activities around whales are also regulated.


The National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Amendment Act, 2014 (Act No. 21 of 2014) which enables the establishment of marine protected areas to provide sanctuaries for all marine species.

South Africa is also a signatory or party to various international treaties that promote the protection of whales, including Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources(CCMALR) and the International Whaling Commission.

These legal instrument provide optimum conditions for all whale species to recover from past unsustainable whaling practices. In addition, South African re9earcheo play a leading role in international science forums aimed at determining the food requirements of top predators such as whales and setting measures to ensure adequate access to their prey.

(b) Whales eat a variety of prey within South African marine waters and at traditional feeding grounds in the Southern Ocean. In general, whales feed in the polar waters and breed in warmer waters. Feeding time is therefore typically spent away from South Africa in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic waters. The Southern Ocean is managed by agreement, including the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). South Africa is an active member and contributes to deliberations on conservation of the Southern Ocean.

  1. (a) The South African policy and legal framework protects all whale species. The Department plays a meaningful role in International Conventions and Regional Fisheries Management Organisations to ensure that all fisheries are sustainable and that the environment is protected.

(b) The existing policy and legal framework to protect whales is currently being implemented and compliance and enforcement initiatives are in place to aid protection of our marine species.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 6/11/2020

06 November 2020 - NW2450

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What is the total amount of Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) funding that has been irregularly paid to public servants who were not eligible for TERS funding because they continued to receive their full salaries throughout the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus; (2) how will he (a) recoup and (b) hold public servants accountable who irregularly applied for and/or received TERS money meant to support struggling private sector enterprises and workers?

Reply:

Type

Total exceptions

Total amount

Possible Double Dipping - PERSAL

9 494

R 41 009 737.70

Possible Double Dipping - SANDF

78

R 327 638.36

Total

9 572

41 337 376.06

2. The matter is under investigation by the UIF Fraud Unit as well as the SIU and based on the investigation recommendations, the recovery process will be initiated by UIF. In addition, possible criminal cases and internal disciplinary cases can be instituted

06 November 2020 - NW2457

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1995 on 11 September 2020 in relation to the setting of the 2020 trophy hunting quota of 50 elephant, what are the scientific reasons and/or scientific evidence to support the trophy hunting quota of 50 elephant; (2) whether she, when approving the quota, considered the scientific data that shows that removing older male elephant, parlicula8y through trophy hunting has a disastrous impact on the species as a whole; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) on what basis is the 2020 quota of 50 elephants allocated for each province; (3) what (a) is the 2020 elephant trophy hunting quota for each province and (b) are the 9cientific masons and/or scientific evidence for the specific provinces b be allocated with an elephant hunting quota?

Reply:

(1)  The 2020 trophy hunting quota for elephants was set at 106 elephants. However, on average only 50 bulls are hunted annually. Globally, elephant as listed on the IUCN Red List as "Vulnerable“. In South Attica, the species is listed on the regional Red List as “Least Concern"

The national elephant population for South Africa is increasing, and estimated at approximately 30,000 individuals, of which an estimated 24,000 individuals occur within national and provincial reserves collectively, in seven of the nine provinces of South Africa.

The elephant population of South Africa is well managed and activities related to elephants are regulated through the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act 10 of 2004 (NEMBA), specifically the Threatened or Protected Species Regulations (TOPS Regulations), the National Norms and Standards for the Management of Elephants in South Africa (Government Gazette no. 30833), and respective provincial conservation legislation. In addition, local protocols managing elephant trophy hunting, taking into consideration the role of mature bulls, are in place in many areas were t trophy hunting of elephants take place in South Africa. South Africa has an annual national Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) trophy hunting quota of 150 elephants (300 tusks). In managing this quota, provinces are required to conduct calculations of their annual provincial level off-takes. These provincial off-takes are then collated to provide for a national quota.

On a provincial level, the quota is calculated by estimating the total elephant population within the province, multiplied by 19› to obtain the off-take quota for the specific province. Trophy hunting of elephants within South Africa is limited and the allocated annual quota is often not fully utilised. Therefore, trophy hunting is considered as having a negligible impact on elephant populations in South Africa. The 1% trophy hunting off-take is much lower than the average growth rate of the national elephant population.

(2) The study by Elephants for Africa and the University of Exeter, on "The Importance of Old Bulls: Leaders and Followers In Collective Movement of All-Male Groups In African Savannah Elephant", was recently published in September 2020, whereas the determination of the 2020 quota was made prior to the results of the said study. The department and the Provincial Scientific Authority will consider the key findings of the study in making determination of hunting quota for elephant in the future.

However, given the population numbers and the low number of elephant bulls' trophy hunted per annum the impact on populations is likely to be negligible. The Allen e/ at. (2020) study highlights that the off take (trophy hunting) of older mature bulls (considered bulls over 26 years of age) not only removes the prime breeders, but also removes individuals with a central ‹ale in the male society.

In South Africa the majority of bulls hunted are over the age of 50 years and nearing senescence, thus no longer bleeding. It is acknowledged that mature older bulls do play an important role in bull society. However, where low numbers of mature bulls and specifically those nearing senescence are hunted the impact on the population aa a whole and the bull society is likely to be negligible. In addition, elephant have evolved to cope with natural mortalities taking place, with the natural mortality rate of older mature bulls at approximately 1% per annum.

A study conducted by Burke et al, (2008) evaluating the risk and ethical concerns of hunting male elephant has indicated that all responses measured were minor and that the hunting of male elephant in South Africa is ethically acceptable when considering effects on the remaining elephant population. The authors recommended that bulls should be hunted when alone. This recommendation has been captured in the Norms and Standards for Management of Elephant in South Africa

(3) (a) The table below indicates the 2020 elephant trophy hunting quota for each province:
 

Province

Quota No.

Eastern Cape Province

3 Elephants (06 Tusks)

Free State Provinc

0

Gauteng Province

0

KwaZulu-Natal Provinc

15 Elephant(30 Tusks)

Limpopo Province

50 Elephant (100 Tusks)

Mpumalanga Province

40 Elephants (80 Tusks)

North West Province

0

Northern Cape Province

0

Western Cape Province

0

TOTAL

108 Elephants (216 Tusks)


b. See the response to question 1 above

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 6/11/2020

(#)

06 November 2020 - NW2301

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to an overall decrease of 3% on the Traditional Affairs budget allocation in February this year and a further decrease of R2, 1 million, what has she found to be the reasons behind the specified further decrease?

Reply:

There was no overall decrease of 3% on the Traditional Affairs budget allocation in February this year. However, as part of the 2020 Special Adjustment, in June an amount of R3 million was suspended from the allocation of the Department. This was for purposes of supporting the COVID-19 macro-economic stimulus response.

End.

06 November 2020 - NW2455

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Whether, with reference to the 2017 decision by Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs that the game animals, which were the subject of the R183million irregular donation of game animals through the SA Rare Game Breeders Association to so-called politically connected private game farm owners, be returned to the North West Province and the repatriation costs be funded by certain person (name and details furnished), the game animals with their progeny have been returned in full; if not, (a) what number of animals have in fact been returned and (b) on what date are the remaining animals expected to be returned; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified person refunded the cost of the repatriation as instructed; if not, what action has been taken to ensure the recovery of the costs; (3) whether the SA Police Service and/or any other judicial body have been requested to investigate the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the results of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

(1),(2) and (3) The management of the environment and protection of natural resources is a concurrent function between the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries and Provincial Departments responsible for matters related to the environment, Therefore, the issues raised in this question fall within the jurisdiction of the North West Provincial Department of Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism. In View of this it is recommended that the matter be referred to the relevant Member of Executive Council (MEC) responsible for environmental affairs in the North West Province.

Regards
MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 6/11/2020
 

06 November 2020 - NW2192

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What type of support was provided to Learners with Special Educational Needs during the lockdown in each province?

Reply:

Eastern Cape: 

  • Radio lesson schedules were developed and broadcasts included: 2 National Radio Stations;  14 Community Radio Stations; and 1 On-Line Radio Station
  • Broadcast for e-School underway.  Access via the following link: rtmp://197.242.147.204/live/2e1 
  • Grade 12 Tips for Success, Mind the Gap study guides and past exam papers all uploaded and available on ECDoE website.
  • Access viawww.ecdoe.gov.za.  Click on Learners’ Support Menu or www.eccurriculum.co.za

Gauteng: 

  • Provided autumn camp support material to all learners.
  • Created an e-platform containing learning materials.
  • Radio broadcast: using community radio stations.
  • Created WhatsApp groups for learners/ teachers and subject advisors
  • Weekly reports were provided to the provincial Command Centre on the readiness of the Special Schools to receive learners.
  • The GDE COVID-19 steering committee had a representative from the disability sector. This enabled direct reporting and requesting progress on support required.
  • National guideline documents were contextualised for Special Schools to facilitate effective and efficient implementation. 
  • Special Schools were supported with the restructuring of timetables and transport routes.
  • Youth Brigade members were deployed in Special Schools to assist with the activities regarding the containment of the COVID-19.
  • Virtual or on-site school visits, monitoring and supporting school readiness were conducted from provincial level. 
  • The Inclusion and Special Schools Directorate updated and added links to support Special Schools offering the Differentiated CAPS for learners with Severe Intellectual Disabilities, the Technical Occupational Curriculum and the Learning Programme for Learners with Profound Intellectual Disabilities.  This included curriculum content and lesson plans: 
  • Technical Occupational Stream: https://education.gauteng.gov.za/Pages/Technical-Occupational-Curriculum-for-Special-Schools.aspx  
  • NCS CAPS for SID: https://education.gauteng.gov.za/Pages/DCAPS-Gr-R-5-Severe-Intellectual-Disabilities.aspx
  • Learning Programme for PID: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1QQgJUt1ZcqMqViyKmwdWa-dbjA2zLBau?usp=sharing

KwaZulu-Natal: 

  • Distributed lesson plans, in video format, to all schools for the Deaf. The province has also secured slot for broadcasting lessons in the local radio stations, including Ukhozi FM. 
  • Created the eFunda Portal with online resources;
  • Print media utilised to support learning home;
  • Radio broadcast programme/Comprehensive Schedule.

North West: 

  • Parents were kept up to date on school contamination and provision of personal protective equipment upon return of learners.
  • An audit of learners who would be or not returning to school was undertaken.
  • Parents were encouraged to take learners to hospitals and clinics for their appointments.
  • Parents were advised to contact schools for guidance and support on how to access therapeutic services.
  • The Department collaborated with the Department of Health regarding the rendering of therapeutic services for learners while they were at home.
  • A Facebook page was created to support learners by transversal itinerant outreach teams. 
  • Google Classroom was used to support learners with co-morbidity. 
  • Arrangements were made for parents to collect learning materials, assistive devices and instructions from schools. 
  • Western Cape: 
  • Made available revision programme for 12 subjects available in English and Afrikaans.
  • Created a one-pager guideline for all subjects indicating what should be done, distributed to parents and teachers and learners.
  • Telematics Broad Cast lessons: Register all grade 10- 12 learners in the country; Access through live streaming; Have all past recorded lessons (Grade 10-12)
  • All subject advisers – created WhatsApp groups with teachers.
  • WCED portal was loaded with comprehensive set of resources for each subject.
  • Autism Western Cape have also made resources available for parents and caregivers and these were obtainable at https://www.autismwesterncape.org.za/services-resources/ . These were videos that explained the contents of the booster box/packs that they had developed. There was also a booklet for reference by parents and caregivers. Working with Autism South Africa, Autism Western Cape were able to send the available booster boxes to parents.
  • Set up a Facebook page for “Real South African Sign Language”, and at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePDwWPAwFXo&t=6s, containing free lessons for the lockdown period.
  • Resources for children with autism spectrum disorder were made available to parents at  https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times.Teachers .
  • With reference to the Schools of Skills, in which the Technical Occupational Stream is being piloted, a shared folder on Google Drive was shared with all principals of these schools.
  • Sent video clips with activities via WhatsApp to parents and guardians. In addition, the PED created a WhatsApp resource bank, to which each of the members of the transversal outreach itinerant teams is linked. All available resources for this category of learners were shared with members in this group.

06 November 2020 - NW2451

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of applicants who received the Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme payments between 1 April 2020 and 30 September 2020 as (i) applicants below the legal age of employment, (ii) applicants with the same identity number as Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) employees, (iii) deceased individuals, (iv) individuals in prison, (v) individuals with invalid identity numbers, (vi) applicants who received benefits from other state institutions, including remuneration and (vii) applicants with the same banking details as UIF employees and (b) is the total quantum of payments in each category?

Reply:

Type

Total

Total amount

Below legal age of employment

53

224 677.43

(i) Applicants below the legal age of employment:

(ii) Applicants with the same identity number as Unemployment Insurance Fund

Type

Total

Total amount

Applicant's ID numbers same as UIF employee

1

4 027.45

(iii) Deceased individuals:

Type

Total

Total amount

Deceased

113

441 144.34

Type

Total

Total amount

Inmates

26

R 129 242.64

(iv) Individuals in prison:

(v) Individuals with invalid identity numbers:

Type

Total

Total amount

Invalid ID numbers

4 161

R 30 071 248.84

(vi) Applicants who received benefits from other state institutions, including remuneration:

Type

Total

Total amount

(SASSA) disability grant

20

69 419.36

(SASSA) Old age grant

22 611

88 814 684.36

(vii) Applicants with the same banking details as UIF employees:

(a) is the total quantum of payments in each category?

Type

Total

Total amount

Applicant's bank details same as UIF employee

4

  1. 613.89

(b) Is the total quantum of payments in each category?

Total amount: R 119 769 058.31

06 November 2020 - NW2449

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of public servants have been identified to have irregularly (a) applied for and (b) benefited from the Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme?

Reply:

Type

Total exceptions

Total amount

Possible Double Dipping - PERSAL

9 494

R 41 009 737.70

Possible Double Dipping - SANDF

78

R 327 638.36

Total

9 572

41 337 376.06

06 November 2020 - NW2452

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of labour centres in the Republic, (b) number of the specified labour centres failed to open when Alert Level 1 of the national lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 came into force on 21 September 2020 and (c) was the reason for the prolonged closure in each specified instance?

Reply:

1. 125

2. None

3. Note applicable

 

06 November 2020 - NW93

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Mrs M Clarke (DA) to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) (a) What are the details of (i) each department that has contracted workers, (ii) the permanent organogram in terms of staff structures of each specified department, (iii) the budget for the relevant permanent positons and (iv) the expenditure for the relevant contracted positions within each department and (b) why are contracted positions established within each department when the staff organogram have vacant funded positions available; (2) What total number of government departments have merged? (3) Whether the staff of the merged departments have been placed; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total number of staff members have not been placed within positions and (b) what does the department intend doing with staff that has not been placed?NW105E

Reply:

(a) (i) In terms of information on PERSAL as at 31 May 2020, 62 581 employees have been appointed on temporary basis. Attached is a breakdown of temporary appointments per department (Annexure A).

(ii) The breakdown from PERSAL as at 31 May 2020 on the permanent organogram in terms of staff structures of each specified department is attached at (Annexure B).

(iii) and (iv) Budget and expenditure details for the relevant contracted positions can be obtained from the National Treasury.

(b) Persons may be employed to contracted positions additional to the establishment of a department based on a temporary need and such appointments are in terms of Regulation 57 (2) where;

  • The incumbent of a post is expected to be absent for such a period that his/her duties cannot be performed by other employees;
  • A temporary increase in work occurs or it is necessary for any other reason to temporarily increase the staff of the department;
  • An employee’s post has been abolished and he or she cannot be transferred into another post; and
  • An employee is part of a development programme as contemplated in regulation 58 (Development Programmes: Internship)

Appointments of this nature are for a period that must not exceed 12 consecutive calendar months.

2. The following 10 departments were merged on 01 April 2020 to coincide with budget appropriations for the 2020/21 financial year:

No.

Departments that Merged

New Merged Departments

1.

Agriculture

Rural Development and Land Reform

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2.

Communications

Telecommunications and Postal Services

Communications and Digital Technologies

3.

Mineral Resources

Energy

Mineral Resources and Energy

4.

Sport and Recreation South Africa

Arts and Culture

Sports, Arts and Culture

5.

Trade and Industry

Economic Developments

Trade, Industry and Competition

3 (a) The process of placement has not yet been concluded. Consultations with organized labour are underway in the affected departments on the matching and placing of the staff of the merged departments. Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 1 of 2019 provides guidelines on the identification, transfer and placement of staff in a transparent, fair and inclusive process.

(b) The agreement provides that excess employees not matched and placed, be held additional to the post establishment. The employer must apply measures to enhance redeployment including training of employees additional to the establishment to meet the requirements of vacant posts.

A National Implementation Task Team comprising of the employer and organised labour under the auspices of the PSCBC will monitor implementation. Departmental Task Teams are established to facilitate the process of matching and placing.

End

05 November 2020 - NW2001

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether lifestyle audits have been conducted for each member of the Cabinet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Consultations on a lifestyle audits framework are ongoing and being finalised.

In the meantime, all members of the Cabinet and Deputy Ministers have submitted the declarations of their financial interests to the Registrar of Executive Interests, the Secretary of the Cabinet, in line with the Executive Members’ Ethics Act and the Executive Ethics Code.

05 November 2020 - NW2171

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he, based on Mr Edwin Sodi’s recent testimony at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, implicating certain Ministers and Deputy Ministers (names and details furnished) as beneficiaries of Mr Sodi’s company (name furnished), intends taking any action against the executive members in accordance with the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998 and the Executive Ethics Code; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he intends to relieve the implicated executive office bearers of their responsibilities as Minister and Deputy Ministers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am aware of the testimony given by Mr Sodi to the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State. No finding has been made by the Commission in this regard. I will apply my mind to any actions that need to be taken once findings and recommendations in this regard are made.

05 November 2020 - NW2396

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether, given that despite the eased regulations the tourism industry remains the hardest hit sector due to the nationwide lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, her department has a plan to implement adjustments in pricing in order to promote local tourism as has become a global trend?

Reply:

The setting of prices falls within the ambit of the private sector. South African Tourism does engage the sector to consider special offers as part of the promotion activities they conduct i.e. Sho’t Left programme. The Minister of Tourism has commenced with a consultation process with the sector on the concept of dual pricing.

05 November 2020 - NW2456

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1995, on 11 September 2020, in relation to the setting of the trophy hunting quota of eleven leopards for 2020, what is (a) the total number of wild leopards in the Republic and (b) their distribution in each province; (2) what (a) is the total number of male Leopards in the age range of seven years and above and (b) is the distribution of male leopards in each province; and (3) (a) chat are the scientific reasons and/or scientific evidence for the decision to set the 2020 national trophy hunting quota at eleven leopards, (b)(i) how and (ii) on what basis is the 2020 quota of eleven leopards allocated per province, (c) what (i) is the 2020 leopard hunting quota for each province and (ii) are the scientific reasons and/or scientific evidence for the specific provinces to be allocated with a leopard hunting quota?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b), (2)(a)(b) and (3)(a)

Subsequent to the publication of the non-detriment finding for leopard in 2015, the Department, in liaison with the Scientific Authority, adopted an adaptive approach to determine the annual leopard hunting quota. Population trend data generated through the South African Leopard
Monitoring Project is used to inform decision making on the annual leopard hunting quota. South Africa ensures that leopard hunting is consistent with the sustainable use principles and that it does not have a detrimental impact on the survival of the leopard in the wild. Hunting of leopards in South Africa is therefore managed through:

Restrictions to designated hunting zones where trends in leopard density indicate that populations are stable or increasing, and

Limits to males older than 7 years, which is likely to have a minimal impact on population trends. This is used as an additional precautionary safeguard.

It is again emphasised that only hunting zones where leopard populations are stable and increasing have been designated as eligible for hunting of leopard. Trends in leopard populations were determined by multi state models fitted to leopard density data that wee collected through the Leopard Monitoring Project at 17 monitoring sites between 2013 and 2019. Data from these sites were used to designate hunting zones. As a precautionary measure, only one leopard can be hunted per eligible hunting zone.

(b)(i)(ii)

The 2020 quote of eleven leopards is a country wide quota and not a quota per province. In other words, the total number of leopards that may be hunted in South Africa in 2020 is eleven (11) and not ninety-nine (99) as inferred by be question. The basis for the allocation of the quota is provided in question 3(a) above.

The table below indicates the allocation of the 2020 leopard hunting quota for each province:

Province

Allocated quota

Eastern Cape Province

0

Free State Province

O

Gauteng Province

0

KwaZulu-Natal Province

0

Limpopo Province

nine (9) male leopards of seven years or older

Mpumalanga Province

O

North West Province

No (2) male leopards of seven years or older

Northern Cape Province

0

Western Cape Province

0

(c)(ii)

The basis for the allocation of the quota is provided in question 1-3 above.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 6/11/2020

05 November 2020 - NW2317

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to clause 1.3 of Chapter 6 of the November 2019 Guide for Members of the Executive and the media statement by his Office on 1 October 2020 , he intends taking any further action against the Minister for failing to comply with the specified guidelines for international travel; if not, why not; if so, what action will he be taking against her for contravening the explicit provisions of the guidelines by undertaking an unauthorised international trip at taxpayer expense; (2) whether he was informed of the passengers who would accompany the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans on her 8 September 2020 trip to Zimbabwe; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a copy of (a) the written request submitted by the Minister and (b) his written letter of approval approving the specified trip; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2890E

Reply:

The international trip undertaken by the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans was approved by me on 8 September 2020. As I was not in Gauteng at the time of the receipt of the request, the approval was verbal and the relevant documentation was signed as soon as possible thereafter.

While the request did not comply with the requirement in the Guide for Members of the Executive that requests should be made at least two weeks prior to departure, this is, unfortunately, not an uncommon occurrence due to the pressures of state work.

I do not intend to take any further action. I deem the reprimand given to the Minister, the directive that three months’ salary be donated to the Solidarity Fund, and the obligation to ensure that the costs of the trip are reimbursed by the political party (which has been done) sufficient sanction.

I was informed that the Minister would be travelling with 2 support staff as listed in her written request for permission to travel to Zimbabwe, submitted to me on 7 September 2020.

The information about the request for permission to travel by the Minister as well as my approval was made public on 1 October 2020, and can be accessed on the Presidency website.

05 November 2020 - NW2257

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his decision to sanction the Minister of Defence, Ms N N Mapisa-Nqakula, by docking her salary for her error in judgement to use a SA Air Force plane to ferry a delegation of the African National Congress to attend party-political meetings in Harare, Zimbabwe from 8 to 9 September 2020, on what statutory grounds did he rely (a) in this regard and (b) when determining that no further action should be taken against the (i) specified Minister for allowing a delegation of the specified political party to use the SA Air Force plane and (ii) specified political party for abusing taxpayer-funded State resources for party-political purposes; (2) whether he intends referring the matter for further investigation to the Special Investigating Unit and/or the SA Police Service in respect of (a) any of the officials from the specified political organisation for contravening any of the applicable regulations and (b) the Minister pertaining to the prohibition on international travel during the national State of Disaster; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether he is satisfied (a) with the Minister’s calculations of the amount owed by the political organisation as reimbursement to the State for being ferried on the flights and (b) that the political organisation has reimbursed the State; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Constitution provides that Ministers serve at the pleasure of the Head of the Executive. Section 91(2) of the Constitution empowers the President to appoint and dismiss them. Assignments to Ministers and decisions on their performance are within the President’s discretion.

I made clear that I disapproved of the Minister’s decision and actions, and therefore I applied the sanction in a manner that I deemed fit for her error in judgment.

As the President of the Republic I have no authority to sanction a political party for their actions. Decisions made within the political party are for the political party to communicate.

I understand that the Public Protector is investigating this matter.

The Department of Home Affairs is responsible for the entry and exit of persons to and from the Republic and for investigating if anything untoward occurred with respect to their responsibilities.

As the Honourable Member would be aware, not all international travel was prohibited during the period in question. Repatriation flights, travel by diplomats, travel by investors or business persons (after seeking due permission) was allowed.

The account of the costs involved was submitted to me, and to the Public Protector and made public, as was confirmation of payment by the political party in question, and I have no reason to doubt their accuracy.

05 November 2020 - NW2062

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, given the high demand for skilled medical professionals in the Republic, the small number of available seats at the South African tertiary institutions to train medical professionals, the current dire plight of South African foreign qualified medical doctors in obtaining accreditation through the Health Professions Council of South Africa, after having been forced to seek professional medical qualifications outside the Republic and the oral reply of the Minister of Health to question 379 on 2 September 2020 offering little chance of a resolution, he will intervene and instruct that an urgent meeting be convened between all interested parties in the hope of reaching an amicable and prompt resolution of the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There is a high demand for skilled medical professionals in South Africa, as there is in most countries globally.

To address this problem, Government has, among other interventions, ensured the expansion of the training platform in South African medical schools and has increased the number of doctors graduating from South African universities.

Additionally, Government also increased the intake of students studying medicine within the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Programme (NMFC), through an agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba. The programme has since added a total of 2,498 medical doctors to our health workforce in the public health sector, and is expected to add a further 649 by January 2021.

With reference to the “South African foreign qualified medical doctors”referred to by the Honourable Member, I am advised thatthis concerns citizens who hold foreign qualifications, are not registered as medical practitioners under a foreign registering authority, have not completed training as interns and therefore are not meeting all requirements for registration.

In other words, these citizens are foreign-qualified medical graduates. They are not registered as medical practitioners or doctors in the countries where they have received their medical education.

To assist these medical graduates to get clinical exposure and to complete training as interns, the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) on 24 June 2020 approved the pathway that was referred to in the oral reply of the Minister of Health to Question 379 on 2 September 2020.

I am advised by the Minister of Health that the HPCSA Pathway is in line with the 2018 Policy Guidelines issued by the National Department of Health.

This will assist citizens who are qualified outside South Africa and are not, or were not, registered with a foreign registering authority and have not completed training as interns with a smooth integration into the South African healthcare system.

In view of the above, there is no need for my intervention.

05 November 2020 - NW94

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department has specified criteria or policies in place with regard to the number of officials employed in the Public Service who should attend committee meetings in the Parliament of the Republic of South Africa; if not, (a) why not and (b) what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details and (ii) has he found that the specified criteria has proven cost effective in respect of the outcomes achieved with regard to effective accountability?

Reply:

(a) Yes, the Department of Public Service and administration has specified criteria in place regarding the number of officials who should attend the committee meetings in the Parliament of the Republic of South Africa.

(b)(i) The criteria for attending committee meetings in Parliament is included in the departmental Travel Policy which states the following “The number of employees attending official engagement on the same matter must be limited to 3 employees from the department. If the number exceeds 3, approval must be obtained from the Accounting Officer. The Accounting Officer, Deputy Directors-General or employees holding an equivalent rank, Ministerial advisors appointed in terms of section 12A of the Public Service Act and other EXCO members reporting directly to the Accounting Officer, people performing Parliamentary duty and the Chairperson and Secretary to the Public Service Remuneration Review Commission (PSSRS) do not contribute to the three (3) employees mentioned above.”

END

04 November 2020 - NW2102

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of the (a) sources of the funds and (b) progress made to obtain the funding required for the implementation of the business rescue plan of the SA Airways (SAA) that was approved by the SAA creditors on 14 July 2020?

Reply:

a) Various sources of funding are being considered including the strategic equity partner, application for funding from Government through the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework process, approaching Development Financial Institutions and Commercial Banks.

b|) The process has reached an advanced stage, which we will be able to announce in due course. Due to the sensitive nature of these negotiations we are unable to pronounce at this stage.

04 November 2020 - NW2134

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a)What financial payments that were requested have been paid to Eskom since 1 January 2020, (b) On what exact dates were the payments made and (c) What amounts were paid; (2) What is the; (a) Total cost in each month of transporting diesel from Cape Town to the gas turbine power plants in the Republic over the past 12 months and (b) Cost per litre of diesel in each month for the past 12 months for the gas turbine power plants; (3) Whether the report of the Medupi Conveyor Belt accident has been completed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) Whether he will furnish Mrs B M van Minnen with a copy of the report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(1)(a)(b)(c) Since the question regarding financial payments is not specific, Eskom assumes it refers to payments received in line with the Government Appropriations.

Since January 2020, Eskom received the amounts set out in Table 1 below, as part of the Appropriations and Special Appropriations Act of 2019.

Table 1: Payments received by Eskom in line with Government Appropriations

Financial Year

(b) Date

(c) Amount paid, R'm

2020

03-Feb-20

4 000

2020

11-Feb-20

4 000

2020

28-Feb-20

5 000

2020

31-Mar-20

9 500

2021

29 May 20

1 000

2021

11 Aug 20

5 000

Total for the 2020 Calendar year

28 500

(2)(a) The cost of transport is included in the diesel price. Transport of diesel to Ankerlig and Port Rex is via truck, while transport is via pipeline for Gourikwa and Acacia.

(2)(b) The cost of diesel per litre in each month over the past 12 months for the gas turbine power plants is as set out in Table 2 below. Eskom received an average discount of 35c/l over this period.

Table 2 Cost of diesel per litre in each month for the gas turbine power plants

Month

Wholesale Price (R/l)

Average Discount

Nett Price

(R/l)

04-09-19

14.05

0.35

13.70

02-10-19

14.30

0.35

13.95

06-11-19

14.14

0.35

13.79

04-12-19

13.99

0.35

13.64

01-01-20

14.08

0.35

13.73

05-02-20

14.03

0.35

13.68

03-03-20

13.49

0.35

13.14

01-04-20

12.09

0.35

11.74

06-05-20

10.48

0.35

10.13

03-06-20

10.70

0.35

10.35

01-07-20

12.43

0.35

12.08

05-08-20

12.88

0.35

12.53

(3) The report of the Medupi conveyor belt accident has been completed.

(4) The report is a product of an internal investigation that was commissioned in accordance with Eskom’s established integrated risk management processes. The report is therefore an internal report for consumption by the relevant Eskom senior executives and cannot be made public. However, Eskom endeavours to provide a summary of key findings from the report once internal governance processes are finalised.

04 November 2020 - NW2133

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What; (a) Is the current municipal debt outstanding to Eskom by each municipality and (b) Attempts have been made to collect the outstanding specified municipal debt to Eskom? NW2696E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) The total debt owed by municipalities as at 31 July 2020 is R46.1 billion, of which R31 billion is overdue debt. The details of the age analysis of the total debt owed by each municipality to Eskom, as at 31 July 2020 are set out in Annexure A.

b) Eskom has implemented several interventions to collect the outstanding debt owed as set out in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Interventions by Eskom to collect outstanding debt

Interventions by Eskom

Implemented concessions as agreed with SALGA

  • Eskom increased the payment days from 15 to 30 days for all non-metropolitan municipalities, reduced the interest rate on arrears, and applies payments to capital first before interest.
  • Eskom offers payment plans as a means to make the payment of the arrear debt more affordable over a period of time.

Interventions by Eskom

Focus on enhancing and enforcing current revenue management processes

  • This includes direct engagement with defaulting municipalities, issuing contract breach notices with the intention of encouraging a remedy of the breach, interruption of supply, and also litigating by issuing summons for payment.
  • Legal pursuance of debt owed also extends to the attachment of assets and bank accounts of certain municipalities.

Partnering with government

  • Eskom fully participates in intergovernmental structures such as the Eskom Political Task Team and the Multi-disciplinary Revenue Committee that is convened by the Office of the Deputy President.
  • Eskom offers its services and expertise in the form of active partnering with stakeholders to improve revenue collection within municipalities.
  • Eskom works closely with National Treasury, which provides municipal financial oversight, thereby ensuring municipal budgets are funded and payment obligations to Eskom are met.

ANNEXURE A - PQ2133

REPORTING MONTH :

2020/07/31

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

31 - 60 days

61 - 90 days

90 days+

Total

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

 

EASTERN CAPE

1 045 309 406

2 530 451

82 838 040

54 125 462

1 094 964 881

2 279 768 239

1 795 121 602

268 812 797

215 833 839

1

ALFRED NZO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-206 089

247 583

38 373

9 043

92 140

181 051

153 815

19 010

8 225

2

AMAHLATHI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 173 481

10 224

4 674 349

1 760 031

16 357 033

27 975 119

22 424 224

3 363 616

2 187 279

3

AMATHOLE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

1 274 342

1 087 143

1 210 463

981 709

1 092 622

5 646 278

4 836 768

727 414

82 097

4

BLUE CRANE ROUTE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 094 374

0

0

0

0

14 094 374

12 255 977

1 838 397

0

5

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

237 804 629

0

36 963

1

0

237 841 592

206 746 921

31 094 356

315

6

CHRIS HANI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-723 145

101 341

4 198 860

221 205

432 114

4 230 375

3 786 403

389 371

54 601

7

DR BEYERS NAUDE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 712 692

69 099

8 824 386

7 206 803

85 385 606

114 198 585

87 592 369

13 119 997

13 486 219

8

ELUNDINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

152 619

0

0

0

0

152 619

134 562

18 057

0

9

EMALAHLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 019 976

0

5 877

0

0

2 025 852

1 756 485

263 473

5 895

10

ENGCOBO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0,05

0,01

0

11

ENOCH MGIJIMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

42 663 040

15 051

31 083 743

20 638 507

298 112 955

392 513 295

305 419 072

45 776 831

41 317 392

12

GREAT KEI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 562 521

0

484 587

10 368

3 802 232

5 859 708

4 665 931

699 858

493 919

13

INGQUZA HILL LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

250 676

34 647

257 909

0

0

543 232

469 595

70 439

3 198

14

INTSIKA YETHU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

527 757

0

0

0

0

527 757

458 919

68 838

0

15

INXUBA YETHEMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 308 862

0

8 968 063

5 983 581

140 121 530

167 382 037

119 397 835

17 741 834

30 242 368

16

JOE GQABI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

11 361

134 482

109 492

1 496 472

0

1 751 808

1 500 303

225 045

26 459

17

KING SABATA DALINDYEBO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

101 419 957

31 501

424 314

1 441 991

112 009 461

215 327 225

180 089 083

27 617 009

7 621 133

18

KOUGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

31 699 079

0

798

0

0

31 699 876

27 563 600

4 134 540

1 737

19

KOU-KAMMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

704 582

0

308 878

0

0

1 013 460

877 925

131 689

3 847

20

MAKANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

17 097 721

0

0

0

36 749 083

53 846 804

45 909 235

6 829 881

1 107 688

21

MATATIELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

6 988 990

0

0

0

0

6 988 990

6 077 383

911 607

0

22

MBASHE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 827

0

219

333

0

2 378

1 992

299

87

23

MBIZANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

93 301

0

0

0

1

93 302

80 413

12 067

822

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

24

MHLONTLO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

199 361

45 970

34 821

0

0

280 152

242 800

36 420

932

25

MNQUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

26

NDLAMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

7 573 353

0

0

0

0

7 573 353

6 518 988

1 054 365

0

27

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

513 455 879

527 935

0

0

0

513 983 814

446 942 072

67 041 372

370

28

NGQUSHWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

NTHABANKULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

30 151

0

276

0

0

30 427

26 458

3 969

0

30

NYANDENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY FBE

107 342

0

0

0

0

107 342

93 341

14 001

0

31

O R TAMBO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-468 490

225 060

222 275

174 269

193 240

346 355

263 672

64 209

18 474

32

PORT ST JOHNS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

303 262

0

0

0

0

303 262

263 706

39 556

0

33

RAYMOND MHLABA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 715 887

0

7 687 542

4 832 117

166 402 968

188 638 514

122 480 855

17 928 459

48 229 201

34

SAKHISIZWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 995 628

12

0

0

0

1 995 640

1 720 822

258 121

16 698

35

SENQU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 340 493

0

0

0

0

5 340 493

4 643 910

696 582

0

36

SUNDAYS RIVER VALLEY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 538 619

0

2 510 673

1 583 566

0

7 632 858

6 176 658

926 499

529 701

37

UMZIMVUBU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

44 043

403

0

0

0

44 446

38 649

5 797

0

38

WALTER SISULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

15 841 324

0

11 755 177

7 785 466

234 213 897

269 595 865

173 510 863

25 689 820

70 395 182

 

FREE STATE

558 515 003

247 880 311

275 222 401

206 877 352

11 474 620 510

12 763 115 577

8 663 638 405

1 258 736 678

2 840 740 494

39

CENTLEC MUNICIPALITY

3 430 414

0

0

0

0

3 430 414

2 971 169

445 675

13 570

40

DIHLABENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

26 792 920

0

18 576 125

13 342 424

347 465 405

406 176 873

296 860 680

43 919 008

65 397 185

41

KOPANONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 331 508

0

10 065

15 155

1 226 544

6 583 272

5 556 785

825 596

200 892

42

LETSEMENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 981 926

0

4 272 604

2 347 114

46 973 170

58 574 813

45 544 488

6 840 068

6 190 257

43

MAFUBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

13 032 629

0

12 416 681

15 357 066

98 532 534

139 338 910

101 708 119

14 920 993

22 709 798

44

MALUTI A PHOFUNG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

103 018 183

662 361

89 820 631

72 908 612

5 140 907 401

5 407 317 188

3 416 686 863

493 591 612

1 497 038 713

45

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

4 952 986

247 171 599

12 040 567

0

13 886 892

278 052 045

241 698 211

36 254 997

98 836

46

MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 029 084

0

14 084 839

7 374 869

192 387 328

221 876 119

144 565 922

21 065 830

56 244 367

47

MASILONYANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

6 792 694

0

5 811 351

2 434 505

60 087 494

75 126 044

60 368 482

8 906 425

5 851 137

48

MATJHABENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

178 222 967

7 893

49 033 516

44 390 457

3 129 712 117

3 401 366 950

2 277 416 556

329 785 275

794 165 118

49

METSIMAHOLO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

44 243 387

0

0

0

13 500 000

57 743 387

49 953 693

7 493 054

296 640

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

50

MOHOKARE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

67 803

0

66 300

65 412

192 350

391 865

334 842

50 226

6 796

51

MOQHAKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 234 333

0

15 742 628

0

298 357 452

354 334 414

274 732 913

40 968 278

38 633 222

52

NALA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

25 440 184

0

2 973 884

17 704 568

346 273 371

392 392 006

298 390 489

43 565 352

50 436 165

53

NGWATHE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

37 416 763

0

31 989 813

18 228 528

1 221 468 050

1 309 103 154

986 444 975

142 542 453

180 115 726

54

NKETOANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

20 562 888

0

5 750 543

5 557 075

321 984 368

353 854 874

239 246 224

34 691 455

79 917 195

55

PHUMELELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 037 971

26 578

2 314 024

2 213 297

124 528 836

137 120 705

99 794 356

14 859 853

22 466 496

56

SETSOTO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 717 024

11 879

210 852

0

0

11 939 755

10 275 707

1 541 356

122 692

57

TOKOLOGO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 006 543

0

4 049 180

2 839 483

93 121 829

105 017 035

78 046 722

11 542 190

15 428 123

58

TSWELOPELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 202 797

0

6 058 799

2 098 788

24 015 370

43 375 754

33 041 210

4 926 979

5 407 565

 

GAUTENG

6 262 789 360

707 633 991

259 734 441

182 966 557

2 405 224 960

9 818 349 309

7 967 389 189

1 194 170 609

656 789 511

59

CITY OF EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 841 503 839

703 358 185

14 068 423

331 637

0

2 559 262 084

2 226 904 328

334 200 566

-1 842 810

60

CITY OF JOHANNESBURG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 670 743 142

85 603

3 778 616

0

2 275

1 674 609 637

1 456 122 030

218 418 546

69 062

61

CITY OF TSHWANE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 508 561 807

724 170

384 906

0

0

1 509 670 884

1 312 835 323

196 828 012

7 548

62

EMFULENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

626 500 695

3 386 573

158 757 750

110 805 767

1 833 220 909

2 732 671 694

1 968 807 647

294 487 852

469 376 196

63

LESEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

39 965 438

0

0

0

0

39 965 438

34 753 416

5 212 022

0

64

MERAFONG CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

106 995 000

79 460

30 161 686

26 536 973

363 916 132

527 689 250

382 220 081

57 162 147

88 307 021

65

MIDVAAL LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

43 316 862

0

0

0

0

43 316 862

37 666 837

5 650 026

0

66

MOGALE CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

226 714 381

0

168 198

0

0

226 882 579

170 075 997

25 511 623

31 294 960

67

RAND WEST CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

198 488 196

0

52 414 862

45 292 180

208 006 073

504 201 310

377 934 338

56 689 438

69 577 534

68

SEDIBENG DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

79 570

79 570

69 192

10 379

0

 

KWAZULU NATAL

2 640 303 110

5 626 740

38 055 628

32 493 098

482 404 486

3 198 883 061

2 686 612 419

403 032 475

109 238 166

69

ABAQULUSI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

52 536 257

12 584

0

0

17 281 243

69 830 084

56 131 678

8 421 628

5 276 778

70

ALFRED DUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

42 465 418

0

0

0

0

42 465 418

36 926 450

5 538 968

0

71

AMAJUBA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

365 343

0

243 797

16 239

41 156

666 535

577 233

86 800

2 502

72

BIG 5 HLABISA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-2

0

0

0

0

-2

-2

0

0

73

CITY OF UMHLATHUZE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

135 633 196

1 230 235

153 317

148 200

0

137 164 948

119 267 789

17 893 124

4 036

74

DANNHAUSER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

75

DR NKOSAZANA DLAMINI ZUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

18 415

0

2 545

0

0

20 960

18 208

2 731

21

76

EDUMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 118 208

0

0

0

0

5 118 208

4 450 616

667 592

0

77

EMADLANGENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 020 573

0

0

0

0

2 020 573

1 757 020

263 553

0

78

ENDUMENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

18 996 139

0

0

0

0

18 996 139

16 519 983

2 476 156

0

79

ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 512 335 557

0

5 185

0

0

1 512 340 742

1 315 078 890

197 261 841

11

80

GREATER KOKSTAD LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-1 633

0

0

0

0

-1 633

-1 633

0

0

81

HARRY GWALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-584 999

161 024

0

0

0

-423 975

-427 098

1 947

1 175

82

ILEMBE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

819 821

780 852

1 013

0

0

1 601 686

1 392 771

208 916

0

83

IMPENDLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

84

INKOSI LANGALIBALELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

51 163 261

0

0

0

25 207 105

76 370 366

59 246 542

8 886 539

8 237 286

85

JOZINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

32 710

0

0

0

0

32 710

28 443

4 266

0

86

KING CETSHWAYO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

156 948

166 379

0

0

0

323 328

279 853

43 474

0

87

KWADUKUZA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

104 639 975

0

0

0

0

104 639 975

90 991 283

13 648 692

0

88

MANDENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

89

MAPHUMULO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 839

0

0

0

0

1 839

1 599

240

0

90

MKHAMBATHINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

91

MPOFANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

7 921 418

0

5 957 353

3 952 182

168 480 033

186 310 986

137 797 506

20 384 739

28 128 740

92

MSINGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-3 304

0

0

0

0

-3 304

-2 782

-522

0

93

MSUNDUZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

480 468 091

0

45 104

24 039

1 592 529

482 129 763

415 304 937

62 535 103

4 289 724

94

MTHONJANENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 547 629

0

0

0

3 571 696

6 119 325

5 203 446

781 578

134 301

95

MTUBATUBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 550

9 548

0

0

0

21 098

17 917

2 688

493

96

NDWEDWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

97

NEWCASTLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

125 363 929

0

30 242 547

21 597 294

166 566 605

343 770 375

262 288 394

39 461 437

42 020 544

98

NKANDLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 021 175

0

0

0

0

4 021 175

3 484 208

522 631

14 336

99

NONGOMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

25 992

0

26 194

0

0

52 186

45 379

6 807

0

100

NQUTHU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 574 987

0

0

0

0

3 574 987

3 108 684

466 303

0

101

OKHAHLAMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 455

0

0

0

0

1 455

1 265

190

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

102

RAY NKONYENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 348 518

0

0

0

0

14 348 518

12 476 972

1 871 546

0

103

RICHMOND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

104

UBUHLEBEZWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

35 627

42 770

33 220

0

0

111 617

96 508

14 569

540

105

UGU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

305 961

1 673 529

0

0

0

1 979 491

1 721 959

257 037

494

106

ULUNDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

22 836 934

0

8 111

6 586 606

99 612 854

129 044 505

93 943 656

13 991 774

21 109 076

107

UMDONI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-57 247

70 103

0

0

0

12 856

10 655

2 201

0

108

UMFOLOZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

99 443

19 360

0

0

0

118 803

103 307

15 496

0

109

UMGUNGUNDLOVU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

8 567

0

0

0

0

8 567

7 449

1 117

0

110

UMHLABUYALINGANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-1 000

0

0

0

0

-1 000

-870

-130

0

111

UMKHANYAKUDE DISTRICT MUNIC

3 832 673

0

79 841

0

0

3 912 513

3 409 374

502 361

779

112

UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

7 920 573

0

0

0

0

7 920 573

6 887 455

1 033 118

0

113

UMNGENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

20 381 396

0

0

0

0

20 381 396

17 722 952

2 658 443

0

114

UMSHWATHI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-2

0

0

0

0

-2

-2

0

0

115

UMUZIWABANTU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

116

UMVOTI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 353 066

0

0

0

0

10 353 066

9 002 666

1 350 400

0

117

UMZIMKULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

118

UMZINYATHI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

897 411

221 356

710 537

148 451

51 264

2 029 019

1 758 677

267 133

3 209

119

UMZUMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

171 762

0

0

0

0

171 762

148 285

22 243

1 234

120

UPHONGOLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 736 084

0

0

0

0

3 736 084

3 248 768

487 315

0

121

UTHUKELA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

4 311 747

199 515

181 736

16 056

0

4 709 054

4 094 838

614 217

0

122

ZULULAND DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

1 471 651

1 039 484

365 126

4 032

0

2 880 292

2 491 189

376 216

12 887

 

LIMPOPO

365 644 212

83 934

36 521 267

19 461 882

799 096 597

1 220 807 892

917 389 531

136 409 206

167 009 155

123

BA-PHALABORWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 296 929

0

0

0

0

10 296 929

8 953 852

1 343 078

0

124

BELA-BELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 529 223

0

16 264 129

6 505 124

534 614

35 833 091

22 204 295

3 349 128

10 279 668

125

BLOUBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 796 357

0

68 663

0

0

5 865 021

5 100 018

765 003

0

126

CAPRICORN DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

231 179

0

108 572

0

0

339 751

293 593

44 456

1 701

127

COLLINS CHABANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

442 394

0

0

0

0

442 394

344 466

97 928

0

128

ELIAS MOTSOALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 791 749

0

0

0

0

10 791 749

9 366 960

1 405 044

19 744

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

129

EPHRAIM MOGALE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 984 035

0

0

0

0

5 984 035

5 203 508

780 526

0

130

FETAKGOMO - GREATER TUBATSE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

695 238

0

0

0

0

695 238

604 571

90 668

0

131

GREATER GIYANI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

94 137

0

0

0

0

94 137

81 859

12 279

0

132

GREATER LETABA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 276 535

0

0

0

0

2 276 535

1 979 595

296 939

0

133

GREATER TZANEEN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

62 478 617

0

0

0

0

62 478 617

54 097 570

8 114 634

266 412

134

LEPELLE NKUMPI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

333 195

0

0

0

0

333 195

289 735

43 460

0

135

LEPHALALE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 968 872

0

83 097

0

0

13 051 969

11 340 038

1 702 157

9 774

136

MAKHADO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 837 585

0

0

0

0

40 837 585

35 510 944

5 326 642

0

137

MAKHUDUTHAMAGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

36 690

0

0

0

0

36 690

31 904

4 786

0

138

MARULENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

27 376

0

0

0

0

27 376

23 805

3 571

0

139

MODIMOLLE-MOOKGOPHONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

24 901 644

0

19 975 470

12 956 758

541 353 824

599 187 696

430 035 176

63 881 053

105 271 466

140

MOGALAKWENA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

28 617 694

68 719

21 335

0

0

28 707 749

24 643 089

3 696 463

368 196

141

MOLEMOLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

369 567

0

0

0

0

369 567

321 362

48 204

0

142

MOPANI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

2 782 672

0

0

0

0

2 782 672

2 342 185

440 487

0

143

MUSINA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 281 246

0

0

0

62 547 185

76 828 431

52 507 211

7 863 053

16 458 168

145

POLOKWANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

110 045 238

0

0

0

0

110 045 238

95 690 601

14 354 637

0

146

SEKHUKHUNE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

2 727 234

0

0

0

0

2 727 234

2 424 021

303 213

0

147

THABAZIMBI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 035 505

0

0

0

194 660 974

203 696 479

147 869 991

21 522 136

34 304 352

148

THULAMELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

941 719

0

0

0

0

941 719

818 886

122 833

0

149

VHEMBE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

6 121 581

15 215

1

0

0

6 136 796

5 310 296

796 827

29 673

 

MPUMALANGA

907 660 119

7 516 615

437 595 269

295 614 172

8 067 142 378

9 715 528 552

6 871 695 575

1 013 313 981

1 830 518 996

150

BUSHBUCKRIDGE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 592 270

9 556

41 218

47 295

2 795 848

11 486 187

9 591 898

1 438 956

455 332

151

CHIEF ALBERT LUTHULI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 152 692

0

12 654 701

44 644

3 064 943

26 916 980

18 370 903

2 755 567

5 790 510

152

CITY OF MBOMBELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

233 332 697

7 506 989

59 540 611

50 613 658

119 353 057

470 347 013

347 286 841

52 077 008

70 983 163

153

DIPALESENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 767 510

0

3 135 474

28 792

40 966 490

54 898 267

36 562 627

5 480 622

12 855 018

154

DR J S MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

45 430

0

46 800

0

0

92 230

149 401

-58 126

955

155

DR PIXLEY KA ISAKA SEME LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 194 699

0

0

0

0

11 194 699

9 734 521

1 460 178

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

156

EMAKHAZENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 110 334

0

7 624 258

4 727 831

14 106 323

35 568 745

19 644 348

2 945 752

12 978 645

157

EMALAHLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

202 206 778

0

184 122 466

105 468 608

3 765 940 297

4 257 738 149

2 980 551 539

438 233 357

838 953 253

158

GOVAN MBEKI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

118 537 253

70

75 977 923

56 430 543

1 845 400 427

2 096 346 216

1 491 685 244

220 881 471

383 779 501

159

LEKWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

51 751 210

0

35 985 637

27 920 218

1 061 620 169

1 177 277 234

771 943 754

113 585 356

291 748 124

160

MKHONDO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

23 505 497

0

19 843 787

10 989 345

140 688 284

195 026 912

143 033 710

21 658 341

30 334 861

161

MSUKALIGWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 017 013

0

25 819 186

16 502 497

98 578 799

180 917 495

129 653 393

19 441 736

31 822 366

162

NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

38 741

0

0

0

0

38 741

33 549

5 032

159

163

NKOMAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

18 159 927

0

19 840

0

0

18 179 768

15 801 662

2 370 249

7 857

164

STEVE TSHWETE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

79 812 695

0

38 668

0

10 023

79 861 386

69 443 904

10 416 429

1 053

165

THABA CHWEU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

53 638 796

0

9 123 742

8 066 497

731 152 976

801 982 010

607 390 361

87 677 266

106 914 383

166

THEMBISILE HANI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

273 419

0

0

0

0

273 419

237 756

35 663

0

167

VICTOR KHANYE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

35 523 158

0

3 620 958

14 774 245

243 464 742

297 383 103

220 580 164

32 909 122

43 893 817

 

NORTH WEST

841 754 173

2 233 012

257 373 301

114 059 427

1 616 955 797

2 832 375 711

2 045 584 616

303 446 819

483 344 276

168

CITY OF MATLOSANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

245 873 306

686 256

57 731 377

49 476 792

295 308 522

649 076 254

498 853 779

74 629 652

75 592 823

169

DITSOBOTLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

19 888 630

9 034

15 811 342

10 967 219

580 419 857

627 096 083

403 251 980

58 948 453

164 895 650

170

DR RUTH SEGOMOTSI MOMPATI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

76 928

0

43 745

0

0

120 673

104 973

15 700

0

171

GREATER TAUNG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 736 478

0

0

0

0

1 736 478

1 510 345

226 133

0

172

JB MARKS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

127 779 494

0

22 790 470

0

0

150 569 964

130 832 609

19 624 891

112 464

173

KAGISANO-MOLOPO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

338 156

0

218 868

0

0

557 024

484 492

72 532

0

174

KGETLENGRIVIER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 221 795

22 347

3 127 140

2 967 531

128 124 786

142 463 600

102 472 991

15 057 349

24 933 259

175

LEKWA-TEEMANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

16 374 286

11 979

5 295 415

4 105 005

28 438 977

54 225 662

45 013 631

6 752 309

2 459 722

176

MADIBENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

61 889 822

112 129

46 638 872

27 191 585

49 111 665

184 944 072

146 411 142

21 880 992

16 651 938

177

MAHIKENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

434 909

46 888

82 618

99 498

4 887 425

5 551 338

4 299 862

616 684

634 793

179

MAMUSA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 765 300

230 076

4 542 741

2 651 415

84 228 354

97 417 888

64 355 570

9 487 426

23 574 891

180

MAQUASSI HILLS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

17 729 506

1 037 353

4 969 338

5 017 932

10 719 534

39 473 662

29 198 825

4 354 983

5 919 854

181

MORETELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

822 572

0

0

0

0

822 572

705 339

105 799

11 434

182

MOSES KOTANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

548 174

0

0

0

0

548 174

476 087

72 087

0

183

NALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

28 783 257

0

7 755 111

7 018 725

325 325 325

368 882 419

248 644 382

36 372 825

83 865 212

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

184

NGAKA MODIRI MOLEMA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-295 536

0

0

0

0

-295 536

-215 388

-80 148

0

185

RAMOTSHERE MOILOA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 014 105

76 950

6 463 760

4 232 882

45 036 315

64 824 013

49 482 277

7 418 730

7 923 006

186

RATLOU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

946 515

0

0

0

0

946 515

823 499

123 015

0

187

RUSTENBURG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

281 951 757

0

81 890 831

318 076

470 551

364 631 215

270 476 067

40 580 472

53 574 676

 

NORTHERN CAPE

344 185 847

491 368

72 340 140

33 725 145

1 657 186 468

2 107 928 968

1 459 764 851

215 637 494

432 526 623

188

!KHEIS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

48 605

69 735

0

0

0

118 339

101 008

15 151

2 181

189

DAWID KRUIPER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

28 287 216

0

0

0

0

28 287 216

23 958 504

3 593 776

734 936

190

DIKGATLONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 921 723

0

11 199 072

2 405 857

114 259 861

132 786 514

89 544 028

13 103 909

30 138 577

191

EMTHANJENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 133 067

0

8 300 662

4 886 344

71 524 133

95 844 205

70 079 616

10 497 178

15 267 411

192

GAMAGARA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 057 404

0

10 154 304

10 199

229 882 298

280 104 206

204 883 347

30 542 311

44 678 547

193

GA-SEGONYANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

16 881 579

0

0

0

0

16 881 579

11 686 218

1 752 933

3 442 428

194

HANTAM LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 883 373

0

0

0

0

2 883 373

2 507 281

376 092

0

195

JOE MOROLONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 412 277

0

707 836

0

0

2 120 114

1 740 990

261 101

118 023

196

KAI !GARIB LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 161 264

0

6 550 145

4 832 837

318 372 016

338 916 262

233 828 207

34 086 755

71 001 300

197

KAMIESBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

823 637

353 168

1 213 979

997 020

19 450 858

22 838 661

17 337 681

2 589 369

2 911 612

198

KAREEBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-270

0

0

0

0

-270

-512

242

0

199

KAROO HOOGLAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

30 511

0

0

0

0

30 511

26 531

3 980

0

200

KGATELOPELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 289 068

0

0

0

0

3 289 068

2 211 400

331 710

745 958

201

KHAI-MA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 231 326

64 307

906 888

633 133

17 567 862

20 403 516

13 323 309

1 977 493

5 102 715

202

MAGARENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 931 296

0

2 357 735

1 645 332

58 243 830

65 178 194

42 469 756

6 244 447

16 463 991

203

NAMA KHOI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 417 488

0

8 818 618

6 424 048

110 568 882

136 229 036

90 015 279

13 537 080

32 676 677

204

PHOKWANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

19 782 404

0

5 952 228

5 309 723

116 395 538

147 439 893

105 562 316

15 735 134

26 142 443

205

RENOSTERBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 477 358

0

1 185 868

989 069

88 517 636

92 169 930

55 603 383

8 014 615

28 551 933

206

RICHTERSVELD LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 962 553

4 158

1 434 466

1 146 780

8 269 265

12 817 222

9 932 841

1 489 888

1 394 493

207

SIYANCUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 218 530

0

3 488 128

0

150 826 726

166 533 384

104 722 521

15 334 349

46 476 514

208

SIYATHEMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 388 979

0

2 709 253

1 774 437

63 576 385

71 449 053

50 090 782

7 391 879

13 966 392

209

SOL PLAATJE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

145 089 302

0

9 043

7 744

0

145 106 089

120 503 185

18 075 478

6 527 427

210

THEMBELIHLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 990 003

0

1 654 177

1 227 199

77 900 543

82 771 921

49 523 127

7 197 184

26 051 609

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

211

TSANTSABANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

13 003 441

0

3 368 820

60 023

147 252 789

163 685 073

106 538 739

15 626 285

41 520 049

212

UBUNTU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 621 811

0

2 131 961

1 375 400

64 577 847

70 707 019

45 485 525

6 645 686

18 575 807

213

UMSOBOMVU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 141 904

0

196 956

0

0

9 338 860

8 089 790

1 213 469

35 601

 

WESTERN CAPE

2 128 610 643

468 097

13 559 252

8 907 022

4 955 170

2 156 500 183

1 871 098 781

280 628 568

4 772 834

214

BEAUFORT WEST LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

16 618 073

2

1 350 357

0

0

17 968 433

15 290 788

2 293 692

383 953

215

BERGRIVIER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

13 025 659

0

0

0

0

13 025 659

11 326 660

1 698 999

0

216

BITOU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 779 187

367

0

0

0

14 779 554

12 851 778

1 927 776

0

217

BREEDE VALLEY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

46 785 107

0

0

0

0

46 785 107

40 682 700

6 102 407

0

218

CAPE AGULHAS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 318 050

0

0

0

0

12 318 050

10 711 347

1 606 702

0

219

CEDERBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 422 826

129 097

9 243 198

6 468 139

3 421 849

30 685 109

25 517 245

3 827 587

1 340 277

220

CITY OF CAPE TOWN METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 344 766 378

203 828

52 964

13 250

89 301

1 345 125 721

1 169 720 089

175 397 831

7 801

221

DRAKENSTEIN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

209 005 120

0

0

0

0

209 005 120

181 253 161

27 210 855

541 104

222

EDEN DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

66 031

0

0

0

0

66 031

57 192

8 579

260

223

GEORGE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

71 141 484

0

0

0

0

71 141 484

61 862 160

9 279 324

0

224

HESSEQUA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 483 848

0

0

0

0

4 483 848

3 898 092

585 757

0

225

KANNALAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 738 693

0

2 901 594

2 425 633

1 444 020

11 509 940

8 530 103

1 279 516

1 700 321

226

KNYSNA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

27 494 603

15

1 431

0

0

27 496 048

23 908 113

3 586 217

1 718

227

LAINGSBURG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

469 439

0

0

0

0

469 439

407 232

60 963

1 244

228

LANGEBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

42 248 052

0

0

0

0

42 248 052

36 737 436

5 510 615

0

229

MATZIKAMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 285 691

0

0

0

0

14 285 691

11 833 676

1 775 051

676 964

230

MOSSEL BAY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

50 700 673

0

0

0

0

50 700 673

43 985 167

6 597 775

117 731

231

OUDTSHOORN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

23 009 623

0

0

0

0

23 009 623

20 008 367

3 001 255

0

232

OVERSTRAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 485 198

0

0

0

0

40 485 198

35 204 520

5 280 678

0

233

PRINS ALBERT LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 646 075

0

52

0

0

1 646 126

1 431 369

214 705

52

234

SALDANHA BAY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 339 866

96 939

0

0

0

40 436 804

35 161 624

5 274 246

935

235

STELLENBOSCH LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

52 626 589

37 845

9 337

0

0

52 673 770

45 803 178

6 870 478

115

236

SWARTLAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

33 945 087

0

320

0

0

33 945 407

29 517 468

4 427 614

325

237

SWELLENDAM LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 975 014

0

0

0

0

9 975 014

8 673 880

1 301 134

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

238

THEEWATERSKLOOF LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 787 132

0

0

0

0

9 787 132

8 510 552

1 276 579

0

239

WEST COAST DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

1 194 027

0

0

0

0

1 194 027

1 038 255

155 738

34

240

WITZENBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

31 253 122

3

0

0

0

31 253 124

27 176 630

4 076 494

0

04 November 2020 - NW1986

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) Total volume of coal that Eskom purchased at (i) Above average and (ii) Acceptable pricing since 2007 was found to be unsuitable and was therefore unused for power generation and (b) Is the name of each company that the unsuitable coal was purchased from in each year?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(i) and (ii) All coal at Eskom’s coal stockyards will be used for power generation.

The request to disclose the prices and names of associated suppliers is commercially sensitive. The utility is currently progressing coal supply negotiations with existing and potentially new coal suppliers. By disclosing the requested information to parliament and to the public, suppliers could potentially use this information to erode Eskom’s bargaining power.

(b) Not applicable.

04 November 2020 - NW2132

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) Daily electrical megawatt savings achieved through load shedding (i) In each province and (ii) In each metro over the past 60 days of load shedding and (b) Total amount of accumulated man-hours which have been load shed (i) In each province and (ii) In each metro over the past 60 days? NW2695E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(i) The estimated daily megawatts load shed in each Eskom operating unit (OU) is as set out in Annexure A.

Most of Eskom OUs are aligned to the provincial boundaries with the following exceptions:

  1. Gauteng OU also includes most North West province
  2. Limpopo OU includes the Rustenburg region of the North West province
  3. Western Cape OU includes the Kalahari region of the Northern Cape province
  4. Free State OU includes the Kimberley region of the Northern Cape province

(a)(ii) Daily megawatts load shed in each metro is to be sought from the metros.

(b) Eskom does not have a measurement of man-hours which have been load shed. On the assumption that the intention was to request information on the megawatt- hours (MWh) that have been load shed.

(b)(i) The estimated daily megawatt-hours load shed in each province is as set out in Annexure B.

(b)(ii) The estimated daily megawatt-hours load shed is to be sought from the metros.

Annexure A

Estimated megawatts load shed per Eskom Operating UnitPeriod: 1 July to 3 September 2020

 

10-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

N/A

N/A

203

133

198

210

138

0

Gauteng

N/A

N/A

378

316

255

287

402

0

KwaZulu Natal

N/A

N/A

134

126

125

208

140

0

Free State

N/A

N/A

180

118

38

93

241

0

Limpopo

N/A

161

162

172

121

176

148

0

Eastern Cape

N/A

70

65

60

68

78

74

0

Mpumalanga

N/A

182

196

143

178

173

196

0

 Total

N/A

412.29

1317

1069

982

1225

1338

0

 

11-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00 - 00:00

Western Cape

152

110

210

109

206

138

188

N/A

Gauteng

314

339

429

343

354

346

488

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

127

116

168

103

123

153

147

N/A

Free State

122

210

86

175

68

149

191

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

164

153

129

162

168

158

95

Eastern Cape

N/A

59

67

53

40

56

57

60

Mpumalanga

N/A

158

156

181

207

154

182

196

Total

715

1156

1268

1093

1160

1163

1411

350

 

12-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00 - 20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

102

185

239

344

109

122

249

N/A

Gauteng

298

337

396

298

376

405

293

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

215

138

176

147

218

138

100

N/A

Free State

63

160

101

154

89

238

52

N/A

Limpopo

98

114

159

151

131

169

130

63

Eastern Cape

56

72

74

64

37

55

67

30

Mpumalanga

N/A

182

147

181

189

158

156

181

Total

832

1187

1291

1339

1149

1284

1047

274

 

13-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

131

118

162

134

90

110

175

N/A

Gauteng

274

347

349

353

350

332

324

327

KwaZulu Natal

120

113

108

129

86

145

128

N/A

Free State

88

236

142

75

161

152

180

N/A

 

13-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Limpopo

N/A

164

148

152

120

159

117

140

Eastern Cape

N/A

84

88

60

49

78

84

37

Mpumalanga

N/A

173

196

126

182

147

181

189

Total

613

1235

1191

1028

1039

1122

1189

694

 

14-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

130

185

123

203

208

177

172

N/A

Gauteng

375

441

571

490

314

387

285

216

KwaZulu Natal

107

128

112

121

144

142

165

N/A

Free State

151

205

140

56

100

260

147

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

158

162

161

121

176

148

152

Eastern Cape

N/A

70

82

64

74

98

97

50

Mpumalanga

N/A

182

196

143

178

173

196

126

Total

763

1368

1386

1237

1138

1413

1210

543

 

15-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

37

96

78

226

132

215

115

N/A

Gauteng

421

495

312

208

309

395

306

336

KwaZulu Natal

41

66

54

134

158

206

152

N/A

Free State

117

36

40

50

161

225

120

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

78

63

161

166

158

162

172

Eastern Cape

N/A

38

19

45

65

80

89

56

Mpumalanga

N/A

162

187

213

154

182

196

143

Total

617

971

753

1037

1145

1460

1141

708

 

16-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

102

107

64

167

92

273

138

N/A

Gauteng

0

163

233

204

120

391

204

363

KwaZulu Natal

93

97

62

144

106

212

N/A

N/A

Free State

0

85

134

80

231

108

154

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

78

64

141

158

153

71

N/A

Eastern Cape

N/A

42

43

37

52

78

62

N/A

Mpumalanga

N/A

147

181

189

158

156

181

N/A

Total

195

718

781

960

917

1369

809

363

 

13-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

165

160

189

140

92

222

143

N/A

Gauteng

287

289

327

335

351

361

459

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

126

110

110

138

83

102

112

N/A

Free State

77

223

136

105

149

141

175

N/A

Limpopo

122

176

148

143

114

159

151

141

Eastern Cape

76

87

95

65

67

65

88

38

Mpumalanga

N/A

173

196

126

182

147

181

189

Total

852

1217

1201

1052

1037

1197

1310

368

 

14-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00 - 00:00

Western Cape

165

160

113

157

113

63

76

N/A

Gauteng

354

363

488

492

327

347

191

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

128

127

135

106

180

79

N/A

N/A

Free State

124

185

103

37

83

150

7

N/A

Limpopo

173

158

162

158

122

83

89

N/A

Eastern Cape

76

87

95

65

67

65

88

38

Mpumalanga

154

182

196

143

178

173

196

126

 

1174

1261

1291

1159

1070

960

646

164

 

18-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00 - 20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

136

204

132

N/A

Gauteng

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

402

477

312

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

166

169

139

N/A

Free State

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

221

147

98

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

169

148

152

120

Eastern Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

91

111

84

60

Mpumalanga

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

173

196

126

182

 

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1358

1452

1042

362

 

19-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

189

66

158

93

187

133

164

N/A

Gauteng

306

383

374

355

494

571

309

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

111

79

119

112

141

157

178

N/A

Free State

81

169

70

142

192

148

54

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

158

161

173

150

157

172

122

Eastern Cape

N/A

47

51

63

68

83

98

63

Mpumalanga

156

181

207

154

182

196

143

178

 

843

1082

1139

1091

1413

1444

1119

362

 

20-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

163

195

192.4

101

228

149

249

N/A

Gauteng

405

305

396

421

224

138

300

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

97

89

130

96

152

115

151

N/A

Free State

115

173

116

211

106

175

77

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

131

141

172

153

158

161

173

Eastern Cape

N/A

65

39

60

70

44

63

61

Mpumalanga

147

181

189

164

156

181

207

154

Total

927

1139

1204

1226

1088

959

1207

388

 

01-Sep-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

101

182.6

204

234

311

413

373

N/A

Gauteng

292

292

309

309

941

941

817

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

166

133

168

171

334

299

394

N/A

Free State

89

79

186

280

355

335

328

N/A

Limpopo

153

158

133

173

317

296

309

280

Eastern Cape

66

44

30

67

112

132

122

114

Mpumalanga

161.55

187

213

160

346

394

350

360

 

1028

1076

1241

1393

2716

2810

2693

754

 

02-Sep-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00 - 20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

101

183

204

234

311

413

373

N/A

Gauteng

292

292

309

309

941

941

817

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

166

133

168

171

334

299

394

N/A

Free State

89

79

186

280

355

335

328

N/A

Limpopo

153

158

133

173

317

296

309

280

Eastern Cape

66

44

30

67

112

132

122

114

Mpumalanga

162

187

213

160

346

394

350

360

Total

1028

1076

1241

1393

2716

2810

2693

754

 

03-Sep-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

332

355

389

203

359

458

351

N/A

Gauteng

864

981

871

857

607

724

688

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

293

266

344

326

254

256

271

N/A

Free State

302

287

262

343

328

271

292

N/A

Limpopo

290

248

269

283

297

253

283

283

Eastern Cape

107

133

99

120

110

139

N/A

N/A

Mpumalanga

346

394

350

360

347

394

350

354

Total

2534

2664

2583

2491

2302

2495

2235

636

Annexure B

Estimated megawatt-hours per Eskom Operating UnitPeriod: 1 July to 3 September 2020

Date

Western Cape

Gauteng

Kwazulu Natal

Free State

Limpopo

Eastern Cape

Mpumalanga

TOTAL

Stages

                   

Fri 10-Jul-2020

1764

3275

1466

1341

830

830

2134

11 639

Stage 2

Sat 11-Jul-2020

2226

5225

1875

2000

2058

783

2465

16 633

Stage 2

Sun 12-Jul-2020

2700

4805

2264

1714

2026

911

2388

16 808

Stage 2

Mon 13-Jul-2020

1840

5312

1658

2068

1998

959

2387

16 222

Stage 2

Tue 14-Jul-2020

2396

6158

1834

2118

2153

1069

2385

18 114

Stage 2

Wed 15-Jul-2020

1798

5564

1624

1499

1921

786

2471

15 663

Stage 1/2

Thu 16-Jul-2020

1886

3356

1427

1580

1327

626

2024

12 227

Stage 1/2

Thu 13-Aug-2020

2222

4818

1562

2014

2304

1161

2387

16 468

Stage 2

Fri 14-Aug-2020

1694

5128

1508

1377

1888

1161

2692

15 448

Stage 2

Tue 18-Aug-2020

944

2383

948

933

1176

691

2749

9 825

Stage 2

Wed 19-Aug-2020

1980

5585

1791

1712

2186

943

2790

16 988

Stage 2

Thu 20-Aug-2020

2555

4377

1657

1947

2178

804

2757

16 275

Stage 2

Tue 01-Sep-2020

1884

2962

1337

1180

1665

809

2066

11 903

Stage 2

Wed 02-Sep-2020

3636

7802

3330

3304

3637

1372

4344

27 425

Stage 2/4

Thu 03-Sep-2020

4894

11183

4020

4170

4408

1414

5791

35 880

Stage 4

Additional Information

An overview of the days were load shedding was implemented and the corresponding stages between 1 July to 3 September 2020 is as set out in the table below.

Date

Load shedding Stage

Date

Load shedding Stage

10-Jul-20

Stage 2

14-Aug-20

Stage 2

11-Jul-20

Stage 2

18-Aug-20

Stage 2

12-Jul-20

Stage 2

19-Aug-20

Stage 2

13-Jul-20

Stage 2

20-Aug-20

Stage 2

14-Jul-20

Stage 2

01-Sep-20

Stage 2

15-Jul-20

Stage 1 / 2

02-Sep-20

Stage 2 /4

16-Jul-20

Stage 1 / 2

03-Sep-20

Stage 4

13-Aug-20

Stage 2

   

04 November 2020 - NW1985

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) total amount did Eskom pay for coal that was above the annual average price for coal purchases in each year since 2007, (b) is the name of each company that the coal was purchased from and (c) were the coal volumes purchased from each specified company?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(b) and (c)

The request to disclose the prices and names of associated suppliers is commercially sensitive. The utility is currently progressing coal supply negotiations with existing and potentially new coal suppliers. By disclosing the requested information to parliament and to the public, suppliers could potentially use this information to erode Eskom’s bargaining power.

04 November 2020 - NW2196

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the Seraleng Housing Project situated along the Z543 Meriting, Rustenburg, GPS co-ordinates -25.592018, 27.254960, (a) what is the total amount her department paid for the specified project, (b) what is the name of the person into whose bank account her department paid the money and (c) will she provide the bank statement of the account; (2) whether her department owes any outstanding amount to the contractor; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, where is that money currently

Reply:

Honourable Member, please be advised that my Department did not appoint the contractor for the Seraleng Housing Project and therefore did not pay any money towards the project.

04 November 2020 - NW982

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)      With reference to the ongoing business rescue process at the SA Airways and following the statement he made to the Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises on 6 May 2020 (details furnished), (a) how is the Government planning to keep the airline running without any further financial support from the fiscus; (2) Whether he will furnish Mr G K Y Cachalia with a copy of the business rescue plan with proposals on the alternative transition process that he presented to the business rescue practitioners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Department and National Treasury have been tasked by Cabinet to consider alternative sources of funding for SAA to ensure that a restructured airline emerges from the Business Rescue process. Government will have to consider various sources of Funding including Strategic Equity Partnerships.

(2) Yes, a copy of the business rescue plan with proposals on the alternative transition process that he presented to the business rescue practitioners will be provided accordingly. (Kindly note the attached copy of the BR Plan for consideration).

04 November 2020 - NW2195

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the Seraleng Housing Project situated along the Z543 Meriting, Rustenburg, GPS co-ordinates -25.592018, 27.254960, what is the (a) name of the company to whom her department awarded the tender to build the houses, (b) total number of houses that were planned for the specified project and (c) total amount of the tender that was awarded; (2) on what date did the (a) building of the houses commence and (b) project grind to a halt?

Reply:

(1)(a) The tender for the Seraleng Housing Project was not awarded by my Department but by the North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements. With regards to the request for name of a contractor involved in the housing project referred to in this question, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the name of the contractor. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) I am informed that the total number of houses to be built was 557.

(c) The total amount of the tender was R89 146 104.11

(2)(a) I am further advised that the building of houses commenced in October 2015 and

(b) the project was halted in 2018.

04 November 2020 - NW1890

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the reasons that (a) he has not taken any action against a certain company (name furnished) amidst the allegations of corruption and money laundering and (b) the contract of the specified company was extended by Transnet; (2) Whether he has found that a certain person (name and details furnished) received a donation of R300 000 from the specified company through a foundation?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

(1)(a) According to MNS the allegations of bribery and kickbacks as published in the City Press were malicious and defamatory. As a result, MNS lodged a complaint against City Press with the Press Council.

The Press Council rejected the City Press allegations of bribery and kickbacks and directed City Press to publish an apology to MNS and to Mr Ndlovu for:

1.1.1 Unjustifiably reflecting in its reportage, both in the headlines and in the text of the article, that MNS had been implicated in kickbacks, alleged acts of corruption and bribery; and

1.1.2Unnecessarily tarnishing their reputation.

(1)(b) MNS was appointed onto Transnet’s legal panel through a fair, just and equitable procurement process during 2017. The panel was appointed for a period of 3 years.

(2) The allegations of Dr Molefe receiving R300 000 from MNS have been peddled since June 2019 and despite the facts being put on the table on numerous occasions, the allegations are repeated by the EFF.

MNS received a request from the Popo Molefe Foundation Charitable Trust to make a sponsorship/donation to the Charitable Trust to provide bursaries to previously disadvantaged students who cannot afford the costs of tertiary education. MNS was not the only recipient of this request. A number of companies and individuals were approached with a similar request. A copy of the request letter is attached hereto as Annexure “A”.

The Charitable Trust organized a Golf Day and Gala Dinner on 31 May 2019 as part of its fund raising programme. All potential donors/sponsors could contribute to advance the educational aspirations of previously disadvantaged students. In this regard MNS contributed an amount of R350 000 to the Charitable Trust, which entitled MNS and other sponsors/donors to inter alia be recognized and listed on the various branding platforms that the Charitable Trust employed. This included amongst others, being publicly mentioned at the Gala Dinner and listed on Charitable Trust’s website for the contribution made to the Charitable Trust in the 2019 fund raising programme.

There was no direct or indirect benefit to either Dr Molefe or any of his family members arising from the funds donated to the Charitable Trust. The sole beneficiaries of the Charitable Trust are disadvantaged students benefitting from the Charitable Trust through bursaries to pay for their tertiary fees. Save for the donation referred to above, MNS has not, either directly or indirectly advanced any donation/loan/payment to Dr Molefe or any of his associated entities.

03 November 2020 - NW2490

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of international relations

(1) In light of recent reports that have allegedly linked an employee of her department to the murder of two women in Sudan (a) what steps has her department taken to co-operate with the Sudanese government in resolving the matter (b) how does her department ensure that diplomatic immunity is not used to cover up crimes and misconduct by employees posted abroad?

Reply:

1. (a) South Africa and Sudan share cordial bilateral relations and the former is co-operating with the Sudanese authorities with regard to investigating the allegations levelled against the partner of the departmental employee. Communication was received through diplomatic channels and subsequently conveyed to the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) for their guidance.

(b) The Department has no intention of abusing diplomatic immunity nor covering a crime allegedly committed by any employee. The Department has referred the matter to the relevant departments dealing with allegations of this nature.

03 November 2020 - NW2383

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What multilateral programmes do the Southern African Development Community bloc and other African regional blocs have in addressing human trafficking on the continent?

Reply:

Most Member States in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and African Union (AU) have acceded to the first universal instrument dealing exclusively with human trafficking namely the United Nations (UN) Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children which serves as a supplement the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime (2000) known as the Palermo Protocol. This instrument provides the basis for cooperation and sharing of good practices among UN Member States to address human trafficking which is by nature a cross border phenomenon.

At the continental level the African Union adopted the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights in 1981, which prohibits slavery and human trafficking. The Charter is further complemented by the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child and the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa, which make specific provisions for the protection of women and children against slavery.

Furthermore, the Ouagadougou Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings, Especially Women and Children, adopted by the African Union in 2006, reaffirmed the provisions provided for in the continental instrument on human trafficking and encouraged African States to adopt legislation and institutional measures to combat trafficking in human beings. It aims at developing co-operation, best practices and mechanisms to prevent and combat trafficking in human beings. The Action Plan takes a holistic human rights approach and includes measures to protect the victims and prosecute the traffickers.

SADC adopted a Regional Strategy to Combat Illegal Migration, Smuggling of Migrants and Trafficking in Persons. This Strategy includes capacity building and training, revision of the legal frameworks, public education, awareness raising and victim support. Complementary Strategies to this Regional Strategy are the Revised Strategic Plan of Action on Combatting Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children, and the SADC-United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Regional Programme. Progress from these programmes was noted, amongst others, in the following areas: enactment of legislation criminalising Trafficking in Persons; the development of National Action Plans, Victim Identification Guidelines; Implementing Regulations, Standard Operating Procedures and referral mechanisms; and the establishment of the Regional Database on Trafficking in Persons. As the Regional Strategy to Combat Illegal Migration, Smuggling of Migrants and Trafficking in Persons is due to lapse in 2023, the SADC Secretariat, in conjunction with Member States, are reviewing the Regional Strategy.

Member States of the East African Community (EAC), namely; Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda and Tanzania, are all party to the United Nations (UN) Convention Against Transactional Organized Crime and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. Article 124 of the EAC Treaty read together with Article 12 of the Protocol on Peace and Security, requires Member States to undertake joint operations in controlling and preventing transnational and cross-border crimes including human trafficking. EAC Member States have specific laws on counter-trafficking in persons which are in line with the above UN Convention and the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children. However, the penalties for offences under the laws of Member States differ from one jurisdiction to another.

In 2016, the East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) passed the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Bill. The object of the Bill is to provide for a legal framework for the prevention of trafficking in persons, prosecution of perpetrators of trafficking in persons, provision of protection mechanisms and services for victims of trafficking in persons and development of partnerships for co-operation to counter trafficking in persons in the Community.

02 November 2020 - NW2394

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What amount did his department budget for the maintenance of the roads from Maphumulo in the iLembe region in KwaZulu-Natal joining Glendale, Jimu, and Mvozane to Tongaat and Mazibuko, to the Mvoti pedestrian bridge, which has been under construction for six years, and which gets flooded during the winter season, making the roads dangerous and difficult to use; (2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the construction of the roads will be completed?

Reply:

It was assumed that the following projects are the one that they are refering to as they are the only two projects that have challenges on site with stoppages by poor perfomance of the same contractor which is Tekeweni Civils,

1. Backround information on P711 (Upgrade Project)

Main Road 711 is situated within the Ilembe District in KZN and commences at km 0,000 at the intersection with P104 and ends at km 33.49 at the intersection with P20/1 (R74). The last 4.11 kilometres of the road has a blacktop surface while the remainder of the road is gravel. The route closely follows the existing alignment in a north to south direction intersecting with a number of district and local access roads. In addition, the route also serves a large population, approximately nine secondary and primary schools, three crèches, two health facilities including the Mtandeni Hospital, four places of worship (viz. churches) as well as agricultural lands. The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Transport has elected to upgrade the entire gravel section of Main Road 711 to a blacktop standard together with seven major structures in order to enable safer and greater travel between the towns of Maphumulo, Stanger, the King Shaka International Airport and the Dube Tradeport.

Projeced budget Expenditure & Output

Financial Year

Budget Required on Construction

Budget Required on Design

Km Outputs

Major Structures

Persons days

Jobs created

Training

               

2020/21

R 37 259 436.00

R6 227 491.50

5

3

2440

18

10

2021/22

R 65 620 951.20

R7 599 328.80

5

3

5640

30

10

2022/23

R 44 982 268.20

R4 432 941.80

4.08

1

3670

23

10

Sub Total

R 147 862 655.00

R18 259 762.10

5

7

11750

71

10

Grand Total

R 331 987 483.90

R112 441 022.83

29.08

8

65674

1433

10

The general project information is as follows:

GENERAL PROJECT INFORMATION

Extent of Project (Region)

Mtandeni to Maphumulo– (King Shaka)

Project Description (Technical, Social, Developmental)

To upgrade the corridor between Maphumulo and Stanger/ Tongaat and the DubeTradeport. To facilitate the development in the area

Latest Total Project Budget Estimate

R 444 428 506.73

Total No of kms of Project

29.080 kms

Start Date (Design year)

October 2010

Start Date (Construction year)

July 2011

Anticipated construction completion

July 2022

( 1) Backround information on P100 (Upgrade Projects)

P100 will be designed from km 15+400 to the end at km 45+192, at the uMzinyathi River Bridge. The existing portion of the route requiring upgrading extends from the Mdloti River Bridge in the north to the uMzinyathi River Bridge in the south. The proposed alignment closely follows the existing alignment, with both horizontal and vertical realignments proposed to meet the minimum geometric standards required. The road has been classified as a Secondary Road (SR), catering for medium to long distance movements between primary roads, towns and agricultural areas. The design and construction of uMzinyathi River Bridge will include the realignment of the bridge, use of the existing structure as a temporary deviation, construction of a new bridge and the removal of the existing bridge.

Projected budget expenditure & output

Financial Year

Budget Required on Construction

Budget Required on Design

Km Outputs

Major Structures

Persons days

Jobs created

 

             

Training

2020/21

R64 570 445.25

R6 410 593.35

3.78

2

2960

22

10

2021/22

R16 267 597.85

R4 273 728.90

0.412

1

990

45

10

Sub Total

R80 838 043.10

R10 684 322.25

4.192

3

3950

67

0

Grand Total

R473 451 595.16

R97 583 990.24

34.42

12

164 567

3673

10

The general project information is as follows:

GENERAL PROJECT INFORMATION

Extent of Project (Region)

Ndwedwe to Inanda

Project Description (Technical, Social, Developmental)

Type 3: Secondary Road. 6.5m wide, 2-lane, black-topped surfaced road, traversing generally mountainous terrain with climbing and passing lanes due to percentage of heavies. Highly urbanized for a portion, catalyst for development due to proximity to Inanda, Ntuzuma&KwaMashu, Development potential for opening agricultural areas and access to schools, clinics and housing.

Latest Total Project Budget Estimate

R 571 035 585.41

Total Length of Project

29.72 km

Start Date (Design year)

2001

Start Date (Construction year)

April 2003

Anticipated Construction Completion Date

March 2022

(2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long and

The construction of this road takes so long due to the following challenges:

Challenges

Remedial Measures

The contractor’s slow rate of progress

The contractor was issued with two contractual notifications highlighting slow rate progress. The contractor has not increased productivity therefore, this contract is currently following the termination process within the department. The annual contract ZNT4198 has been planned and submitted to the department for approval, should the current contract be terminated, in order to complete the remaining works on P711 between Km 9.080 to Km 14.080.

The unmarked grave sites within the road reserve

Ongoing consultation with local community members

The relocation of ilembe water main affects approximately 1,2km of the existing road.

The contractor has been instructed to provide a programme of works in order to complete the relocation.

Community Protests due to non-payment to sub-contractors by the main contractor

Ongoing engagement with the main contractor and community at PLC and special meetings.

(2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long?

The construction of this road takes so long due to the following challenges:

Challenges

Remedial Measures

The contractor’s slow rate of progress

The Contractor was issued with two contractual notifications highlighting slow rate progress. The contractor has not increased productivity therefore, this contract is currently following the Termination process within the Department. The annual contract ZNT4198 has been planned and submitted to the Department for approval, should the current contract be Terminated, in order to complete the remaining works on P100.

The relocation of external services within the road reserve

Ongoing consultation with external service providers

Community Protests due to non-payment to sub-contractors by the main contractor

Ongoing engagement with the main contractor and community at PLC and special meetings.

The maximisation of CPG opportunities in a contract that does not have a CPG allocation due to the tender being advertised in 2015 and engagement with the respective local business forums

This is being addressed through PLC meetings and ongoing discussions with the contractor.

02 November 2020 - NW2338

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1266 on 13 July 2020, teachers who have been diagnosed with co-morbidities have returned to school; if not, why not; if so, what number of the specified teachers have returned to schools?

Reply:

As at the end of COVID-19 Alert Levels 2, a total of 22 392 educators had been granted concession to work from home or remotely in terms of Collective Agreement 1 of 2020. These educators were expected to return to work commencing on 21 September 2020 upon the inception of Alert Level 1, and the expiry of the concession granted in terms of Collective Agreement 1 of 2020. As at 09 October 2020 all affected educators had returned to work as expected, except those who had applied for and granted various types of leave in terms of the normal leave dispensation. In total 3 975 educators had not returned to work by 09 October 2020; and of these edu8cators, only 475 had not been granted leave in terms of the applicable leave dispensation.

02 November 2020 - NW2320

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the fact that a certain company (name furnished) failed to establish the Environmental Consultative Committee as directed and has contravened section 139.02.11 (1) of the Civil Aviation Regulations (details furnished), sanctions have been imposed on the specified company for the contravention of the regulation; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The establishment of an Environmental Consultative Committee (ECC) is not a default regulatory requirement and only becomes a legal requirement when the Director of Civil Aviation (DCA) issues an instruction to that effect. The license holder was therefore not in contravention with the regulation before the issuance of such an instruction, on 04 June 2020. Such an instruction by the DCA, is issued when environmental matters at an aerodrome does not get resolved through other means and it becomes necessary for the license holder to establish a formal consultative structure with interested parties in the area to resolve environmental matters.

02 November 2020 - NW2308

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) are the reasons that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ignored the court order by Judge Wendy Hughes on 1 June 2020 to retain the lawyers for six more months and (b) plans are in place to assist with clients’ claims during the specified time period; (2) (a) how does the RAF intend to source more state attorneys, (b) what are the timelines and (c) why has the RAF chosen to take the specified route and move away from the previous approach; (3) whether the specified change that the RAF has embarked on will be more cost-effective for the specified entity; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) details of the costing and (b) further relevant details; (4) what has been the total cost to the RAF to have the panel of 103 attorneys disbanded?

Reply:

1. (a) The reasons that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ignored the court order by Judge Wendy Hughes on 1 June 2020 to retain the lawyers for six more months was that the RAF launched an appeal against the order, which appeal has the legal effect of suspending the operation of the order. However, the Applicants then brought an application in terms of section 18(3) of the Superior Courts Act, 2013 for the order to be implemented pending the outcome of the petition to the Supreme Court of Appeal, which application was granted by the Judge, but was subsequently set aside by a full bench of the Court,following an appeal by the RAF in terms of section 18(4) of the Act; and (b) the RAF has put plans in place, as required by section 4(1)(b)of the RAF Act, to assist with clients’ claims by investigating and settling the matters returned by its former panel of attorneys and inviting plaintiff attorneys to block settlement meetings, where the RAF purposefully pursues the settlement of matters that are capable of settlement, and by referring disputes for voluntary mediation through a pilot project. Majority of these matters were litigated unnecessary as they are capable of settlement. This approach is beneficial to the claimants as they no longer need to wait for future trial dates in order to have their claims settled but rather settled earlier;

2. (a) the RAF intends to source more state attorneysthrough its usual recruitment processes and this will be informed by the volume of work (number of litigated matters where there are triable disputes) versus the reasonable number of attorneys required to attend to such matter efficiently; (b) with a timeline for the initial targeted number set for the end of the current financial year and (c) the RAF has chosen the specified route to move away from the previous approach because the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (the Act) provides that the RAF must pay compensation to road accident victims in accordance with the Act, which allows the RAF a period of 120 days from the date on which the claim is lodged to investigate its liability and to settle the claim. It is only in exceptional cases that litigation is contemplated, and it is not anticipated that the RAF would outsource its investigation of claims to an external panel of attorneys, as has been done. It is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopper on the RAF matters set down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in South Africa. RAF matters get settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. Moreover, the panel of attorneys and the RAF are regularly criticized for the manner in which they manage these outsourced claims. In a recent Judgment in Mpumalanga High Court in the matter of Mncube v RAF, Legodi JP said the following

“More than 90% of matters on our trial roll are the Road Accident Fund which is funded through public purse. One would have thought the parties and or legal practitioners in dealing with these matters, will be more expedient and professional. However, the contrary appears to be the case. This is despite continuous financial woes the Fund finds itself in.”

In the unreported judgment of Daniels and Others v Road Accident Fund and Others, Binns-Ward J, after reviewing 17 cases where the RAF was rebuked by various judges for their handling of claims and litigation, said the following:

“A depressing feature of all of the aforementioned judgments is that they instance examples of cases in which the Fund must have incurred substantial legal expenses in taking to trial, or on appeal, claims which it had no basis to responsibly contest. In the context of the evidence before us that legal expenses constitute a very significant component of the Fund's overall expenditure, this is an aspect of the Fund's conduct which is demanding of conscientious attention by the responsible authorities…”.

Currently, the RAF owes claimants many billions of Rand in settled claims. It is however unable to pay these claimants and yet spends R10.6 billion on legal costs annually. By getting rid of the current operating model, with unaffordable panel of attorneys, and by adopting the new operating model the RAF could save substantial amounts in legal fees. The RAF 2020-2025 Strategic Plan targets a 75% saving on legal costs over the five-year period, which will assist the RAF to pay claimants promptly from the anticipated saving. In addition, this new operating model will lead to very few RAF matters coming before courts, which will lessen the workload of the overworked judges;

(3) it is foreseen that the change will be substantially more cost-effective for the RAF (a) by reverting to an operating model which gives effect to section 4(1)(b) of the RAF Act, where the RAF capacitates its Operations (claims) Department for Claim Handlers to investigate and settle claims, as opposed to outsourcing claims to a costlypanel of attorneys, and by pursuing voluntary mediation, as opposed to expensive and protracted litigation, through which significant savings in legal cost can be achieved and (b) where litigation cannot be avoided, referral of the matter to a salaried state attorney, as opposed to a private attorney, will achieve further savings. In terms of the previous model, any attendance by an attorney on a particular litigated matter resulted in a charge of approximately R 292,50 per quarter of an hour and with RAF litigation being handled by the office of the State Attorneys, such attendances will no longer attract any fees;

(4) the service level agreements concluded between the RAF and its former panel of attorneys expired due to effluxion of time on 31 May 2020 following amendments which were made to the Service Level Agreement which was due to expire in November 2019. Of significance with the amendment is that a provision which allowed for making copies on handover of files was amended. The provision of copying costs was going to result in legal costs of R 1, 3 Billion at any time when the RAF changes the panel of attorneys. The total cost to the RAF to have the panel of attorneys disbanded is unknown, as it is a function of the difference between the R 3.6 billion approximately spent by the RAF annually on its former panel of attorneys, and the cost of the implementation of the new operating model, which is expected to achieve substantial savings on legal cost, as alluded to in the earlier response to the prior question.

02 November 2020 - NW2272

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of schools in the Republic still use pit toilets as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) is the provincial breakdown of the specified schools?

Reply:

a. The site assessment and scoping report recently completed (09/10/2020) revealed that, about 719 Schools require new sanitation facilities as they still make use of the pit toilets. All the other schools which were declared as part of the 3898 have been actioned (allocated to Implementing Agent, who have commenced with planning, or are under construction, or have reached final completion; while some small unviable schools have been merged with other such schools)

b.

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SCHOOLS

Eastern Cape

561

Kwa-Zulu Natal

89

Limpopo

69

TOTAL

719

02 November 2020 - NW2254

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Of the R30 million adjusted budget for the procurement of personal protective equipment (PPEs) to support taxi ranks, (a) what amount of that budget was paid to the service providers and (b)(i) what are the relevant details of exactly what items were bought, (ii) how was it distributed, (iii) which taxi ranks received the PPEs and (iv) is there an acknowledgement of receipt?

Reply:

a) What amount of the budget was paid to the service providers, and

An amount of R30 055 626, 16

b) (i) What are the relevant details of exactly what items were bought,

Procurement of PPE’s for Public Transport Industry – Type of PPE’s and Cost

GOODS

ITEMS

AMOUNT

Public Transport: Activation at Taxi Ranks

Mask Surgical, Gloves - Surgical, Sanitisers, Disinfectants, SanitiserRefils, Disinfectant Wipes, Non-contact Infrared Temperature Scanners

R141 940,00

Public Transport: Round 1 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters

Mask Surgical, Gloves - Surgical, Sanitisers empty refillable bottles, Disinfectants,SanitiserRefils, Disinfectant refill, Disposable Protective Wear, Fogging Machines

R12 142 082,38

Public Transport: Round 2 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters (Multiple Award)

Sanitisers empty refillable bottles, Disinfectant refill, Disposable Protective Wear, Fogging Machines, Mask Surgical, Disinfectant Spray, SanitiserRefils

R12 589 210.03

PT: Assistance to DBE by providing Sanitisers and Disinfectant to Scholar Transport

Disinfectant refillable bottle, Disinfectant Refils, Gloves-Surgical, Sanitiser refillable bottle, SanitiserRefils

R5 182 393.75

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON PPE

R30 055 626,16

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON PPE – TRANSPORT SECTOR

R30 055 626,16

(ii) How was it distributed?

The PPEs were distributed proportionally among provinces based on the number of taxi vehicles registered and issued with valid Operating License in each province. See attached tables A and B.

TABLE A: TAXI INDUSTRY

Note: Deliveries Round 1 completed - 20/04/2020 Deliveries Round 2 completed - 19/05/2020

ITEM

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION

TOTAL QUANTITY DELIVERED

 

GP

KZN

WC

MP

L

FS

NW

EC

NC

 

PENDO-FOG machine to disinfect surfaces and taxis

per item

3

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

19

Taxi Disinfectant Spray Bottle

2 units per taxi rank x 300

170

167

161

109

117

117

117

117

117

1192

Disinfectant refill for taxis

2 x 20 litres per rank x 300

173

169

163

111

119

119

119

119

119

1211

Sanitizers 1 litre bottles for each taxi for use by driver and passengers

per item

16247

15750

24210

16650

16650

15900

16650

16900

14300

153257

Sanitisers 20 litre refill

20 litre

451

302

336

253

253

252

253

286

223

2609

PPE suits for Marshalls

per item

130

126

126

100

106

103

106

106

96

999

Masks

per item

98000

78890

78840

54940

54940

58890

54940

55700

44900

580040

Gloves

box of 100

1060

851

60

928

928

815

828

860

760

7090

TABLE B: SCHOLAR TRANSPORT

Note: Deliveries completed by 05/06/2020

ITEM

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION

TOTAL QUANTITY DELIVERED

 

GP

KZN

WC

MP

L

FS

NW

EC

NC

 

Sanitizers 1 litre bottles for use by driver and passengers

per item

500

133

209

153

180

310

137

757

121

2500

Sanitisers 10 litre refill

10 litre refill

757

85

500

133

180

153

137

121

209

2275

Disinfectant litre bottle for Transport

per item

500

133

209

153

180

79

137

757

121

2269

Disinfectant 20 litre refill

20 litre refill

500

133

209

153

180

79

137

757

121

2269

Gloves for drivers

box of 100

757

90

500

133

180

153

137

121

209

2280

(iii) Which taxi ranks received the PPEs, and

The PPEs were received by the Provincial Representatives who then distributed them in the different taxi ranks within the Provinces.

(iv) Is there an acknowledgement of receipt?

The Provincial Representatives received and acknowledged receipt of the PPEs.

02 November 2020 - NW2393

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What criteria will he use in appointing the next board of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa to prevent what was experienced with the previous board?

Reply:

The composition of the Board of control of PRASA is provided in Section 24 of the Legal Succession to the South African Transport Services Act, 1989 (Act No. 9 of 1989). Section 24(1) empowers the Minister to appointment a Board of Control of eleven (11) Members.

The criteria for appointing the Board of Control is as follows:

a) Publication of an advert in the Media calling for nomination of persons to serve as Members of the Board of Control of PRASA.

b) Shortlisting of nominated persons.

c) Recommendation for appointment of suitable candidates.

d) Request Cabinet approval for appointment of recommended candidates.

e) Once Cabinet approves/supports the recommendations, the Minister will appoint the approved candidates.

f) The candidates will be given appointment letters and will be inducted and resume their duties.

02 November 2020 - NW2270

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the Public Protector’s report on the illegal conversion of the panel vans into Toyota Quantum 16-seater passenger minibus taxis, which confirmed the allegations levelled against his department and other organs of the State, on what date will he take action against the SA Bureau of Standards, National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications, Management Information Base, Toyota South Africa and all the financial institutions involved in this corruption?

Reply:

In the report on “Illegal Conversion of Toyota Quantum Panel Vans into Minibus Taxis” (Report No 37 of 2018/19), the Public Protector issued remedial action that must be implemented by the Minister of Transport. In terms of the report, the appropriate steps that the Minister is instructed to take urgently is to engage all affected stakeholders to ensure that these vehicles are removed from the roads. There is no suggestion or directive in the PP Report for the Minister to act against any of the entities mentioned above. However, the Minister is forging ahead engaging these stakeholders as directed in the PP Report to find a permanent solution.

02 November 2020 - NW2307

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) was the reason that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) decided to disband their panel of 103 attorneys that was set up in 2014 and (b) is the new litigious model that the RAF will be following; (2) what total number of (a) in-house lawyers does the RAF currently have, (b) vacancies exist and (c) lawyers does the RAF intend to hire in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a) The reason the Road Accident Fund (RAF) decided to disband its panel of attorneys is because the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (the Act) provides that the RAF must pay compensation to road accident victims in accordance with the Act, which allows the RAF a period of 120 days from the date on which the claim is lodged to investigate its liability and to settle the claim. It is only in exceptional cases that litigation is contemplated, and it is not anticipated that the RAF would outsource its investigation of claims to an external panel of attorneys, as has been done. It is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopper on the RAF matters set down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in South Africa. RAF matters get settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. Moreover, the panel of attorneys and the RAF are regularly criticized for the manner in which they manage these outsourced claims. In a recent Judgment in Mpumalanga High Court in the matter of Mncube v RAF, Legodi JP said the following

“More than 90% of matters on our trial roll are the Road Accident Fund which is funded through public purse. One would have thought the parties and or legal practitioners in dealing with these matters, will be more expedient and professional. However, the contrary appears to be the case. This is despite continuous financial woes the Fund finds itself in.”

In the unreported judgment of Daniels and Others v Road Accident Fund and Others, Binns-Ward J, after reviewing 17 cases where the RAF was rebuked by various judges for their handling of claims and litigation, said the following:

A depressing feature of all of the aforementioned judgments is that they instance examples of cases in which the Fund must have incurred substantial legal expenses in taking to trial, or on appeal, claims which it had no basis to responsibly contest. In the context of the evidence before us that legal expenses constitute a very significant component of the Fund's overall expenditure, this is an aspect of the Fund's conduct which is demanding of conscientious attention by the responsible authorities…”.

Currently, the RAF owes claimants many billions of Rand in settled claims. It is however unable to pay these claimants and yet spends R10.6 billion on legal costs annually. By getting rid of the current operating model, with unaffordable panel of attorneys, and by adopting the new operating model the RAF could save substantial amounts in legal fees.

The RAF 2020-2025 Strategic Plan targets a 75% saving on legal costs over the five-year period, which will assist the RAF to pay claimants promptly from the anticipated saving. In addition, this new operating model will lead to very few RAF matters coming before courts, which will lessen the workload of the overworked judgesand (b) the new litigious model that the RAF is following seeks to capacitate its operations for Claim Handlers to investigate and settle claims, as opposed to outsourcing claims to a costly panel of attorneys, and by pursuing voluntary mediation, as opposed to expensive and protracted litigation, and where litigation cannot be avoided, referral of the matter to a salaried state attorney, as opposed to a private attorney;

(2) (a) the RAF currently has a total number of 62 attorneys to be seconded to the Office of the State Attorney to deal exclusively with RAF matters, (b) the further recruitment of additional attorneys will be informed by an analysis still be done on the ability of the current attorneys to deal efficiently with the current number of litigated matters, where triable disputes exists, and (c) the RAF aims to further recruit on an ongoing basis such additional attorneys informed by the number of litigated matters which requires representation in Court. The number of attorneys to be recruited in the 2020 – 21 financial year is unknown at this stage.

02 November 2020 - NW2321

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What has the SACivil Aviation Authority done, except to attend a meeting on 27 June 2019 and issue an instruction almost a year later, to ensure that a certain company (name furnished) meets the conditions of their operating licence?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The SACAA maintains oversight over its license holders through annual inspections and, if required, additional surveillance. The SACAA has therefore conducted oversight audits on this operator as per the mandate of the Regulator.

The licence holder is currently in compliance with the conditions for which the operating certificate was issued, as contemplated inPart 139 of the Civil Aviation Regulations.

30 October 2020 - NW2482

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

With reference to naming of streets to acknowledge persons and promote heritage transformation, (a) what (i) total number of streets in each province have been earmarked for this purpose and (ii) is the reason that some streets remain unnamed and (b) how does the Government intend to address the issue of unnamed streets? NW3090E

Reply:

(a). (i) – (ii) The naming and renaming of streets remains the mandate of the local municipalities and does not fall within the mandate of the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture.

(b) The Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture is responsible for the naming and renaming of national features as per the South African Geographical Names Council Act, (Act No 118 of 1998).

30 October 2020 - NW2401

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) Given that a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Department of Basic Education and Sport and Recreation South Africa regarding an Integrated School Sport Framework that provides for clarity on roles and responsibilities for all stakeholders in school sport was signed on 30 May 2018 in Cape Town, which currently is not being followed, what steps will he take to reclaim full autonomy over school sport by stopping federations from discarding the well-organised school sport bodies to start their own sport bodies; (2) whether his department has been informed of the division and confusion the discarding of the specified MoU is causing amongst schools, as they do not know which school sport body they need to affiliate to; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department has been informed of the extent to which the specified problems are disadvantaging learners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he will intervene to stabilise the situation so that learners can once again enjoy school sport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The former Department of Sport and Recreation and the present Department of Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) continues to implement its responsibilities as indicated in the MOU signed on 30 May 2018.

This is illustrated by the fact that DSAC has aligned its Mass Participation and Sport Development Conditional Grant funding on School Sport, to ensure that the outcomes as it relates to its roles and responsibilities in the MOU are effected. It should be noted that DBE is responsible for levels 1-3 of the MoU and DSAC is responsible for levels 4-6. and to this effect from the Conditional Grant funding, School Sport has a ring-fenced 40% allocation, which is further allocated as follows:

Provinces MUSTring fence R10 million to provide transport, attire and delivery of provincial teams to the National School Sport Championships. An allocation to a province will include all funds that are necessary for the hosting of the National Schools Championships and will include accommodation, breakfast and dinner for the provinces that will be hosting the 4 segments of the National Schools Championships a year, (Autumn, Winter, IG Festival and Summer).

The remaining School Sport allocation is further allocated as follows:

  • 10 % for training of people to deliver school sport;
  • 20% to purchase equipment and or attire for schools below quintal 1- 3 identified through participation in leagues;
  • 40% to deliver district and provincial competitions;
  • 15% to remunerate co-ordinators who co-ordinate, support, monitor and evaluate school sport at district and local level; and
  • 15 % to support school sport structures.

School Sport is a joint co-operation between the Department of Sport , Arts and Culture and Department of Basic Education and thus each has a responsibility to ensure that School Sport is fully implemented as indicated in the MoU. National Sports Federations are recognized in terms of the Recognition of Sports Bodies Regulations and are custodians of the code of sport. School Sport is a critical pipeline for the honing of skills talent identification and it forms the foundation of the athlete development pathway. No School Sport structure can function on its own, without the support of the Federations. Federations are the custodians of their codes and must take ownership to ensure that there are school sport structures and School Sport has representation within the Structures of the Federation.

There is no intention to close school sport structures, however all school sport structures must adhere to the guidelines for the establishment of school sport structures, must be recognized and an affiliate of the Sports Federations and must be representative of educators for the purpose of accountability and safeguarding. The Department provides dedicated, ringfenced funding to the priority codes for School Sport. There is an allocation of funding within the Conditional Grant allocated to provinces for the establishment of School Sport structures.

2. The stakeholders meet regularly on a quarterly basis as an Extended Joint National Task Team comprising Federations, National Departments of Sport and Education, Provincial Departments of Sport and Education, Teacher unions and School Governing Bodies Associations to discuss programmes and policy matters related to the MoU. Progress reports from all stakeholders are shared.

To date there has not been any indication of confusion about structures. The only matter that has been a challenge is with regard to Athletics SA and their affiliate School Athletics. All School Sport structure know that they must account to the Federation, as the custodians of the code and also report quarterly to the extended JNTT.

Schools Athletics had sought to operate outside the mother body with disregard to resolutions taken at a Council meeting. They were subsequently suspended by the Federation. All our operations regarding sporting codes is done through Sport Federations and not School Sport structures.

3. Indeed, the challenges in School Sport have far reaching implications for the learners. We are guided by the National Sport and Recreation Act which empowers the Minister to recognise one sporting body per code. There is also the Recognition of Sport and Recreation Bodies Regulations, which gives effect to that act. Resources are provided to Federations to implement school sport and work through them to ensure that school sport structures are accountable. We also acknowledge that the active teachers play a central role in the structures and their participation in the programme is important. The resistance of some of the School Sport structures to adhere to this principle creates a challenge that ultimately leads to other undesirable effects. In an effort to sustain such autonomous structures, learners / parents are expected to pay for participation. This, then creates a wide gap between those who have and those who have not. The far-reaching consequence is that athletes participating outside the Federations jurisdiction do not gain official recognition for achievements, setting new records and the awarding of National colours which falls within the jurisdiction of the National Federations.

4. The department stands ready at all times to intervene in resolving these matters and we have intervened previously where there has been misunderstanding between structures and federations. As indicated above, the Department convened a meeting with Athletics SA, the Department of Basic Education and the Teacher Union to resolve the impasse around the Schools Athletics Championship that was disrupted by COVID-19 Lockdown.

30 October 2020 - NW2376

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

In light of the fact that eight environment ministry officials have been suspended in relation to a R2 billion tender fraud (details furnished), and her department's undertaking that it would, in due course, implement system recommendations that were outlined in the forensic investigation report, what(a) are the recommendations and (b) is the expected timeline for the implementation of the recommendations?

Reply:

A The forensic investigation report made the following recommendations with regard to improvement to supply chain management processes:

  1. The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) should revise its functionality criteria for tenders such that these is compliance with the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, 2000: Preferential Procurement Regulations, 2017.
  2. The DEFF should revise its practice of appointing the same officials to serve on the Bid Specification Committee (BSC) and Bid Evaluation Committee (BEC). The functions of bid specification and evaluation should be segregated in order b minimise the risk of allusion between officials.
  3. The DEFF should implement a system whereby all BSC, BEC and Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC) meetings are mechanically bearded. Such recordings should be filed for reference.
  4. The Supply Chain Management (SCM) Directorate should ensue that all minutes of BSC, BEC and BAC meetings are prepared within a reasonable period and filed. Such minutes should be signed by the relevant officials present at such meetings.
  5. The DEFF should cancel all contracts and/or negotiations with bidders who did not meet the mandakry and functional requirement of the bid.

B The following recommendations have been implemented to date:

    1. Criteria far evaluation of tenders have been amended b ensure objectivity and transparency. All Terms of Reference are reviewed by a quality assurer and are approved by the BAC.
    2. BAC meetings are recorded and minutes are prepared timeously. The BAC will only consider tenders for adjudication of the BSC and BEC minutes are included in submission.

The following recommendations will be implemented in due course:

iii. Amendments to the SCM with regard B the BSC and BEC composition

lv. Contracts as currently being reviewed by Counsel to consider any legal risks and to advise regarding the due process that must be followed when contracts are cancelled.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISIJERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE:
27/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2380

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Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

In view of the announcement by his department in May 2019 that a new contractor had been appointed to complete the process of converting the house of Ms Winnie Madikizela-Mandela in Brandfort into a museum and that a budget of R2 million had been allocated towards the specified project of which the construction was to be completed by November 2019, (a) what caused delays in completing the project, (b) by what date does he envisage will it be completed and (c) what actions has he taken against those persons responsible for the specified delays?            NW2955

Reply:

The Minister in May 2019 announced that a new contractor had been appointed to complete the process of converting the Ms Winnie Madikizela-Mandela house in Brandfort into a museum and that a budget of R2 million had been allocated towards the specified project of which the construction was to be completed by November 2019.

a) The construction of the project was not delayed.

b) The construction was completed on 19 November 2019.

c) No action is necessary as the project was completed within the planned time.

30 October 2020 - NW2480

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether the mandate of the task team on the removal of statues, symbols and monuments that do not reflect the constitutional values of a post-colonial and post-apartheid democratic order to theme parks has ended; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date; (2) (a) what total number of persons were on the task team and on what date were they appointed, (b) how was the selection made and what was the criteria, (c) how and by whom will future audits on the statues, monuments and symbols be done, (d) what budget allocation will be made available, (e) what total number of heritage sites in the Republic can sustain themselves and (f) who decided to use the name theme parks; (3) On what date will the final report be made available to the committee and the public and has the final report been made available to task team members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Whether the final report has been made available to task team members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The mandate of the task team was to conduct public hearings in all nine provinces on the transformation of South Africa’s Heritage Landscape. The Task Team was specifically asked to consult the public on the fate of statues, symbols and geographical names that commemorated figures and the heritage of both colonial and apartheid figures and cultures. The Task Team was also requested to consult on the fate of statues, symbols and monuments that do not reflect the constitutional values of a post-colonial and post-apartheid democratic order.

2. (a)The total number of task team members was thirteen (13), they were nominated on 17 April 2015 at Freedom Park during the National Consultation workshop on the Transformation of the Heritage Landscape. I signed the letters of appointing task team members on 04 May 2015.

(b) The Task Team members were nominated during the National consultation workshop at Freedom Park. Members nominated are Heritage Practitioners, Academics specialising in history and heritage and persons representing stakeholder institutions and interest groups within the South African Society to assist the department to implement the 20 resolutions taken during the national consultative workshop. Prof M Ndletyane, Dr D Webb, Ms L Callinicos and Dr S Fikeni are historians and academics. Mr J Mohlala was chairperson on the South African Geographical Names Council, Dr A Bailey represented Afriforum, Mr E Fereira represented the Afrikaans KultuurTaalVereeneging, Mr C Le Fleur represented the National Khoisan Council and Mr C Maxwele represented the Rhodes Must Fall youth movement, Advocate S Mancotywa and Advocate T Ramagoma represented the National Heritage Council, MrDumisaniSibayi represented the South African Heritage Resources Agency and Mr V Ndima represented the then Department of Arts and Culture.

(c)  The South African Heritage Resources Agency will do the national audit of all statues in South Africa and after public consultations a determination will be made where there is a need for the removal and repositioning of some of the symbols and statues, the process will be guided by SAHRA’s removal and relocation guidelines as per South Africa Heritage Resources Act no 25 of 1999.

(d) The affected municipalities will be required to allocate operational budget.

(e) Heritage sites in South Africa are funded by the government.

(f) The public consultation process will inform decisions on the location of theTheme Parks.

4. The final report on the Transformation of South Africa’s Heritage Landscape was published on 23 February 2018.

30 October 2020 - NW2489

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1) With regard to the recent media reports, wherein it is alleged that he has written to the International Cricket Council (ICC) about his intention to intervene in the running and management of Cricket South Africa (CSA), what contingency plans does he have in place to (a) ensure that the ICC does not ban the CSA from international cricket as a result of his intervention and (b) safeguard the livelihood of players when the ICC bans the CSA from international cricket; (2) Whether he will furnish Inkosi B N Luthuli with the strategic document on how he plans to intervene, stating the envisioned outcome of his intervention; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

1.(a) The Minister is empowered by the National Sport and Recreation Act, 1998 (Act No. 110 of 1998) to intervene in any dispute, alleged mismanagement, or any other related matter in sport or recreation that is likely to bring a sport or recreation activity into disrepute. Furthermore, the International Cricket Council (ICC) notice dated 11 November 2011 sent to all members headed in relation to “Regulations relating to the Independence of Member Board” provides that Naturally, a government (or any office thereof) would also not be prevented from investigating the affairs of a Member Board in order to ascertain whether any criminal offences have been committed, including fraud, dereliction of directors’ duties (including fiduciary duties) or contravention of any relevant legislation. Similarly, there may be circumstances where a government rightfully seeks to intervene in the event that a Member Board is dysfunctional. The ICC Governance Review Committee believes that this is a question of accountability, not interference.”

(b) There is a difference between intervention and interference. Hence, the Minister is not seeking to interfere in matters relating to the selection of teams, the administration of the game and the appointment of, or termination of the service of, the Executive Members of cricket.

The word “intervene” has, according to its dictionary meaning, a positive connotation of attempting to come between disputing parties, to intercede, to mediate, and to prevent further damage or harm from occurring.

To “interfere” has a negative connotation according to dictionary meanings, and generally people are resentful of attempts to “interfere” because it has connotations of meddling in other people’s business, to interpose in a way that hinders or impedes or that involves colliding with or coming into opposition with another party. It normally is associated with having a damaging or negative effect.

2. The Sport and Recreation Act is the strategic instrument and it will be premature to disclose the modus operandi related to any action as outlined in the Act. By disclosing the envisaged outcome will really compromise the process. As this is a developing story, updated information will be provided at the appropriate time.

30 October 2020 - NW2370

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)Whether, in relation to the recommendations of the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, there has been an investigation into and a report produced on the involvement of members of the Executive in intelligence operations and measures to prevent this; if so, (a) which members of the national Executive exceeded their mandate in this regard and (b) what consequences have they faced; (2) whether, in relation to the recommendations of the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, there has been an investigation into and a report produced on the policy framework including legislation that governs operational activities conducted by members of the national Executive; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, in relation to the recommendations of the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, there has been an investigation into and a report produced on the development of guidelines that will enable members to report a manifestly illegal order as envisaged in section 199(6) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether, in relation to the recommendations of the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, there has been an investigation into and a report produced on the effectiveness of (a) Training and Development Programmes in capacitating members of the Agency and (b) intelligence and counter-intelligence coordination within the Agency and between the agency and other South African intelligence entities and the capacity and role of the National Intelligence Coordinating Committee in this regard; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether, in relation to the recommendations of the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, there has been an investigation into and a report produced on the effectiveness and appropriateness of the existing oversight mechanisms in ensuring accountability and transparency; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes. Investigations have been instituted. These investigations are on going.

(2) The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa prohibts involvement of the Members of the Executive into the intelligence operations of the State Security Agency (SSA). Furthermore, the existing National Strategic Intelligence Act (Act 39 of 1994) and Operational Directives of the SSA also prohits involvement of the Members of the Executive into the intelligence operations.

Both the National Strategic Intelligence Act (Act 39 of 1994) and the Intelligence Services Act (Act 65 of 2002) are under review for amendment as part of the intelligence reforms recommended by the High-level Review Panel.

(3) Review of Operational Directives and Standard Operational Procedure is a work in progress. The review seeks to amongst others enable SSA Members to report manifestly illegal order. Furthermore, a process on Amendments to Regulations is currently underway, the Regulations will strengthen accountability and good governance of the Members.

(4) The Intelligence Academy is in a process of reviewing its training programmes with a view to adequately capacitate Members of the intelligence community. Furthermore, the intelligence amendments currently underway seeks to improve coordination of intellligence and counter intelligence.

(5) The Reports are instrumental in the reform and the legislative amendments, aimed at strengthen the oversight structures. The legislative amendments will be submitted to Parliament for consideration, inputs and processing.

30 October 2020 - NW2486

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will provide Mrs C Phillips with a list of any companies that provide mining companies with goods and/or services that (a) he and (b) his immediate family are shareholders in or benefit from financially; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister makes annual declaration of Financial Interest to Parliament through Parliamentary Ethics Committee. The Member can, if she is interested, make a request to access such declaration from the Committee.

30 October 2020 - NW2491

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In light of the fact that the Nigerian government is currently experiencing widespread protests against police brutality and its governance structures, what (a) is the Government’s position on the current situation in Nigeria and (b) agreements are in place between the South African and Nigerian governments that can allow for a sharing of experiences and assistance in police reform and better governance in Nigeria?

Reply:

(a) South Africa supports the statement issued by the Chairperson of the African Union Commission, Mr Moussa Faki Mahamat, on 21 October 2020, strongly condemning the violence that erupted on 20 October 2020 during protests in Lagos, Nigeria that has resulted in multiple deaths and injuries. The Chairperson reiterated the African Union's commitment to continue to accompany the government and people of Nigeria in support of a peaceful solution, and encouraged the Nigerian authorities to conduct an investigation to ensure the perpetrators of acts of violence are held to account

South Africa stands ready to assist should such a request come through the competent authorities of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

(b) The Agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Federal Republic of Nigeria in respect of Police Cooperation was signed on 14 March 2001 during the 3rd Session of the Bi-National Commission between South Africa and Nigeria. The Agreement came into force on 27 July 2005 and makes provision for the exchange of working experience, as well as training of personnel. Cooperation within the framework of the agreement is on the basis of a request received from the interested competent authority.

30 October 2020 - NW2485

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will provide Mrs C Phillips with a list of any companies that (a) he and (b) his immediate family members are shareholders in and/or benefit from financially, that have applied for prospecting and/or mining rights; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister makes annual declarations to Parliament through the Parliamentary Ethics Committee. The Member can, if she is interested, make a request of the Ministers Declaration of Financial Interests from the Committee.