Questions and Replies

07 October 2015 - NW3492

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What amount is the EastCape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College spending annually (i) on its own internal security arrangements internally and (ii) to hire external security firms and (b) what are the (i) names and (ii) details of each external security firm; (2) is there a current budget deficit at specified college; if so, (a) how much is the budget deficit, (b) how did the deficit arise and (c) how does his department intend to resolve the deficit; (3) has any money from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme been used by the college for any purpose other than student loans and bursaries; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. (a) The following table provides details of the amounts spent by Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EMC) on its internal and external security.

Security

Per month

Amount Spent from January to September 2015

1. Internal

R45,417.00

R408,753.00

2. External

(a) Metro Security Services (3.5 months only)

R239,474.61 per month

R838,161.15

(b) Eagle Eye Security Services and Guarding (monthly)

R622 634.60 per month

R5,603,711.40

Total (9 Months)

R6,850,625.55

(b) The table below provides details of each external firm:

Name of the Firm

Number of Guards

Grades

Commencement Date

Termination Date

Metro Security Services

20

A, B, C and D

26 January 2015

15 May 2015

Eagle Eye Security Services and Guarding

52

A, B, C, D and E

1 March 2014

28 February 2017

NB: It should be noted that Metro Security Services was only appointed to bolster security at

EMC during the unrest.

2) (a) The current operating budget deficit for 2015 is R9.9 million which excludes non-cash items totalling R14.5 million for depreciation and bad debts.

     (b) The budget deficit is predominantly attributable to extraordinary items not budgeted for such as strike related costs in terms of security, repairs to property, legal fees, etc.

(c) Following the conclusion of the employees’ industrial action and restoration of normal operations, a budget review will be undertaken. Whilst there were exceptional strike related costs, there were also savings on certain expenditure items that will mitigate the deficit. A revised budget, including virements will be presented to the College Council before the end of the financial year.

3) Funds from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme have not been utilised by the College for any purposes other than student bursaries.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3492 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 October 2015 - NW3695

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many students (a) were registered by the (i) Further Education and Training colleges and (ii) universities across the country in 2015 and (b) will be registered by the specified institutions in 2016?

Reply:

a) (i) Public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges have a number of enrolment intakes within an academic year. Headcount enrolments in public TVET colleges across the nine provinces as at 21 August 2015 are tabulated below. This excludes headcount enrolments for Engineering Trimester 3 N1 – N6 programmes, which will only be available on 30 October 2015.

Total Headcount Actual students enrolled as at 21 August 2015

Province

NC(V)
Engineering

NC(V)
Business and General Studies

Engineering

Intro N4 - N6
Business Studies

Other Programmes

TOTAL
Headcount Actual students Enrolled

     

N1 - N3

N4 - N6

     

Eastern Cape

5 600

15 066

10 294

4 959

29 880

2 646

68 445

Free State

1 721

5 273

10 380

4 760

24 744

1 851

48 729

Gauteng

8 426

18 303

38 059

18 122

52 234

4 983

140 127

KwaZulu-Natal

9 800

21 365

20 880

10 259

43 898

10 255

116 457

Limpopo

9 839

16 538

19 622

7 450

32 181

1 044

86 674

Mpumalanga

4 590

6 912

9 133

3 299

9 270

119

33 323

North-West

3 405

6 628

9 886

3 293

14 554

1 017

38 783

Northern Cape

731

1 537

3 686

269

6 814

756

13 793

Western Cape

3 887

10 920

11 403

3 057

25 391

13 369

68 027

National

47 999

102 542

133 343

55 468

238 966

36 040

614 358

Data source: Weekly Enrolment Monitoring as at 21 August 2015.

(ii) Universities have a number of enrolment intakes within an academic year and will be submitting their 2015 enrolment data to the Department on 30 November 2015. The university headcount enrolment target for the 2015 academic year is 1 020 000.

b) The preliminary headcount enrolment targets for the 2016 academic year are as follows:

   (i) Public TVET colleges: 829 000

   (ii) Universities: 1 035 000

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3695 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 October 2015 - NW3491

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Prof B Bozzoli (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) Does the East Cape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (East Cape Midlands TVET College) intend to perform a membership audit of all of the unions representing employees at the specified college; if not, why not; if so, (a) when will the audit be conducted and (b) will the results inform the manner in which collective bargaining is undertaken at the specified college; (2) a) why have approximately 66 former members of staff who received formal dismissal notices from the specified college for striking illegally, 33 of whom have serious criminal charges already laid against them, including arson, intimidation and attempted murder, been rehired by the specified college and (b) what are the terms of employment for the rehired staff members; (3) were the relevant positions advertised; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; ( 4) what is the total monetary value of the damage caused to property during the violent strike earlier in 2015?

Reply:

(1) Yes. The Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college in conjunction with the Department of Higher Education and Training will be conducting a union membership audit as part of an annual requirement to determine which recognised unions have organisational rights within the College.

(a) The audit will be conducted during the last quarter of the 2015 academic year.

(b) No. Collective bargaining can only take place at a central level through the General Public Service Sectorial Bargaining Council (GPSSBC), Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) and/or Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC). It is envisaged that through the College Labour Relations Forum, many issues of rights can be discussed, which will improve and enhance employer-employee relations, as well as secure labour peace and stability.

(2) (a) The College, after seeking legal advice, realised that the dismissals could be declared null and void on procedural grounds. The College therefore agreed to a "re-hearing'', which meant the dismissals would be null and void. There is no concept of "re-hearing" in the labour relations regime and such a process would be highly contestable. The dismissals would have only been fully effective after their appeals were rejected, and even then they would have had the right to challenge the dismissals further through dispute resolution mechanisms, including the labour courts and other courts. The affected employees were not rehired but re-instated.

The inherent risks in waiting for the process to be concluded and based on the legal advice, the unprocedural actions by the College would have impacted on the normalisation of learning and teaching, as well as resources of the College. If the College was found to have acted "unprocedurally" during the hearings, the possibility existed that the employees could have returned to the College on their own terms which was something that the Department and College had to mitigate against. The re-instatement of the employees was part of a settlement agreement with the National Education, Health and Allied Workers' Union (NEHAWU).

(b) The terms and conditions of the settlement agreement are as follows:
• The employees were on leave without pay from the date of their dismissal to 6 September 2015;
• All employees who embarked on the unprotected strike will forfeit a month's salary and repay any payments made to them while they were part of the unprotecied strike. This is aligned to the principle of "no work no pay"; and
• Accept a twelve month final written warning not to engage in any misconduct activities. The final written warning indicates that if the employee is found guilty of any misconduct. it will lead to a call for their dismissal.

While there were a number of employees who faced charges related to acts of arson, intimidation and attempted murder, they remain innocent until found guilty of the charges in terms of the South African legal system. In South Africa, both criminal charges and disciplinary hearings can be undertaken in parallel. It should be noted that charges were laid/instituted by individuals and not the College. At this time, the Department and College are investigating all employees who embarked on the unprotecied strike for misconduct, which will soon be followed by disciplinary action.

(3) The positions were not advertised as there were appeal processes still to be completed. However, the College opted to appoint temporary lecturers to replace striking or dismissed lecturers in order for teaching and learning to continue.

(4) Since no single employee could be identified for causing any loss or damage, the College will be undertaking a forensic audit to accurately quantify the expenses and damage incurred or caused during the strike. According to estimated College calculations, the monetary value of expenses and damage caused to property is estimated at R4 297 180.16. The College intends exercising its right to claim these damages from NEHAWU and individuals who are found guilty after disciplinary hearings are completed. This excludes the expenses and damage caused to the vehicles and property of College personnel who were not on strike, as they have their right to claim damages reserved.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3491 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:
 

01 October 2015 - NW3489

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Was the EastCape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College aware that a certain person (name and details furnished) had left the previous position with several audit queries still pending; if not, why not; if so, why (a) was the specified person appointed and (b) is the specified person still a staff member at the specified college despite having been suspended in January 2013 after an audit by Pricewaterhouse Coopers?

Reply:

a) Mr Abdullah was initially placed at the Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EMC) in 2012 as a Support Chief Financial Officer by the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA). At that stage, neither SAICA nor the Department were aware of the alleged irregularities or outstanding audit queries emanating from his previous employer, i.e. Coega Municipality.

Subsequent to his deployment, SAICA and the Department were made aware of potential contractual irregularities at EMC. SAICA, as his employer, appointed Pricewaterhouse Coopers to investigate these irregularities.

Mr Abdullah resigned from SAICA before the disciplinary process could proceed and was subsequently appointed by the former Principal of EMC as a Senior Resources Manager at the College.

This alleged irregular appointment formed part of the scope of the initial forensic investigation, but due to the court verdict indicating that the Department could not apply section 8 of the National Treasury Regulations, expenditure management, but instead had to follow section 46 of the Continuing Education and Training Act of 2006, as amended, the outcome of the irregular appointment could not be confirmed.

b) Mr Abdullah is still in the employ of the College Council as a Senior Resource Manager. His alleged irregular appointment will form part of the Terms of Reference of the new forensic investigation that is planned to be initiated with the College Council, before the end of the 2015/16 financial year.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3489 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 September 2015 - NW3207

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What is the failure rate in each subject constituting the Emergency Medical Care and Rescue Diploma at the Central University of Technology in the Free State; (2) have there been student protests concerning aspects of the specified failure rate, if so, what are the relevant details of these protests; (3) is the University aware that the life of one of the lecturers (name furnished), who is in charge of one or more of these courses has been threatened; (4) (a) has the University received and taken cognisance of (i) a petition requesting the specified person to be removed from the course and (ii) numerous affidavits from signatories to that petition stating that it was signed under false pretences and (b) is the specified person continuing to teach the course; (5) Has the University intervened at any stage in the programme or any of its component courses in order to alter the pass rate after these protests; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department does not manage the affairs of any university and the following responses to the above questions have been obtained from the Central University of Technology (CUT):

  1. The success rate of the Emergency Medical Care (EMC) programme is currently below 50% compared to the university average of 76%. Ten students graduated on 4 September 2015 with the Diploma in EMC with 87 students at years two and three levels in the programme.
  2. No student protests have occurred, however some of the students reported the challenges experienced in the programme to the media. The Deputy Vice Chancellor: Academic and Research, Acting Dean and Head of Department (HOD) engaged with the students and staff to discuss and put strategies in place to address the concerns raised by students and staff.
  3. Yes, the university is aware that the life of Mr RG Campbell, one of the lecturers in charge of one or more of these courses, has been threatened. The University has put processes in place to deal with the matter according to its internal policies.
  4. Yes, the university took cognisance of this petition and alleged false pretences. The Dean, HOD and Director of Human Resources have had several engagements with the particular staff member and students. This matter has been resolved and the lecturer has continued lecturing from July 2015.
  5. The following interventions were implemented by the university during 2014/15:
  • A task team was established to monitor the EMC programme at a strategic level for the period January to June 2015;
  • Accreditation by the Professional Board for Emergency Care;
  • Appointment of an Internal Review Panel;
  • Improvement of the staffing situation in the EMC programme;
  • Strengthening of student academic support;
  • Increase in the effectiveness and efficiency of the Work-Integrated Learning programme to ensure that sufficient placement opportunities for students are secured;
  • Improvement in communication structures;
  • Regular meetings between CUT and the Professional Board;
  • Interventions by Senate; and
  • Regular interventions by university management.




END

22 September 2015 - NW3319

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

1. Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2649 on 18 August 2015, he has any scientific facts at hand which prove that English as a medium of instruction will offer all persons access to institutions of higher education, given that there are many areas in the country where the persons are not at all proficient or have very poor communication skills in English; (2) whether he will endeavour to protect all the indigenous official languages, including Afrikaans, against the dominant nature of English in order to prevent English from eventually displacing the other languages, which will lead to entirely English-speaking institutions of higher education, as is the case with the University of Johannesburg; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. There is no need for scientific facts to validate the response provided in my reply to question 2649. The response is validated by the fact that all schools in South Africa teach English, either as a first language or second language, whilst other African languages, including Afrikaans, are also taught as a first or second language, depending on the geographical area or school types. This therefore makes English a common or cross cutting language for all matriculants entering University, something that cannot be said for all other African languages. As mentioned previously, this does not detract from the development of all African languages, which is a necessary process. The fact that some students are not proficient in English is a separate matter, however the fact remains that they have been exposed to English in comparison to other African languages.
     
  2. I would like to indicate that a similar parliamentary question, published in internal question paper no. 25 of 2014, was posed to me. Therefore, the honourable member should refer to my response to question 2319 of November 2014.




END

18 September 2015 - NW3240

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the names of the training projects which are currently funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and (b) where are they located; (2) what amount was (a) allocated to each project and (b) deposited into the bank account of each project; (3) what (a) is the name of the recipient organisation in respect of each project and (b) is the name of the chief executive officer or official who occupies an equivalent position of such organisation; (4) has each project been independently audited; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) what was the audit outcome; (5) (a) how many signatories were required to authorise payment of grants to each recipient of CETA funds and (b) what are their names?

Reply:

  1. and (2) (a) Annexure A comprises of the names and allocation of the training projects that are currently funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA).
  2. (b) CETA works on a performance-based payment system. Therefore, CETA reimburses funded entities and does not make upfront payments. It only pays after training and/or services have been rendered.
  3. Please refer to Annexure B attached to this response.
  4. (a) and (b) All projects on the commitment schedule, as at 31 March 2015, were independently audited by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA). The findings in respect of the selected programmes will be reported in the 2014/15 annual report.
  5. (a) The CETA has an invoice processing unit which looks into compliance requirements that must be met by all approved entities before any payment can be made. Each funded learning pathway, e.g. Learnerships, has its own invoice compliance requirements to be met as per the approved budget. If the invoice is compliant, the Requestor signs the invoice and it is reviewed by the relevant Manager, endorsed by the Chief Financial Officer and approved by the Chief Executive Officer.

(b) The following positions have delegations of authority to sign-off payments:

  • Projects Manager;
  • Core Business Manager;
  • Core Business Executive;
  • Finance Manager;
  • Chief Financial Officer; and
  • Chief Executive Officer.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3240 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 September 2015 - NW3244

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Who is the founder of the Dambuza Community Trust, (b) who is the current chief executive officer of the Trust, (c) where is it operating and (d) who sits on its board; (2) what is the amount of all funding supplied to the Trust from (a) all sector education and training authorities and (b) the National Skills Fund in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13, (iv) 2013-14 and (v) 2014-15 financial years; (3) how many learners in each field of study (a) did the Trust indicate it would train when applying for funds, (b) were admitted to each programme and (c) were trained to completion through the Trust in respect of each grant awarded; (4) (a) for how long have the learners been trained and (b) from which accredited authority have the learners received their certificates or equivalent qualification?

Reply:

The Dambuza Community Development Trust is a non-profit organisation founded in 2007 to promote community participation in the development of the Dambuza and greater Edendale areas, including education and training opportunities for the youth.

The honourable member is welcome to request any information directly from the Trust.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3244 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 September 2015 - NW3314

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are now (a) functioning in a manner that is recommended in the National Development Plan, (b) providing workers with the skills that the country desperately needs and (c) directly assisting a large number of trainees annually to acquire nationally recognised qualifications; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the extent to which SETAs were now adding genuine value in upskilling the South African workforce?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) work in accordance with the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training, thus responding to the National Development Plan (NDP). Earlier this year, the Department tabled in Parliament its Strategic Plan (2015-2020) which was developed on the basis of the vision espoused in the NDP, 2014 - 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework, and policy imperatives of the White Paper, which gives the direction to the entire post-school education and training sector.

(b) Yes, the Skills Development Act, 97 of 1998 directs that SETAs must, in accordance with any requirements that may be prescribed; develop Sector Skills Plans within the framework of the national skills development strategy. Goal 5 of the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) III focuses on encouraging better use of the workplace-based skills development, whereupon SETAs are required through mandatory and discretionary grants to support the training of employed workers as well as encourage employers to expand such training, in order to improve the overall productivity of the economy and address skills imbalances in the workforce and labour market. The Department is required in terms of the Skills Development Act to enter into Service Level Agreements with SETAs to ensure that goals enunciated in the NSDS III are implemented, including but not limited to skilling the workforce, monitored on a quarterly basis. All SETAs directly respond to the sector skills priorities, which are derived from the Sector Skills Plans. The Sector Skills Plans are developed using information received from the respective sector stakeholders hence, training interventions implemented by SETAs address skills that the country requires. I promulgated a national list of occupations in high demand on 4 November 2014 through Government Gazette No. 38174.

(c) Yes, SETAs are implementing PIVOTAL learning programmes as directed, amongst others, by the SETA Grant Regulations regarding monies received by a SETA and related matters, as published on 3 December 2012, which includes but is not limited to offering bursaries to learners at Universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges leading to part or full qualifications as recognised nationally, i.e. learnerships, internships, artisanship, work integrated learning, amongst others.

2. Whilst the SETA system has contributed positively in addressing challenges of skills development in the country, I have been upfront and on record in acknowledging the challenges facing the SETA system, hence I am in the process of reviewing the SETA system in accordance with the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training, NDP and other relevant government strategic policy documents.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3314 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

16 September 2015 - NW3241

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

In respect of each training project currently funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) (a) what total number of students were to be trained in each field of study at the outset of each of these projects and (b) for what specified training periods; (2) (a) how many students were in fact trained in each field of study and (b) for how long was each student trained; (3) (a) how many students have qualified in each field of study at the conclusion of these projects and (b) how long did each student take to qualify; (4) what was the average cost of training for each student?

Reply:

  1. (a) and (b) Please refer to Annexure A which lists the total number of students trained and training periods thereof.
  2. (a) The table below provides details of the duration and number of students trained and

qualified:

Learning Programmes

Learners Trained

Number of employed Learnerships entered (funded)

0

Number of employed Learnerships entered (unfunded)

78

Number of unemployed Learnerships entered (funded)

3 005

Number of unemployed Learnerships entered (unfunded)

350

Number of employed Bursaries entered

0

Number of unemployed Bursaries entered

581

Number of employed Skills Programmes entered (funded)

119

Number of employed Skills Programmes entered (unfunded)

67

Number of unemployed Skills Programmes entered (funded)

1 006

Number of unemployed Skills Programmes entered (unfunded)

97

Number of unemployed Internships entered (workplace experience)

686

TVET College Graduate Placement

58

Candidacy programmes entered

0

University Graduate Placement

342

Number of apprenticeships entered (unemployed)

2 982

Number of apprenticeships entered (employed)

0

Number of RPL programmes entered (employed)

0

Number of RPL programmes entered (unemployed)

1 218

Total

10 589

(b) The table below provides details on the duration of the programmes offered:

Learning Pathways

Duration

Apprenticeships

1 year

Learnerships

3 years

Short Skills Programmes

1 – 4 months

Internships

3 years

Candidacy

1 year

3. (a) and (b) Please refer to the response to questions 2 (a) and (b) above.

4. 50% of the grant amount was allocated towards the learner stipend, and the remaining 50% was for the actual implementation of the training.

Learning Pathways

Unit Cost

Apprenticeships

R46 350.00

Learnerships

R36 000.00

Short Skills Programme

R13 500.00

Recognition of Prior Learning

R3 500.00

Trade Tests

R3 500.00

Internships

R36 000.00

Work Placements

R36 000.00

Candidacy

R60 000.00

Bursaries

R60 000.00

Total

R294 850.00

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3241 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 September 2015 - NW3209

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How many staff members teaching in adult education centres in each province have experienced delays in salary payments during the transition from provincial to national management of the specified centres, (b) what have been the (i) dates, (ii) scale and (iii) average length of these delays, (c) what bridging funds to assist teachers in this sector have been provided, especially in cases where they have been unable to pay for costs such as (i) rent and (ii) other vital expenses and (d) have any teachers been evicted from their homes as a result of the lack of payment of their salaries; (2) are any salary payments still outstanding; if so, what steps has he taken in this regard?

Reply:

  1. (a) In the erstwhile Adult Education and Training (AET) centres, when reference is made to

‘salary payments’ the concept is also used to refer to other forms of payment such as claims and stipends. Claims for instance, are part-time and extra-ordinary payments, usually over and above the normal salary of a person. The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) became responsible for the payment of salaries of staff members teaching in AET centres from 1 April 2015, and is unable to respond to delays in salaries, which may have occurred prior to the AET function shift when the function was still with the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). The response covers the period from 1 April 2015 to 31 August 2015. In view of the above, 2 540 staff members teaching at AET centres experienced delays in salaries during the transition from provincial to national competence.

(b) Table 1 below responds to the delays experienced by AET teachers of the Eastern Cape Province

  1. Dates
  1. Scale
  1. Average length of delays

Month Affected

Date salary paid

Actual calendar days delay

   

April 2015

17 August 2015

119 days

10 AET teachers

17 days

May 2015

17 August 2015

88 days

   

June 2015

17 August 2015

48 days

   

July 2015

17 August 2015

17 days

   

August 2015

31 August 2015

0 days

   

The System Change Control (SCC) was not performed by the Eastern Cape PED which led to the appointment of AET teachers onto the DHET PERSAL on 1 June 2015 instead of 1 April 2015. The salaries of the affected AET teachers were backdated from 1 April 2015 to 31 July 2015 and paid on 17 August 2015, and their salaries for August 2015 were paid on 31 August 2015. Currently, there are no staff members teaching at Eastern Cape AET centres experiencing any delays in salary payments.

Tables 2 to 5 below outline the delays experienced by the Northern Cape, North-West, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape AET teachers with regards to payment of stipends and claims.

Table 2: Delays experienced by AET teachers of the Northern Cape Province

  1. Dates
  1. Scale
  1. Average length of delays

Month Affected

Date salary paid

Actual calendar days delay

   

April 2015

30 June 2015

61 days

248 AET teachers paid stipends

45.5 days

May 2015

30 June 2015

30 days

   

June 2015

30 June 2015

0 days

   

In the Northern Cape and North West provinces, delays were experienced with the payment of stipends in April and May 2015 mainly because the appointment of AET teachers who are paid stipends could not be performed programmatically. AET teachers had to be uploaded manually onto the DHET’s PERSAL system. The stipends for April and May 2015 were paid on 30 June 2015 as supplementary payments together with stipends for June 2015. There have been no delays experienced with the payment of stipends since June 2015.

Table 3: Delays experienced by AET teachers of the North-West Province

  1. Dates
  1. Scale
  1. Average length of delays

Month Affected

Date salary paid

Actual calendar days delay

   

April 2015

30 June 2015

61 days

1 340 AET teachers paid stipends

45.5 days

May 2015

30 June 2015

30 days

   

June 2015

30 June 2015

0 days

   

With regard to the stipends in the Northern Cape and the North-West Provinces the stipends will run automatically every month as fixed amounts per month have been loaded.

Table 4: Delays experienced by AET teachers of the Western Cape Province

  1. Dates
  1. Scale
  1. Average length of delays

Month Affected

Date salary paid

Actual calendar days delay

   

April 2015

22 June 2015

53 days

400 AET teachers paid on a claim system

37.5 days

May 2015

22 June 2015

22 days

   

The reason for delay is the late submission of claim forms to the DHET by the PED. The payment of claims received from the Western Cape is up to date with exception of approximately forty-nine problematic cases which involve officials working in Community Learning Centres (CLCs) that are above the age as prescribed by the Public Service Act, 1994 or have taken severance packages during 1998 and 2001 and were only allowed to work for one (1) continuous year, or were previously dismissed from service. Such cases have been discussed with the Management of the Western Cape and contracts for these officials will end on 31 December 2015.

Table 5: Delays experienced by AET teachers of KwaZulu-Natal Province

  1. Dates
  1. Scale
  1. Average length of delays

Month Affected

Date salary paid

Actual calendar days delay

   

April 2015

22 July 2015

83 days

542 AET teachers paid on a claim system

47.5 days

May 2015

28 July 2015

58 days

   

June 2015

2 September 2015

64 days

   

July 2015

30 September 2015

61 days

   

August 2015

Claims not yet received

   

The KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Province used the claim system to pay AET teachers. As explained in my response to question 1, a claim is not a salary and in the case of KZN, these are extra-ordinary appointments because most of the AET teachers are already appointed as full-time teachers by the KZN PED. In order for any claim to be processed, the DHET has to verify the claim through the Centre Manager, the Regional Manager and the Vocational and Continuing Education and Training Programme Manager. The claims for April and May 2015 were submitted late in June 2015 by the KZN PED. DHET officials worked overtime to first appoint AET teachers onto the DHET PERSAL system and then verify claims and ultimately process payment of claims.

It should also be noted that for the claims method of payment, AET teachers who were transferred from PEDs had to be first appointed onto the PERSAL system before the claims could be processed. There are still cases whereby relevant documentation for appointment is still outstanding and on-going communication is taking place with the KZN Regional Office to rectify this, hence, payments for these claims are still outstanding. This delay affects approximately 542 AET teachers for the period between April and July 2015. These are mainstream teachers who have not completed and submitted the necessary Human Resources Management and Administration (HRMA) mandate documentation. This is due to the fact that they believed it is unnecessary as they are already employed full-time by the KZN PED. Such officials are being assisted by HRMA and the Acting Community Education and Training College Principal to complete and submit documentation for their appointment, processing and payment of their claims.

Other causes of the delays in the payment of claims in KZN is the non-appointment of AET teachers or non-payment of claims because of instances of negligence and/or irregularities in the forms that are submitted to the DHET for loading appointments and processing of payments. For most of the 542 outstanding cases, the DHET has not effected appointments or processed claims as doing so would be in contravention of the prescripts of both the PSA and the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (PFMA). Such cases include instances where:

  • Documentation submitted to the DHET was incorrectly completed;
  • AET teachers have not submitted original documents required to upload their appointment;
  • An AET teacher signs as both the Claimant and Centre Manager on his/her own claim forms;
  • Discrepancies are found between the hours claimed and the actual hours worked;
  • The hours claimed far exceed the maximum hours the teacher is allowed to work per month;
  • Information provided is not correct and relevant to the applicable officials, i.e. incorrect identity document numbers and PERSAL number were used; and
  • Some documents submitted are not signed by the necessary delegated officials and incorrect calculations are made on the forms.

(c) There are no bridging funds that were provided as the PFMA does not allow for such.

(d) The DHET has not received any reports of teachers having been evicted from their homes.

2) No, there are no outstanding salary payments but there are outstanding payments of claims. The DHET is liaising with the Regional Offices to ensure that correct documentation, which are correctly and accurately completed, is submitted to enable uploading of appointments and processing of payments. The DHET is in the process of paying claims received on an on-going basis. Queries are received through the Rapid Response Team and escalated to the relevant managers for a solution.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3209 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 September 2015 - NW3243

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has the Chief Executive Officer and/or the board of the Construction Education Training Authority received any petitions signed by staff members since 1 January 2013; if so, (a) what was the content of each petition and (b) how many staff members signed each petition; (2) did any of these petitions make allegations of corruption against a certain official (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) how many petitions made such allegations, (b) have the allegations been investigated and (c) has the specified official been suspended pending the outcome; (3) have any members of staff of CETA been (a) disciplined, (b) suspended or (c) dismissed for alleged disciplinary offences related to the petitions?

Reply:

  1. The Chief Executive Officer and/or the Board of the Construction Education Training Authority did not receive any petitions signed by staff members since 1 January 2013.
  2. and (3) Not applicable.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3243 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 September 2015 - NW3290

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The table below provides details of travel and accommodation costs between Gauteng and Pretoria during the 2014/15 financial year for the Deputy Minister and myself:

Executive Authority

Total amount spent

  1. (ii) Number of trips undertaken
 
  1. (i) Travel

(i) Hotel

(aa) Residential in Cape Town

(bb) Residential in Pretoria

 
  1. Minister

R128 065.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

16

  1. Deputy Minister

R203 463.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

29

Total

R331 528.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

45

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3290 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 September 2015 - NW3068

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How does (i) his department and (ii) entities reporting to him define red tape and (b) what (i) specific interventions and/or (ii) systems have been implemented to (aa) identify and (bb) reduce red tape in (aaa) his department and (bbb) the entities reporting to him?

Reply:

(a) and (b) At the time of compilation, eighteen out of the twenty-six entities have responded to the question.

Name

(ii) How do you define red tape?

a) What specific interventions/systems that have been applied to identify red tape

(b) What specific interventions / systems that have been implemented to reduce red tape

  1. Department of Higher Education and Training

The Department does not have its own definition of red tape. Using the conventional use of the word “red tape”, it is understood to be unnecessary delays caused by a lack or non-existence of delegations of authority to lower levels and/or too many officials having to be in the decision-making processes of an organisation.

  • I have approved the Delegations of Authority to the Director-General in respect to the Public Service Act and Public Service Regulations, and the Director-General has further delegated some of the functions to other performer levels. Further to this, the College Councils of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and Community Education and Training (CET) colleges are empowered by the Continuing Education and Training Act to make certain decisions and consult, and report to the Minister on decisions made where necessary. This is to ensure that decisions are made at lower levels to ensure that there is efficient and effective management as well as governance of institutions.
  • Service standards in certain operational areas and a service delivery charter have been developed to assist in monitoring delays in the operations of the department. The standard operating procedures have been developed in certain operational areas, aimed at ensuring that the decision-making processes are clear and applied consistently across the Department within set timeframes.
  1. Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA)

Red tape is understood to be the regulations and/or rules that are considered unnecessary that hinders and delays work done as decision-making process is rather lengthy and negatively impacting stakeholders depending on the outcome and decisions of processes.

  • The frequency of Board meetings in a year
  • Through previous experiences or lessons learned over the years.
  • Customer Satisfaction Surveys and Stakeholder Forums and Sub-Committees’ feedback.
  • Assessment of time taken for standard applications to be processed.
  • BANKSETA has a flat organisational structure with its Heads of Departments given a mandate to make decisions that allow the daily running of the business. This means that it is not in all instances where the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) has to make decisions. In the event where the CEO is out of the country, the acting CEO has the delegated rights and responsibilities of the CEO to action decisions needed.
  • The Accounting Authority has also delegated some responsibilities and provided the CEO with the mandate to make certain decisions to aid the business to proceed with operations without waiting for the Board sitting.
  • In the event where urgent decisions need to be made which falls outside the delegation to the CEO; urgent meetings/teleconference can be arranged to allow the Accounting Authority opportunity to consider what is put forth and make a decision. The other option is having round robin decision by the Accounting Authority.
  1. Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA)

Defined as administrative (i.e. rules, procedures, procedures and processes) and regulatory hurdles, to achieving the original purpose, that affect or impose unnecessary delays, inaction, costs that exceed their benefits, productivity, and/or delivery (Including competitiveness).

  • We track and monitor the intended application of the regulatory requirements (i.e. Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), Treasury Regulations, Skills Development Act, etc.) to address non-compliance.
  • There are now relevant registers (i.e. Supply Chain Management, Asset Management, Financial Management, etc.) in place that assists in identifying red tape.
  • Appointed leadership that is committed to continuous improvements and rooting out corruption.
  • Trained staff as part of capacitating them and improving their skills so that they provide excellent service to all our stakeholders.
  • Refocused management to effectively manage performance, processes, systems, people and finances.
  • Improved supply chain management practices in order to address irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditures.
  • Set tools and monitoring mechanisms in order to track payment of suppliers within the 30 days period from receipt date of invoice.
  1. Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)

The bureaucracy that results in delays in service delivery.

  • Continuous development and review of organisation’s operational framework.
  • Monthly dashboard analysis of divisional targets and achievements.
  • Monitoring of turnaround times of key performance indicators of executives and managers and implanting strategies to address deviations.
  • Line managers have been empowered to make decisions within the broad spectrum of the organisation’s operational strategy and are fully involved in strategic and business planning.
  • Monitoring, evaluation and tracking of performance against targets and continuous review and development of strategy to optimise return.
  • Business process reengineering to ensure maximum efficiency, effectiveness and economy for core business processes.
  • Replacement of manual processes with increasingly automated systems.
  • Enforcing a culture of delivery, client orientation and focus maximising return of investment.
  1. Council on Higher Education (CHE)

CHE does not have its own definition of red tape.

Not applicable

Not applicable

  1. Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

Non-essential procedures, forms, reporting and regulations where cost heavily outweighs benefit and stands in the way of skills development.

  • Management meetings are held fortnightly to discuss issues relating to efficient and effective delivery of the SETA.
  • The SETA also interacts regularly with DHET and provides input to various matters of engagement.
  • An Enterprise-wide risk management system is in place to ensure optimal management of all risks associated with the performance of functions and delivery of services to support governance responsibilities.
  • Robust Quality Management System is also in place.
  • Furthermore, the staff at the SETA understands and delivers on reporting requirements.
  1. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&M SETA)

The process undertaken to facilitate decision making without making the processes too onerous and time consuming in order to ensure efficiency and enhancing service delivery.

The SETA developed and adopted a new business model, which resulted in the review and enhancement of business processes.

  • A more flattened organisational structure was developed and implemented to fast-track service delivery and decision making.
  • The SETA has adopted a more direct reporting line and structure.
  • The delegation of authority was reviewed by the Executive Authority to broaden and provide increased capacity for the CEO.
  • The roles and responsibilities of Board Committee Structures have been streamlined for effectiveness and efficiency.
  1. Food and Beverages Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV SETA)

Red tape refers to excessive regulation or rigid conformity to formal rules that are considered redundant or bureaucratic and hinders or prevents action or decision-making.

None

None

  1. Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)

A tedious process of decision making which has an adverse effect on the beneficiaries of the service being rendered.

  • The stakeholder sessions of the Board.
  • Delivery model of the HWSETA.
  • Innovation sessions with all stakeholders.
  • Service Delivery Charter.
  • Revision of the delegation of authority.
  • Decentralisation and devolution of powers.
  1. Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)

Unnecessary and invalid / irrelevant requirements.

Process mapping and stakeholder feedback.

Bi-annual updates to processes and guidelines.

  1. Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)

MERSETA does not have its own definition of red tape.

Not applicable

Not applicable

  1. Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

Lengthy policies that hinder progress of activities that need to be carried out.

Engagement in tender processes as

it takes too long to finalise a tender, ±60 days is a long process including 21 days of advertisement.

Improved policies, that are more enabling, are being investigated.

  1. National Skills Fund (NSF)

The NSF does not have a formal definition for red tape.

The NSF implemented Project Siyaphambili aimed at improving the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the entity. This included a current state assessment of the NSF to identify inefficiencies throughout the organisation, taking into consideration various reviews conducted on the skills levy system and NSF specifically.

The NSF will improve efficiencies in the organisation through the implementation of enabling technology (ERP system, document management system, monitoring technology, etc.) and through delegations of authority to a more efficient restructured organisation. Turn-around times will be monitored throughout all processes.

  1. National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)

NSFAS does not have its own definition of red tape.

Not applicable

Not applicable

  1. Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)

Red tape is bottlenecks/ bureaucratic procedures that take long to achieve/ approve matters for implementation in the organisation, which inhibits performance.

No specific intervention or system has been applied to identify red tape.

  • Clearly defined workflows.
  • Standard Operating Procedures that outline roles and responsibilities, and turnaround times.
  • Delegations of Authority Framework.
  • Regular management meetings to review performance and to fast track decision-making.
  1. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)

Needlessly time-consuming procedures.

QCTO regularly monitors their procedures to identity areas of red tape, by reviewing the number of days allocated to process applications or requests received from stakeholders and by continually monitoring the chain of command in the processing of requests to improve turnaround time.

Systems and processes are continuously assessed to reduce red tape. Moreover, processes are governed by policies and procedures which stipulate turnaround times for processes. These timeframes are also part of the QCTO’s key performance indicators against which the organisation is audited.

  1. South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)

Unnecessary steps or procedures in our processes that client’s need to follow to access our services.

  • SAQA’s systems are reviewed constantly in line with our established client service standards.
  • SAQA has a customer care helpline/helpdesk that records any customer complaints. These complaints are reviewed and the effects on the turnaround times are scrutinised so that SAQA can ensure continuous improvements in terms of its service delivery.

SAQA ensures that all unnecessary steps are eliminated from the processes.

  1. Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)

Excessive rules and/or regulations which are redundant and prevent action taking place or decision-making.

Delegations of authority are in place, which are aligned to National Treasury prescripts and promote governance per PFMA requirements. Since the body is under administration, the delegations of authority are under review.

  • Segregation of duties to employees in the entity to allow approvals / recommendations at various committees / levels.
  • Operational plans that are linked to the mandate of the organisation are in place to ensure tasks at various levels are outlined and agreed upon. These operational plans are translated into performance assessment contracts.
  1. Services SETA

It is any unnecessary and unjustifiable processes that have the effect of making it impossible for role players to achieve required goals and therefore hinder service delivery.

An Organisational Development process has been embarked upon to analyse all processes, procedures and policies with a view to eliminating anything unnecessary and shortening anything which may be too lengthy or cumbersome, but without compromising quality and compliance.

  • The discretionary grant application system has been simplified and automated.
  • Project implementation steps are clearly articulated in the offer letters to service providers.
  • Documentation required for disbursements is clearly outlined and disbursements are based on pre-agreed deliverables outlined in contracts.
  • Stakeholders receive direct support and training on requirements so as to reduce the amount of back and forth engagement on matters.
  • A tool is being developed to enable real time reconciliation of learner attendance to facilitate timely payments of learner stipends.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3068 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 September 2015 - NW3168

Profile picture: Dudley, Ms C

Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he is aware of students who graduated but did not receive their certificates at the Motheo FET/TVET College in Thaba Nchu between 2008 and 2010; (2) has the specified matter been investigated; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. There are no outstanding National Accredited Technical Diploma (NATED) Report 190/1 certificates, as these are issued within 3 months after the release of results as per the national policy.

There are however students who did not receive their National Certificate (Vocational) [NC (V)] certificates at the Thaba Nchu campus of Motheo Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college for the period 2008 to 2010. The table below provides details on the number of outstanding NC (V) certificates:

Examination cycle

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Total

200811

2

8

0

10

200903

8

0

0

8

200911

6

13

5

24

201003

9

3

5

17

201011

27

9

19

55

Total

52

33

29

114

2)  Yes. The outstanding NC(V) certificates affect all public TVET and private colleges and are due to a consolidation error on the examinations Information Technology (IT) system managed and maintained by the State Information Technology Agency (SITA). Through the intervention made by my Director-General and the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training, SITA has sourced additional project management and technical capacity from an outside IT service provider to eliminate the backlog and ensure that it does not recur. In accordance with the project plan tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training in August 2015, all outstanding NC (V) certificates will be available at TVET college examination centres by January 2016.

The Department is intervening, on behalf of graduates being denied access to the workplace and/or higher education study programmes due to outstanding certificates, respectively in the following manner:

  • Letters of verification are issued on request;
  • Employers are contacted on behalf of students; and
  • Higher education institutions are contacted on behalf of students.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3168 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 September 2015 - NW3208

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

In the five months since his reply to question 734 on 24 March 2015, (a) is the specified TVET college stable, (b) are all classes taking place regularly under the supervision of fully qualified staff, (c) what has happened to the (i) staff who took part in the unprotected strike and (ii) students who supported them and (d) have the activities and threats to render the specified TVET college ungovernable subsided?

Reply:

(a) Whilst the Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EMC) has been operating in a stable and violence-free environment since 9 March 2015, the unprotected strike continued due to delays in the disciplinary processes initiated by EMC against a number of employees.

The National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union (NEHAWU) National Office Bearers, Department of Higher Education and Training and EMC Council signed a settlement agreement intended to restore and improve working relations between the parties on 7 August 2015. The strike was agreed to be called off with effect from 4 September 2015.

(b)  Regular classes have been conducted by appropriately qualified EMC employed lecturers and others engaged on short-term contracts via a temporary employment agency to replace striking or dismissed lecturers. The College participated in the interviews of the temporary lecturers to confirm that they were qualified as per the curriculum prescripts for the various programmes.

(c) (i) All employees, including dismissed employees who took part in the unprotected strike have been mandated to agree in writing on the settlement terms finalised on 7 August 2015 as a prerequisite to returning to work on 7 September 2015. The settlement agreement requires all employees who embarked in the unprotected strike to forfeit a month’s salary, repay any payments made to them while they were part of the unprotected strike, and accept a twelve month final written warning not to engage in any misconduct activities.

(ii) Students who participated in the strike action for a prolonged period of time have failed to meet the 80% attendance policy requirements for entry into trimester/semester final examinations. Therefore, they have been advised to deregister or return to the college in the following trimester/semester or the following year, depending on the programme for which they had registered.

(d)  Not only have the activities and threats to render the specified TVET college ungovernable, subsided but it has completely stopped.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3208 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 September 2015 - NW3245

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the summary report entitled An Examination of Aspects of Initial Teacher Education Curricula at Five Higher Education Institutions in The Initial Teacher Education Research Project, compiled by JET Education Services and issued in August 2014, for each of the key findings, what are the details of the action which (a) has already been taken and (b) will be taken to rectify the shortcomings in the university education of intermediate phase teachers identified in each of the key findings?

Reply:

The Initial Teacher Education Research Project (ITERP) that is currently being conducted by JET Education Services is a partnership project between JET, the Education Deans Forum and Departments of Basic Education, and Higher Education and Training. It is a longitudinal project, which is investigating initial teacher education programme delivery at a selected sample of universities. It is also tracking new teacher graduates as they take up posts in schools in an attempt to understand their readiness as beginning teachers and their ability to make the transition from teacher education into teaching.

The ITERP was conceptualised and is being implemented as part of efforts to strengthen teacher education and is not separate from this. The project findings are fed directly back to universities through engagements with individual universities and regular reporting on findings at the quarterly meetings of the Education Deans Forum.

It must be noted that the ITERP is researching the initial teacher education programmes that were designed and implemented in line with the former teacher education qualifications policy, i.e. the Norms and Standards for Educators in Schooling of 2000. All teacher education programmes have to be redesigned to align with the new standards set by the Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework of 2007, revised in 2013 and the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications (MRTEQ) of 2011, revised in 2015. One of the main purposes of the ITERP is to inform the design of new teacher education programmes.

The MRTEQ sets standards for teacher education at the programme level. Initial teacher education programmes have to meet the standards set for teaching specialisations in terms of knowledge mix, credits and levels. This will assist to respond to one of the key findings that emerged from the ITERP and the degree of variation between programmes offered by different universities.

The MRTEQ also, more closely, regulates the teaching practice component of teacher education programmes to strengthen this component of initial teacher education programmes. It sets standards regarding the nature of schools to be used for teaching practice, the nature of the teaching practice component within initial teacher education programmes, and the time spent in schools.

A national Teacher Education Programme Evaluation Committee (TEPEC) has been set up, chaired by the Department of Higher Education and Training, involving the participation of the Department of Basic Education, South African Council of Educators and Education and the Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA). This committee reviews all teacher education programmes to ensure that they meet the requirements stipulated in the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications.

In addition to the policy measures that have been put in place to strengthen teacher education, the Department of Higher Education and Training is implementing a 5 year (2015/16 – 2019/20) Teaching and Learning Development Capacity Improvement Programme (TLDCIP) that will support universities to strengthen teacher education programmes at the level of curriculum structure and curriculum delivery.

A specific project in the TLDCIP will focus on strengthening university capacity for primary teacher education. It will involve the implementation of a range of activities to strengthen the capacity and capability of universities for the delivery of quality primary school teacher education programmes, including the following:

  • Establish new initial teacher education programmes at universities where specific specialisations are not yet offered but which are needed and which the university is interested to offer;
  • Develop and roll-out a national advocacy campaign for teaching generally, specifically Foundation Phase teaching as a viable and attractive career choice;
  • Support academic communities of practice focused on priority teaching subject specialisations (Mathematics, Languages, Science and Technology), which would have the responsibility to understand university practices across the system with respect to the specialisation, with a view towards the development of knowledge and practice standards for the teaching specialisation, which could assist to achieve greater convergence and rigour in teacher education curricula;
  • Support appropriate research, programme development and material development activities that will improve the quality of initial teacher education programme delivery;
  • Finalise norms and standards for professional practice and teaching schools as well as mechanisms for their establishment;
  • Develop a national database of schools that will be developed as professional practice schools;
  • Support universities to develop business plans for the establishment of teaching schools;
  • Develop a national programme to support the professional development of school teachers that act as tutors and mentors to initial teacher education students, which can be delivered in a blended mode, with a significant online component; and
  • Develop an online platform/course for the teaching practice/work-integrated learning component of teacher education programmes.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3245 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 September 2015 - NW2977

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) how many technical and vocational education and training colleges are registered in each district in Mpumalanga, (b) what are the names of the specified colleges and (c) how students are enrolled in each specified college; (2) what is the annual student registration fee in each specified college; (3) how many of the specified colleges have increased their registration fees; (4) (a) how many students at these colleges are not receiving their National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) subsidies, (b) what are the reasons for this and (c) how many students have (i) been forced to suspend their studies or (ii) not attended classes due to non-payment of NSFAS subsidies?

Reply:

  1. – (3) There are three Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in Mpumalanga. The table below provides further details to questions 1 (b) to 3:
  1. TVET college
  1. Student enrolment
  1. Annual Student Registration Fees
  1. Increment on Registration Fees
  1. Ehlanzeni TVET college

8 043

None

Not applicable

  1. Gert Sibande TVET college

9 123

None

Not applicable

  1. Nkangala TVET college

11 603

None

Not applicable

Total

28 769

   
  1. The table below responds to questions 4 (a) and (c):

TVET college

Number of students awarded NSFAS allowances

  1. Number of students not receiving NSFAS allowances

b) Reasons for students not receiving NSFAS

  1. Number of students
       

(i) forced to suspend their studies

(ii) not attended classes due to non-payment of NSFAS subsidies

  1. Ehlanzeni TVET college

3 330

153

Students providing incorrect bank accounts

0

0

  1. Gert Sibande TVET college

2 798

403

Lost Identity Documents and incorrect bank accounts

0

0

  1. Nkangala TVET college

2 290

1 236

Students not submitting claims to finance timeously.

0

0

Total

8 418

1 792

 

0

0

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2977 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 September 2015 - NW3139

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How many students over how many years have graduated from the recently de-accredited social work degree at the University of South Africa, (b) have the employers of the specified students been informed that their employees are in possession of a degree which has now been deemed inadequate by the Council for Higher Education, (c) how will the inadequacies in their training be remedied, (d) how many other social work degrees were assessed by the specified council, (e) what were the specific outcomes of each assessment and (f) what remedies were proposed in each case where inadequacies were found?

Reply:

(a) Students who graduated from the University of South Africa (UNISA) with a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) before the programme’s accreditation status was changed to ‘not accredited’ by the Council on Higher Education (CHE) in June 2015, are not affected by the change. Therefore, only graduates in 2015 are affected but will be allowed to register with the South African Council on Social Service Practitioners. Students who are currently enrolled in the programme will be transferred to the new programme once accredited. The University has already commenced with the recurriculation of the programme and will submit the programme to CHE for accreditation before the end of 2015. No new enrolments in the BSW will be allowed at UNISA for 2016. Once new enrolments are allowed in 2017, current students will be transferred to the new accredited programme.

(b) The primary employer of BSW graduates is the Department of Social Development (DSD). The Department, DSD and UNISA met to discuss the implications of the de-accreditation. The primary employer is therefore aware of the processes going forward, with regard to the development and offering of a new accredited BSW at UNISA.

(c) Inadequacies are remedied through recurriculation. A communication and teach-out plan for current BSW students has been developed by UNISA. Transferring current students to other programmes, until the new BSW is accredited, is considered as an option. More resources will be allocated to the Department of Social Work at the University and additional staff will be headhunted.

(d) Sixteen BSW programmes were reviewed.

(e) Seven received full accreditation, five received accreditation with conditions, one with a notice of withdrawal, whilst three were de-accredited, including UNISA’s programme.

(f) The four primary concerns were about staff competencies, the theoretical underpinning and content of the programme, programme design, and the nature and extent of practical sessions in the programme.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3139 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 September 2015 - NW3004

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department intends to encourage every university with a law department in the country to revert to a BA, LLB curriculum seeing that the present curtailed provisions are allegedly inadequate to the needs of the profession and are inadequately equipping new lawyers with the depth of literacy so necessary to their profession; if not, why not; if so, what efforts is his department putting in place to redress the inadequacy of literacy amongst new law graduates?

Reply:

The National Reviews’ Directorate of the Council on Higher Education (CHE) circulated the draft manual, proposal and guidelines for the review of all Bachelor of Law (LLB) programmes on 5 August 2015 for comments.

The starting point of the review is the LLB qualification standard, which has been recently developed by CHE in consultation with the Reference Group on Standards Development comprising of academic experts in the field of law education. The review is an assessment of whether or not the current LLB degree programme meets the qualification standard and complies with criteria for design, delivery, output, impact and sustainability, derived from the CHE’s Criteria for Programme Accreditation.

Furthermore, the Department has representation on the National LLB Task Team, which will upon completion of the national review process, advise me on the structure of the programme at all universities. The National LLB Task Team comprises of representatives from the South African Law Deans Association (SALDA), Society of Law Teachers of Southern Africa (SLTSA), Law Society of South Africa (LSSA), General Council of the Bar (GCB), Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, and the Department of Higher Education and Training.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3004 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 August 2015 - NW2921

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he interacted with his counterpart in China during his recent visit to that country to ascertain why the Beijing Institute of Technology, North Western Polytechnical University, Xidian University, Shenyang Aerospace University, Ningbo University and South China University of Technology were so pivotal to knowledge production and economic growth in China; if not, why not; if so, (a) what useful lessons do the specified universities and other universities have to offer South Africa and (b) when will he implement policies derived from such lessons?

Reply:

No, I did not interact with my counterpart during my recent visit to China as I was invited by the Deputy President, Mr Cyril Ramaphosa to form part of his delegation. I therefore followed the Deputy President’s programme and accompanied him to all his meetings.

However, there are many useful lessons that other universities in China can offer South Africa. There are on-going collaborations between various Chinese and South African Universities, e.g. the Universities of Pretoria and Stellenbosch have partnered with Northeast Normal and Hunan Universities.

A Centre for Chinese Studies (CCS), based at Stellenbosch University, has been established to analyse China-related research by collaborating with scholars from Africa, China and other international academic centres with similar interests, and publishes regular discussion papers, policy briefings and short opinion pieces on current issues. CCS also hosts visiting academics and government officials within the China Forum that provides a platform to discuss and debate on China-African related subjects.

CCS has co-operative linkages with key universities and institutions pursuing both research collaboration and exchange undertakings, prioritising linkages with Chinese institutions that include Beijing University, Tsinghua and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. CCS is also home to the Confucius Institute, the first institution of its kind established in Africa.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2921 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 August 2015 - NW2886

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 42 on 27 February 2015 wherein he stated that the total expenditure on the Vukani Aviation cadet pilot programme is R68 million as at February 2015, what were the agreed programme performance targets for the specified signed contracts in (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; (2) what were (a) the reported achievements of the specified programme and (b) the reasons for non-performance on the specified financial years; (3) (a) how many cadets were actively participating in the commercial pilot license training and (b) what was the amount of the specified contracts as at 12 February 2015; (4) when is the specified programme expected to be completed?

Reply:

  1. The Department concluded one contract with Vukani Aviation, which commenced on 8 January 2013 covering a period of 36 months and includes the information on the requested financial years.

The Vukani Aviation Cadet Pilot Scheme Programme has the following targeted outcomes:

Programme

Target

Aviation Awareness: Recruitment and Selection

500

Psychometrics Test

500

Simulation

100

Life Skills Programmes

60

Commercial Pilot License

60

It should be noted that the cadets were split into 3 groups of 20, to allow for reasonable instruction time.

(2) (a) A summary of achievements since the inception of the programme are as follows:

  • Training

Training Programmes

Learners who completed the Commercial Pilot License and Advanced Pilot Training

4

Learners currently undergoing Commercial Pilot License Training

19

Learners who have obtained their Commercial Pilot License and currently undergoing Advanced Pilot Training

15

Cadets who have found employment after completing the Commercial Pilot License and Advanced Pilot Training

5

Total students who dropped out / dismissed / absconded

17

Total

60

  • Aviation Awareness: Recruitment and Selection - The aviation awareness portion of the project started on 16 February 2013 targeting 500 learners. Vukani Aviation visited rural and township based schools in five provinces, as well as utilizing radio stations and local newspapers to ensure greater awareness and project reach. According to the data provide to us, over 10 000 students were reached through this awareness campaign.
  • Psychometric Test: 189 Psychometric tests were done.
  • Simulation: 100 Learners were shortlisted and went through the simulation process.

Life Skills Programmes: The planned target for the Life Skills Programme was 60 learners, with 50 learners benefitting whilst 10 learners left the programme before completing all the required activities.

(b) The intention was that all 60 cadets would complete all the required tasks and flight hours in a period of 18 months, which proved to be difficult due to the following reasons:

  • According to Vukani Aviation, the Private Pilot License Ground School component took longer than anticipated, as the cadets struggled with mastering the required content and some were given more than the required attempts to accomplish certain tasks.
  • During the period leading up to the funeral of the late President Nelson Mandela, flight schools around Gauteng lost almost a month of flying time due to restrictions placed on the Gauteng airspace.

(3) (a) 9 Cadets have completed the Commercial Pilot License and Advanced Pilot Training with 5 cadets already having found employment, 19 learners are currently undergoing Commercial Pilot License Training and 15 learners are currently undergoing Advanced Pilot Training.

(b) The total budgeted programme cost is R77 070 921.00.

(4)  The entire programme, as per the contract with Vukani Aviation, is expected to be completed by 31 December 2015.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2886 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 August 2015 - NW2786

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Kilian, Ms JD to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) With reference to the expectations that the Technical and Vocational Education and Training college (TVET) sector has to expand significantly, (a) how long has the Mitchell’s Plain campus of the False Bay TVET college been sharing facilities with the high school in Mitchell’s Plain and (b) what are the relevant details of his department’s future infrastructure plan for the expansion of the specified college; (2) whether his department has considered the proposal presented by the False Bay TVET College Council for the acquisition of the Swartklip site situated between Khayelitsha and Mitchell’s Plain; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether any formal negotiations have been entered into with the current owner, the Airports Company of South Africa; if not, why not; (4) whether his department has made budgetary provision in the medium term for the necessary infrastructure roll-out of a campus to serve the community of Mitchell’s Plain; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. (a) False Bay Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College commenced renting and sharing the facilities of Portlands Primary School from 1 April 2004 until the end of 2006. The operations were then relocated to Spine Road High School from 1 January 2007 to date. The demand has outgrown the facilities and the college has secured 17 classrooms at Khanya School for usage from January 2016. The headcount enrolment at the Mitchell’s Plain site in 2014 was 1 149, with the additional facilities secured at Khanya School, the college will be able to accommodate approximately 1 500 students in 2016. The education activities at the Mitchell’s Plain campus will be delivered from two sites in 2016.

(b) The Department had identified the need for expansion of infrastructure for both the Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha campuses in 2011. The requirement has been included in the Department’s infrastructure planning and funding bids to National Treasury each year. The process that the Department follows is that all funding secured is mapped against the identified demands and basis of prioritisation. This process is informed by factors such as current available facilities and level of such, pool of potential students and finally the Provincial Indices of Multiple Poverty. In this regard, priority had to be given to sites in other provinces that are listed on a higher level of priority. The funding requirement of False Bay TVET College is still active on the Department’s infrastructure funding list.

(2) False Bay TVET College presented its proposal for the establishment of a campus at the Swartklip Denel site at a meeting, which was chaired by my Deputy Minister on 14 January 2014. I, together with the Department, have since been playing an active role in assisting the college to secure the site. The site is ideally placed to provide access to both the Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha areas.

(3) False Bay TVET College, supported by the Department, has been in active dialogue with Denel and the Department of Public Enterprises. Recently, the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) has shown an interest in purchasing the Swartklip site. To date the college has had two meetings on 29 July 2015 and 5 August 2015 with ACSA in order to ensure that our interests are taken into consideration in the process of acquiring the site from Denel. The Department will be approaching the Minister of Transport in order to secure support for the college, as ACSA resides under the Department of Transport.

(4) The Department works on the basis of prioritised infrastructure support and available funding. In light of the current fiscal climate and the Department’s steadfastness to complete its infrastructure commitments in areas that have high poverty rankings, it is not possible to make a budgetary provision in the current Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). The Department will however explore innovative means to assist with the refurbishment of the Swartklip site once funding has been secured.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2786 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 August 2015 - NW2772

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department supported the publish or perish principle for South African academics at tertiary institutions to ensure that the quality of research and teaching equated with the best in the world and that promotions in the academic sphere were directly related to peer endorsement of academic work; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) details and (b) outcomes of pursuing such a policy?

Reply:

The Department does not support the so-called principle of “publish or perish” for South African academics. The Department supports the development of academics that value teaching, research and community engagement as outlined in the recently approved Staffing South Africa’s Universities Framework (SSAUF). This includes supporting universities to be innovative and produce quality research. We expect that universities have some highly productive researchers, that may not focus much on teaching, and equally that there will be scholars who have a greater focus on teaching. The focus on publishing at all costs regardless of the quality or substance of the research is not supported by the Department.

It should be noted that the Department does not control nor develop policies on the promotions criteria at universities. The Department admits that highly productive academics, whether in the sphere of research or scholarship of teaching, should be recognised. It is also aware that some universities value research as a key criterion for promotion.

The Department has recently published a revised Research Output Policy (2015). The purpose of this policy is to encourage research productivity by rewarding quality research output at public higher education institutions. The policy is not intended to measure all output, but to enhance productivity by recognising the major types of research output produced by higher education institutions, and uses appropriate proxies to determine the quality of such output. While increased productivity is a key driver behind this policy, what has informed the revision was the need to ensure improved quality of subsidised research outputs.

Within the total subsidy funding allocated to universities in 2015/16, R3 billion which is just under 15% of the total block grant of R20.5 billion, is allocated for research output subsidies and implemented through the Research Output Policy. The remainder of the block grant (85%) is linked to teaching inputs and outputs as well as institutional factors. As can be seen, teaching is the area that is allocated the largest proportion of funding.

Since the implementation of the research outputs subsidy in 2005, South Africa’s research outputs have increased at a rate of 13% per annum, which is a substantial return on investment. The Department takes pride that our universities’ research productivity has improved significantly since 2005. South African universities’ research productivity is ranked top in Africa, and recent impact studies show that more South African research is published in high-impact journals than all other Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) member states.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2772 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 August 2015 - NW2800

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department meets the Government’s employment equity target of 2% for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training has 0.72% of its employees who are classified as disabled. All advertisements for vacancies in the Department specify that candidates whose appointment will promote representivity in terms of race, gender and disability will receive preference. The Z83 application form that is used across the public service requires applicants to specify their disability. No qualifying applications received, have specified their disability status. The Department informally liaises with relevant organisations for persons with disabilities to recruit possible qualifying applicants for vacant positions within the Department. For the next five years, the Department aims at being an inclusive department through the implementation of strategies for the recruitment and retention of disabled individuals.

 

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2800 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 August 2015 - NW2649

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, arising from his remarks on the importance of mother tongue instruction in the light of the Government’s constitutional and international legal obligations to promote mother tongue instruction, he will consider the positioning of (a) some or (b) all universities as institutions of mother tongue instruction; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa declares that “the official languages of the Republic are Sepedi, Sesotho, Setswana, siSwati, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiXhosa and isiZulu”. The Constitution, Section 6 (1), (2) and (4) of the Founding Provisions also states that “the state must take practical and positive measures to elevate the status and advance the use of these [the indigenous] languages” and that all official languages must enjoy parity of esteem and be treated equitably. The Constitution enjoins the Pan South African Language Board to promote and create conditions for the development and use of these and other languages.

With regard to the provision of languages at institutions of higher learning, Section 29 (2) of the Constitution states that “everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is reasonably practicable. In order to ensure the effective access to, and implementation of this right, the state must consider all reasonable educational alternatives, including single medium institutions, taking into account:

  1. equity;
  2. practicability; and
  3. the need to redress the results of past racially discriminatory laws and practices.

These facts are stated so that there is a clear understanding on the obligations of the Minister of Higher Education and Training. In terms of Section 27 (2) of the Higher Education Act (101 of 1997, as amended), the Minister determines Language Policy for Higher Education. In accordance with this legislation, each institution of higher education is required to establish its own language policy, guided by the Constitution and Language Policy for Higher Education. This requirement takes into account the autonomy of institutions to determine flexible language policies provided that such determination is within the context of public accountability and my responsibility to establish the parameters. Although the Language Policy for Higher Education is designed to promote African languages in institutional policies and practices in higher education, it clearly does not make a determination for institutions to instruct in various mother tongues. It would be against the Constitution of the Republic if institutions were to instruct in a language that will disadvantage non-speakers of that particular language. For example, English as a medium language of tuition allows access for all to our higher education institutions and therefore, no one is prevented from accessing our higher education institutions if English is utilised as a language of instruction.

In terms of individual university language policies, multilingualism is supported. Currently, it is however not practical to use languages other than English or Afrikaans as a medium language of tuition, since these have not been developed as languages of instruction at school level. The language of instruction at most universities is therefore English, while most formerly Afrikaans institutions have a dual language policy. The action required is aggressive improvement of universities in developing indigenous languages. I believe that the promotion of multilingualism in the higher education sector is imperative as the Constitution of the RSA accords equal status to all our languages.

In this regard, the Language Policy for Higher Education published in November 2002 is the framework that guides the practices at higher education institutions. The Department is in the process of revising this policy to ensure that other South African languages can be developed to a level where they can enjoy parity in our universities.

 

 

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2649 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 August 2015 - NW2700

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) he, (b) his Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in his department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

(a) Yes, I undertook a trip to China from 09 - 12 September 2014.

(b) No, the Deputy Minister did not travel to China during the 2014/15 financial year.

(c) I was accompanied by my Special Advisor: Mr J Pampallis, Chief Director: International Relations: Mr G Jeppie, Media Liaison Officer: Mr K Nkwanyana, and my Personal Assistant: Ms M Sako.

(i) The purpose of my visit was to participate in the World Economic Forum (WEF), which took place in Tianjin, China, from 09 - 12 September 2014. I was requested by the WEF to chair a working session titled “Skilling STEMS (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths)” on 11 September 2014.

(ii) (aa) The total cost of the visit was R293 416.62.

(bb) The breakdown of costs are as follows:

  • Flights: R161 485.00
  • Accommodation: R47 354.65
  • Ground transport: R34 892.97
  • Daily allowance: R49 684.00

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2700 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 July 2015 - NW2249

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) any entities reporting to him has paid out the remainder of any employee's contract before the contractually stipulated date of termination of the contract since the 2008-09 financial year up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (i) what amount has (aa) his department and (bb) entities reporting to him spent on each such payout, (ii) to whom were these payouts made and (iii) what were the reasons for the early termination of the contracts in each specified case?

Reply:

  1. Department of Higher Education and Training:

Financial Year

(i) Amount paid

on early

termination

(ii) Name of

employee

(iii) Reasons for

early

termination

2010/11

R711 187.43

Ms R Munusamy

Settlement agreement

2012/13

R685 200.00

Mr PS Mvelase

Unresolvable working practices

  1. At the time of compilation, eighteen of the twenty-six entities indicated that they did not pay out the remainder of any employee's contract before the contractually stipulated date of termination, since the 2008/09 financial year up to the latest specified date. The information received from the eight entities is attached as Annexure A. The Department is following up on the outstanding information from one entity.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2249 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 July 2015 - NW2514

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What are the (a) names and (b) details of companies that (i) won and (ii) lost all tenders issued by and through the University of Fort Hare in the (aa) 201314 and (bb) 201415 financial years?

Reply:

Responses provided by the University of Fort Hare are tabulated below:

(aa) Tenders issued in the 2013-14 financial year

Contract Reference number

(a) and (b) Names and details of companies

(i) successful

bidder/contractor

(ii) bidders who lost the

tender

  1. UFH-SCM02/2013
  • Dimension Data (Pty) Ltd
  • VX Telecom
  1. UFH-SCM03/2013
  • Simo Solutions CC & Dimension Data (Pty) Ltd (Joint Venture)
  • Gijima
  • Datacentrix
  • Business Connexion
  1. UFH-SCM09/2013
  • Ntinga Projects Managers
  • DPV Quantity Surveyors
  • Lurco Trading 307
  • Indwe Quantity Surveyors
  • Ntlonzi Investments
  • Aurecon SA
  • Bigen Africa
  • PD Naidoo & Associates Consulting Engineers
  • Ngonyama Okpanum
  • Zintle's Rural Development
  • EOH Mthombo
  • Dimension Data
  1. UFH-SCM10/2013
  • SFM Electrical and Refrigeration CC
  • Interpro Trading cc
  • Amatola Airconditioning
  • Electric Link
  • Flat-Foot Air conditioners
  1. UFH-SCM13/2013
  • First Technology (Pty) Ltd
  • Aloe Office and Business Equipment
  • Allied Business Solutions
  • Dimension Data
  • Datacentrix
  1. UFH-SCM14/2013
  • Dimension Data (Pty) Ltd
  • First Technology
  • Ubuntu Technologies
  • Datacentrix
  • Store Tech
  • Business Connexion
  1. UFH-SCM15/2013
  • Business Connexion (Pty) Ltd
  • Datacentrix
  • Dimension Data
  • First Technology
  • Ceos Technologies
  1. UFH-SCM17/2013
  • KPMG Incorporated
  • Aza Kopano
  • Rakoma & Associates
  • Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo
  • PWC
  • Marais and Smith
  • Delloite & Touche
  • Moore Stephens
  • Nexia Sabat
  • Umnotho Business Consultant

(bb) Tenders issued in the 2014-15 financial year

Contract Reference number

(a) and (b) Names and details of companies

(i) successful

bidder/contractor

(ii) bidders who lost the

tender

  1. UFH-SCM02/2014
  • Kamo Construction (Pty) Ltd
  • Thalami Consortium
  • Golden Rewards cc
  • Impelelo Construction cc
  • MIS Maintenance
  1. UFH-SCM16/2013
  • Itec East Cape (Pty) Ltd
  • Aloe Office and business equipment t/a Xerox
  • Northern Cape Printing & Stationery
  • Vitom Technologies
  • Penit Printing & Stationery
  • NRG Office Solutions
  • Morvest Eratis
  • Pinnacle Business Solutions
  1. UFH-SCM05/2013
  • Asag and Isondlo Investments (Joint venture)
  • Iyevest Group & Partners
  • Inframax/Africast
  • Escotek Consortium
  • Transtuct Building & Civil
  • LDM Consortium
  • Crowie Projects
  • Focus & Enza Consortium
  • VDZ Construction
  • Kao Consortium
  • SMADA Property Holdings
  • Majestic Silver Trading 118
  • Equicent
  • CBD Consortium - Bigen Africa

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2514 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 July 2015 - NW2516

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) When was a certain person (name and details furnished) employed by the University of Limpopo and (b) what are the specified person’s qualifications;

Reply:

The University of Limpopo has responded as follows:

  1. (a) Mr LL Lebelo was employed by the erstwhile University of the North, now the University

of Limpopo, on 1 June 1996.

(b) In 2014, the University embarked on a qualifications audit as Mr Lebelo could not

submit an original matriculation certificate.

  1. Managed Integrity Evaluation (Pty) Ltd was employed to perform the verification of his qualifications and was unable to verify his qualifications. He is currently subject to a disciplinary hearing.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2516 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 July 2015 - NW2515

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is the Ernst and Young forensic report on the University of Limpopo for the 2013-14 financial year publically available; if not, why not, if so, which (a) department or (b) departmental official is the custodian of the report?

Reply:

No. The forensic report on the University of Limpopo for the 2013/14 financial year is not publically available as it contains confidential information with regards to untested allegations against individuals and in order to avoid the infringement of the fundamental rights of individuals mentioned in the report, I will not be able to release the report.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2515 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 July 2015 - NW2425

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount did (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in (i) Sowetan and (ii) Daily Sun in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

(a)  The Department did not use the Sowetan and Daily Sun newspapers for advertising during the years in question.

(b)  At the time of compilation, eighteen out of twenty-six entities responded to the request for information, with ten entities indicating that they had not advertised in the Sowetan and Daily Sun in the 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 financial years. The responses from the eight entities are listed in the table below.

(b) Public Entity

(i) Amount spent on advertising in the Sowetan

(ii) Amount spent on advertising in the Daily Sun

 

(aa) 2012/13

(bb) 2013/14

(cc) 2014/15

(aa) 2012/13

(bb) 2013/14

(cc) 2014/15

  1. Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA)

R48 675.00

R66 470.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

  1. Education, Training and Development Practices (ETDPSETA)

R28 169.84

R129 558.94

R95 891.72

R0.00

R0.00

R49 709.02

  1. Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)

R59 211.20

R16 545.39

R0.00

R19 794.62

R22 855.87

R0.00

  1. Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R29 913.60

R32 558.40

R0.00

  1. Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

R40 530.96

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

  1. National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)

R21 523.20

R0.00

R60 575.04

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

  1. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)

R0.00

R0.00

R 6 019.20

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

  1. Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA)

R42 237.00

R19 243.20

R78 454.80

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2425 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2015 - NW2315

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Does his department have any time-specific plans for remedying the situation in National Technical Education programmes in Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) colleges, in which Umalusi has identified certain problems (details furnished);

Reply:

  1. Initiatives to transform the National Accredited Technical Diploma (NATED) programmes require both immediate and long-term approaches. Currently, the Department and National Artisan Moderation Body (NAMB) are working collaboratively with the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) as the lead partner to model the translation of the NATED programmes into occupationally registered qualifications under the QCTO. The Electrical, Plumbing and Financial Management programmes will be used as pilots in the modelling exercise involving all the relevant statutory, industry and education and training stakeholders. Once this process is completed, the model will be applied progressively to prioritise NATED programmes in engineering and some business related programmes. The curriculum, assessment, work-placement and certification requirements in the transformed qualifications are being addressed holistically, taking cognisance also of the quality assurance mechanisms that will apply across the qualification provision pipeline.

The Department has to rely on the services of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college lecturers to set and internally moderate question papers. All examiners and moderators are briefed annually in specially convened sessions prior to engaging in the setting and internal moderation of question papers. The completion of assessment grids, standards for marking guidelines and the rigour expected in the internal moderation of question papers are all addressed in these sessions.

Several additional examinations posts are to be advertised and filled by 31 March 2016 as part of the migration process, to facilitate the appointment of suitably qualified and experienced curriculum specialists. These officials will, amongst other duties, serve as moderators in the setting process and in so doing, address the completion of assessment grids, standards for marking guidelines and the rigour expected in the internal moderation of question papers.

Various examination centres submit inaccurate and poorly captured data in both electronic and hard copy format for resulting purposes per examination cycle. This does not only delay the approval of results, but brings the integrity of the process into question. The Department has recently completed and tested a national document on data verification standards of examinations for implementation by examination centres. All Information Technology (IT) service providers that service TVET colleges were involved in the process and the IT system administrators will be briefed when the Department hosts examinations support workshops across the nine provinces from August to October 2015.

The Department is not aware of any consolidated irregularity report that is still outstanding. The consolidated irregularity report for the November 2014 examinations cycle of the General Education and Training Certificate: Adult Basic Education and Training (GETC: ABET) Level 4 qualification was submitted late due to a delay in the response of the inputs required from Provincial Departments of Education. The Department has addressed this matter with the heads of examinations in provinces and agreed on the processes and timeframes to be adhered to for future examination cycles.

2) (a) Currently, there are 10 106 lecturers at TVET colleges.

(b) Work is underway to comprehend the skills shortfall of lecturers. Lecturers come from a varied background in some cases lacking pedagogical and technical skills. While an annual survey is done, it is not always possible to meaningfully identify the level of competence of lecturers.

(c) and (d) The Policy on Professional Qualifications for Lecturers in Technical and Vocational Education and Training was gazetted in May 2013. Universities are currently working on developing programmes that are aligned to the qualifications policy. The range of qualifications included in the policy will address the development needs of lecturers who are under-qualified, as well as those that may hold appropriate qualifications but need to develop pedagogical competence. The first programmes are likely to be offered in 2016, pending approval and accreditation by relevant bodies, and more will become available in 2017.

In the meantime, the Department has initiated a number of lecturer development activities such as continued curriculum updates on new curriculum. Recently, a Lecturer Support System was introduced with an aim to expand content updates to lecturers on a large scale. This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Dutch government. In addition, we are also developing mechanisms for structured workplace exposure for lecturers. A protocol on lecturer exchanges will also be developed this year.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2315 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 March 2015 - NW434

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) With reference to his reply to question 2663 on 9 December 2014, what are the names and relevant details of each of the 164 specific and individual projects the national skills fund supported in the 2013-14 financial year; (2) what was the (a) budget and (b) amount spent in each case; (3) in each specified case, (a) what (i) detailed predetermined set of objectives were the applications judged against and (ii) individual targets were (aa) set and (bb) met for each project and (b)(i) what are the details of the (aa) expenditure monitored and (bb) surpluses returned in each specified case and (ii) how was overspending dealt with; (4) were the projects audited; if so, in each specified case for each of the 164 specific and individual projects what (a) were the findings of the audit, (b) were the recommendations and (c) actions has he taken in this regard? NATIONAL ASSEMBLYFOR WRITTEN REPLYQUESTION 434DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 27/02/2015 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 04 OF 2015) Prof B Bozzoli (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:(1) With reference to his reply to question 2663 on 9 December 2014, what are the names and relevant details of each of the 164 specific and individual projects the national skills fund supported in the 2013-14 financial year;(2) what was the (a) budget and (b) amount spent in each case;(3) in each specified case, (a) what (i) detailed predetermined set of objectives were the applications judged against and (ii) individual targets were (aa) set and (bb) met for each project and (b)(i) what are the details of the (aa) expenditure monitored and (bb) surpluses returned in each specified case and (ii) how was overspending dealt with;(4) were the projects audited; if so, in each specified case for each of the 164 specific and individual projects what (a) were the findings of the audit, (b) were the recommendations and (c) actions has he taken in this regard? NW510EREPLY:(1) and (2) The attached list comprises of the names, relevant details, budget and amount spent on each of the 164 projects supported by the National Skills Fund in the 2013/14 financial year.(3) and (4) Please refer to my response to question 2663

Reply:


(1) and (2) The attached list comprises of the names, relevant details, budget and amount spent on each of the 164 projects supported by the National Skills Fund in the 2013/14 financial year.

(3) and (4) Please refer to my response to question 2663

23 March 2015 - NW434

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) With reference to his reply to question 2663 on 9 December 2014, what are the names and relevant details of each of the 164 specific and individual projects the national skills fund supported in the 2013-14 financial year; (2) what was the (a) budget and (b) amount spent in each case; (3) in each specified case, (a) what (i) detailed predetermined set of objectives were the applications judged against and (ii) individual targets were (aa) set and (bb) met for each project and (b)(i) what are the details of the (aa) expenditure monitored and (bb) surpluses returned in each specified case and (ii) how was overspending dealt with; (4) were the projects audited; if so, in each specified case for each of the 164 specific and individual projects what (a) were the findings of the audit, (b) were the recommendations and (c) actions has he taken in this regard?

Reply:

Attached please fine here: Reply

28 December 2010 - Question:Minister of Higher Education

MPs to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Reply:

QUESTION 1503

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 14 OF 2010)

Ms A M Dreyer (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

1. Whether the forensic investigation into the Public Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA) has been completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was it completed and (b) when was the report delivered to him;

2. Whether he has taken any action subsequent to receiving the report; if not, why not; if so, (a) when will this report be tabled in Parliament and (b) what are the further relevant details?

NW1759E

REPLY:

It must be noted that the questions refer to a period of time that predates the date on which I, as the Minister of Higher Education and Training, was assigned the responsibility for the administration of the Skills Development Act by the President. This proclamation took effect on 1st November 2009. Since assuming responsibility, I have taken the following actions:

· The Skills Development Act permits the Minister, after consultation with the National Skills Authority and the SETA in question, to direct the Director-General to appoint an administrator to take over the administration of a SETA or to perform the functions of a SETA if, inter alia, the SETA fails to perform its functions. I have invoked section 15 (1) of the Act to address non-compliance of the Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA). I have directed a letter to the PSETA requesting them to comment on my intentions to invoke section 15 (1) of the Act. I have received their reply and have indicated that I have instructed my DG to proceed with the appointment of an administrator.

· I have proposed to my Colleague Minister Baloyi, the Minister of the Public Service and Administration, that we establish a joint committee reporting to both Minister Baloyi and myself to review the role of the Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA). This Committee is in the process of being established

1 (a) The forensic investigation has not been completed. However, two forensic investigations were conducted into the PSETA's finances, namely, a joint effort between SAPS and the Special Investigations Unit and another one by Price Waterhouse Coopers which must still be concluded.

1 (b) I was informed that a report dated 3 March 2009 was submitted to the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) by the SIU. The PWC investigation is currently under way and great strides have been made in finalising the investigation. According to the last meeting that was held between PSETA and PWC on 30 April 2010, all the information that was outstanding was made available except for the following:

(i) On 31 March 2010, the PSETA Board requested the ADG: DPSA to provide banking details of all employees that were employed by the PSETA during the period when the incident occurred so that the said information can be forwarded to the PWC forensic investigators.

(ii) Computers and/or Laptops that were used by the former CFO Mr. Munyayi and Managers at PSETA that were involved in the administration of the NSF project and especially the management of the finances could not be traced and: a request was made to the DPSA – Asset Management Unit to provide relevant information. However, according to the DPSA it was not possible to trace the computers/laptops that were used at the time.

The meeting also resolved that the forensic investigators will prepare a list of suspected fraudulent accounts and assistance of the SIU will verify whether the suspected accounts are fraudulent or not.

Due to the fact that the outstanding information as indicated was not provided by the DPSA, it will therefore be difficult to determine by when the report will be finalised.

1 (b) Based on the above, it was not possible for the investigators to report to the Department of Higher Education and Training. However, it is important to note that the matter was discussed by the PSETA Board with the DDG: ESDS and HRD at the Department of Labour during August 2008.

2 As already indicated to the report is not finalised and therefore not submitted to me to take the necessary action.

The PSETA has reported that subsequent to the discovery of the fraud and the outcome of the Special Investigations Unit's (SIU) report, the following actions were taken:

(i) PSETA's banking account with ABSA was placed on hold to prevent any further fraudulent transactions and was only opened after new personnel and controls were put in place.

(ii) PSETA sent out letter to the banking institutions where the fraudulent accounts were held requesting the respectively banks to place the affected accounts on hold.

(iii) Disciplinary proceedings were instituted against the former Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Maxwell Munyai, who was identified to have been responsible for the fraud and/or theft.

(iv) Legal proceedings were instituted against Mr. Munyai for the fraud and/or theft of the NSF funds. He was subsequently convicted on 39 counts of the initial 44 counts of fraud and/or theft and was sentenced to 10 years in prison, of which 3 years were set aside for time spend whilst awaiting trial.

(v) VIP Softline was engaged to manage and administer the Larnership payroll for the rest of the learnership programme.

(vi) SAB & T Chartered Accountants were engaged to provide the back office accounting services and Kwinana and Associates was also engaged in 2009 to carry out the financial records reconstruction exercise for the PSETA since inception.

(vii) Mr. Kenny Govender, the Acting Chief Executive Officer during the period in which the fraud occurred was given a written warning for negligence in the management of the NSF account.

(viii) Ms. Mamello Mahommed's, the Learnership Manager, probation was not confirmed due to unsatisfactory performance in the discharge of the NSF obligations.

(ix) Mr. Hannes Roets was appointed as the Finance Manager in January 2007 and unfortunately passed away in March 2007 and in 2009 Kwinana and Associates was appointed to provide the CFO function/services.

(x) Mr. Clive Mtshisa was seconded as the interim Chief Executive Officer and Mr. Sipho Majombozi was subsequently appointed Acting Chief Executive Officer from February 2008 on the understanding that he will relinquish the position upon the recruitment of a substantive Chief Executive Officer.

(xi) A substantive Chief Financial Officer has been identified and is expected to assume office with effect from 1 June 2010 and the selection process for a substantive Chief Executive Officer is currently under way with interviews having been conducted on the 17th of May 2010 and the final appointed will done on 8 June 2010.

In view of the fact that the report is not finalised as already indicated and it is therefore not possible to confirm by when the report will be tabled in Parliament. The Department will require the administrator of the PSETA to ensure that the report will be finalised and submitted as soon as possible.

2(a) Once the final report has been submitted to my Department, I will ensure that it will be managed in terms of the relevant legislation.

2 (b) Further details pertaining to the issue under discussion could be made available once the final report has been submitted to my Department.

QUESTION 1791

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/06/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 16 OF 2010)

Mr N M Kganyago (UDM) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) What are the minimum compulsory qualifications for a person to take up a lecturing position at a further education and training (FET) college?

(2) Whether all current FET lecturers meet the minimum compulsory qualifications; if not, (a) how many lecturers are not properly qualified and (b) what steps does his department intend taking in this regard?

NW2059E

REPLY:

(1) There has been no specific policy for FET college lecturers in the past and they were generally appointed in terms of the Employment of Educators' Act, at REQV 10 to 13. This was however applied very unevenly across the colleges nationally. It must be noted that the requirements of FET Colleges differ significantly from schools. Accordingly the South African Council of Educators (SACE) granted special dispensation for qualified artisans (with N certificates / Technical Diplomas) but lacking professional Teaching qualifications to register as teachers.

(2) In August 2009 the Department published a gazette for public comment that sets out the framework for lecturer qualifications and development in the FET college sector. Although the framework has not been finalised, it serves as the benchmark for the employment of lecturers going forward. . Once the framework is finalised the Department will develop a plan for relevant lecturers to upgrade and up-skill to meet these requirements. An analysis of 4788 lecturers reveals the following:

Relative Education Qualification Values

Number of Lecturers

%

REQV 10

99

2.07%

REQV 11

11

0.23%

REQV 12

57

1.19%

REQV 13

1721

35.94%

REQV 14

2900

60.57%

There are currently just over 5000 lecturers employed in public FET Colleges.

QUESTION 1792

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/06/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 16 OF 2010)

Mr N M Kganyago (UDM) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) How many lecture periods per week do further education and training (FET) colleges devote to practical training of learners in (a) carpentry, (b) bricklaying and plastering, (c) plumbing, (d) motor mechanics and (e)(i) heavy and (ii) light current electrical work;

(2) Whether he has found that learners in the above trades acquire suitable saleable skills for entry into the labour market; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? W2060E

REPLY:

(1) In the NC (V) qualification students spend 2 - 3 hours per week in practical training. The curriculum prescribes that neither the theory nor practical learning must be more than 60%, or less than 40%. Given this limited flexibility, the firm requirement however is that all the outcomes as listed in the subject guidelines must be met.

(2) The subjects mentioned are the occupational component of a much bigger vocational (career-orientated) qualification requiring students to spend the greater portion of the college day in other forms of learning. The occupational subjects mentioned are not intended to qualify the students in these respective occupations. It is intended rather to give the students an opportunity to acquire important knowledge and skills to enable further learning and qualification along a career pathway, or to specialise further in a given occupation/job. Practical application in the subjects mentioned are supported by practical work done in the other three vocational subjects in the vocational programme, and is therefore sufficient for the intended purpose.

QUESTION 1793

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/06/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 16 OF 2010)

Mr N M Kganyago (UDM) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a)(i) How many first-year students were registered for degrees in engineering at each university and (ii) how many of them qualified to commence their second year in (aa) 2007, (bb) 2008 and (cc) 2009 and (b) what was the demographic breakdown of these students according to race?

NW2061E

REPLY

(a)(i) The attached table gives an indication of how many first-year students were registered for degrees in engineering at each university, including the demographic breakdown as requested in part (a)(ii) of the question.

(ii) The information on how many have qualified to commence their second year and the demographics for the second year is not available as institutions have different definitions for years of study. For example some institutions may require a student to repeat the first year if they fail subjects, whereas another institution will regard a student in a similar position as a 2nd year student. The total number of students (second year and onwards, excluding first time entering students) enrolled for engineering are as follows:

2006: 34066

2007: 35959

2008: 37035

QUESTION 687

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 7 OF 2010

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether any universities took up the offer to register students without having to pay registration fees upfront; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many and (b) which universities;

(2) Whether any eligible students were overlooked by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme of South Africa (NSFAS) offer; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW813E

REPLY:

(1.a) As of Thursday, 17 March 2010, eighteen institutions had taken up the offer for the 2010 academic year, to the value of R331 million as indicated in table below. The total upfront payment claimed from HEIs for donor category DE-General amounts to R317 million. Central University of Technology and the University of South Africa indicated that they did not need the upfront payment. The Cape Peninsula University of Technology will send additional claims during March 2010.

The University of Pretoria, Rhodes University, and Vaal University of Technology are still busy with the processing of claims and will submit their claim for upfront payment during March 2010.

The total amount claimed for DE-Teacher (ringfenced) amounts to R9, 835 million. Three universities submitted claims: UKZN, NWU and TUT. Only three universities (UKZN, UNIZULU and TUT) submitted claims in the Category DE-Disability to the amount of R2, 343 million.

Other claims submitted by Stellenbosch University of R1 million was for the payment of agricultural bursaries and the University of the Witwatersrand for the bursaries provided by Rural Education Access Programme (R66 000).

(b) UPFRONT PAYMENTS CLAIMED BY UNIVERSITIES AS AT 18 MARCH 2010

18 Universities took up the offer to register students without having to pay registration fees upfront:

Institution

DE-General

DE-Teaching (Ringfenced)

DE - Disability

Other

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

5 391

     

University of Cape Town

21 816

     

Durban Institute of Technology

35 680

     

University of Fort Hare

5 205

     

University of the Free State

19 584

     

University of Johannesburg

54 124

     

University of KwaZulu-Natal

23 205

2 990

614

 

University of Limpopo

1 331

     

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

22 852

     

North West University

19 580

2 091

   

University of Stellenbosch

     

1 000

Tshwane University of Technology

34 620

1 442

1 633

 

University of Venda

1 699

     

Walter Sisulu University

23 445

     

University of Western Cape

23 491

     

University of Witwatersrand

29 882

   

66

University of Zululand

12 828

3 312

96

 

Mangosuthu University of Technology

5 500

     

TOTAL

316 765

9 835

2 343

1 666

TOTAL UPFRONT PAYMENT CLAIMED FOR ALL CATEGORIES

R330 009 087 million

It is assumed that universities that did not apply for funds used their own funds in anticipation of receipt of the NSFAS transfer.

(2) In 2008, 11 120 and in 2009, 16 172 students applied for, were eligible for but did not have an NSFAS award. Reasons are not provided as to why these students do not have an award, but it could be that they received bursaries elsewhere such as from private companies. The 2009 figure provided by public institutions is provisional as this data from the public institutions is not audited. The public institutions will submit their audited 2009 data to the Department in July 2010. Provisional 2010 data will be available from institutions at the end of October 2010 as they have a 2nd semester registration in July 2010.

QUESTION 881

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 23/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 8 OF 2010

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) What is the (a) breakdown and (b) total budget of the stakeholder summit on higher education transformation scheduled for 22 to 23 April 2010, including the preparations towards it? NW1018E

REPLY:

1a) Breakdown of budget (in Rands)[1]

Programme development

46 850

Development of summit concept papers (including honoraria for plenary and commission presenters)

325 400

Logistics, Planning and Project Management (including management of summit webpage)

138 000

Scribing (including synthesis report of pre-summit submission, recording of summit proceedings)

118 400

Development of proceedings report and summit report using blogs/submissions

125 400

Travel costs

46 204

Printing for conference report

102 400

Consumables

30 050

Contingency

67 596

Management fee

124 727

Catering costs

219 161

VAT

155 806

TOTAL

1 500 000[2]

1b) It must be highlighted that the budget for the Summit does not utilise voted funds but donor funding. The total budget of the stakeholder summit amounts to R1.5 million. A Summit Steering Committee (SSC) was appointed by the Minister who oversees the planning of the summit, the development of the programme, the management of the event and, the production of the report. The SSC is stakeholder driven with representation from HESA, the CHE, SAUS and organised labour. A service provider was appointed to undertake all the organisational work and to manage the summit. The committee has met several times and will meet again on 15 April to finalise the preparations. An advertisement, calling for submissions from higher education stakeholders was placed in the Mail & Guardian, The Sunday Times and the City Press.

[1] Total number of delegates expected is 400.

[2] The budget is donor funding, not voted funds.

QUESTION 2211

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 20/08/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 23 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) How many lecturers currently employed at the 53 further education and training colleges (i) have (aa) doctoral, (bb) masters, (cc) honours and (dd) bachelors degrees and (ii) do not have a university degree and (b) what are the relevant details regarding the rationale to employ lecturers who do not have a university degree?

NW2718E

REPLY:

a) The information contained below is for lecturers employed in the 50 further education and training colleges and not 53 FET Colleges as requested. This data is collated from the summary of REQVs.

(i) (aa)Doctors degree : 38;

(bb)Masters degree: 200;

(cc) Honours degree: 720;

(dd)Bachelors degree :2647and

(ii) number of lecturers who do not have university degree is 4062, of which 3569 have diploma qualifications

b) There are two types of lecturers that are under-qualified in FET Colleges, but they offer effective teaching and learning. The following are the categories:

· Lecturers with National N Diploma (Trade Test and N6 Diploma)

These lecturers have acquired the relevant qualification in different field of trades. They have knowledge required to teach trade subjects, but have no professional training as lectures and teachers

· Lecturers with ordinary Teachers Diploma

These lecturers have had professional being as teachers /educators but do not have disciplinary knowledge to teach trade related subjects.

In August 2009, the Department published a gazette for public comment that sets out the policy framework for lecturer training and development in the college sub-sector. Although the framework is not yet finalised, the department intends to build on this framework to set the minimum qualifications requirements for employment as a lecturer in the FET sub-system. The issue of lecturer training, development and support is part of the FET summit process, because the department had already identified it as of the challenges in this sector.

QUESTION 2117

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/08/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 21 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

1. Why has only one university made it onto the Times Higher Education World University Ranking;

2. whether he has any plans in place to ensure that South African universities appear in the top 100 rankings; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW2557E

REPLY:

1. Comparative practices related to league tables like the Times Higher Education World University Ranking is limited in its biased use of a range of indicators in an attempt to measure and compare universities. There are many differences between universities and the context in which universities are developed; continue to develop and function - including the financial, historical, social, political and cultural changes - makes information obtained in this way controversial. South Africa is on a specific development trajectory and imperatives considered as being key to South African universities might be excluded from the list of criteria against which institutions are judged.

A snapshot evaluation of these rankings shows a bias towards universities which are larger and well-resourced, where English is the language of the academy and modelled along Westernised notions of what a university is or ought to be. Strikingly, there is little or no recognition for the humanities and creative arts.

2. As the South African Government, our objective is to ensure that the quality of our universities is constantly and consistently measured against our own set of criteria (including international best practices). We have in place the Higher Education Quality Committee (HEQC), which is the permanent committee of the Council for Higher Education mandated to ensure a robust quality system for the university sector. The HEQC executes this mandate through a vigorous process of academic programme accreditation as well as institutional audits. The process is aimed at continuously improving and strengthening our university sector.

QUESTION 1969

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/07/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 18 OF 2010)

Mrs G M Borman (ANC) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether all the Further Education and Training (FET) Colleges have received their final examination results for 2009; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2205E

REPLY:

Yes. All FET Colleges have received their final examination results for 2009.

The Department of Higher Education and Training uses two key policies when resulting candidates for the National Certificate (Vocational), namely the National Policy on the Conduct, Administration and Management of the Assessment of the National Certificates (Vocational) gazetted in September 2007 and the Policy for the National Certificates (Vocational): Qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) gazetted in March 2006.

In terms of national policy, an NC (V) candidate must complete all the required assessment components for each National Certificate (Vocational) subject to ensure a complete result in each subject. In instances where an examination centre has marked a candidate absent on the mark sheet for the Internal Continuous Assessment (ICASS) and/or the Integrated Summative Assessment Task (ISAT), the policy states that the absence of a mark in either of these components will result in the student registered for the particular subject receiving an "incomplete" result. A high number of NC (V) candidates were marked absent on official mark sheets for either or both the ICASS and ISAT components. Such candidates are therefore deemed by the Department of Higher Education and Training to have been officially resulted.

The Department of Higher Education and Training will be visiting all 9 provinces during September 2010 to provide guidance and support in the resulting process to facilitate an improved understanding of the process and how to interpret the results generated.

QUESTION 1948

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26/07/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 17 OF 2010)

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether his department has measures in place to identify all (a) unregistered and (b) illegally operating colleges; if not, why not; if so, (aa) how many (i) unregistered and (ii) illegal colleges have been identified, (bb) where were they located;

(2) whether the department has taken any action against these unregistered and illegal colleges; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (i) what action has been taken, (ii) what criminal charges have been brought and (iii) how many cases of false registration of students were identified at each college?

NW2336E

REPLY:

1. (a) No, the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) does not have such measures in place. DHET reacts to complaints, reports, allegations from students, parents and the general public with regard to unregistered Private FET Colleges. This is the same process by which law enforcement agencies obtain information about criminal acts.

(aa) (i) and (ii) Investigations sparked by complaints have exposed sixty two (62) private institutions that are not registered as FET colleges and as such are operating illegally.

(bb) The colleges found operating illegally were located in the following provinces: Gauteng (39), Western Cape (6), Eastern Cape (6), Limpopo (4), KwaZulu-Natal (4) North West (2) and Mpumalanga (1).

2. (i) The DHET issued defaulting private education institutions with letters warning that they were not registered and were therefore acting in contravention of the FETC Act (2006). The DHET works closely with the South African Police Service and other law-enforcement agencies, in responding to reports of private education institutions that are alleged operating illegally.

(ii) and (iii) Police recently arrested owners and management of eight (8) private colleges and charges of fraud were brought against them. The cases are being finalised by the courts and this process could reveal the numbers of students who were illegally enrolled. DHET advises identified students to institute lawsuits for refund against institutions that have been found to be operating illegally.

QUESTION 1946

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26/07/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 17 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) How many student protests were held at each tertiary institution campus (a) in (i) 2005, (ii) 2006, (iii) 2007 and (iv) 2009 and (b) during the period 1 January 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

(2) (a) which student organisation led the protest in each case, (b) what were the reasons for the protest action in each case and (c) how long did the protest action last in each case;

(3) whether teaching and academic work was affected by any protest action; if so, (a) how and (b) what are the further relevant details in each case;

(4) what (a) damage to property or (b) violence was reported in each case? NW2334E

REPLY:

1. My Department has always monitored student protests, but not kept records or data on what transpires on individual university campuses. Since the beginning of 2010, my Department established an internal registration monitoring process to ensure that the DHET is informed about unrest at institutions. I have consulted with the university leadership (administrators as well as students) as to the causes of student protest and how these can be addressed by individual institutions taking into account their contexts.

2. Anecdotal evidence suggest that the genesis of student protests does not necessarily reside in any one organisation. Instead, students express their dissatisfaction through the voice of its leaders in Student Representative Councils (SRC). The SRC is enshrined in legislation, through the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997), section 26 (2) (e), as an integral organ to the institutional governance landscape. The main causes of student protests relate to exclusions, whether academically or financially. How students articulate this (and other causes) differs across institutions (and even across campuses within one institution) as the institutional context will determine the degree of dissatisfaction amongst the student body.

3. Universities have, as part of their rules and regulations as stipulated through Institutional Statutes, formal procedures for managing protest action, and these are implemented where necessary. Institutions manage student protests when they arise to specifically prevent the disruption of academic work and examinations. My Department, where necessary, works with the institutions to ensure that disruptions are kept to a minimum, and to prevent further disruptions. Institutions have the responsibility for dealing with time lost during protest action.

4. Reports about damage to property are sometimes received from institutions, or reported in the media. In this case, individual institutions would have to supply reports about specific incidents on their campuses.

QUESTION 1944

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26/07/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 17 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

With reference to his reply to question 881 on 17 May 2010, (a) what are the names of the donors of the R1,5 million that was spent on the Stakeholder Summit on Higher Education Transformation of 22-23 April 2010, (b) what amount did each donor contribute and (c) on what date was each donation made?

NW2332E

REPLY:

a) The Summit was jointly funded in kind by the Centre for Education Policy Development (CEPD) and the Joint Education Trust (JET)

b) The total cost of the summit amounted to R1 700 933.17. Funds were provided as follows:

CEPD: R1 201 026.07

JET: R499 907.10

c) As it was a contribution in kind, no actual monies were transferred to the department. Donors managed the payments to service providers over a period of time.

QUESTION 61

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 05/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 4 OF 2010

Mr R Tua (ANC-NC) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether the Government is considering the construction of a university in the North Cape; if not; why not; if so; (a) how far are such plans and (b) what are the timeframes for the completion of such university? CW86E

REPLY:

(a)The establishment of fully fledged universities in the said province remains a priority for this government. In this regard, we have consulted and continue to consult with the National Institute for Higher Education, provincial governments and stakeholders involved in the provincial delivery of higher education programmes in the relevant provinces. Work towards the establishment of universities in Mpumalanga and the Northern Cape will continue this financial year.

(b) I will be appointing two task teams to explore suitable university models for the needs of these provinces and come up with costed proposals and timelines. Professor Cheryl de la Rey and Professor Thandwa Mthembu will Chair these teams and will work together on key issues that will be common to both processes. It is envisaged that the time-frames for completion of the work of the task team will be by the end of 2010.

QUESTION 68

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 02/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 5 OF 2010

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether the provision of bursaries to students is based on the criteria of (a) race, (b) gender and (c) disability; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) Whether access to funds of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is equally managed and promoted in (a) rural and (b) urban areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case;

(3) Whether the pay-outs from the NSFAS cover all necessary fees, including boarding, lodging and books; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NO594E

REPLY:

1a) No. NSFAS primarily allocates bursaries to students based on priority skills areas, financial need and academic potential.

1b) No. See point 1a)

1c) Yes. NSFAS administers bursaries for people with disabilities on behalf of the DHET and DoL.

2 NSFAS is equally managed and promoted in both rural and urban environments. NSFAS has in the recent past tried to focus much more on rural communities. This has taken a number of forms - use of SABC Radio vernacular language stations to allow them to reach communities all over South Africa; visits to schools in rural areas; attending career exhibitions in rural areas; a presence on some rural-based university campuses during the university registration period; industrial theatre (in some rural towns); etc. In addition there is a partnership with the Rural Education Access Programme and other NGOs to ensure that access is not urban based purely.

3 No. Allocation to universities falls into mainly two categories. Some universities grant full loans to needy students and others like UCT and Stellenbosch, have adequate funding to grant full loans to needy students. Historically disadvantaged institutions (HDI) like the University of Fort Hare and Walter Sisulu University, which have a larger number of financially needy students, usually adjust loans to needy students, reducing them to spread the funds to more needy students. This is the conundrum of the allocation formula to both institutions and individuals. If the demand is greater and the allocation cannot accommodate full loans, financially needy students obtain partial loans which do not necessarily cover all necessary fees, including boarding, lodging and books. Under current arrangements, NSFAS bursaries are also provided to students registered at FET Colleges.

4 BACKGROUND INFORMATION

I assume that the honourable member is addressing the issue of NSFAS-administered bursaries and not bursaries in general. NSFAS administers the following bursary schemes:

a. On behalf of the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET):

· Bursaries for Further Education and Training students

· Funza Lushaka bursary scheme for teacher education in priority areas. The School of Education at Higher Education Institutions and the DHET identifies successful candidates based on the following criteria: academic ability, eligibility for one of the academic programmes for which the bursary is granted and candidates whose financial position would otherwise exclude them from enrolment for a teaching qualification.

· Bursaries for disabled students

b. On behalf of other government departments:

· Bursaries for training social workers to address its skills shortages via the Department of Social Development. The allocation to the student starts as a loan but is converted to a bonded bursary upon graduation, where the graduate takes up a post in the public sector for a specified period. No specific criteria is attached as the objective is to alleviate the shortage of qualified social workers by offering bursaries to students willing to study social work.

· Bursaries for scarce skills studies are identified by the Department of Agriculture using selection criteria based on academic potential and financial need. The Department of Agriculture selects its bursaries through its National Bursary Committee and require graduates to work for the same number of years that they received the bursary.

· Bursaries from the Department of Labour targets scarce skills areas including bursaries for people with disabilities. The NSFAS selects suitable bursary recipients based on the Department's National Master Scarce Skills List.

· Bursaries of R50 000 are provided to top achievers through the Eastern Cape Provincial Government.

c. NSFAS also administers private sector funded bursaries. NSFAS is not responsible for identifying suitable candidates for the bursaries, but enters into contracts with each private sector partner. Academic admission criteria and conditions applicable on graduation are determined by the donors/sponsors.

QUESTION 69

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 02/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 5 OF 2010

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether there is a correlation between (a) the funds allocated by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to students and (b) the number of learners matriculating annually; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NO595E

REPLY:

1a) NSFAS has developed an allocations formula to determine how its funds are distributed to universities. NSFAS funds are divided between 23 public higher education institutions on the basis of the following formula:

· The disadvantaged student index (DSI), which is calculated for each institution using full-time equivalent (FTE) enrolled undergraduate students, actual student numbers from 2009, weighted by race, namely, African = 3, coloured = 2, Indian = 1 provided by the DHET through HEMIS. Although not weighted, white students are eligible for NSFAS funds.

· The full cost of study (FCS), which is calculated for each institution based on the costs required to cover tuition, registration fees and residence fees including meals per institution.

· The FCS and DSI are multiplied to determine the Disadvantage Students' Cost Index (DSCI).

· The allocation to HEIs in Rands is the Apportionment Factor (AF) percentage for that institution of the total sum available. The AF is expressed as a percentage for each institution as follows: DSCI of HEI/sum of all DCSI x 100.

1b) The allocation of funds to the HEIs is based on the number of disadvantaged students and the FCS at each institution and not the number of learners matriculating in a particular year. Aspiring students who wish to enroll at HEIs must apply for registration at the institution of the student's choice. They would be advised to apply for financial aid if it is required and will be requested to submit to NSFAS the necessary application forms. The HEIs recommend the amount of the aid to be given to students from the allocation of funds (the Apportionment Factor) allocated to the HEI through NSFAS. The HEIs allocates an estimated three quarters of NSFAS funding to existing students and a quarter is reserved for first year students.

QUESTION 1748

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 15 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) What were the start and end date of tenure in office of every (a) permanent and (b) acting (i) Director-General and (ii) chief financial officer during the period 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009?

NW2014E

REPLY:

The member is reminded that the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) did not exist between 1 January 2000 and 7 July 2009. The question can only be answered from the time that DHET was established. In addition, a budget for DHET was only established in April 2010, and a Chief Financial Officer was only appointed then.

EMPLOYMENT STATUS

NAME OF OFFICIAL

START DATE

END DATE

(a) (i) Permanent Directors-General

Ms. M Metcalfe

1st September 2009

To- date

( a) (ii) Permanent Chief Financial Officers

n/a

n/a

n/a

(b) (i) Acting Directors-General

Dr M Qhobela

21 July 2009

31st August 2009

(ii) Acting Chief Financial Officers

n/a

n/a

n/a

QUESTION 270

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/02/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 2 OF 2010

Ms P C Duncan (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) How many medical graduates graduated from each medical school in each of the five most recent specified years for which information is available;

(2) whether his department has any plans in place to increase the number of medical graduates; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what plans, (b) how many additional medical graduates will result from the implementation of these plans and (c) at what stage of development are these plans? NW286E

REPLY:

(1) Number of medical graduates from 2004 to 2008

Institution

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

University of Cape Town

159

150

185

160

164

University of Limpopo

238

294

239

200

150

University of KwaZulu-Natal

178

298

201

189

224

University of the Free State

167

106

105

129

109

University of Pretoria

180

197

207

198

200

University of Stellenbosch

148

150

170

149

167

University of Witwatersrand

205

247

170

175

189

Walter Sisulu University

119

69

89

97

103

TOTAL

1394

1511

1366

1297

1306

(2) (a) The preparing of growth projections in the health sciences is part of the brief of the Health Sciences Review Committee. This is a joint committee of the Departments of Finance, Heath and Higher Education and Training. It is administered by the Department of Higher Education and Training, and includes as members representatives from HESA and the HPCSA.

The Review Committee has concentrated its work on enrolment and graduation models for those undergraduate health sciences programmes which require access, for clinical training purposes, to provincial hospital services. These programmes include the MBChB.

The Health Sciences Review Committee's enrolment and graduation models for the MBChB have allowed it to construct three scenarios for the period 2008 to 2020 for the eight universities which offer MBChB degrees.

Scenario 1

(b) The Department of Higher Education and Training has allocated infrastructure and clinical training funding to five universities which had indicated that they could increase their new intakes of MBChB students by 3% per annum. On this low growth scenario, the number of clinical students requiring access to provincial hospital services would, by 2020, be 665 (or 16%) higher than the total for 2008. The total of MBChB graduates would increase by only 175 (or 14%) in 2020 compared to 2008.

Scenario 2

This is a medium growth scenario. It assumes that all eight universities will increase their new undergraduate intakes by 3 percentage points above scenario 1. So the first five universities would be given 6% new intake growth targets, and the remaining three 3% growth rate targets. On this growth scenario, the number of students in the clinical years would, by 2020, be 1843 (or 43%) higher than the total for 2008. The total of MBChB graduates would increase by 504 (or 40%) in 2020 compared to 2008.

Scenario 3

This is a high growth scenario. It assumes that all eight universities will increase their new undergraduate intakes by a further 3 percentage points above scenario 2. On this scenario, the number of students in the clinical years would, by 2020, be 3059 (or 72%) higher than the total for 2008. The total of MBChB graduates would, on the scenario, increase by 800 (or 63%) in 2020 compared to 2008.

The Health Sciences Review Committee has begun to determine what the costs would be of these and other enrolment and graduate growth scenarios in health sciences programmes. It has noted that the initial cost demands of growth in the MBChB will be high, even in the years before increased totals of graduates begin to emerge from the system. Costs will have to be incurred in employing additional academic staff as enrolments in the preclinical years begin to grow. Provision will have to be made for additional academic teaching space, particularly class rooms, class laboratories and staff offices.

A major bottle neck in the system will be the demands which increases in clinical training will place on provincial hospital services. As enrolments grow in the clinical years (which would be three years after intakes increase), provision would have to be made for rapid increases in new training beds in provincial hospitals services. Provision would also have to be made for additional clinical supervisors and for additional service staff and running costs in those hospitals which are involved in the training of students.

(c) The Health Sciences Review Committee will complete its work on these enrolment and cost models during the 2010/11 financial year. Its report will be submitted in the first instance to the Minister of Higher Education and Training.

QUESTION 1067

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Mr D C Ross (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

With reference to his reply to question 270 on 16 March 2010, what amount of funding has been given to each medical school for the (a) 2007-08, (b) 2008-09, (c) 2009-10 and (d) 2010-11 financial years? NW1216E

REPLY:

(1) Earmarked (or designated) funds have been allocated from two sources to universities which have either a medical faculty or dental faculty or both. These are (a) infrastructure funds covering the cycles 2007/08 to 2009/10 and 2010/11 to 2011/12, and (b) clinical training grants covering the cycles 2008/09 to 2009/10 and 2010/11 to 2011/12.

(2) The infrastructure funds made available for 2007/08 to 2009/10 were allocated on the basis of applications received from universities. They had been asked to indicate what funds they would need to implement student enrolment growth plans in the period from 2005 to the 2010. No specific provision was made for the health sciences in this first cycle, but universities could have submitted requests for funds under this category. Applications for funding tended to focus on engineering and technology, the applied sciences, and the basic life and physical sciences. The second cycle of 2010/11 to 2011/12 made specific provision for the health sciences. Universities were asked to submit applications for infrastructure developments which would enable them to increase their outputs of health sciences graduates. Table 1 below sums up the health sciences infrastructure amounts allocated to universities over the 5-year period 2007/08 to 2011/12.

Table 1

Health sciences infrastructure allocations to universities with medical and/or dental faculties

(Rands millions)

 

2007/08 to 2009/10

2010/11 to 2011/12

TOTAL

University of Cape Town

0

0

0

University of the Free State

0

17.1

17.1

University of KwaZulu-Natal

0

62.0

62.0

University of Limpopo

81.0

84.7

165.7

University of Pretoria

0

32.6

32.6

Stellenbosch University

0

20.2

20.2

Walter Sisulu University

0

25.5

25.5

University of the Western Cape

0

46.4

46.4

University of the Witwatersrand

0

70.3

70.3

TOTAL

81.0

358.8

439.8

(3) Clinical training grants are allocated to universities on the basis of the numbers of students they have in clinical training programmes. These are programmes which require health sciences students to have access to the staff, patients and facilities of provincial health services. Programmes which are eligible for clinical training grants include medicine and dentistry, the professions allied to medicine, pharmacy, nursing, emergency medical care, and clinical and biomedical technology. These clinical training grants are used by universities to appoint additional clinical training staff, purchase clinical training equipment, and to provide new clinical training facilities. Most of these new clinical training facilities will be in small towns and rural areas some distance from the main teaching hospitals. The new facilities will give the medical and dental faculties access to new groups of patients, and will enable them to expand the numbers of students in the clinical training years of their academic programmes.

(4) Table 2 below sums up the clinical training grants allocated to the universities with medical and dental faculties over the 4-year period 2008/09 to 2011/12.

Table 2

Clinical training grant allocations to universities with medical and/or dental faculties

(Rands millions)

 

2008/09 to 2009/10

2010/11 to 2011/12

TOTAL

University of Cape Town

59.0

66.2

125.2

University of the Free State

39.3

47.3

86.6

University of KwaZulu-Natal

75.3

106.3

181.6

University of Limpopo

61.3

70.4

131.7

University of Pretoria

73.9

73.0

146.9

Stellenbosch University

56.7

60.8

117.5

Walter Sisulu University

20.5

27.5

48.0

University of the Western Cape

25.0

49.8

74.8

University of the Witwatersrand

86.0

96.3

182.3

TOTAL

497.0

597.6

1094.6

(5) The totals in Tables 1 and 2 do not include the undesignated block grants which universities receive on the basis of their student enrolments, their graduate totals and their research outputs. These block grant funds amount totalled R13 300 million in 2009/10, and will be R15 000 million in 2010/11.

(6) Block grants are undesignated in the sense that they are spent at the discretion of each Council to support all teaching and research activities of its university. It is not therefore not possible to indicate exactly how much of the 2010/11 block grant total will be spent on teaching and research in medical and dental faculties. The most that can be said is that approximately 12% (or R1 800 million) of the 2010/11 block grant will have been be generated by the enrolments, graduates and research outputs of these faculties.

QUESTION 1072

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Mrs D Robinson (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) How many librarians have graduated in each year since 2000, (b) from which institutions did they graduate and (c) what steps have been taken to increase the number of graduate librarians? NW1221E

REPLY:

(a) and (b)

A total number of students at the different universities who have majored in the field of study: Library and Information Science (LIS) and have graduated is as follows:

 

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

TOTAL

747

716

478

508

460

435

376

411

486

The table below provides further detail of the 18 universities where students have graduated over the years 2000 to 2008.

Graduates in Library and Information Science by institution

(b) It is acknowledged that South Africa is experiencing an increasing shortage of young people in the LIS profession. Attracting young people to this profession is difficult due to past librarian stereotypes. Moreover, the trend is for businesses to appoint non-LIS professionals to manage their information. Therefore the education of future leaders of the LIS profession rests firmly on the shoulders of the 12 universities that currently offer formal education in mainly Information Science.

QUESTION 1075

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

Mrs M Wenger (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether any amount was (a) budgeted for and (b) spent (i) in the (aa) 2007-08 and (bb) 2008-09 financial years and (ii) during the period 1 April 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available on his department's mini drug master plan; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) What amount has been allocated to his department's mini drug master plan for the 2010-11 financial year? NW1224E

REPLY:

(1)(a) (i)(aa) No, since the Department did not exist at that time.

(bb) No, since the Department did not exist at that time.

(ii) No, since the Department did not exist at that time.

(2) The Department did not budget for the mini drug master plan for the 2010/11 financial year.

QUESTION 929

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 23/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 8 OF 2010

Mr A M Mpontshane (IFP) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether he has received and studied the review report of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS); if not, why not; if so,

(2) Whether he will make it mandatory for prospective recipients of NSFAS not to pay an upfront registration fee; if not, why not; if so, when;

(3) Whether a student failing in one academic year will still receive funding for another year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1074E

REPLY:

1 Yes, I received the report and studied it.

2 A period of consultation has commenced which will end on the 30th April 2010. I will present a report with final recommendations to Cabinet in August 2010. It must be noted that both NSFAS and I have written to institutions informing them of the upfront payment facility available from NSFAS and have urged them to utilise this facility.

3 The NSFAS Manual indicates that academic performance determines continued funding by NSFAS. However, a student is allowed to appeal the decision supported by evidence such as death in the family, sick note/certificate and/or, any other circumstances beyond his/her control. The financial aid committee of an institution will have to look at the student's academic history to satisfy itself before a decision to consider the appeal is made, subject to the availability of funds.

QUESTION 1289

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26/04/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 11 OF 2010)

Ms A M Dreyer (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether he has received the report of the Public Service Commission (PSC) on the assessment of the Public Sector Education and training authority's PSETA) contribution towards the development of skills and careers progression prospects in the public section; if so , what are the relevant details ; if not ,

(2) Whether he accepts the recommendations based on the findings of the PSC with regard to the functioning of the PSETA; if not, why not if so, what are the details of the (a) dates and (b) timelines for the implementation of the report recommendations?

N1449E

REPLY:

  1. The Department has received the report of the PSC on the assessment of its contribution towards the development of skills and careers progression prospects in the public sector and the report is relevant in its entirety given that in the Department's assessment of the PSETA, it has been operating in a unstable environment which resulted in it being a poorly performing SETA.
  2. The Department accepts the recommendations of the PSC report. The Department has further commenced on a process to address the poor performance of the PSETA in terms of the relevant legislative requirements as well as approved policies and processes.

QUESTION 155

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 11/02/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 1 OF 2010

Mr A Louw (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) (a) What was the cost of the advertisement that appeared in a certain newspaper (name furnished) on 21 January 2010 congratulating the Services Seta Learnership graduates and (b) from which budget was the advertisement funded;

(2) whether any other similar advertisement was taken out in any other (a) radio, (b) television or (c) print media; if not, why was it only printed in the said newspaper; if so, (i) which media, (ii) on what dates and (iii) at what cost? NW164E

REPLY:

The SETA Funding Regulations provide for administration costs to a maximum of 12.5% of the total levy income of a SETA, which includes advertising costs. The management of the SETA funds is verified/audited on a regular basis by the Department and the Auditor-General to ensure compliance with legislation/policies.The SETA confirmed that the costs under discussion were from the 12.5% administration budget and not from any training budget.

1 (a) The SETA indicated that the advertisements appeared in the following newspapers at the costs as reflected in the third column of the under mentioned table:

Newspaper name

Date of advertisement

Cost

Sowetan

31 January 2010

R51 217.92 Excluding VAT

City Press

31 January 2010

R139 618.08 Excluding VAT

Business Report

01 February 2010

R185 259.90 Excluding VAT

1(b). The said costs were funded from the Public Relations budget (Administration budget).

2. It was also confirmed by the SETA that similar advertisements occurred as indicated below:

(a) Radio - Durban Local Radio Station: No cost (free)

(b)Television - E TV and SABC: No cost (free)

(c) Print Media - See paragraph 1(a)

QUESTION 162

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 10 OF 2010)

Mr R A Lees (DA-KZN) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether any classes and teaching took place at Dr C N Phatudi Campus of the Sekhukhune Further Education and Training College during the week of 22 to 26 March 2010; if not, (a) why not, (b) what action has been taken for students in order to catch up on the time lost and (c) what were the financial implications for the (i) students and (ii) campus for this period; if so, what are the relevant details?

CW193E

REPLY:

1. Yes, classes took place at Dr C N Phatudi Campus of the Sekhukhune Further Education and Training College during the week of 22 to 26 March 2010. However, it was only the classes for students who were preparing exams for the 1st trimester which was due to commence on 24 March 2010.The students enrolled on the NC (V) programmes were on recess from 19 March to 6 April 2010.

a) Falls away in the light of the above response.

b) No action has been taken because there was no teaching time lost; hence there was no need to catch up.

c) (i) There were no financial implications for the students.

(ii) There were no financial implications for the campus

QUESTION 1715

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 15 OF 2010)

Dr J C Kloppers-Lourens (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether her (a) department or (b) any of its entities has signed any contractual agreements with certain companies (names furnished) or any of their affiliates (i) in the (aa) 2008-09 and (bb) 2009-10 financial years and (ii) during the period 1 April 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (aaa) what is the nature of each contract, (bbb) what is the (aaaa) start and (bbbb) end date of each contract, (ccc) what is the monetary value of each contract, (ddd) what are the details of the process that was undertaken for the signing of each contract, (eee) who else tendered for each contract that was awarded and (fff) what amount did each tenderer quote in each case?

NW1972E

REPLY

(a) None of the following companies are/were on contract with the Department of Higher Education and training:

· 101 Junjus Trading CC

· Blue Nightingale Trading 61

· Ever Roaring Investment, and

· SGL Engineering Projects

(b) Provincial departments and the Department's public entities have their own regulatory Framework regarding this matter. They do not require the Minister's permission to enter into business contracts with companies.

QUESTION 1140

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 10 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether his department has established (a) on what the universities spend the funds they receive from the government for their research performance and (b) how much goes back to the researcher and their research account; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1297E

REPLY:

Funding for research outputs is calculated based on research output units, measured on an annual basis, and is included in the block grant allocated to each university. The block grants are utilised at the discretion of the University when the budget of the university is finalised and approved by Council. The total funding for research outputs increased from R1,522 billion in 2008/09 to R2,003 billion in 2010/11.

In addition to the funding of research outputs, research developments grants (earmarked allocation) totalling R129 million have been allocated to 12 universities. For these research development grants, the department requires each institution to submit a proposal on how they will use the grant to improve and strengthen an institutions research capacity. Once the plans have been approved by the Minister of Higher Education and Training, the funds are released. At the end of the year each institution will submit a progress report on how the funds have been spent and the department ensures that the funds spent are in line with what the Minister approved in order to increase its research capacity.

QUESTION 1159

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 10 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether the hosting of the Stakeholder Summit on Higher Education Transformation scheduled for 22 and 23 April 2010 at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology will be funded by his department; if not, why not; if so,

(2) whether such funding has been pursued through a tender process; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1317E

REPLY:

1. The costs of hosting the Summit at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology were met by donor funds and not voted funds.

2. Not applicable. See above response.

QUESTION 827

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 23/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 8 OF 2010

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) With which programme within his department is the responsibility of the compilation of the skills shortage audit vested;

(2) whether this programme works in collaboration with (a) training centres specific to certain industries, (b) technikons and (c) universities of technology in order to ensure that each of the individuals who graduate from these institutions are properly trained and equipped with relevant and marketable skills to secure employment within the fields in which they are trained; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW960E

REPLY:

(1) Historically this work was done by the Employment and Skills Development Services (ESDS) Branch (under the Department of Labour) but will now be located in the Skills Branch of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

(2) The compilation of the national scarce and critical skills list is based on Sector Skills Plans submitted annually by Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs). For the past 5 years, the preliminary draft of the National Scarce and Critical Skills List has been checked with the Skills Committee of government's economic cluster before being published. The Skills Development branch within the Department of Higher Education and Training will be responsible for evaluating SETA sector skills plans and compiling for draft list which will then be submitted to the Human Resources Development, Planning and Monitoring Coordination Branch for verification and publication.

The Council for Higher Education has the task of supporting Institutions of Higher Education to ensure that their qualifications are fit for purpose. The Qualifications Council for Trade and occupations will perform this role for trades and occupations. Until this is fully operational, the SETAs will continue to perform the Quality Assurance function.

QUESTION 306

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/02/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 2 OF 2010

Mr D A Kganare (Cope) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) How many students attended first year studies at public universities in the past five years, (b) how many repeated their first year, (c) how many passed their first year, (d) what is the percentage of students that finish their degrees in under five years and (e) how much on average does it cost the Government for each student in each year in subsidies and student loans? NW323E

REPLY:

(a) Number of first time entering undergraduate students, from 2004 to 2008:

Year

Number of Students

2004

145 238

2005

135 293

2006

140 008

2007

152 125

2008

151 952

(b) This information is not available as institutions have different definitions for years of study. For example some institutions may require a student to repeat the first year if they fail subjects, where as another institution will regard a student in a similar position as a 2nd year student.

(c) Success rates of first time entering undergraduate students, from 2004 to 2008:

Year

Percentage Success Rate

2008

69.2

2007

69.1

2006

68.4

2005

69.7

2004

67.3

Note: This includes contact and distance students. The success rate is calculated by taking the number of courses passed by students at all the public higher education institutions and dividing by the number of courses for which they are enrolled.

(d) Based on a cohort study analysis for 2000 and 2001 first time entering undergraduate students in contact institutions, 40.8% and 40.7% students graduate within five years of study, respectively. Students registered for professional first bachelors' degrees are included in this study, however, the minimum duration of their qualifications may be longer than 4 years, e.g. the MBChB.

Note: The cohort study tracks the first time entering undergraduate students for a particular year in order to determine the percentage of students who drop out and who graduate within the minimum time plus 2 years. For contact institutions a minimum of 5 years data is required for tracking General 1st Bachelor's degrees and for the 4 or more years Professional Bachelor's degrees the study requires at least 8 years of data.

e) The average cost per student is presented in the table below.

Year

Head count enrolled students

(A)

(thousands)

Total State budget for universities 1) (B)

(R billions)

Average

State Budget

per student

(B/A)

(R thousands)

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

685

744

735

741

761

10.8

11.8

13.1

14.8

17.1

15.8

15.9

17.8

20.0

22.5

1) Students of year n determine the State funding of year n+2

The average cost per student has been calculated by taking the total state budget for Universities and dividing by the number of headcount students enrolled in the system. A headcount student is an unduplicated count of all students in the University system. This represents only the cost of the State through the subsidy and does not include private contributions or NSFAS where applicable. It does not include any analysis of the differentiated costs by discipline or institution within the system.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PROVINCE

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 307

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 27/08/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 23 OF 2010)

Mr D B Feldman (COPE-Gauteng) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) What strategies did his department use to increase the number of (a) young people and (b) adults who are accessing education at (i) technical and (ii) vocational centres during the period 1 July 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

CW403E

REPLY:

a) Strategies adopted by the Department to increase the number of young people who are accessing education at:

i. Technical Centres

In 2009, the department extended the phasing out of selected programmes of the National N Certificates: N4-6 and N Diploma qualifications offered at Further Education and Training (FET) Colleges. The extension came as the result of the need for Grade 12 learners to access further learning. The last date for examination of these programmes is November 2012 for N Certificates and December 2014 for N Diplomas.

Furthermore, the department has approved the extension of the phasing out of the National N Certificates: N1-N3 Engineering Studies. The extension period of the engineering studies ends when the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) offers occupational qualifications registered on the National Qualification Framework. Students enrolled on the N1-N3 programmes must be indentured by industry prior to enrolment. This allows industry to continue with their apprenticeship programmes until such time that these are replaced by the QCTO registered occupational qualifications.

ii. Vocational Centres

The department introduced a bursary scheme (NSFAS) for NCV programmes in order to increase the number of disadvantaged young people who are willing to access FET Colleges.

b) The Department has collaborated with provinces and stakeholders to advocate for access to adults accessing education at centres. Part of the advocacy has entailed community radio interviews with AET officials.

Interprovincial meetings have been held with AET officials on advocacy matters to develop contextual messages for adult learners.

When AET learners receive their GETC results, learners are also encouraged to look to Colleges to further their learning.

QUESTION 1596

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 14 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

1. Whether he will permit the establishment of private medical schools; if not, why not; if so, when will they be established;

2. Whether his department had any discussions with the Department of Health on the establishment of private medical schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1858E

REPLY:

1. In terms of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No 101 of 1997) (hereafter referred to as "the Act"), the Minister of Higher Education and Training has the authority to establish public higher education institutions including the establishment of medical schools. The Act however does not empower the Minister of Higher Education and Training to establish "private medical schools".

Section 51 of the Act states that no person other than a public higher education institution or an organ of state may provide higher education unless that person is, in the prescribed manner, registered or conditionally registered as a private higher education in terms of this Act.

Medical schools offer higher education programmes. If such a provider does not fit the definition of a public higher education institution or an organ of state, then that provider is required to establish a private higher education institution which operates as a "medical school" under the authority of the Registrar of Private Higher Education Institutions.

Since the Act permits the establishment of private medical schools if it meets the requirements for registration, the Minister may not prohibit the registration unless there are compelling reasons to do so.

2. No, there were no discussions with the Department of Health because the matter was never raise

QUESTION 1561

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 14 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

1. Whether there are enough students in the education sector to meet the annual target of preparing the 15 000 to 18 000 teachers a year as estimated by his department for jobs in the school education sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1820E

REPLY:

No, there are currently no sufficient students in teacher education programmes to meet the projected needs of the system.

The number of new teachers required each year is not a simple calculation as there are a variety of labour market forces influencing the teacher supply needs of Basic Education, including internal mobility of qualified teachers in and out of the labour market and foreign educators entering the system. It is estimated that the Higher Education and Training system should prepare approximately 15 000 new teachers annually across specific subjects and phases.

The table below provides an indication of initial teacher education (ITE) graduate output in 2007, and 2008 from the 21 Higher Education Institutions which offer initial teacher education programmes. The information provided in the table was submitted by the Higher Education Management and Information System officer at each institution in 2009, and provides the most accurate picture available. At the time that the information was collected, audited data for 2009 was not yet available. Audited graduate figures for 2009 will be available in October 2010.

Table 1: Graduate output in initial teacher education programmes

 

Number of ITE graduates in 2007

Number of ITE graduates in 2008

Total graduates across all universities

5528

6009

It should be noted that these figures do not include graduates who may take up teaching positions without completing a formal initial teacher education qualification. However, the information confirms that the teacher education system needs to expand to at least double its 2008 graduate output over the next few years in order to meet the projected need for new teachers.

It is expected that 2009 figures will show a significant increase in graduate production, as the impact of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme and the Teacher Recruitment Campaign become more evident. Since the introduction of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme there has been a significant increase in the enrolment of student teachers at Higher Education Institutions. The table below shows that the total Full-time equivalent (FTE) enrolment across all years in initial teacher education programmes increased by 25% from 2008 to 2009.

Table 2: Initial Teacher Education programmes: Growth in FTEs from 2008 to 2009

 

FTEs 2008

FTEs 2009

% growth

Total FTEs in ITE across all institutions*

27747

34675

25.0%

*UNIVEN data not available

   

When the first year enrolment alone is considered, there was an increase of 35% in 2009, as compared to first year enrolment in 2008.

The issue of teacher preparation and provisioning is receiving attention in the new, strengthened, integrated Plan for Teacher Education and Development, which is being developed as a result of collaborative work that was started through the Teacher Development Summit held last year. The Plan proposes that institutional arrangements for teacher education and development be strengthened. In particular, it proposes that institutional capacity be increased through increasing the capacity of existing institutions to provide initial teacher education, and developing additional institutions where appropriate/necessary.

QUESTION 1385

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07/05/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 12 OF 2010)

Dr H C van Schalkwyk (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether the Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA) received 100% of its part of his department's budget allocated to Programme 2: Human Resource Management and Development in the 2008-09 financial year; if not, why not; if so, (a) what was the allocation for PSETA in Programme 2, (b) what percentage of this allocation was budgeted for (i) skills programmes, (ii) education and training quality assurance and (iii) learning programmes and (c) what percentage of the allocation was budgeted for salaries?

NW1622E

REPLY:

a. The PSETA receives budgetary support for its operations through the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) on an annual basis. The budget amount is determined by the DPSA and PSETA is then advised on the quantum of the budgetary support. The Seta does not take physical delivery of the money, but the money resides at the DPSA and is ring fenced for use by the PSETA. During the course of the year PSETA, through the Office of the Chief Executive Officer submits requests to the DPSA to procure goods and services and any expenditure incurred by the DPSA on behalf of the PSETA is set off against the ring fenced money on a draw-down facility. These expenses are recorded and accounted for as part of the DPSA expenditures in the relevant accounting period. In the 2008/09 financial year the PSETA was allocated a total of R20 575 000.00 to meet its operational expenses for the year. According to the expenditure report generated by the DPSA, PSETA used R14 748 883.00 of the allocated budget and the balance was retained by the DPSA.

The budget surplus that was recorded in 2008/09 (unused balance) was mainly due to the breakdown in relations between the PSETA and the DPSA which resulted in PSETA paying some of its operational expenses using the National Skills Fund (NSF) monies. The breakdown in relations resulted in the DPSA failing or refusing to honour some of the operational expenses that the PSETA had incurred and to avoid facing possible litigation by the service providers PSETA used the unused balance in the National Skills Fund account to meet these obligations on the understanding that the funds will be reimbursed from the DPSA managed and controlled Operational Fund when relations between the two entities healed. There are currently extensive discussions underway as part of the broader SETA Landscape discussions which are intended to heal the rifts and re-establish the PSETA on a widely accepted basis.

b. & c. The allocated funds were proportionately distributed amongst the major operational units as follows:

DESCRIPTION

PERCENTAGE ALLOCATED

Compensation to Employees

30%

Administration

25%

Education and Training Quality Assurance Unit

15%

Learnership Unit

15%

Skills Planning

15%

TOTAL

100%

QUESTION 998

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether any arrests and/or prosecution of students for drug and alcohol-related offences committed on the campus of any of the 23 universities and 50 Further Education and Training (FET) colleges have occurred; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1143E

REPLY:

Honourable Member is requested to note that the information is not available at the moment. It will be requested from the 23 public higher education institutions and the Members of the Executive Councils in the nine Provinces who are responsible for Further Education and Training Colleges and will be submitted once all institutions have replied.

QUESTION 148

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 11/02/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 1 OF 2010

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) How many (a) first-time first year students have registered at each university for 2010, (b) of these students are on the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, (c) are recipients of other bursaries and (d) first year students are registered to study (i) education, (ii) accounting, (iii) engineering, (iv) medicine, (v) social work and (vi) geology;

(2) whether his department has implemented any new measures to reduce the high drop-out rate amongst the first and second year students; if not, why not; if so, what measures;

(3) whether these measures have proven to be effective in other countries and/or institutions; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW157E

REPLY:

1(a) Provisional data for 2010 shows that there are 161 184 first time entering students however institutions are still registering students and their 2nd semester enrolments only take place from June 2010. Please note that final audited figures will only be available later in the year.

1(b) This information is not available at this stage due to the requirements for individual loan agreements between each student and NSFAS.

(c) This information varies from institutions to institutions. Institutions are responsible for the disbursement of bursaries.

1(d) Number of first time entering, undergraduate students, in education, engineering, medicine, social work and geology, by institution, in 2008

Institution

Education

Accounting

Engineering

Medicine

Social Work

Geology

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

745

784

1 390

0

0

15

University of Cape Town

30

665

491

223

29

26

Central University of Technology, Free State

219

184

439

0

0

1

Durban Institute of Technology

103

707

1 126

0

33

0

University of Fort Hare

199

203

0

0

86

13

University of the Free State

1 615

303

0

150

32

19

University of Johannesburg

266

1 548

1 110

0

123

22

University of KwaZulu-Natal

626

946

407

213

93

28

University of Limpopo

1 642

72

0

208

51

6

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

188

497

453

0

0

7

North West University

639

675

222

0

177

0

University of Pretoria

566

793

983

217

71

13

Rhodes University

0

208

0

0

0

15

University of South Africa

4 075

6 387

1 538

0

1 306

2

University of Stellenbosch

73

174

93

267

7

0

Tshwane University of Technology

1 034

960

1 664

0

0

35

University of Venda

269

225

58

0

109

24

Vaal University of Technology

147

524

1 517

0

0

0

Walter Sisulu University

939

672

315

113

93

0

University of Western Cape

77

8

0

0

0

0

University of Witwatersrand

526

494

578

202

27

26

University of Zululand

1 514

147

0

0

90

4

Mangosuthu University of Technology

0

408

868

0

0

0

TOTAL

15 490

17 585

13 252

1 593

2 327

256

Provisional data for 2010 can only be provided in October by institutions, as they are still registering students and their 2nd semester enrolments only take place from June 2010.

2. Institutions are being funded through the Foundation provisional grants to provide additional support and extended programmes to students that are underprepared. These Foundation provisional grants are a top up to address teaching and learning aspects such as staffing, equipment and facilities. Provision is also made in the infrastructure funding to address the improvement of efficiency in the teaching and learning experience. R430 million, R185 million and R1, 585 million have been allocated in the 2010/11 financial year for teaching development grants, foundation provision and infrastructure and efficiency funding respectively.

3. The effectiveness of these abovementioned strategies are monitored through progress reports submitted by each institution. There has been some improvement in the success rates; however it is still to early to determine the outcome of these.

QUESTION 472

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26/02/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 4 OF 2010

Rev H M Dandala (Cope) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether he developed any plans to establish universities in (a) Mpumalanga and (b) Northern provinces that will make tertiary education easily accessible to the people in these provinces; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW548E

REPLY:

The National Institutes of Higher Education in Mpumalanga and the Northern Cape are mandated, through the Higher Education Act, to coordinate the provision of higher education in these provinces. This co-ordinating function is managed through partnership agreements with universities operating in these provinces, i.e. UNISA, Tshwane University of Technology, Vaal University of Technology and the University of Pretoria for the NIHE in Mpumalanga; and the University of the Free State, Central University of Technology and Vaal University of Technology for the NIHE in the Northern Cape.

The establishment of fully fledged universities in the said provinces remains a priority for this government. Part of this government's mandate is to ensure that universities are established in those provinces which do not have universities. In this regard, we have consulted and continue to consult with the NIHEs, provincial governments and stakeholders involved in the provincial delivery of higher education programmes in the relevant provinces. I will address this further in my budget speech.

Until the proposed model is approved, the National Institute of Higher Education in Mpumalanga and Northern Cape will remain the vehicle through which higher education is delivered in those provinces.

QUESTION 1028

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether he received the forensic audit report and other related documents in respect of the Tshwane South Further Education and Training College; if so,

(2) Whether he intends taking any action with regard to these documents; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1174E

REPLY:

(1) Member James is referred to the provisions of section 46 of the Further Education and Training Act (2006) and respectfully requested to note that the powers to investigate are with the MEC of Education.

The Gauteng Department of Education is keeping the Department of Higher Education and Training informed of the actions they are taking in terms of the FETC Act, 2006 (Act 16 of 2006). I have not received any forensic audit report in respect of the Colleges.

(2) In conjunction with the Member of the Executive Council responsible for the Gauteng Department of Education, I will take appropriate steps after all the reports have been considered.

QUESTION 1029

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether he will close the sector education and training authorities and replace them with apprenticeships operating within well-established industries with recognised training centres; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1175E

REPLY:

I have no intention of closing the sector education and training authorities (SETAs). The member is respectfully requested to consider the functions of the SETA as outlined in the Skills Development Act (SDA). SETA's are advisory authorities which represent our social partners and which develop sectoral skills plans (SSPs) and administer the skills levy in that sector in alignment with the SSP and the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS). They have performed a quality assurance function, but this is to move to the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO).

I will not replace SETAs with apprenticeships as the the functions and purposes of these are not conceptually interchangeable. SETAs are advisory bodies. Apprenticeships are one of the routes to attaining artisan status. The member is respectfully referred to the Annual Reports and Strategic Plans of several SETA's, notably MERSETA, which explain the work done by SETA to support artisan training through both learnerships and apprenticeships systems.

The position in respect of SETA's is that we have now gazetted the proposed new SETA landscape for public comment. The position in respect of apprenticeships is that the DHET will through the QCTO establish the National Artisan Moderating Body (NAMB) as required in the SDA. As indicated in my budget speech, this is a priority

QUESTION 1030

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether any chief executive officers (CEOs) of the sector education and training authorities (Setas) (a) have been (i) handed over to the SA Police Service for investigation, (ii) arrested, (iii) prosecuted and (iv) convicted and (b) are serving prison sentences; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) which Setas' CEOs and (bb) what are the relevant details in each case;

(2) Whether any money have been retrieved as a result of such investigations and prosecutions; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1176E

REPLY:

1) I have not been informed of any actions as indicated in paragraph (1) of your question against any SETA or senior officials managing the SETAs.

2) In terms of my response to (1), this falls away

QUESTION 1031

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 9 OF 2010)

Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) How many (i) black, (ii) Indian, (iii) coloured and (iv) white students have (aa) been trained, (bb) graduated and (cc) been placed in the (aaa) Auto, (bbb) plastic, (ccc) Metal and (ddd) New Tyre and Motor Chambers in terms of the Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA), (b) how many of each of these categories of Chambers have students with disabilities and (c) what are the costs for each trainee? NW1177E

REPLY:

(a) (i) –( iv) & (aa) - (bb) & (aaa) – (ddd).The following students as indicated in the table below have been trained in the different chambers for the 2009/10 period :

FIELD

GROUP

NUMBERS

METAL

AFRICANS

54

METAL

COLOUREDS

10

METAL

INDIANS

3

METAL

WHITES

3

MOTOR

AFRICANS

23

MOTOR

COLOUREDS

2

MOTOR

INDIANS

1

MOTOR

WHITES

12

NEW TYRE

AFRICANS

2

PLASTIC

AFRICANS

2

PLASTIC

COLOUREDS

3

(cc) The MERSETA has indicated that their data not does not track placements, as it only focuses on training up until when a learner gets qualified. However, the SETA is in a process to implement a system that will track the learners' movements and placements.

(b) The following categories of chambers had learners with disabilities:

CHAMBER

RACE

DISABLED

AUTO

AFRICANS

19

AUTO

WHITES

1

METAL

AFRICANS

18

METAL

COLOUREDS

7

METAL

INDIANS

3

METAL

WHITES

5

MOTOR

AFRICANS

12

MOTOR

COLOUREDS

2

MOTOR

INDIANS

1

MOTOR

WHITES

5

PLASTIC

COLOUREDS

1

(c) The costs of each learner in the different learning programmes are as reflected in the table below:

Learning Programme

Cost per learner

Skills Programme

R190 per credit per learner

Learnership 18.1

Leanership 18.2

Primary Focus Learnerships :

R25000 per learner

Non-primary focus Learnerships:

R18 500 per learner

Bonus grants for people with disability

R 10 000 per learner

Primary Focus Learnerships:

R20 000 per learner

Non-primary focus Learnerships:

R16 500 per learner

Bonus grants for people with disability

R 10 000 per learner

Learner allowance is paid in accordance with the regulations

Apprenticeship

R90 000 per apprentice

Bonus grants for people with disability

R 10 000 per learner

New Venture Creation learnership Level 2 or Level 4:

Basic Grant

R19 000 per learner.

Bonus for people with disability

R 10 000 per learner

Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET)

ABET Placement Assessment: R150 per learner

Levels 1 & 2

= R1800 per learning area

Levels 3 & 4

= R2 500 per learning area

Training for sector specialists, assessors and moderators

· Assessors R3000

· Moderators R2500

· Mentors R2500

· SDFs R5000

QUESTION 496

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 05/03/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 6 OF 2010

Mr M L Fransman (ANC) to ask the Minister of Higher Education:

What (a) is the total budget of the National Skills Fund (NSF), (b) amount has been spent until November 2009, (c) amount of the 2009-10 budget has not been spent as at 1 November 2009, (d) amount of the 2009-10 budget has not yet been committed to a project as at 1 November 2009 and (e) is the amount of the NSF unspent allocations broken down in each province? NW586E

REPLY:

(a) The total approved 2009/10-budget of the National Skills Fund as at 1 November 2009 was –

R 3,470,479,000.

One of the reasons for the quite high budget amount is because the budget makes provision for an amount of R1,2 billion to support the Training Lay-off scheme as a result of the international economic crisis.

(b) The total expenditure of the National Skills Fund as at 1 November 2009 was –

R 537,363,000.

(c) The unspent part of the 2009/10-budget of the National Skills Fund as at 1 November 2009 was therefore – R 2,933,116,000.

Kindly note that the contractual commitments as at 01 November 2009 amounted to –

R 1,059,426,000. Also note that certain of these commitments are multi-year commitments, for instance the Business Processing Outsourcing and Off-Shoring (BPO&O) training grants linked to the DTI investment incentive programme are spread over a 3 year period from as per the approved incentive period per case.

It should further also be noted that at this point none of the R1,2 billion earmarked for the support of the Training Lay-off scheme was committed or spent.

(d) The 2009/10-budget not yet committed to a project as at 01 November 2009 amounted to –

R 1,174,860,000-00

(e) The amount of the NSF unallocated funds broken down in each province?

Of the abovementioned amount of R1,174,860 uncommitted funds R508,560 have been directly earmarked per province for the training of unemployed people related to the Social Development Initiatives funding programme of the National Skills Fund . The break-down per province are as follows:

Province

Budget 2009/10

(A)

Training contracts awarded at 31 Oct 2009

(Dept of Labour Prov Offices)

(B)

Balance of previous years carried forward too 2009/10

(C)

Total

Commitments

[ B + C = D ]

(D)

Total

Expenditure

(as at 1 November 2009) – payments of claims submitted by training providers

(E)

Unallocated Balance [A – D]

Eastern Cape

135,742,393

23,993,011

796,160

24,789,171

2,482,963

110,953,222

Free State

37,339,028

3,380,040

1,410,263

4,790,303

797,415

32,548,725

Gauteng North

42,559,136

5,010,380

1,027,057

6,037,437

74,084

36,521,699

Gauteng South

102,279,675

55,391,395

349,269

55,740,664

2,922,358

46,539,011

KwaZulu Natal

61,502,481

0

105,254

105,254

1,082,035

61,397,227

Limpopo

26,622,028

5,901,751

11,389

5,913,140

221,334

20,708,888

Mpumalanga

30,541,447

5,996,431

431,435

6,427,866

302,588

24,113,581

Northern Cape

22,153,622

14,818,261

146,503

14,964,764

259,750

7,188,858

North West

71,580,333

9,213,062

3,314,258

12,527,320

1,378,707

59,053,013

Western Cape

74,330,120

0

153,146

153,146

153,146

74,176,974

BESD-Entrepreneur Development Programme

* Gauteng North

* Gauteng South

* Northern Cape

23,000,000

11,162,583

 

11,162,583

0

11,837,417

   

(3,814,805)

       
   

(4,168,774)

       
   

(3,179,004)

       

Daily Learner Allowance

24,521,120

999,056

 

999,056

999,055

23,522,064

Head Office

624,248

624,248

 

624,248

624,248

0

             

TOTAL

652,795,631

136,490,218

7,744,734

144,234,952

R 11,297,683

R 508,560,679

The transfer of the skills development function from the Department of Labour (DoL) to the new Department of Higher Education and Training from 1 November 2009 resulted the uncertainty at the DoL Provincial Offices to continue awarding training contracts for the training of unemployed people. This has since been resolved and now receiving the necessary attention.

A further amount of R500 million and R50 million have been earmarked for the Requests for Proposals respectively for the NSF Strategic Project Programmes and Capacity Building for Community Based Organisations (CBOs) that have been advertised in the media during 2009, and these proposals received are under consideration through the normal procurement adjudication processes. A breakdown per province is only available once the adjudication process has been completed.

The remaining balance of unallocated funds are related to –

(1) R 80 million earmarked for ABET-programmes which has been held back to determine whether the NSF should still continue to fund ABET programmes in the future.

(2) R25, 3 million available for BPO&O training grants. These funds are dependant on applications that the Department of Trade and Industry receive from interested qualifying investors for BPO&O incentives and applications approved by the BPO&O Adjudication Committee. Training incentive grants has since been awarded to qualifying applicants during November 2009 to February 2010 and the current available balance as at end February 2010 is R8, 6 million.

(3) R10 million earmarked for the capacity building of members of the National Skills Authority constituency organisations. This programme is currently receiving attention.

QUESTION 1102

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 10 OF 2010)

Mr R B Bhoola (MF) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether there are specific criteria for funding poor children to advance their tertiary education; if so, what are the relevant details?

(2) Whether there is a National student Financial Aid Scheme (NASFAS) office in Durban; if not, why not; if so what are relevant details?

NW1099E

REPLY:

1. The National Student Financial Aid Scheme(NSFAS) was established by Government as the primary instrument for providing financial support for poor students who wish to advance their tertiary education. The current distribution model is based on the historical equity profile of students at institutions and the means test to allocate funds to institutions and individuals. Based on an annual estimation of the number of students that are eligible for financial assistance and through the financial means test with joint family income of less than R122 000, allocations are made to each institution by the NSFAS.

Two criteria are important in determining allocation:

- NSFAS funding is dependent on the student being granted and retaining an academic place at a HEI;

- NSFAS funding is dependent on determining the degree of financial need of the family of the student who has been granted an academic place at a public HEI through the NSFAS means test.

2. NSFAS has a national head office in Cape Town but no provincial or regional offices. It must be noted that students apply for NSFAS through public higher education institutions and not through NSFAS directly.

QUESTION 399

DATE OF PUBLICATION IF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26/02/2010

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 4-2010)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) What (i) vehicles, (ii) aircraft and (iii) properties are currently owned by her department and (b) with regard to each item, (i) when was it purchased, (ii) how much did it cost and (iii) for what reason was it purchased? NW472E

REPLY:

(a) (i) Mercedes Benz ML320 CDI and BMW 750i.

(ii) The Department does not own any aircraft.

(iii) The Department does not own any property.

(b) (i) - Mercedes Benz ML 320 CDI – Purchased on 19 March 2008.

- BMW 750i - Purchased on 25 June 2009.

(ii) - Mercedes Benz ML 320 CDI – Purchase price – R576 379.98.

- BMW 750i - Purchase price – R1 110 750.01.

(iii) - Mercedes Benz ML 320 CDI – Purchased as official vehicle for the former

Minister of Education in Cape Town.

- BMW 750i - Purchased as official vehicle for the Minister of Higher Education and Training

It may be noted that following the re-organisation of government after the 2009 elections, the Department is in the process of transferring assets from the Department of Labour, which will be effective as from 1st April 2010.

29 December 2009 - Question:Minister of Higher Education

MPs to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Reply:

QUESTION 1672

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 16/10/2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 22-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether, since his appointment in May 2009 any renovations or alterations were done at state owned and private residences of him, or any other specified official of his department; if so, (a) where he and the occupants of each such residence were accommodated during the renovations and (b) at what cost to his department in each case? NW2128E

REPLY:

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

QUESTION 546

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether his department makes use of private security firms; if so, how much money was spent on such firms in 2008;

(2) Whether these firms are used on a contractual basis; if so, (a) how many contracts did his department take out in this regard in 2008, (b) with which firms were these contracts taken out, (c) for what specific purpose was each contract taken out and (d) what was the value of the contract in each case;

(3) Why is there a need for his department to use a private security firm as opposed to state security? NW610E

REPLY:

The Department of Higher Education is still in the process of being established and as yet has no contractual obligations at all. The Department of Education and its DG is responsible for the 2009/10 budget. Therefore the Department of Higher Education is not making use of any private security firm but uses in-house security.

  • Not applicable
  • Not applicable

QUESTION 375

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 03/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 05-2009)

Dr. WC James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether he a purchased a new vehicle on his new appointment to office; if so , (a) why, (b) what make and model is the vehicle (c) what did the vehicle cost and (d) (i) what accessories were included in excess of the vehicle's purchase price and (ii)what was the cost of such accessories; if not,

(2) Whether he inherited an existing vehicle; if so, (a) what was the make and model (b) how old is the vehicle?

NW435E

REPLY:

Pretoria

Cape Town

(1) The Department purchased a vehicle for use by the Minister on 11th of June 2009.

No

(a) The vehicle used by the previous Minister of Education in Pretoria is used as official vehicle in Cape Town.

Not applicable

(b) BMW 750i

Not applicable

(c) (c) R1 110 750.00

Not applicable

(d)(i) Not applicable

Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

Not applicable

(2) No

Yes

(a) Not applicable

2008 Mercedes Benz ML320 CDI

(b) Not applicable

16 Months

QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY

FRIDAY, 16 OCTOBER 2009

1717. Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) What amount was spent by his department on (a) hotel accommodation, (b) restaurant expenses and (c) travel costs (i) in the 2008-09 financial year and (ii) during the period 1 April 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, for (aa) him, (bb) specified officials of his department and (cc) any other specified individuals;

(2) why did each individual use the specified accommodation in each case? NW2209E

REPLY:

(1) (i) (a) (b) (c) (aa) (bb) (cc) Not applicable for the 2008/09 financial year. The establishment of the Department of Higher Education and Training and the subsequent appointment of the Minister of Higher Education and Training occurred during May 2009.

(ii) During the period 1 April 2009 up to 30 September 2009

(a) Hotel accommodation for his department:

Officials: R 416 470.71

Conferences: R 616 867.43

(b) Restaurant (meal) expenses for his department:

Officials: R 43 810.84

Conferences: R 1 638.18

(c) Travel costs for his department:

Officials R1 418 732.49

Conferences R 37 638.62

(ii) The breakdown of restaurant expenses for him and officials in the offices of the minister are not readily available and is included in the expenditure on accommodation.

(aa) minister:

(a) & (b) Hotel accommodation & Restaurant (meal) expenses from 1 May 2009 – 30 September 2009:

· R212 735.64

(c) Travel costs from 1 May 2009 – 30 September 2009

· R397 582.58

(bb) officials in the offices of the minister:

(a) & (b) Hotel accommodation & Restaurant (meal) expenses from 1 May 2009 – 30 September 2009:

· R172 332.77

(c) Travel costs from 1 May 2009 – 30 September 2009:

· R773 645.77

(cc) Not applicable

(2) It was the most cost effective and appropriate accommodation available when the bookings were made.

QUESTION 170

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 21-2009)

Mrs L S Makhubela-Mashele (ANC) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether he intends to increase the number of further education and training colleges to address the skills shortages that affect our global competitiveness; if not why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NO1442E

REPLY:

The Department does not envisage increasing the number of FET Colleges. The current FET College landscape of 50 colleges and 360 sites is adequate for the task. At present these sites are well placed to deliver skills and have spare capacity.

The key challenge is to increase the number of students at the colleges. This is being hampered by the current constraints in budget.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 1521

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether, with reference to the statements made by the Minister of Health that the strengthening of colleges was the next focus of the Department of Health and that discussions with the Department of Higher Education and Training were at an advanced stage, copies of the report identifying the colleges which are to be strengthened will be made available to the public; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) (a) what amount does his department envisage spending and (b)(i) when and (ii) on what specifically will it be used to rebuild these colleges;

(3) (a) what officials in his department will (i) lead and (ii) co-lead the project and (b) what is the projected completion date.

REPLY:

It is suggested that the Honourable member direct this question to the Minister of Health.

QUESTION 1591

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 20-2009)

Mr. G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether his department developed and adopted a policy providing guidelines for the appointment of persons with a criminal record; if so, (a) when was the policy (i) developed and (ii) adopted and (b) where can a copy of the policy be obtained; if not,

(2) whether his department has any plans in place to develop and adopt such a policy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether his department does any pre-employment screening of potential employees for criminal records; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(4) whether any employees with criminal records are currently employed by his department; if so, (a) how many and (b) what is their (i) job level and (ii) occupational category? NW1997E

REPLY:

(1) The Department of Higher Education and Training is not fully functional as yet and make use of resources of the Department of Education. Except for, Ministerial Staff and the Director-General no official appointments have been made in the Department of Higher Education and Training.

2. A policy providing guidelines for the appointment of persons with criminal records is currently under development and will be functional as soon as the Department starts to advertise and fill posts.

(3) Not applicable at the moment.

4. Not applicable at the moment.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY

QUESTION 1293

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 11/09/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 16-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether his department has invested in a university that teaches in languages other than English and/or Afrikaans; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1640E

REPLY:

The Department of Education has published the Language in Education Policy (1997) and the Language Policy for Higher Education (2002) which, are designed to promote multilingualism in the education sector. Their aim is to ensure that all South African languages are "developed to their full capacity while at the same time ensuring that the existing languages of instruction (English and Afrikaans) do not serve as a barrier to access and success."

As part of our initiative to promote multilingualism in higher education, the Department of Education supports a number of pilot projects under the South African-Norway Tertiary Education Development programme. The focus of the pilot projects is promoting multilingual proficiency for academic staff and students registered in service disciplines such as social work, law, nursing, medicine and other health sciences. Support is also provided for academic tutorials conducted in indigenous languages.

ESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY

FRIDAY, 23 OCTOBER 2009

[No 24 – 2009] First Session, Fourth Parliament

1922. Mr G G Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether his department has done a skills audit in order to identify scarce skills prior to formulating the curricular of Further Education and Training Colleges (FET); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2486E

RESPONSE:

The NC(V) curricula are the only curricula developed by the Department for FET colleges in the last 5 years. The initial 11 vocational programmes developed in 2005 under the NC (V) qualification were identified through the scarce skills and sector skills reports available from the Department of Labour at the time. The initial 11 programmes included:

v 3 Engineering programmes (Civil, Mechanical and Electrical)

v IT and Computer Science

v Hospitality and Tourism

v Primary Agriculture

v 3 Business- related programmes: Marketing, Office Administration, Management and Finance, Economics & Accounting

To date an additional 3 programmes (Mechatronics, Safety in Society and Education & Development) have been added in response to stakeholder demand, based on a formal application and approval process. Similarly, 3 additional programmes and 4 new subjects are currently under development. The latter are funded by stakeholders.

All programmes on offer respond to the objectives and , where indicated, targets contained in the HRDS. The point of caution is the interpretation of the term 'skills' which is often used in specific relation to occupational categories, which constitute a sub-set of the vocational offerings at FET colleges.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY

QUESTION 523

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether any function was organised to mark the occasion of the delivery of his budget vote in 2009; if so, (a) what total amount was spent on this function, (b) from which budget was the money allocated, (c) what amount was spent on (i) food and refreshments, (ii) venue, (iii) entertainment, (iv) staff and (v) transport and (d) how many persons were invited to attend this function? NW587E

REPLY:

Yes, one function was held for the two departments namely the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Higher education and Training. The amounts spend and number of persons invited is as indicated below.

R267 044.57

The Communications budget

(i) R47 673.99

(ii) None

(iii) R20 500

(iv) None

(v) None

(d) 250

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION 182

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 21-2009)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether calendars issued by his department to Members of Parliament indicating only one extra day of holiday during the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer tournament is in accordance with Government's plans for school holidays around this event; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NO2081E

REPLY:

The school calendar is the responsibility of the Minister of Basic and the Question should be redirected to the Department of Basic Education.


QUESTION 191

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 21-2009)

Mr Z S Makhubele (ANC) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) What steps has been taken to remove the burden of the cost of education from poor families especially in the light of the underspending by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and (b) to what degree is the further expansion of the services and the transformation of the NSFAS receiving priority? NO2097E

REPLY:

(a) .The NSFAS has requested institutions to provide information on under-spending in order to redistribute funds to needy students within the current academic year. The Department of Higher Education and Training has been monitoring this matter closely.

(b) I appointed a Ministerial Committee to review the NSFAS in July 2009. A report is expected at the end of this year. The overall purpose of the review is to assess the strengths and shortcomings of the current Scheme and to advise my office on the short, medium and long term needs for student financial aid in order to promote the twin goals of equity of access and providing free undergraduate education to students from working class and poor communities who cannot afford further or higher education. The review will evaluate different models of student financial aid and make recommendations on the policy and operational changes required to ensure the effective and efficient achievement of these goals, which will enable South Africa to produce graduates with the qualifications and skills required to build our developmental state.

QUESTION 195

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 21-2009)

Mrs M T Kubayi (ANC) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

What is his plan on dealing with the fee increment in institutions of higher education? NO2101E

REPLY:

The issues of student fees remain a concern to me and my Department. In this regards letters have been sent to all institutions requesting them to provide the Department with the following information amongst others:

 Institutional policies in respect of fees payable and regulations regarding the payment of fees.

 average increase in academic and residence fees for the 2010 academic year compared to the previous years

 The anticipated estimate in fee increases for the 2010 academic year, taking into account the MTEF allocation to higher education.

 The totals which institutions expect to raise from tuition, student housing and the proportions which these represents of the total income of the institutions for the 2010 financial year.

 The average increase in additional student levies i.e. ICT, transport library and catering separately for the 2010 academic year, compared to the previous years.

 The general guidelines and specific rules or requirements for the payment of academic, residence and other fees.

 Institutional processes followed in the determination of fees for the 2010 academic year.

 The provisions being made from institutional and other sources to assist financially disadvantaged and academically deserving students.

This information will then assist us to be able to analyze the trends so that we can make informed decisions in our discussions with different stakeholders. I am also going to meet with Higher Education South Africa (HESA) including all national student organisations to discuss strategies to deal with the tensions that may arise as a result of disagreements on fee increments taking into account that the Department does not determine fees.

QUESTION 435

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06-2009)

Mr L W Greyling (ID) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether he will review the National Student Financial Aid Scheme of South Africa (NSFAS) in order for students to be awarded bursaries rather than loans; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) Whether he will review other aspects of NSFAS; if so, which aspects? NW495E

REPLY:

1. I established a Ministerial Committee for the Review of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme on 10 June 2009 to review the efficacy of the Scheme. The overall purpose of the review is to assess the strengths and shortcomings of the current Scheme and to advise on the short, medium and long term needs for student financial aid in order to promote the twin goals of equity of access and providing free undergraduate education to students from poor communities who cannot afford further and higher education. The Committee will also conduct a needs analysis of students who currently do not qualify for NSFAS support but cannot obtain loans from commercial banks and make recommendations in this regard. The Terms of Reference are contained in Government Gazette, No 32317.

2. The Terms of Reference include but are not limited to assessing amongst others:

 Assess the strengths and shortcomings of the current National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).

  • Conduct a needs analysis of students who will require financial aid in the short, medium and long terms, taking into account the Government's commitment to providing free undergraduate education to students from poor families who would otherwise not be able to pursue further or higher education.
  • Undertake a review of the Means Test and provide guidelines to determine the criteria for eligible students.
  • Make recommendations on appropriate mechanisms for raising and administering the required funds, including the parameters of the recapitalization of NSFAS and for the possible establishment of a student loan bank.
  • Investigate the feasibility of student financial aid being linked to priority fields of study and levels of academic performance.
  • Assess the viability of extending financial aid to students in not-for-profit private higher education institutions. Assess the nature and extent of former and current students blacklisted by NSFAS and universities, and recommend appropriate action to be taken to deal with the problem.
  • Recommend changes to the policy, regulations and operational framework of the NSFAS, including the distribution formula for the allocation of financial aid to institutions, the Means Test, the respective roles and the responsibilities of the institutional financial aid bureaus and the NSFAS.
  • Recommend changes to the governance, management, operational capacity and systems of the NSFAS to meet the needs of the new policy framework.

QUESTION 445

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06-2009)

Ms N Y Vukuza-Linda (Cope) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether the principle of commonalities that should have existed for mergers to occur between different institutions of higher learning has been upheld; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW506E

REPLY:

The Department released the "Guidelines for Mergers and Incorporations" document in April 2004 to assist merging institutions to map out the essentials and processes all merging institutions will have deal with on the way to creating new institutions. The Department made it very clear from the moment the Ministry released its proposals that the proposed mergers were "mergers of equals" and that throughout the various phases of the mergers all the affected institutions were to be treated equally.

Consequently, all the pre-merger processes and decisions were equally shared amongst the participating institutions and the 'interim' governance and management structures were set up in accordance with the "Standard Institutional Statute" and comprised equal numbers of personnel from the affected institutions irrespective of the size of the participating institution. In short, the principle of commonalities was upheld throughout the highly complex processes of merging diverse institutions of higher education in this country.

It is acknowledged that in practice the dynamics across merging institutions have been complex and that each merger has its own dynamics. The Merger Unit has assisted in contexts where the principles of commonalities needed to be asserted.

QUESTION 2260

13 November 2009

Publication No 28- 2009

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(a) Who were the members of the Transition Oversight Committee and the six technical task teams appointed to oversee the migration of the Further Education and Training Colleges to his department, (b) what budget was allocated for their work and (c) what are the (i) timelines and (ii) deadlines for the reports to be submitted? NW2969E

REPLY:

(a) The membersof the Transition Oversight Committee are:

Ø Mr J Pampalis

Ø Prof M Metcalfe

Ø Dr M Qhobela

Ø Mr F Patel

Ø Dr B Mahlobo

Ø Adv E Boshoff

Ø Mr S Mommen

Ø Mr T Tredoux

Ø Mr A Schoeman

Ø Ms T Futshane

Ø Ms A Singh

COMPOSITION OF THE SIX TECHNICAL TASK TEAMS ON THE TRANSFER OF COLLEGES

Name of Task Team

Composition

1. Legislation Matters

· Adv E Boshoff (Convenor)

· Mr S Richter

· Mr C Leukes

· Dr BS Mahlobo

   

2. Institutional support: Governance, Management, IT Support, Information and Data Collection

· Mr S Mommen (Convenor)

· Mr ATP Mpanza

· Dr BS Mahlobo

· Mr A Raubemheimer

· Dr J van Rensburg

· Ms S Swaratlhe

· Mr J Mogale

· Dr M Buthelezi

· Dr N Nkoe

3. Finance and Funding

· Mr T Tredoux (Convenor)

· Dr S Padayachee

· Ms Masipa

· Dr J van Rensburg

· Ms S Swaratlhle

· Mr S Mommen

· Dr BS Mahlobo

   

4. Staffing and Human Resources

· Mr A Schoeman (Convenor)

· Ms S Gear

· Mr J Slater

· Dr BS Mahlobo

   

5. Student Enrolment and Support

· Ms T Futshane (Convenor)

· Ms Z Gungwa

· Ms K Madumo

· Mr S Ntuli

   

6. Qualifications, Programmes and Assessment

· Ms A Singh (Convenor)

· Ms P Vinjevold

· Ms R Burger

· Ms N Pote

· Ms M Koen

· Ms M Swart

(b) No budget was allocated for their work.

(c) i) Timelines: It is anticipated that their functions should be completed on 31 March 2010.

ii) The Technical Task Teams submit their reports on monthly basis to the Transfer Oversight Committee.

QUESTION 854

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21/08/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 10-2009)

Dr WG James to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

What budget was set aside for the work of the Ministerial Committee for the Review of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme;

Whether the committee is on schedule to report by the deadline of 10 December 2009; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details? NW1004E

REPLY:

No specific budget was allocated for the work of the committee. The work of the committee is being supported through operational funds of the Higher Education branch of the Department of Education.

Yes, the committee is scheduled to provide my office with an initial report by December 2009.

QUESTION 977

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/08/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 12-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether he has taken any steps with regard to suspending import duties or on finding other means of reducing the cost of imported prescribed text books for university students, especially in the disciplines of science and medicine; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1178E

REPLY:

I would like to recommend that the Minister of Trade and Industry be approached for a reply as tariffs and related duties are determined by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in consultation with the International Trade and Administration Commission. I will however explore this possibility in the near future and ask my officials to consult with the Department of Trade and Industry.

QUESTION 696

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07/08/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 07-2009)

Mr. L L Bosman (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether, in light of the current recession and the consequent shortfall in state revenue, his department has introduced any austerity measures to reduce its expenditure with regard to (a) official vehicles, (b) travel, (c) travel by departmental officials, (d) accommodation and household help or (e) any other aspects of government business; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW790E

REPLY:

This matter is being dealt with by Cabinet and guidelines are awaited. The Cabinet dealt with the aforementioned matter and the Department is currently waiting for the guidelines. Cabinet will soon announce measures in this regard, which all departments will be expected to implement. Please refer to the statement of the Cabinet meeting of 12 August 2009.

In light of the above, (a); (b); (c); (d); and (e) are not applicable.

QUESTION 1357

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether the results of the study of residences commissioned by his department are completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) when will it be released and (b) what are the further relevant details? NW1713E

REPLY:

The Department of Higher Education and Training will, during 2010, be undertaking a study of student housing in the public higher education system. The study will focus on the system's need for additional student housing, and on the ways in which expansion could be financed. The Department will draw on lessons learned from the 2010/11 to 2011/12 residence expansion process funded by government, institutions and the private sector. The implementation of these expansion plans will lead to the number of student housing places rising by 7 000 by the 2011 academic year, from the current total of 100 000. This expansion programme includes provision for the major renovation of 2 000 existing residence places, primarily in smaller rural universities.

QUESTION 124

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/06/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 02 - 2009):

Mr. G. G. Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether he has met with any stakeholders to discuss the problems pertaining to (a) students not permitted to write examinations if they have not paid their study fees, (b) the banning of student organisations and (c) the issuing of study material at Unisa; if not, why not; if so, (i) when and (ii) what were the outcomes of these meetings?

NW134E

REPLY:

Yes I have met with stakeholders. Assuming that the question relates to Unisa, I have met the Vice-chancellor.

(a) We agreed with the Vice-chancellor that this requirement will be waived and we are given to understand that this has been done.

(b) We are not aware of any student organisations being banned.

(c) This has been resolved in line with (a)

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY

QUESTION 916

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21/08/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 10-2009)

Dr WG James (DA) to ask the Minister of Minister of Higher Education and Training:

1. Whether his Director-General signed a performance contract with him; if not, why not; if so, when;

2. Whether all senior managers in his department signed performance contracts with the Director-General; if not, (a) which senior managers did not sign, (b) for what reason and (c) when will it be done; if so, on which date each senior manager sign a performance contract? NW1072E

REPLY:

1 No, the Director-General assumed duty on 1 September 2009, however, she is in the process of signing the performance agreement and it will still be finalised and submitted within three months from her date of assumption of duty.

2. No, not all senior managers signed performance agreements with the Director-General

(a) The following senior managers did not sign the performance contracts:

 Mabizela M

 Motaung N

(b) Performance Agreement of Mabizela M is in the process of being signed and will be forwarded to the DPSA soon, and that of Motaung N is delayed owing to changes in her job description.

(c) As soon as the Director-General has taken a final decision on the matters raised in the official's new job description, the contract will be finalised.

QUESTION 1648

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 20-2009)

Mr I M Ollis (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether all (a)(i) offices and (ii) sites of his department and (b) entities reporting to him adhere to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993; if not, (aa) why not, (bb) which facilities fail to adhere to the Act, (cc) where are they situated and (dd) what (aaa) aspects of the Act does each such facility not comply with and (bbb) action has been taken in each case; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) (a) how often should each facility be inspected and (b) when last was each facility inspected? NW2054E

REPLY:

(1) (a) (i) and (ii) The Department of Higher Education is not fully functional yet and is currently making use of the facilities and resources of the Department of Education. The Department of Education Higher is accommodated in one of the three buildings occupied by the Department of Education, in Central Pretoria and all these adhere to the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

(b) CHE, SAQA and UMALUSI, are entities that report to the Minister for Higher Education and Training. They all adhere to the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

(2). The Act does not specify how frequent inspections must take place.

The Landlord does inspect monthly and the internal Office Services at least weekly

QUESTION 1165

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 11/09/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 16-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether his department uses temporary employment services and/or labour brokers; if so, (a) why, (b) how many positions have been filled by temporary employment services in the (i) 2006- 07, (ii) 2007-08 and (iii) 2008-09 financial years, (c) what percentage of the total staff complement did temporary employment services contribute in each of these years and (d) how much money has been spent on temporary employment services in each year?NW1500E


REPLY:

The Department of Higher Education and Training does not make use of temporary employment services and/or labour brokers.

a. Not Applicable

b. Not Applicable

c. Not Applicable

d. Not Applicable

QUESTION 460

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06 - 2009)

The Leader of the Opposition (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

In each of the past three years up to the latest specified date for which information is available, how many engineers (a) graduated and (b) registered with the Engineering Council of South Africa to increase the acquisition of priority skills as required by Joint Initiative on Priority Skills Acquisition (Jipsa) programmes?

NW521E

REPLY:

(a)

Year

2005

2006

2007

Total Engineering Graduates

6624

7714

8381

       

(b)

Year

2005

2006

2007

Total Engineering Registrations

5488

6090

6384

Source: Engineering Council SA

     

QUESTION 376

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 03/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 05-2009)

Dr. WG James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether a function was held by his department to celebrate his appointment as minister; if so, (a) how much did the function cost, (b) what is the breakdown of the cost and (c) how many guests attended the function;

(2) Whether there were any related costs for the travel and accommodation of guests; if so, (a) what were the costs and (b) what was the breakdown of these costs?

NW436E

REPLY:

(1) There was no function held by the Department to celebrate the appointment of the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Not applicable. (b) Not applicable. (c) Not applicable.

(2) Not applicable. (a) Not applicable. (b) Not applicable

QUESTION 977
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/08/09
(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 12-2009)
Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether he has taken any steps with regard to suspending import duties or on finding other means of reducing the cost of imported prescribed text books for university students, especially in the disciplines of science and medicine; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1178E

REPLY:

I would like to recommend that the Minister of Trade and Industry be approached for a reply as tariffs and related duties are determined by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in consultation with the International Trade and Administration Commission. I will however explore this possibility in the near future and ask my officials to consult with the Department of Trade and Industry

QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY

FRIDAY, 23 OCTOBER 2009

[No 24 – 2009] First Session, Fourth Parliament

1841. Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether there are any plans to re-open the Giyani College of Education in Limpopo; if not, why not; if so, what plans?

REPLY:

The facilities of the former Giyani College of Education are currently being used by the Limpopo Department of Education for purposes other than teacher education. The Department of Higher Education and Training and the Limpopo Department of Education have not discussed the future use of these facilities as a site for training teachers.

However, given the importance of increasing the number of quality teachers trained by universities, and colleges previously incorporated into universities, the Ministry of Higher Education and Training has approved a range of projects designed to increase the intake and output of teacher training graduates. In this regard, funding of R474 million has been allocated to 19 universities for the 2010/11 and 2011/12 financial years, while a further R139 million will be added by institutions, making the total available for this initiative R 613 million. The commitment made by universities is to increase, by 2012 compared to their 2007, their enrolments of new (or first time entering) Bachelor of Education enrolments by 1 000, and their new Postgraduate Certificate in Education enrolments by 700. This annual total of 1 700 additional new students would, over a 4 year period, raise the total of students in teacher training in universities by a total of over 4 000, compared to the 2007 enrolment total.

QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY

FRIDAY, 23 OCTOBER 2009

[No 24 – 2009] First Session, Fourth Parliament

1840. Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) In respect of each version of the 2008-09 annual report of his department and the annual reports of each statutory and other entity reporting to his department, (a) what was the (i) budgeted cost, (ii) actual cost and (iii) breakdown of cost in respect of (aa) printing, (bb) graphic design, (cc) other costs and (dd) unit cost of each annual report and (b) how many copies of each were (i) produced and (ii) distributed;

(2) whether any version of the abovementioned reports was retracted or withdrawn; if so, (a) how many times were each annual report withdrawn or retracted, (b) what (i) were the reasons for each withdrawal or retraction and (ii) was the amount spent on each version and (c) how many copies were withdrawn in each case;

(3) how was the decision taken to award the contract to the (a) graphic design company and (b) printing company;

(4) whether (a) his department or (b) any of those public entities that fall under his department held a function on tabling their 2008-09 annual report; if so, in each case (i) what was the name of the public entity, (ii) how much did the function cost, (iii) what is the breakdown of that cost, (iv) where was the function held and (v) how many guests were invited?

REPLY

(1) The Department of Higher Education and Training only came into effect in May 2009, therefore no Annual Report has been developed or tabled during the period mentioned. Therefore questions 2-4 are not applicable to DoHET

REPLY regarding entities that report to the Minister of Higher Education and Training.

QUESTION (1a)

i) Public Entity

Budgeted cost

of the Annual

Report

ii) Actual cost of

the Annual

Report

iii) Breakdown of cost in respect of

PUBLIC ENTITY

   

Printing

Graphic Design

Other costs

Unit cost of each Annual Report

Council on Higher Education (CHE)

140 000

139 701

92 545

20 000

27 156

139,70

National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)

367 382

228 601

154 200

39 923

34 478

226,00

South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)

250 000

209 833

125 416

71 980

12 437

67,78

Question (1b)

i) How many copies

were produced?

ii) How many copies

were distributed

Public Entity

2008/09

2008/09

CHE

1 000

1 000

NSFAS

1 010

510

SAQA

3 000

2 505

 

CHE

NSFAS

SAQA

QUESTION 2 (b)

NO version retracted or withdrawn from Parliament

NO version retracted or withdrawn from Parliament

NO version retracted or withdrawn from Parliament

       

QUESTION 3

Tender Evaluation Method: Price, HDI, WE, Disability, SMME, Skills Emp, HR, Community, Locality, Rural Area

For graphic design, a request for proposals were sent out to suppliers on the supplier database and for printing quotations were requested through design companies

One company was contracted to do design, layout, editing and printing. The contract was awarded after an open tender was advertised. 21 companies sent in bids and the contract was awarded to the company that scored the highest points in the tender evaluation process.

       

QUESTION 4 (b)

No function held.

No function held.

No function held.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 1839

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 23/10/2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 22-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether (a) he, (b) any specified officials and (c) any other persons have been issued with a government or official credit card; if so, what are the relevant details for him and each holder of a credit card in respect of the (i) name, (ii) job title, (iii) credit limit, (iv) outstanding amount as at the latest specified date for which information is available, (v) monthly expenses incurred for each month since receiving the credit card, (vi) reason for such persons being issued with a credit card and (vii) uses that such a credit card is intended for;

(2) whether any such credit cards are over their credit limit; if so, (a) whose credit cards are over the limit and (b) what is the reason for the credit cards exceeding the limit;

(3) whether any action has been taken against such persons for exceeding their credit card limits; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2398E

REPLY:

(1) (a), (b) & (c): No

(1) (i) to (vii): Not applicable

(2) (a) and (b): Not applicable

(3) Not applicable.

QUESTION 92

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/06/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 01-2009)

Mr AM Mpontshane (IFP) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether his department has taken any steps with regard to the high number of outstanding loans owed to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the impact this is having on both students and administrators; if not, why not; if so, what steps?

NW95E

REPLY:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is currently recovering approximately R40 million per month in loan repayments from past student debtors. The total recovered from loans, including interest in 2008 was R616 million. The recovered funds are reallocated to fund new students in the subsequent year. The amount is significant against the total budget of R2.496 billion for 2009.

The scheme has however identified the need to responsibly maximize the recovery of outstanding loans from all eligible debtors. Through its partnership with the South African Revenue Services, NSFAS is able to track students who secure formal employment and who are then registered on the Pay-As-You-Earn (PAYE) taxpayer register. In this regard, one of the strategic goals of the NSFAS for the period 2009 to 2011 is to review its loan recovery strategy.

As part of the terms of reference of the review of the Scheme, the committee will also assess the nature and extent of former and current students indebted and blacklisted by NSFAS and universities, and to recommend appropriate action to be taken to deal with the problem. This Committee has commenced its work and will provide the Minister of Higher Education and Training with a report before the end of 2009. The report will be published for public comment.

QUESTION 579

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/07/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 06 - 2009)

Dr. W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

What has been the (a) expected and (b) actual number of graduates at each (i) university, (ii) technikon and (iii) further education and training (FET) colleges, in each of the past five years up to and including 2008?

NW645E

REPLY:

UNIVERSITIES AND TECHNIKONS

INSTITUTION NAME

Actual 2003

Actual 2004

UNIVERSITIES

   

University of Cape Town

5.1

5.2

University of Durban Westville

1.9

(2)

University of Fort Hare

0.9

1.2

Medical University of South Africa

0.8

0.7

University of Natal

7.6

(2)

University of the North

1.1

1.5

University of the Free State

4.5

5.1

University of Port Elizabeth

2.9

4.2

Potchefstroom University

6.0

(3)

University of Pretoria

9.2

10.7

Rand Afrikaans University

5.8

7.1

Rhodes University

2.4

1.7

University of South Africa

10.6

14.5

University of Stellenbosch

5.3

5.3

University of the Western Cape

2.2

2.3

University of Witwatersrand

4.1

4.7

University of Zululand

1.9

2.1

Vista University

2.4

(4)

University of Transkei

1.4

1.1

University of the North West

1.1

(3)

University of Venda

1.3

1.3

University of KwaZulu-Natal

 

8.3

North West University

 

9.6

Sub Total: Universities

78.5

86.6

INSTITUTION NAME

Actual 2003

Actual 2004

TECHNIKONS

   

Cape Technikon

3.1

3.4

Technikon Northern Gauteng

1.6

(5)

Mangosuthu Technikon

0.9

0.9

ML Sultan Technikon

(1)

(1)

Natal Technikon

(1)

(1)

Technikon Free State

1.4

1.9

Peninsula Technikon

2.1

2.2

Port Elizabeth Technikon

2.0

1.9

Technikon Pretoria

6.0

(5)

Technikon SA

2.7

(6)

Vaal Triangle Technikon

2.1

2.3

Technikon Witwatersrand

1.9

2.1

Border Technikon

0.8

0.8

Technikon North West

0.6

(5)

Eastern Cape Technikon

1.5

1.2

Durban Institute of Technology

3.1

3.8

Tshwane University of Technology

 

9.8

Sub Total: Technikons

29.8

30.3

TOTAL: UNIVERSITIES AND TECHNIKONS

108.3

116.9

NUMBER OF GRADUATES AND OUTPUT TARGETS ( '000 )

Institution

Actual 2005

Actual 2006

Actual 2007

2010 target: approved October 2007

(A)

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

5.7

6.8

6.9

7.0

University of Cape Town

6.1

5.3

5.4

6.2

Central University of Technology

2.1

2.3

2.3

2.4

Durban University of Technology

4.3

4.4

4.7

4.7

University of Fort Hare

1.8

1.9

1.6

2.1

University of Free State

5.2

5.4

4.7

6.2

University of Johannesburg

10.1

10.2

9.5

10.2

University of KwaZulu-Natal

8.3

8.6

7.6

9.8

University of Limpopo

3.0

3.3

4.1

3.6

Mangosuthu Technikon

1.2

1.9

1.8

1.6

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

5.4

4.9

6.0

5.9

North West University

7.7

9.8

11.3

10.1

University of Pretoria

11.6

11.4

10.9

11.9

Rhodes University

2.1

1.9

1.8

2.1

University of South Africa

14.1

13.8

14.3

20.3

University of Stellenbosch

5.5

5.6

5.7

6.2

Tshwane University of Technology

9.4

9.1

9.8

10.1

Vaal University of Technology

2.3

2.4

2.7

3.0

University of Venda

1.6

1.8

1.9

1.9

Walter Sisulu University

2.7

3.5

3.0

3.6

University of the Western Cape

3.0

2.8

3.1

4.0

University of the Witwatersrand

5.0

4.9

5.4

6.4

University of Zululand

2.1

2.2

2.0

2.6

TOTAL

120.3

124.2

126.5

141.9

(A) NOTES: The graduate targets for 2010 are based on agreed upon targets with the institutions and approved by the Minister in 2007.

Notes:

(1) See Durban Institute of Technology

(2) See University of KwaZulu-Natal

(3) See North West University

(4) Campuses Incorporated into University of Pretoria, RAU

University of the Free State, University of Port Elizabeth, Technikon Free State,

Potchefstroom University and UNISA

(5) See Tshwane University of Technology

(6) See University of South Africa

FET COLLEGE GRADUATES: 2004 – 2008

Year

Nr of Passes

2004

135337

2005

138122

2006

152484

2007

132256

2008

127335

NOTES: The above figures reflect those students who passed 7 subjects. Students who passed 5 and 6 subjects out of the 7 were excluded.

QUESTION 588

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07/08/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 07-2009)

Mr M J Ellis (DA) to the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether the SA Qualifications Authority Standards Generating Body (SGB) task team has been constituted; if not, why not; if so, (a) who was appointed to the task team and (b) what are their qualifications;

(2) whether the task team has commenced with the standards generating body process; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) when will the process be completed? NW650E

REPLY:

(1) The South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) has not constituted any Standards Generating Body (SGB) task team, as these structures are already established in terms of the National Standards Body Regulations. In terms of these regulations 12 National Standards Bodies and 152 Standards Generating Bodies were established and are operational since 1999. Some of the SGBs have since been disestablished upon completion of their tasks.

(2) This is not applicable as there no task team has been established as per the response above.

QUESTION 1799

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 16/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 22-2009)

Mr J H van der Merwe (IFP) to ask the Minister of Higher Education:

1. Whether remedial action will be taken with regard to Unisa's policy of only (a) issuing degree and diploma certificates in English and (b) hosting graduation ceremonies in English; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case;

2. Whether he will make a statement on the matter? NW2300E

REPLY:

1. Unisa recognizes that the country has eleven official languages, and English is but one of them. However, fiscal constraints militate against the University hosting graduation ceremonies in all eleven languages and for practical and operational purposes, Unisa graduation ceremonies are hosted in English. For internal purposes, Unisa has a Language Policy that we, believe, will eventually lead to practical multi-lingualism. As a matter of interest, Unisa is in the process of establishing an Academy of African Languages and Science, the aim being to give practical effect to the use of languages other than English and Afrikaans, to be used as languages of science.

However, with specific reference to the award for doctoral degrees, where the thesis has been submitted in Afrikaans and the student indicates a preference for Afrikaans, the citation which accompanies the award of the degree, is read by the supervisor in Afrikaans during the graduation ceremony. (To date, Unisa has not had any doctoral thesis submitted in languages other than English and Afrikaans). In the event any student presents in Afrikaans, the awards is also presented in Afrikaans (This has not happened with other languages). This is easily and usually the case, where such students have received their degrees with distinction.

In addition, Unisa will prepare and award a graduation certificate in any of the eleven languages if a request for same were made by any of the graduation students. Again, however, to date, Unisa has not received a request of such a nature.

2. The issue of the language used on certificates and at graduation ceremonies is part of the wider debate on language policy at higher education institutions. The Department of Education has published policy to give effect to the provisions of the Constitution. The Language in Education Policy (1997) and the Language Policy for Higher Education (2002) were designed to promote multilingualism in the education sector.

Their aim is to ensure that all South African languages are "developed to their full capacity while at the same time ensuring that the existing languages of instruction (English and Afrikaans) do not serve as a barrier to access and success." Amongst other matters receiving my attention, close monitoring of the implementation of the above forms part of the work of the Department.

QUESTION 1065


DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/09/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 14-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

What is the present staff establishment of his department;

Whether any new positions have been or will be created; if so, (a) when, (b) how many and (c) which positions;

Whether there are any vacancies that need to be filled; if so, (a) how many, (b) at what level and (c) when will they be filled? NW1326E

REPLY:

1. The staff establishment of the Department of Higher Education and Training is currently under consideration.

2. It is envisaged that new positions will have to be created especially in the field of the corporate services function.

According to the Department of Public Service and Administration staff establishments of newly created departments should be finalised by the end of October 2009.

It is not yet clear how many new positions need to be created as the staff establishment is still under consideration.

Please see explanation under 2 (b).

It is envisaged that vacancies will occur that need to be filled. It is however at this stage not clear how many and at what level.

QUESTION 24

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/06/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 01-2009)

Mr GG Boinamo (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Education:

1. Whether is department's initiative of merging institutions of higher learning has produced the desired outcomes; if so, what is the breakdown of the (a) success of each of these tertiary institutions mergers and (b) impact it has had on (i) transformation and (ii) restructuring of higher education; if not, what is the breakdown of all institutions of higher learning that have emerged and failed to produce desired outcomes,

2. Whether his department has taken any steps to rectify this situation, if not, why not; if so, what steps? NW25E

REPLY:

The Department of Education has been supporting, monitoring and evaluating the progress of mergers and incorporations to ensure the goals and objectives of the restructuring process are realised. A recent priority has been to provide technical and financial assistance to develop and rehabilitate the physical infrastructure of institutions. In this regard, I allocated for the triennium 2007/08 to 2009/10, R3 856 million, for infrastructure development and efficiency gains to higher education institutions. These funds are being used to build or renovate student residences, lecture theaters, libraries and laboratories, as well as improve enrolments and graduation rates in scarce and critical skills.

While the outcomes of mergers are generally long term, the mergers have necessitated different approaches in the context of individual institutional requirements and adjustments have had to be made in light of the continuous monitoring and evaluation of the process. As an example, the former MEDUNSA will be retained as a separate campus of the University of Limpopo in Ga-Rankuwa and not re-locate to Polokwane as initially proposed. Currently, the Department is providing technical support and advice to the Universityof Limpopo in the physical development of the respective campuses.

Although progress toward the merger goals has not always been even during the past five years, by August 2009 all the institutions had achieved the desired levels of integration as depicted in the indicative table below. Other areas of successful integration include ICT, finance, student administration and facilities.

QUESTION 1404

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 25/09/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 18-2009)

Mr AP van der Westhuizen (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) When will the funding model for further education and training (FET) colleges be implemented in full;

(2) Whether the funding model will enable FET colleges to expand their offering of more courses, such as those needed for the training of technicians; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

REPLY:

In terms of Gazette 32010 of 16 March 2009, the funding model for FET Colleges will be implemented in full from 1 April 2010.

(2) The colleges will be able to expand their offering of more courses. The funding norms are focussed on the division of State funding into approved programmes. The current list of approved programmes consists of the NC(V) programmes, NQF Levels 2 to 4. These programmes were developed based on the priority skills areas as identified in 2006 and 2007 via the ASGISA and JIPSA processes. The approval of new programmes is an annual cycle which is initiated by the FET Colleges. The approved programme list with the relevant funding weights and programme costs is then circulated to the colleges by July of each year.

(3) The content of these replies are already in the public domain and no statement is necessary. QUESTION 1956

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 23/10/2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 22-2009)

Dr A Lotriet (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether his department provides additional financial support to higher education institutions where more than one language has to be provided for as a language of instruction; if so, what are the relevant details; if not,

(2) whether he intends providing such financial support; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether only historically Afrikaans universities are expected to provide education in more than one medium of instruction; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) reasons in this regard and (b) further relevant details? NW2520E

REPLY:

The funding formula that distributes public funding to public higher education institutions currently does not allocate funds to institutions that provide tuition in more than one language of teaching and learning. The Department of Higher Education and Training however has funded, through donor support a number of projects that support multi-lingualism in higher education institutions.

There are currently no plans to revise the subsidy allocation formula to the delivery of teaching and learning in more than one language.

The Ministry of Education published the Language in Education Policy (1997) and the Language Policy for Higher Education (2002), which are designed to promote multilingualism in the education sector. Their aim is to ensure that all South African languages are "developed to their full capacity while at the same time ensuring that the existing languages of instruction (English and Afrikaans) do not serve as a barrier to access and success." Universities have the prerogative to develop and determine their language policies, consistent with the above policies in terms of the Higher Education Act. It is thus the choice of individual institutions to have more than one language of teaching and learning.

QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY

FRIDAY, 23 OCTOBER 2009

[No 24 – 2009] First Session, Fourth Parliament

1956. Dr A Lotriet (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

(1) Whether his department provides additional financial support to higher education institutions where more than one language has to be provided for as a language of instruction; if so, what are the relevant details; if not,

(2) whether he intends providing such financial support; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether only historically Afrikaans universities are expected to provide education in more than one medium of instruction; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) reasons in this regard and (b) further relevant details? NW2520E

Reply

(1) The funding formula that distributes public funding to public higher education institutions currently does not allocate funds to institutions that provide tuition in more than one language of teaching and learning. The Department of Higher Education and Training however has funded, through donor support a number of projects that support multi-lingualism in higher education institutions.

(2) There are currently no plans to revise the subsidy allocation formula to the delivery of teaching and learning in more than one language. However, the Ministerial Statement on Higher Education Funding for 2010/11 does indicate a review of the subsidy allocation formula.

(3) The Ministry of Education published the Language in Education Policy (1997) and the Language Policy for Higher Education (2002), which are designed to promote multilingualism in the education sector. Their aim is to ensure that all South African languages are "developed to their full capacity while at the same time ensuring that the existing languages of instruction (English and Afrikaans) do not serve as a barrier to access and success." Universities have the prerogative to develop and determine their language policies, consistent with the above policies in terms of the Higher Education Act. It is thus the choice of individual institutions to have more than one language of teaching and learning.

QUESTION 1672

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 16/10/09

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 22-2009)

Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training:

Whether, since his appointment in May 2009 any renovations or alterations were done at state owned and private residences of him, or any other specified official of his department; if so, (a) where he and the occupants of each such residence were accommodated during the renovations and (b) at what cost to his department in each case? NW2128E

REPLY:

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(a) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable